Search Posts

nyheder2019august01

3h

Det mener børn om mænd med skæg: De er stærke, men grimme

Indtil børn går i puberteten, bryder de sig ikke om skæggede mænd, viser ny australsk forskning.

1h

How roads can help cool sizzling cities

Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a Rutgers-led team of engineers.

5h

Jogging and five other exercises ward off weight gain despite 'obesity genes'

For people who inherited genes that increase their chance of becoming obese, there is hope for keeping the weight off. A study has identified the types of exercise that are especially effective at combating genetic effects that contribute to obesity.

8min

Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish

Biomedical researchers have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs.

8min

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys. Western South America in particular holds a key role in the history of the continent due to the presence of three major ecogeographic domains (the Andes, the Amazonia, and the Pacific Coast), and for hosting the earliest and largest complex societies. A new study rev

8min

From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams

The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. An international research team has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. This was achieved by irradiating the superconductor with a helium-ion microscope, a technology that has only recently become available. The researchers

8min

Quantum light sources pave the way for optical circuits

Physicists have succeeded in placing light sources in atomically thin material layers with an accuracy of just a few nanometers. The new method allows for a multitude of applications in quantum technologies, from quantum sensors and transistors in smartphones through to new encryption technologies for data transmission.

8min

Levels of 'ugly cholesterol' in the blood are much higher than previously imagined

The amount of remnant particle cholesterol in the blood, the so-called ugly cholesterol, is much higher than previously believed. The discovery may have implications for future prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

8min

Genomic data reveal intense fish harvesting causes rapid evolution

For the first time, scientists have unraveled genetic changes that cause rapid fish evolution due to intense harvesting—changes that previously had been invisible to researchers.

11min

Genomic data reveal intense fish harvesting causes rapid evolution

For the first time, scientists have unraveled genetic changes that cause rapid fish evolution due to intense harvesting—changes that previously had been invisible to researchers.

14min

Meet the Beetles: Newly Discovered Brooklynites Have 6 Legs

Researchers studying trees at Green-Wood Cemetery found a nonnative beetle previously unknown to science.

14min

Scientists discover immune cell subtype in mice that drives allergic reactions

Allergies can be life-threatening when they cause anaphylaxis, an extreme reaction with constriction of the airways and a sudden drop in blood pressure. Scientists have identified a subtype of immune cell that drives the production of antibodies associated with anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions. The research reveals a potential target for new therapies to prevent severe allergic reactions.

22min

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens

Researchers have found an elastic polymer that possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes – including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

22min

Peering into the soul of the immune system to better fight disease

A rare, short-lived population of immune cells in the bloodstream may serve as 'periscopes' to monitor immune status via lymph nodes deep inside the body, according to new resesearch.

22min

Study assesses outcomes for meth users with burn injures

Researchers were surprised to find that methamphetamine use is not linked with worse health outcomes among burn patients, but was associated with significantly worse discharge conditions for meth-positive patients. Meth-positive patients suffered worse injuries and stayed longer in hospital than meth-negative patients. Also, more meth-positive patients left the hospital against medical advice and

22min

Old cells, new tricks: important clue to AML diagnosis and treatment discovered

Around 22,000 people will be diagnosed this year in the US with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the second most common type of leukemia diagnosed in adults and children. Researchers have discovered a key reason why this disease is so difficult to treat and therefore cure.

22min

Digital games may beat mindfulness apps at relieving stress, new study shows

Digital games may relieve stress after a day's work more effectively than mindfulness apps.

22min

Genomic data reveal intense fish harvesting causes rapid evolution

For the first time, scientists have unraveled genetic changes that cause rapid fish evolution due to intense harvesting — changes that previously had been invisible to researchers.

23min

Cancer without end? Discovery yields fresh insights

In a new commentary appearing in the August 2nd issue of the journal Science, Carlo Maley and Darryl Shibata describe the evolutionary dynamics of a sexually transmitted cancer affecting dogs, which arose in a single ancient animal, living as much as 8.5 millennia ago. The findings provide fresh insights into disease evolution relevant to human cancer study and treatment.

23min

Flukes and Fins: A Photo Appreciation of Whales

Today, the 200th birthday of the author Herman Melville, most famous for his book Moby Dick , seems like an appropriate moment to compile a collection of images of whales from around the world. Melville’s knowledge and appreciation of these magnificent animals, along with his storytelling skills, continue to make Moby Dick a compelling read. The real-world beauty of whales in their natural habita

23min

Three concepts from complexity could play a big role in social animal research

From bees to birds to humans, the animal kingdom is full of organisms that have evolved complex social structures to solve specific problems they encounter. Explaining why some species evolved more complex societies than others has been a fundamental challenge in the field of social animal research, and might be best approached with tools from complex systems, according to a team of researchers fr

26min

Three concepts from complexity could play a big role in social animal research

From bees to birds to humans, the animal kingdom is full of organisms that have evolved complex social structures to solve specific problems they encounter. Explaining why some species evolved more complex societies than others has been a fundamental challenge in the field of social animal research, and might be best approached with tools from complex systems, according to a team of researchers fr

29min

Planetary Society Declares Success as LightSail 2 Sails on Sunbeams

Rockets are great if you want to get someplace fast, but there’s something whimsical about sailing on a beam of light. The Planetary Society has declared its LightSail 2 mission a success after it did just that. The satellite deployed its solar ail last week, and now it has successfully maneuvered in space without the help of engines. The Planetary Society launched its spacecraft aboard a SpaceX

32min

TESS Finds Potentially Habitable Super-Earth Just 31 Light Years Away

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite ( TESS ) has only been scanning the skies for about a year, but it has already identified several new candidate exoplanets. As astronomers were working to confirm one recent sighting, they happened upon something unexpected. That solar system, known as GJ 357, hosts not one but three exoplanets. What’s more, one of those planets is a super-Earth in the

32min

Teen wins Google Science Fair for method to remove microplastics from water

Google holds an annual science fair that's open to students ages 13 to 18. Fionn Ferreira won for developing an effective way to remove microplastics from water. Microplastics can be found in many habitats around the world, posing a threat to marine life and, therefore, people who eat fish. None An Irish teenager has won the 2019 Google Science Fair for developing a method to remove microplastics

34min

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Wipha hugging China coast

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and saw Tropical Storm Wipha hugging the southern coast of China.

35min

Satellite shows Tropical Storm Flossie holding up

Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Storm Flossie's structure didn't change much overnight from July 31 to August 1. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided a view of the storm early on Aug. 1.

35min

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Erick still hanging as a hurricane

Hurricane Erick continued hold onto its status as it moved west through the Central Pacific. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms, showing Erick still had some punch left in it.

35min

Promising new solar-powered path to hydrogen fuel production

Engineers have utilized a single enzyme biomineralization process to create a catalyst that uses the energy of captured sunlight to split water molecules to produce hydrogen. The synthesis process is performed at room temperature and under ambient pressure, overcoming the sustainability and scalability challenges of previously reported methods.

36min

How little we know: Experts document the lack of research on youth firearm injury

A national team has just published the largest-ever examination of the state of research on all aspects of youth firearm injury – whether intentional, unintentional or self-inflicted. The bottom-line conclusion: Far more research, and better research, is needed on children, teens and the prevention and aftermath of firearm injuries and deaths. If translated into action, such new knowledge could he

36min

Finally, Porn Is on the Blockchain

SpankChain A new blockchain company called SpankChain wants to become the go-to payment platform for internet porn with its new service, “SpankPay.” If SpankPay takes off, it would let porn companies, adult entertainers, and perhaps sex workers accept payments of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, ether, and monero, according to CoinDesk . It’s easy to joke about putting miscellaneous new industries

40min

The Problem with Levees

They can be very valuable tools for managing flood risk—but we learned a century ago that relying on them exclusively won't work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

40min

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that an elastic polymer possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes—including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

41min

CRISPR baby maker explored starting a business in designer-baby tourism

He Jiankui met with US investors and entrepreneurs to discuss commercial plans for CRISPR kids.

42min

New computational method could advance precision medicine

Scientists have devised a new computational method that reveals genetic patterns in the massive jumble of individual cells in the body. The discovery, published in the journal eLife, will be useful in discerning patterns of gene expression across many kinds of disease, including cancer. Scientists worked out the formulation by testing tissue taken from the testes of mice. Results in hand, they're

44min

Three concepts from complexity could play a big role in social animal research

A new paper in Animal Behaviour lays out three concepts from complex systems science that could advance studies into animal social complexity.

44min

NYU physicist receives US Department of Energy Early Career Award

New York University physicist Jiehang Zhang has received an Early Career Award from the U.S. Department of Energy.

44min

Improving outcomes for sepsis patients

More than 1 million sepsis survivors are discharged annually from acute care hospitals in the United States. Although the majority of these patients receive post-acute care (PAC) services, with over a third coming to home health care (HHC), sepsis survivors account for a majority of readmissions nationwide. Effective interventions are needed to decrease these poor outcomes.

44min

ATS publishes clinical guideline on obesity hypoventilation syndrome

The American Thoracic Society has published an official clinical guideline on the evaluation and management of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in the Society's Aug. 1, 2019 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

44min

Promising new solar-powered path to hydrogen fuel production

Engineers have utilized a single enzyme biomineralization process to create a catalyst that uses the energy of captured sunlight to split water molecules to produce hydrogen. The synthesis process is performed at room temperature and under ambient pressure, overcoming the sustainability and scalability challenges of previously reported methods.

46min

Do we cheat because of our nature or our environment?

Our own propensity to cheat is more likely than external factors to lead us to actually break the rules, researchers report. Researchers took a closer look at cheating during periods of relative economic abundance and scarcity to determine whether cheating for monetary gain is a product of the economic environment. Famous criminals’ propensity for cheating has been attributed to their circumstanc

47min

Facebook removes fake accounts it says are tied to the Saudi government – CNET

People behind these accounts posed as news outlets and criticized rivals.

48min

“Crypto rogue” nations want to use blockchains to undermine the US dollar

Governments that want to circumvent US sanctions are turning to cryptocurrencies to avoid the traditional financial system.

51min

Could lab mice born to wild parents improve the search for human cures?

“Wildling” rodents could overcome roadblocks in immunology research

51min

Burger King’s Impossible Whopper Is Going Nationwide on August 8

The Impossible Whopper is ready to go national. Burger King started selling Whoppers featuring Impossible Foods’ plant-based patties at its St Louis restaurants in early April . Weeks later, the company announced plans to add it to the menu in additional markets, noting that it would target a nationwide rollout toward the end of 2019 if the meatless burger did as well in those new regions as it d

1h

The Man Who Transformed Broadway

Harold Smith Prince was the George Kennan of the modern musical theater. He was present at the post-World War II creation of a brand of boffo showmanship that came to dominate Broadway in the days when Broadway was still a dominant force—in some ways, the dominant force—in American popular music and culture. Prince prevailed through changing tastes and times—the rise of rock and roll and the coun

1h

We might run out of these elements

Abstracted. (infographic by Sara Chodosh/) We can easily imagine running out of resources like water, wood, and oil, but it's harder to fathom draining our stocks of chemical building blocks like calcium, iron, and bismuth. Modern life relies on certain squares of the periodic table to do things like strengthen steel and add nutrients to fertilizer, so such losses would cause real problems. We're

1h

The Problem with Levees

They can be very valuable tools for managing flood risk—but we learned a century ago that relying on them exclusively won't work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

New vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) elicits strong immune response

An experimental vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), one of the leading causes of infectious disease deaths in infants, has shown early promise in a Phase 1 human clinical trial. Researchers report that one dose of their vaccine candidate elicited large increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for several months.

1h

New signaling component important for plant symbiosis

A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This shows how symbiotic signals from symbiotic bacteria are transmitted upon perception, ultimately leading to their accommodation within the host plant.

1h

Sudden hearing loss: Update to guideline to improve implementation and awareness

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) affects five to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States.

1h

Storytelling bots learn to punch up their last lines

Nothing disappoints quite like a good story with a lousy finish. So researchers who work in the young field of automated storytelling don't think they're getting ahead of themselves by devising better endings.

1h

FRESH 3D printing used to rebuild functional components of human heart

Scientists are a major step closer to 3D bioprintng functional organs, after team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers devise a method of rebuilding components of the human heart, according to a study published in Science. The team developed an advanced version of Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) technology, licensed to FluidForm, to 3D print collagen with unpreced

1h

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Wipha hugging China coast

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and saw Tropical Storm Wipha hugging the southern coast of China.

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Erick still hanging as a hurricane

Hurricane Erick continued hold onto its status as it moved west through the Central Pacific. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms, showing Erick still had some punch left in it.

1h

How a 6,000-Year-Old Dog Cancer Spread Around the World

A massive collection of dog tumor samples is revealing the secrets of a contagious, parasite-like cancer that could help explain human cancers too.

1h

Roach-sized robot is fast, tough, and super strong

A new insect-sized robot can scurry across the floor at nearly the speed of a darting cockroach, researchers report. It’s nearly as hardy as a cockroach, too. Try to squash this robot under your foot, and more than likely, it will just keep going. “Most of the robots at this particular small scale are very fragile. If you step on them, you pretty much destroy the robot,” says Liwei Lin, a profess

1h

Yellowstone grizzly bears are again listed as threatened

Court reverses agency action that cited a rising population

1h

Scientists Built a Ball of Plasma They Call a “Mini-Sun”

Paging Doc Ock Physicists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison built a swirling orb of plasma they’re calling a “ miniature Sun ” — so they can study how stars work up close. The mini-sun, complete with its own powerful electromagnetic field, will help the scientists understand solar wind as well as how the real Sun occasionally blasts out plasma, according to Space.com . The mini-sun has been

1h

Allt för rena möss kan störa forskning

Stephan Rosshart, immunolog vid universitetet i tyska Freiburg, har ägnat veckor åt att fånga möss på hästgårdar. – Jag ville ha tag i vilda möss på grund av deras mikrober, säger han. Vid födseln får vilda musungar mängder av mikrober från sin mamma. Bakterier, virus och andra mikroorganismer följder med genom livet och påverkar hur immunsystemet utvecklas. Laboratoriemöss är annorlunda. De är in

1h

Study assesses outcomes for meth users with burn injures

UC Davis Health researchers were surprised to find that methamphetamine use is not linked with worse health outcomes among burn patients, but was associated with significantly worse discharge conditions for meth-positive patients. Meth-positive patients suffered worse injuries and stayed longer in hospital than meth-negative patients. Also, more meth-positive patients left the hospital against med

1h

Peering into the soul of the immune system to better fight disease

A rare, short-lived population of immune cells in the bloodstream may serve as 'periscopes' to monitor immune status via lymph nodes deep inside the body, according to new resesearch.

1h

Satellite shows Tropical Storm Flossie holding up

Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Storm Flossie's structure didn't change much overnight from July 31 to August 1. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided a view of the storm early on Aug. 1.

