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nyheder2019august02

Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes

Eleven new frog species were described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. This is the largest number of frog species described in a single article from the western hemisphere in over a decade. Additionally, the publication is also impressive by being the result of an undergraduate thesis. The species were discovered in the tropical Andes of Central and Southern Ecuador by researchers from the Mus

15h

Scientists are making human-monkey hybrids in China

Scientists may have taken a big—and controversial—leap by mixing human cells into monkey embryos.

55min

Søren vil samle 20.000 cigaretskod: ’Jeg har smidt dem. Nu er det mit ansvar at rydde op’

Han har givet sig selv et år til at samle sin andel af svineriet op igen.

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Quantum entanglement in chemical reactions? Now there's a way to find out

For the first time, scientists have developed a practical way to measure quantum entanglement in chemical reactions.

5min

NASA satellite finds Tropical Storm Wipha blankets the Gulf of Tonkin

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the clouds from Tropical Storm Wipha blanketing the Gulf of Tonkin.The Gulf of Tonkin is a body of water located in the northern part of the South China Sea. It is located off the coast of northern Vietnam and southern China.

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NASA catches birth of Northwestern Pacific's Tropical Storm Francisco

Soon after Tropical Storm Francisco developed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

6min

Researchers map global economy in collaboration with LinkedIn

A small team of researchers at Indiana University has created the first global map of labor flow in collaboration with the world's largest professional social network, LinkedIn. The work is reported in the journal Nature Communications.

6min

Biologists reverse engineer the microtubules that make up cell walls and spindles

Imagine standing in a lumberyard and being asked to build a house—without blueprints or instructions of any kind. The materials are all in front of you, but that doesn't mean you have the first idea how to get from point A to point B.

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Biologists reverse engineer the microtubules that make up cell walls and spindles

Imagine standing in a lumberyard and being asked to build a house—without blueprints or instructions of any kind. The materials are all in front of you, but that doesn't mean you have the first idea how to get from point A to point B.

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IBM fired up to 100,000 employees to attract millennial workers, says lawsuit

IBM faces a handful of lawsuits related to claims that the company engaged in ageist practices. On Tuesday, court documents revealed a past deposition of a former employee who said that IBM has fired as many as 100,000 employees in recent years. Some laid-off employees believe they were fired due to their age. None IBM has been accused of firing thousands of older employees over the past few year

13min

Paradoxical outcomes for Zika-exposed tots

Forty-five percent of Zika-exposed infants who had abnormalities at birth had normal test results in the second or third year of life. By contrast, 25% who had normal assessments at birth had below average developmental testing or abnormalities in hearing or vision by age 32 months.

20min

Change the bias, change the behavior? Maybe not

In a meta-analysis of published research, psychologists tease out how changes in implicit bias do — and do not — appear to lead to changes in behavior. And why that might be.

20min

Socially active 60-year-olds face lower dementia risk

Being more socially active in your 50s and 60s predicts a lower risk of developing dementia later on, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS Medicine.

20min

A wearable device so thin and soft you won't even notice it

Wearable human-machine interfaces have benefited from advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs. But current models still can be bulky and uncomfortable, and they can't always handle multiple functions at one time. Researchers have now reported the discovery of a multifunctional ultra-thin wearable electronic device that is imperceptible to the wearer.

20min

Scientists Are Trying to List AI as the Inventor on a New Patent

Scientists and lawyers from the U.K. are fighting with patent offices in three separate countries over who deserves credit for new inventions churned out by artificial intelligence algorithms. Legal experts and American engineer Stephen Thaler, the inventor of an algorithm named Dabus AI, have filed for patents in the U.K., Europe, and the U.S. in Dabus’ “name,” arguing that the algorithm deserve

21min

Astronomer: We Can Use Earth’s Atmosphere as a Massive Telescope

Terrascope It Out We don’t currently have the ability to build the sort of planet-sized telescope that that would let peer into the far reaches of our universe. But we do have a planet, and using a trick of physics, David Kipping, an assistant professor of astronomy at Columbia University, thinks we could transform its atmosphere into a planet-sized telescope he dubs the “ terrascope .” Really Bi

21min

China’s AI Teachers Could Revolutionize Education Worldwide

Learning Curve China is betting big on the potential of artificial intelligence to revolutionize education. A newly published MIT Technology Review story details how the nation is embracing AI as both a replacement and a supplement to human teachers — and the outcome of the country’s AI experiment could affect the future of education on a global scale. AI Teachers From algorithms that curate tuto

21min

This Alien Planet Is So Hot It Bleeds Metal

There are thousands of confirmed exoplanets in the cosmos, and many of them are members of solar systems very different than our own. As missions like Kepler and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have highlighted more distant worlds, astronomers have been surprised how many of them have so-called “hot Jupiters.” WASP-121b is the hottest of these close-orbiting gas giants. How hot i

21min

Turning water into ice in the quantum realm

When you pop a tray of water into the freezer, you get ice cubes. Now, researchers have achieved a similar transition using clouds of ultracold atoms.

23min

Researchers create first-ever 'map' of global labor flow

A new study from Indiana University reveals the ebb and flow of labor — as well as industries and skills — across the global economy using data on 130 million job transitions among 500 workers on the world's largest professional social network, LinkedIn.

23min

Reverse engineering the fireworks of life

An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching. Scientists have known that microtubule branching is key to assembling spindles and making connections between cell components. Researchers in Sabine Petry's lab have spent six years confirming which proteins are the key components of micro

23min

Last week in tech: The Fortnite World Cup, Capital One’s hack, and the Impossible Whopper

Might just be a viable career option. (Epic Games/) Even if you had previously avoided the brightly-colored gaming juggernaut of Fortnite, this week likely changed that. Last weekend, a 16-year-old named Kyle Giersdorf won $3 million at the Fortnite World Cup by virtually murdering players from around the world in a tournament that started as an open event with tens of millions of participants. S

26min

Hospitalizations highlight potential dangers of e-cigs to teens’ lungs

E-cigarette use can harm the lungs, and eight Wisconsin teens who developed severe lung injuries after vaping may be the latest victims.

31min

VIDEO Vatpinde, koalaer og kondomer: Her er alt, du skal vide om klamydia

Hvert år får over 30.000 danskere konstateret sexsygdommen klamydia.

31min

Next antibiotic may come from dirt bacteria

New insight about a broad spectrum antibiotic agent, obafluorin, made from a fluorescent strain of soil bacteria might offer a powerful antidote to antibiotic resistance, researchers say. Understanding how antibiotic scaffolds construct in nature can help prospect for new classes of antibiotics through DNA sequencing and genome mining. Scientists used this knowledge to help solve the X-ray crysta

55min

Water treatment cuts parasitic roundworm infections affecting 800 million people

A two-year study in rural Kenya explored the effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing and nutritional interventions on rates of intestinal worm and Giardia infections. The results indicated that water treatment alone was sufficient to cause an 18 percent reduction in roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) infection rates. Adding sanitation and handwashing increased reduction to 22 percent. The

55min

Turning water into ice in the quantum realm

When you pop a tray of water into the freezer, you get ice cubes. Now, researchers have achieved a similar transition using clouds of ultracold atoms.

55min

Technique uses magnets, light to control and reconfigure soft robots

Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes. The technique relies on light and magnetic fields.

55min

Experts Say Now Is the Time to Start Investing in Cryptocurrencies, and eToro Makes It Easy

When cryptocurrencies first started popping up 10 years ago, for the most part, only gamblers and speculators invested in them. But a lot has changed since then. Today crypto trading has become almost mainstream, and some financial experts believe investors should dedicate two to five percent of their portfolios to crypto assets. That said, cryptocurrencies still display extreme volatility, and c

57min

NASA catches birth of Northwestern Pacific's Tropical Storm Francisco

Soon after Tropical Storm Francisco developed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

1h

Water treatment cuts parasitic roundworm infections affecting 800 million people

A two-year study in rural Kenya explored the effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing and nutritional interventions on rates of intestinal worm and Giardia infections. The results indicated that water treatment alone was sufficient to cause an 18 percent reduction in roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) infection rates. Adding sanitation and handwashing increased reduction to 22 percent. The

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Portugal Bags Lowest-Cost Solar Bid In The World

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Heat wave 3 degrees hotter due to climate change: scientists

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Scientists developing controllable contact lens that zooms in

The contact lens is made mainly from stretchy, electroactive polymer films. It's able to recognize subtle electrooculographic signals that we generate in the tissues near the eye. Samsung also recently filed a patent to develop what appear to be smart contact lenses. None A new type of soft contact lens could someday allow wearers to zoom in on distant objects just by blinking, or moving their ey

1h

North Atlantic right whales in crisis – and the people risking lives to save them

Once hunted to near extinction, North Atlantic right whales are now facing new human threats.

1h

US Army Doubles Down on Directed Energy Weapons

Laser Contest The US Army really, really wants to add directed energy weapons — laser cannons, essentially — to its arsenal. Army officials just awarded contracts to weapons developers Northrop Grumman and Raytheon to develop directed-energy weapons to attach to the tank-like Stryker combat vehicle, according to Defense News . The Army wants lasers to disable drones, rockets, and vehicles — a sig

1h

Whale washes up in Donegal estuary

The whale was discovered where the river Leannan and Lough Swilly converge.

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Could e-taxis help clean up London's air?

Some drivers say there is not enough charging points to charge the vehicles.

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Bid to better protect Scotland's 'Dinosaur Isle'

There are fears that Skye's fossils of creatures from more than 165 million years ago are threatened by irresponsible collectors.

1h

A super-thin slice of wood can be used to turn saltwater drinkable

Most ways to purify saltwater take up a lot of energy, but simply running seawater through a thin, heated slice of porous wood can render it fresh and drinkable

1h

The Fundamental Link Between Body Weight and the Immune System

It’s simple: Eat less. Sometimes combined with the directive move more , the point of this mantra is clear. If you can’t lose weight, you are either stupid or lazy—or, probably, both. See also: Calories in, calories out. But if things were that simple, diets would work. Middle-aged people would not suddenly start gaining weight despite eating and moving similarly year over year. No one would have

1h

The Endless, Invisible Persuasion Tactics of the Internet

Even the cheesiest, most cloyingly overearnest romance movies lack the pathos of pop up notifications once you’ve cancelled an online subscription. “If you leave us now, you’ll take away the biggest part of us” is a message I’d expect to receive from a spouse upon being served divorce papers. It’s actually Spotify’s farewell message , spelled out by the song titles included in the playlist it sho

1h

Raise costs for water in cities to better handle droughts?

Changing the incentives for water use and storage could mitigate the stress of droughts, according to new research. Humans use water for a variety of different ends, but rivers also need water flowing through them to ensure the survival of fish and other wildlife. In fact, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires a minimum stream flow in certain rivers to protect threatened fish. In Oregon’s Wil

1h

A wearable device so thin and soft you won't even notice it

Wearable human-machine interfaces have benefited from advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs. But current models still can be bulky and uncomfortable, and they can't always handle multiple functions at one time. Researchers reported Friday, Aug. 2, 2019, the discovery of a multifunctional ultra-thin wearable electronic device that is imperceptible to the wearer.

1h

New wood membrane provides sustainable alternative for water filtration

Inspired by the intricate system of water circulating in a tree, a team of researchers led by Princeton University, have figured out how to use a thin slice of wood as a membrane through which water vapor can evaporate, leaving behind salt or other contaminants. Most membranes that are used to distill fresh water from salty are made of polymers, which are derived from fossil fuels and are also dif

1h

Turning water into ice in the quantum realm

When you pop a tray of water into the freezer, you get ice cubes. Now, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Toronto have achieved a similar transition using clouds of ultracold atoms.

1h

Quantum entanglement in chemical reactions? Now there's a way to find out

For the first time, scientists have developed a practical way to measure quantum entanglement in chemical reactions.

1h

Socially active 60-year-olds face lower dementia risk

Being more socially active in your 50s and 60s predicts a lower risk of developing dementia later on, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS Medicine.

1h

How 'natural-killer' cells might help women avoid a deadly risk of childbirth

Malfunctioning uterine NK cells play a key role in placenta accreta, a condition that leads to over-attachment of the placenta to uterine tissues and can cause extensive bleeding during childbirth. In mouse models, scientists at Cincinnati Children's trace the NK cell malfunction to a mutant form of the protein Gab3, and demonstrate that healthy NK cell transplants can prevent accreta.

1h

Technique uses magnets, light to control and reconfigure soft robots

Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes. The technique relies on light and magnetic fields.

1h

How Does Smoking Marijuana Affect Driving?

Drinking alcohol or taking certain medications can make us unfit to drive, but what about marijuana? How Does Smoking Pot Affect Our Ability to Drive? Video of How Does Smoking Pot Affect Our Ability to Drive? Human Friday, August 2, 2019 – 14:00 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — We know that alcohol and some prescription drugs can make impair a person's ability to drive… but what abo

1h

Shared e-scooters aren't always as green as other transport options

People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. But a new study from North Carolina State University finds it's not that simple: shared …

1h

I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream For … Lab-Grown Animal Proteins!

Some startups are making synthetic versions of animal proteins for use in foods from smoothies to baked goods. The goal: to reshape the food supply without the environmental footprint of livestock. (Image credit: Olivia Falcigno/NPR)

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Can video chats teach toddlers? It depends

The brains of toddlers resist learning from screens, even video chats, according to a new study, but having a parent present can help. Previous research has shown that unlike older children, infants, and toddlers need responsive, face-to-face encounters with real, live humans in order to learn new information. But researchers wondered about video chat. Can infants and toddlers learn from a person

1h

A Brain Scan May Predict Alzheimer’s. Should You Get One?

One expert warns of “unintended downsides,” including overuse of only modestly effective medications.

1h

Healthy social life could ward off dementia, study shows

Being socially active in 50s and 60s linked to lower risk of illness later in life, researchers say Being socially active in your 50s and 60s may help lower the risk of developing dementia in later life, a study has found. Researchers studied data that tracked more than 10,000 people from 1985 to 2013. The participants answered a questionnaire every five years about the frequency of their social

1h

Record Purcell factors in ultracompact hybrid plasmonic ring resonators

For integrated optical devices and traveling-wave resonators, realistic use of the superior wave-matter interaction offered by plasmonics is impeded by ohmic loss, which increases rapidly with mode volume reduction. In this work, we report composite hybrid plasmonic waveguides (CHPWs) that are not only capable of guiding subwavelength optical mode with long-range propagation but also unrestricted

1h

Metal oxide semiconductor nanomembrane-based soft unnoticeable multifunctional electronics for wearable human-machine interfaces

Wearable human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are an important class of devices that enable human and machine interaction and teaming. Recent advances in electronics, materials, and mechanical designs have offered avenues toward wearable HMI devices. However, existing wearable HMI devices are uncomfortable to use and restrict the human body’s motion, show slow response times, or are challenging to rea

1h

A pyrolysis-free path toward superiorly catalytic nitrogen-coordinated single atom

Nitrogen-coordinated single-atom catalysts (SACs) have emerged as a frontier for electrocatalysis (such as oxygen reduction) with maximized atom utilization and highly catalytic activity. The precise design and operable synthesis of SACs are vital for practical applications but remain challenging because the commonly used high-temperature treatments always result in unpredictable structural chang

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Photothermally and magnetically controlled reconfiguration of polymer composites for soft robotics

New materials are advancing the field of soft robotics. Composite films of magnetic iron microparticles dispersed in a shape memory polymer matrix are demonstrated for reconfigurable, remotely actuated soft robots. The composite films simultaneously respond to magnetic fields and light. Temporary shapes obtained through combined magnetic actuation and photothermal heating can be locked by switchi

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Hydrophobic nanostructured wood membrane for thermally efficient distillation

Current membrane distillation (MD) is challenged by the inefficiency of water thermal separation from dissolved solutes, controlled by membrane porosity and thermal conductivity. Existing petroleum-derived polymeric membranes face major development barriers. Here, we demonstrate a first robust MD membrane directly fabricated from sustainable wood material. The hydrophobic nanowood membrane had hi

1h

Simultaneous implementation of resistive switching and rectifying effects in a metal-organic framework with switched hydrogen bond pathway

Resistive random-access memory (RRAM) has evolved as one of the most promising candidates for the next-generation memory, but bistability for information storage, simultaneous implementation of resistive switching and rectification effects, and a better understanding of switching mechanism are still challenging in this field. Herein, we report a RRAM device based on a chiral metal-organic framewo

1h

Observation of a transition between dynamical phases in a quantum degenerate Fermi gas

A proposed paradigm for out-of-equilibrium quantum systems is that an analog of quantum phase transitions exists between parameter regimes of qualitatively distinct time-dependent behavior. Here, we present evidence of such a transition between dynamical phases in a cold-atom quantum simulator of the collective Heisenberg model. Our simulator encodes spin in the hyperfine states of ultracold ferm

1h

Entanglement classifier in chemical reactions

The Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) entanglement, which features the essential difference between classical and quantum physics, has received wide theoretical and experimental attentions. Recently, the desire to understand and create quantum entanglement between particles such as spins, photons, atoms, and molecules is fueled by the development of quantum teleportation, quantum communication,

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Application of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in tumor-associated bone segmental defect

Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely applied in bone repair because of its superior biocompatibility. Recently, a proliferation-suppressive effect of HA nanoparticles (n-HA) against various cancer cells was reported. This study was aimed at assessing the translational value of n-HA both as a bone-regenerating material and as an antitumor agent. Inhibition of tumor growth, prevention of metastasis,

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Fang Needles, Quantum Carpets and Tender Robot Touches

Feast your eyes on the week’s best science GIFs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Republican Party Is Losing Its Future

You can pick your own favorite data point. “There are 277 Republican governors, senators and congresspeople. Without Hurd, exactly one (1) is black,” Dan Lavoie calculates . Or as Politico notes , “There are more men named Jim in the House than Republican women running for reelection.” But the point is clear. With Representative Will Hurd’s announcement last night that he won’t run for reelection

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Americans Trust Scientists, Until Politics Gets in the Way

A report from Pew Research Center shows that Americans have great confidence in scientists—except for Republicans when the issue is the environment.

