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nyheder2019august05

Author Correction: Declines in mental health associated with air pollution and temperature variability in China

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11660-5

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Author Correction: A peak in the critical current for quantum critical superconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11621-y

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The 5 best email apps to rescue your inbox

The dream of a clean inbox is within your reach. (Web Hosting via Unsplash/) We can probably all agree that email is broken. The convenience and simplicity of being able to write to someone anytime, anywhere, has led to an avalanche of messages that can be almost impossible to keep up with, and often end up bringing more anxiety than solutions. But developers have introduced genuinely useful emai

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SpaceX Debuts “Rideshare” Program For Launching Satellites

Team Effort On Monday, SpaceX launched its SmallSat Rideshare Program, an initiative designed to make it easier — and cheaper — for smaller satellite operators to reach space by letting them split the cost of regularly scheduled launches. Currently, many smaller satellite operators cut the cost of reaching space by hitching a ride aboard a rocket already launching a “primary” payload into orbit,

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Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats

The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off.

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Researchers create first-ever 'map' of global labor flow

A new study reveals the ebb and flow of labor — as well as industries and skills — across the global economy using data on 130 million job transitions among 500 workers on the world's largest professional social network, LinkedIn.

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Obama Still Sounds Like a President

Today, the consoler in chief finally emerged to comfort the nation after the massacres in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. No, not President Donald Trump. He spoke, too , in White House remarks read stiffly from a teleprompter, using a lexicon that sounds stunted coming from him. Instead, this was Barack Obama, in a statement delivered on social media: pic.twitter.com/nNOVtQ50O4 — Barack Obama (

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A new map is the best view yet of how fast Antarctica is shedding ice

submitted by /u/TheIntellectZone [link] [comments]

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Could Space-Based Solar Save The World? | Answers With Joe

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

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Trade Wars Are Not Good, or Easy to Win

Stocks plunged this afternoon in Wall Street’s worst day of the year, as the trade war between the United States and China entered a dangerous new phase that could imperil the historic U.S. recovery. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 both fell 3 percent. Oil crashed. The spread between three-month and 10-year Treasury rates—the “yield curve,” which has historically served as a pres

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Is it safe to use an electric fan for cooling?

The safety and effectiveness of electric fans in heatwaves depend on the climate and basing public health advice on common weather metrics could be misleading, according to a new study from the University of Sydney.

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Embargoed news from Annals of Internal Medicine: Electric fans not safe for relieving the heat when temperatures are high and humidity is low

In hot, arid conditions with a relatively low heat index, electric fans may be detrimental to health and are not advisable. However, in hot, but very humid weather conditions with a much higher heat index, fans lowered core temperature and cardiovascular strain and improved comfort. Findings from a brief research report are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Google has a problem with pregnant workers, employee memo alleges

The employee said she encountered a pattern of hostility and retaliation.

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New Operation Could Delay Menopause for 20 Years, Says Clinic

Menstruation can be such a pain that you might think anyone who gets periods would be counting down the days until menopause , the time in life when their body starts producing lower levels of sex hormones and they subsequently stop having monthly periods. No more cramps? Goodbye PMS? Yes, please! But menopause actually brings with it a laundry list of new health problems , from hot flashes and n

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These High Tech Bed Sheets Use Infrared Light for Faster Muscle Recovery

Exercise is important. But if you’re not taking care of your body post-workout, you’re doing it a disservice. This means taking rest days, and being kind to your muscles and joints between workouts so you get enough muscle recovery time. However, there are other ways to maximize your recovery when you’re not working out. It turns out, infrared light is touted as one of the best ways to give your

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Solar-powered desalination plant in Kenya gives fresh water to 25,000 people a day

New solar-powered desalination plant provides fresh water in Kenya. The plant is already able to support 25,000 people a day. As more water-scarce regions pop up worldwide, technology such as this offers an energy efficient way to provide fresh water. We are only at the beginning of an increasingly more perilous worldwide water crisis. The ability to turn seawater into drinking water will be able

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Improving the magnetic bottle that controls fusion power on Earth

The exhaustive detection method that discovered the error field in the initial run of the NSTX-U tokamak could serve as a model for error-field detection in future tokamaks.

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Fans May Be Okay for Muggy Days–but Avoid Them in Extreme Dry Heat

New research contradicts conventional wisdom on fan use during heat waves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fans May Be Okay for Muggy Days–but Avoid Them in Extreme Dry Heat

New research contradicts conventional wisdom on fan use during heat waves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Targeting DNA sequencing for plant biodiversity research

Third-generation sequencing (TGS) technologies like the portable MinION sequencer promise to revolutionize biology, but getting there will require tweaking techniques. Particularly, the low output delivered by TGS sequencers means that targeted sequencing approaches will have to be developed to assure proper sequencing coverage of regions of interest. In research presented in a recent issue of App

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Study: Urban sprawl creates food deserts

Urban sprawl has led to the creation of food deserts in metropolitan areas across the United States, according to a published study by a researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington.

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Targeting DNA sequencing for plant biodiversity research

Third-generation sequencing (TGS) technologies like the portable MinION sequencer promise to revolutionize biology, but getting there will require tweaking techniques. Particularly, the low output delivered by TGS sequencers means that targeted sequencing approaches will have to be developed to assure proper sequencing coverage of regions of interest. In research presented in a recent issue of App

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What Drives People to Mass Shootings?

There may be as many explanations as there are killers. But over the decades, scientists have seen some patterns emerge.

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Trump: Social Media Companies Should Spot Mass Shooters in Advance

Thought Crime In response to the two mass shootings this weekend, Trump called on social media companies to develop tools that might flag potential shooters in advance. In his speech, Trump didn’t specify how that tool might work or whether it would lead to any action being taken against the people it flags, according to The Verge . It’s a proposal, of course, that raises troubling questions abou

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Targeting DNA sequencing for plant biodiversity research

High-throughput sequencing is revolutionizing research in plant evolutionary biology. Using third-generation sequencing technologies, researchers are able to target long fragments of chloroplast DNA to improve genome assembly. Researchers at the French National Institute for Research for Sustainable Development (IRD) in Montpellier, France, have developed a new method to capture and sequence long

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UTA study: Urban sprawl creates food deserts

Urban sprawl has led to the creation of food deserts in metropolitan areas across the United States, according to a published study by a researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington. Shima Hamidi, director of UTA's Center for Transportation Equity, Decisions and Dollars, published 'Urban sprawl and the emergence of food deserts in the USA' in Urban Studies Journal.

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Netflix cancels sci-fi series The OA leaving fans with a cliff-hanger – CNET

Fans of the the mind-bending series still want answers.

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‘Teach back’ communication can keep you out of the hospital

When certain patients “teach back” a doctor’s instructions, they’re more likely to stay out of the hospital, according to a new study. In the study, people living with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease—conditions that can result in hospital visits if not managed effectively at home or with a patient’s primary care doctor—saw double-digit drops in hospital admissions compared

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Device pinpoints sound like a barn owl’s brain

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to new research. “We were already studying this type of circuitry when we stumbled across the Jeffress model of sound localization,” says Saptarshi Das, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics at Penn State. The Jeffress model, which Lloyd Jeffress developed

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Trump suggests connection between video games and mass shootings

The president suggested that video games, in part, cause Americans to glorify violence. No solid body of research currently supports the claim that violent video games cause real-world violence. Research on video games has been historically messy, political and contentious. None In the wake of two mass shootings this weekend, President Donald Trump said Monday that the U.S. needs to "shine light

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Beaches choked with stinky seaweed could be the new normal

Slimy, stinky brown seaweed that ruins beachgoers' vacations from Mexico to Florida may be the new normal unless Brazil halts Amazon deforestation, experts say.

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Magnetic plasma pulses excited by UK-size swirls in the solar atmosphere

An international team of scientists led by the University of Sheffield have discovered previously undetected observational evidence of frequent energetic wave pulses the size of the UK, transporting energy from the solar surface to the higher solar atmosphere.

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Magnetic plasma pulses excited by UK-size swirls in the solar atmosphere

Scientists have discovered previously undetected observational evidence of frequent energetic wave pulses the size of the UK, transporting energy from the solar surface to the higher solar atmosphere.

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Still blocked from Hawaii peak, telescope seeks Spain permit (Update)

The group behind a $1.4 billion telescope planned for Hawaii is applying for a permit to build in Spain as ongoing protests and a human blockade prevent them from starting construction on Mauna Kea, Hawaii's highest peak that some people consider sacred.

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Researchers take key step toward cancer treatments that leave healthy cells unharmed

Researchers have opened up a possible avenue for new cancer therapies that don't have the side effects that oftentimes accompany many current cancer treatments by identifying a protein modification that specifically supports proliferation and survival of tumor cells.

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Researchers take key step toward cancer treatments that leave healthy cells unharmed

Researchers have opened up a possible avenue for new cancer therapies that don't have the side effects that oftentimes accompany many current cancer treatments by identifying a protein modification that specifically supports proliferation and survival of tumor cells.

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Missing link in algal photosynthesis found, offers opportunity to improve crop yields

Photosynthesis is the natural process plants and algae utilize to capture sunlight and fix carbon dioxide into energy-rich sugars that fuel growth, development, and in the case of crops, yield. Algae evolved specialized carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms (CCM) to photosynthesize much more efficiently than plants. This week researchers report a long-time unexplained step in the CCM of green al

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Magnetic plasma pulses excited by UK-size swirls in the solar atmosphere

An international team of scientists led by the University of Sheffield have discovered previously undetected observational evidence of frequent energetic wave pulses the size of the UK, transporting energy from the solar surface to the higher solar atmosphere.

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No racial disparities in quality-of-care for CABG outcomes for those insured by TRICARE

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examined whether patients insured through TRICARE — a universal insurance and equal-access system that covers more than 9 million active-duty members, veterans and their families — experienced these disparities. The team found no racial disparities in quality-of-care outcomes, providing insights about the potential impacts of universal insurance an

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Short-lived Tropical Storm Gil gives a kick on NASA imagery

Tropical Storm Gil was a two day tropical cyclone in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. It formed on Saturday, August 3, and by the end of the day on August 4, it was already a remnant low pressure area. On August 5, though, NASA's Terra satellite found a couple of small areas of strong storms left in the remnants of Gil.

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Missing link in algal photosynthesis found, offers opportunity to improve crop yields

Photosynthesis is the natural process plants and algae utilize to capture sunlight and fix carbon dioxide into energy-rich sugars that fuel growth, development, and in the case of crops, yield. Algae evolved specialized carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms (CCM) to photosynthesize much more efficiently than plants. This week, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a tea

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Researchers forecast failure in disordered materials

Disordered materials—such as cellular foams, fiber and polymer networks—are popular in applications ranging from architecture to biomedical scaffolding. Predicting when and where these materials may fail could impact not only those materials currently in use, but also future designs. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of California Los Angeles were able to forecast

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Trump’s Habit of Contradicting Himself After a Tragedy

Updated on August 5, 2019 at 4:38 p.m. ET In a moment when Donald Trump’s presumed task was to comfort and unify Americans, he instead risked causing confusion: His speech about the weekend’s pair of mass shootings undercut his own proposal for confronting gun violence that he’d tweeted just three hours before. Consistency has rarely been this president’s strong suit, especially in the aftermath

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NASA gazes into Tropical Storm Lekima in Philippine Sea

NASA's Aqua satellite gazed into Tropical Storm Lekima as it moved through the Philippine Sea on August 5 and the AIRS instrument aboard took the temperature of its cloud tops to estimate storm strength.

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NASA Catches tropical storm Francisco's approach to landfall in southern Japan

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Francisco had powerful thunderstorms with heavy rain capabilities around the center of circulation as it moves toward landfall in southern Japan.

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NASA finds one small area of strong storms left in fading Flossie

NASA's Terra satellite found one small area of strong storms left in Tropical Depression Flossie on August 5 as it neared Hawaii.

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Fertilizer feast and famine: Solving the global nitrogen problem

Commercial organic and synthetic nitrogen fertilizer helps feed around half of the world's population. While excessive fertilizer use poses environmental and public health risks, many developing nations lack access to it, leading to food insecurity, social unrest and economic hardship.

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Maya more warlike than previously thought

What was the role of warfare in Mayan civilization? New evidence from lake sediments around the abandoned city of Witzna indicates that extreme, total warfare was not just an aspect of the late Mayan period, leading to its fall, but a characteristic of intercity rivalry during the peak of Mayan culture. UC Berkeley and Tulane University researchers discovered a thick charcoal layer from a massive,

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Key step toward cancer treatments that leave healthy cells unharmed

Researchers have opened up a possible avenue for new cancer therapies that don't have the side effects that oftentimes accompany many current cancer treatments by identifying a protein modification that specifically supports survival of tumor cells.

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Blocking key mineral uptake could prevent gonorrhea infection

Blocking the ability of the bacterial pathogen that causes gonorrhea to uptake the mineral zinc can stop infection by this widespread sexually transmitted infection, according to a new study.

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Fertilizer feast and famine: Solving the global nitrogen problem

Research has identifies five strategies to tackle the two-sided challenge of a lack of fertilizer in some emerging market economies and inefficient use of fertilizer in developed countries. The study examined solutions to the global nitrogen problem.

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Opioid use recovery requires persistence, range of services

Successful recovery from opioid use disorder appears to be even more challenging than recovery from alcohol use disorder, and individuals with opioid use problems may require more intensive medical, psychological and social support services over a longer period of time, results of the first national study of opioid problem resolution suggest.

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Scientists can now manipulate brain cells using smartphone

A team of scientists have invented a device that can control neural circuits using a tiny brain implant controlled by a smartphone. The device could speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, addiction, depression, and pain.

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Forecasting failure in disordered materials

Researchers were able to forecast likely points of failure in two-dimensional disordered laser-cut lattices without needing to study detailed states of the material.

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Professional coaching alleviates burnout symptoms in physicians

Medical doctors in the United States are twice as likely to experience symptoms of burnout as other workers, which can compromise quality of care and place patients at risk. Researchers now suggest a new approach to fighting burnout: external professional coaching.

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Scientists create artificial catalysts inspired by living enzymes

Researchers have made a significant advance in the development of artificial catalysts for making cleaner chemicals and fuels at an industrial scale.

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In the future, this electricity-free tech could help cool buildings in metropolitan areas

Engineers designed a new system to help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, an important innovation as cities work to adapt to climate change. The system consists of an inexpensive polymer/aluminum film that's installed inside a box at the bottom of a specially designed solar 'shelter.' The film helps keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air

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BU researchers use amazon reviews and AI to predict product recalls

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can take months to identify and verify a problem before issuing a product recall, so most recalls come from manufacturers, often after enough people have gotten sick to generate bad press. But soon, artificial intelligence could comb through online reviews to identify serious threats to public health, and speed the process of a product recall.

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Researchers take key step toward cancer treatments that leave healthy cells unharmed

Researchers have opened up a possible avenue for new cancer therapies that don't have the side effects that oftentimes accompany many current cancer treatments by identifying a protein modification that specifically supports survival of tumor cells.

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Gut throws cells overboard when chemical insults build up

A Duke University team was testing more than 20 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in an attempt to make the zebrafish a new model for studying chemical injury in the gut. What they found was unexpected: the gut was systematically sloughing off epithelial cells as a defense mechanism against a molecule that inhibited the MDR efflux pumps that protect cells.

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The rate of sea-level rise has surged for decades — and the trend will persist

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02385-y Data from the 1990s showed an accelerated pace of sea-level rise, but new analysis shows that the speed-up started far earlier.

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Unique electrical properties in quantum materials can be controlled using light

Insights from quantum physics have allowed engineers to incorporate components used in circuit boards, optical fibers, and control systems in new applications ranging from smartphones to advanced microprocessors. But, even with significant progress made in recent years, researchers are still looking for new and better ways to control the uniquely powerful electronic properties of quantum materials

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Long-Term Radiation Exposure From Space Travel Harms Memory, Mood

Astronauts traveling to Mars will get hit with long-term, low-dosage radiation. A new study in mice suggests the radiation could cause lasting memory and learning problems. (Credit: u3D/Shutterstock) There's a major outstanding question lingering over the future of human spaceflight: Just how much radiation can the body handle? While humans have spent more than a year at a time on orbiting space s

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A Burned City, and a New View of Warfare Among the Ancient Maya

A digital reconstruction of two inscribed stones from the cities of Witzna and Naranja, one of which contains a phrase indicating that Witzna was burned. (Credit: Wahl et al./Nature Human Behaviour) The Maya Classic Period, which stretched between roughly 300 and 900 A.D. is typically seen as a kind of golden age for the ancient Central American civilization. Populations boomed, supported by vast

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What Conservative Pastors Didn’t Say After El Paso

On Sunday morning, some of America’s pastors made no mention of the horrific mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed at least 31 people and injured dozens more over the weekend. Other Church leaders, however, knew they could not ignore the events. “Our pulpit is not one that silence works in,” Jason Morriss, the pastor at Austin New Church, a progressive Methodist congrega

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How Hot Was July? Hotter Than Ever, Global Data Shows

European climate researchers said Monday that last month was the hottest month ever recorded, slightly eclipsing the previous record-holder, July 2016.