1h

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens

Researchers have found an elastic polymer that possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes – including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

1h

How little we know: Experts document the lack of research on youth firearm injury

A national team has just published the largest-ever examination of the state of research on all aspects of youth firearm injury – whether intentional, unintentional or self-inflicted. The bottom-line conclusion: Far more research, and better research, is needed on children, teens and the prevention and aftermath of firearm injuries and deaths. If translated into action, such new knowledge could he

1h

Scientists discover immune cell subtype in mice that drives allergic reactions

Allergies can be life-threatening when they cause anaphylaxis, an extreme reaction with constriction of the airways and a sudden drop in blood pressure. Scientists have identified a subtype of immune cell that drives the production of antibodies associated with anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions. The research was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of th

1h

3D printing the human heart

CMU researchers have published in Science a new 3D bioprinting method that brings the field of tissue engineering one step closer to being able to 3D print a full-sized, adult human heart.

1h

Sudden hearing loss: Update to guideline to improve implementation and awareness

The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update) today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) affects five to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States.

1h

Experimental respiratory syncytial virus vaccine prompts antibody surge

A novel experimental vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of severe respiratory illness in the very young and the old, has shown early promise in a Phase 1 clinical trial. The candidate, DS-Cav1, was engineered and developed by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH, who were guided by their atomic-level under

1h

New vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) elicits strong immune response

An experimental vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), one of the leading causes of infectious disease deaths in infants, has shown early promise in a Phase 1 human clinical trial. Researchers report in the journal Science that one dose of their vaccine candidate elicited large increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for several months.

1h

The curious tale of the cancer 'parasite' that sailed the seas

A contagious canine cancer that conquered the world by spreading between dogs during mating likely arose around 6,000 years ago in Asia and spread around the globe through maritime activities, scientists say.

1h

EU agriculture not viable for the future

The current reform proposals of the EU Commission on the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) are unlikely to improve environmental protection, say researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Göttingen in the journal Science. While the EU has committed to greater sustainability, this is n

1h

Fishing for insights into evolutionary change in the genome of frozen fish

Using decades-old frozen fish, researchers have discovered roots of rapid evolutionary adaptation to human activity in the Anthropocene. Similar traits – at least in the fish they studied — can arise through highly divergent genetic pathways, the researchers say.

1h

Microbiome diversity builds a better mouse model

The path to building a better mouse model starts with the microorganisms that colonize it.

1h

Mapping the Milky Way in three dimensions

By measuring the distance from our sun to thousands of individual pulsating stars scattered across the Milky Way, researchers have charted our Galaxy on a larger scale than ever before.

1h

3D printing new parts for our broken hearts

Researchers have developed a 'FRESH' new method of 3D printing complex anatomical structures out of collagen — a primary building block in many human tissues.

1h

'Wildling' mice could help translate results in animal models to results in humans

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health developed a new mouse model that could improve the translation of research in mice into advances in human health. The mouse model, which the scientists called 'wildling,' acquired the microbes and pathogens of wild mice, while maintaining the laboratory mice's genetics that make them more useful for research.

1h

'Voltron' imaging tool captures brain cell action in living animals

Janelia scientists have developed a new way to track neural activity. The technique can target specific brain cells and relies on dyes that are brighter and more stable than those currently used.

1h

Jogging and five other exercises ward off weight gain despite 'obesity genes'

For people who inherited genes that increase their chance of becoming obese, there is hope for keeping the weight off. A study by Wan-Yu Lin of National Taiwan University and colleagues, published Aug. 1 in PLOS Genetics, identified the types of exercise that are especially effective at combating genetic effects that contribute to obesity.

1h

Turtle embryos play a role in determining their own sex

In certain turtle species, the temperature of the egg determines whether the offspring is female or male. But now, new research shows that the embryos have some say in their own sexual destiny: they can move around inside the egg to find different temperatures. The study examines how this behavior may help turtles offset the effects of climate change.

1h

Making HVAC heat exchangers five times better

Turbulent heat exchangers are widely used in HVAC systems around the world, and a new study demonstrates a simple modification that can improve their capability by 500%.

1h

Researchers unlock cancer cells' feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth

An international team led by researchers has discovered the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells that drives the growth of the nucleolus and causes tumors to rapidly multiply. The findings could lead to the development of new cancer treatments that would stop tumor growth by cutting the energy supply to the nucleolus.

1h

Study casts doubt on evidence for 'gold standard' psychological treatments

Researchers have found 56% percent of 'Empirically Supported Treatments' per the American Psychological Association fare poorly across most metric scores for power and replicability.

1h

From greenhouse gas to fuel

Scientists have revealed a new approach to convert carbon dioxide gas into valuable chemicals and fuels.

1h

Need to rethink emergency responses for children in humanitarian settings

Humanitarian crises present major threats to the wellbeing of children, and for more than two decades Child Friendly Spaces have been considered one of the best ways to respond. A recent looked at the impact of Child Friendly Spaces in five countries affected by humanitarian emergencies and found major differences across settings. This is the first study to evaluate whether existing interventions

1h

Youth empowerment program can prevent childhood obesity

A new pilot study used youth-produced narratives to empower youth to reduce sugary drink consumption and obesity risk.

1h

Doing more with less: Flexible, reduced-load jobs a win-win for workers, employers

A professor is researching reduced-load work options to help provide benefits for professionals and companies.

1h

Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on how dementia protein becomes dysfunctional

Researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unraveling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia.

1h

Thousands of Years Ago, a Dog Gave Rise to an Immortal Entity

One of the strangest living things on the planet started as a dog, but has turned into something else entirely. It originated somewhere in Asia about 6,000 years ago, when a cell in the genitals of an unknown dog developed mutations that allowed it to multiply uncontrollably. That is, it became a tumor. But unlike almost every other cancer, which ultimately goes down with its host, this one did n

1h

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

On moonless nights in a tropical forest, bats slice through the inky darkness, snatching up insects resting silently on leaves—a seemingly impossible feat. New experiments at the Smithsonian …

1h

Turtle Embryos Choose Their Sex Before Birth

Turtles, tortoises (shown here) and other reptiles change sex inside their eggs depending on the outside temperature. That trait has scientists worried that climate change may skew their populations toward one gender. (Credit: Seasoning17/Shutterstock) Freshwater turtle nests dot the sandy shores of ponds throughout Asia. And like many reptiles, the embryos become males or females depending on how

1h

From greenhouse gas to fuel

Scientists have revealed a new approach to convert carbon dioxide gas into valuable chemicals and fuels.

1h

Milky Way’s twisted spiral revealed in 3D

Nature, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02364-3 Map of ultra-bright stars called Cepheids shows galaxy’s warped disk.

1h

UN chief: Data shows July equaled or surpassed hottest month

Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says the latest data from the World Meteorological Organization shows that the month of July "at least equaled if not surpassed the hottest month in recorded history"—and it followed the hottest June ever.

1h

Study finds mutual fund managers use their networks for info on insider trades

Insight on insider trades is tough to come by, but some mutual fund managers have figured out a way to leverage their networks—and the Securities and Exchange Commission's EDGAR servers—to better read between the lines when tracking stocks.

1h

How to build a fire in the wilderness

Yes, you did start that fire. And you kept it burning while the world kept turning. (LUM3N via Pixabay/) Knowing how to start a fire in the wilderness can save your life. Bud Ahrens knows this first-hand. A few years ago, while leading a dog sledding trip in northern Minnesota with Outward Bound , an outdoor education and wilderness company, he watched as a coworker fell through ice into a lake.

1h

The Milky Way is more warped than astronomers thought

3D map of bright, pulsing stars shows galactic disk is S-shaped, not flat

1h

New 3D Map of the Milky Way Shows Our Galaxy's Heart Is Totally Twisted

Researchers have mapped the Milky Way in unprecedented detail using data from thousands of giant, pulsating stars.

1h

NASA and SpaceX are Developing Tech to Refuel Spacecrafts While in Orbit

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

2h

Researchers unlock cancer cells' feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Impossible Foods gets FDA approval to sell fake meat in grocery stores

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

2h

All of the ways climate change is already impacting our daily lives

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

2h

Jogging Is the Best Weapon Against 'Obesity Genes'

These six exercises may help ward off obesity in those who are genetically predisposed to packing on the pounds.

2h

Time's up, CO2

[no content]

2h

News at a glance

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Fields of dreams

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Fishing for answers

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

The making of a lumen

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Born to be a wildling

[no content]

2h

2h

It's a dog's life

[no content]

2h

2h

If I only had a heart

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Too much of a gas

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

A weedy challenge

[no content]

2h

Hydraulic fracturing and active coarsening position the lumen of the mouse blastocyst

During mouse pre-implantation development, the formation of the blastocoel, a fluid-filled lumen, breaks the radial symmetry of the blastocyst. The factors that control the formation and positioning of this basolateral lumen remain obscure. We found that accumulation of pressurized fluid fractures cell-cell contacts into hundreds of micrometer-size lumens. These microlumens eventually discharge t

2h

The geologic history of seawater oxygen isotopes from marine iron oxides

The oxygen isotope composition ( 18 O) of marine sedimentary rocks has increased by 10 to 15 per mil since Archean time. Interpretation of this trend is hindered by the dual control of temperature and fluid 18 O on the rocks’ isotopic composition. A new 18 O record in marine iron oxides covering the past ~2000 million years shows a similar secular rise. Iron oxide precipitation experiments reveal

2h

Stabilizing halide perovskite surfaces for solar cell operation with wide-bandgap lead oxysalts

We show that converting the surfaces of lead halide perovskite to water-insoluble lead (II) oxysalt through reaction with sulfate or phosphate ions can effectively stabilize the perovskite surface and bulk material. These capping lead oxysalt thin layers enhance the water resistance of the perovskite films by forming strong chemical bonds. The wide-bandgap lead oxysalt layers also reduce the defe

2h

A three-dimensional map of the Milky Way using classical Cepheid variable stars

The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy, with physical properties inferred from various tracers informed by the extrapolation of structures seen in other galaxies. However, the distances of these tracers are measured indirectly and are model-dependent. We constructed a map of the Milky Way in three dimensions, based on the positions and distances of thousands of classical Cepheid variable stars.

2h

3D bioprinting of collagen to rebuild components of the human heart

Collagen is the primary component of the extracellular matrix in the human body. It has proved challenging to fabricate collagen scaffolds capable of replicating the structure and function of tissues and organs. We present a method to 3D-bioprint collagen using freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels (FRESH) to engineer components of the human heart at various scales, from capillarie

2h

Contrasting genomic shifts underlie parallel phenotypic evolution in response to fishing

Humans cause widespread evolutionary change in nature, but we still know little about the genomic basis of rapid adaptation in the Anthropocene. We tracked genomic changes across all protein-coding genes in experimental fish populations that evolved pronounced shifts in growth rates due to size-selective harvest over only four generations. Comparisons of replicate lines show parallel allele frequ

2h

Transcutaneous ultrasound energy harvesting using capacitive triboelectric technology

A major challenge for implantable medical systems is the inclusion or reliable delivery of electrical power. We use ultrasound to deliver mechanical energy through skin and liquids and demonstrate a thin implantable vibrating triboelectric generator able to effectively harvest it. The ultrasound can induce micrometer-scale displacement of a polymer thin membrane to generate electrical energy thro

2h

High thermoelectric cooling performance of n-type Mg3Bi2-based materials

Thermoelectric materials have a large Peltier effect, making them attractive for solid-state cooling applications. Bismuth telluride (Bi 2 Te 3 )–based alloys have remained the state-of-the-art room-temperature materials for many decades. However, cost partially limited wider use of thermoelectric cooling devices because of the large amounts of expensive tellurium required. We report n-type magne

2h

Isochorismate-derived biosynthesis of the plant stress hormone salicylic acid

The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) controls biotic and abiotic plant stress responses. Plastid-produced chorismate is a branch-point metabolite for SA biosynthesis. Most pathogen-induced SA derives from isochorismate, which is generated from chorismate by the catalytic activity of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1. Here, we ask how and in which cellular compartment isochorismate is converted to SA. We sh

2h

Structure of the Cdc48 segregase in the act of unfolding an authentic substrate

The cellular machine Cdc48 functions in multiple biological pathways by segregating its protein substrates from a variety of stable environments such as organelles or multi-subunit complexes. Despite extensive studies, the mechanism of Cdc48 has remained obscure, and its reported structures are inconsistent with models of substrate translocation proposed for other AAA+ ATPases (adenosine triphosp

2h

A proof of concept for structure-based vaccine design targeting RSV in humans

Technologies that define the atomic-level structure of neutralization-sensitive epitopes on viral surface proteins are transforming vaccinology and guiding new vaccine development approaches. Previously, iterative rounds of protein engineering were performed to preserve the prefusion conformation of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) glycoprotein, resulting in a stabilized subunit v

2h

New Products

[no content]

2h

2h

Substrate processing by the Cdc48 ATPase complex is initiated by ubiquitin unfolding

The Cdc48 adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) (p97 or valosin-containing protein in mammals) and its cofactor Ufd1/Npl4 extract polyubiquitinated proteins from membranes or macromolecular complexes for subsequent degradation by the proteasome. How Cdc48 processes its diverse and often well-folded substrates is unclear. Here, we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of the Cdc48 ATPase in compl

2h

Laboratory mice born to wild mice have natural microbiota and model human immune responses

Laboratory mouse studies are paramount for understanding basic biological phenomena but also have limitations. These include conflicting results caused by divergent microbiota and limited translational research value. To address both shortcomings, we transferred C57BL/6 embryos into wild mice, creating "wildlings." These mice have a natural microbiota and pathogens at all body sites and the tract

2h

The pigment-protein network of a diatom photosystem II-light-harvesting antenna supercomplex

Diatoms play important roles in global primary productivity and biogeochemical cycling of carbon, in part owing to the ability of their photosynthetic apparatus to adapt to rapidly changing light intensity. We report a cryo–electron microscopy structure of the photosystem II (PSII)–fucoxanthin (Fx) chlorophyll (Chl) a/c binding protein (FCPII) supercomplex from the centric diatom Chaetoceros grac

2h

2h

2h

Somatic evolution and global expansion of an ancient transmissible cancer lineage

The canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a cancer lineage that arose several millennia ago and survives by "metastasizing" between hosts through cell transfer. The somatic mutations in this cancer record its phylogeography and evolutionary history. We constructed a time-resolved phylogeny from 546 CTVT exomes and describe the lineage’s worldwide expansion. Examining variation in mutation

2h

The making of a lumen

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Born to be a wildling

[no content]

2h

2h

It's a dog's life

[no content]

2h

2h

If I only had a heart

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

LightSail away

Successful deployment realises a 40-year dream. Richard A Lovett reports.

2h

Jogging the best exercise for those genetically prone to obesity

Taiwanese study assesses exercise impact with five measures of obesity. Paul Biegler reports.

2h

The curious tale of the cancer 'parasite' that sailed the seas

A contagious canine cancer that conquered the world by spreading between dogs during mating likely arose around 6,000 years ago in Asia and spread around the globe through maritime activities, scientists say.

2h

New Mouse Model Predicts Two Clinical Trial Failures in Humans

The lab animals had more natural microbiomes seeded by wild mice, unlike conventional models that are kept in sterile conditions.