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Uganda Launching New Experimental Ebola Vaccine Trial

Researchers aim to deploy the trial in neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo, which has been ravaged by Ebola for a year.

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Shark Attacks Seal Decoy Camera | Shark Week

Off the coast of Guadalupe Island, a team of researchers capture footage of a Great White chomping down on their seal decoy rover. Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: h

1h

Turning water into ice in the quantum realm

When you pop a tray of water into the freezer, you get ice cubes. Now, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Toronto have achieved a similar transition using clouds of ultracold atoms.

1h

New wood membrane provides sustainable alternative for water filtration

Inspired by the intricate system of water circulating in a tree, a team of researchers led by Princeton University, have figured out how to use a thin slice of wood as a membrane through which water vapor can evaporate, leaving behind salt or other contaminants.

1h

Quantum entanglement in chemical reactions? Now there's a way to find out

Scientists have long suspected that a quantum phenomenon might play a role in photosynthesis and other chemical reactions of nature, but don't know for sure because such a phenomenon is so difficult to identify.

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NASA satellite finds Tropical Storm Wipha blankets the Gulf of Tonkin

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the clouds from Tropical Storm Wipha blanketing the Gulf of Tonkin.

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Change the bias, change the behavior? Maybe not

In a meta-analysis of published research, psychologist Calvin Lai of Washington University in St. Louis teases out how changes in implicit bias do — and do not — appear to lead to changes in behavior. And why that might be.

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Paradoxical outcomes for Zika-exposed tots

Forty-five percent of Zika-exposed infants who had abnormalities at birth had normal test results in the second or third year of life. By contrast, 25% who had normal assessments at birth had below average developmental testing or abnormalities in hearing or vision by age 32 months.

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The Wood-Wide Web, 1 Trillion Trees, Gorilla Festivals, And Teeny Robots

A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Wood-wide Web, 1 Trillion Trees, Gorilla Festivals, and Teeny Robots (July 2019 Monthly Roundup) Video of Wood-wide Web, 1 Trillion Trees, Gorilla Festivals, and Teeny Robots (July 2019 Monthly Roundup) Earth Friday, August 2, 2019 – 13:45 Alistair Jennings, Contributor On this monthly roundup, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some

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Sesame Allergy More Common Than Once Thought, Study Finds

More than one million children and adults are allergic to sesame in the United States, scientists report. But sesame is not among the allergens that must be listed on food labels.

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Fang Needles, Quantum Carpets and Tender Robot Touches

Feast your eyes on the week’s best science GIFs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tigers are making a massive comeback in India — up 33% in four years

India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making it, by far, the country with the largest wild population. Their wild population increased over 33 percent in just four years. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made it his goal to increase tiger conservationist efforts. India now has nearly 3,000 tigers living in the wild. Due to concentrated conservation efforts and stricter wildlife poli

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Mystery deaths of dolphins, whales off Tuscany

Thirty-two dolphins and two whales have been found dead off the Tuscan coast since the beginning of the year, the Italian region's environmental protection agency said Friday.

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Mystery deaths of dolphins, whales off Tuscany

Thirty-two dolphins and two whales have been found dead off the Tuscan coast since the beginning of the year, the Italian region's environmental protection agency said Friday.

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To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty

There's a species of poison frog called the "strawberry frog" or the "blue jeans frog," depending on who you ask. These frogs are smaller than a quarter, with bright red bodies and navy blue …

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City parks are only as good as the trip to get there

The easier and safer it is to get to a park, the more likely people are to visit the park frequently, research finds. If city planners want more people to visit community greenspaces, they should focus on “putting humans in the equation,” according to the new study in Landscape and Urban Planning . Adriana Zuniga-Teran, assistant research scientist at the University of Arizona College of Architec

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How I switched from academia to science communication

Nature, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02387-w Science communication can be a welcome destination for some PhD students, but my road there was not straightforward. It required support from a life coach and international organizations, explains Evguenia Alechine.

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Genetic testing motivates behavior changes in families at risk for melanoma

A new study investigated whether genetic testing would motivate people at risk of developing melanoma to alter their behavior in order to reduce their risk.

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AI reveals new breast cancer types that respond differently to treatment

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to recognize patterns in breast cancer — and uncovered five new types of the disease each matched to different personalized treatments.

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AI could enable accurate screening for atrial fibrillation

A new research study shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm — atrial fibrillation (AF) — in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is in normal rhythm at the time of a test. In other words, the AI-enabled EKG can detect recent atrial fibrillation that occurred without symptoms or that is impending, potentially improving treatment options.

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Male black widows piggyback on work of rivals in a desperate attempt to find a mate

A new study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate.

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Native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity

A study found notable distinctions in the migrations of different types of bighorn sheep herds. Native herds that have never been removed from historic ranges retain more diverse migratory patterns than restored and augmented herds.

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Hong Kong Protesters Use Lasers to Block Facial Recognition Tech

Laser Focused Since early June, an estimated 1 million people have taken to the streets of Hong Kong to protest a bill that would allow extraditions to China. To avoid identification, many of the Hong Kong protesters cover their faces. But according to a new Washington Post story , some have also been shining high-powered lasers directly at surveillance cameras — a high-tech protest strategy inte

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Cubicle cuisine: 4 delicious meals you can cook in the office microwave

We're pretty sure this is the best photo ever taken of a Triscuit pizza. (Thomas Payne/) It's hard to get a solid office lunch. Offices rarely have full kitchens, and nobody has time to go all MasterChef in the middle of the day, anyway. So what's a foodie to do? Spend her hard-earned money on takeout? Heat up a frozen meal like some apocalypse survivor in a bunker? Eat a cold sandwich… or worse

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Number of US fish stocks at sustainable levels remains near record high

Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the Status of U.S. Fisheries Annual Report to Congress, which details the status of 479 federally-managed stocks or stock complexes in the U.S. to identify which stocks are subject to overfishing, are overfished, or are rebuilt to sustainable levels.

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Number of US fish stocks at sustainable levels remains near record high

Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the Status of U.S. Fisheries Annual Report to Congress, which details the status of 479 federally-managed stocks or stock complexes in the U.S. to identify which stocks are subject to overfishing, are overfished, or are rebuilt to sustainable levels.

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Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity

On the surface, bighorn sheep migration is like that of many other large mammals, moving to higher elevations as snow melts in the springtime then returning to lower ground to forage as winter sets in.

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Number of US fish stocks at sustainable levels remains near record high

Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the Status of US Fisheries Annual Report to Congress, which details the status of 479 federally-managed stocks or stock complexes in the US to identify which stocks are subject to overfishing, are overfished, or are rebuilt to sustainable levels.

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Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity

On the surface, bighorn sheep migration is like that of many other large mammals, moving to higher elevations as snow melts in the springtime then returning to lower ground to forage as winter sets in.

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Slow-motion video reveals how ants deliver their painful venom

Insects can deliver 13 drops of venom per second

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Tesla Slammed by Another Autopilot Crash Lawsuit

Filing Suit In March, Jeremy Beren Banner died when his Tesla crashed into a tractor-trailer while “Autopilot” mode was turned on. Now his suing for wrongful death. The family filed suit on Thursday, Business Insider reports , marking the latest in Autopilot’s tumultuous history. Tesla has repeatedly been accused of overselling the limited capabilities of the semi-autonomous driving feature, whic

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Study finds genetic testing motivates behavior changes in families at risk for melanoma

A new study led by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) and collaborators at Northwestern University (NW) and Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) investigated whether genetic testing would motivate people at risk of developing melanoma to alter their behavior in order to reduce their risk. The study was published today in Genetics in Medicine.

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Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity

A study led by Blake Lowrey found notable distinctions in the migrations of different types of bighorn sheep herds. Native herds that have never been removed from historic ranges retain more diverse migratory patterns than restored and augmented herds.

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Male black widows piggyback on work of rivals in a desperate attempt to find a mate

A new U of T study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate.

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Endangered list sought for firefly with double-green flash

Peering through the darkness under the faint light of a peach-colored moon, wildlife biologist Jason Davis spots a telltale green flash in the bushes.

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The world's ageing dams are not built for ever more extreme weather

A town in the UK has been evacuated after extreme rains eroded a dam’s spillway. It is just one of many ageing dams worldwide not designed for increasingly extreme weather

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Endangered list sought for firefly with double-green flash

Peering through the darkness under the faint light of a peach-colored moon, wildlife biologist Jason Davis spots a telltale green flash in the bushes.

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A Battle Is Raging in the Tree of Life

Which came first, the sponge or the comb jelly?

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Manufacture of light-activated proteins

A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed. Such proteins, also known as optogenetic tools, can be switched on and off through light impulses, thus triggering specific cellular processes. So far, researchers developing optogenetic tools have been pretty much forced to resort to trial-and-error. A combination of computer-aided and experimental methods has now paved the

2h

Indonesia lifts tsunami warning after powerful quake off Java

Indonesian authorities lifted a tsunami warning late Friday after a powerful earthquake earlier struck off the southern coast of heavily populated Java island.

2h

Girls only: Polish village waits for the birth of a boy

A county mayor in southwestern Poland is promising a surprise award for the couple who next have a boy in a village where only girls have been born for nearly a decade.

2h

Greening devastates the citrus industry—new research offers a solution

Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as greening, is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases in the world. Infected trees produce bitter fruits that are green, misshapen, and unsuitable for sale. Once a tree is infected, there is no cure and it typically dies within a few years. Greening has already devastated the Florida citrus industry and poses a threat to California and Texas as well a

2h

Greening devastates the citrus industry: New research offers a solution

Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as greening, is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases in the world. Infected trees produce bitter fruits that are green, misshapen, and unsuitable for sale. Once a tree is infected, there is no cure and it typically dies within a few years. Greening has already devastated the Florida citrus industry and poses a threat to California and Texas as well a

2h

Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement

'Freedom songs' were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights, in addition to helping empower Black women to lead others when formal leadership positions were unavailable.

2h

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators

Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park.

2h

Unexpected nut eating by gorillas

Scientists have observed a population of western lowland gorillas in Loango National Park, Gabon using their teeth to crack open the woody shells of Coula edulis nuts. The researchers combined direct feeding observations and mechanical tests of seed casings to show that gorillas may be taxing their teeth to their upper limits, year after year, to access this energy rich food source.

2h

Notre Dame: Lead fears prompt new cleanup rules, equipment

Cleanup work at fire-ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral will resume later this month but under stricter lead-protection rules, amid growing public concern about toxic pollution.

3h

Greening devastates the citrus industry—new research offers a solution

Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as greening, is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases in the world. Infected trees produce bitter fruits that are green, misshapen, and unsuitable for sale. Once a tree is infected, there is no cure and it typically dies within a few years. Greening has already devastated the Florida citrus industry and poses a threat to California and Texas as well a

3h

NASA sees tropical storm Flossie headed to Central Pacific Ocean

Tropical Storm Flossie continues tracking in a westward direction through the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is expected to move into the Central Pacific Ocean later today, August 2.

3h

After You Die, These Genes Come to Life

(Credit: Immersion Images/Shutterstock) From the time we see Bambi’s mom bite the dust, we all know what death is. At least, we think we do. But the simple definition of death—that the body stops working—doesn’t take into account how weird our bodies actually are. “We really know nothing about what happens when you die,” says Peter Noble, a former professor at the University of Alabama. Noble know

3h

Will Hurd Could Be the Canary in the Coal Mine

It’s bad enough for House Republicans that eight of their members have already decided to call it quits after next year; that six have announced their retirement in the past two weeks alone; and that those fleeing Congress include two of the party’s 13 women lawmakers, its chief of candidate recruitment, and the GOP’s sole African American representative in the House, Will Hurd of Texas. What’s e

3h

NOAA finds Tropical Storm Erick's center with help of two NASA satellites

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Tropical Storm Erick is being battered by wind shear, and that its strongest storms were south of the Big Island of Hawaii. Forecasters used other NASA satellites to find Erick's center.

3h

Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement

When Nina Simone belted out "Mississippi Goddam" in 1964, she gave voice to many who were fighting for equal rights during the Civil Rights Movement. The lyrics didn't shy away from the anger and frustration that many were feeling.

3h

Mayo Clinic study shows AI could enable accurate screening for atrial fibrillation

A new Mayo Clinic research study shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm — atrial fibrillation (AF) — in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is in normal rhythm at the time of a test. In other words, the AI-enabled EKG can detect recent atrial fibrillation that occurred without symptoms or that is impending, potentially improving treatm

3h

Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement

'Freedom songs' were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights, in addition to helping empower Black women to lead others when formal leadership positions were unavailable.

3h

Greening devastates the citrus industry — new research offers a solution

Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as greening, is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases in the world. Infected trees produce bitter fruits that are green, misshapen, and unsuitable for sale. Once a tree is infected, there is no cure and it typically dies within a few years. Greening has already devastated the Florida citrus industry and poses a threat to California and Texas as well a

3h

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators

Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park.

3h

New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer’s 20 Years Before Symptoms

Alzheimer’s Blood Test Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri claim they have made significant progress toward developing a blood test that can detect Alzheimer’s — up to 20 years before symptoms appear. They’re hoping the test will aid future dug trials by speeding up the screening process for potential clinical trial participants, according to The Ne

3h

Shining (star)light on the search for life

In the hunt for life on other worlds, astronomers scour over planets that are light-years away. They need ways to identify life from afar — but what counts as good evidence? To know a true sign when you see it, you must look beyond the planet itself, all the way to the gleaming star it orbits.

3h

Knowing where the center of a space is helps inform spatial awareness

As you enter a new environment such as visiting a classroom for the first time, your brain takes in information about your surroundings to help inform where you are and what direction you are facing. Knowing where the center of the room is located helps provide a reference point for processing space. A new study provides new insight into navigation and spatial learning by examining how the rat bra

3h

Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics

An international collaboration has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds. This suggests that the seabird has been threatened by these chemicals once they eat plastics.

3h

Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin

It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. The caterpillars not only mimic the form but also the color of a twig. In a new study, researchers demonstrate that the caterpillars can sense the twig's color with their skin.

3h

Eye imaging technology provides opportunities in biotechnology

A researcher examined the flow properties of aqueous microcellulose suspensions. Optical coherence tomography, an imaging technology commonly used in medical imaging of eye, was applied in a novel way in her study.

3h

Math: An optimal route on a sub-Riemannian manifold does not make sharp turns

The regularity of optimal routes on sub-Riemannian manifolds has been an important open problem in sub-Riemannian geometry since the early 90s. A researcher now gives new restrictions on the shape of optimal paths. The most important new restriction is the lack of sharp turns, i.e., corners.