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A.I. can say when neurosurgeons are ready to operate

Machine learning algorithms can accurately assess the capabilities of neurosurgeons during virtual surgery before they step into an actual operating room, a new study shows. Researchers recruited fifty participants from four stages of neurosurgical training; neurosurgeons, fellows and senior residents, junior residents, and medical students. The participants performed 250 complex tumor resections

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Protest is not enough to topple a dictator: The army must also turn

What does it take to overthrow a dictator? Reflecting on this question in exile, Leon Trotsky wrote in History of the Russian Revolution (1930): There is no doubt that the fate of every revolution at a certain point is decided by a break in the disposition of the army … Thus in the streets and squares, by the bridges, at the barrack gates, is waged a ceaseless struggle – now dramatic, now unnotic

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Fertilizer feast and famine

Research led by the University of California, Davis identifies five strategies to tackle the two-sided challenge of a lack of fertilizer in some emerging market economies and inefficient use of fertilizer in developed countries. The study examined solutions to the global nitrogen problem.

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Young teens of color more likely to avoid peers with mental illness

Students identifying as black or Latino are more likely to say they would socially distance themselves from peers with a mental illness, a key indicator of mental illness stigma, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The findings reinforce how stigma may prevent teens who face prejudice and discrimination from seeking help for a mental health problem when they

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2015 Volkswagen emissions scandal damaged other German automakers' reputations and profits

Rüdiger Bachmann at the University of Notre Dame and his co-authors studied the scandal and found that the fallout from Volkswagen's wrongdoing cost other German car makers billions of dollars in sales.

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Deciphering pancreatic cancer's invade and evade tactics

Two known gene mutations induce pathways that enhance pancreatic cancer's ability to invade tissues and evade the immune system. Researchers report the molecular details of this process providing insights into druggable targets for immunotherapies.

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New study: Ocean temperature 'surprises' becoming more common

Around the world, periods of rapid ocean warming are happening more often than we thought. In order to thrive in the future, marine communities need to make decisions based on climate trends rather than historical data.

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Visa concerns deter foreign-born PhDs from working in startups

Foreign-born Ph.D. graduates with science and engineering degrees from American universities apply to and receive offers for technology startup jobs at the same rate as U.S. citizens, but are only half as likely to actually work at fledgling companies, a Cornell University study has found.

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Police use of fatal force is identified as a leading cause of death in young men

The killing of young men by police is a leading cause of death in the United States with black men 2.5 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement over their lifetime than white men, according to a Rutgers University study.

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Libra, Facebook’s global digital currency plan, is fuzzy on privacy, watchdogs warn

Privacy commissioners from the Americas, Europe, Africa and Australasia have put their names to a joint statement raising concerns about a lack of clarity from Facebook over how data protection …

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First Human-Monkey Chimeras Developed in China

The researchers aims to grow transplantable human organs from primate embryos.

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Texas-sized plasma ‘cannonballs’ could help solve one of the sun’s biggest mysteries

The sun constantly shoots plasma into its atmosphere, creating a partially unexplained inferno. (NASA/SDO/) A battle rages on the surface of the sun. Wavy spikes shoot up to thousands of miles high, while plasma bombs explode at the edges of sunspots. Now, solar researchers may have observed another weapon in our nearest star's arsenal: Texas-sized balls of heat and light. These spheres streak th

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Researchers weigh in on Trump’s $500 million plan to share childhood cancer data

Challenges abound for linking databases, but effort could start with pilot projects

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“Blind” Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles

MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast — about the size of a full-grown Labrador — is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors. Instead, it nimbl

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Researchers discover blocking key mineral uptake could prevent gonorrhea infection

Blocking the ability of the bacterial pathogen that causes gonorrhea to uptake the mineral zinc can stop infection by this widespread sexually transmitted infection, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

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Police use of fatal force is identified as a leading cause of death in young men

Police violence is a leading cause of death of young men in the United States with black men 2.5 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement over their lifetime than white men, according to a Rutgers study.

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Visa concerns deter foreign-born PhDs from working in startups

Foreign-born Ph.D. graduates with science and engineering degrees from American universities apply to and receive offers for technology startup jobs at the same rate as U.S. citizens, but are only half as likely to actually work at fledgling companies, a Cornell University study has found.

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New study: Ocean temperature 'surprises' becoming more common

August 5, 2019—A new study published this week shows how marine ecosystems around the world are experiencing unusually high ocean temperatures more frequently than researchers previously expected. These warming events, including marine heatwaves, are disrupting marine ecosystems and the people who depend on them.

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Maya more warlike than previously thought

What was the role of warfare in Mayan civilization? New evidence from lake sediments around the abandoned city of Witzna indicates that extreme, total warfare was not just an aspect of the late Mayan period, leading to its fall, but a characteristic of intercity rivalry during the peak of Mayan culture.Researchers discovered a thick charcoal layer from a massive, scorched-earth attack on Witzna on

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Unique electrical properties in quantum materials can be controlled using light

A new study found that Weyl semimetals, a class of quantum materials, have bulk quantum states whose electrical properties can be controlled using light.

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Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa

With a tongue up to 7 cm long, the long-tongue fly Moegistorhynchus longirostris often battle to fly, especially in the wind. Researchers were able to show conclusively that long- and short-tubed flowers place and receive pollen on different parts of the fly's long tongue: short tubed flowers mostly midway and long-tubed flowers on or near the head. This indicates a barrier to the flow of genes.

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Paradoxical Survival: Examining the Parrondo effect across biology

SUTD researchers study the pivotal role that Parrondo's paradox plays in the shaping of living systems and its potential identity as a universal principle underlying biological diversity and persistence.

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Symphony of genes in animal evolution

One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. It has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain function. In a recent study, biologists show that not only individual genes but also these gene arrangements in the genome have played a

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Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees

A new article reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees.

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Mankai duckweed plant found to offer health benefits

In this new study, the researchers compared Mankai shake consumption to a yogurt shake equivalent in carbohydrates, protein, lipids, and calories. Following two weeks of monitoring with glucose sensors, participants who drank the duckweed shake showed a much better response in a variety of measurements including lower glucose peak levels; morning fasting glucose levels; later peak time; and faster

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How some older brains decline before people realize it

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new study could explain why.

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A new lens for life-searching space telescopes

Researchers have designed a new kind of telescope that is a cheaper, lighter and more powerful option than creating telescopes using ever-larger mirrors. With a fleet of the new space telescopes, they aim to scour a thousand worlds for the chemical signatures of life.

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Amazing Tech Turns You Into a CGI Character In Real Time

On The Fly New technology from a computer graphics company called Cubic Motion can turn a motion-capture performance into a fully-rendered computer-generated character in real-time. In a flashy demo for video game studio execs, Cubic Motion had a CGI character recite a script before suddenly addressing individual spectators. In a remote studio, Digital Trends reports , a performer was using the n

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Novel nano-vaccine for melanoma

Researchers have developed a novel nano-vaccine for melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Their approach has so far proven effective in preventing the development of melanoma in mouse models and in treating primary tumors and metastases that result from melanoma.

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Israel Demos “Tank of the Future” Featuring Xbox-Style Controller

Think Tank Three years ago, Israel launched its Carmel advanced armored fighting vehicle program, an initiative designed to develop the military’s “tank of the future.” On Sunday, Israel demonstrated three prototypes of the Carmel — and based on that demo, the future of military combat might involve more game console-style controllers. Under Control Israel asked three defense contractors — Elbit,

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Giant Turbines Propel Boom in Wind Energy

Technological advances mean the wind industry may only see a small slowdown when tax credits end — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Paper trail leads to heart valve discoveries

Bioengineers are studying heart disease with paper-based structures that mimic the layered nature of aortic valves, the tough, flexible tissues that keep blood flowing in one direction only. The devices allow them to see in detail how calcifying diseases slow or stop hearts from functioning.

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Ultrasound guidance improves first-attempt IV success in IV access in children

When caregivers used ultrasound to guide placement of intravenous lines in children with presumed difficult access, they had higher success rates on their first attempt. Researchers report that this technique reduces the number of needle sticks in their young patients.

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Novel nano-vaccine for melanoma

Researchers have developed a novel nano-vaccine for melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Their approach has so far proven effective in preventing the development of melanoma in mouse models and in treating primary tumors and metastases that result from melanoma.

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Blinking eye-on-a-chip used for disease modeling and drug testing

The latest iteration of an eye-on-a-chip has a mechanical eyelid to simulate blinking and was used to test an experimental drug for dry eye disease. By incorporating human cells into an engineered scaffolding, the eye-on-a-chip has many of the benefits of testing on living subjects, while minimizing risks and ethical concerns.

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Insects as livestock: Considering nutritional needs of insects

Grasshoppers and crickets could provide a growing world population with a substantial portion of the protein it needs. For the first time ever, scientists have explored what kind of feedstuffs might be suitable for environmentally friendly factory farming of insects.

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Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease

Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. To combat this disease, many farmers opt for intensive application of insecticides. However, this practice is frequently ineffective and has a negative impact on the environment and human health. A team of scientists found two environmen

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How wildfires trap carbon for centuries to millennia

Charcoal produced by wildfires could trap carbon for hundreds of years and help mitigate climate change, according to new research. A new study quantifies the important role that charcoal plays in helping to compensate for carbon emissions from fires. Researchers say that this charcoal could effectively 'lock away' a considerable amount of carbon for years to come.

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Geoengineering versus a volcano

Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. But could this effect be intentionally recreated to fight climate change?

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Simple fluorescent surfactants produced for medicine, manufacturing

Chemists have produced an array of fluorescent surfactants for imaging, biomedical and manufacturing applications.

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Researchers forecast failure in disordered materials

Researchers were able to forecast likely points of failure in two-dimensional disordered laser-cut lattices without needing to study detailed states of the material.

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NASA Catches tropical storm Francisco's approach to landfall in southern Japan

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Francisco had powerful thunderstorms with heavy rain capabilities around the center of circulation as it moves toward landfall in southern Japan.

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Scientists can now manipulate brain cells using smartphone

A team of scientists in Korea and the United States have invented a device that can control neural circuits using a tiny brain implant controlled by a smartphone. The device could speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, addiction, depression, and pain.

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Maya more warlike than previously thought

What was the role of warfare in Mayan civilization? New evidence from lake sediments around the abandoned city of Witzna indicates that extreme, total warfare was not just an aspect of the late Mayan period, leading to its fall, but a characteristic of intercity rivalry during the peak of Mayan culture. UC Berkeley and Tulane University researchers discovered a thick charcoal layer from a massive,

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How plants hit the brakes to stop root growth

A cellular transporter links two of the most powerful hormones in plant development—auxin and cytokinin—and their involvement in putting the brakes on root growth, researchers report. There’s no organ system in the body that does as much for humans as roots do for plants. Part anchor and part mouth, a plant’s root system architecture is critical to its success. But the process of growing new root

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Brain Awareness Video Contest 2019

What Color is Monday? This video on synesthesia is one of the Top Ten videos in the Society for Neuroscience Brain Awareness Video Contest . Voting for the 2019 People's Choice Award closes 12 p.m. Eastern time on August 30, 2019. However, it wasn't immediately apparent to me how you're supposed to cast your vote… UPDATE (Aug 6 2019): vote for your favorite for the People's Choice award by liki

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Central Florida could be a potential location for a permanent shelter to host migrant children

A letter from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is scouting out locations for a permanent shelter. With an influx of migrant children and public outcry on their living conditions, this may be their solution. It is not clear whether or not the permanent shelter will ever be built. According to a recent email sent to state legislature from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Serv

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Raman spectroscopy poised to make thyroid cancer diagnosis less invasive

Researchers have demonstrated that an optical technique known as Raman spectroscopy can be used to differentiate between benign and cancerous thyroid cells. The new study shows Raman spectroscopy's potential as a tool to improve the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, which is the ninth most common cancer with more than 50,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.

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Shrinking brain tumors and opening the door for targeted cancer therapies

A new drug, known as IP1867B, could be used for future treatments of brain tumors. The research team showed that IP1867B worked with existing cancer treatments boosting their effectiveness and, in some cases, restored sensitivity to some treatments.

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Measuring distances to remote celestial objects and analyzing cosmic clouds

Researchers jointly developed an originative radio receiver DESHIMA (Deep Spectroscopic High-redshift Mapper) and successfully obtained the first spectra and images with it. Combining the ability to detect a wide frequency range of cosmic radio waves and to disperse them into different frequencies, DESHIMA demonstrated its unique power to efficiently measure the distances to the remotest objects a

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Patterns of substance use and co-use by adolescents

Using in-depth interviews with adolescents (16-19 years of age) who used alcohol and marijuana, this study examines the role that social and physical contexts play in adolescent decision-making about simultaneous use of alcohol and marijuana.

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Rye is healthy, thanks to an interplay of microbes

Eating rye comes with a variety of health benefits. A new study now shows that both lactic acid bacteria and gut bacteria contribute to the health benefits of rye. The study used a metabolomics approach to analyze metabolites found in food and the human body.

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Spacer protects healthy organs from radiation exposure during particle therapy

Medical researchers have develop a novel medical device with non-woven fabric style made of bioabsorbable material.

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Researchers develop a rapid, low-cost method to 3D print microfluidic devices

Current 3D printed microfluidics are limited by multiple factors, such as available materials for 3D printing (e.g. optical transparency, flexibility, biocompatibility), achievable dimensions of microchannels by commercial 3D printers, integration of 3D printed microfluidics with functional materials or substrates. Researchers have circumvented these limitations by developing a novel method that c

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Long-lasting effects of ironwork on mammal distributions over the last millennium

Pre-modern energy-intensive industries have had long-lasting impacts on macro-ecological patterns. A new study revealed that the impact of pre-modern ironwork starting over 1000 years ago can still be seen in the distributions of small mammals in Japan today. The study offers insights into the history of biodiversity and provides practical knowledge that can be used to develop sustainable societie

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How This Engineer Hacked Together His Own “Artificial Pancreas”

A software engineer named Liam Zebedee got fed up with the challenges of life with diabetes , so he decided to hack his insulin pump and turn it into a brand new, high-tech “pancreas.” Zebedee detailed the process of finding and ordering parts, coding the software for a smart insulin pump, and assembling the final product in his blog . At the end, he shared pictures of his new rig — a small modul

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Elephant Herd Protects Their Baby from Lions | Serengeti

With lions approaching the herd, these elephants mobilize quickly to protect their new born baby. Stream Serengeti on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/serengeti/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Serengeti https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Follow us on Instagram:

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Elon Musk Fans Think His Meme Tweets Are Teasing a New Tesla

Meme Lord Anybody who follows Elon Musk on Twitter knows that the Tesla and SpaceX CEO is an avid meme lord . But now, some Musk-watchers are suggesting that his jokey feed could be his way of foreshadowing the debut of a new Tesla vehicle. In particular, Business Insider noticed , they’re pointing to a run of memes about bees as a sign that a “Tesla Model B” could be in the works. Bee Movie One

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Hoverboard Guy Crosses English Channel, Shifts Focus to Flying Car

Flying High French inventor Franky Zapata’s second attempt to cross the English Channel on his flying hoverboard was a success — and now he’s turning his attention to what he says is an upcoming flying car he’s also working on. “I have my flying car to finish,” he told reporters after landing, according to a France 24 story . “It has to come out before the end of the year, so we’ll come home, tak

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Opioid use recovery requires persistence, range of services

Successful recovery from opioid use disorder appears to be even more challenging than recovery from alcohol use disorder, and individuals with opioid use problems may require more intensive medical, psychological and social support services over a longer period of time, results of the first national study of opioid problem resolution suggest.