2h

A 3-D map of stars reveals the Milky Way’s warped shape

Our galaxy flaunts its curves in a chart of thousands of stars called Cepheids.

2h

EU agriculture not viable for the future

The current reform proposals of the EU Commission on the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) are unlikely to improve environmental protection, say researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Göttingen in the journal Science. While the EU has committed to greater sustainability, this is n

2h

The curious tale of the cancer 'parasite' that sailed the seas

A contagious canine cancer that conquered the world by spreading between dogs during mating likely arose around 6,000 years ago in Asia and spread around the globe through maritime activities, scientists say.

2h

Drone Spots Shark Hunting Seal | Shark Week

The team captures stunning drone footage of a Great White shark hunting a seal in shallow water. Stream Air Jaws Strikes Back on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/air-jaws-strikes-back Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Fa

2h

Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival

Understanding the internal energy flow — including the metabolism — of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study. Researchers investigating the bioenergetics of sharks and rays; data which may reveal how they will fare in a drastically changing ocean.

2h

Finding weakness in bacterial protein to fight antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal previously undiscovered hot spots on the surface of bacteria's critical enzyme, which could guide novel approaches to antibiotic design.

2h

How side hit to the head could damage brain, lead to concussion

Play contact sports for any length of time and at one point or another you're probably going to have your 'bell rung' by a powerful blow to the head from a hard hit or fall. Researchers have reconstructed ting the inertial stresses and strains that prevail inside a brain that's just been hit hard from the side.

2h

Going green? Not so easy for mainstream brands

Recent research shows that when mainstream brands advertise using visual cues suggesting the product is environmentally friendly or 'green' consumers may actually evaluate the product as being less effective and switch to a more niche green brand.

2h

Ninja out: Gaming megastar leaves Twitch for Mixer

Fortnite superstar Tyler "Ninja" Blevins has left Twitch and is taking his video game live streams to Microsoft's Mixer platform, a stunning switch that could have wide-ranging consequences …

2h

IndyCar to use hybrid technology to boost horsepower, safety

IndyCar plans to use hybrid technology to increase horsepower and improve safety.

2h

Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics.

2h

Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected

New microscopy technique provides unprecedented insight into nanoscopic slip layers formed in flowing complex liquids.

2h

Study finds mutual fund managers use their networks for info on insider trades

New research from the University of Notre Dame found that these tracked insider trades can predict future firm returns, with the stocks bought by a fund manager after a tracked insider buy outperforming other firm purchases.

2h

Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics.

2h

Knockout mice are guide to new genes for eye and skin disorders

Albinism is the best-known of a group of rare genetic disorders that can affect both eyes and skin. Some genes have been identified that are linked to these conditions, but many remain mysterious. Now a team has identified dozens of these genetic mutations in a screen of gene-targeted 'knockout' mice.

2h

Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected

New microscopy technique provides unprecedented insight into nanoscopic slip layers formed in flowing complex liquids.

2h

Precision editing of gut bacteria reduces cancer in mice

Researchers have shown that precision editing of the bacterial populations in the gut reduces inflammation-associated colorectal cancer in mice.

2h

Monthly lifestyle counseling tied to better outcomes for patients with diabetes

A new study in Diabetes Care suggests that patients who received lifestyle counseling at least once a month were at decreased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attacks, strokes and hospitalization for chest pain as well as death from any cause compared to those who received counseling less frequently.

2h

Hubble uncovers a 'heavy metal' exoplanet shaped like a football

How can a planet be 'hotter than hot?' The answer is when heavy metals are detected escaping from the planet's atmosphere, instead of condensing into clouds.

2h

Drop of ancient seawater rewrites Earth's history

The remains of a microscopic drop of ancient seawater has assisted in rewriting the history of Earth's evolution when it was used to re-establish the time that plate tectonics started on the planet.

2h

Working Scientist podcast: Global career moves, and how to survive them

Nature, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02365-2 Moving abroad is a fact of life for many scientists. Astrophysicist Elizabeth Tasker offers some advice.

2h

Similarities in the insulating states of twisted bilayer graphene and cuprates

In recent decades, enormous research efforts have been expended on the exploration and explanation of high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, a class of materials exhibiting zero resistance at particularly high temperatures. Now a team of scientists from the United States, Germany and Japan explains in Nature how the electronic structure in twisted bilayer graphene influences the emergence of

2h

New approach could make HVAC heat exchangers five times more efficient

Researchers from Tsinghua University and Brown University have discovered a simple way to give a major boost to turbulent heat exchange, a method of heat transport widely used in heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

2h

Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Whether They Become Male Or Female

In many turtle species, sex is determined by temperature in the egg. That makes turtles particularly vulnerable to climate change. But scientists say the animals may have a way to shield themselves. (Image credit: Ye et. al / Current Biology)

3h

Electronic skin could give prosthetics a better sense of touch

A new artificial nervous system could one day give robots and prosthetic devices a sense of touch equivalent to, or better than, human skin, researchers report. The new electronic skin system—called Asynchronous Coded Electronic Skin (ACES) —has ultra-high responsiveness and robustness to damage, and can pair with any kind of sensor skin layers to function effectively as an electronic skin. “Huma

3h

The Notre Dame Fire Spread Toxic Lead Dust Over Paris

The fire at the cathedral in April appears to have caused widespread lead dust contamination, prompting a lawsuit against the city.

3h

Two Nights, Two Very Different Ways of Talking About Race

In the past three weeks, Donald Trump has alleged that Al Sharpton “hates Whites & Cops.” He’s called Baltimore , a majority-black city, a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess,” and he’s attacked one of the city’s congressmen, Elijah Cummings. He’s sent racist tweets telling four congresswomen of color to “go back” to the countries they came from. But for much of the first night of the Democ

3h

The Whiter, Richer School District Right Next Door

The Waterbury School District is quarantined within man-made, invisible walls, partitions that hug it on each side, forming taut, if unnatural, boundaries on the map. The school district, in Waterbury, Connecticut, is touched by eight other districts, each one whiter, more affluent, and receiving more dollars than Waterbury itself. Take the Wolcott School District, for example, where 87 percent o

3h

Biden’s Rivals Helped Him More Than He Helped Himself

After two nights of spirited debate in Detroit, many Democrats may be feeling anxious: Their 2020 front-runner didn’t entirely mollify concerns about his political skills, and his three major rivals positioned themselves in ways that could leave the party vulnerable in the general election. Former Vice President Joe Biden, under fire from virtually every other candidate on the stage, delivered a

3h

A Scientist Witnessed Poachers Killing a Chimp

It started as a good day. As usual, Kevin Langergraber got up at dawn to follow and observe the chimpanzees of Ngogo in Uganda’s Kibale National Park. An anthropologist from Arizona State University, he has been studying that group for 19 summers. This year, food has been scarce, and so have the chimps. But yesterday, Langergraber found a group of 30 adults, playing and relaxing, with infants cra

3h

When Sharks Attack | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

On this episode of The Daily Bite, Luke Tipple breaks down when sharks attack and how horrible humans taste! Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.co

3h

Most detailed ever 3D map of Milky Way shows 'warped' shape

Our galaxy is like a distorted disc, study based on Cepheid stars confirms The most detailed three-dimensional map yet of the Milky Way has been revealed, showing that our galaxy is not a flat disc but has a “warped” shape like a fascinator hat or a vinyl record that has been left in the sun. “The stars 60,000 light years away from the Milky Way’s centre are as far as 4,500 [light years] above or

3h

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

Bats can find motionless insects on leaves in the dark. This was thought to be impossible, because the acoustic camouflage provided by the leaves should confuse their echolocation system. Biologists have now discovered how bats overcome this problem.

3h

New type of pipe for pumping blood is just liquid with no pipe

Fluids like blood can be damaged when they flow through tiny tubes like those in surgical pumps. But that doesn't happen in a new "anti-tube" made of liquid

3h

Lyft Suspends SF E-Bikes Because They’re Bursting Into Flames

Down in Flames Lyft can’t seem to keep its electric bicycles on San Francisco streets. In April, the company pulled its e-bikes in the city because their sensitive brakes were sending riders flying over the handlebars. Lyft then sued San Francisco in early June over a contract dispute, delaying the return of the bikes until the pair reached a temporary resolution earlier this month. And now, just

3h

Bats Use Leaves as Mirrors to Locate and Catch Their Prey

The latest discovery in the arms race between bats and insects reveals that even silent, motionless dragonflies aren't safe

3h

Yang’s Climate Plan: “Start Moving Our People to Higher Ground”

Techno-Optimism Andrew Yang, the self-branded technological presidential candidate , said that it’s time for people to adapt to climate change by seeking out higher ground — literally. Yang, speaking at Wednesday’s Democratic Party debate, said that it’s too late to prevent many of the catastrophic events of climate change, reports MarketWatch . Yang went on to argue that it may be time to abando

3h

Thousands of People Are About to Test an HIV Vaccine

Phase III Starting in September, tens of thousands of people in Europe and the Americas will start to test an experimental HIV vaccine. After nearly 40 years of testing more than 100 different experimental vaccines , this new drug seems to boost resistance to HIV for up to two years after being administered, Nature News reports . It’s too soon to make any bold claims about how well the vaccine wo

3h

Robert Young obituary

My friend Robert Young, who has died aged 83, was a psychotherapist, writer and academic, the author of influential books on Darwin, psychoanalysis and the history of ideas. A brave man of the left, he founded several journals of radical inquiry into science and psychoanalysis, and became a book publisher. Born and raised in Dallas, Texas, Bob was the son of Harold Young, who worked for a cotton

3h

Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook is 79% off

submitted by /u/Feled1996 [link] [comments]

3h

New approach could make HVAC heat exchangers five times better

Turbulent heat exchangers are widely used in HVAC systems around the world, and a new study demonstrates a simple modification that can improve their capability by 500%.

3h

US infrastructure unprepared for increasing frequency of extreme storms

Current design standards for United States hydrologic infrastructure are unprepared for the increasing frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms, meaning structures like retention ponds and dams will face more frequent and severe flooding, according to a new study.

3h

Discovery of distinct lung cancer pathways may lead to more targeted treatments

Known for its poor prognosis, lung adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer, responsible for about 4 of 10 diagnoses. Researchers can now distinguish between two pathways where this deadly cancer can develop. They say their discovery could help future patients.

3h

Ancient plankton help researchers predict near-future climate

Temperature data inferred from plankton fossils from the Pliocene, an era with CO2 levels similar to today's, allowed a team to rectify discrepancies between climate models and other proxy temperature measurements.

3h

Physician leaders call for action to create a new generation of physician-scientists

A group of prominent physician-scientist leaders propose a plan for increasing the number of physicians who conduct research looking for tomorrow's breakthroughs and cures.

3h

'Is it time for another contraception revolution?'

In an effort to protect the planet and preserve its natural treasures for future generations, another contraception revolution that provides options for populations not currently being served by modern contraception may be the answer according to the author of a new article.

3h

In Second Democratic Debate, Candidates Criticize Biden's Climate Plans

Hopefuls for the Presidential nomination argued over the scope of U.S. efforts to curb global warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Daily briefing: UAE will be the first Arab nation on Mars

Nature, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02373-2 The United Arab Emirates will launch a Mars mission. Plus: a promising new HIV vaccine and a placental microbiome plot twist.

3h

The Secret Life of Kudzu

A plant scorned as an invasive species offers a wealth of practical uses and cultural significance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Police officers' exposure to peers accused of misconduct shapes their subsequent behavior

A new Northwestern University study investigated how Chicago police officers' exposure to peers who had been accused of misconduct shaped their involvement in subsequent excessive force cases.

3h

'Green' taxes

A comparative analysis has shown that 'indirect' instruments, such as excise taxes on motor fuel and other energy taxes, did not yield any lesser impact than their 'direct' counterparts, and, over time, were even more effective. This is the conclusion drawn by Ilya Stepanov, researcher at the Higher School of Economics, in his article, 'Taxes in the Energy Sector and Their Role in Reducing Greenho

3h

Study highlights need to rethink emergency responses for children in humanitarian settings

Humanitarian crises present major threats to the wellbeing of children, and for more than two decades Child Friendly Spaces have been considered one of the best ways to respond. A recent looked at the impact of Child Friendly Spaces in five countries affected by humanitarian emergencies and found major differences across settings. This is the first study to evaluate whether existing interventions

3h

From greenhouse gas to fuel

University of Delaware scientists are part of an international team of researchers that has revealed a new approach to convert carbon dioxide gas into valuable chemicals and fuels.

3h

Study casts doubt on evidence for 'gold standard' psychological treatments

Researchers have found 56% percent of 'Empirically Supported Treatments' per the American Psychological Association fare poorly across most metric scores for power and replicability.

3h

Ancient plankton help researchers predict near-future climate

Temperature data inferred from plankton fossils from the Pliocene, an era with CO2 levels similar to today's, allowed a UA-led team to rectify discrepancies between climate models and other proxy temperature measurements.

3h

UC researchers unlock cancer cells' feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth

An international team led by researchers from the University of Cincinnati and Japan's Keio and Hiroshima universities has discovered the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells that drives the growth of the nucleolus and causes tumors to rapidly multiply. The findings, published Aug. 1, 2019 in the journal Nature Cell Biology, could lead to the development of new cancer treatments that wou

3h

Tarantino’s Most Transgressive Film

As soon as I heard that Quentin Tarantino was making a movie about the Manson killings, I knew I would be there on opening night. As the release date neared, and the ravishing still photography of Andrew Cooper, Tarantino’s regular photographer, began to appear—beginning with a January spread in Vanity Fair , which operated like an injection of Narcan on that slumbering magazine—I wondered whethe

3h

How roads can help cool sizzling cities

Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a team of engineers.

3h

Electrify America will use robots to charge self-driving EVs

As self-driving and electric vehicles advance, one fundamental question remains: How will autonomous EVs connect to charging stations? Volkswagen-backed Electrify America and Stable …

3h

Whistleblower vindicated in Cisco cybersecurity case

A computer security expert who has won a trailblazing payout in a whistleblower lawsuit over critical security flaws he found in October 2008 in Cisco Systems Inc. video surveillance software …

3h

Walloped by heat wave, Greenland sees massive ice melt

The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic.

3h

Ancient plankton help researchers predict near-future climate

The Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawai'i recently recorded the highest concentration of carbon dioxide, or CO2, levels in human history. In fact, the last time CO2 levels surpassed 400 parts per million was during the Pliocene, a geological epoch between two and five million years ago, when oceans surged 50 feet higher and small icecaps barely clung to the poles.

3h

Video: Why are we dumping fertilizer on wildfires?

When wildfires break out on hot, windy days, they pose a serious threat to people and the environment.

3h

The Universal Law That Aims Time’s Arrow

Pour milk in coffee, and the eddies and tendrils of white soon fade to brown. In half an hour, the drink cools to room temperature. Left for days, the liquid evaporates. After centuries, the cup will disintegrate, and billions of years later, the entire planet, sun and solar system will disperse. Throughout the universe, all matter and energy is diffusing out of hot spots like coffee and stars, u

3h

There’s more to pufferfish than that goofy spiked balloon

Three odd things about pufferfishes: how they mate, how they bite and what’s up with no fish scales?