3h

Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews

The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein which is essential for the development of a chronic course of infection is not present in this virus.

3h

Manufacture of light-activated proteins

A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed. Such proteins, also known as optogenetic tools, can be switched on and off through light impulses, thus triggering specific cellular processes. So far, researchers developing optogenetic tools have been pretty much forced to resort to trial-and-error. A combination of computer-aided and experimental methods has now paved the

3h

Flu vaccine reduces risk of early death for elderly intensive care patients

An influenza vaccine does not just work when it comes to influenza. A new study shows that elderly people who have been admitted to an intensive care units have less risk of dying and of suffering a blood clot or bleeding in the brain if they have been vaccinated. And this is despite the fact that they are typically older, have more chronic diseases and take more medicine then those who have not b

3h

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators

Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park.

3h

Shining (star)light on the search for life

In the hunt for life on other worlds, astronomers scour over planets that are light-years away. They need ways to identify life from afar—but what counts as good evidence?

3h

Sesame Allergy More Common Than Once Thought, Study Finds

More than one million children and adults are allergic to sesame in the United States, scientists report. But sesame is not among the allergens that must be listed on food labels.

3h

Historic Greenland Melt Is a "Glimpse of the Future"

A major heat wave pushed melting into areas of the ice sheet that normally stay frozen year-round — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Why you really, really, really shouldn't shower or swim with your contacts in

Taking a little care can go a long way. (Joseph Greve via Unsplash/) Contact lens wearers beware: your daily habits may be riskier than you thought . According to a report published earlier this month, a 41-year-old woman in the UK recently lost the sight in her left eye after swimming and showering in contacts. For two months she endured pain, blurry vision, and sensitivity to light. When she ma

3h

New treatment option shown for heart failure fluid overload

Clinical researchers found that giving higher doses of the diuretic spironolactone could safely and effectively treat fluid excess in heart failure patients who did not respond to other diuretics.

3h

Machine learning helps predict if storms will cause power outages

Summer thunderstorms that knock out power grids are common around the world. Computer scientists and meteorologists applied machine learning to predict how damaging each particular storm will be.

3h

Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists

The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified. The findings explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds.

3h

Finding new knowledge in history: Evaluating seven decades of ex situ seed regeneration

Biologist have been promoting the transition of gene banks into bio-digital resource centers – the aim is the preparation and collation of the phenotypic and genetic information for all stored accessions.

3h

Shared E-scooters aren't always as 'green' as other transport options

People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. But a new study finds it's not that simple: shared e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.

3h

Dizziness of unknown cause may be perception disorder

Many patients with functional dizziness look back on a long odyssey to numerous doctors, because no organic causes could be found. Now for the first time, an experiment has identified possible causes of the disorder: problems with the processing of sensory-motor signals in the brain that resemble those associated with dizziness due to organic causes.

3h

Bittersweet truth of how bee-friendly limonoids are made

Limonoids are a class of plant natural products whose complex chemistry has been intensively investigated for over 50 years.

3h

3D miniature livers lead the way to patient-specific drug discovery

Researchers have developed a reproducible method for creating multicellular miniature liver organoids from pluripotent stem cells. Steatohepatitis, a liver disease involving inflammation, fat accumulation and fibrosis, was triggered in these miniature livers. They also established sick liver organoids using patient-derived stem cells. Two different treatments alleviated the symptoms, proving that

3h

In medicine, young women continue to pay a higher price for family

Forty percent of female doctors in a new study stopped working or moved to working part time within a few years of finishing their medical training. In contrast, all of the male doctors kept working full time.

3h

NASA sees tropical storm Flossie headed to central pacific ocean

Tropical Storm Flossie continues tracking in a westward direction through the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is expected to move into the Central Pacific Ocean later today, August 2, 2019.

3h

Poshmark Users, You Need to Reset Your Passwords

Chances are high that if you’ve resold clothes online any time recently (or bought them second-hand), you’ve done so on Poshmark. Unfortunately, it’s also the latest company to suffer a data …

3h

How to Resist the Lure of Overconfidence

A practical guide to putting things in perspective — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Virologist Keerti Shah Dies

The Johns Hopkins University researcher's work helped solidify the link between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, leading to the approval of the HPV vaccine in 2006.

3h

Apple: Humans Will No Longer Review Siri Recordings

Apple has temporary halted a program that let humans listen to Siri recordings — including intensely personal audio that users never meant for the digital assistant, nevermind Apple contractors, to hear. “We are committed to delivering a great Siri experience while protecting user privacy,” the company told TechCrunch . “While we conduct a thorough review, we are suspending Siri grading globally.

3h

The 'war on coal' myth

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Karin Kirk Is environmental extremism causing the decline of the American coal industry? A look at the economics shows that coal has been beaten fair and square in the marketplace by cheaper and cleaner alternatives. The best way to support coal communities is to confront these economic realities, rather than creating a divisive and false narrati

3h

What role will climate change play in the 2020 presidential election?

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections Journalists and political wonks have spilled lots of ink, and more recently lots of gigabytes, in presidential election runups speculating that the environment and global warming could become significant issues in voters’ minds. Seldom have their expectations been realized. Are there reasons to think things might turn out differently in the 2020 pre

3h

US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare

In the wake of the U.S. government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company iCarbonX to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, M.D., of Scripps Research, argues for more, not less, collaboration between China and the U.S. on artificial intelligence development.

3h

How to Resist the Lure of Overconfidence

A practical guide to putting things in perspective — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare

In the wake of the U.S. government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company iCarbonX to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, M.D., of Scripps Research, argues for more, not less, collaboration between China and the U.S. on artificial intelligence development.

3h

Who Was Jesus?

His story is perhaps the most famous on Earth, yet we know relatively little about Jesus, the man.

3h

NOAA finds Tropical Storm Erick's center with help of two NASA satellites

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Tropical Storm Erick is being battered by wind shear, and that its strongest storms were south of the Big Island of Hawaii. Forecasters used other NASA satellites to find Erick's center.

3h

Voters really want presidential candidates to talk more about science

A large majority of Iowans (74 percent) say it is important for the presidential candidates to talk about how science and scientific research will affect their policymaking decisions, but only 22 percent recall them discussing science issues during the past two months.

3h

How to Resist the Lure of Overconfidence

A practical guide to putting things in perspective — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

'Strange Harvests' Turns Nature's Fairy Tales Inside Out

Edward Posnett's book is more than an impressive add to the modern travelogue: it refuses to accept the landscape at face value as it paints remote terrain in visceral and breathtaking prose. (Image credit: Edward Posnett)

3h

Voters really want presidential candidates to talk more about science

A large majority of Iowans (74 percent) say it is important for the presidential candidates to talk about how science and scientific research will affect their policymaking decisions, but only 22 percent recall them discussing science issues during the past two months. The Iowa Science Survey, jointly conducted by Research!America and Science Debate, surveyed 802 Iowans on their attitudes to scien

3h

Model predicts cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's, up to two years out

An artificial intelligence model predicts cognitive decline of patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease by predicting their cognition test scores up to 2 years in the future. The model could be used to improve the selection of candidate drugs and participant cohorts for clinical trials, which have been notoriously unsuccessful so far.

3h

A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis

A new study has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. The disease tuberculosis is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, which affects more than 10 million people every year, and kills up to 2 million, making it the most deadly of the infectious diseases.

3h

Hobbs & Shaw Is Loud, Silly, and Pointless

Once upon a time, in the summer of 2001, a young and only moderately swole Vin Diesel appeared in The Fast and the Furious as Dominic Toretto, an L.A. ex-con who organized drag races, stole DVD players off the backs of trucks, and got in trouble with the local law. From this modest beginning, thanks to the vagaries of studio franchising and the enduring cinematic appeal of fast cars and big muscl

3h

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators

Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park.

4h

If Aliens Are Flashing Laser Beams at Us, We Now Have a Way to Detect Them

Are aliens using super powerful flashlights to get our attention? Astronomers think there's a chance they are.

4h

The Pentagon Is Launching Mass Surveillance Balloons Over America

Eagle Eye The Pentagon is launching spy balloons over the Midwest to monitor and track individual people and vehicles. The point of the balloons is “to provide a persistent surveillance system to locate and deter narcotic trafficking and homeland security threats,” according to documents filed with the Federal Communications Commission. But, as The Guardian reports , that also means everyday peop

4h

Making a case for returning airships to the skies

Reintroducing airships into the world's transportation-mix could contribute to lowering the transport sector's carbon emissions and can play a role in establishing a sustainable hydrogen based economy. These lighter-than-air aircraft could ultimately increase the feasibility of a 100% sustainable world.

4h

Strawberry Poison Frogs Can Take the Heat — Up to a Point

Some poison frogs have become used to the warmer temperatures caused by climate change and deforestation, but they’re nearing their limit. Strawberry-Poison-Frog2.jpg Image credits: Justin Nowakowski / University of California, Davis Creature Friday, August 2, 2019 – 11:00 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — Human body temperature typically hovers close to 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. But f

4h

Change implicit bias, change behavior? Maybe not

Changing implicit bias doesn’t necessarily change behavior, research suggests. The concept of implicit bias has made its way into the general consciousness, most often in the context of racial bias. More broadly, however, implicit biases can affect how people think of anything. “All the little ways in which our everyday thinking about social stuff is unconscious or uncontrollable,” writes Calvin

4h

Knowing where the center of a space is helps inform spatial awareness

As you enter a new environment such as visiting a classroom for the first time, your brain takes in information about your surroundings to help inform where you are and what direction you are facing. Knowing where the center of the room is located helps provide a reference point for processing space. A Dartmouth study published in Science provides new insight into navigation and spatial learning b

4h

Shining (star)light on the search for life

In the hunt for life on other worlds, astronomers scour over planets that are light-years away. They need ways to identify life from afar — but what counts as good evidence? To know a true sign when you see it, you must look beyond the planet itself, all the way to the gleaming star it orbits.

4h

AI reveals new breast cancer types that respond differently to treatment

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to recognize patterns in breast cancer — and uncovered five new types of the disease each matched to different personalized treatments.

4h

New stem cell combination could help to repair damaged hearts

A combination of heart cells derived from human stem cells could be the answer to developing a desperately-needed treatment for heart failure, according to new research part-funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Biotechnology.

4h

US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare

In the wake of the US government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company, iCarbonX, to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research, has co-written a commentary arguing for more, not less, collaboration between China and the US on artificial intelligence (AI) development.

4h

Study estimates frailty, prefrailty among older adults

This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 46 observational studies involving nearly 121,000 nonfrail adults (60 or older from 28 countries) and estimated the rate of new cases of frailty and prefrailty, which is a high risk of progressing to frailty.

4h

How common is sesame allergy?

This study used survey responses from nearly 79,000 individuals to estimate how common sesame allergy is in the United States.

4h

Surgery simulators are key to assessment of trainees

Machine learning-guided virtual reality simulators can help neurosurgeons develop the skills they need before they step in the operating room, according to a new study.

4h

Frailty is a medical condition, not an inevitable result of aging

A landmark study published today, led by researchers at Monash University in Australia, explored the incidence of frailty in 120,000 people over the age of 60 in 28 countries. 4.3% will develop frailty per year.

4h

Sesame allergy is more common than previously known

Sesame allergy affects more than 1 million children and adults in the US, more than previously known, reports a new study. This the first study to show prevalence and severity of sesame allergy in all 50 states. But sesame labeling is currently not required by law and is often labeled in a confusing manner. This increases the risk of accidental ingestion. The FDA is considering whether to require

4h

Public trust that scientists work for the good of society is growing

More Americans trust the motives of scientists than of journalists or politicians.

4h

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought

New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels. (Image credit: Patrick Donovan/Getty Images)

4h

Experts Question Rationale for Stem Cell Trial for Autism

So far, the only evidence that treatments like this one work is anecdotal.

4h

New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps

New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. This paper, "Data Indicate the Importance of Expert Agencies in Conservation Policy," empirically supports the need for strong oversight of federal activities. It also sug

4h

Up Close With a Grander Mako Shark | Shark Week

Joe Remeiro, Devon Massyn and Keith Poe capture amazing footage of a huge grander Mako shark off the coast of California. Stream Monster Mako: Perfect Predator on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/monster-mako-perfect-predator Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http

4h

Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds

The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center. (Image credit: Roy Scott/Science Source)

4h

It's Like an Analogy

Creative communication can help, or hurt, our attempts to bridge the divide between technically or emotionally disparate audiences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Researchers 3D Print Functional Components of Human Heart

Printing Hearts A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University just 3D printed functional components of the human heart — including small blood vessels and large beating ventricles. “We now have the ability to build constructs that recapitulate key structural, mechanical, and biological properties of native tissues,” said Adam Feinberg, a professor at Carnegie Mellon and the co-founder of

4h

The Books Briefing: America’s Pastime

Something about summer makes the simplest pleasures—such as a good book on a still day—feel like the height of contentment. “America’s pastime” of baseball is a bit more satisfying, too, when the skies are at their bluest and the sun doesn’t set on the ballpark until well into the evening. Ring Lardner, a beat reporter from baseball’s early days, uses the sport’s meditative quality to draw up mom

4h

New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps

New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. This paper, "Data Indicate the Importance of Expert Agencies in Conservation Policy," empirically supports the need for strong oversight of federal activities. It also sug

4h

Unexpected nut eating by gorillas

Scientists from the Max Planck institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Washington University in St. Louis have observed a population of western lowland gorillas in Loango National Park, Gabon using their teeth to crack open the woody shells of Coula edulis nuts. The researchers combined direct feeding observations and mechanical tests of seed casings to show that gorillas may be taxing their t

4h

Model predicts cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's, up to two years out

An artificial intelligence model developed at MIT predicts cognitive decline of patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease by predicting their cognition test scores up to 2 years in the future. The model could be used to improve the selection of candidate drugs and participant cohorts for clinical trials, which have been notoriously unsuccessful so far.

4h

Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists

The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. The findings, published in Current Biology, explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds.

4h

Arctic study to shed light on organisms key to the food chain

A research team—led by a University of Stirling expert—will set off on a scientific cruise to the Arctic Ocean this weekend in a bid to understand the behaviour of tiny organisms that are key to the food chain.

4h

Blood test spots Alzheimer’s early with 94% accuracy

A blood test to detect early brain changes in Alzheimer’s disease has moved one step closer to clinical use, researchers report. Up to two decades before people develop the characteristic memory loss and confusion of Alzheimer’s disease, damaging clumps of protein start to build up in their brains. Researchers say they can measure levels of the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta in the blood and us

4h

Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists

The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. The findings, published in Current Biology, explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds.

4h

Research reveals bittersweet truth of how bee-friendly limonoids are made

Limonoids are a class of plant natural products whose complex chemistry has been intensively investigated for over 50 years.

4h

The curious tale of the cancer 'parasite' that sailed the seas

A contagious canine cancer that conquered the world by spreading between dogs during mating likely arose around 6,000 years ago in Asia and spread around the globe through maritime activities, scientists say.

4h

EU agriculture not viable for the future

The current reform proposals of the EU Commission on the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) are unlikely to improve environmental protection, say researchers. While the EU has committed to greater sustainability, this is not reflected in the CAP reform proposal.

4h

'Wildling' mice could help translate results in animal models to results in humans

Researchers developed a new mouse model that could improve the translation of research in mice into advances in human health. The mouse model, which the scientists called 'wildling,' acquired the microbes and pathogens of wild mice, while maintaining the laboratory mice's genetics that make them more useful for research.

4h

Research reveals bittersweet truth of how bee-friendly limonoids are made

Limonoids are a class of plant natural products whose complex chemistry has been intensively investigated for over 50 years.

4h

U of A students look to cut plastic waste with hemp-based feminine hygiene products

Every year, millions of plastic-lined feminine hygiene products wind up in Canadian landfills, destined to decompose over hundreds of years.

4h

A groundbreaking expedition to the bottom of all five oceans | Victor Vescovo

Victor Vescovo is leading the first-ever manned expedition to the deepest point of each of the world's five oceans. In conversation with TED science curator David Biello, Vescovo discusses the technology that's powering the explorations — a titanium submersible designed to withstand extraordinary conditions — and shows footage of a never-before-seen creature taken during his journey to the botto

4h

Space data relay system shows its speed

A satellite network that can zoom in on ships at sea and check for oil spills in almost real time has demonstrated its capabilities at a high-level international event in Brussels.