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50 Million Years Needed for New Zealand's Bird Biodiversity to Recover

New Zealand's kiwi birds, a national symbol, are endangered. And scientists say the rest of the island's bird populations have also been hard hit by humans. (Credit: Lakeview Images/Shutterstock) When the Maori arrived to New Zealand from Tahiti some 700 years ago, they found a “land of birds.” The gargantuan, ostrich-like moa stood as tall as 10 feet and the kakapo – a giant flightless parrot wit

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Unique electrical properties in quantum materials can be controlled using light

A new study from Penn researchers found that Weyl semimetals, a class of quantum materials, have bulk quantum states whose electrical properties can be controlled using light.

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Penn Engineering's blinking eye-on-a-chip used for disease modeling and drug testing

The latest iteration of the Huh lab's eye-on-a-chip has a mechanical eyelid to simulate blinking and was used to test an experimental drug for dry eye disease. By incorporating human cells into an engineered scaffolding, the eye-on-a-chip has many of the benefits of testing on living subjects, while minimizing risks and ethical concerns.

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NASA gazes into Tropical Storm Lekima in Philippine Sea

NASA's Aqua satellite gazed into Tropical Storm Lekima as it moved through the Philippine Sea on August 5 and the AIRS instrument aboard took the temperature of its cloud tops to estimate storm strength.

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Short-lived Tropical Storm Gil gives a kick on NASA imagery

Tropical Storm Gil was a two day tropical cyclone in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. It formed on Saturday, August 3, and by the end of the day on August 4, it was already a remnant low pressure area. On August 5, though, NASA's Terra satellite found a couple of small areas of strong storms left in the remnants of Gil.

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NASA finds one small area of strong storms left in fading Flossie

NASA's Terra satellite found one small area of strong storms left in Tropical Depression Flossie on August 5 as it neared Hawaii.

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Shrinking brain tumours and opening the door for targeted cancer therapies

A new drug, known as IP1867B, could be used for future treatments of brain tumours.The research team showed that IP1867B worked with existing cancer treatments boosting their effectiveness and, in some cases, restored sensitivity to some treatments.

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Biomarkers confirm higher incidence of thyroid cancer among World Trade Center responders

Method developed by Brazilian and US researchers distinguishes between malignant and benign tumors and rules out false positive results.

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How deep space travel could affect the brain

Exposure to chronic, low dose radiation — the conditions present in deep space — causes neural and behavioral impairments in mice, researchers report in eNeuro. These results highlight the pressing need to develop safety measures to protect the brain from radiation during deep space missions as astronauts prepare to travel to Mars.

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Brain reorganization predicts language production

The right hemisphere of the brain can take over language functions when the left hemisphere is damaged early in development, according to research in four-year-old children published in eNeuro. These findings offer insight into typical language development in children and the flexibility of the brain in response to injury.

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Machine learning classifies word type based on brain activity

Pairing machine learning with neuroimaging can determine whether a person heard a real or made up word based on their brain activity, according to a new study published in eNeuro. These results lay the groundwork for investigating language processing in the brain and developing an imaging-based tool to assess language impairments.

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The Public’s Trust in Scientists Rises, Pew Poll Shows

Despite growing support, respondents still have concerns when it comes to scientific transparency and integrity.

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The Atlantic Festival Set to Convene Leading Innovators, Entertainers, and Lawmakers in Washington, D.C. September 24-26

Yo-Yo Ma. Susan Rice. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Susan Wojcicki. These are just some of the marquee names scheduled to appear at The Atlantic Festival this fall in Washington, D.C. The annual event will animate downtown’s Penn Quarter with some of the world’s most fascinating people in politics, business, tech, and entertainment. From September 24-26, The Atlantic Festival will bring together over 10

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A Flawed Thriller About the Myth of the ‘Model Immigrant’

Luce begins with a provocation. The film’s plot is set into motion by an essay that Luce Edgar (played by Kelvin Harrison Jr.), a star student at a suburban high school, turns in to one of his teachers, Harriet Wilson (Octavia Spencer). Asked to write in the voice of a historical figure, Luce picked Frantz Fanon, the Martinican philosopher who said violence was sometimes morally necessary in the

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Scientists to restore rocky intertidal seaweed to boost coastal biodiversity

Somewhat drab and unassuming, the humble rockweed's olive-green or yellowish-brown appearance belies its importance in the rocky intertidal zone.

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Poor health increases chance of recidivism and reincarceration

Poor physical or mental health increases the chance that formerly incarcerated individuals will commit more crimes and return to prison, according to a groundbreaking new Rutgers University-Camden study.

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Scientists to restore rocky intertidal seaweed to boost coastal biodiversity

Somewhat drab and unassuming, the humble rockweed's olive-green or yellowish-brown appearance belies its importance in the rocky intertidal zone.

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A transparent squid with glowing internal organs recorded by deep-sea explorers

A team of ocean explorers captured images last week of a surreal transparent squid with glowing internal organs in the Gulf of Alaska, as part of a study backed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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A transparent squid with glowing internal organs recorded by deep-sea explorers

A team of ocean explorers captured images last week of a surreal transparent squid with glowing internal organs in the Gulf of Alaska, as part of a study backed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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New study aims to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases

CABI's expert scientists in the field of ecosystems management and invasion ecology have presented new guidance on ways to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases such as the box tree moth and ash dieback.

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Long-lasting effects of ironwork on mammal distributions over the last millennium

Awareness is growing among scientists about the significance of pre-modern anthropogenic impacts prior to the Industrial Revolution on present-day patterns of biodiversity. In particular, pre-modern energy-intensive industries, such as ironwork, of the sort depicted in the 1997 anime film Princess Mononoke directed by Hayao Miyazaki, were major drivers of ecosystem alteration and have had long-las

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Restoring forests means less fuel for wildfire and more storage for carbon

When wildfires burn up forests, they don't just damage the trees. They destroy a key part of the global carbon cycle. Restoring those trees as quickly as possible could tip the scale in favor of mitigating severe climate change.

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Raman spectroscopy poised to make thyroid cancer diagnosis less invasive

Researchers have demonstrated that an optical technique known as Raman spectroscopy can be used to differentiate between benign and cancerous thyroid cells. The new study shows Raman spectroscopy's potential as a tool to improve the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, which is the ninth most common cancer with more than 50,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.

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New study aims to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases

CABI's expert scientists in the field of ecosystems management and invasion ecology have presented new guidance on ways to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases such as the box tree moth and ash dieback.

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Geoengineering versus a volcano

Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. But could this effect be intentionally recreated to fight climate change? A new paper in Geophysical Research Letters investigates.

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Lab produces simple fluorescent surfactants

Laboratories use surfactants to separate things, and fluorescent dyes to see things. Rice University chemists have combined the two to simplify life for scientists everywhere.

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Accelerating development of STT-MRAM

Researchers at the Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems (CIES) at Tohoku University have successfully observed microscopic chemical bonding states in ultrathin MgO—an important determinant in STT-MRAM performance. The observation was carried out via an angle-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-HAXPES) in collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institut

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Long-lasting effects of ironwork on mammal distributions over the last millennium

Awareness is growing among scientists about the significance of pre-modern anthropogenic impacts prior to the Industrial Revolution on present-day patterns of biodiversity. In particular, pre-modern energy-intensive industries, such as ironwork, of the sort depicted in the 1997 anime film Princess Mononoke directed by Hayao Miyazaki, were major drivers of ecosystem alteration and have had long-las

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Restoring forests means less fuel for wildfire and more storage for carbon

When wildfires burn up forests, they don't just damage the trees. They destroy a key part of the global carbon cycle. Restoring those trees as quickly as possible could tip the scale in favor of mitigating severe climate change.

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How wildfires trap carbon for centuries to millennia

Charcoal produced by wildfires could trap carbon for hundreds of years and help mitigate climate change, according to new research published today.

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Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease

Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) caused by tomato yellow leaf curl virus-like viruses is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. To combat this disease, many farmers opt for intensive application of insecticides. However, this practice is frequently ineffective and has a negative impact on the environment and hu

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Ultrasound guidance improves first-attempt IV success in IV access in children

When caregivers used ultrasound to guide placement of intravenous lines in children with presumed difficult access, they had higher success rates on their first attempt. Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia report that this technique reduces the number of needle sticks in their young patients.

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Poor health increases chance of recidivism, reincarceration, says Rutgers-Cam

Poor physical or mental health increases the chance that formerly incarcerated individuals will commit more crimes and return to prison, according to a groundbreaking new Rutgers University-Camden study.The study – conducted by Nathan Link and Richard Stansfield, assistant professors of criminal justice at Rutgers-Camden, and Jeffrey Ward, an associate professor of criminal justice at Temple Unive

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Tel Aviv university scientists develop novel nano-vaccine for melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have developed a novel nano-vaccine for melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Their approach has so far proven effective in preventing the development of melanoma in mouse models and in treating primary tumors and metastases that result from melanoma.

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Link between intimate partner homicide and firearms dealters in urban settings

The forthcoming Rutgers-Camden study, to be published in the journal Preventative Medicine, is the first to investigate the connection between firearms dealers and intimate partner homicide at the county level, and one of only a handful ever to examine how access to legal guns through federally licensed firearm dealers in the community is linked to gun violence.

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Study shows why a common form of immunotherapy fails, and suggests solution

New research has uncovered a mechanism thought to explain why some cancers don't respond to a widely used form of immunotherapy called checkpoint inhibitors' or anti-PD-1. In addition, the scientists say they have found a way to fix the problem, paving a way to expand the number of patients who may benefit from the treatment.

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Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease

Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) caused by tomato yellow leaf curl virus-like viruses is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. To combat this disease, many farmers opt for intensive application of insecticides. However, this practice is frequently ineffective and has a negative impact on the environment and hu

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Paradoxical survival: Examining the Parrondo effect across biology

Inspired by the flashing Brownian ratchet, Parrondo's paradox is a counter-intuitive phenomenon in which two losing games, when played in a specific order, can surprisingly end up winning. For example, slot machines are designed to ensure that players lose in the long run. "What the paradox says is that there might be slot machines which are subtly linked in such a way that playing either slot mac

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Symphony of genes

One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals—which lived about 600 million years ago—already possessed an extremely complex genome. Many of the ancestral genes can still be found in modern day species (e.g., human). However, it has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain func

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Dry feed for superfood producers

Given that they generate hardly any greenhouse gases, are undemanding, nutritious and fast growing, insects have generated a lot of hype in recent years. They are touted as the superfood of the future—cheap suppliers of protein that can even decompose all kinds of residual products.

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Modi’s Kashmir Decision Is the Latest Step in Undoing Nehru’s Vision

No single person is as responsible for the shape and foundation of modern India as Jawaharlal Nehru. In August 1947, Nehru—a Harrow- and Cambridge-educated atheist who was deeply influenced by Fabian socialism—led a newly independent, intensely religious, and poorly educated developing country, and made it in his image. Nehru’s three biggest ideas—a socialist economy based on centralized planning

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White Nationalists Discover the Environment

On Saturday, a gunman killed 21 people at a Walmart in the border city of El Paso, Texas. Minutes before the shooting, a four-page rant seeming to justify the attack appeared online. It includes white-nationalist diatribes about “cultural and ethnic replacement” and an immigrant “invasion.” Horrific and familiar. But the so-called manifesto includes another theme, which fits less obviously into t

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Paradoxical survival: Examining the Parrondo effect across biology

Inspired by the flashing Brownian ratchet, Parrondo's paradox is a counter-intuitive phenomenon in which two losing games, when played in a specific order, can surprisingly end up winning. For example, slot machines are designed to ensure that players lose in the long run. "What the paradox says is that there might be slot machines which are subtly linked in such a way that playing either slot mac

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Symphony of genes

One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals—which lived about 600 million years ago—already possessed an extremely complex genome. Many of the ancestral genes can still be found in modern day species (e.g., human). However, it has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain func

1d

Dry feed for superfood producers

Given that they generate hardly any greenhouse gases, are undemanding, nutritious and fast growing, insects have generated a lot of hype in recent years. They are touted as the superfood of the future—cheap suppliers of protein that can even decompose all kinds of residual products.

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Scientists develop novel nano-vaccine for melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have developed a novel nano-vaccine for melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Their innovative approach has so far proven effective in preventing the development of melanoma in mouse models and in treating primary tumors and metastases that result from melanoma.

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Environmental Activists Have Higher Death Rates Than Some Soldiers

Killings of those protecting nature are highest in countries with corruption and weak rule of law — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Grooming for ‘natural beauty’ messes up beach biodiversity

Attempts to maintain the “natural beauty” of Southern California beaches are actually having a massive negative impact on the beach ecosystem overall, a new study warns. To most people, a beach is a beach. You could likely take an image of almost any urban beach in Southern California—the flat, mostly featureless expanse of sand against blue-green water and blue skies—swap it with one of nearly a

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Environmental Activists Have Higher Death Rates Than Some Soldiers

Killings of those protecting nature are highest in countries with corruption and weak rule of law — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Geoengineering versus a volcano

Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. But could this effect be intentionally recreated to fight climate change? A new paper in Geophysical Research Letters investigates.

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Raman spectroscopy poised to make thyroid cancer diagnosis less invasive

Researchers have demonstrated that an optical technique known as Raman spectroscopy can be used to differentiate between benign and cancerous thyroid cells. The new study shows Raman spectroscopy's potential as a tool to improve the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, which is the ninth most common cancer with more than 50,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.

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Rice lab produces simple fluorescent surfactants

Rice University chemists have produced an array of fluorescent surfactants for imaging, biomedical and manufacturing applications.

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How wildfires trap carbon for centuries to millennia

Charcoal produced by wildfires could trap carbon for hundreds of years and help mitigate climate change, according to new research. A new Nature Geoscience study quantifies the important role that charcoal plays in helping to compensate for carbon emissions from fires. Researchers say that this charcoal could effectively 'lock away' a considerable amount of carbon for years to come.

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Health Officials Blame Vaping for “Severe Respiratory Illnesses”

Big news today: inhaling particulate matter is bad for you. That’s been a well-accepted medical fact for decades now — smoking kills, right? — but the debate over the merits and dangers of vaping somehow continue on. But now 14 teens and young adults in Wisconsin have been hospitalized for vaping-related breathing problems, according to CNN . It’s troubling news for e-cigarettes, which are usuall

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How Mosquitoes Helped Shape the Course of Human History

Historian and author Timothy Winegard discusses the way mosquitoes have played a major role in battles, genetics and the gin and tonic

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Someone Deepfaked Keanu Reeves Into “Sesame Street”

Matrix Glitch Have you ever wondered what would happen if you dropped Keanu Reeves and the cast of “Sesame Street” into a blender? Now you finally have the answer, thanks to a YouTube video that used deepfake trickery to edit Reeves’ face onto two singing children’s bodies. Deepfakes, or manipulated videos that make it look like people do or say things that never actually happened, could undermin

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Want to Know the Real Future of AR/VR? Ask Their Devs

A new survey of 900 active devs provides some surprising clarity into the technology's constraints.

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Team model makes hospital pharmacies better

A new team-based model for intensive care unit pharmacists resolves a common dilemma for hospitals and improves care for critically ill patients, researchers report. Many intensive care units (ICUs) include a team of general practice pharmacists, supplemented by one who specializes in critical care. Typically, only the specialist can respond to such complex, ICU-specific issues as determining whe

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Cancer Research in a Nutshell

A Web site called OncoBites offers short, easy-to-understand reports on what’s new in the field — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Paper trail leads to heart valve discoveries

Rice University bioengineers are studying heart disease with paper-based structures that mimic the layered nature of aortic valves, the tough, flexible tissues that keep blood flowing in one direction only. The devices allow them to see in detail how calcifying diseases slow or stop hearts from functioning.

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Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease

Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. To combat this disease, many farmers opt for intensive application of insecticides. However, this practice is frequently ineffective and has a negative impact on the environment and human health. A team of scientists found two environmen

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New Zealand's biodiversity will take millions of years to recover

The arrival of humans in New Zealand, some 700 years ago, triggered a wave of extinction among native bird species. Many more species are currently under threat. Recent calculations by scientists from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and Massey University in New Zealand show that it would take at least 50 million years of evolution to restore the biodiversity that has been lost. Thei

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Dry feed for superfood producers

Grasshoppers and crickets could provide a growing world population with a substantial portion of the protein it needs. For the first time ever, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi, Kenya, have explored what kind of feedstuffs might be suitable for environmentally friendly factory farming of insects.

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Rutgers-developed model for ICU pharmacists addresses common dilemma for hospitals

A new team-based model for intensive care unit (ICU) pharmacists, developed by Rutgers and RWJBarnabas Health System, resolves a common dilemma for hospitals and improves care for critically ill patients.