3h

Save the world by saving your plants' seeds

I grow seed libraries. (illustration by Rafael Alvarez/) Rebecca Newburn, Co-founder of Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library in Richmond, California In 2010, a friend and I started the Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library . It's a lot like a regular library, but instead of books, we lend packets of seeds. You can check them out, plant them at home, and harvest new ones that you're welcome to return

3h

Using Tools Puts Crows in a Good Mood

New Caledonian crows may find tool use fun, according to a new study. crow-with-tool-cropped.jpg Image credits: Dakota McCoy Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Thursday, August 1, 2019 – 12:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Getting food is nice. But scoring that food through clever tool use is even better, according to

3h

This Young Man and Woman Were Buried Face-to-Face 4,000 Years Ago in Kazakhstan

While some media outlets have suggested they were a teenage couple, that idea hasn't been confirmed.

4h

In Photos: Young Couple Buried 4,000 Years Ago in Kazakhstan

The man and woman were buried facing each other, with a variety of grave goods.

4h

A Seal Has Taken Up Residence in Manhattan, and Its Human Neighbors Are Thrilled

The playful creature is an example of a broader return of wildlife to crowded New York City.

4h

Heterophase nanostructures contributing to efficient catalysis

Selective catalysis plays a key role in various applications, such as the chemical industry and oil refining, hence, developing catalysts with high efficiency and excellent chemoselectivity has become a research hotspot. Compared with other materials, noble metals, especially ultrathin two-dimensional (2-D) noble metal nanomaterials, have drawn tremendous research interest owing to their superior

4h

US infrastructure unprepared for increasing frequency of extreme storms

Current design standards for United States hydrologic infrastructure are unprepared for the increasing frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms, meaning structures like retention ponds and dams will face more frequent and severe flooding, according to a new study.

4h

The Secret Life of Kudzu

A plant scorned as an invasive species offers a wealth of practical uses and cultural significance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Dissecting Why We Laugh

Photo: Shutterstock Laughter is one of the many reflexes that humans—and some other species—have, much like sneezing, shivering, or yawning. However, unlike most reflexes, laughing seems to serve no biological purpose, making it a mystery to psychologists and neurologists alike. Lawrence Ian Reed, Ph.D., a clinical assistant professor at New York University, set out to answer why we laugh at “ Wh

4h

A chemical clue to how life started on Earth

Earth didn't always harbor life. But around 4 billion years ago, something in the environment changed, and systems with biological properties began to emerge. Many scientists believe a lively dance of molecules called amino acids is partly responsible for the shift: Molecules linked up, broke apart and eventually came together to form life as we know it.

4h

The Secret Life of Kudzu

A plant scorned as an invasive species offers a wealth of practical uses and cultural significance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Scientists Just Found a Hellish Exoplanet Shaped Like a Football

Football Exoplanet An international team of astronomers has found a distant exoplanet that’s being deformed into the shape of a football by the brutal gravitational pull of its host star. “This planet is a prototype for ultra-hot Jupiters,” said Drake Deming, astronomy professor at the University of Maryland and co-author of a paper about the bizarre planet that was published today in the Astrono

4h

To lift a crow’s mood, give it a toolkit

Nature, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02345-6 Clever crows are more cheerful after wielding simple instruments.

4h

Why are you yawning right now?

As a graduate student, spending an early morning or late night in the lab is not uncommon. During those hours, it’s also not uncommon to catch me in the midst of a yawn (or many). This makes sense, though; I’m tired from little sleep or a long day. However, you may be surprised to learn … Continue reading

4h

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys. Western South America in particular holds a key role in the history of the continent due to the presence of three major ecogeographic domains (the Andes, the Amazonia, and the Pacific Coast), and for hosting the earliest and largest complex societies. A new study in

4h

Animals can’t adapt fast enough for climate change

Climate change is outpacing the ability of birds and other species to adapt to their changing environment, researchers report. The researchers evaluated more than 10,000 published scientific studies for their work. The analysis concludes that animals can respond to climate change, but those responses generally don’t allow species to cope with the rapid pace of rising temperatures. The researchers

4h

Water and ultra-thin metal generate electricity

Flowing water over extremely thin layers of inexpensive metals that have oxidized, including iron, can produce electricity, researchers report. The technique could be useful in developing new forms of sustainable power production. The films have a conducting metal nanolayer (10 to 20 nanometers thick) insulated with an oxide layer (2 nanometers thick). Pulses of rainwater and ocean water alternat

4h

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys. Western South America in particular holds a key role in the history of the continent due to the presence of three major ecogeographic domains (the Andes, the Amazonia, and the Pacific Coast), and for hosting the earliest and largest complex societies. A new study in

4h

Promising new solar-powered path to hydrogen fuel production

Engineers at Lehigh University are the first to utilize a single enzyme biomineralization process to create a catalyst that uses the energy of captured sunlight to split water molecules to produce hydrogen. The synthesis process is performed at room temperature and under ambient pressure, overcoming the sustainability and scalability challenges of previously reported methods.

4h

Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish, new study shows

Biomedical researchers at KU Leuven have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs.

4h

System to image the human eye corrects for chromatic aberrations

Researchers report a new imaging system that cancels the chromatic optical aberrations present in a specific person's eye, allowing for a more accurate assessment of vision and eye health. By taking pictures of the eye's smallest light-sensing cells with multiple wavelengths, the system also provides the first objective measurement of longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA), which could lead to n

4h

The untold story of the ‘circle of trust’ behind the world’s first gene-edited babies

How regulations and the scientific community itself failed to stop the “rogue” Chinese scientist He Jiankui

4h

Did CRISPR help—or harm—the first-ever gene-edited babies?

He Jiankui’s attempt to knock out the CCR5 gene was messy—and so are debates about potential consequences

4h

Discovery of distinct lung cancer pathways may lead to more targeted treatments

Known for its poor prognosis, lung adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer, responsible for about 4 of 10 diagnoses, according to the National Cancer Institute. Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus can now distinguish between two pathways where this deadly cancer can develop. They say their discovery could help future patients. The findings appear in Cancer Cell.

4h

Police officers' exposure to peers accused of misconduct shapes their subsequent behavior

A new Northwestern University study investigated how Chicago police officers' exposure to peers who had been accused of misconduct shaped their involvement in subsequent excessive force cases.

4h

US infrastructure unprepared for increasing frequency of extreme storms

Current design standards for United States hydrologic infrastructure are unprepared for the increasing frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms, meaning structures like retention ponds and dams will face more frequent and severe flooding, according to a new study in AGU's journal Geophysical Research Letters.

4h

Despite treatment, elderly cancer patients have worse outcomes if HIV-positive

Elderly cancer patients who are HIV-positive have worse outcomes compared to cancer patients in the same age range who do not have HIV. A new study in JAMA Oncology takes a closer look at the disparity, factoring in whether or not cancer treatment had an impact on outcomes among this patient population.

4h

Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish, new study shows

Biomedical researchers at KU Leuven have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs.

4h

Scientists identify a new signaling component important for plant symbiosis

A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This shows how symbiotic signals from symbiotic bacteria are transmitted upon perception, ultimately leading to their accommodation within the host plant.

4h

Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution

A new study details how a quantum computing technique called 'quantum annealing' can be used to solve problems relevant to fundamental questions in nuclear physics about the subatomic building blocks of all matter. It could also help answer other vexing questions in science and industry, too.

4h

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors

When two mesh screens are overlaid, beautiful patterns appear when one screen is offset. These 'moiré patterns' have long intrigued artists, scientists and mathematicians and have found applications in printing, fashion and banknotes. Now, a team has paved the way to solving one of the most enduring mysteries in materials physics by discovering that in the presence of a moiré pattern in graphene,

4h

A Glitch in Tesla’s Dog Mode Is Trapping Pups In Hot Cars

A Dog’s Life Tesla’s plan to keep dogs safe while their owners run errands has a dangerous flaw — but thankfully, the company is already working to fix it. In February, Tesla added a new Enhanced Autopilot feature called “ Dog Mode ” to its cars. When enabled, the setting lets a driver park their car, but keep the air conditioner running — the idea being they could then safely leave their pooch i

4h

Quantum light sources pave the way for optical circuits

An international team headed up by Alexander Holleitner and Jonathan Finley, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has succeeded in placing light sources in atomically thin material layers with an accuracy of just a few nanometers. The new method allows for a multitude of applications in quantum technologies, from quantum sensors and transistors in smartphones through to new encr

4h

Scientists identify a new signaling component important for plant symbiosis

A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This shows how symbiotic signals from symbiotic bacteria are transmitted upon perception, ultimately leading to their accommodation within the host plant.

4h

Photocatalytic generation of highly reactive alkynes under visible light conditions

Alkynes are a group of organic compounds that are used to manufacture industrial reagents and polymers. Photolysis of a cyclopropenone with UV-light is a useful method to generate a highly reactive alkyne. However, if the reaction mix contains accompanying compounds that are sensitive to UV light, they will degenerate. Therefore, performing this reaction in the presence of visible light instead wi

4h

Scientists crack the code to improve stress tolerance in plants

In any eukaryotic organism, the DNA in a cell exists not as a loose strand, but as a highly condensed complex that consists of DNA and other proteins known as histones. Overall, this condensed structure is referred to as chromatin, and this packaging is important for maintaining the integrity of DNA structure and sequence. However, as chromatin restricts the topology of DNA, modification of chroma

4h

Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution

Some math problems are so complicated that they can bog down even the world's most powerful supercomputers. But a wild new frontier in computing that applies the rules of the quantum realm offers a different approach.

4h

Doing more with less: Flexible, reduced-load jobs a win-win for workers, employers

Attracting and retaining the best and brightest employees with an unemployment rate that is hovering near a 50-year low is a challenge for companies.

4h

Scientists crack the code to improve stress tolerance in plants

In any eukaryotic organism, the DNA in a cell exists not as a loose strand, but as a highly condensed complex that consists of DNA and other proteins known as histones. Overall, this condensed structure is referred to as chromatin, and this packaging is important for maintaining the integrity of DNA structure and sequence. However, as chromatin restricts the topology of DNA, modification of chroma

4h

Tracking baby fish for better reef management

A group of Australian scientists has created the world's first computer model that can accurately predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The study confirms the importance of fish larvae produced in no-take zones for the health of fish populations within nearby fishing zones.

4h

Very little public support for relaxing rules and regulations around fracking

A major new public attitudes survey on fracking reveals very little public support for relaxing the rules and regulations around fracking—a key demand of major shale gas extraction companies.

4h

A chemical clue to how life started on Earth

Earth didn't always harbor life. But around 4 billion years ago, something in the environment changed, and systems with biological properties began to emerge. Many scientists believe a lively dance of molecules called amino acids is partly responsible for the shift: Molecules linked up, broke apart and eventually came together to form life as we know it.

4h

Tracking baby fish for better reef management

A group of Australian scientists has created the world's first computer model that can accurately predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The study confirms the importance of fish larvae produced in no-take zones for the health of fish populations within nearby fishing zones.

4h

Finding weakness in bacterial protein to fight antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal previously undiscovered hot spots on the surface of bacteria's critical enzyme, which could guide novel approaches to antibiotic design.

4h

Turtle embryos can influence their own sex

There’s value in being able to move around in the egg, research finds.

4h

Finding weakness in bacterial protein to fight antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal previously undiscovered hot spots on the surface of bacteria's critical enzyme, which could guide novel approaches to antibiotic design.

4h

Species aren't adapting fast enough to cope with climate change, according to new study

Many species are adapting to climate change, but those adaptations aren't occurring fast enough to guarantee their long-term survival, according to a recent study that analyzed 10,000 published scientific papers. An Iowa State University biologist contributed to the international research team.

4h

Hubble uncovers a 'heavy metal' exoplanet shaped like a football

How can a planet be 'hotter than hot?' The answer is when heavy metals are detected escaping from the planet's atmosphere, instead of condensing into clouds.

4h

Doing more with less: Flexible, reduced-load jobs a win-win for workers, employers

A Purdue University professor is researching reduced-load work options to help provide benefits for professionals and companies.

4h

Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution

A new study led by a Berkeley Lab physicist details how a quantum computing technique called 'quantum annealing' can be used to solve problems relevant to fundamental questions in nuclear physics about the subatomic building blocks of all matter. It could also help answer other vexing questions in science and industry, too.

4h

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

Bats can find motionless insects on leaves in the dark. This was thought to be impossible, because the acoustic camouflage provided by the leaves should confuse their echolocation system. Inga Geipel and colleagues discovered how bats overcome this problem.

4h

Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish, new study shows

Biomedical researchers at KU Leuven have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs.

4h

Do yellow-lens night-driving glasses improve visibility, reduce headlight glare?

With the use of a driving simulator, three commercially available yellow-lens night-driving glasses were compared with clear lenses to examine their ability to detect pedestrians or reduce the negative effects of headlight glare. The study included 22 participants.

4h

Cost, potential environmental effects of unused pharmaceuticals in cataract surgery

The financial and environmental costs of unused portions of drugs from cataract surgery at four surgical sites in the US was investigated in this study.

4h

Study compares HIV, cancer treatments, outcomes in older patients

This study compared outcomes after a cancer diagnosis in patients with and without HIV who were 65 or older, had similar stages of cancer, and had received stage-appropriate cancer treatment in the year following diagnosis.

4h

Repairing harmful effects of inbreeding could save the iconic Helmeted Honeyeater

Study combines over 30 years of demanding fieldwork and advanced genetics to quantify how much harm is done by inbreeding in the last wild population of the Helmeted Honeyeater, and identifies ways forward.

4h

Turtle embryos play a role in determining their own sex

In certain turtle species, the temperature of the egg determines whether the offspring is female or male. But now, new research shows that the embryos have some say in their own sexual destiny: they can move around inside the egg to find different temperatures. The study, publishing Aug. 1 in the journal Current Biology, examines how this behavior may help turtles offset the effects of climate cha

4h

Study examines direct-to-consumer stem cell clinics in 6 Southwestern states

This direct-to-consumer stem cell marketplace has come under increasing scrutiny, but relatively little is known about the clinics or how the treatments they offer align with the expertise of their practitioners. In a paper published Aug. 1 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, investigators offer a detailed characterization of nearly 170 stem cell businesses across Arizona, California, Colorado, Neva

4h

Old cells, new tricks — important clue to AML diagnosis and cure discovered

Around 22,000 people will be diagnosed this year in the US with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the second most common type of leukemia diagnosed in adults and children. Researchers from Australia's Monash University have discovered a key reason why this disease is so difficult to treat and therefore cure.