5h

Powered by pixels

It's 2019. We want our cell phones fast, our computers faster and screens so crisp they rival a morning in the mountains. We're a digital society, and blurry photos from potato-cameras won't cut it for the masses. Physicists, it turns out, aren't any different—and they want that same sharp snap from their neutrino detectors.

5h

Researchers discover new mechanism of microorganism resistance against free radicals

There are numerous different scenarios in which microorganisms are exposed to highly reactive molecules known as free radicals. These molecules are capable of damaging important cell components and may be generated during normal cell metabolism or in response to environmental factors. Free radicals play a significant role in antibiotic effectiveness, the development of diseases and the normal func

5h

Public trust that scientists work for the good of society is growing

More Americans trust the motives of scientists than of journalists or politicians.

5h

Styrtede nær børnehavebørn: Schweiziske postdroner sat på jorden

En drone fra det schweiziske postvæsen styrtede i maj ned blot et stenkast fra en gruppe legende børnehavebørn. Derfor har Swiss Post valgt at suspendere brugen af droner og bedt producenten Matternet om at implementere en række sikkerhedsforanstaltninger.

5h

Researchers discover new mechanism of microorganism resistance against free radicals

There are numerous different scenarios in which microorganisms are exposed to highly reactive molecules known as free radicals. These molecules are capable of damaging important cell components and may be generated during normal cell metabolism or in response to environmental factors. Free radicals play a significant role in antibiotic effectiveness, the development of diseases and the normal func

5h

Goals boost recovery for older adults in physical therapy

Goal-oriented, motivational physical and occupational therapy helps older patients recover more fully from broken hips, strokes, and other ailments that land them in skilled nursing facilities for rehabilitation, according to a new study. Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation—an approach in which physical and occupational therapists work to engage patients more fully during therapy sessions—helped them

5h

Scientists top list of most trusted professions in US

Pew survey shows rise in confidence that scientists will act in public’s interest Scientists have topped a survey of trusted professions, with adults in the US more confident that they act in the public’s best interests than employees from any other line of work studied. The survey found that confidence in scientists has risen markedly since 2016 and more than half of American adults believe the

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Who were the mysterious Neolithic people that enabled the rise of ancient Egypt? Here's what we've learned on our digs

To many, ancient Egypt is synonymous with the pharaohs and pyramids of the Dynastic period starting about 3,100BC. Yet long before that, about 9,300-4,000BC, enigmatic Neolithic peoples flourished. Indeed, it was the lifestyles and cultural innovations of these peoples that provided the very foundation for the advanced civilisations to come.

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To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty

Strawberry poison frogs live in Costa Rican forests that are being cut down for farmland. The deforested pastures are hotter and sunnier, so scientists wanted to see if the frogs had adapted to withstand the heat. They learned that the frogs from pastures had adapted to seek out warmer temperatures than frogs from forests. The maximum temperature they can stand didn't change, though — so if globa

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How microorganisms protect themselves against free radicals

There are numerous different scenarios in which microorganisms are exposed to highly reactive molecules known as free radicals. These molecules are capable of damaging important cell components and may be generated during normal cell metabolism or in response to environmental factors. A team of researchers has discovered a previously unknown mechanism which enables microorganisms to protect themse

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New blood test can detect rejection by antibodies after kidney transplant

A group of scientists has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies. The identification can be done through a simple blood test and at an early stage. It is the first known biomarker for rejection by antibodies. The researchers hope that the test can be further developed quickly for use in the hospital.

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New treatment option shown for heart failure fluid overload

UT Health San Antonio clinical researchers found that giving higher doses of the diuretic spironolactone could safely and effectively treat fluid excess in heart failure patients who did not respond to other diuretics.

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Machine learning helps predict if storms will cause blackouts

Summer thunderstorms that knock out power grids are common around the world, and can be a problem in Finland. A collaboration between computer scientists at Aalto University and the Finnish Meteorological Institute applies machine learning to predict how damaging a storm will be.

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Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists

The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. The findings, published in Current Biology [August 1, 2019], explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds.

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Finding new knowledge in history — evaluating seven decades of ex situ seed regeneration

Publication of a comprehensive set of historical phenotypic data of wheat in Scientific Data.

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The Math Equation That Tried to Stump the Internet

Sometimes BODMAS is just PEMDAS by another name. And no, the answer is not 100.

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Climate Could Be an Electoral Time Bomb, Republican Strategists Fear

A growing number of young voters, including conservatives, identify climate change as a top priority. Republican strategists fear that could soon pose a big problem.

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Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes

Eleven new frog species were recently discovered in the tropical Andes. This is the largest number of frog species described in a single article from the western hemisphere in over a decade.

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Economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not

Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development — including more women in government — are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline.

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Newly discovered Labrador fossils give clues about ancient climate

The discovery of fossilized plants in Labrador, Canada, by a team of paleontologists provides the first quantitative estimate of the area's climate during the Cretaceous period, a time when the earth was dominated by dinosaurs.

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Way to enhance the sustainability of manufactured soils

A combination of waste materials supplemented with a product of biomass could help in the search for high quality soils, a new study suggests.

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Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin

It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. The caterpillars not only mimic the form but also the color of a twig. In a new study, researchers of Liverpool University in the UK and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Germany demonstrate that the caterpillars can sense the twig's color with their skin.

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Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics

An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds. This suggests that the seabird has been threatened by these chemicals once they eat plastics.

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3D miniature livers lead the way to patient-specific drug discovery

Researchers from TMDU and CCHMC developed a reproducible method for creating multicellular miniature liver organoids from pluripotent stem cells. Steatohepatitis, a liver disease involving inflammation, fat accumulation and fibrosis, was triggered in these miniature livers. They also established sick liver organoids using patient-derived stem cells. Two different treatments alleviated the symptoms

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Shared E-scooters aren't always as green as other transport options

People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. But a new study finds it's not that simple: shared e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.

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Nordic researchers: A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis

A new study from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Denmark, has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. The disease tuberculosis is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, which affects more than 10 million people every year, and kills up to 2 million, making it the most deadly of the infectious diseases.

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What you might have missed

Gene regions being linked to PTSD, an autonomous bike and a Millennium Falcon from back in the Cambrian – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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Coming of Age on Cape Cod in the Summer of ‘71

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a group of friends who met in their early 20s on Cape Cod in the summer of 1971. They lived crammed together in a house festooned with owl decorations, and the Owl House became the center of thei

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What ‘Chernobyl’ Can Teach Us About Failure

I’ve been watching the outstanding HBO series Chernobyl , which details the worst nuclear reactor meltdown in human history—an event that was approximately 400 times more potent than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. What occurred to me, and what I discovered over the course of the TV series, this was a cataphoric failure destined to happen. A slow drift into failure from the beginning—only e

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Flu vaccine reduces risk of dying for elderly intensive care patients

An influenza vaccine does not just work when it comes to influenza. A new study shows that elderly people who have been admitted to an intensive care units have less risk of dying and of suffering a blood clot or bleeding in the brain if they have been vaccinated. And this is despite the fact that they are typically older, have more chronic diseases and take more medicine then those who have not b

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Manufacture of light-activated proteins

A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Such proteins, also known as optogenetic tools, can be switched on and off through light impulses, thus triggering specific cellular processes. So far, researchers developing optogenetic tools have been pretty much forced to resort to trial-and-error. A combination of computer-aided

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When plant roots learned to follow gravity

Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity. The 'how and when' of this evolutionary step has, until now, remained unknown. Plant biologists have identified crucial components and processes which only developed in seed plants around 350 million years ago to enable fast and efficient gravity-driven root growth.

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NASA’s Space Launch System May Have Set Back Orbital Refueling by a Decade

NASA has been working on the Space Launch System (SLS) as a replacement for the Space Shuttle for a decade, and the project has already consumed $14 billion in funding. It’s not exactly a secret that pure political will has kept the SLS going, but there may have been some casualties along the way. A former United Launch Alliance (ULA) engineer has chimed in on Twitter to tell an anecdote about ho

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Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews

The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein which is essential for the development of a chronic course of infection is not present in this virus. DZIF scientists at the Charite – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin and the Un

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Research reveals bittersweet truth of how bee-friendly limonoids are made

Research by the John Innes Centre and Stanford University opens the door to azadirachtin production.

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New research findings on dizziness of unknown cause

Many patients with functional dizziness look back on a long odyssey to numerous doctors, because no organic causes could be found. Now for the first time, an experiment at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has identified possible causes of the disorder: problems with the processing of sensory-motor signals in the brain that resemble those associated with dizziness due to organic causes.

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Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands

A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. They named the new species Gastrodia amamiana, and the findings were published in the online edition of Phytotaxa on August 2, 2019.

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Agile untethered fully soft robots in liquid

To free the potential of soft robots in new applications, untethered design is of great importance but still challenging. Scientists from China promoted a new approaching based on Marangoni Propulsion to enable the soft robot untethered. The method simplifies the design and manufacturing of the untethered soft robot with agile locomotion capability, which might be helpful for finding the new possi

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Making a case for returning airships to the skies

Reintroducing airships into the world's transportation-mix could contribute to lowering the transport sector's carbon emissions and can play a role in establishing a sustainable hydrogen based economy. According to the authors of an IIASA-led study, these lighter-than-air aircraft could ultimately increase the feasibility of a 100% sustainable world.

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Pre-life building blocks spontaneously align in evolutionary experiment

It nearly baffled researchers to see amino acids that make up life today spontaneously link up under lab conditions that mimicked those of pre-life Earth. The result was predecessors of today's proteins. The researchers made it hard on the amino acids by adding non-biological competitors, but nature selected the life chemicals.

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Why I Disrupted Trump’s Speech at Jamestown

On Tuesday, Virginia’s general assembly celebrated 400 years since a legislative body was formed by the colonists of old Jamestown. As a member of the House of Delegates, I was given a front-row seat at the festivities. Unfortunately, the celebration, which was intended to be a nonpartisan reflection on our commonwealth’s complicated history, was tarnished by the presence of President Donald Trum

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Goodbye, Snails

Once, snails decorated the forests of Hawaii like Christmas ornaments. There were more than 750 unique species, which descended from ancestral mollusks that arrived on the islands millions of years ago. Hawaii’s snails were exemplars of evolution’s generative prowess. But in recent decades, Hawaii’s snails have become notorious for the opposite force: extinction. Due to habitat loss and invasive

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Scientists crack the code to improve stress tolerance in plants

Epigenetic regulation — modification of gene expression from the 'outside' — is an important part of the overall genetic processes within a cell. A group of scientists now reveals a novel epigenetic regulation mechanism that is involved in DNA damage repair in plants, thereby suggesting a possibility of reinforcing global food security.

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To heal big bone wounds, we could one day inject ‘spackle’

A cell-based therapy can drastically accelerate the bone regeneration process after injury, research with mice shows. Large, complex bone wounds are hard for doctors and patients alike to contend with. They often require grafts and multiple surgeries. Jan Stegemann, professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan, is reprogramming adult cells from bone marrow so that they can be

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Two-dimensional (2-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with a microfluidic diamond quantum sensor

Quantum sensors based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising detection mode for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy due to their micron-scale detection volume and noninductive-based sample detection requirements. A challenge that exists is to sufficiently realize high spectral resolution coupled with concentration sensitivity for multidimensional NMR analysis of picolitre

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A Year In, the Second-Largest Ebola Outbreak Continues to Rage

Despite vaccination and treatment efforts, the epidemic in Central Africa has resulted in 1,700 deaths and counting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Year In, the Second-Largest Ebola Outbreak Continues to Rage

Despite vaccination and treatment efforts, the epidemic in Central Africa has resulted in 1,700 deaths and counting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is a Vegetarian Diet Bad for Your Brain?

If creatine is important for brain functioning and vegetarians have lower creatine levels, could a vegetarian or vegan diet have a negative impact on cognitive function? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Efficient, interconnected, stable: New carbon nanotubes to grow neurons

Carbon nanotubes able to take on the desired shapes thanks to a special chemical treatment, called crosslinking and, at the same time, able to function as substrata for the growth of nerve cells, finely tuning their growth and activity. The research is a new and important step towards the construction of neuronal regenerative-interfaces to repair spinal injuries

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New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps

New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species.

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Participants at HKU conference call for attention to research quality

To explore the way to go and share best practices on research integrity, about 700 researchers, teachers, leaders of funding agencies, government officials, journal editors etc. from 60 countries gathered at the 6th World Conference on Research Integrity held at the University of Hong Kong between June 2 and 5, 2019. Entitled New Challenges for Research Integrity, the conference heard enriching vi

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Synthesizing single-crystalline hexagonal graphene quantum dots

A KAIST team has designed a novel strategy for synthesizing single-crystalline graphene quantum dots, which emit stable blue light. The research team confirmed that a display made of their synthesized graphene quantum dots successfully emitted blue light with stable electric pressure, reportedly resolving the long-standing challenges of blue light emission in manufactured displays.

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Prior Zika virus or dengue virus infection does not affect secondary infections in monkeys

Previous infection with either Zika virus or dengue virus has no apparent effect on the clinical course of subsequent infection with the other virus, according to a study published August 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David O'Connor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues.

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"You Have the Rite" | Marc Bamuthi Joseph

In a breathtaking, jazz-inflected spoken-word performance, TED Fellow Marc Bamuthi Joseph shares a Black father's tender and wrenching internal reflection on the pride and terror of seeing his son enter adulthood.

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In a U.S. First, Doctors Use Gene-Editing Crispr Tool to Treat a Genetic Disorder

Doctors in the U.S. have used the gene-editing tool Crispr to treat a patient with a genetic disorder for the very first time. But researchers caution that the procedure — done as part of an ongoing trial for sickle cell disease — is still experimental and must be weighed against other treatment options.

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Peacekeeping missions can actually increase criminal violence, research finds

The presence of UN peacekeeping missions can inadvertently make criminal violence worse by providing the security necessary for organised crime to flourish, and creating a 'peacekeeping economy' which criminals can exploit, finds a new study by Dr. Jessica di Salvatore of the University of Warwick.

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The uncertainty of detecting planets

Uncertainty in science is a good thing. Because here's how the scientific model works: you observe a phenomenon, then form a hypothesis about why that phenomenon is taking place, then test the hypothesis, which leads you to develop a new hypothesis, and so on. That process means it can be difficult to ever definitely know something. Instead, scientists work to understand the uncertainty in their m

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Earth’s volcanic ‘hot spots’ are in constant motion

Scientists have long considered volcanic hot spots, like those that created the Hawaiian Islands, stationary points, but a new study finds they are actually in constant motion. The findings, which appear in in Nature Communications , solve a major debate about the origin of the large-scale structure of the Earth’s surface and deep interior. The Earth’s lithosphere is the outermost shell of our pl

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FBI: Conspiracy Theorists Are a Domestic Terrorism Threat

Cracking Down The FBI has determined that conspiracy theorists pose a serious domestic terrorism threat. That’s according to documentation reviewed by Yahoo News and which has since been published online . The May 2019 documents, which specifically refer to QAnon and Pizzagate conspiracies, show that federal law enforcement is paying close attention to politically-motivated acts of violence. Emer

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Don't Ask How to Pay for Climate Change. Ask Who

Opinion: Asking presidential candidates *how* they'll pay for the cost of climate change is naive. We should be asking, “*who* is going to pay?” and “how much?”

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Ninja Is Leaving Twitch. What's Next?

The pro gamer is going to Mixer. Also, the tenth season of 'Fortnite' will have giant robots and a classic open-world game finally gets an English version.

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‘We’re All Tired of Being Called Racists’

CINCINNATI—Donald Trump’s supporters would like to be clear: They are tired of being called racists. Leave it to the president’s eldest son to set the tone. Last night at the 17,500-person-capacity U.S. Bank Arena downtown here, Donald Trump Jr. strode onto the stage two hours before the president was scheduled to speak. The venue was already brimming. It had been a rough week for his father. On

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Cute marsupial had a fierce fossil relative

Short-tailed opossums are cute little marsupials which live in South America, but a new discovery shows they had a fierce fossil relative.