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Ebola vaccine: Why is a new jab so controversial?

The outbreak shows no signs of abating, so why is the roll-out of a second vaccine proving contentious?

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Most people would rather lose their job to a robot than another human

Most people would prefer a robot to take their job if they had to lose it, but they would prefer to see another human step in if a co-worker was going to lose theirs

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Konstgjort öga kan ersätta djurförsök

Med ojämna mellanrum sveper ett konstgjort ögonlock över en tredimensionell modell av ögats yttersta lager. Amerikanska forskare har byggt den blinkande apparaten för att testa nya läkemedel mot torra ögon och andra ögonsjukdomar. Apparaten innehåller mänskliga celler odlade till vävnader som ska efterlikna hornhinnan och den omgivande slemhinnan. Forskarna hoppas att systemet i framtiden även ska

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Study: Andrew Yang's UBI plan isn't popular among rich folks

A new survey shows a majority of people making more than $125,000 a year oppose a basic income plan. The survey also showed how age and political affiliation relates to support for the idea. This news should put a major damper on any hopes that the United States will get around to basic income anytime soon. A new study has bad news for people who want to make basic income a reality in the United

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Five Things Trump Is Blaming for El Paso

President Donald Trump has allowed mention of white supremacy to escape his lips on only two occasions in his political career. The first came in February 2016, when under questioning from Jake Tapper he declined to reject an endorsement from the former KKK leader David Duke. The second came in August 2017, after a white-supremacist march in Charlottesville, Virginia. “Racism is evil and those wh

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'Hobbs & Shaw' Ruled the Box Office Last Weekend

The Rock's muscles brought in more than $60 million domestically. Plus: *Spider-Verse* duo signs with Universal, *Batwoman* is the future, and *Dune* gets delayed.

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Physicists measure how electrons in transition metals get redistributed within fraction of optical oscillation cycle

Researchers in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. They observed the electrons getting concentrated around the metal atoms within less than a femtosecond. This regrouping might influence important macroscopic properties of these compounds, such as electrical conductiv

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Polyoxometalate-based coordination frameworks for methane generation in photoreduction of carbon dioxide

Excessive CO2 discharge derived from the continuous burning of fossil fuels has caused global warming and environmental issues. Artificial conversion of excess CO2 into serviceable energy products is an important pathway to achieve sustainable development. Solar-driven photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to carbon-neutral fuels (CO, CH4) and/or value-added chemicals (HCOOH, CH3OH) affords a feasible s

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Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees

Adjuvants are chemicals that are commonly added to plant protection products, such as pesticides, to help them spread, adhere to targets, disperse appropriately, or prevent drift, among other things. There was a widespread assumption that these additives would not cause a biological reaction after exposure, but a number of recent studies show that adjuvants can be toxic to ecosystems, and specific

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Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa

Using quantum dots as a tool to trace the pollen of the long-tubed iris, Lapeirousia anceps, evolutionary ecologists from Stellenbosch University have succeeded in capturing a snapshot of a plant in the process of speciation.

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Google maps for tissues

Modern light microscopic techniques provide extremely detailed insights into organs, but the terabytes of data they produce are usually nearly impossible to process. New software is helping researchers make sense of these reams of data.

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How electrons in transition metals get redistributed

Researchers have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. They observed the electrons getting concentrated around the metal atoms within less than a femtosecond. This regrouping might influence important macroscopic properties of these compounds, such as electrical conductivity, magnetization or optical characteristi

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Sleep is essential for business leaders seeking next successful venture

The secret ingredient for coming up with great business ideas that can take off, may be something we can all tap into — a good night's sleep. According to a new study, sleep plays an especially important role in not only identifying a good business idea, but in evaluating it and believing it is viable.

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Twelve centuries of European summer droughts

Researchers have published a study exploring the association between summer temperature and drought across Europe placing recent drought in the context of the past 12 centuries. The study reveals that, throughout history, northern Europe has tended to get wetter and southern Europe to get drier during warmer periods.

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Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees

Adjuvants are chemicals that are commonly added to plant protection products, such as pesticides, to help them spread, adhere to targets, disperse appropriately, or prevent drift, among other things. There was a widespread assumption that these additives would not cause a biological reaction after exposure, but a number of recent studies show that adjuvants can be toxic to ecosystems, and specific

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Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa

Using quantum dots as a tool to trace the pollen of the long-tubed iris, Lapeirousia anceps, evolutionary ecologists from Stellenbosch University have succeeded in capturing a snapshot of a plant in the process of speciation.

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Why sodium-ion batteries don’t last as long

The unintended presence of hydrogen, which leads to degradation of battery electrodes, is behind the short lifetimes of sodium-ion batteries, according to new research. Batteries power our lives: we rely on them to keep our cell phones and laptops buzzing and our hybrid and electric cars on the road. But ever-increasing adoption of the most commonly used lithium-ion batteries may actually lead to

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In the inner depths of the ear: The shape of the cochlea is an indicator of sex

The auditory section of the inner ear, or the 'cochlea,' does not have the same shape from birth depending on whether one is a man or a woman. Demonstrated by a French-South African collaboration, an interdisciplinary effort evolving scientists primarily from the CNRS, UT3 Paul Sabatier, and l'Université Clermont Auvergne,1 these results have helped develop the first reliable method for sex determ

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Mankai duckweed plant found to offer health benefits — Ben-Gurion University research

In this new study, the researchers compared Mankai shake consumption to a yogurt shake equivalent in carbohydrates, protein, lipids, and calories. Following two weeks of monitoring with glucose sensors, participants who drank the duckweed shake showed a much better response in a variety of measurements including lower glucose peak levels; morning fasting glucose levels; later peak time; and faster

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JHU study explains how some older brains decline before people realize it

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why.

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Why Many Mass Shooters Are ‘Loners’

Updated at 1:43 p.m. on August 5, 2019. The man accused of killing 22 people and injuring dozens more at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, this weekend was an “extreme loner” who was “picked on” for his voice and his clothes, the Los Angeles Times reported . The lonely life of the suspect, who is widely reported to be 21-year-old Patrick Crusius of Allen, Texas, reveals a troubling pathway to violence

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Elon Musk: Starship Prototypes Could Be Ready to Fly This Month

Seeing Double Two separate prototypes of SpaceX’s Starship rocket could be ready to fly before the end of August, CEO Elon Musk revealed to the Twittersphere on Saturday — though it’s not clear whether the debut would be a short hop or a historic orbital adventure. On August 24, SpaceX will hold a presentation in Boca Chica, Texas, to update the world on its Starship program. In a tweet discussin

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Risk att utveckla astma, hösnuva och eksem syns i generna

Även om tidigare studier funnit många gener som har en effekt på dessa sjukdomar, så har forskare inte kunnat förklara hela den genetiska bakgrunden till uppkomsten av astma, hösnuva och eksem. I en ny studie från Uppsala universitet, SciLifeLab, har forskare funnit totalt 141 regioner (gener) i vår arvsmassa som förklarar en stor del av den genetiska risken bakom astma, hösnuva och eksem. Så mån

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Cancer Research in a Nutshell

A website called OncoBites offers short, easy-to-understand reports on what’s new in the field — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bits of Corpse from One of the Universe's Oldest Stars Found Inside Its 'Child'

An ancient star in the Milky Way holds traces of another star that was among the oldest in the universe.

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Slow Down That Protein’s Travel Plans

Here’s a new look at the various ways that small molecules can affect a well-known drug target (the estrogen receptor) and it shows us that we’re all going to have to look at these things more carefully than we do. Now, to be fair, the ER is already fairly complicated, because it’s a nuclear receptor. Those things tend to have rather large binding sites for small-molecule ligands, which is why (i

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Using quantum dots and a smartphone to find killer bacteria

A combination of off-the-shelf quantum dot nanotechnology and a smartphone camera soon could allow doctors to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in just 40 minutes, potentially saving patient lives.

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It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species

Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. Many more are threatened. Now, researchers estimate that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of bird species lost since humans first colonized New Zealand.

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Lessons of conventional imaging let scientists see around corners

Scientists, drawing on the lessons of classical optics, have shown that it is possible to image complex hidden scenes using a projected 'virtual camera' to see around barriers.

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New voyage to the universe from DESHIMA

Researchers in Japan and the Netherlands jointly developed an originative radio receiver DESHIMA (Deep Spectroscopic High-redshift Mapper) and successfully obtained the first spectra and images with it. Combining the ability to detect a wide frequency range of cosmic radio waves and to disperse them into different frequencies, DESHIMA demonstrated its unique power to efficiently measure the distan

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How Do Trivia Masters Do It? The Right Answer Is ‘Brain Efficiency.’

We all have that friend who "knows everything."

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New species of early dinosaur described from South Africa

A new dinosaur species has been discovered after laying misidentified in a museum collection for 30 years.

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Using quantum dots and a smartphone to find killer bacteria

A combination of off-the-shelf quantum dot nanotechnology and a smartphone camera soon could allow doctors to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in just 40 minutes, potentially saving patient lives.

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US Submarine That Vanished on 1st Mission in WWII Is Found Off Alaskan Islands

Nearly 80 years ago, the USS Grunion submarine sank on its inaugural mission during World War II, taking the lives of 70 sailors with it as it plunged to the bottom of the Pacific.

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Using quantum dots and a smartphone to find killer bacteria

A combination of off-the-shelf quantum dot nanotechnology and a smartphone camera soon could allow doctors to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in just 40 minutes, potentially saving patient lives.

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New species of early dinosaur described from South Africa

A new dinosaur species has been discovered after laying misidentified in a museum collection for 30 years.

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Novel networking

As a new joint appointee at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Eden Figueroa is getting accustomed to traversing between his roles within the Lab's Computational Science Initiative (CSI) and Instrumentation Division while also overseeing the Quantum Information Technology group as a tenured professor at Stony Brook University. For most, working in so many places at onc

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Paper trail leads to heart valve discoveries

Paper is at the heart of an experimental device developed by Rice University bioengineers to study heart disease.

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Restoring forests means less fuel for wildfire and more storage for carbon

When wildfires burn up forests, they don't just damage the trees. They destroy a key part of the global carbon cycle. Restoring those trees as quickly as possible could tip the scale in favor of mitigating severe climate change. Lisa A. McCauley explains how quick action to thin out vegetation will actually increase carbon storage in forests by the end of this century.

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High lead concentrations in amazonian wildlife

Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Central University of Catalonia/Vic University detect high levels of lead concentration in wildlife samples from the Peruvian Amazon caused by lead-based ammunition and oil-related pollution in extraction areas. The research was recently published in Nature Sustainability.

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Paradoxical Survival: Examining the Parrondo effect across biology

SUTD researchers study the pivotal role that Parrondo's paradox plays in the shaping of living systems and its potential identity as a universal principle underlying biological diversity and persistence.

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Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa

With a tongue up to 7 cm long, the long-tongue fly Moegistorhynchus longirostris often battle to fly, especially in the wind. Researchers from Stellenbosch University in South Africa were able to show conclusively that long- and short-tubed flowers place and receive pollen on different parts of the fly's long tongue: short tubed flowers mostly midway and long-tubed flowers on or near the head. Thi

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A new approach to the correction of artificial intelligence errors is proposed

The journal 'Physics of Life Reviews', which has one of the highest impact factors in the categories 'Biology' and 'Biophysics', has published an article entitled 'Symphony of high-dimensional brain'.The discussion was focused on two problems:1) How to quickly and effectively correct the errors of artificial intelligence (AI)?2) What is the reason why small neural ensembles in the multidimensional

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Symphony of genes

One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. It has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain function. In a recent study, biologists show that not only individual genes but also these gene arrangements in the genome have played a

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Earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters obey same mathematical pattern

Researchers from the Centre for Mathematical Research (CRM) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have mathematically described the frequency of several dangerous phenomena according to their size with more precision than ever. Using new statistical tools, researchers have rigorously demonstrated how the frequency of earthquakes, hurricanes, torrential rains and meteorite impacts can be descri

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Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees

A new paper in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees.

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'Stressors' in middle age linked to cognitive decline in older women

A new analysis of data on more than 900 Baltimore adults has linked stressful life experiences among middle-aged women — but not men — to greater memory decline in later life.

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Need for anti-rejection drugs in transplant recipients

For decades, immunologists have been trying to train the transplant recipient's immune system to accept transplanted cells and organs without the long-term use of anti-rejection drugs. New preclinical research shows that this is now possible.

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Multiple genes affect risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema

Researchers have found a total of 141 regions (genes) in our genetic material that largely explain the genetic risk underlying asthma, hay fever and eczema. As many as 41 of the genes identified have not previously been linked to an elevated risk for these diseases. The results are published in the scientific journal Human Molecular Genetics.

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Long-term declines in heart disease and stroke deaths are stalling

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries, and are even increasing in some countries, according to new research.

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Will the 4-Day Workweek Take Hold in Europe?

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Advanced robotics forced scientists to invent a new Turing test

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The Construction Labor Shortage: Will Developers Deploy Robotics?

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AI Now Predicts Blackouts Caused by Storms

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Tencent’s "Honor of Kings" AI beats a team of pros

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Israel's 'Tanks Of The Future' Prototype Features Artificial Intelligence

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AI and automation are making office life easier

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States Clash With Cities Over Potential Opioids Settlement Payouts

As lawyers for cities and counties push a plan for a nationwide settlement of opioid lawsuits, states push back, saying they should lead the way.

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Klimatjeneste: Juli var varmeste måned nogensinde målt

Juli bød på varmerekorder flere steder i det vestlige Europa. Globalt var det varmeste måned nogensinde målt.

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Unexpected ‘Germline’ Plant Cells May Shield New Generations

Karel Říha ’s mutant plants were too healthy. The molecular biologist, a postdoctoral researcher in Texas in the year 2000, was breeding botany’s leading model organism, Arabidopsis , an unremarkable weed in the mustard family. He had carefully chosen a strain with a mutation that robbed the plants of their ability to repair the caps at the end of their DNA. With every cell division, these protec

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50 Million Years Needed for New Zealand's Bird Biodiversity to Recover

New Zealand's kiwi birds, a national symbol, are endangered. And scientists say the rest of the island's bird populations have also been hard hit by humans. (Credit: Lakeview Images/Shutterstock) When …

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A Burned City, and a New View of Warfare Among the Ancient Maya

A digital reconstruction of two inscribed stones from the cities of Witzna and Naranja, one of which contains a phrase indicating that Witzna was burned. (Credit: Wahl et al./Nature Human Behaviour) The …

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No, there's still no link between video games and violence

Do video games trigger violent behavior? Scientific studies have found no link. But the persistent theory is back in the headlines following the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas , on Saturday.

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New study aims to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases

CABI's expert scientists in the field of ecosystems management and invasion ecology have presented new guidance on ways to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases such as the box tree moth and ash dieback.Researchers suggest that a number of important factors should be considered when monitoring for non-native pests that can pose a serious threat to forest resour

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Polyoxometalate-based coordination frameworks for CH4 generation in photoreduction of CO2

The highly selective generation of desirable hydrocarbon fuel, such as methane (CH4), from CO2 remains extremely challenging. Polyoxometalate-grafted metalloporphyrin coordination frameworks (POMCFs) that are constructed with reductive polyoxometalate (POM) cluster and photosensitive Tetrakis (4-carboxylphenyl) porphyrin (TCPP) linkers, exhibiting high selectivity for CH4 in photoreduction of CO2.

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Researchers create first-ever personalised sound projector with £10 webcam

A University of Sussex research team have demonstrated the first sound projector that can track a moving individual and deliver an acoustic message as they move, to a high-profile tech and media conference in LA.

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Long-lasting effects of ironwork on mammal distributions over the last millennium

Pre-modern energy-intensive industries have had long-lasting impacts on macro-ecological patterns. A new study published in Scientific Reports revealed that the impact of pre-modern ironwork starting over 1000 years ago can still be seen in the distributions of small mammals in Japan today. The study offers insights into the history of biodiversity and provides practical knowledge that can be used

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A new paradigm for efficient upward culture of 3D multicellular spheroids

The 3D multicellular spheroids with intact cell-cell junctions are critical in biological research because they can mimic the cellular physiological environments. In this work, a durable superamphiphobic silica aerogel surface has been fabricated for the upward culture of 3D multicellular spheroids. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was electrodeposited on a conductive steel mesh as a first templat

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How light steers electrons in metals

Researchers in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. They observed the electrons getting concentrated around the metal atoms within less than a femtosecond. This regrouping might influence important macroscopic properties of these compounds, such as electrical conductiv

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New voyage to the universe from DESHIMA

Researchers in Japan and the Netherlands jointly developed an originative radio receiver DESHIMA (Deep Spectroscopic High-redshift Mapper) and successfully obtained the first spectra and images with it. Combining the ability to detect a wide frequency range of cosmic radio waves and to disperse them into different frequencies, DESHIMA demonstrated its unique power to efficiently measure the distan

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Stanford scientists create artificial catalysts inspired by living enzymes

Stanford researchers have made a significant advance in the development of artificial catalysts for making cleaner chemicals and fuels at an industrial scale.