4h

A biomimetic 2D transistor for audiomorphic computing

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11381-9 Biomimetic audiomorphic functionalities can be implemented in solid-state devices including 2D materials. Here, the authors fabricate a device based on multiple split gates with nano-gaps on a single semiconducting MoS2 channel that captures the neurobiological architecture and computational map inside the aud

4h

Chemical mimicry of viral capsid self-assembly via corannulene-based pentatopic tectons

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11457-6 The icosahedron, as the polyhedron closest in symmetry to the sphere, is one of the most compelling Platonic solids for chemists to construct. Here, the authors assemble a supramolecular icosahedron from twelve pentatopic corannulene-based tectons, a strategy that was proposed over a decade ago but only now sy

4h

Small molecule degraders of the hepatitis C virus protease reduce susceptibility to resistance mutations

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11429-w Targeted protein degradation (TPD) is a promising strategy for drug development. In this proof-of-concept study, the authors use telaprevir, which binds hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease, to target the protease for protein degradation, and show inhibition of wildtype as well as drug resistant HCV.

4h

Large-scale neuroanatomical study uncovers 198 gene associations in mouse brain morphogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11431-2 Brain morphogenesis is an important process contributing to higher-order cognition, however our knowledge about its biological basis is largely incomplete. Here, authors analyzed 118 neuroanatomical parameters in 1,566 mutant mouse lines to identify 198 genes whose disruptions yield neuroanatomical phenotypes

4h

Vertical redistribution of salt and layered changes in global ocean salinity

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11436-x Climate change is increasing the flow of freshwater to the ocean, yet study of salinity shifts is hampered by a lack of data. Here the authors show that the flux of salt through the ocean rivals that of freshwater inputs and leads to a layered structure of global salinity changes over the past twenty years.

4h

A first-principles phase field method for quantitatively predicting multi-composition phase separation without thermodynamic empirical parameter

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11248-z Predicting alloy microstructures with parameter-free theoretical schemes remains a challenge. Here the authors derive a general phase field approach to reproduce the microstructural evolution of a nickel-aluminum alloy as a function of composition only and without empirical thermodynamic parameters.

4h

Polyhydride CeH9 with an atomic-like hydrogen clathrate structure

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11330-6 Obtainment of hydrogen-rich metal hydrides that are high-temperature superconductors has been demonstrated under very high pressure, but is still largely unexplored. Here the authors synthesize CeH9, with a structure related to solid metallic hydrogen, at relatively low pressure and without need for heating.

4h

Novel data show expert wildlife agencies are important to endangered species protection

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11462-9 The U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires that federal agencies consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) or National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to ensure federal actions do not jeopardize the existence of listed species. Here, the authors analyze recorded from 2000–2017 and investigate t

4h

Why fatal shootings result in more arrests

The primary reason fatal shootings result in arrests more frequently than nonfatal shootings is police devote more time and resources to the fatal cases, a new study finds. This suggests that persistence pays off—yet staying with an investigation that may last months is a luxury afforded only to homicide detectives, the researchers say. “With respect to preventing gun violence, an arrest in a non

4h

Google Play Pass App And Game Subscription Service Testing Is Underway

When Apple announced its monthly subscription gaming service called Apple Arcade, everyone expected Google to launch its own similar service. It's taken Google some time to launch a competing …

4h

4h

Yellow glasses don’t help night drivers spot dangers any faster

Yellow spectacles are supposed to improve a driver's vision at night but in tests people wearing them couldn't actually spot pedestrians any faster

4h

UK navy will use AI-guided robot submarines to find explosive mines

The UK’s Royal Navy wants to use artificial intelligence to guide a fleet of robot submarines, helping them seek and destroy underwater mines

4h

Turtle embryos may control their sex by moving inside their eggs

Ambient temperature can influence the sex of reptile embryos, but turtle embryos may move to warm or cool spots inside the egg to counteract the effect

4h

This “AI Doctor” Can Predict Acute Kidney Conditions 2 Days Early

Kidney Predictor Researchers from Alphabet-owned company DeepMind say a new AI can ingest a patient’s medical history and predict, with 90 percent accuracy, whether they’re going to need dialysis for acute kidney injury 48 hours before it occurs. “Currently we pick these things up too late and harm is caused to patients, and we think there’s a real opportunity for these AI systems to be able to p

4h

'Aquaman' Director James Wan Is Making Secret Horror Movie

He'll work on it before starting on the sequel to his DC movie.

4h

Turtle embryos can influence their own sex

There’s value in being able to move around in the egg, research finds.

5h

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are all around London

Swabbing public surfaces reveals some unpleasant truths.

5h

India adds a new snake to the list

Unusual and rare find made in the Western Ghats. Biplab Das reports.

5h

Turtle embryos may determine their own sex—by seeking the perfect temperature

Newly documented behavior could balance turtle sex ratios and save them from climate change

5h

Artificial intelligence could help air travelers save a bundle

Researchers are using artificial intelligence to help airlines price ancillary services such as checked bags and seat reservations in a way that is beneficial to customers' budget and privacy, as well as to the airline industry's bottom line.

5h

Promising new solar-powered path to hydrogen fuel production

Engineers at Lehigh University are the first to utilize a single enzyme biomineralization process to create a catalyst that uses the energy of captured sunlight to split water molecules to produce hydrogen. The synthesis process is performed at room temperature and under ambient pressure, overcoming the sustainability and scalability challenges of previously reported methods.

5h

BU study: Youth empowerment program can prevent childhood obesity

A new pilot study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers is the first to use youth-produced narratives to empower youth to reduce sugary drink consumption and obesity risk.

5h

Storytelling bots learn to punch up their last lines

Nothing disappoints quite like a good story with a lousy finish. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University who work in the young field of automated storytelling don't think they're getting ahead of themselves by devising better endings.

5h

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors

When two mesh screens are overlaid, beautiful patterns appear when one screen is offset. These 'moiré patterns' have long intrigued artists, scientists and mathematicians and have found applications in printing, fashion and banknotes. Now, a Rutgers-led team has paved the way to solving one of the most enduring mysteries in materials physics by discovering that in the presence of a moiré pattern i

5h

Turtle Embryos May Have a Say in Deciding Their Sex

In a species of freshwater turtle, embryos can move toward warmer or cooler environments within the egg and thus help choose their sexual destiny, but not all experts are convinced.

5h

Survey of Stem Cell Clinics Reveals Cause for Concern

Two coauthors of a new study discuss their findings about nearly 170 facilities in the southwestern US selling unproven therapies—and what should be done about them.

5h

The human skills we need in an unpredictable world | Margaret Heffernan

The more we rely on technology to make us efficient, the fewer skills we have to confront the unexpected, says writer and entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan. She shares why we need less tech and more messy human skills — imagination, humility, bravery — to solve problems in business, government and life in an unpredictable age. "We are brave enough to invent things we've never seen before," she say

5h

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

On moonless nights in a tropical forest, bats slice through the inky darkness, snatching up insects resting silently on leaves—a seemingly impossible feat. New experiments at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) show that by changing their approach angle, the echolocating leaf-nosed bats can use this sixth sense to find acoustically camouflaged prey. These new findings, published in

5h

Repairing harmful effects of inbreeding could save the iconic Helmeted Honeyeater

Habitat destruction results in wildlife populations that are small, made up of relatives, and have low genetic variation.

5h

Turtle embryos play a role in determining their own sex

In certain turtle species, the temperature of the egg determines whether the offspring is female or male. But now, new research shows that the embryos have some say in their own sexual destiny: they can move around inside the egg to find different temperatures. The study, publishing August 1 in the journal Current Biology, examines how this behavior may help turtles offset the effects of climate c

5h

Swiss cheese concrete can help cities beat the heat

Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the “urban heat island effect” that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a new study. Impermeable pavement made of concrete or asphalt covers more than 30 percent of most urban areas and can exceed 140 degrees Fahrenheit in the summertime. It heats the air, posing human health risks, and surface runoff, threatening aquatic life. I

5h

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

On moonless nights in a tropical forest, bats slice through the inky darkness, snatching up insects resting silently on leaves—a seemingly impossible feat. New experiments at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) show that by changing their approach angle, the echolocating leaf-nosed bats can use this sixth sense to find acoustically camouflaged prey. These new findings, published in

5h

Repairing harmful effects of inbreeding could save the iconic Helmeted Honeyeater

Habitat destruction results in wildlife populations that are small, made up of relatives, and have low genetic variation.

5h

Turtle embryos play a role in determining their own sex

In certain turtle species, the temperature of the egg determines whether the offspring is female or male. But now, new research shows that the embryos have some say in their own sexual destiny: they can move around inside the egg to find different temperatures. The study, publishing August 1 in the journal Current Biology, examines how this behavior may help turtles offset the effects of climate c

5h

Organoids offer new research opportunities

Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish, study shows.

5h

Tracking baby fish for better reef management

Scientists have created the world's first computer model to predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The models are validated by in-depth fieldwork and genetic tracking, and will help managers decide which areas need the most protection to ensure future adult populations of coral trout.

5h

Politics this week

[no content]

5h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

5h

Business this week

[no content]

5h

What sort of 'development' has no place for a billion slum dwellers?

Imagine a community of 200,000. Convivial, walkable, six times the density of Manhattan but with a smaller ecological footprint. It provides low-cost services and affordable housing mixed with productive uses such as recycling, farming and trading. It's a city within a city.

5h

Who did the Maya sacrifice?

Anyone and everyone

5h

5h

How to wring power from the night air

Mimic the way that lightning happens

5h

Drop of ancient seawater rewrites Earth's history

The remains of a microscopic drop of ancient seawater has assisted in rewriting the history of Earth's evolution when it was used to re-establish the time that plate tectonics started on the planet.

5h

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys. Western South America in particular holds a key role in the history of the continent due to the presence of three major ecogeographic domains (the Andes, the Amazonia, and the Pacific Coast), and for hosting the earliest and largest complex societies. A new study in

5h

Light for the nanoworld

An international team headed up by Alexander Holleitner and Jonathan Finley, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has succeeded in placing light sources in atomically thin material layers with an accuracy of just a few nanometers. The new method allows for a multitude of applications in quantum technologies, from quantum sensors and transistors in smartphones through to new encr

5h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2019

ORNL story tips: Training next-generation sensors to 'see,' interpret live data; 3D printing tungsten could protect fusion reactor components; detailed study estimated how much more, or less, energy US residents might consume by 2050 based on seasonal weather shifts; astrophysicists used ORNL supercomputer to create highest-ever-resolution galactic wind simulations; new solar-thermal desalination

5h

Distant 'heavy metal' gas planet is shaped like a football

The scorching hot exoplanet WASP-121b may not be shredding any heavy metal guitar riffs, but it is sending heavy metals such as iron and magnesium into space. The distant planet's atmosphere is so hot that metal is vaporizing and escaping the planet's gravitational pull. The intense gravity of the planet's host star has also deformed the sizzling planet into a football shape.

5h

Udgifter til Region H's it-afdeling stiger efter Sundhedsplatformen

Det ser ikke ud til, at platformen vil føre til de besparelser på drift af it-systemer i Region Hovedstaden, som det ellers var ventet.

5h

Twisted Graphene Exhibits Previously Theoretical Magnetic State With Great Potential

Credit: Adam Dachis The “wonder material” known as graphene continues to prove its merits in unexpected ways as scientists and engineers experiment with new applications. In an accidental discovery at Stanford, graphene exhibited a magnetic property that was previously considered theoretical and could someday lead to important advancements in storage technologies. Without even a shred of hyperbol

5h

Scientists crack the code to improve stress tolerance in plants

Epigenetic regulation — modification of gene expression from the 'outside' — is an important part of the overall genetic processes within a cell. A group of scientists from Tokyo University of Science now reveals a novel epigenetic regulation mechanism that is involved in DNA damage repair in plants, thereby suggesting a possibility of reinforcing global food security.

5h

Digital games may beat mindfulness apps at relieving stress, new study shows

Digital games may relieve stress after a day's work more effectively than mindfulness apps.

5h

Two fraudsters, one passport

New research published today into the rise of so-called 'face morphing' attacks has found that computers are significantly more accurate at detecting fraudulent passport or identity images than humans. Face morphing is a method used by fraudsters which digitally merges two separate identity photographs to create a single image that sufficiently resembles both people to an extent that they are able

5h

New blood test can detect rejection by antibodies after kidney transplant

A group of European scientists led by KU Leuven has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies. The identification can be done through a simple blood test and at an early stage. It is the first known biomarker for rejection by antibodies. The researchers hope that the test can be further developed quickly for

5h

Very little public support for relaxing rules and regulations around fracking

A major new public attitudes survey on fracking reveals very little public support for relaxing the rules and regulations around fracking — a key demand of major shale gas extraction companies.

5h

From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams

The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. An international research team has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. This was achieved by irradiating the superconductor with a helium-ion microscope, a technology that has only recently become available. The researchers

5h

Distant 'heavy metal' gas planet is shaped like a football

The scorching hot exoplanet WASP-121b may not be shredding any heavy metal guitar riffs, but it is sending heavy metals such as iron and magnesium into space. The distant planet's atmosphere is so hot that metal is vaporizing and escaping the planet's gravitational pull. The intense gravity of the planet's host star has also deformed the sizzling planet into a football shape.

5h

System to image the human eye corrects for chromatic aberrations

Researchers report a new imaging system that cancels the chromatic optical aberrations present in a specific person's eye, allowing for a more accurate assessment of vision and eye health. By taking pictures of the eye's smallest light-sensing cells with multiple wavelengths, the system also provides the first objective measurement of longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA), which could lead to n

5h

This Strange Solar-Powered Drone Could Save You in a Disaster

Strange Sight If you’re ever in a disaster and see a weird-looking aircraft flying overhead, don’t fret — it could be there to help you. For two years, Chinese aircraft manufacturer OXAI Aircraft Co. has been developing MOZI 2, a fully solar-powered unmanned aircraft it hopes will one day help out in disaster relief situations. On Saturday, the drone took its maiden flight at an airport in Deqing

5h

A novel graphene-matrix-assisted stabilization method will help 2-D materials become a part of quantum computers

Scientists from Russia and Japan found a way of stabilizing two-dimensional copper oxide (CuO) materials by using graphene. Along with being the main candidates for spintronics applications, these materials may be used in forthcoming quantum computers. The results of the study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

5h

Women on Tinder prefer highly educated men

A belief among many is that women have a higher preference for education level and earnings potential in a potential partner while men have a higher preference for physical attractiveness. But is there any evidence for this belief in 2019? And is this sex difference in preferences present in online dating? Researchers from Ghent University went undercover on the popular dating app Tinder to answer

5h

Using organisms to decontaminate soil

The German Ministry of Education and Research is funding a long-term soil remediation project run by the University of Jena. The project is to investigate and test biological methods for remediating soils contaminated with metal at the former uranium mining site near Ronneburg, Thuringia, to renew the soils, and to make them available for land use.

5h

Wearable prototype would detect overdose and deliver naloxone

Researchers are developing a device to automatically detect an opioid overdose and deliver naloxone, a drug that reverses deadly effects. This matters because opioid users tend to be alone and incapacitated during an overdose. “The antidote is always going to be with you,” says Hyowon “Hugh” Lee, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue University. “The device wouldn’t require y

5h

‘Protein origami’ forms 2D triangles and squares

Researchers have created protein origami, or nanostructures, in the shapes of triangles and squares using stable protein building blocks. The work draws inspiration from DNA origami, in which folding DNA forms nanostructures. The protein nanostructures can endure high temperatures and harsh chemical conditions, neither of which is possible with DNA-based nanostructures. In the future, these prote

5h

Using organisms to decontaminate soil

The German Ministry of Education and Research is funding a long-term soil remediation project run by the University of Jena. The project is to investigate and test biological methods for remediating soils contaminated with metal at the former uranium mining site near Ronneburg, Thuringia, to renew the soils, and to make them available for land use.