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Priority rule for organ donors could have unintended consequences

Several countries have combated low organ donor counts by implementing a priority rule that pushes registered donors to the front of the line if they ever need a transplant. However, according to a study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin published today in Management Science, this model has drawbacks.

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How microorganisms protect themselves against free radicals

There are numerous different scenarios in which microorganisms are exposed to highly reactive molecules known as free radicals. These molecules are capable of damaging important cell components and may be generated during normal cell metabolism or in response to environmental factors. A team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin has discovered a previously unknown mechanism whic

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Artificial intelligence predicts which movies will succeed—and fail—simply from plot summaries

New measure could prevent producers from making (some) bad films

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'Siberia is burning': Artists raise awareness of Russia wildfires

Russian artists want more urgent action to take place.

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Scientists discover a new type of pulsating star

Scientists can tell a lot about a star by the light it gives off. The color, for example, reveals its surface temperature and the elements in and around it. Brightness correlates with a star's mass, and for many stars, brightness fluctuates, a bit like a flickering candle.

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Flydende øer skal producere brændstof med solceller og havets CO2

PLUS. En gruppe norske og schweiziske forskere arbejder på at udvikle et koncept, hvor klynger er flydende øer dækket med solceller trækker CO2 ud af verdenshavende og producerer methanol.

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Apple says its contractors will stop listening to users through Siri

Apple Inc. said it is suspending its practice of employees reviewing voice recordings after privacy concerns

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Pseudoscience is taking over social media – and putting us all at risk

Search for "climate change" on YouTube and before long you'll likely find a video that denies it exists. In fact, when it comes to shaping the online conversation around climate change, a new study suggests that deniers and conspiracy theorists might hold an edge over those believing in science. Researchers found evidence that most YouTube videos relating to climate change oppose the scientific co

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To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty

There's a species of poison frog called the "strawberry frog" or the "blue jeans frog," depending on who you ask. These frogs are smaller than a quarter, with bright red bodies and navy blue limbs, and they live in shady Costa Rican forests. Or, they did, until humans began cutting the forests to create farmland. These sunny fields and pastures are hotter and drier than the forests, and scientists

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Climate change made European heatwave up to 3°C hotter

Nature, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02384-z Human-induced warming also made the hot spell up to 100 times more likely in some parts.

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Author Correction: Diverse and robust molecular algorithms using reprogrammable DNA self-assembly

Nature, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1378-x

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Publisher Correction: Heterochromatin drives compartmentalization of inverted and conventional nuclei

Nature, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1454-2

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To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty

There's a species of poison frog called the "strawberry frog" or the "blue jeans frog," depending on who you ask. These frogs are smaller than a quarter, with bright red bodies and navy blue limbs, and they live in shady Costa Rican forests. Or, they did, until humans began cutting the forests to create farmland. These sunny fields and pastures are hotter and drier than the forests, and scientists

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Newly discovered Labrador fossils give clues about ancient climate

The discovery of fossilized plants in Labrador, Canada, by a team of McGill directed paleontologists provides the first quantitative estimate of the area's climate during the Cretaceous period, a time when the earth was dominated by dinosaurs.

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Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age?

Lifelong anonymity orders for adults who were convicted of crimes as children are rarely granted. In theory, these orders legally prevent a person ever being identified. But given that information is now shared at lightning speed across different platforms, can these orders still work in practice?

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Can an AI Hold a Patent

The BBC reports a case in which an artificial intelligence (AI) system is named as a possible patent holder for a new invention, and interlocking food container. Apparently none of the people involved with the invention meet the criteria for being a patent holder, since they did not come up with the actual innovation. As a result, two professors from the University of Surrey have teamed up with t

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A 3-D model of the Milky Way Galaxy using data from Cepheids

A team of researchers at the University of Warsaw has created the most accurate 3-D model of the Milky Way Galaxy to date. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group explains how they used measurements from a special group of pulsating stars to create the map.

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Image: Hubble traces a galaxy's outer reaches

Believe it or not, this long, luminous streak, speckled with bright blisters and pockets of material, is a spiral galaxy like our Milky Way. But how could that be?

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Newly discovered Labrador fossils give clues about ancient climate

The discovery of fossilized plants in Labrador, Canada, by a team of McGill directed paleontologists provides the first quantitative estimate of the area's climate during the Cretaceous period, a time when the earth was dominated by dinosaurs.

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To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty

Strawberry poison frogs live in Costa Rican forests that are being cut down for farmland. The deforested pastures are hotter and sunnier, so scientists wanted to see if the frogs had adapted to withstand the heat. They learned that the frogs from pastures had adapted to seek out warmer temperatures than frogs from forests. The maximum temperature they can stand didn't change, though — so if globa

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Shared e-scooters aren't always as green as other transport options

People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. But a new study from North Carolina State University finds it's not that simple: shared e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.

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Sex appeal helped dinosaurs take flight

Attracting mates with showy displays may have helped dinosaurs develop feathers that let them take flight, according to new research by University of Alberta paleontologists.

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Dark energy vs. modified gravity: Which one will prevail?

Einstein's theory of general relativity predicts the existence of dark energy—a mysterious form of energy that permeates space and accelerates the expansion of the Universe. But what if Einstein was wrong and there was no such thing as dark energy? The GalaxyDance project has been investigating this scenario.

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Mumbai-Pune Hyperloop gets public infrastructure tag

submitted by /u/sareusernametaken [link] [comments]

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Deathwatch for the Amazon

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Scientists Built A Ball Of Plasma They Call A “Mini-Sun”

submitted by /u/anon99129 [link] [comments]

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Climate Change Is Happening Too Fast for Animals to Adapt

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A New Dawn: The Post Climate Crisis Civilization

submitted by /u/TheRaimonds [link] [comments]

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Climate battle will 'succeed or fail' in Asia: UN

The battle to combat climate change will "succeed or fail" based on what happens in Asia, where growing energy needs are increasing demand for fossil fuels, UN officials said Friday.

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With its CRISPR revolution, China becomes a world leader in genome editing

Amid controversy over gene-edited babies, government continues to pour resources into work with plants and animals

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The Demystification of the Postpartum Female Body

New-mom underwear had been a well-known initiation rite for years. Soft, stretchy, made of disposable mesh, and mysteriously available only in maternity wards, it was an unlikely hot-ticket item—but sure enough, mothers quietly advised the soon-to-be mothers in their lives to steal as many pairs of it as possible from the hospital before bringing their new babies home. And then, suddenly, it was

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Hottest day records set across Europe this year will soon be broken

Global warming caused the record-smashing heatwave in Europe during the hottest July ever globally – and climate models suggest there’s worse to come

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Sorry, scooters aren’t so climate-friendly after all

A look at the full lifetime emissions of the vehicles call into question the ecological assumptions around “micromobility.”

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New technology for protein complex discovery holds promise for biotechnology and crop improvement

Living cells survive and adapt by forming stable protein complexes that allow them to modulate protein activity, do mechanical work and convert signals into predictable responses, but identifying the proteins in those complexes is technically challenging. Purdue University researchers have developed a method to predict the composition of thousands of proteins complexes at one time, a discovery tha

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New technology for protein complex discovery holds promise for biotechnology and crop improvement

Living cells survive and adapt by forming stable protein complexes that allow them to modulate protein activity, do mechanical work and convert signals into predictable responses, but identifying the proteins in those complexes is technically challenging. Purdue University researchers have developed a method to predict the composition of thousands of proteins complexes at one time, a discovery tha

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Charting Our Robocar Future

WIRED writer Alex Davies joins us to discuss the challenges companies face as they race to get self-driving shuttles and delivery vehicles onto streets.

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Sony Xperia 1 Review: Big, Tall, and Expensive

Sony's latest flagship Android phone is nice—just not nice enough to justify its $950 price tag.

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Image of the Day: Harbor Seal Wearables

External satellite transmitters fitted to the animals’ heads track their movements and habitat use.

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July heatwave up to 3C hotter due to climate change

The record-shattering heatwave that baked much of northern Europe last month was likely between 1.5 to 3 degrees Celsius hotter due to manmade climate change, an international team of scientists said Friday.

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Removing tiny shrimp may help climate-proof Lake Tahoe's clarity

Lake Tahoe, with its iconic blue waters straddling the borders of Nevada and California, continues to face a litany of threats related to climate change. But a promising new project to remove tiny, invasive shrimp could be a big step toward climate-proofing its famed lake clarity.

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One Search to (Almost) Rule Them All: Hundreds of Hidden Planets Found in Kepler Data

Improved data analysis could substantially increase the total known planets from NASA’s K2 mission, revealing fascinating new worlds and intriguing planetary patterns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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One Search to (Almost) Rule Them All: Hundreds of Hidden Planets Found in Kepler Data

Improved data analysis could substantially increase the total known planets from NASA’s K2 mission, revealing fascinating new worlds and intriguing planetary patterns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Investigating alternatives to opioids for dogs in pain

Opioids are among the most effective pain relievers in dogs and cats, but amid the U.S. opioid crisis it has become much more difficult for animal hospitals to access these drugs. This, coupled with the potential for abuse of opioids by pet owners or others, makes it increasingly imperative that veterinarians pursue alternatives.

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Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands

A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. They named the new species Gastrodia amamiana, and the findings were published in the online edition of Phytotaxa on August 2.

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Investigating alternatives to opioids for dogs in pain

Opioids are among the most effective pain relievers in dogs and cats, but amid the U.S. opioid crisis it has become much more difficult for animal hospitals to access these drugs. This, coupled with the potential for abuse of opioids by pet owners or others, makes it increasingly imperative that veterinarians pursue alternatives.

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Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands

A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. They named the new species Gastrodia amamiana, and the findings were published in the online edition of Phytotaxa on August 2.

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2C of global warming would put pressure on Melbourne's water supply

Melbourne's existing water supplies may face pressure if global warming hits the 2℃ level, according to our new research published today in Environmental Research Letters.

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How to encourage the occasional voter to cast a ballot

Despite a cumulative increase of nearly 10 percent in voter turnout in Canadian federal elections between 2008 and 2015, the country's voter turnout rates remain moderate. And they're about 20 percent lower than they were before the 1990s.

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Experimental RSV vaccine boosts antibodies for months

One dose of a new vaccine candidate elicited large increases in respiratory syncytial virus-neutralizing antibodies that continued for several months, researchers report. The experimental vaccine against RSV, one of the leading causes of infectious disease deaths in infants, has shown promise in the new Phase 1 human clinical trial. People contract RSV in all stages of life, but it’s most dangero

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Fast fashion lies: Will they really change their ways in a climate crisis?

Recently Zara introduced a sustainability pledge. But how can Zara ever be sustainable? As the largest fast-fashion retailer in the world, they produce around 450 million garments a year and release 500 new designs a week, about 20,000 a year. Zara's fast-fashion model has been so successful it has inspired an entire industry to shift—churning out an unprecedented number of fashion garments year-r

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Redaktionens favoritter: Se mig! Mærk mig! Følg mig!

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

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Confronting Flames, Floods and More in a Warming World

Communities are learning how to reshape landscapes ravaged by climate impacts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Record heatwave 'made much more likely' by human impact on climate

Scientists say July at least equalled and may have beaten hottest month on record The record-breaking heatwave that roasted Europe last month was a one-in-a-thousand-year event made up to 100 times more likely by human-driven climate change, scientists have calculated. Around the globe, July at least equalled and may have surpassed the hottest month on record, according to data from the World Met

8h

Libraries can have 3-D printers but they are still about books

How often do we hear that libraries aren't just about books anymore? They are makerspaces with 3-D printers, scanners, laser vinyl cutters and routers. They provide green rooms, sewing machines, button makers, and tools like drills, saws and soldering irons. They are places to borrow seeds, fishing rods, cake making supplies, binoculars, laptops and tablets, radon detectors, musical instruments, b

8h

Why the 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Is So Deadly

The digestive power of this amoeba is the stuff of nightmares when it plays out in a human brain.

8h

Completely New Form of Gold Created

Gold rearranges its atoms and forms a previously unknown structure.

8h

Europe’s Heat Wave, Fueled by Climate Change, Moves to Greenland

The four-day hot spell was rare for France and the Netherlands, researchers say, but it used to be a lot rarer.

8h

Google to let rival search firms bid to be Android's default in EEA

Android users in most of Europe will have a choice of default search providers based on highest bids.

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Africa needs better science capacity to meet environmental challenges

Humanity faces unprecedented environmental challenges. Nowhere are the challenges greater than in Africa, the second most populous continent. Over the next century Africa will replace Asia as the driver of global population increase and the impact of climate change will be severe.

8h

New toolkit for photonics: Quantum simulation by light radio

Intensive research is being carried out on quantum simulators: they promise to precisely calculate the properties of complex quantum systems, when conventional and even supercomputers fail. In a cooperative project, theorists from the the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching anf the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) have now developed a new toolbox for quantum si

8h

When plant roots learned to follow gravity

Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity. The how and when of this evolutionary step has, until now, remained unknown. Plant biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have identified crucial components and processes which only developed in seed plants around 350 million years ago to enable fast and efficient gra

8h

When plant roots learned to follow gravity

Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity. The how and when of this evolutionary step has, until now, remained unknown. Plant biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have identified crucial components and processes which only developed in seed plants around 350 million years ago to enable fast and efficient gra

8h

July May Have Been the Hottest Month Ever Recorded, UN Says

Following the hottest June ever recorded, July 2019 may have been the single warmest month in history.

8h

Shoebox-size breath analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

A small, portable breath monitor developed at the University of Michigan can quickly and accurately detect acute respiratory distress syndrome, an often deadly disease that causes fluid to leak into the lungs and demands early diagnosis.

8h

A small number of leaky natural gas wells produce large emissions of greenhouse gases

Wells that extract natural gas from underground often leak large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, into the air. A team of Princeton University researchers has found that, in one of the biggest gas-producing regions, most of these emissions come from a tiny subset of the wells, a finding with major implications for how to control the problem.

8h

Climate change: Heatwave made up to 3C hotter by warming

The heatwave that hit Europe last week was made more probable and more intense by human activities, say scientists.

8h

This Voracious, Unstoppable Bug Is Killing Off Vineyards

Some Pennsylvania wine growers have reported losing 90 percent of their grapes due to damage from the invasive spotted lanternfly.

8h

'A Black Lady Sketch Show' Is a Much-Needed Jolt to TV Comedy

HBO's new series is part of an ongoing, long overdue evolution.

8h

The Issue With Meghan Markle’s Vogue Issue

If the past few decades have taught us anything, it’s that being a princess sucks. Royal wives are expected to stay quiet, have babies, and submit to endless commentary on their wardrobes. By guest-editing the September issue of British Vogue , Meghan Markle has decided to reject the first rule and embrace the last one—but on her own terms. As for the babies, she has sent her husband, Prince Harr

8h

Work Ruined Email

If you hate email, it’s probably because you work an office job where wrangling your messages is central to getting things done. Tasks arrive unbidden, dispatched impersonally from silent co-workers sitting mere feet away and stacked into a giant pile with no end. It wasn’t always like this. In the past, managers might have used computers to create or review reports or ledgers. But the job itself

8h

The Human Cost of Amber

M atthew Downen had never done anything like this before. In a hotel room in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, he watched as a dealer poured a bag of amber fossils onto a white towel spread over a desk. The previous night, at the opening reception for the eighth International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods, and Amber, Downen had gotten a tip from a friend: A guy here

8h

Can bacteria help people to mine asteroids?

Luis Zea is investigating the possibility of mining metals from asteroids in space using an unlikely agent: bacteria.

8h

Confronting Flames, Floods and More in a Warming World

Communities are learning how to reshape landscapes ravaged by climate impacts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

We spotted a star moving so fast it will enter intergalactic space

We spotted a star zooming through the Milky Way at 1700 kilometres per second – so fast that it will soon leave our galaxy behind and enter intergalactic space

8h

Can an Illusory World Help Treat Psychosis's Real-World Delusions?

Psychologists launch a clinical trial to gauge whether virtual reality can quell the fears of patients with the mental disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Can an Illusory World Help Treat Psychosis's Real-World Delusions?

Psychologists launch a clinical trial to gauge whether virtual reality can quell the fears of patients with the mental disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Can an Illusory World Help Treat Psychosis's Real-World Delusions?