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Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport

While watching the production of porous membranes used for DNA sorting and sequencing, University of Illinois researchers wondered how tiny steplike defects formed during fabrication could be used to improve molecule transport. They found that the defects — formed by overlapping layers of membrane — make a big difference in how molecules move along a membrane surface. Instead of trying to fix th

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In the future, this electricity-free tech could help cool buildings in metropolitan areas

Engineers designed a new system to help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, an important innovation as cities work to adapt to climate change. The system consists of an inexpensive polymer/aluminum film that's installed inside a box at the bottom of a specially designed solar 'shelter.' The film helps keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air

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Put a charge on it

The results, published in Nature Materials, make the US Department of Energy 150ºC challenge for emissions more attainable. Scientists from the López Group propose a dynamic charge and oxidation state for Single-Atom Catalysts. The dynamic charge transfer between metal and oxide is crucial to understanding the nature of the active site in Single-Atom Catalysts.

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Industry payments to physician director of NCI-designated cancer centers

Data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services were used to examine industry payments to physician directors of National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in this research letter.

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Overweight, obesity in children across Europe

This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 103 studies with nearly 478,000 children (ages 2 to 13) to look at how common overweight and obesity are among children across Europe.

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Study of deceased football players with CTE examines contributors associated with dementia

This study of 180 deceased former football players who had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) investigated the association of brain white matter pathologic changes and cerebrovascular disease with dementia.

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Professional coaching alleviates burnout symptoms in physicians

Medical doctors in the United States are twice as likely to experience symptoms of burnout as other workers, which can compromise quality of care and place patients at risk. In a study in JAMA Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic researchers suggest a new approach to fighting burnout: external professional coaching.

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Seaweed sinks deep, taking carbon with it

Macroalgae is shown to be a major global contributor to carbon sequestration.

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Google maps for tissues

Modern light microscopic techniques provide extremely detailed insights into organs, but the terabytes of data they produce are usually nearly impossible to process. New software, developed by a team led by MDC scientist Dr. Stephan Preibisch and now presented in Nature Methods, is helping researchers make sense of these reams of data.

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Lessons of conventional imaging let scientists see around corners

Scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Universidad de Zaragoza in Spain, drawing on the lessons of classical optics, have shown that it is possible to image complex hidden scenes using a projected 'virtual camera' to see around barriers.

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The front line of environmental violence

Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study.According to UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Nathalie Butt, the 1558 deaths recorded between 2002 and 2017 were largely due to external demand for the very resources they were trying to protect.

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Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats

The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off.

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It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species

Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. Many more are threatened. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 5 estimate that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of bird species lost since humans first colonized New Zealand.

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Using quantum dots and a smartphone to find killer bacteria

A combination of off-the-shelf quantum dot nanotechnology and a smartphone camera soon could allow doctors to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in just 40 minutes, potentially saving patient lives.

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Amerikansk undersøgelse: Dele-løbehjulet udleder mere CO2 end bussen

Ny undersøgelse fra USA viser, at elløbehjul belaster miljøet mere end en række andre transportformer. I to ud af tre tilfælde udleder en tur på elløbehjulet mere CO2 end alternativet.

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A new UK astronomy instrument is set for Mexico

A new instrument to help astronomers understand how stars are born is bound for the Large Millimetre Telescope (LMT) in Mexico.

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Burning of Maya City Said to Be Act of Total Warfare

By linking an ancient text, environmental analysis and ruins, archaeologists have documented a brutal attack.

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Space agency chief fired after revealing recent Amazon deforestation

Brazil’s president Jair Bolsonaro has fired the director of the agency that monitors deforestation in the Amazon after it revealed a big increase in deforestation

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Ancient Maya warfare flared up surprisingly early

Extreme conflicts broke out well before the decline of the Maya civilization, researchers say.

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A new lens for life-searching space telescopes

The University of Arizona Richard F. Caris Mirror Laboratory is a world leader in the production of the world's largest telescope mirrors. In fact, it is currently fabricating mirrors for the largest and most advanced earth-based telescope: The Giant Magellan Telescope.

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That age-old discussion about the Moon

We know how old it is, but is it? Richard A Lovett looks into it.

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Mayans conducted ‘total war’ much earlier than thought

A neat narrative linking violence and the end of civilisation is challenged by new evidence. Barry Keily reports.

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AI could detect potential heart issues

US trial shows potential to find what the eye can’t see.

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Getting a clearer view around the corner

Research takes a new approach to non-line-of-site imaging.

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50 million years needed for NZ’s lost birds to recover

When whole lineages go extinct, what are the long-term evolutionary impacts? Tanya Loos reports.

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Researchers find proteins that might restore damaged sound-detecting cells in the ear

Using genetic tools in mice, researchers say they have identified a pair of proteins that precisely control when sound-detecting cells, known as hair cells, are born in the mammalian inner ear. The proteins may hold a key to future therapies to restore hearing in people with irreversible deafness.

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Warning to adults: Children notice everything

Adults are really good at paying attention only to what you tell them to — but children don't ignore anything. That difference can actually help children do better than adults in some learning situations, a new study suggests.

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Researchers make immunotherapy work for treatment-resistant lymphoma

Researchers have developed a way to use immunotherapy drugs against treatment-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas for the first time by combining them with stem cell transplantation, an approach that also dramatically increased the success of the drugs in melanoma and lung cancer.

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Reverse engineering the fireworks of life

An interdisciplinary team has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching. Scientists have known that microtubule branching is key to assembling spindles and making connections between cell components. Researchers have spent six years confirming which proteins are the key components of microtubule production, and now they have discovered

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Spacer protects healthy organs from radiation exposure during particle therapy

Kobe University and Alfresa Pharma Corporation develop a novel medical device with non-woven fabric style made of bioabsorbable material.

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Study: Sleep is essential for business leaders seeking next successful venture

The secret ingredient for coming up with great business ideas that can take off, may be something we can all tap into — a good night's sleep. According to a new study, sleep plays an especially important role in not only identifying a good business idea, but in evaluating it and believing it is viable.

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SUTD researchers develop a rapid, low-cost method to 3D print microfluidic devices

Current 3D printed microfluidics are limited by multiple factors, such as available materials for 3D printing (e.g. optical transparency, flexibility, biocompatibility), achievable dimensions of microchannels by commercial 3D printers, integration of 3D printed microfluidics with functional materials or substrates. Researchers at SUTD have circumvented these limitations by developing a novel metho

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It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species

Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. Many more are threatened. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 5 estimate that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of bird species lost since humans first colonized New Zealand.

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Non-line-of-sight imaging using phasor-field virtual wave optics

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1461-3 Algorithms based on diffractive wave propagation of light offer effective imaging of complex scenes hidden from direct view.

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Talk about loss to boost support for environmental causes

When it comes to garnering support for environmental causes, talking about the consequences of a loss works better than talking about the benefits of a gain, a new study shows. One of the difficulties in environmental management is garnering public support for a course of action designed to address a particular problem. Researchers find that the way you frame a project can make a big difference i

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A sphere of colour

This image shows a snippet of the Sun up close, revealing a golden surface marked by a number of dark, blotchy sunspots, curving filaments, and lighter patches known as 'plages' – brighter regions often found near sunspots. The width of the image would cover roughly a third of the diameter of the solar disc.

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Lessons of conventional imaging let scientists see around corners

Along with flying and invisibility, high on the list of every child's aspirational superpowers is the ability to see through or around walls or other visual obstacles. That capability is now a big step closer to reality as scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Universidad de Zaragoza in Spain, drawing on the lessons of classical optics, have shown that it is possible to image

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Scientists create artificial catalysts inspired by living enzymes

All living organisms depend on enzymes—molecules that speed up biochemical reactions that are essential for life.

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Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport

While watching the production of porous membranes used for DNA sorting and sequencing, University of Illinois researchers wondered how tiny steplike defects formed during fabrication could be used to improve molecule transport. They found that the defects—formed by overlapping layers of membrane—make a big difference in how molecules move along a membrane surface. Instead of trying to fix these fl

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It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species

Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. Many more are threatened. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 5 estimate that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of bird species lost since humans first colonized New Zealand.

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Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats

The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off.

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Seaweed sinks deep, taking carbon with it

Seaweed may be a quiet achiever when it comes to mitigation of greenhouse gases, with it now shown to travel far and deep beyond coastal areas and thus to play a key role in sequestering carbon from the atmosphere.

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Scientists propose a dynamic charge and oxidation state for single-atom catalysts

Pollutants coming out of cars' exhausts are harmful to the environment and public health. With the goal of overall curbing car emissions, the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a challenge to scientists worldwide: catalytically converting 90 percent of all critical pollutants (hydrocarbons, CO2, NOx etc.) in car exhaust into less harmful substances at 150ºC. However, nanoparticle based heterogen

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The front line of environmental violence

Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study.

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Where Death Ends and Cyborgs Begin, With Futurist Zoltan Istvan

Transhumanism is a growing movement but also one of the most controversial. Though there are many varying offshoots within the movement, the general core idea is the same: evolve and enhance human beings by integrating biology with technology . We recently sat down with one of the most influential and vocal transhumanists, author and futurist Zoltan Istvan , on the latest episode of Singularity U

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Inspired by nature

Artificial catalysts mimic living enzymes.

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Citizen scientists and the Great Barrier Reef

QUT researchers are inviting you to help with vital work.

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I’ve Seen the Limits of Journalism

No. Not again. That’s how I felt on Saturday when I heard the terrible news from El Paso and then again on Sunday morning when Dayton added a second blow. I imagine I wasn’t alone. Each time the shocking news of another mass shooting arrives, I find myself wanting to turn away. I was the editor of the Rocky Mountain News in Denver when the Columbine High School shootings gripped the nation in 199

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All Made by Google Devices to Include Recycled Material

Starting in 2022, 100 percent of Made by Google products will include recycled materials (via Bence Boros/Unsplash) Google this week announced a new initiative …

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CryoSat conquers ice on Arctic lakes

The rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is not only linked to melting glaciers and declining sea ice, but also to thinning ice on lakes. The presence of lake ice can be easily monitored by imaging sensors and standard satellite observations, but now adding to its list of achievements, CryoSat can be used to measure the thickness of lake ice—another indicator of climate change.

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Rye is healthy, thanks to an interplay of microbes

Eating rye comes with a variety of health benefits. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland now shows that both lactic acid bacteria and gut bacteria contribute to the health benefits of rye. Published in Microbiome, the study used a metabolomics approach to analyse metabolites found in food and the human body.

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Accelerating development of STT-MRAM

Researchers at the Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems (CIES) at Tohoku University have successfully observed microscopic chemical bonding states in ultrathin MgO — an important determinant in STT-MRAM performance. The observation was carried out via an angle-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-HAXPES) in collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Insti

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A novel robotic jellyfish able to perform 3D jet propulsion and maneuvers

Jellyfishes in nature use jet propulsion to move through the water, which have been proven to be one of the most energetically efficient swimmers on the planet. Therefore, the movements of jellyfish have attracted significant interest over the past decade in the context of bioinspired underwater vehicle. Now researchers in Beijing have developed a novel robotic jellyfish able to perform vertical a

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A new lens for life-searching space telescopes

University of Arizona researchers have designed a new kind of telescope that is a cheaper, lighter and more powerful option than creating telescopes using ever-larger mirrors. With a fleet of the new space telescopes, they aim to scour a thousand worlds for the chemical signatures of life.

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3 Secrets to Beat Performance Anxiety

Performance anxiety makes us second-guess everything from how to shoot a free throw to what to say next in an interview — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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High lead concentrations found in Amazonian wildlife

It is in industrialised countries and regions of the world where one can find the highest concentrations of lead, the world's most widespread neurotoxical accumulative metal. Thus, it was presumed that the Amazon, the world's largest expanse of tropical rainforest containing the highest levels of biocultural and cultural diversity, would contain a low amount of urban or industrial contaminants due

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3 Secrets to Beat Performance Anxiety

Performance anxiety makes us second-guess everything from how to shoot a free throw to what to say next in an interview — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Early detection of European spruce bark beetles with remote sensing

Scientists of the University of Twente discovered that early detection of European spruce bark beetles is possible with remote sensing. For the first time, remote sensing data has been used successfully to show the early infestation (so-called green attack) of European spruce when still effective actions can be taken to prevent the outbreaks and further damage.

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Early detection of European spruce bark beetles with remote sensing

Scientists of the University of Twente discovered that early detection of European spruce bark beetles is possible with remote sensing. For the first time, remote sensing data has been used successfully to show the early infestation (so-called green attack) of European spruce when still effective actions can be taken to prevent the outbreaks and further damage.

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Earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters obey same mathematical pattern

Tracking the magnitude of several catastrophic natural events and drawing a graphic of how many episodes of each have occurred throughout history yields a result which cannot be ignored. Quite on the contrary, what the graphic reveals is a highly defined curve which luckily shows that the stronger the capacity to devastate, the less frequently the episode occurs. For example, very few earthquakes

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Fossil's New Wear OS Smartwatches Enable Voice Calling For iPhone Users, Prices Start At $295

As promised, Fossil today formally introduced its Gen 5 smartwatch family utilizing the Wear OS by Google platform. The new smartwatches bring with them some nifty upgrades, including a handy …

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Samsung's First Galaxy Smartphones With AMD Radeon Graphics Could Arrive In 2021

During a recent earnings call with investors, Samsung indicated that its mobile devices could leverage AMD's graphics technology roughly two years from now, which means we could potentially …

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Galaxy Watch Active 2 has an ECG feature, still cheaper than the Apple Watch – CNET

Samsung's newest smartwatch is coming Sept. 27 for less than $300, but it might take a while to get FDA clearance.

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AT&T's priciest unlimited plans will be able to add Spotify Premium as a new perk – CNET

Prefer Spotify to HBO? The streaming service is about to become an option on AT&T's Unlimited & More Premium plan.

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Twelve centuries of European summer droughts

An international team of researchers have published a study exploring the association between summer temperature and drought across Europe placing recent drought in the context of the past 12 centuries. The study reveals that, throughout history, northern Europe has tended to get wetter and southern Europe to get drier during warmer periods.

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Patterns of substance use and co-use by adolescents

Using in-depth interviews with adolescents (16-19 years of age) who used alcohol and marijuana, this study examines the role that social and physical contexts play in adolescent decision-making about simultaneous use of alcohol and marijuana.

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Largest epilepsy study ever finds high-risk genes

New research identifies rare genetic variations that are associated with a higher risk of epilepsy. The new study, the largest ever to look at the genetic sequences of people with epilepsy, involved almost 18,000 people worldwide. The study finds genetic links shared by both severe forms of epilepsy and less severe forms of the disease, says Sam Berkovic, director of epilepsy at Austin Health and

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In the inner depths of the ear: The shape of the cochlea is an indicator of sex

The auditory section of the inner ear, or the "cochlea," does not have the same shape from birth depending on whether one is a man or a woman. This is due to the torsion of the cochlear spiral, which differs based on gender, especially at its tip.

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Huawei’s Latest Earnings Mask Its Trouble Outside China

Huawei last week touted a 23% increase in first-half revenue, despite US sanctions. But smartphone sales fell outside its home country.

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Trump Failed to Stop American Carnage

President Donald Trump declared in his inaugural address that the “American carnage” some in the nation were facing “stops right here and stops right now.” At hi s rallies, he speaks to supporters as if he has lived up to his pledge to “make America great again.” But it’s hard to feel that the United States is “great again” when men born and raised here keep going on mass killing sprees. Over the

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Breast cancer treatment costs influence patient choices

The cost of breast cancer treatment influences the type of surgery a significant portion of people choose, even those who are well-educated and have health insurance, research finds. The researchers say the finding should help guide how physicians pose treatment options to their patients, particularly as surgical approaches often have similar outcomes, but could have different costs. “Eligible wo

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Samsung Galaxy Watch Active2: Price, Specs, Release Date

The new wearable from Samsung adds even more health-tracking features to better compete with the fitness-forward Apple Watch.