5h

Granular aluminum for future computers

Computers based on quantum mechanical principles can solve certain tasks particularly efficiently. Their information carriers, the so-called qubits, not only have the values "0" and "1," but also states in between, called superposition states. However, maintaining such a state is difficult. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now used granular aluminum (nicknamed grAl) f

5h

High-Luminosity LHC: Diggers at work 100 meters underground

Dig, dig, dig. One hundred meters underground, excavation work is under way for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider project. This next-generation LHC, which will begin operation in 2026, will reach luminosities five to ten times higher than its predecessor. This increased number of collisions will increase the chances of observing rare processes.

5h

Going green? Not so easy for mainstream brands

Did you know that Nike makes a line of clothing and shoes created from recycled plastic bottles? Did you know that consumer products giant, Procter & Gamble, made eco-friendly industrial products for commercial use? Or that outdoor clothing manufacturer, Patagonia, made fleece products and jackets from used soda bottles and recycled fabric?

5h

Venice calls European port cities to arms over cruise ships

Venice has appealed to top European cruise ship destinations, from Amsterdam to Barcelona, Dubrovnik and Marseille, to unite in tackling the dangers and environmental impact of hulking liners, port authorities said Thursday.

5h

Tagging a Massive Great White Shark | Shark Week

Off the Chatham Islands in New Zealand, Kina Scollay and Andy Casagrande are attempting to deploy a satellite tag on a massive white shark to track its movements using GPS. Stream Sharks of the Badlands on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/sharks-of-the-badlands Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&h

6h

How Climate Change Could Trigger the Next Global Financial Crisis

A few years ago, Mark Carney, a former Goldman Sachs director who now leads the Bank of England, sounded a warning. Global warming, he said, could send the world economy spiraling into another 2008-like crisis. He called for central banks to act aggressively and immediately to reduce the risk of climate-related catastrophe, taking the warming planet as seriously as they would a cooling economy. A

6h

Heterophase nanostructures contributing to efficient catalysis

In the research on phase engineering of noble metal nanomaterials, amorphous/crystalline heterophase nanostructures have exhibited some intriguing properties. The random atomic arrangement in amorphous phase results in highly unsaturated coordination and abundant active sites for catalytic applications. In addition, the amorphous/crystalline interfaces can also benefit the catalytic activity. Here

6h

A novel graphene-matrix-assisted stabilization method will help unique 2D materials to become a part

Scientists from Russia and Japan found a way of stabilizing two-dimensional copper oxide (CuO) materials by using graphene. Along with being the main candidates for spintronics applications, these materials may be used in forthcoming quantum computers. The results of the study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

6h

Toxic chemicals hindering the recovery of Britain's rivers

Toxic chemicals from past decades could be hindering the recovery of Britain's urban rivers, concludes a recent study by scientists from Cardiff University, the University of Exeter, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

6h

Edinburgh is global hotspot for inflammatory bowel disease rates

Edinburgh has some of the highest known rates of inflammatory bowel disease in the world and the figure is expected to rise in the next 10 years.

6h

Levels of 'ugly cholesterol' in the blood are much higher than previously imagined

The amount of remnant particle cholesterol in the blood, the so-called ugly cholesterol, is much higher than previously believed. This is shown in new research from the University of Copenhagen and Copenhagen University Hospital. The discovery may have implications for future prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

6h

Scientists identified a new signaling component important for plant symbiosis

A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This shows how symbiotic signals from symbiotic bacteria are transmitted upon perception, ultimately leading to their accommodation within the host plant.

6h

Anaemic star carries the mark of its ancient ancestor

In a paper published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, researchers led by Dr Thomas Nordlander of the ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions (ASTRO 3D) confirm the existence of an ultra-metal-poor red giant star, located in the halo of the Milky Way, on the other side of the Galaxy about 35,000 light-years from Earth.

6h

From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams

The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. This was achieved by irradiating the superconductor with a helium-ion microscope at the Unive

6h

Undeclared Wars in Cyberspace Are Becoming More Aggressive and Automated

The US is at war. That’s probably not exactly news, as the country has been engaged in one type of conflict or another for most of its history. The last time we officially declared war was after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in December 1941. Our biggest undeclared war today is not being fought by drones in the mountains of Afghanistan or even through the less-lethal barrage of threats over the nucle

6h

Sex Trafficker Jeffrey Epstein Obsessed With Eugenics, Cryogenics

Dirty Deeds In a strange twist, it turns out that well-connected financier Jeffrey Epstein — currently awaiting trial for sex-trafficking and sexually abusing minors over many years — is an ardent believer in fringe sciences like eugenics and cryogenic preservation. For years, Epstein met with prominent scientists to discuss his desires to, in the words of The New York Times , “seed the human rac

6h

With a twist, graphene shows new kind of magnetism

Carefully stacking and rotating two honeycomb-shaped lattices of carbon to a special angle generates a new kind of magnetism, which scientists had predicted but not yet observed. The authors suggest the magnetism, called orbital ferromagnetism, could prove useful for certain applications, such as quantum computing. “We were not aiming for magnetism. We found what may be the most exciting thing in

6h

One of two newly discovered exoplanets shows potential as a habitable world

A super-scorched planet orbiting around a nearby dim star has helped reveal the presence of two previously unseen planets—one of which could host liquid water and thus be friendly to life, astronomers say.

6h

Researchers demonstrate low voltage LEDs

When atomically thin semiconductors are combined together in a Lego style, they emit light at a lower voltage potentially leading to low energy consumption devices.

6h

Research looks at virus past to predict future outbreaks

Looking at the past may help the future when combating some viruses in humans, especially the evolutionary history of hantaviruses.

6h

Low level exposure to air pollution is harmful, mouse model shows

Scientists investigating the effect of air pollution on lung health, in an animal model, have concluded that even low levels of exposure can have a detrimental effect on the lungs. They say the results have implications for government agencies responsible for urban planning.

6h

Strong evidence for causal link between obesity and multiple diseases

New research presents the strongest evidence yet of a causal relationship between obesity and a wide range of serious conditions.

6h

A chemical clue to how life started on Earth

Many scientists find it strange that every living thing on our planet forms its proteins from the exact same set of 20 amino acids. Why that specific set? Scientists know there are many more amino acids out there. A new study suggests it's no accident. Rather, the kinds of amino acids used in proteins are more likely to link up together because they react together more efficiently and have few ine

6h

Researchers build hybrid chip able to run autonomous bicycle

A team made up of members from a host of institutions in China, one in Singapore and one in the U.S., has built a hybrid chip that can control an autonomous bicycle. In their paper published …

6h

How Caves and Frozen Zoos Are Putting Endangered Species on Ice

Researchers are freezing cell samples with liquid nitrogen to keep biodiversity alive. Could this be the best way to conserve species for the future? FrozenZooTubes.jpg Image credits: Courtesy of San Diego Zoo Creature Thursday, August 1, 2019 – 09:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — In 1975, medical doctor Kurt Benirschke founded the Center for the Reproduction of Endangered Sp

6h

Research looks at virus past to predict future outbreaks

Looking at the past may help the future when combating some viruses in humans, especially the evolutionary history of hantaviruses.

6h

Anaemic star carries the mark of its ancient ancestor

A newly discovered ancient star containing a record-low amount of iron carries evidence of a class of even older stars, long hypothesised but assumed to have vanished.

6h

Polyscience Teaser Trailer

Welcome to the era of DuraChill®, changing the world of chillers forever.

6h

Largest ever study finds links in epilepsy genes

Researchers and patients from Austin Health and the University of Melbourne have been involved in the largest ever study looking at the genetic sequences of people with epilepsy.

6h

Russian scientists studied the effect of mutations of Alzheimer's disease

A team of neurobiologists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) published an article on their study of the causes of Alzheimer's disease and suggested therapy methods. The scientists believe the disease is associated with the genes that code the formation of contacts between neurons. The team also discovered a substance that could considerably reduce the negative effec

6h

Unmasking the hidden burden of tuberculosis in Mozambique

The real burden of tuberculosis is probably higher than estimated, according to a study on samples from autopsies performed in a Mozambican hospital. The study, led by the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa', shows that highly sensible molecular techniques can detect cases that escape clinical diagnosis and even traditional post-mortem examinatio

6h

The drug combination effective against bovine leukemia

Scientists have succeeded in reducing levels of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in cows with severe infections by combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and an enzyme inhibitor. The finding could be utilized to control other diseases in cattle, and perhaps in humans someday.

6h

Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on how dementia protein becomes dysfunctional

University of Queensland researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unravelling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia.

6h

Finding weakness in bacterial protein to fight anti-biotic resistance

Researchers reveal previously undiscovered hot spots on the surface of bacteria's critical enzyme, which could guide novel approaches to antibiotic design.

6h

Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival

Understanding the internal energy flow — including the metabolism — of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study.University of Queensland PhD candidate Christopher Lawson led a team of researchers investigating the bioenergetics of sharks and rays; data which may reveal how they will fare in a drastically changing oc

6h

Tracking baby fish for better reef management

Scientists have created the world's first computer model to predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The models are validated by in-depth fieldwork and genetic tracking, and will help managers decide which areas need the most protection to ensure future adult populations of coral trout.

6h

Going green? Not so easy for mainstream brands

Recent research shows that when mainstream brands advertise using visual cues suggesting the product is environmentally friendly or 'green' consumers may actually evaluate the product as being less effective and switch to a more niche green brand.

6h

6h

The Democratic Primary Is Right Back Where It Started

DETROIT—There’s an elevated train here, in the city’s downtown, called the People Mover . It doesn’t cost much to ride. It goes in a loop every 15 minutes or so. It moves only in one direction, around and around. It’s a lot like the Democratic primary, after two rounds of formal debate and seven months of campaigning. There have been flashes of dynamism in the campaign so far, candidates who’ve p

6h

AI system 'should be recognised as inventor'

Two patent filings seek to set a precedent by naming an AI as their inventor.

6h

6h

6h

AT&T Developing 5G Robots To Work in Retail Stores

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

6h

6h

6h

6h

6h

6h

Plastic Bags Ban

submitted by /u/eliman42 [link] [comments]

6h

6h

6h

6h

6h

Ancient drop of water rewrites Earth's history

The remains of a microscopic drop of ancient seawater has assisted in rewriting the history of Earth's evolution when it was used to re-establish the time that plate tectonics started on the planet.

6h

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors

When two mesh screens are overlaid, beautiful patterns appear when one screen is offset. These "moiré patterns" have long intrigued artists, scientists and mathematicians and have found applications in printing, fashion and banknotes.

6h

Advance in understanding of all-solid-state batteries

All-solid-state batteries, a battery design composed of all solid components, have gained attention as the next major advance beyond lithium ion batteries because of their potential to store more energy while being safer to operate. When capable of being produced in commercial quantities, solid-state batteries would revolutionize electric vehicles (EVs) effectively increasing drivable range or sig

6h

Measurements induce a phase transition in entangled systems

Many famous experiments have shown that the simple act of observing a quantum system can change the properties of the system. This phenomenon, called the "observer effect," appears, for example, when Schrödinger's cat becomes either dead or alive (but no longer both) after someone peeks into its box. The observation destroys the superposition of the cat's state, or in other words, collapses the wa

6h

This Startup Is Developing Tea, Coffee Infused With Psilocybin

Tea Party In May, Denver, Colo., became the first city in the United States to decriminalize psilocybin , the compound that gives “magic mushrooms” their hallucinogenic properties. Now, a Denver beverage startup is making plans to begin delivering small doses of psilocybin to its customer via its coffees and teas — the latest sign that the once highly controversial substance is starting to go mai

6h

Better renewable energy storage could cut emissions

With proper policy support, investment in batteries and other energy storage technologies can make money and cut greenhouse gas emissions, researchers report. Drive through nearly any corner of America long enough and giant solar farms or rows of wind turbines come into view, all with the goal of increasing the country’s renewable energy use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But what some ma

6h

Study shows placenta truly is a bacteria-free zone

A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has found evidence indicating that the human placenta is a sterile environment. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of the placental environment and what they found. In an accompanying News and Views piece, Nicola Segata, with Università degli Studi di Trento, suggests that the findings by the team ind

6h

Study shows placenta truly is a bacteria-free zone

A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has found evidence indicating that the human placenta is a sterile environment. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of the placental environment and what they found. In an accompanying News and Views piece, Nicola Segata, with Università degli Studi di Trento, suggests that the findings by the team ind

6h

Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected

New microscopy technique provides unprecedented insight into nanoscopic slip layers formed in flowing complex liquids.

6h

Photocatalytic generation of highly reactive alkynes under visible light conditions

In a recent study published in Organic Letters, researchers at Kanazawa University developed a method to generate a highly reactive alkyne, an organic molecule having a C≡C triple bond, from a cyclopropenone, an organic molecule having a strained three membered ring, using a visible light responsive photocatalyst.

6h

Knockout mice are guide to new genes for eye and skin disorders

Albinism is the best-known of a group of rare genetic disorders that can affect both eyes and skin. Some genes have been identified that are linked to these conditions, but many remain mysterious. Now a team led by UC Davis researchers has identified dozens of these genetic mutations in a screen of gene-targeted 'knockout' mice. The authors hope the work, published Aug. 1, 2019 in Scientific Repor

6h

Low level exposure to air pollution is harmful, mouse model shows

Scientists investigating the effect of air pollution on lung health, in an animal model, have concluded that even low levels of exposure can have a detrimental effect on the lungs. They say the results have implications for government agencies responsible for urban planning.

6h

Middle-school Latino children report more depressive symptoms after family member arrested

Latino children who experience the immigration-related arrest of a family member report more severe levels of depression than those who don't have such an experience, especially if one or both parents are undocumented, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

6h

Autopsies reveal how meth hurts the heart

Autopsy samples reveal that methamphetamine use makes dangerous structural changes in heart muscle that increase the risk of heart attack, sudden cardiac death and heart failure. A microscopic understanding of how the stimulant drug changes the heart could help in devising ways to treat meth's toxic effects.

6h

Are Intel’s 10nm Ice Lake CPUs worth the wait?

Welcome to the latest episode of Upscaled, our explainer show where we look at the parts that make our favorite tech faster. In this episode we're testing Intel's 10th …

6h

Giphy is bringing GIF stickers to TikTok

TikTok, the app of choice for teens today, is adding another tool to its arsenal: stickers. The short-form video app owned by Bytedance is joining forces with Giphy. Users can add GIF …

6h

Mind the Staph: London Is Crawling with Antibiotic-Resistant Microbes

The bacteria are not a major threat, but they could transfer their resistance to more dangerous pathogens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Viruses Thrive in the Arctic Ocean

A surprising study overturns a common assumption — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Scientists and Miners Team Up to Preserve Opalized Fossils

An ambitious collaboration between paleontologists and a local mining community seeks to conserve the rare fossilized remains

6h

Don't just blame government and business for the recycling crisis – it begins with us

As the dramatic shutdown of major recycling company SKM this week has illustrated, recycling is not free.