Psychologists launch a clinical trial to gauge whether virtual reality can quell the fears of patients with the mental disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Ratcliffe’s Withdrawal Reveals Trump Still Doesn’t Understand Appointments

Updated on August 2 at 2:35 p.m. In March 2004, Attorney General John Ashcroft entered George Washington University Hospital with severe pancreatitis. Ashcroft had designated Deputy Attorney General James Comey as the acting attorney general while he was incapacitated. Meanwhile, at the White House, top officials in George W. Bush’s administration were hoping to approve a terror-related surveilla

9h

The original Love Island: how George Sand and Fryderyk Chopin put Mallorca on the romance map

More than four million Britons watched Amber Gill and Greg O'Shea being crowned the victors of Love Island 2019. Gill, a beauty therapist and model from Newcastle in the north of England, and O'Shea, a rugby player from Limerick in Ireland, proved the most popular pairing among the 24 reality TV show contestants on the Balearic island of Mallorca.

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Best ever map of Milky Way shows our galaxy is warped in an S-shape

The most detailed ever map of the Milky Way shows that our galaxy is not flat. It turns out the disc is warped into an S-shape

9h

Researchers from the IDIBELL and the University of Barcelona describe a new treatment that could cope with 2 bone diseases

Researchers have found a possible treatment for 2 bone diseases that have actually no cure.

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Discovering Fine Neurovascular Structures in Tibial Epiphysis Using Confocal Laser Microscopy

Download this application note from Olympus to find out how the FV3000 microscope enabled a research team to successfully image a complex 3D structure of sensory nerves and their surrounding vasculature penetrating a foramen in the tibial epiphysis!

9h

Forsker: Spioner kan få adgang til dansk teledata i Rumænien

En ekspert vurderer, at rumænske efterretningsagenter med loven i hånden kan kræve adgang til danske teledata. TDC tvivler ikke på, at sikkerhedsniveauet kan opretholdes.

9h

On Neuroscience and Morality: Five Questions for Patricia S. Churchland

Patricia S. Churchland, a philosopher and the author of "Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition," discusses how neuroscience, evolution, and biology are all essential to understanding moral decision-making, as well as the similarities between human and animal brains, and how we develop social values.

9h

China has started a grand experiment in AI education. It could reshape how the world learns.

In recent years, the country has rushed to pursue “intelligent education.” Now its billion-dollar ed-tech companies are planning to export their vision overseas.

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Indian boy, seven, found with 526 teeth inside his mouth

Teeth sized between 0.1mm to 3mm discovered in lower jaw of boy during surgery in Chennai A seven-year-old boy who had suffered occasional toothache was found to have 526 teeth inside his jaw, according to surgeons in India. The hundreds of teeth were found inside a sac that was nestled in the molar region of his lower jaw, following surgery carried out at the Saveetha dental college and hospital

9h

Why nanotechnology could be the key to smarter machines

The field of ‘synthetic intelligence’ aims to replicate the structural complexity of the human brain

9h

Computing history: From government secrets to a failed tech utopia

Elon Musk isn't the first technologist to worry about robot overlords. The early computers of the '40s and '50s were referred to as electronic brains, and people regarded them with fascination and fear. Until the 1960s, computing power was wielded only by corporations and the government. Then, out of the 1960s counterculture rose a generation of technologists with a techno-utopic vision: Give eve

9h

Trump Might Make a Big Mistake in Afghanistan

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made news this week by suggesting that President Donald Trump has instructed him to pursue troop reductions in Afghanistan by Election Day 2020. “He’s been unambiguous,” Pompeo said. “End the endless wars. Draw down. Reduce.” After an uproar, the secretary blamed sloppy press reporting and said that any withdrawals of U.S. forces from Afghanistan will be based on co

9h

The Booming, Ethically Dubious Business of Food Delivery

This is a blessed age for food in America—for dining out and cooking in; for recipe books, and TV shows, and recipe books that become TV shows ; for the celebrity chefs who occupy seats in the cultural pantheon once reserved for artists; and above all, for the American eater, who is fortunate to be chewing and digesting at a time when there are more restaurants than ever in the United States. But

9h

Quentin Tarantino’s Ultimate Statement on Movie Violence

This article contains major spoilers for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood . For his ninth and supposedly penultimate film, Quentin Tarantino gave up violence. In a way. To a point. The ever-polarizing writer-director is famed for his stylish and shocking scenes of brutality, which he’s used for cartoonish thrills ( Kill Bill ’s 89-person sword fight) , queasy comedy ( Pulp Fiction’s accidental face-

9h

The Bad-Apple Myth of Policing

On a late-fall afternoon in 1984, in Charlotte, North Carolina, Dethorne Graham started to feel ill. He understood what was happening; insulin reactions from diabetes were a regular part of his life. Graham asked his friend William to drive him to a local convenience store where he could buy orange juice to offset the effects. Graham walked in, but left quickly after seeing a long line at the cou

9h

Forensics Friday: What would you do if you were the reviewer?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the eleventh in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue read

9h

Stars may keep spinning fast, long into old age

NASA’s TESS telescope has spotted an old star that spins too fast for theory to explain, suggesting that stars may have a magnetic midlife crisis.

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Turtle embryos can choose their own sex, shows new research – but why?

The animal world has many weird and wonderful ways of having sex. Some animals, such as snails, are hermaphrodites—able to make both eggs and sperm simultaneously. Some, such as wrasses and parrot-fish, initially hatch as male but transition to female in later life as they get older. Still others, including some lizard species, have dispensed with males entirely, and the females reproduce by parth

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Turtle embryos can choose their own sex, shows new research – but why?

The animal world has many weird and wonderful ways of having sex. Some animals, such as snails, are hermaphrodites—able to make both eggs and sperm simultaneously. Some, such as wrasses and parrot-fish, initially hatch as male but transition to female in later life as they get older. Still others, including some lizard species, have dispensed with males entirely, and the females reproduce by parth

10h

Finding signs of happiness in chickens could help us understand their lives in captivity

When animal welfare campaigner Ruth Harrison published a book in 1964 called Animal Machines, there was a public outcry. Her vivid descriptions of post-war intensive farming started a discussion about animal welfare that led to new guidelines for safeguarding animals in human care. From this, the "Five Freedoms" were born.

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Finding signs of happiness in chickens could help us understand their lives in captivity

When animal welfare campaigner Ruth Harrison published a book in 1964 called Animal Machines, there was a public outcry. Her vivid descriptions of post-war intensive farming started a discussion about animal welfare that led to new guidelines for safeguarding animals in human care. From this, the "Five Freedoms" were born.

10h

Harold Prince Knew How to Make a Musical

As a college student spending a year in London in the late 1970s, I wangled a writing assignment from a New York magazine that got me into every rehearsal of Evita , a musical then in its first production. The excitement in London was over the new show’s authors—Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, who had also written Jesus Christ Superstar . But for me, the best part was getting an up-close view o

10h

Mapping the kinks in faulty DNA

Here is a challenge for you: copy letter-by-letter, word-for-word a document that is 1,200,000 pages long—that's a stack of paper higher than the Statue of Liberty. And don't make any typos or miss any punctuation.

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Mapping the kinks in faulty DNA

Here is a challenge for you: copy letter-by-letter, word-for-word a document that is 1,200,000 pages long—that's a stack of paper higher than the Statue of Liberty. And don't make any typos or miss any punctuation.

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Orchestrating development in the fly embryo

Most multicellular organisms on Earth—including you—begin as a single fertilized egg and then undergo a complex choreography of cellular growth to become a functioning adult composed of countless cells. Understanding this process is a major goal in the field of developmental biology. Now, using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system, a new study illustrates how two proteins act li

10h

Cell injections could train the body to accept a transplanted organ

Organ donations save lives but require the recipient to take drugs that prevent rejection – in future, cell injections may train the body to accept the new organ

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Orchestrating development in the fly embryo

Most multicellular organisms on Earth—including you—begin as a single fertilized egg and then undergo a complex choreography of cellular growth to become a functioning adult composed of countless cells. Understanding this process is a major goal in the field of developmental biology. Now, using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system, a new study illustrates how two proteins act li

10h

A mother’s fight to get medical cannabis for her son

In cases of intractable epilepsy, cannabidiol can be the only effective treatment. Why is it so hard to obtain?

10h

When plant roots learned to follow gravity

Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity. The 'how and when' of this evolutionary step has, until now, remained unknown. Plant biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have identified crucial components and processes which only developed in seed plants around 350 million years ago to enable fast and efficient g

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Researchers remove the need for anti-rejection drugs in transplant recipients

For decades, immunologists have been trying to train the transplant recipient's immune system to accept transplanted cells and organs without the long-term use of anti-rejection drugs. New University of Minnesota preclinical research shows that this is now possible.

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Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Determining Sex

Scientists have found that turtle embryos can play a role in determining their own sex, which could help their species guard against climate change.

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Multisensory learning between odor and sound enhances beta oscillations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47503-y

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Engineering genetically encoded FRET-based nanosensors for real time display of arsenic (As3+) dynamics in living cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47682-8 Engineering genetically encoded FRET-based nanosensors for real time display of arsenic (As 3+ ) dynamics in living cells

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Assessing genetic diversity and similarity of 435 KPC-carrying plasmids

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47758-5

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Characterization of Maillard reaction products micro/nano-particles present in fermented soybean sauce and vinegar

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47800-6

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Got Impossible Milk? The Quest for Lab-Made Dairy

With advances in synthetic biology, researchers and entrepreneurs strive to create cows’ milk without cows.

10h

NASA targets coastal ecosystems with new space sensor

NASA has selected a space-based instrument under its Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) portfolio that will make observations of coastal waters to help protect ecosystem sustainability, improve resource management, and enhance economic activity.

10h

AI could be your wingman—er, wingbot—on your next first date

AIMM wants to disrupt online dating. What could go wrong?

10h

Radio Atlantic: Rebuilding the Blue Wall

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Listen to Edward-Isaac Dovere interview Dana Nessel on Radio Atlantic. DETROIT —A white moderate man can win statewide in Michigan, sure, but so can a progressive Jewish lesbian. And that, says state Attorney General Dana Nessel—who was elected last year on a statewide ticket that featured four women and one young

10h

Stationspladser og fodgængertunneller forsinkes for at holde metro-åbning på sporet

Den nye metrolinje i København forventes stadig færdig sidst i september. Det gælder dog ikke fodgængertunneller og pladserne ved stationerne.

10h

Solenergi blir biobränsle utan solceller

Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har lyckats framställa mikroorganismer som effektivt kan producera alkoholen butanol utav koldioxid och solenergi, utan att behöva gå omvägen via solceller. – Vi har systematiskt designat och skapat en serie modifierade cyanobakterier som stegvis producerade ökande mängder butanol i direkta processer. När de bästa cellerna används i långtidsförsök i våra laborator

11h

Teslas nye batteri kan forsyne storby med strøm i seks timer

Enorme batterier skal lagre vedvarende energi og være et alternativ til små naturgasanlæg, mener Tesla.

11h

Researchers use machine learning technique to rapidly evaluate new transition metal compounds

In recent years, machine learning has been proving a valuable tool for identifying new materials with properties optimized for specific applications. Working with large, well-defined data sets, computers learn to perform an analytical task to generate a correct answer and then use the same technique on an unknown data set.

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Ny ballade om deep learning: Resultater kan ikke reproduceres og tommelfingerregler fungerer lige så godt

Ny videnskabelig artikel stiller endnu engang spørgsmålstegn ved effekten af neurale netværk til machine learning.

11h

Cutting pollution won't cause global warming spike, study finds

Fears that efforts to reduce air pollution could dramatically speed up the process of global warming have been allayed with the publication of a landmark new study.

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Folic acid seems to be essential for fathers-to-be as well as mothers

With evidence building that folic acid is vital for healthy sperm, is it time to recommend that fathers-to-be supplement their diet with the vitamin?

12h

Andrew Yang is trying to prepare us for our future AI overlords.

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Energy storage market to exceed 1,000GW globally by 2040

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LightSail 2 successfully demonstrates solar sailing

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Greenland's in The Middle of a Record Melting Event, as The Arctic Burns And Swelters

197 billion tons of water poured into the North Atlantic in July alone.

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If you act now you can maybe avoid the worst of climate change. But you know you're not going to | First Dog on the Moon

The rage inducing, sober reality of it, you could do it but you won’t Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

13h

Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not

In a world first, researchers at ZSL and UCL compared changes in bird and mammal populations with socio-economic trends in low- and lower-middle income countries over the past 20 years. Their results suggest that national-level economic growth and more gender-balanced governments enhance wildlife populations and provide support for linking the UN's human development and conservation targets.

14h

Study identifies way to enhance the sustainability of manufactured soils

A combination of waste materials supplemented with a product of biomass could help in the search for high quality soils, a new study suggests.

14h

Cheater, cheater: Human Behavior Lab studies cheating as innate trait

Is cheating a product of the environment or a character trait?

14h

'Iceberg Corridor' sparks tourist boom on Canada's east coast

At dusk, tourists marvel at the sensational collapse of an iceberg at the end of its long journey from Greenland to Canada's east coast, which now has a front row seat to the melting of the Arctic's ice.

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Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion

Fuels made from agricultural or forestry wastes known as lignocellulosic biomass have long been a champion in the quest to reduce use of fossil fuels. But plant cell walls have some innate defenses that make the process to break them down more difficult and costly than it could be.

14h

Convention on Biological Diversity adopts indicator to track conservation of useful plants

The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership officially adopted in July a new indicator to track progress on the conservation of thousands of economically and culturally important plants. Developed by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture and the Crop Trust, the indicator helps rate progress toward the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), Aichi Biodiversity Target 13, which includes ma

14h

Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes

Eleven new to science species of rain frogs are described by two scientists from the Museum of Zoology of the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador in the open-access journal ZooKeys. Discovered in the Ecuadorian Andes, the species are characterized in detail on the basis of genetic, morphological, bioacoustic, and ecological features.

14h

'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media

The term "fake news" has been popularized by President Donald Trump in recent years, and while its meaning has been hotly debated, the spreading of false information to fulfill a political agenda is far from a new concept around the world. Exploring the perception of the "fake news" phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authore

14h

Convention on Biological Diversity adopts indicator to track conservation of useful plants

The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership officially adopted in July a new indicator to track progress on the conservation of thousands of economically and culturally important plants. Developed by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture and the Crop Trust, the indicator helps rate progress toward the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), Aichi Biodiversity Target 13, which includes ma

14h

Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes

Eleven new to science species of rain frogs are described by two scientists from the Museum of Zoology of the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador in the open-access journal ZooKeys. Discovered in the Ecuadorian Andes, the species are characterized in detail on the basis of genetic, morphological, bioacoustic, and ecological features.

14h

Canadian iceberg hunter on the trail of white gold

It's midday and Edward Kean, a Canadian fisherman who now scours the North Atlantic for icebergs that have broken off from Greenland's glaciers, is positively beaming.

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Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not

Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development — including more women in government — are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline.

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Humanity's next test: feed 10 billion without ruining Earth

It is a question critical to mankind's survival: how do we grow enough food to sustain our booming population without wrecking our only home and plundering Nature's bounty?

14h

'I like plastic': Pakistan's toxic 'love affair' with waste

From the once pristine rivers of Hindu Kush to the slums of Islamabad, Pakistan is being smothered by plastic due to a lack of public awareness, government inertia, and poor waste management.

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Eco-venues and no-flyer zones: Edinburgh fringe tackles the climate crisis

Mass extinctions, carbon emissions and freak storms will feature at a festival where artists are finding new ways to raise the alarm ‘I no longer think of this as a technological problem. I don’t think of it as a political problem.” Alanna Mitchell is assessing the climate emergency. “I think of it as a cultural problem.” The Canadian journalist and playwright believes the arts play a key role in

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The psychology of climate science denial – Science Weekly podcast

We revisit the archive as Ian Sample looks at why some people continue to deny anthropogenic global heating, despite the scientific evidence. Could better communication be the key? And what tips can scientists and journalists take from political campaigns? Continue reading…

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The psychology of climate science denial – Science Weekly podcast

We revisit the archive as Ian Sample looks at why some people continue to deny anthropogenic global heating, despite the scientific evidence. Could better communication be the key? And what tips can scientists and journalists take from political campaigns?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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'Dead zone' reduced by Hurricane Barry but still 8th largest

This year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" is the eighth largest on record, but Hurricane Barry reduced its size from an expected near record, the scientist who has measured it since 1985 said Thursday.