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The Newest Way to Go Green? Retrofit Your Old Car to Make It Electric

Thanks to a rapid decline in lithium-ion battery prices and increases in their energy storage density, we’re headed into the age of the electric car. So much so that some nations, including France , India , and the UK are aiming to phase out internal combustion engine vehicles altogether by 2030 or 2040. Individual cities and territories, in the hunt for cleaner air standards , may phase out petr

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More than half a million Americans exposed to toxic air pollution face cancer risks above EPA guidelines

Neighbors used to barely notice the drab, low-slung industrial building across the river from downtown.

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Multiple genes affect risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema

In a new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University, researchers have found a total of 141 regions (genes) in our genetic material that largely explain the genetic risk underlying asthma, hay fever and eczema. As many as 41 of the genes identified have not previously been linked to an elevated risk for these diseases. The results are published in the scientific journal Human Molecular Genetics.

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Gender bending: Baby turtles influence their own sex

Baby turtles influence their gender by moving around inside their eggs, research has revealed.

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This is the healthiest part of the apple, according to study

Love munching on apples? You could be missing out on the best part of the fruit, according to a new report.

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Where do great white sharks show up most?

There are two hot spots where great white sharks surface, data from the shark tracking organization OCEARCH shows. The first is the waters off Cape Cod in Massachusetts, scene of the Jaws movies. But the second is in the ocean around North Carolina's Outer Banks, the data shows.

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Gaming app aims to teach millions of US adults who can't read

Damon Richardson, a born-and-raised Dallas resident in his mid-20s, tried attending Eastfield College in 2013. But he faced a hurdle so big that he eventually had to leave: He could barely read.

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This is the healthiest part of the apple, according to study

Love munching on apples? You could be missing out on the best part of the fruit, according to a new report.

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Where do great white sharks show up most?

There are two hot spots where great white sharks surface, data from the shark tracking organization OCEARCH shows. The first is the waters off Cape Cod in Massachusetts, scene of the Jaws movies. But the second is in the ocean around North Carolina's Outer Banks, the data shows.

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Earthlings living on Mars? It's 'a possibility in our lifetime,' scientists discover

Inspired by science fiction and a strange phenomenon on the Martian surface, researchers have discovered a way that Earth life could survive on the red planet.

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White-Nationalist Terrorism Must Be Stopped

Not long after the El Paso shootings occurred, I took to Twitter to denounce white-nationalist terrorism as a real threat to our country. I didn’t realize at the time that I was the first major Republican elected official to do so. But I certainly won’t be the last, as more details come out about the goals and views of this terrorist. What made me comment so soon? It’s simple: I read the shooter’

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Power generation achieved by a self-assembled biofuel cell

Researchers have developed the first fully functional biofuel cell whose biocatalysts (enzymes that play a critical role in power generation) directly self-assemble onto the electrodes. In about 5 minutes, enzyme-nanoparticle hybrids added to a biofuel cell solution selectively bind to either the anode or the cathode, and in doing so form the key components of the biofuel cell.

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We Should All Be Science Critics

A Harvard scholar says viewing science and technology with a critical eye can make the world a better place — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Verdens første abefoster med menneskeceller skabt i Kina

I et skridt mod at dyrke menneskeorganer i dyr har et spansk/amerikansk forskningsteam haft succes med at skabe en ny kimær: et abefoster med stamceller fra et menneske.

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Researchers find proteins that might restore damaged sound-detecting cells in the ear

Using genetic tools in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a pair of proteins that precisely control when sound-detecting cells, known as hair cells, are born in the mammalian inner ear. The proteins, described in a report published June 12 in eLife, may hold a key to future therapies to restore hearing in people with irreversible deafness.

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Team cracks mystery of Dead Sea summer ‘snow’

New research may solve the mystery behind the the Dead Sea’s salt crystal “snowfall.” It’s summertime at the Dead Sea, and for locals and visitors enjoying the large saltwater lake shared by Israel, Jordan, and Palestine, that means sun, sand, and… snow? “It’s a bit counterintuitive,” says Raphael Ouillon, a PhD student in the lab of mechanical engineering professor Eckart Meiburg at the Universi

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Researchers publish novel study of gratitude in online communities

Published in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Senior Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction, Dr. Stephann Makri and his colleague Sophie Turner, offer a model of gratitude in online communities—the gratitude cycle—which has the potential to transform the design of online community platforms by encouraging acknowledgment of kind acts and expression of gratitude

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Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics

An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds. This suggests that the seabird has been threatened by these chemicals once they eat plastics.

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Making a case for returning airships to the skies

Reintroducing airships into the world's transportation-mix could contribute to lowering the transport sector's carbon emissions and can play a role in establishing a sustainable hydrogen based economy. According to the authors of an IIASA-led study, these lighter-than-air aircraft could ultimately increase the feasibility of a 100 percent sustainable world.

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Our Milky Way Galaxy Is Warped Instead of Flat

From everything we’ve been able to tell, the Milky Way is a fairly typical galaxy. It’s a medium-large spiral with several smaller satellite galaxies, and the disk spans some 120,000 light-years. It can be hard to tell what the galaxy looks like from the inside, though. A new analysis focusing on a class of very bright stars indicates the Milky Way might be stranger than we thought with a warped

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Ultrasound ‘lens’ could replace invasive endoscopy

A new technique uses ultrasound to noninvasively take optical images of the body’s organs, researchers report. This new method has the potential to eliminate the need for invasive visual exams using endoscopic cameras, which need to be inserted into the body, such as down the throat or under the skin, to reach the stomach, brain, or any other organs for examination. Endoscopic imaging, or using c

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July confirmed as hottest month on record

July this year was the warmest month ever observed worldwide, satellite data has confirmed.

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The Most Dangerous American Idea

L ast week, the historian Timothy Naftali revealed a 1971 conversation between Richard Nixon, then the president of the United States, and Ronald Reagan, then the governor of California, in which Reagan referred to African UN delegates as “monkeys” who are “still uncomfortable wearing shoes.” Reagan was expressing anger over those African nations that voted to recognize the People’s Republic of C

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July 2019 hottest month globally ever recorded: EU

July 2019 was the hottest month across the globe ever recorded, according to data released Monday by the European Union's satellite-based Earth observation network.

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Four new 'hot Jupiters' discovered

Astronomers report the detection of four new "hot Jupiter" exoplanets as part of the WASP-south survey. The newfound alien worlds received designations: WASP-178b, WASP-184b, WASP-185b and WASP-192b. The discovery is detailed in a paper published July 26 on arXiv.org.

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India’s geologists champion law to protect fossil treasures

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02361-6 Scientists estimate that several hundred geological sites are threatened by the prospect of vandalism or development.

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Experiments suggest macaques are capable of making decisions based on inference

A team of researchers at Columbia University has carried out experiments with macaques and in so doing has found evidence that suggests they are capable of inference-based thinking. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the experiments they carried out and what they learned from them.

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Cashless Stores Alienate Customers in the Name of Efficiency

Opinion: Brands that do away with printed currency are unintentionally self-selecting their users.

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Europe's record heat melted Swiss glaciers

After snowy winter, an unusually rapid melt

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No E.T. Life Yet? Here's Why That's Important.

The search for intelligent aliens has time and again come up empty. Perhaps that means they aren't out there.

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Experiments suggest macaques are capable of making decisions based on inference

A team of researchers at Columbia University has carried out experiments with macaques and in so doing has found evidence that suggests they are capable of inference-based thinking. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the experiments they carried out and what they learned from them.

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Throwing lifelines to job seekers after incarceration

It's Wednesday morning and Brooke Wages is standing in front of a whiteboard, bouncing ideas off her startup partner Sarika Ram, a rising junior at Boston University, and writing out a game plan for the rest of the day. It's early, but Wages is focused and energetic about the work ahead of her. You can tell that she is, to use one of her favorite phrases, killing the game.

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Physicists simulate engine oil behavior under extreme pressure

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and elsewhere have modeled the behavior of a widely used lubricant under extreme conditions. Their calculations on Russian supercomputers spare the costly experiments and predict how the viscosity of 2,2,4-trimethylhexane changes between the standard conditions and a pressure as high as 10,000 times that in your room. The findi

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Koala-detecting dogs sniff out flaws in Australia's threatened species protection

In a country like Australia—a wealthy, economically and politically stable nation with multiple environmental laws and comparatively effective governance—the public could be forgiven for assuming that environmental laws are effective in protecting threatened species.

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Koala-detecting dogs sniff out flaws in Australia's threatened species protection

In a country like Australia—a wealthy, economically and politically stable nation with multiple environmental laws and comparatively effective governance—the public could be forgiven for assuming that environmental laws are effective in protecting threatened species.

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Evidence found of evolution influencing number of neurons that sense certain odors

An international team of researchers has found evidence of evolution influencing the number of neurons that sense certain odors in mammals. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their genetic study of the mucosa involved in the sense of smell in several mammals and what they found.

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Evidence found of evolution influencing number of neurons that sense certain odors

An international team of researchers has found evidence of evolution influencing the number of neurons that sense certain odors in mammals. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their genetic study of the mucosa involved in the sense of smell in several mammals and what they found.

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Jane Heitmann er ny formand for sundheds- og ældreudvalget

Medlemmerne til Folketingets Sundheds- og Ældreudvalg er udpeget. Formandsposten går til Jane Heitmann (V).

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Sammenhæng mellem god sygehusledelse og patienttilfredshed

Der er en positiv sammenhæng mellem god ledelsespraksis og centrale resultater som patienttilfredshed og kvalitet på sygehuse.

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Nya exoplaneter upptäckta

Den amerikanska rymdstyrelsen Nasas satellit Tess har upptäckt tre nya planeter, meddelar myndigheten. De ligger ungefär 73 ljusår från jorden, vilket astronomiskt sett är nära.

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Video-Game Violence Is Now a Partisan Issue

Updated at 1:48 p.m. on August 5, 2019. In the two decades since Columbine, video games have taken a lot of the blame for mass shootings. The evidence has never supported this conclusion, and researchers have become only more certain that media don’t cause violence, or even aggression. Nevertheless, the idea persists . Just hours after a horrifying shooting—including the one that left 22 people d

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Rye is healthy, thanks to an interplay of microbes

Eating rye comes with a variety of health benefits. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland now shows that both lactic acid bacteria and gut bacteria contribute to the health benefits of rye. Published in Microbiome, the study used a metabolomics approach to analyse metabolites found in food and the human body.

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Twelve centuries of European summer droughts

An international team of researchers have published a study exploring the association between summer temperature and drought across Europe placing recent drought in the context of the past 12 centuries. The study reveals that, throughout history, northern Europe has tended to get wetter and southern Europe to get drier during warmer periods. They also observe that recent changes in drought pattern

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Eye imaging technology provides opportunities in biotechnology

In her doctoral dissertation, M.Sc. Sanna Haavisto, researched the flow properties of aqueous microcellulose suspensions. Optical coherence tomography, an imaging technology commonly used in medical imaging of eye, was applied in a novel way in her study. The measurement methods developed in the doctoral thesis can also be utilized in developing the material properties of microfibrillated cellulos

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Manufacture of light-activated proteins

A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). Such proteins, also known as optogenetic tools, can be switched on and off through light impulses, thus triggering specific cellular processes. They can, for example, be used to analyze and control how signals are transmitted by nerve cells. So far, researchers developing optog

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Rye is healthy, thanks to an interplay of microbes

Eating rye comes with a variety of health benefits. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland now shows that both lactic acid bacteria and gut bacteria contribute to the health benefits of rye. Published in Microbiome, the study used a metabolomics approach to analyse metabolites found in food and the human body.

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Eye imaging technology provides opportunities in biotechnology

In her doctoral dissertation, M.Sc. Sanna Haavisto, researched the flow properties of aqueous microcellulose suspensions. Optical coherence tomography, an imaging technology commonly used in medical imaging of eye, was applied in a novel way in her study. The measurement methods developed in the doctoral thesis can also be utilized in developing the material properties of microfibrillated cellulos

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Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews

The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein which is essential for the development of a chronic course of infection is not present in this virus. DZIF scientists at the Charite—Universitaetsmedizin Berlin and the Univ

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Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin

It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. The caterpillars not only mimic the form but also the color of a twig. In a new study, researchers of Liverpool University in the UK and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Germany demonstrate that the caterpillars can sense the twig's color with their skin. Caterpillars that were blindfolded changed the col

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'Stressors' in middle age linked to cognitive decline in older women

A new analysis of data on more than 900 Baltimore adults by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has linked stressful life experiences among middle-aged women — but not men — to greater memory decline in later life.

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Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews

The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein which is essential for the development of a chronic course of infection is not present in this virus. DZIF scientists at the Charite—Universitaetsmedizin Berlin and the Univ

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Manufacture of light-activated proteins

A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). Such proteins, also known as optogenetic tools, can be switched on and off through light impulses, thus triggering specific cellular processes. They can, for example, be used to analyze and control how signals are transmitted by nerve cells. So far, researchers developing optog

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Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin

It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. The caterpillars not only mimic the form but also the color of a twig. In a new study, researchers of Liverpool University in the UK and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Germany demonstrate that the caterpillars can sense the twig's color with their skin. Caterpillars that were blindfolded changed the col

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Efficient, interconnected, stable: New carbon nanotubes to grow neurons

Carbon nanotubes able to take on the desired shapes thanks to a special chemical treatment, called crosslinking and, at the same time, able to function as substrata for the growth of nerve cells, finely tuning their growth and activity. The research just published in ACS Nano, the prestigious international scientific journal, is a new and important step towards the construction of neuronal regener

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Deconstructing Clarence Thomas

The first thing to know about Clarence Thomas is that everybody at the Supreme Court loves him. Surprisingly, given his uncompromising public persona and his near-total silence during oral arguments, Thomas cultivates a jovial presence in the building’s austere marble hallways. Unlike most of his colleagues, he learns everyone’s name, from the janitors to each justice’s law clerks. He makes fast

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Heatwaves and flash floods: yes, this is Britain's 'new normal'

"It's hard to believe, isn't it, that we had a heatwave just last week?"

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BedJet 3 Review: A Better Way to Blow Warm (or Cool) Air Between Your Sheets

The third generation of the novel device is smaller and has a much-improved remote control.

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Bad Science Promoting Organic Apples

Are we eating apples wrong? An ABC news headline reads, “If you aren’t eating the whole apple, you might be eating it the wrong way, a study finds.” This reporting is based on this study , which is a comparison of the bacterial content of different parts of apples, and comparing organically grown to conventionally grown apples. The study found that there was a different bacterial composition betw

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A new map is the best view yet of how fast Antarctica is shedding ice

Stitching together data from several satellite missions allowed scientists to create the most comprehensive map of Antarctic ice flow ever.

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Image of the Day: Clustered Memories

Using super-resolution microscopy, scientists learned how mutant tau causes a memory-related protein to clump up in mouse neurons.

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A dynamic view of chemotherapy effectiveness

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02336-7 Chemotherapy can halt cancer by causing cells to enter a non-dividing state called senescence, but sometimes it causes tumour cells to proliferate. It now seems that the dynamics of the protein p21 governs which of these fates occurs.

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Corkscrew photons may leave behind a spontaneous twist

Everything radiates. Whether it's a car door, a pair of shoes or the cover of a book, anything hotter than absolute zero (i.e., pretty much everything) is constantly shedding radiation in the form of photons, the quantum particles of light.

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'Gods Of The Upper Air' Traces The Birth Of Cultural Anthropology

Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas' powerful challenge to racial science — and of how others like Margaret Mead and Zora Neale Hurston contributed to that project. (Image credit: ullstein bild Dtl./ullstein bild via Getty Images)

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Return to the moon? 3D printing with moondust could be the key to future lunar living

The entire Apollo 11 mission to the moon took just eight days. If we ever want to build permanent bases on the moon, or perhaps even Mars or beyond, then future astronauts will have to spend many more days, months and maybe even years in space without a constant lifeline to Earth. The question is how would they get hold of everything they needed. Using rockets to send all the equipment and supplie

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Climate change entrepreneurship as if the planet mattered

submitted by /u/rednap_howell [link] [comments]

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We're Starting to Harness the Microbiome to Treat Disease

submitted by /u/Dubille [link] [comments]

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An ambitious plan to stop the rise of superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is here to stay, but that doesn't mean we can't do anything to stop it.