6h

The drug combination effective against bovine leukemia

Scientists have succeeded in reducing levels of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in cows with severe infections by combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and an enzyme inhibitor. The finding could be utilized to control other diseases in cattle, and perhaps in humans someday.

6h

The drug combination effective against bovine leukemia

Scientists have succeeded in reducing levels of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in cows with severe infections by combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and an enzyme inhibitor. The finding could be utilized to control other diseases in cattle, and perhaps in humans someday.

6h

London’s public spaces are rife with multidrug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistance genes have been found in high proportions of Staphylococcus bacteria isolated from commonly touched surfaces in shopping centres, train stations and hospitals in London

6h

Månelanding i 2024: SpaceX og Blue Origin skal hjælpe Nasa med navigation og optankning i rummet

SpaceX skal konstruere en tankstation for raketter i kredsløb, og Lockheed Martin skal dyrke rumplanter med robotgartnere. Nasa har skrevet under på 19 kontrakter.

6h

Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected

Whether it is oil gushing through pipelines or blood circulating through arteries, how liquids flow through tubes is perhaps the most fundamental problem in hydrodynamics. The challenge is to maximize transport efficiency by minimizing the loss of energy to friction between the moving liquid and the stationary tube surfaces. Counterintuitively, adding a small amount of large, slow moving polymers

6h

How not to police financial services. Balanced scorecards don't work for bankers

Casual observers of the financial services royal commission might be forgiven for thinking the days of sales-based commissions being paid to bank and insurance staff were over.

6h

Study provides new insight into the origin of Canary Islands caldera

Las Cañadas caldera at Tenerife, Canary Islands, is the result of different episodes of caldera collapses, associated to large explosive eruptions that triggered several landslides that modified the shape of the walls of the Las Cañadas volcanic edifice, according to a new review study published recently in the journal Earth-Sciences Reviews. The study integrates in the same solution the two main

7h

Researchers calculate soil freezing depth from satellite data

A team of researchers from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), the Institute for Water and Environmental Problems of the Siberian Branch of RAS, and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has proposed a way to determine soil freezing depth based on satellite microwave radiometry. The findings were published in Studying the Earth From Space, a Russi

7h

ATLAS Experiment explores the Higgs boson 'discovery channels'

At the European Physical Society Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP) in Ghent, Belgium, the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN released new measurements of Higgs boson properties using the full LHC Run 2 dataset. Critically, the new results examine two of the Higgs boson decays that led to the particle's discovery in 2012: H→ZZ*→4ℓ, where the Higgs boson decays into two Z bosons, in turn decaying

7h

Mind the Staph: London Is Crawling with Antibiotic-Resistant Microbes

The bacteria are not a major threat, but they could transfer their resistance to more dangerous pathogens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Intel Ice Lake Processors: Specs, Details, Release Date

Today, the chipmaker provided details about its long-hyped Ice Lake processors, which will start showing up in laptops around the holidays.

7h

The One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack

A 'Cameroon Web' reporter remains in a maximum-security prison, and a writer for 'Kashmir Narrator' will have been imprisoned for one year on August 27.

7h

Strong evidence for causal link between obesity and multiple diseases

New research from the University of South Australia presents the strongest evidence yet of a causal relationship between obesity and a wide range of serious conditions.

7h

A chemical clue to how life started on Earth

Many scientists find it strange that every living thing on our planet forms its proteins from the exact same set of 20 amino acids. Why that specific set? Scientists know there are many more amino acids out there. A new study out of Scripps Research suggests it's no accident. Rather, the kinds of amino acids used in proteins are more likely to link up together because they react together more effi

7h

More teens are dropping maths. Here are three reasons to stick with it

The numbers of secondary school students who take higher-level maths and science are low in Australia. In 2012, there were 30,000 more Year 12 students than in 1992. But the numbers of students studying physics, chemistry and biology decreased by 8,000, 4,000 and 12,000 respectively.

7h

New research helps hay producers manage Bermuda grass stem maggot

A relatively new pest—the Bermuda grass stem maggot—is plaguing Texas hay producers this season, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

7h

Humans Have Significantly Interrupted the Free Flow of Rivers

Dams are the single biggest impediment to river connectivity, which is crucial to maintaining healthy ecosystems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

A Global Profile of Air Pollution, on the Frontlines of the Ebola Epidemic and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Drifting Genes and Drifting Continents from 1969

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Darwin's Ideas on Evolution Drive a Radical New Approach to Cancer Drug Use

Principles of evolution and natural selection drive a radical new approach to drugs and prevention strategies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Device That Automates Manual Breathing Bags Could Save Lives

A machine that can pump manual bag valve masks without human help could be a stopgap measure or replacement for mechanical ventilators — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Women Still Face Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment at Work

People are less likely to recommend a woman for promotion if she has self-reported being sexually harassed, a study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Nations Get Busy Inside the Arctic Circle

As ice retreats, countries are expanding military seaports, exploiting shipping lanes and exploring for oil and gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Mind the Staph: London Is Crawling with Antibiotic-Resistant Microbes

The bacteria are not a major threat, but they could transfer their resistance to more dangerous pathogens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Special Report: What's Next for the Arctic?

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Map Reveals Parts of the U.S. Northeast Most Vulnerable to a Geomagnetic Superstorm

The composition of ground rock in a area influences the likelihood of electrical blackouts from solar storms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Viruses Thrive in the Arctic Ocean

A surprising study overturns a common assumption — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Uncovering the Secrets of Flycatcher Eyes

A never before seen collection of structures in the birds’ retinas may help them track speedy prey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Despite What You Might Think, Major Technological Changes Are Coming More Slowly Than They Once Did

Major technological shifts are fewer and farther between than they once were — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Birds Are Dying from Power-Line Collisions–Now There's a Solution

Illuminating electric lines with ultraviolet light—which birds can see—can substantially reduce crashes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

A New Book Examines the Relationship between Math and Physics

It sure comes in handy for doing physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Should Kids Learn to Code?

Not necessarily! — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

What Are Animals Thinking When They Face Off?

Conventional wisdom holds that the ability to assess a rival's fighting ability is universal in the animal kingdom. Recent research has shown otherwise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

A New Reality Up North

Climate change is dramatically altering life at the top of the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

The Three-Body Problem

Although mathematicians know they can never fully “solve” this centuries-old quandary, tackling smaller pieces of it has yielded some intriguing discoveries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Faster MRI Method Could Shake Up Brain Imaging

A new technique relies on measuring changes in tissue stiffness resulting from neural activity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Arctic Tensions Are Rising, but Cooperation Could Benefit Nations Most

Actions that seem provocative may actually be beneficial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Faster MRI Method Could Shake Up Brain Imaging

A new technique relies on measuring changes in tissue stiffness resulting from neural activity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

New research helps hay producers manage Bermuda grass stem maggot

A relatively new pest—the Bermuda grass stem maggot—is plaguing Texas hay producers this season, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

7h

A century of public housing: building homes, not just houses, takes more than bricks and mortar

Good quality, affordable housing is of vital importance to people's sense of identity, health and general well being. But in the UK we don't have sufficient housing that is affordable, of sufficient quality, and in places that people want to live in order to be able to provide the requisite conditions for making a house a home.

7h

Can plants think? They could one day force us to change our definition of intelligence

Some might balk at the idea that plants made of roots, stems and leaves could have intelligence or consciousness. But scientists have actually been hotly debating this idea for decades.

7h

Letters From India

I’m sure that I’m not alone in getting emails like the one I got yesterday, and I get them reasonably often. Out of the blue, I hear from someone finishing up a degree at an obscure (to me) Indian university. In this latest case, the person writing doesn’t even get around to telling me which one. And they are interested in doing a post-doc with me. Sometimes there’s language in there about “my de

7h

Can plants think? They could one day force us to change our definition of intelligence

Some might balk at the idea that plants made of roots, stems and leaves could have intelligence or consciousness. But scientists have actually been hotly debating this idea for decades.

7h

5 Unofficial Types of Depression

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen covers five of the most common faces of depression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

5 Unofficial Types of Depression

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen covers five of the most common faces of depression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

7h

Cancer Medicine Is Failing Us

Our aggressive, expensive approach to cancer is doing more harm than good — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

How White Nationalists Have Co-Opted Fan Fiction

Opinion: In fan fiction, enthusiasts create whole new worlds from elements of cherished pieces of fiction or history. Racists have perverted the form.

8h

Hasselblad X1D II Review: A Compact Hasselblad

Hasselblad greatly improves its X1D mirrorless medium format camera, which can do things DSLR's can't, but it's still slow and pricey compared to rivals.

8h

Reconstructing the Memories of Aging Matriarchs

People tend to build themselves on family history, yet the myths that multiply within every family reveal that history’s malleability. Two recent novels—Juliet Grames’s debut, The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna , and Leah Hager Cohen’s Strangers and Cousins —illustrate this dynamic, the families within each grappling with a matriarch who has lost her memory. Though the characters’ attemp

8h

Sixth person dies from listeria outbreak linked to NHS sandwiches

Public Health England says latest death was one of nine cases previously confirmed A sixth person has died after eating pre-packaged sandwiches and salads linked to a listeria outbreak, Public Health England (PHE) has said. The latest death was one of the nine cases previously confirmed and PHE said there had been no new cases linked to the outbreak. Continue reading…

8h

Image of the Day: Resilient Lung Cells

A specific type of lung cell withstands flu infection by doubling down on DNA repair.

8h

The best nanotube edges have ‘armchairs’ and ‘zigzags’

Carbon nanotubes with segregated sections of “zigzag” and “armchair” facets growing from a solid catalyst are far more energetically stable than a circular arrangement would be, say researchers. These terms refer to the shape of the nanotube’s edge: A zigzag nanotube’s end looks like a saw tooth, while an armchair is like a row of seats with armrests. They are the basic edge configurations of the

8h

GMOs and the Knowledge Deficit Model

A 2015 Pew survey found that 88% of AAAS scientists believe that GMOs (genetically modified organisms) are generally safe to eat, while only 37% of the general public did. This was the biggest gap, 51%, of any science attitude they surveyed – greater than evolution or climate change. This hasn’t changed much since. A 2018 Pew survey found that 49% of US adults think that GMOs are worse for your h

8h

8h

A scientific approach to recreate metabolic evolution in plants

Plants have evolved to produce a variety of compounds that vary from species to species. These compounds play a key role for the survival strategies of plants. Compounds that are bitter and poisonous protect the plants from being eaten by insects and animals. Meanwhile, compounds that have good smell or colorful pigments attract insects carrying pollens.

8h

Simulation technique predicts microstructures of alloys used in jet engines—before they are made

Japanese researchers were able to rapidly and accurately predict the microstructure of Nickel-Aluminum (Ni-Al) alloys that are commonly used in the design of jet engine turbine parts. Predictions of the microstructure of these alloys have so far been time-consuming and expensive. The findings have the potential to greatly advance the design of materials—made up of a range of different alloys—that

8h

The mechanism for gamma-ray bursts from space is decoded

Gamma-ray bursts, short and intense flashes of energetic radiation coming from outer space, are the brightest explosions in the universe. As gamma rays are blocked by the atmosphere, the bursts were discovered accidentally in the late sixties by the Vela satellites, defense satellites sent to monitor manmade nuclear explosions in space.

8h

A scientific approach to recreate metabolic evolution in plants

Plants have evolved to produce a variety of compounds that vary from species to species. These compounds play a key role for the survival strategies of plants. Compounds that are bitter and poisonous protect the plants from being eaten by insects and animals. Meanwhile, compounds that have good smell or colorful pigments attract insects carrying pollens.

8h

We're Starting to Harness the Microbiome to Treat Disease

But strong regulation is a must to protect patient safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Herlev Hospital vil selv producere kræftsmadrende immunceller

PLUS. Setuppet er ved at være på plads til, at vi fra dansk side selv kan manipulere immunceller til effektiv kræftbehandling.

8h

Wasps are shrinking in size and it may be because of climate change

Global warming has been linked to smaller body sizes in antelopes, sparrows – and now wasps. Oddly, their wings are shrinking faster than the rest of their body

8h

8h

Should we worry about the robots and mind-reading apps remaking our world? | Alex Hern

Technology is spying on us and machines are developing human voices. But it’s not all a weird cyberpunk dystopia Technology changes so fast that our lives are radically different from even a decade ago, yet slowly enough that sometimes we don’t even notice the changes. We live in the future, in other words, and sometimes it takes a moment to realise what an odd, and perhaps unsettling, future it

8h

Who Will Design the Future? – Issue 74: Networks

Ada Lovelace was an English mathematician who lived in the first half of the 19th century. (She was also the daughter of the poet Lord Byron, who invited Mary Shelley to his house in Geneva for a weekend of merriment and a challenge to write a ghost story, which would become Frankenstein .) In 1842, Lovelace was tasked with translating an article from French into English for Charles Babbage, the

8h

The Flawed Reasoning Behind the Replication Crisis – Issue 74: Networks

Here are three versions of the same story: 1. In the fall of 1996, Sally Clark, an English solicitor in Manchester, gave birth to an apparently healthy baby boy who died suddenly when he was 11 weeks old. She was still recovering from the traumatic incident when she had another baby boy the following year. Tragically, he also died, eight weeks after being born. The causes of the two children’s de

8h

Families of Choice Are Remaking America – Issue 74: Networks

When Dan Scheffey turned 50, he threw himself a party. About 100 people packed into his Manhattan apartment, which occupies the third floor of a brick townhouse in the island’s vibrant East Village. His parents, siblings, and an in-law were there, and friends from all times and walks of his life. He told them how much they meant to him and how happy he was to see them all in one place. “My most i

8h

The Senate's Transportation Plan Reckons With Climate Change

America's Transportation Infrastructure Act, approved by a Senate committee this week, includes $10 billion to prevent and mitigate the effects of climate change.

8h

Icy Waterfalls Are Roaring as a Heat Wave Sizzles Greenland

Glaciologists are rappelling into a glacial plumbing system to probe the effects of climate change on the melting of Greenland's ice sheet.

8h

Japanese Scientists Plan to Create Human-Mouse Hybrids. Here's How.

Some unusual embryos may soon be growing in Japan: those of human-mouse and human-rat hybrids, news sources are reporting.

9h

‘Nobody Should Get Applause for Rejoining the Paris Climate Accords’

How should Democrats even debate climate policy? It’s a harder question than it may seem. Climate change is a sprawling, scary, cinematic problem, and its remedies involve the less-than-inspiring technical undergirding of society: stormwater management , the electrical grid, dirt . And dirt management will never be as engrossing as, say, Medicare for All. The party may also benefit, in a sort of

9h

Early Christian 'Church of the Apostles' Possibly Unearthed Near Sea of Galilee

Jesus is said to have healed a blind man and split bread at this holy site.