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Smider du cigaretskod i naturen? Det skader planterne

Cigaretskod kan påvirke, hvordan planter spirer og skyder, viser drivhus-forsøg.

15h

Photos of the Week: Vegas Grasshoppers, Poultry Inspection, Eagle Eyes

The Pan American Games in Peru, a 3-D-printed prosthetic arm in Australia, a baby Sumatran elephant in Indonesia, paddle-boarding pups in the U.K., the Tour de France in Paris, U.S. Democratic presidential debates in Detroit, Vladimir Putin in a submersible, a cranky tiger cub in Istanbul, a hot-air-balloon festival in France, and much more.

15h

Country diary: a dowdy female with the vapours gets male moths a-flutter

Langstone, Hampshire: Potential mates can detect the emergence of an adult vapourer moth from miles away It was impossible to miss the rusty tussock moth ( Orgyia antiqua ) caterpillar foraging on my raspberry bush. Its body was dotted with orangey-red pinacula, wart-like growths sprouting clusters of pale lemon hairs. It had two bristly black antler-like protrusions at the front of its head, and

15h

Study identifies way to enhance the sustainability of manufactured soils

Through its FABsoil project, the University of Plymouth — in partnership with the world famous Eden Project and businesses in Cornwall, such as the Green waste Company — is leading the quest to fabricate soils which could ultimately lead to the creation of custom-made, sustainable products across a range of locations and markets.

15h

Mount Sinai researchers make immunotherapy work for treatment-resistant lymphoma

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a way to use immunotherapy drugs against treatment-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas for the first time by combining them with stem cell transplantation, an approach that also dramatically increased the success of the drugs in melanoma and lung cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Discovery in July.

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Unarmed robots more likely to be shot if racialized as black, new study finds

A recent pair of studies examined peoples' perceptions of robots of different colors. The results suggest that seeing robots can activate racial biases in people, in similar ways that seeing real-life people does. The researchers said the robotics industry has nothing to lose by increasing the diversity of robots. None If you search Google for images of robots, you'll notice that the vast majorit

15h

10 billion tons of meltwater poured off Greenland in a day — but are things as bad as the Twittersphere says?

Comparison of satellite images of the western edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet about 250 miles across, one acquired in 2018 on July 30, and the other on July 31 of this year. Vastly expanded areas of blue in this year's image are indicative of water at the surface. The gray area, known as the "ablation zone," is where ice is exposed and experiencing melting. (Images: NASA Worldview. Animation: Tom

16h

Dæksler springer af under skybrud: Kun få kommuner sikrer kloakkerne

Både i Aalborg, Randers og Horsens har man under de seneste dages skybrud oplevet, at kloakdækslerne springer af og efterlader farlige huller i vejen. I København sikres de med hængsler.

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Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

Mating is risky business for black widow males—so they hitchhike on the silk threads left by competitors to more quickly find a mate. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Cancer: These 4 genes help predict outcome

Using data from more than 10,000 people with cancer, research looks at mutations in the tumor protein p53 to better predict a person's outlook.

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Scientists are making human-monkey hybrids in China

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Walloped by heat wave, Greenland sees massive ice melt

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Scientists Invent Zooming Contact Lenses Activated By Blinking

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US scientists announce 3D heart printing breakthrough

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Japan gives green light to grow human organs inside animals

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First ride: Harley-Davidson's new all-electric motorcycle

Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire electric motorcycle is here and it is impressive. (Harley-Davidson/) This story was originally published on Cycleworld.com. Like many, I was shocked back in 2014 when Harley-Davidson , perhaps the most tradition-steeped motorcycle manufacturer on the planet, unveiled a prototype electric motorcycle with intent to bring a whisper-quiet hog to market. It was a bold step f

18h

Familial hyperkalemia and hypertension and a hypothesis to explain proximal renal tubular acidosis [Letters (Online Only)]

Familial hyperkalemia and hypertension (FHHt) is an inherited disease characterized by hyperkalemia, hypertension, and hyperchloremic acidosis (1, 2). The primary defect is a hyperactive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC), expressed exclusively in renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT). FHHt is caused by a mutation in 1 of 4 genes, WNK1, WNK4, KLHL3,…

18h

Reply to Farfel et al.: Is enhanced chloride reabsorption in proximal tubule a possible mechanism of metabolic acidosis in PHAII? [Letters (Online Only)]

Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis along with hypertension and hyperkalemia are features of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). Increased activity of sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is believed to be an important mechanism of these phenotypic features (1). Gain-of-function mutations of WNK4 in PHAII activate NCC in the distal convoluted tubule, which leads to…

18h

Phosphatidylserine flipping by the P4-ATPase ATP8A2 is electrogenic [Biochemistry]

Phospholipid flippases (P4-ATPases) utilize ATP to translocate specific phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of biological membranes, thus generating and maintaining transmembrane lipid asymmetry essential for a variety of cellular processes. P4-ATPases belong to the P-type ATPase protein family, which also encompasses the ion transporting P2-ATPases: Ca2+-ATPase,..

18h

Water and methane stay together at extreme pressures [Commentaries]

Large lakes of liquid methane nestle between mountain ranges of solid water ice in the polar regions of Jupiter’s moon Titan (1, 2). This strange world illustrates in a quite dramatic fashion that the isoelectronic CH4 and H2O molecules display profoundly different physical properties including a 182 °C difference in…

18h

Itinerant quantum critical point with fermion pockets and hotspots [Physics]

Metallic quantum criticality is among the central themes in the understanding of correlated electronic systems, and converging results between analytical and numerical approaches are still under review. In this work, we develop a state-of-the-art large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulation technique and systematically investigate the itinerant quantum critical point on a…

18h

Parietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer [Neuroscience]

Working memory (WM) is a component of the brain’s memory systems vital for interpretation of sequential sensory inputs and consequent decision making. Anatomically, WM is highly distributed over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the parietal cortex (PC). Here we present a biophysically detailed dynamical systems model for a WM buffer…

18h

Rhodopsin-based voltage imaging tools for use in muscles and neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans [Neuroscience]

Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) based on microbial rhodopsins utilize the voltage-sensitive fluorescence of all-trans retinal (ATR), while in electrochromic FRET (eFRET) sensors, donor fluorescence drops when the rhodopsin acts as depolarization-sensitive acceptor. In recent years, such tools have become widely used in mammalian cells but are less commonly used…

18h

Analysis of lipoprotein transport depletion in Vibrio cholerae using CRISPRi [Microbiology]

Genes necessary for the survival or reproduction of a cell are an attractive class of antibiotic targets. Studying essential genes by classical genetics, however, is inherently problematic because it is impossible to knock them out. Here, we screened a set of predicted essential genes for growth inhibition using CRISPR-interference (CRISPRi)…

18h

Desmin forms toxic, seeding-competent amyloid aggregates that persist in muscle fibers [Biochemistry]

Desmin-associated myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) has pathologic similarities to neurodegeneration-associated protein aggregate diseases. Desmin is an abundant muscle-specific intermediate filament, and disease mutations lead to its aggregation in cells, animals, and patients. We reasoned that similar to neurodegeneration-associated proteins, desmin itself may form amyloid. Desmin peptides correspondi

18h

Sex-specific neuroprotection by inhibition of the Y-chromosome gene, SRY, in experimental Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons. While the cause of DA cell loss in PD is unknown, male sex is a strong risk factor. Aside from the protective actions of sex hormones in females, emerging evidence suggests that sex-chromosome…

18h

Disruption of IRE1{alpha} through its kinase domain attenuates multiple myeloma [Cell Biology]

Multiple myeloma (MM) arises from malignant immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells and remains an incurable, often lethal disease despite therapeutic advances. The unfolded-protein response sensor IRE1α supports protein secretion by deploying a kinase–endoribonuclease module to activate the transcription factor XBP1s. MM cells may co-opt the IRE1α–XBP1s pathway; however, the validity of…

18h

Highly diversified shrew hepatitis B viruses corroborate ancient origins and divergent infection patterns of mammalian hepadnaviruses [Microbiology]

Shrews, insectivorous small mammals, pertain to an ancient mammalian order. We screened 693 European and African shrews for hepatitis B virus (HBV) homologs to elucidate the enigmatic genealogy of HBV. Shrews host HBVs at low prevalence (2.5%) across a broad geographic and host range. The phylogenetically divergent shrew HBVs comprise…

18h

p120-catenin regulates WNT signaling and EMT in the mouse embryo [Developmental Biology]

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) require a complete reorganization of cadherin-based cell–cell junctions. p120-catenin binds to the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain of classical cadherins and regulates their stability, suggesting that p120-catenin may play an important role in EMTs. Here, we describe the role of p120-catenin in mouse gastrulation, an EMT that can be…

18h

Protein stability engineering insights revealed by domain-wide comprehensive mutagenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The accurate prediction of protein stability upon sequence mutation is an important but unsolved challenge in protein engineering. Large mutational datasets are required to train computational predictors, but traditional methods for collecting stability data are either low-throughput or measure protein stability indirectly. Here, we develop an automated method to generate…

18h

Application of antihelix antibodies in protein structure determination [Biochemistry]

Antibodies are indispensable tools in protein engineering and structural biology. Antibodies suitable for structural studies should recognize the 3-dimensional (3D) conformations of target proteins. Generating such antibodies and characterizing their complexes with antigens take a significant amount of time and effort. Here, we show that we can expand the application…

18h

Subȷective well-being in China’s changing society [Social Sciences]

There is now recognition that a population’s overall level of well-being is defined not just by income and wealth. Where we live and who we interact with are likely to be equally important in our overall levels of satisfaction with our lives. This thinking has stimulated studies of subjective well-being,…

18h

Volumetric and shear processes in crystalline rock approaching faulting [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Understanding the approach to faulting in continental rocks is critical for identifying processes leading to fracturing in geomaterials and the preparation process of large earthquakes. In situ dynamic X-ray imaging and digital volume correlation analysis of a crystalline rock core, under a constant confining pressure of 25 MPa, are used…

18h

Contrasting evolution of virulence and replication rate in an emerging bacterial pathogen [Evolution]

Host resistance through immune clearance is predicted to favor pathogens that are able to transmit faster and are hence more virulent. Increasing pathogen virulence is, in turn, typically assumed to be mediated by increasing replication rates. However, experiments designed to test how pathogen virulence and replication rates evolve in response…

18h

Paradoxical association of TET loss of function with genome-wide DNA hypomethylation [Genetics]

Cancer genomes are characterized by focal increases in DNA methylation, co-occurring with widespread hypomethylation. Here, we show that TET loss of function results in a similar genomic footprint. Both 5hmC in wild-type (WT) genomes and DNA hypermethylation in TET-deficient genomes are largely confined to the active euchromatic compartment, consistent with…

18h

Identification of key enzymes responsible for protolimonoid biosynthesis in plants: Opening the door to azadirachtin production [Plant Biology]

Limonoids are natural products made by plants belonging to the Meliaceae (Mahogany) and Rutaceae (Citrus) families. They are well known for their insecticidal activity, contribution to bitterness in citrus fruits, and potential pharmaceutical properties. The best known limonoid insecticide is azadirachtin, produced by the neem tree (Azadirachta indica). Despite intensive…

18h

How drag sharpens a T cell’s view on antigen [Commentaries]

How about a Gedankenexperiment (German for thought experiment)? Let us consider a surface which is sticky, yet to an unknown degree. To determine stickiness we may do the following (experimental strategy 1): We place an object onto the surface, turn the surface upside down, and measure the time until the…

18h

Building a synthetic mechanosensitive signaling pathway in compartmentalized artificial cells [Biochemistry]

To date, reconstitution of one of the fundamental methods of cell communication, the signaling pathway, has been unaddressed in the bottom-up construction of artificial cells (ACs). Such developments are needed to increase the functionality and biomimicry of ACs, accelerating their translation and application in biotechnology. Here, we report the construction…

18h

X-ray induced photodynamic therapy with copper-cysteamine nanoparticles in mice tumors [Applied Biological Sciences]

Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a treatment that uses a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen, and light to kill target cells, is a promising cancer treatment method. However, a limitation of PDT is its dependence on light that is not highly penetrating, precluding the treatment of tumors located deep in the body. Copper-cysteamine nanoparticles…

18h

Ubiquitin in disguise unveils a cryptic binding site in 1.2-MDa anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome [Commentaries]

Ubiquitin serves as a protein modifier and pervasive signaling molecule in eukaryotes, regulating major events throughout the lifetime of a cell, including pathways used for synthesis, repair, and degradation. Aptly named for its ubiquitous presence in human cells, proteomics studies have revealed tens of thousands of sites in ∼5,000 substrates,…

18h

A role for S-nitrosylation of the SUMO-conjugating enzyme SCE1 in plant immunity [Plant Biology]

SUMOylation, the covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins, is emerging as a key modulator of eukaryotic immune function. In plants, a SUMO1/2-dependent process has been proposed to control the deployment of host defense responses. The molecular mechanism underpinning this activity remains to be determined, however….

18h

Retinal and optic nerve degeneration in liver X receptor {beta} knockout mice [Medical Sciences]

The retina is an extension of the brain. Like the brain, neurodegeneration of the retina occurs with age and is the cause of several retinal diseases including optic neuritis, macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are expressed in the brain where they play a key role in maintenance…

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18h

Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

Mating is risky business for black widow males—so they hitchhike on the silk threads left by competitors to more quickly find a mate. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

Mating is risky business for black widow males – so they hitchhike on the silk threads left by competitors to more quickly find a mate. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Pentagon stalls $10 bn cloud contract eyed by Amazon

The Pentagon has put off awarding a $10 billion cloud computing contract sought by Amazon, saying Thursday that the process will be reviewed by the newly-appointed defense secretary.

19h

Climate change: July 'marginally' warmest month on record

Preliminary figures suggest last month's global temperatures equalled or narrowly beat the previous record.

19h

'Voltron' imaging tool captures brain cell action in living animals

Scientists have developed a new way to track neural activity. The technique can target specific brain cells and relies on dyes that are brighter and more stable than those currently used.

19h

'Voltron' imaging tool captures brain cell action in living animals

Scientists have developed a new way to track neural activity. The technique can target specific brain cells and relies on dyes that are brighter and more stable than those currently used.

20h

Repairing harmful effects of inbreeding could save the iconic Helmeted Honeyeater

A new study combines over 30 years of demanding fieldwork and advanced genetics to quantify how much harm is done by inbreeding in the last wild population of the helmeted honeyeater, and identifies ways forward.

20h

System to image the human eye corrects for chromatic aberrations

Researchers report a new imaging system that cancels the chromatic optical aberrations present in a specific person's eye, allowing for a more accurate assessment of vision and eye health. By taking pictures of the eye's smallest light-sensing cells with multiple wavelengths, the system also provides the first objective measurement of longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA), which could lead to n

20h

Can a combination immune therapy reduce genital herpes outbreaks?

Investigators have shown that the combination of a vaccine and a medicated cream is a promising strategy to dramatically reduce the recurrence of genital herpes.

20h

Artificial intelligence could help air travelers save a bundle

Researchers are using artificial intelligence to help airlines price ancillary services such as checked bags and seat reservations in a way that is beneficial to customers' budget and privacy, as well as to the airline industry's bottom line.

20h

Alzheimer’s blood test could predict onset up to 20 years in advance

US scientists say their blood test can be 94% effective in spotting those at risk of the illness A blood test that can detect signs of Alzheimer’s as much as 20 years before the disease begins to have a debilitating effect has been developed by researchers in the US. Scientists at the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis in Missouri believe the test can identify changes in the bra

20h

We're Starting to Harness the Microbiome to Treat Disease

But strong regulation is a must to protect patient safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Cheater, cheater: Human Behavior Lab studies cheating as innate trait

A human behavior lab took a closer look at cheating during periods of relative economic abundance and scarcity to determine whether cheating for monetary gain is a product of the economic environment. During the experiment, they found evidence that cheating is more likely caused by an individual's propensity to cheat than external factors.

20h

Fear of more dangerous second Zika, dengue infections unfounded in monkeys

An initial infection with dengue virus did not prime monkeys for an especially virulent infection of Zika virus, according to a new study. Nor did a bout with Zika make a follow-on dengue infection more dangerous.