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An ambitious plan to stop the rise of superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is here to stay, but that doesn't mean we can't do anything to stop it.

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Warning to adults: Children notice everything

Adults are really good at paying attention only to what you tell them to — but children don't ignore anything. That difference can actually help children do better than adults in some learning situations, a new study suggests.

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Researcher observes the unexpected: nut-eating gorillas

Despite their large body size, gorillas are known to have a vegetarian diet consisting almost exclusively of leafy vegetation and fruit. Their teeth are large and high-crested when compared to other great apes, which is usually seen as an adaptation to spending a large amount of time chewing tough fibrous plant material. In contrast, their teeth are not well adapted to eating hard objects, such as

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Government Scientists Are Censoring Themselves

It may not make headlines, but there’s a lot of evidence that it’s happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Carl Sagans solsejl på triumftogt: Udfoldet og i bevægelse

LightSail2, som SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy bragte i kredsløb i juni, har foldet sig ud i fuldt flor og bevæger sig ud i rummet ved hjælp af Solens fotoner.

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Researcher observes the unexpected: nut-eating gorillas

Despite their large body size, gorillas are known to have a vegetarian diet consisting almost exclusively of leafy vegetation and fruit. Their teeth are large and high-crested when compared to other great apes, which is usually seen as an adaptation to spending a large amount of time chewing tough fibrous plant material. In contrast, their teeth are not well adapted to eating hard objects, such as

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Healthcare industry is a major source of harmful emissions

Climate change presents an unprecedented public health emergency and the global healthcare sector is contributing to the worldwide crisis, argues Jodi Sherman, M.D., associate professor of anesthesiology at the Yale School of Medicine in a commentary published Aug. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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TDK Proposes Automotive Use of Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor

TDK Corp exhibited an ultrasonic wave-based fingerprint sensor at Automotive Engineering Exposition 2019, which took place from May 22 to 24, 2019, at Pacifico Yokohama.

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Dear Therapist: I Can’t Deal With My Mother’s Hatred of My Father

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Following an acrimonious divorce from my mother, my father kidnapped me during what was supposed to be a weekend visit and hid with me in another state for three months before I was found by the police. He spe

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Doctors Remove 526 Teeth from Boy's Cheek. How'd They Get There?

Doctors who extracted the teeth claimed that radiation from mobile towers, as well as genetics, may have played a role in causing the growth. But there's good reason to be skeptical.

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Martian Meteor Collision May Have Triggered a 1,000-Foot Tsunami

A 90-mile-wide scar on the Martian landscape is potential "ground zero."

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Frogs, Toads, Lizards and Bats … Were Found in Bagged Salads

Eat more salad, they said. It's good for you, they said.

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New knowledge in history: Evaluating seven decades of ex situ seed regeneration

The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) in Gatersleben has been promoting the transition of gene banks into bio-digital resource centres—the aim is the preparation and collation of the phenotypic and genetic information for all stored accessions. As an important step for the further development of the Federal Ex situ Gene Bank, which is being hosted by the IPK in Gate

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Synthesizing single-crystalline hexagonal graphene quantum dots

A KAIST team has designed a novel strategy for synthesizing single-crystalline graphene quantum dots, which emit stable blue light. The research team confirmed that a display made of their synthesized graphene quantum dots successfully emitted blue light with stable electric pressure, reportedly resolving the long-standing challenges of blue light emission in manufactured displays. The study, led

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New knowledge in history: Evaluating seven decades of ex situ seed regeneration

The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) in Gatersleben has been promoting the transition of gene banks into bio-digital resource centres—the aim is the preparation and collation of the phenotypic and genetic information for all stored accessions. As an important step for the further development of the Federal Ex situ Gene Bank, which is being hosted by the IPK in Gate

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An environmental reckoning in the High Arctic

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02352-7 Sverker Sörlin lauds an integrative history of remote Beringia, revealing the cost of overexploitation in fragile ecologies.

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Tweets Can Be Deleted, but Your Likes Are Forever

Services such as TweetDelete and Tweet Archive Eraser can wipe out old tweets and retweets, but they can't reach all of your Likes.

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Now on the Used Car Lot: Great Electric Vehicles for Cheap

Used car shopping site Shift says EVs accounted for 4 percent of sales in the first half of 2019, triple their share of a year ago.

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New dinosaur found hiding in plain sight in South African museum

Scientists say bones formerly identified as Massospondylus are from a different species Fossil hunters have discovered a new species of dinosaur that has been hidden in plain sight in a South African museum collection for 30 years. The fossilised bones had been misidentified as a peculiar specimen of Massospondylus , one of the first named dinosaurs. Continue reading…

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Government Scientists Are Censoring Themselves

It may not make headlines, but there's a lot of evidence that it’s happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Hunt Is On for Alpha Centauri's Planets

Astronomers could soon learn whether or not the nearest neighboring star system harbors habitable worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Hunt Is On for Alpha Centauri's Planets

Astronomers could soon learn whether or not the nearest neighboring star system harbors habitable worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Parents Are Turning to a Controversial Treatment for Food Allergies

Thousands of food allergy patients swear by oral immunotherapy, often calling the results life-changing. But with many researchers dismissing the science as thin and the treatment as unnecessary, the schism over oral immunotherapy — among both physicians and food allergy families — may not easily resolve.

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How Steve King Could Turn Iowa Blue

SIOUX CITY, IOWA —J. D. Scholten is back for round two. The 39-year-old former baseball player announced early this morning—in a dreamy, nostalgia-laced video narrated by the Field of Dreams actor Kevin Costner—that he’s running for Representative Steve King’s congressional seat in Northwest Iowa. Scholten has tried this before: In last year’s midterms, the Democrat proved capable competition for

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The Nairobi sanctuary caring for orphaned elephants

This Nairobi orphanage cares for elephants whose parents have often been killed by poachers.

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Antineutrino detection could help remotely monitor nuclear reactors

Technology to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors could allow continuous remote monitoring designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate …

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HTC's standalone VR kit will stream PC content via WiFi

We're still some way away from getting compact VR headsets that tap into cloud VR services via 5G, but for now, HTC has cooked up something that will let standalone 6DoF kits take …

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Why No One Wants to Talk About the Booming Economy

Here are some facts about the American economy: Jobs have grown for 106 consecutive months, the longest streak on record. At 121 months, this is the longest bull market in American history. The unemployment rate has been at 4 percent or less for 16 consecutive months, the longest such streak in 50 years. Inequality remains a crucial problem, but wages are now growing the fastest among the lowest-

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Antineutrino detection could help remotely monitor nuclear reactors

Technology to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors could allow continuous remote monitoring designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate the diversion of nuclear materials. The monitoring could be done from outside the reactor vessel, and the technology may be sensitive enough to detect substitution of a single fuel assembly.

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Team uses AI to detect fast radio bursts

A Swinburne Ph.D. student has built an automated system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to revolutionise our ability to detect and capture fast radio bursts (FRBs) in real-time.

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The best hospitals have more superbugs. Do patients have a right to know?

Many of the best hospitals also have superbugs within their walls. One medical dilemma is whether to tell patients about a superbug's presence: will it inhibit them from seeking care? The best hospitals may have the most superbugs, but they also have the experts who know how to treat patients sickened by bacteria, and possess some of the most powerful antibiotics around. Superbugs: The Race to St

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Journal expresses a great deal of concern over deceased author’s work

A gastroenterology journal has issued an extensive expression of concern about a 2013 paper by Yoshihiro Sato, a Japanese endocrinologist who has posthumously been climbing the Retraction Watch leaderboard. (He’s now ranked number three, ahead of Diederik Stapel.) To call the statement an “expression of concern” is like calling Charles M. Schulz a talented cartoonist, … Continue reading

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Decades of dumping acid suggest acid rain may make trees thirstier

Acidified soil loses calcium, which can affect trees’ ability to hang on to water.

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Techtopia #117: 3D-print et hus på Månen

Podcast: Dette er tredje og sidste del i Techtopias sommerserie i anledning af 50-året for den første månelanding.

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Cyberangreb med destruktiv malware fordoblet de seneste seks måneder

Hackere benytter sig i stigende grad af destruktiv malware. Der er sket en fordobling i antallet af angreb i de seneste seks måneder, hvor især produktionssektoren har været hårdt ramt.

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Eye-controlled soft lens paves way to soft human-machine interfaces

A research team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a soft robotic lens whose movements are controlled by the eyes—blink twice and the lens zooms in and out; look left, right, up or down and the lens will follow.

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Setting the stage for fuel-efficient fertilizer

Ammonia, the primary ingredient in nitrogen-based fertilizers, has helped feed the world since World War I. But making ammonia at an industrial scale takes a lot of energy, and it accounts for more than one percent of the world's total energy-related carbon emissions.

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For the presidential race, 'electability' could decide who wins and who loses

In 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was deemed "electable" by analysts just four years after former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney carried the same label in the race against President Barack Obama, a contest that Romney lost. This election, pundits have dubbed former Vice President Joe Biden as the most "electable" Democrat among a field of more than 20 candidates, in large part bec

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Archaeologist works with tribe to explore its history and to repair historic injustices

Archaeology Professor Matthew Liebmann has been collaborating with the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico for two decades, having served as tribal archaeologist and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act program director for the Jemez Department of Natural Resources. Author of "Revolt: An Archaeological History of Pueblo Resistance and Revitalization in 17th Century New Mexico," Liebman

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Japan loosens the rules on human-animal embryos

The goal is to nurture a human organ, such as a pancreas, inside an engineered host animal

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Asteroid's surprise close approach illustrates need for more eyes on the sky

On 25 July, an asteroid the size of a football field flew by Earth, coming within 65 000 km of our planet's surface during its closest approach—about one fifth of the distance to the Moon.

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Looking for warm dark matter

In the last century, astronomers studying the motions of galaxies and the character of the cosmic microwave background radiation came to realize that most of the matter in the universe was not visible. About 84% of the matter in the cosmos is dark, emitting neither light nor any other known kind of radiation. Hence it is called dark matter. One of its other primary qualities is that it only intera

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Evidence of ubiquitous Alfvén pulses transporting energy from the photosphere to the upper chromosphere

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11495-0 Heating of the upper solar atmospheric layers is an open question. Here, the authors show observational evidence that ubiquitous Alfven pulses are excited by prevalent photospheric swirls, which are found to propagate upwards and carry enough energy flux needed to balance the local upper chromospheric energy l

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Maintenance of cell type-specific connectivity and circuit function requires Tao kinase

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11408-1 It is unclear how circuit specificity and function are maintained during organismal growth. In this study, authors show that connectivity between primary nociceptors and their downstream neurons scales with animal size and that Ste20-like kinase Tao acts as a negative regulator of synaptic growth required for

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Broadband THz to NIR up-converter for photon-type THz imaging

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11465-6 Designing high performance THz pixelless imaging devices is nowadays challenging due to the inability to obtain normal incidence excitation using a grating coupler. Here, the authors report a broadband GaAs HIWIP-LED THz-NIR up-conversion imaging device avoiding the use of any grating coupler.

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A metasomatized lithospheric mantle control on the metallogenic signature of post-subduction magmatism

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11065-4 Hydrous and alkali rich magmas rise through the lithosphere and may host gold-rich ore deposits – a poorly understood process. Here, the authors present new chalcophile element data across a metallogenic section of the lithosphere and suggest a continuous or staged ascent of magmatic-hydrothermal settings from

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Quantifying the impact of public omics data

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11461-w Increasing amount of public omics data are important and valuable resources for the research community. Here, the authors develop a set of metrics to quantify the attention and impact of biomedical datasets and integrate them into the framework of Omics Discovery Index (OmicsDI).

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Evaporation-induced sintering of liquid metal droplets with biological nanofibrils for flexible conductivity and responsive actuation

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11466-5 Providing mechanical sintering of liquid metal droplets under ambient conditions for flexible electronics remains elusive. Here, they propose biological nanofibrils for enabling evaporation-induced sintering of EGaIn droplets into conductive coating on diverse substrates and free-standing films.

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Morphing of liquid crystal surfaces by emergent collectivity

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11501-5 Liquid crystal networks can morph their shape in response to electrical stimulus. Here the authors provide a detailed description of their deformation mechanism and introduce a method to observe the dynamic surface of liquid crystal elastomers. This could help with the development of smart materials.

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The Rad51 paralogs facilitate a novel DNA strand specific damage tolerance pathway

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11374-8 The homologous recombination machinery needs to be recruited at replication intermediates for accurate functioning. Here, the authors reveal that a Rad51 paralog-containing complex, called the Shu complex, recognizes and enables tolerance of predominantly lagging strand abasic sites.

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Värme och torka i Europa under tolv århundraden

Det visar en ny artikel publicerad av en internationell forskargrupp som studerat sambandet mellan sommartemperatur och torka runt om i Europa. I studien analyseras relationen mellan sommartemperatur och torka över både långa och korta tidsskalor. Forskarna undersöker meteorologiska data sedan 1700-talet och rekonstruktioner baserade på trädringar över sommartemperatur respektive sommartorka seda

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Now that futurology is an environmentalism subreddit dedicated to climate change (which I’m not dismissing), can anyone point me to resources on the emerging technologies that I used to find here? My personal interests are in the comments.

Artificial Intelligence (ANI/AGI/ASI)— Augmented Reality/ Virtual Reality— Quantum Computing— Autonomous Vehicles (Cars/ Drones)— Nanotechnology (APM)— CRISPER/ Genetic Engineering— Brain Machine Interfaces— Next Generation Telecommunications— Mind Uploading/ Avatars— Blockchains— Body Augmentation— Moore’s Law/ Exponential Growth— Energy (Solar Power/ Fusion)— Biotechnology/ 3D Printed Tissues—

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Do you believe that there will be way to give humans second edolescence?

I am from a biological point of view. A lot of adult diseases are a reaction to bad nutrition or negligence in childhood – the time of growth and development. For the example imagine if there was a kind of therapy that makes your bones flexible and growing again. You would fix your spine, limbs, for example, grow few inches. You would grow new teeth, develope better eyesight and become fertile ag

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Simulation Theory

If we are in a simulation. Can we detect any form of residual computational energy/frequency? submitted by /u/Traffic-marvel [link] [comments]

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Antineutrino detection could help remotely monitor nuclear reactors

Technology to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors could allow continuous remote monitoring designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate the diversion of nuclear materials. The monitoring could be done from outside the reactor vessel, and the technology may be sensitive enough to detect substitution of a single fuel assembly.

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Water wars: How to avoid conflict over our most precious resource

Climate change is altering weather patterns, endangering the water supply of over half of humanity. New thinking is required to avoid things boiling over

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Coordinated community structure among trees, fungi and invertebrate groups in Amazonian rainforests

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47595-6 Coordinated community structure among trees, fungi and invertebrate groups in Amazonian rainforests

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Salivary glands require Aurora Kinase B for regeneration after transient innate immune-mediated injury

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47762-9 Salivary glands require Aurora Kinase B for regeneration after transient innate immune-mediated injury

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Unnatural spirocyclic oxindole alkaloids biosynthesis in Uncaria guianensis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47706-3

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Relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness/muscular strength and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in brown adipose tissue after exposure to cold in young, sedentary adults

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47918-7 Relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness/muscular strength and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in brown adipose tissue after exposure to cold in young, sedentary adults

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Iron accumulation in tumor-associated macrophages marks an improved overall survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47833-x

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Neoceroplatus betaryiensis nov. sp. (Diptera: Keroplatidae) is the first record of a bioluminescent fungus-gnat in South America

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47753-w

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He’s Getting Worse

The current, and (to date) most debased, phase of the Trump presidency—the phase that includes the unceasing demonization of minority legislators and the endorsement of North Korean communism—began, in retrospect, on May 8, in the Florida Panhandle, at a rally in Panama City. It was there that Donald Trump gave tacit approval to the use of violence against immigrants. The Panama City rally was no

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Sådan afdækkede danske eksperter omfattende skader på norsk atomreaktor

PLUS. Alvorlige korrosionsskader afgjorde reaktorens skæbne: permanent lukning. Læs her, hvordan eksperterne kom frem til den konklusion.

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That Vexing Math Equation? Here’s an Addition

The confusion (likely intentional) boiled down to a discrepancy between the math rules used in grade school and in high school.

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Unethical work must be filtered out or flagged

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02378-x Researchers need guidance on how to handle published work whose ethics have been questioned, argue Graeme D. Ruxton and Tom Mulder.