9h

In Photos: Biblical 'Church of the Apostles' Discovered

Jesus is said to have healed a blind man at the site, located along the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel.

9h

Macaques really can use logical reasoning to solve puzzles

Macaques are good puzzle solvers, but it was unclear if they use logic or just made choices to maximise their reward. Now a test shows logic really is involved

9h

"Awakenings" in Advanced Dementia Patients Hint at Untapped Brain Reserves

Numerous reports documenting lucid moments at the end of life spur Alzheimer’s researchers to explore the phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

"Awakenings" in Advanced Dementia Patients Hint at Untapped Brain Reserves

Numerous reports documenting lucid moments at the end of life spur Alzheimer’s researchers to explore the phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

"Awakenings" in Advanced Dementia Patients Hint at Untapped Brain Reserves

Numerous reports documenting lucid moments at the end of life spur Alzheimer’s researchers to explore the phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The purpose of life: why the textbook needs an update

New research from Australia and Finland could help explain one of nature's strangest quirks—why some animals forego mating to help other animals procreate.

9h

The purpose of life: why the textbook needs an update

New research from Australia and Finland could help explain one of nature's strangest quirks—why some animals forego mating to help other animals procreate.

9h

DNA origami innovation increases accessibility, lowers cost

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper and simpler alternative to typical DNA origami fabrication, increasing the technique's accessibility and potential impact in industry and clinical settings.

9h

Flight by Light: Mission accomplished for LightSail 2

Mission accomplished: the Planetary Society announced Wednesday that its LightSail 2 spacecraft, which was launched last month, had successfully raised its orbit using only the power of photons from the Sun.

9h

LightSail 2 has used sunlight alone to steer around Earth

The Planetary Society’s LightSail 2 spacecraft has fulfilled its mission, demonstrating controlled solar sailing in orbit around Earth for the first time

9h

Uforudsigelig nedbør i Norge giver jordskred nye steder: »At kende risikoområderne er ikke længere nok«

Nye områder bliver udsat for jordskred, advarer Helge Drange, professor ved Geofysisk Institut på Universitetet i Bergen.

9h

Buzz kill: mass bee deaths sting Russian beekeepers

Anatoly Rubtsov looked despondently at the beehives lining his property. "The farm used to be loud, it sang," he said. Today just a faint buzz is audible but an overpowering rotting stench hung in the air after his bees were likely poisoned by a pesticide.

9h

Lizarding to lingering: how humans really behave in public spaces

The researchers behind The Field Guide to Urban Plazas decided to study the public behaviour of human beings in New York City, an update on William H Whyte’s pioneering work from 1980, The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. From ‘roosting’ to ‘schooling’, here are the patterns they found Continue reading…

9h

Buzz kill: mass bee deaths sting Russian beekeepers

Anatoly Rubtsov looked despondently at the beehives lining his property. "The farm used to be loud, it sang," he said. Today just a faint buzz is audible but an overpowering rotting stench hung in the air after his bees were likely poisoned by a pesticide.

9h

The Original Diablo Can Now Be Played In Your Browser

We have come such a long way in terms of technology, where something that required a lot of resources back then don’t. Take for example Blizzard’s original Diablo game. It was released …

9h

Did Hurricane Barry prevent a near-record 'dead zone'?

Scientists are back from measuring the Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" where there's too little oxygen to sustain marine life in a large underwater area starting at the sea floor.

9h

Total recall: N. Koreans in memory championship surprise

In silence, Pang Un Sim stares down at the jumbled-up playing cards for one minute, slowly shuffling through them.

9h

College education is still a class luxury in America. PeerForward is changing that.

More than two-thirds of American jobs require some kind of secondary education. Unfortunately, kids growing up in a low-income area simply do not have the same resources as wealthier areas when it comes to applying for college or making it to graduation. PeerForward works with students in low-income areas to get them into college by helping them identify their target college, find and apply for f

9h

Scientists seek materials that defy friction at the atomic level

Scientists investigate superslippery materials and other unusual friction feats.

10h

Happy birthday, Retraction Watch: We’re turning nine

Nine years ago this coming Saturday, on August 3, 2010, we published a post, “Why write a blog about retractions?” Why, indeed! What has become clear in the intervening nine years is what a rich vein retractions are as stories of what happens when something goes wrong in science. And as we have done every … Continue reading

10h

Year After Latest Ebola Outbreak, New Cases in Major City

In Goma, a third person has been infected and neighboring Rwanda temporarily shut its border crossing with the city.

10h

But What About China?

There was a post-superpower quality to this week’s Democratic debates. On both nights, foreign policy came up near the end, and the discussion focused mostly on the need to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan, avoid war with Iran and, in Michael Bennet’s words , “invest in America again.” That’s fine, as far as it goes. But there was strikingly little discussion about America’s role in upholdin

10h

Conservatives Are Wrong About What’s Driving Immigration

During Tuesday night’s Democratic candidate debate, the CNN anchor Dana Bash asked a provocative question of Senator Bernie Sanders: “You want to provide undocumented immigrants free health care and free college. Why won’t this drive even more people to come to the U.S. illegally?” “Because we’ll have strong border protections,” Sanders responded, later adding, “When I talk about health care as a

10h

Trump Is in an Abusive Relationship With America

She mistreated me. I mistreated her. But we loved each other, we’d proclaim time and again. I’d listened for “I love you,” as if listening for a sign of life, like a doctor listening for a beating heart. I had been led to believe “I love you” is that beating heart of love. Say it, love lives. Don’t say it, love dies. Months before starting my first professorship in 2009, I ended the relationship

10h

Europeans Don’t Necessarily Share American Values

Culture matters—and it matters quite a lot. This is the recurring theme within the new movement of “national conservatives” attempting to reshape the American right. One of their most controversial thinkers is the University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax, who recently drew controversy by saying the United States should consider “cultural distance” in deciding which immigrants to admit or

10h

This self-riding bicycle follows you around while you walk

A chip used to control an autonomous bicycle is inspired by the brain and could pave the way for AI with a broader range of abilities

10h

Before building another telescope, learn from Hawaiian culture

Amid continued protests over the construction of the Thirty Metre Telescope on Mauna Kea, Haunani Kane suggests scientists can learn from Hawaiian culture

10h

Meet a 500-million-year old minibeast from the Cambrian explosion

More than half a billion years ago, this predator cruised the seas in what is now Yunnan, China. The remarkable fossil is on display in a new exhibition

10h

Should we eat local to cut food miles, or does it make no difference?

Reducing food miles seems a sensible and straightforward way to cut carbon emissions. But digging into the science shows it's not that simple, says James Wong

10h

The human placenta may not have a microbiome after all

Recent evidence that the placenta has its own community of microbes is now uncertain as it seems the experiments were corrupted by contamination

10h

Resistent svamp nytt dödligt hot

Jästsvampen candida auris var länge okänd för människan. Det var inte förrän 2009, när läkare i Japan hittade svampen i örat på en 70-årig kvinna, som den fick sitt namn. Auris är det latinska namnet för öra. Tre år senare dök svampen upp i ett laboratorium i Nederländerna när mikrobiologen Jaques Meis analyserade blodprov från patienter som hade vistats på sjukhus i Indien. Sedan dess har candid

10h

Yelp ratings get better when they cost something—like time

An international team of researchers tested the idea that free online ratings are less trustworthy than those that have some cost to them, drawing from the ecological theory known as "costly signaling theory."

10h

Arbejdsløse multimediedesignere spænder ben for flere datamatikere

Datamatik slås i hartkorn med multimedie-designer, når studiets størrelse skal fastsættes. Men det giver ikke mening, mener erhvervsakademier og it-fagforening. Dimensionering af studier skal evalueres efter sommerferien.

10h

Researchers solve 'hot spot' debate

Volcanic hot spots such as the ones that created the Hawaiian Islands have long been considered stationary points, created by processes deep within the earth's interior.

10h

Study aims to map air pollution in front of our faces

To measure air pollution across the United States and other large areas, scientists rely on a patchwork of satellites.

10h

Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival

Understanding the internal energy flow—including the metabolism—of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study.

10h

Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics.

10h

Simulation technique can predict microstructures of alloy materials used in jet engines — before they are made

Japanese researchers were able to rapidly and accurately predict the microstructure of Nickel — Aluminum (Ni-Al) alloys that are commonly used in the design of jet engine turbine parts. Predictions of the microstructure of these alloys have so far been time-consuming and expensive. The findings have the potential to greatly advance the design of materials — made up of a range of different alloys

10h

Can a combination immune therapy reduce genital herpes outbreaks?

New Haven, Conn. — Yale investigators have shown that the combination of a vaccine and a medicated cream is a promising strategy to dramatically reduce the recurrence of genital herpes. Their study, co-led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, was published in the journal npj Vaccines.

10h

Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival

Understanding the internal energy flow—including the metabolism—of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study.

10h

A Scoop About Neil Armstrong Arrived in a Plain Brown Envelope

What happens when The Times gets documents by snail mail with what looks like an important story? First, you have to make sure they’re authentic.

10h

Acid may be key ingredient for better adhesive strength, electronic components

An acid used for medicine and to flavor some drinks soon may help make electronic components and certain adhesives more durable and better for the environment.

10h

Researchers develop novel process to study how trees affect building temperatures, air flow in extreme heat

Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a model to test how shading and air flow can improve indoor temperatures during the sweltering heat of Midwest summers.

10h

Posture correctness of young female soccer players

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47619-1

10h

Biofilm formation capacity and presence of virulence factors among commensal Enterococcus spp. from wild birds

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47602-w

10h

Experimental demonstration of single-shot quantum and classical signal transmission on single wavelength optical pulse

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47699-z

10h

Individual diversity between interdependent networks promotes the evolution of cooperation by means of mixed coupling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47013-x

10h

The Heider balance and the looking-glass self: modelling dynamics of social relations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47697-1

10h

Hedgehog Interacting Protein (Hhip) Regulates Insulin Secretion in Mice Fed High Fat Diets

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47633-3

10h

Altered immune parameters associated with Koala Retrovirus (KoRV) and Chlamydial infection in free ranging Victorian koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47666-8 Altered immune parameters associated with Koala Retrovirus (KoRV) and Chlamydial infection in free ranging Victorian koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus )

10h

10h

Biologist searches remote South Pacific island for slime molds

Norfolk Island is an isolated island in the South Pacific located between New Zealand and Australia. The island is quite small, with a total area of only about 14 square miles. Norfolk Island is known for two things. First, it is the native habitat for a tree known as the Norfolk Island pine, which is widely planted throughout subtropical and tropical areas of the world. Second, the descendants of

11h

Finally, a Robot That Moves Kind of Like a Tongue

Octopus arms and elephant trunks and human tongues move in a fascinating way, which has now inspired a fascinating new kind of robot.

11h

Cat causes carnage in rare seabird colony

Ph.D. student Claire Greenwell from Murdoch University's Harry Butler Institute helped to establish the successful Fairy Tern colony in Mandurah, South-Western Australia, resulting in a thriving colony containing 111 nests by late November 2018.

11h

Cat causes carnage in rare seabird colony

Ph.D. student Claire Greenwell from Murdoch University's Harry Butler Institute helped to establish the successful Fairy Tern colony in Mandurah, South-Western Australia, resulting in a thriving colony containing 111 nests by late November 2018.

11h

Novel catalysis approach reduces carbon dioxide to methane

A growing number of scientists are looking for fast, cost-effective ways to convert carbon dioxide gas into valuable chemicals and fuels.

11h

Solar eclipse provides unique opportunity to study atmospheric waves

Witnessing one total solar eclipse—the one that swept across the continental U.S. in 2017—wasn't enough for Montana State University senior Jaxen Godfrey. But when she flew to Chile in July to experience another, it wasn't just for the thrill. It was to continue studying an elusive atmospheric phenomenon.

11h

Researchers develop cleaner, greener fertiliser

Research from The Australian National University (ANU) has produced a method that transforms waste into a new fertiliser.

11h

Why intercountry adoption needs a rethink

Associate Professor Sonja Van Wichelen, sociologist and leader of the Biohumanity FutureFix research project in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences made the call in a paper published in the latest issue of Law and Society Review.

11h

Chromosome structure inspires intricate works of art

A collaboration between a Virginia Tech entomology professor, art professor, and computer science professor working in biophysics has resulted in the creation of stunning works of art that can help researchers and the public better understand the function of DNA and chromosomes in many important cellular processes.

11h

Chromosome structure inspires intricate works of art

A collaboration between a Virginia Tech entomology professor, art professor, and computer science professor working in biophysics has resulted in the creation of stunning works of art that can help researchers and the public better understand the function of DNA and chromosomes in many important cellular processes.

11h

Male black widow spiders piggyback on the work of their rivals to find female mates faster

A new University of Toronto study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate.

11h

Male black widow spiders piggyback on the work of their rivals to find female mates faster

A new University of Toronto study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate.

11h

Slow start for blue-green algae on Alberta lakes

There have been fewer health advisories than usual about blue-green algae in Alberta lakes this past summer but that doesn't mean the problem is going away, explained a University of Alberta biologist.

11h

'Virtual teams' can overcome barriers to thrive, study finds

Employees working in 'virtual teams' can overcome performance difficulties to work effectively if they have positive feedback, social support and job autonomy in their tasks and jobs, new research involving Curtin University has found.

11h

Nuclear Fallout and the Downwinders’ Dilemma

Although the mushroom cloud became the icon of American nuclear activity in the 20th century, a bomb’s harms did not fade with its dimming fireball. No group in the U.S. understands this better than the downwinders, communities throughout the American Southwest and beyond who were exposed to the fallout.

11h

Decades-old pollutants melting out of Himalayan glaciers

Melting Himalayan glaciers are releasing decades of accumulated pollutants into downstream ecosystems, according to a new study.

11h

Brugs- og havvand styrer temperaturen i nyt energisystem til moderne byggeri

PLUS. Nyt vandbårent energisystem fra norske AF-gruppen vil erstatte omfattende rørsystemer med ventilatorkonvektor i loftet og genbruge det varme brugsvand.

11h

11h

How Facebook’s brain-machine interface measures up

submitted by /u/wyndwatcher [link] [comments]

11h

11h

12h

12h

Rapport peger på central årsag til mail-phishing: Kun hvert femte domæne er sikret med DMARC

Næsten 80 procent af de undersøgte domæner fra virksomheder mangler stadig DMARC, lyder det i nyligt udgivet rapport.

12h

Sucking carbon out of the air is no magic fix for the climate emergency | Simon Lewis

Negative emissions tech is important, but the idea it could replace decarbonisation is pure fantasy. Business as usual is not an option The Arctic is on fire , hot on the heels of the latest scorching European heatwave. As the impact of the climate crisis mounts, more and more people are asking: how can we control this beast we have created? The scientific answer is fairly straightforward: reduce

12h

13h

LightSail 2 spacecraft successfully demonstrates flight by light

Years of computer simulations. Countless ground tests. They've all led up to now. The Planetary Society's crowdfunded LightSail 2 spacecraft is successfully raising its orbit solely on the power of sunlight.

13h

13h