20h

Improving outcomes for sepsis patients

More than 1 million sepsis survivors are discharged annually from acute care hospitals in the United States. Although the majority of these patients receive post-acute care (PAC) services, with over a third coming to home health care (HHC), sepsis survivors account for a majority of readmissions nationwide. Effective interventions are needed to decrease these poor outcomes.

20h

Assessing direct-to-consumer stem cell clinics

This direct-to-consumer stem cell marketplace has come under increasing scrutiny, but relatively little is known about the clinics or how the treatments they offer align with the expertise of their practitioners. Investigators now offer a detailed characterization of nearly 170 stem cell businesses across Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, where about one-third of US stem

20h

Amazon to kill Dash button functions on August 31—you have a month to hack yours

Amazon stopped selling the $5 plastic buttons in February. Don't let yours die.

20h

Impossible Whopper, the 'meatless burger,' is coming to every Burger King nationwide

The plant based "Impossible Whopper" by Impossible Foods will be available August 8th nationwide at all Burger Kings. The Impossible Burger is one of the most popular "meatless meat" options in the industry. Americans are increasingly becoming more interested in alternative options for meat. Burger King recently announced it will begin selling its meatless Whopper nationwide across the United Sta

20h

Scientists Are Reportedly Growing Human-Monkey Embryos in China

Chinese Chimeras A new story in Spanish newspaper El País claims that scientists are growing the first human-monkey hybrid embryos in a Chinese laboratory. According to El País’ report, a research team led by Spanish scientist Juan Carlos Izpisúa is creating these human-monkey hybrids by taking monkey embryos and using gene editing technology to deactivate genes needed to form certain organs. The

20h

New computational method could advance precision medicine

Scientists have devised a new computational method that reveals genetic patterns in the massive jumble of individual cells in the body. The discovery will be useful in discerning patterns of gene expression across many kinds of disease, including cancer. Scientists worked out the formulation by testing tissue taken from the testes of mice. Results in hand, they're already applying the same analysi

20h

Simulation technique can predict microstructures of alloy materials used in jet engines — before they are made

Researchers were able to rapidly and accurately predict the microstructure of Nickel — Aluminum (Ni-Al) alloys that are commonly used in the design of jet engine turbine parts. Predictions of the microstructure of these alloys have so far been time-consuming and expensive. The findings have the potential to greatly advance the design of materials — made up of a range of different alloys — that

20h

Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion

Pretreating plant biomass with THF-water causes lignin globules on the cellulose surface to expand and break away from one another and the cellulose fibers. The expanded lignin is also more exposed to catalytic fragmentation by dilute acid. As a result, lignin can be more efficiently depolymerized, solubilized, and transported out of the cell wall at milder treatment conditions. Co-solvents allow

20h

HBO Max Is Bringing a TARDIS-Load of Doctor Who With It

Well, if you’re kicking off a new streaming service in an age when everyone and their mother has a streaming service, offering plenty of adventures in Time and Space is a nice way to sweeten …

20h

DoorDash Is Acquiring Food Delivery Service Caviar From Square for $410 Million

DoorDash, the delivery service known for screwing over its delivery workers with an elaborate tip-skimming scheme, is reportedly acquiring upscale food delivery platform Caviar in a deal valued …

20h

Saving Endangered Species (Or At Least Their Tissues) With 'Frozen Zoos'

(Credit: Courtesy of San Diego Zoo) (Inside Science) — In 1975, medical doctor Kurt Benirschke founded the Center for the Reproduction of Endangered Species with the goal of using molecular genetics tools to save endangered species. In the corner of the modest lab, which contained a freezer with liquid nitrogen to bank cells, Benirschke hung a poster: “You must collect things for reasons you don’

21h

The Best Way to Counteract Obesity Genes? Jogging

A new study of obesity genes and different kinds of exercise finds that jogging is the best way to counteract weight gain. (Credit: By Giuseppe Elio Cammarata/Shutterstock) Obesity is worldwide health problem tied to both nature and nurture. Genetic mutations make some people more likely to gain weight than others, but exercise lessens those chances. Now, some surprising new research suggests that

21h

This mind-blowing 3D map reveals the Milky Way’s perplexing curves

Our galaxy flares up and down at the edges, and astronomers aren’t sure why. (J. Skowron/OGLE/) When ancient stargazers looked up at the Milky Way , some saw spilt milk or a river flowing across the sky. Others saw a trail of hay, or a flock of birds. No one spotted the pinwheel. It’s hard to resolve a swirly, complex disk when you’re stuck inside, looking horizontally either in toward the center

21h

Cancer without end? Discovery yields fresh insights

Scientists describe the evolutionary dynamics of a sexually transmitted cancer affecting dogs, which arose in a single ancient animal, living as much as 8.5 millennia ago. The findings provide fresh insights into disease evolution relevant to human cancer study and treatment.

21h

Hidden chemistry in flowers shown to kill cancer cells

Researchers have shown that it's possible to produce a compound with anti-cancer properties directly from feverfew — a common flowering garden plant.

21h

Experimental treatment slows prion disease, extends life of mice

Scientists using an experimental treatment have slowed the progression of scrapie, a degenerative central nervous disease caused by prions, in laboratory mice and greatly extended the rodents' lives. The scientists used antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), synthetic compounds that inhibit the formation of specific proteins.

21h

Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion

Pretreating plant biomass with THF-water causes lignin globules on the cellulose surface to expand and break away from one another and the cellulose fibers. The expanded lignin is also more exposed to catalytic fragmentation by dilute acid. As a result, lignin can be more efficiently depolymerized, solubilized, and transported out of the cell wall at milder treatment conditions. Co-solvents allow

21h

The Lancet: Deep learning AI may identify atrial fibrillation from a normal rhythm ECG

Researchers have trained an artificial intelligence model to detect the signature of atrial fibrillation in 10-second electrocardiograms (ECG) taken from patients in normal rhythm. The study, involving almost 181,000 patients and published in The Lancet, is the first to use deep learning to identify patients with potentially undetected atrial fibrillation and had an overall accuracy of 83%. The te

21h

Treatment for liver disorder in pregnancy ineffective, finds new study

Research led by King's College London has found that the currently recommended treatment for a common pregnancy liver disorder that can result in preterm birth and stillbirth, is ineffective and should be reconsidered.

21h

Three concepts from complexity could play a big role in social animal research

A new article lays out three concepts from complex systems science that could advance studies into animal social complexity.

21h

Publisher Correction: Intercellular interaction dictates cancer cell ferroptosis via NF2–YAP signalling

Nature, Published online: 02 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1480-0

21h

Can You Sharpen Your Mind With Games?

submitted by /u/mkop2 [link] [comments]

21h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Mile Eight in a Marathon

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, August 1. ‣ President Donald Trump said he will impose a new round of tariffs on $300 billion in Chinese products starting next month, upping tensions between the two countries. ‣ The Senate approved a two-yea

21h

The Otherworldliness of the Democratic Presidential Debates

Last night's showdown felt like reality TV, in enlightening and uncanny ways.

21h

​Free speech on campus holds the cure to America's growing polarization

In July 2019, a California school board voted unanimously to paint over an 83-year-old, 1,600-square-foot mural chronicling the life of George Washington – in part depicting dead Native Americans and laboring slaves – over concerns that the painting presented traumatic content. The mural, by Stanford University art professor Victor Arnautoff, was created as a pointed critique of Washington, a sla

21h

22h

This Roach-Sized Robot Keeps Going Even After You Step on It

Roach Robot Despite weighing less than one tenth of a gram, a new robot out of the University of California, Berkeley, can withstand the weight of a 60-kilogram (132-pound) person stepping on it — drawing comparisons to a well-known pest. “People may have experienced that, if you step on the cockroach, you may have to grind it up a little bit, otherwise the cockroach may still survive and run awa

22h

22h

Poisoned Air in Paris, Intel's New Chips, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

22h

Everything we know about the new airplanes in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’

An F/A-18F Super Hornet on the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt on July 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erick A. Parsons/Released/) If you've watched the trailer —fans have viewed it tens of millions of times—for the next year's Top Gun: Maverick , then you've seen scenes of Tom Cruise rocketing off an aircraft carrier and fighter jets crui

22h

Snowden says Facebook is spying on you and wants to help fight back – CNET

The NSA whistleblower took to Twitter to hint at anti-spying methods.

22h

Greenland Lost 217 Billion Tons of Ice Last Month

The worst day of melting was July 31, when 11 billion tons of melted ice disappeared into the ocean.

22h

‘Tropical Trump’ sparks unprecedented crisis for Brazilian science

Nature, Published online: 01 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02353-6 Tensions are rising as Jair Bolsonaro’s administration questions the work of government scientists and institutes debilitating cuts to research funding.

22h

Cheater, cheater: Human Behavior Lab studies cheating as innate trait

The Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab took a closer look at cheating during periods of relative economic abundance and scarcity to determine whether cheating for monetary gain is a product of the economic environment.During the experiment, they found evidence that cheating is more likely caused by an individual's propensity to cheat than external factors.

22h

'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media

Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher.

22h

That “CRISPR Baby” Scientist Wanted to Open a Designer Baby Clinic

CRISPR A-List He Jiankui, the disgraced Chinese doctor who brought a trio of CRISPR-edited babies into the world, apparently wanted to open a clinic where he would gene-hack designer babies for the wealthy. Though He never got the chance to pursue his business idea, he did have a number of preliminary conversations on the matter, according to Science Magazine . While He’s plans fell through when

22h

Google’s Pixel Phones Will Soon Be Able to Speak to 911 Operators

Credit: Zlata Ivleva/PCMag Automated 911 calls will soon be able to contact emergency services and relay your exact location without you saying …

22h

Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion

Pretreating plant biomass with THF-water causes lignin globules on the cellulose surface to expand and break away from one another and the cellulose fibers. The expanded lignin is also more exposed to catalytic fragmentation by dilute acid. As a result, lignin can be more efficiently depolymerized, solubilized, and transported out of the cell wall at milder treatment conditions. Co-solvents allow

23h

Experimental treatment slows prion disease, extends life of mice

Scientists using an experimental treatment have slowed the progression of scrapie, a degenerative central nervous disease caused by prions, in laboratory mice and greatly extended the rodents' lives, according to a new report in JCI Insight. The scientists used antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), synthetic compounds that inhibit the formation of specific proteins.

23h

Veterans with traumatic brain injuries have higher suicide risk

Military veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more than twice as likely to die by suicide compared with veterans without such a diagnosis, according to a newly published study by researchers led by faculty from the CU School of Medicine.

23h

About That Joe Biden Op-Ed From 1981

In the late stages of last night’s Democratic-primary debate, the presidential candidate Senator Kirsten Gillibrand brought up a short newspaper article published in 1981. The article, written by one Joseph R. Biden, was an op-ed arguing against a tax credit that would help families pay for child care . Biden, then a senator representing Delaware, made the case that by encouraging more high-earni

23h

The best eco-friendly coffee filters and pods

Green gear to make coffee (Danielle MacInnes via Unsplash/) Even if you aren’t using plastic or paper cups, you can still reduce your waste while making coffee at home. Almost every machine or method of making coffee has a reusable filter option. Here’s a list of eco-friendly filters that will help you cut down on waste, making your delicious cup of joe even tastier. Stop tossing your k-cups in t

23h

Genomic data reveal intense fish harvesting causes rapid evolution

For the first time, scientists have unraveled genetic changes that cause rapid fish evolution due to intense harvesting — changes that previously had been invisible to researchers.

23h

Blood test is highly accurate at identifying Alzheimer's before symptoms arise

A blood test to detect the brain changes of early Alzheimer's disease has moved one step closer to reality. Researchers report that they can measure levels of the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta in the blood and use such levels to predict whether the protein has accumulated in the brain. The findings represent a key step toward a blood test to diagnose people on track to develop the devastating d

23h

American kids today dream of being vloggers, not astronauts

Recent survey of 3,000 kids showed that more kids aspire to be a YouTube star than an astronaut. Children in the U.S. and U.K. were three times more likely to want to become vloggers than kids in China. The survey also indicated that kids in America were less knowledgeable about space travel than their global counterparts. Space travel was once the communal dream and subsequent reality of 1960s.

23h

The importance of hackers: Analyst Keren Elazari

How thinking of helpful hackers as the immune systems of the internet can make your security stronger and better prepare and secure your digital presence.

23h

How a Contagious Dog Cancer Spread Around the World

A type of tumor that can pass between dogs is showing researchers how cancer cells evolve. (Credit: Jess Wealleans/Shutterstock) Thousands of years ago in Asia, a dog got cancer. A single cell underwent a mutation that turned it into the beginnings of a tumor. The dog eventually died, but not before passing on a unique legacy: its cancer cells. Today, those cells are still growing in dogs across t

23h

Hubble Spots a Football-Shaped Planet Leaking Heavy Metals into Space

WASP-121b is so hot that the planet has puffed up beyond its ability to hold onto its own atmosphere, and is instead streaming it away as it flies around its star every 30 hours. (Credit: NASA/ESA/J. Olmsted/STScI) Astronomers just used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to take the temperature of an exoplanet called WASP-121b and discovered that the world is so hot that heavy metals actually leak behi

23h

This Remote Corner Of Nevada Is One Of The Darkest Places In The World

Because of light pollution, most people in the U.S. don't know what a full night sky looks like. But the Massacre Rim area in Nevada has recently been designated a Dark Sky Sanctuary. (Image credit: Richie Bedarski/Friends of Nevada Wilderness)

23h

Milky Way galaxy is warped and twisted, not flat

New research shows our galaxy, the Milky Way, is twisted and warped – not flat as previously thought.

23h

How YouTubers plan to take on YouTube for better working conditions

The nascent YouTubers Union has joined forces with Europe’s largest trade union. They argue that YouTube is violating data privacy laws.

23h

Fear of more dangerous second Zika, dengue infections unfounded in monkeys

An initial infection with dengue virus did not prime monkeys for an especially virulent infection of Zika virus, according to a study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Nor did a bout with Zika make a follow-on dengue infection more dangerous.

23h

Blood test is highly accurate at identifying Alzheimer’s before symptoms arise

A blood test to detect the brain changes of early Alzheimer's disease has moved one step closer to reality. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report that they can measure levels of the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta in the blood and use such levels to predict whether the protein has accumulated in the brain. The findings represent a key step toward a blood te

23h

Portable breath analyzer spots lung disease faster than docs

A small, portable breath monitor can quickly and accurately detect acute respiratory distress syndrome, researchers report. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an often deadly disease that causes fluid to leak into the lungs and demands early diagnosis. To detect the condition today, doctors rely heavily on their own judgment and time-consuming tests. The researchers say their new techn

23h

Meet the Beetles: Newly Discovered Brooklynites Have 6 Legs

Researchers studying trees at Green-Wood Cemetery found a nonnative beetle previously unknown to science.

23h

Google halts Assistant speech data transcription in EU

Google has given reassurances that it won't make transcripts of speech data picked up by its Google Assistant system in the European Union for at least the next three months, a German data-protection …

23h

A Blood Test for Alzheimer’s? It’s Coming, Scientists Report

A test that measures beta amyloid protein in the blood is more accurate than a brain scan and may indicate trouble years earlier.

23h

This Password Manager and VPN App Combo Is the All-in-One Online Security Solution You Need

Are you doing everything you can to protect your personal information online? Most people think they are. But research indicates they are sadly mistaken. According to one recent survey , 92 percent of U.S. adults have engaged in risky data security behavior in the past year. That includes 82 percent who have reused passwords, 61 percent who use the same password most of the time, and 22 percent w

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This AI Scans Faces to Let Bartenders Know Who’s Next in Line

AI and Queue On Thursday, London-based AI firm DataSparQ announced plans to launch AI Bar , a software package that uses facial recognition technology to ensure that pub patrons get served in the order they approach the bar. The idea is that you’ll no longer have to worry about anyone cutting the line while you wait to buy the next round — but privacy experts warn that a quicker pint isn’t worth

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Scientist: We Should Be Prepared to Kill Aliens

Noble Sacrifice Scientists often kill animals — that’s just a grisly fact of biological research. But it’s a bit more complicated in the theoretical future where we’ve made first contact with extraterrestrial life. At that point, science author Guy Harrison argues in a Psychology Today op-ed that biologists may have to come to terms with killing alien life in the name of scientific progress — whi

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