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Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times

An interdisciplinary team in San Francisco uses acupressure, massage, counseling and other methods, as well as medicine, to help kids get relief from chronic pain. But such pediatric centers are rare. (Image credit: Alison Kodjak/NPR)

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Supermarkeds-chef truer kunder med ulovlig offentliggørelse af overvågning

Datatilsynet og jurist understreger, at der er tale om klokkeklare, juridiske problemer. Dagrofa fastholder, at der er tale om enkeltstående tilfælde, men vil ikke svare på spørgsmål om den ulovlige praksis, der har stået på et år.

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Overblik: Sådan fanger politiet forbryderne med de nyeste kriminalteknologier

Mordere, tyveknægte og pushere er presset af politiets nyeste tech-våben. I et gensyn med 12 artikler giver vi et indblik i den seneste udvikling inden for kriminalteknologi.

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500 years on, how Magellan's voyage changed the world

Ferdinand Magellan set off from Spain 500 years ago on an epoch-making voyage to sail all the way around the globe for the first time.

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In French mountains, bear attacks leave shepherds skittish

As day breaks over the Pyrenees mountains, hundreds of sheep scuttle up a valley, the clanging of their neck bells echoing around the hills that fringe the French-Spanish border.

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In French mountains, bear attacks leave shepherds skittish

As day breaks over the Pyrenees mountains, hundreds of sheep scuttle up a valley, the clanging of their neck bells echoing around the hills that fringe the French-Spanish border.

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Ecological land grab: food vs fuel vs forests

The overlapping crises of climate change, mass species extinction, and an unsustainable global food system are on a collision course towards what might best be called an ecological land grab.

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Algae Bloom Fouls N.J.’s Largest Lake, Indicating Broader Crisis

Lake Hopatcong, normally buzzing with swimmers and water skiers, is filled with cyanobacteria in quantities never before recorded.

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Is today’s generation of children “the sickest generation”?

Presidential candidate and New Age self-help guru Marianne Williamson has been repeating a claim that over half of our children have chronic illness and implying that the expansion of the vaccine schedule since the late 1980s is responsible. But is it true? Are over half of our children sick? Is this "the sickest generation"?

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Recursive language and modern imagination were acquired simultaneously 70,000 years ago

A genetic mutation that slowed down the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in two or more children may have triggered a cascade of events leading to acquisition of recursive language and modern imagination 70,000 years ago.

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Recursive language and modern imagination were acquired simultaneously 70,000 years ago

A genetic mutation that slowed down the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in two or more children may have triggered a cascade of events leading to acquisition of recursive language and modern imagination 70,000 years ago.

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TV crews capture first evidence of leopard seals sharing food

Drone footage captured by crews filming the Netflix series Our Planet—narrated by Sir David Attenborough—has shown never-before seen behaviour of two leopard seals sharing food.

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TV crews capture first evidence of leopard seals sharing food

Drone footage captured by crews filming the Netflix series Our Planet—narrated by Sir David Attenborough—has shown never-before seen behaviour of two leopard seals sharing food.

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MIT’s AI Knitting System Designs, Creates Woven Garments

MIT CSAIL's system allows non-experts to create custom knitting designs (via MIT CSAIL) I’ve tried learning to knit. It wasn’t pretty. MIT’s …

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Google Assistant can now read and reply to third-party messaging apps

It seems like Google's Assistant has got another feather in its cap thanks to the ability to read and reply to third-party messaging apps. AndroidPolice reported the discovery, which extends …

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Huawei is testing a smartphone running its Hongmeng OS

If you haven't been living under a rock, you know very well that Huawei has been busy forging an in-house mobile operating system. The company has been sending mixed messages to the press in …

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The Last Time the Globe Warmed

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

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Didi Chuxing’s autonomous driving unit is now an independent company

, the Chinese ride-sharing and transportation giant said today. Didi’s autonomous driving team was created in 2016 and now …

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Lessons From Moscow: How China Might Handle Hong Kong

Large crowds are taking to the streets—outraged by how the place they live is being run, angry that police are beating up protesters—and railing against a broken system they say needs to be made more democratic. The local leader in charge is beholden to a distant capital, and is out of touch with the populace. A worrying question begins to be asked: Will we see a repeat of what happened in June 1

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Exo-skelet giver fynske fabriksarbejdere superkræfter: 'Mine arme løfter sig selv'

Skeletterne skal hjælpe de mange, der har smerter på grund af arbejdet.

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Cloudflare Ditches 8chan. What Happens Now?

In an interview with WIRED, Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince explains his decision to stop protecting 8chan—and where the notorious forum goes from here.

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Whole body vibration shakes up microbiome, reduces inflammation in diabetes

In the face of diabetes, a common condition in which glucose and levels of destructive inflammation soar, whole body vibration appears to improve how well our body uses glucose as an energy source and adjust our microbiome and immune cells to deter inflammation, investigators report.For the first time they have described how regular use of whole body vibration can create this healthier mix by yiel

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Recursive language and modern imagination were acquired simultaneously 70,000 years ago

A genetic mutation that slowed down the development of the prefrontal cortex in two or more children may have triggered a cascade of events leading to acquisition of recursive language and modern imagination 70,000 years ago. This new Romulus and Remus hypothesis, coined by Dr. Vyshedskiy, a neuroscientist from Boston University, might be able to solve the long-standing mystery of language evoluti

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Transgender women case study shows sperm production is possible but not certain

One young transgender woman was able to produce viable sperm after a few months of discontinuing her puberty-halting medication, whereas a second case wasn't able to produce sperm during the time she could tolerate being off her medication.

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MSI detection via liquid biopsy shows high concordance with results from tissue samples

Incorporation of pan-cancer microsatellite instability (MSI) detection into the 74-gene panel Guardant360 liquid biopsy assay showed high concordance with matched tissue samples in nearly 1,000 patients.

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Stop abusing land, scientists warn

Scientists are poised to deliver a stark condemnation of the damage people are wreaking on Earth's land surface.

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Fugtskader, afgasning og manglende styrke: Ny letvægtsbeton volder problemer

EPS-beton kan beskadige gulve, tage og vægge samt føre til skimmelsvamp og frigivelse af pentangas i bygningen. Alligevel er materialet udbredt, og der er ingen officielle anvisninger eller retningslinjer på området.

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Baby Jumping Spiders Are Watching Us, Their Eyesight Is That Good

Even though they're 100 times smaller than an adult spider.

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Facebook, Instagram hit by apparent global outage – CNET

Users of the social networks complain of not being able to share status updates or photos.

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Long-term declines in heart disease and stroke deaths are stalling, research finds

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries, including Australia, and are even increasing in some countries, according to new research.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #31

Story of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Poster of the Week… SkS Week in Review… Story of the Week… China’s emissions ‘could peak 10 years earlier than Paris climate pledge’ Shutterstock CO2 emissions in China may peak up to a decade earlier than the nation has pledged under the Paris Agreement , according to a new study. With its enormous population and heavy reliance

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TV crews capture first evidence of leopard seals sharing food

Previously unseen footage captured during filming for the Netflix series Our Planet — narrated by Sir David Attenborough — reports up to 36 seals seen feeding at the same king penguin colony in South Georgia.

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The American Exception

There is one developed country—and only one—in which it is not only legal, but easy and convenient, to amass a private arsenal of mass slaughter. That country also happens to be the one—and the only one —regularly afflicted by mass slaughters perpetrated by aggrieved individuals. You would not think that this is a complicated problem to puzzle out. Yet even as the casualties from gunfire mount, A

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National Trust brings Sutton Hoo alive with £4m revamp

Suffolk site reopens enhanced with 27-metre ship sculpture, seventh-century treasures and immersive exhibitions Eighty years ago this summer, a beautifully situated if unusually lumpy field in Suffolk became, briefly, the site of an archaeological sensation. An immense Anglo-Saxon ship burial had been uncovered, loaded with some of the most astonishing gold and jewelled artefacts ever found. But

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Will taking down 8chan stop the worst people on the Internet?

The online board thrived on extreme beliefs — and mainstream attention

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The Wrong Way to Talk About the El Paso Shooter's Manifesto

The more oxygen these manifestos get, the wider their messages spread. And no one understands that better than the people posting them.

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Google Fit Now Tracks Sleep, Adds Dark Mode

Look for improved sleep insights and dark theme in the Google Fit app (via Google) Fitness means more than washboard abs and toned arms. So Google Fit …

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When Fear of Deportation Keeps Families From Help After a Shooting

In the aftermath of the mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, yesterday, some reports indicated that immigrants affected by the shooting may have avoided seeking treatment or going to authorities for help locating family members because of their immigration status. On CNN, for example, the former assistant secretary of Homeland Security Juliette Kayyem noted that according to authorities,

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'Halo' TV series has its Cortana ahead of early 2021 premiere

While Showtime took forever to start filling in details for its Halo TV series, it's clearly eager to make up for lost time. The broadcaster has announced that Natascha McElhone …

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Starwatch: Jupiter in a close encounter with red giant Antares

Our largest planet and the red supergiant are close together in the south-eastern sky, joined on Wednesday evening by the moon There is an interesting trio of celestial objects to look out for on the evening of 8 August. The mighty planet Jupiter is currently close to the red giant star Antares in the constellation Scorpius . On 8 August, this pair will be joined by the moon. The chart shows the

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Bulletproof air/mist?

I can’t remember if I dreamt this up or it was a futuristic idea I saw somewhere: would it be possible in crowded areas such as a mall, concert, airport etc to permeate the air with a mist or gas that is basically a non Newtonian style composition so that everything going slower than a bullet would be fine but a bullet or other dangerously fast projectile would start to collect foam around it and

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How Jaywalking Could Jam Up the Era of Self-Driving Cars

submitted by /u/drak0bsidian [link] [comments]

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Researchers 3D print functional parts of the heart using collagen

submitted by /u/idk_anymore [link] [comments]

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Why the Future of Cars is Electric

submitted by /u/stesch [link] [comments]

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Texas airport tests driverless electric passenger shuttle

submitted by /u/wyndwatcher [link] [comments]

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Top 10 reasons we need a maximum age limit to run for President

As there's a minimum age, there should be a maximum one. Aging causes decline in numerous cognitive skills as shown in numerous studies. Older candidates are less likely to support new ideas, technologies and societal changes. None Look, this is not meant to be ageist. But as we have a minimum age to become President – 35 – there should be a maximum age too. Why 35 anyway? Who determined that 35

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Cancer Medicine Is Failing Us

Our aggressive, expensive approach to cancer is doing more harm than good — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Death Rattle of White Supremacy

Will America finally confront the violent death rattle of white supremacy? Or will it fail to inflict the coup de grâce, allowing the ideology of hate to revive itself into a global movement, with radicalized young men engaged in what they believe is a zero-sum war for survival? Last year, those opening lines might have been dismissed as alarmist rhetoric and hyperbole. We no longer have that lux

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No One Knows Trump’s Next Move

Updated on August 4, 2019 at 4:26 p.m. ET It was a part of the presidency that would come to surprise Bill Clinton, if only because of its heartrending frequency. Soon after the gun massacre at Columbine High School in the spring of 1999, Clinton flew to Littleton, Colorado, to talk with students, teachers, and parents mourning the deaths of the 13 victims. So much of his job, he told the audienc

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Lioness Fights Off Male Lions | Serengeti

Kali a brave lioness and devoted mother of four cubs, has broken the golden rules of family life, by having cubs with an outsider. When she tries to bring the cubs home, her betrayal is exposed and she is forced into exile. Stream Serengeti on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/serengeti/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http://www.faceboo

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Mette dumpede matematik i gymnasiet: Nu er hendes forskning på forsiden af New York Times

Mette Bendixen har gjort lynkarriere som topforsker, og nu har hun måske fundet en løsning på den globale mangel på sand.

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The complete guide to building a rooftop garden

You can get your hands dirty no matter where you live. (Julian Hochgesang via Unsplash/) Before man was, gardening waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner. Ok fine, Cormac McCarthy was actually talking about war when he wrote that, but if you ask me, it still holds true for gardening. Along with mastering fire, the purposeful cultivation of plants is widely considere

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How Many Attacks Will It Take Until the White-Supremacist Threat Is Taken Seriously?

Updated at 2:34 p.m. ET on August 4, 2019. There was, it seems, no time to avert the massacre. The anti-immigrant, white-nationalist manifesto heralding an imminent attack was uploaded to the online message board 8chan only minutes before a shooter killed at least 20 people out shopping on a late-summer Saturday in El Paso, Texas. But in another sense, if U.S. authorities confirm that the documen

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10 reasons there should be a maximum age limit to run for president

As there's a minimum age, there should be a maximum one. Aging causes decline in numerous cognitive skills as shown in numerous studies. Older candidates are less likely to support new ideas, technologies and societal changes. None Look, this is not meant to be ageist. But as we have a minimum age to become president – 35 – there should be a maximum age too. Why 35 anyway? Who determined that 35

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Frygten for lægerne

Er det politikernes frygt for læger, der har presset lægerne ud af sygehusvæsnets ledelse? Men politikere og administratorer skal ikke være bange for lægerne. Lægerne er dedikerede, hårdt arbejdende, og de kæmper for deres patienter – tag os tilbage i beslutningsprocesserne.

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US Northwest towns 'woefully unprepared' as fire risk grows

Nestled in the foothills of Washington's Cascade Mountains, the bustling Seattle suburb of Issaquah seems an unlikely candidate for anxiety over wildfires.

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California hospitals question 2030 earthquake standards

A Southern California hospital spent $72 million on a building designed to do two things after an earthquake: stay standing and stay open.

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Making Things We Know Will Disappear

For those stifled by shades of perfectionism, temporary media can remind us how to create things for the fun of it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pilrådden evaluering af hoveduddannelse i almen medicin

Systemet er himmelråbende korrupt og uærligt, og skaber kun dårlig stemning i dens nuværende form.

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Making Things We Know Will Disappear

For those stifled by shades of perfectionism, temporary media can remind us how to create things for the fun of it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China's self-driving "super tractor" starts field tests

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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‘Do Something’: 2020 Democrats Are Stuck After Mass Shootings

Shortly after 12 a.m. ET this morning, Senator Kamala Harris tweeted, “My message to the president on gun violence.” What followed was an eight-second clip of an interview she had conducted on MSNBC earlier in the evening, after a gunman killed at least 20 people and wounded dozens more at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas. “Have the courage to act,” the California Democrat said. “Do something. Do some

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Mentale helbredsproblemer overraskende dyrt for Danmark

Et dansk samfund bruger mere end dobbelt så meget end hidtil antaget på mentale helbredsproblemer, nemlig over 110 mia. kr. om året. Faktisk topper vi OECD’s liste. Det er overraskende, at det får lov til at tage til i styrke.

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How to suffer like a total pro: Pete Holmes on ego, judgment, and feeling special

When you're going through a moment that tests your patience, even causes you to psychologically suffer, sometimes you have to step back and say, "Yes, thank you." Suffering is like sandpaper, and, if we choose, it can buffer us and make us better versions of ourselves. Also, it's critical to find a quiet place within where just the fundamental fact that you are participating in reality imbues you

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Roblox hits 100 million monthly active users

Roblox is big. Bigger than Minecraft big. The massively multiple online title has been around since 2006, but the game has been achieving a crazy amount of momentum of late. On Friday, it announced …

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Colombia’s ex-guerillas learn biodiversity and business models

Andrew J Wight joins an Australian scientist who is helping develop ecotourism in his homeland.

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What If We Visualized Humanity’s Future in Millennia Instead of Centuries?

“Where do you see yourself in five years?” It’s a classic job interview question, designed to probe your level of ambition and aspiration. And it probes about as far ahead as many of us are likely to think: with so many distractions in the here and now, so many crises and challenges and opportunities that will arise, and so much that seems likely to change, who can meticulously sit and plan for d

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What will it take for us to trust algorithms?

They're a part of life, but that sometimes makes us uncomfortable. Mathematician Kate Smith-Miles, from the University of Melbourne, explores why.

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A ‘cancer lab’ on chip

Microfluidics and new devices may enable widespread screening. Phil Dooley reports.

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Anaemic star carries the mark of its ancient ancestor

Astronomers find the most iron-poor star in the galaxy.

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Science history: Virginia Apgar and the score you didn’t know you had

Simple system made a major contribution to assessing the health of newborns. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Looking inside living brain cells

Super-resolution microscopy provide unprecedented access.

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2019's Biggest Breakthroughs | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

On today's episode of The Daily Bite, we recap Shark Week 2019's biggest breakthroughs! Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://w

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