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nyheder2019august06

SpaceIL’s Crashed Spacecraft Spilled Tardigrades on the Moon

The Beresheet lunar lander carried thousands of books, DNA samples, and a few thousand water bears to the moon. But did any of it survive the crash?

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Widely used pesticide in US particularly harmful to bees, study finds

Agriculture has become 48 times more toxic to insects in last 25 years as neonics are used on over 140 different types of crops Agriculture in the United States has become 48 times more toxic to insects over the last 25 years, largely due to a controversial, widely used class of pesticides that are particularly harmful to bees, according to a study published on Tuesday. Neonicotinoid pesticides,

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Thousands of Tardigrades Stranded on the Moon After Lunar Lander Crash

When you look up at the moon, there may now be a few thousand water bears looking back at you.

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Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience

A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. The discovery was made by researchers investigating whether corals that split their spawning over multiple months are more successful at spreading their offspring across different reefs.

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Study: most people would rather lose a job to a robot than a human

Scientists in Germany find that most people would rather a robot replaced them in their job than a human. On the other hand, most people would be upset if a robot took the job of a colleague. People have different emotional reactions to being replaced by robots versus humans. None By most accounts, the robots are coming for human jobs. Predictions vary when exactly that reality will be upon us, b

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Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick — the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

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Blood clotting proteins in urine discovered as biomarkers of lupus nephritis

University of Houston biomedical engineer Chandra Mohan has discovered blood clotting proteins in the urine of patients with Lupus Nephritis which is the leading cause of death in lupus patients. The new biomarker discovery could lead to better clinical disease monitoring.

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Researchers Create First-Ever “2D Gold,” Just Two Atoms Thick

Gold Standard A team of scientists at the University of Leeds has created a new form of gold that’s just two atoms thick — and they say it could improve everything from electronics to water purification systems. “This work amounts to a landmark achievement,” researcher Sunjie Ye said in a press release . “Not only does it open up the possibility that gold can be used more efficiently in existing

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Europe launches second EDRS space laser satellite

Optical links will pull pictures and data from other spacecraft and then speed them to the ground.

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Why the screaming hairy armadillo weeps

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02386-x Local hunters help scientists to understand a generally silent creature’s loud ‘sobs’.

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Novartis Hid Manipulated Data While Seeking Approval for $2.1 Million Treatment

The failure to report the issue has not put patients at risk, the F.D.A. said, but the drugmaker could face criminal and civil penalties.

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Virtual treasure hunt shows brain maps time sequence of memories

We have little difficulty in remembering the chronology of events. We can tell how much time passed between two events and which one occurred first. Apparently, memories of events in the brain are linked when they occur close together. Using an experiment that combines learning in virtual reality and brain scans, researchers describe how a temporal map of memories is created in the brain.

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Dead planets can 'broadcast' for up to a billion years

Astronomers are planning to hunt for cores of exoplanets around white dwarf stars by 'tuning in' to the radio waves that they emit.

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Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick — the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

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America’s Only Gun-Tracing Center

On television, when a perpetrator leaves a gun at the scene, a quick computer search can point law enforcement to the weapon’s owner. In reality—at least in the United States—no such database of firearms exists. To have one would be illegal, according to legislation that passed in Congress in 1986, lobbied for by the National Rifle Association. Instead, we have the National Tracing Center, in Mar

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Mouse Genetics Shape the Gut Microbiome More than Their Environment

Neither the maternal microbiome nor housing conditions appear to permanently alter which microbes remain in the animals.

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Sweden's Klarna, Europe's most valuable fintech after cash call

Swedish payment solutions provider Klarna said Tuesday it had raised $460 million (411 million euro) in an equity round, making it the most valuable financial technology company in Europe at …

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Astronomers Just Spotted One of the Biggest Black Holes Ever

Absolute Unit A team of astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics in Germany just discovered one of the biggest black holes ever, about 700 million light-years away in the Holmberg 15A galaxy. It’s so big, it could fit our entire solar system inside it many times over. It’s even larger than your average supermassive black hole — making it, in the terminology of the re

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Terrawatch: why salt crystals 'snow' down on Dead Sea floor

Scientists have observed up to 10cm of salt falling to sea floor every year since 1979 Try swimming in the Dead Sea and you can’t help but float. This salt lake, bordered by Jordan, Israel and the West Bank, is nearly 10 times as salty as the oceans. In recent decades diversion of freshwater streams has made it even saltier, and since 1979 scientists have observed salt crystals “snowing” down, de

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Manatee Chat: Uncovering Manatee Secrets

It has long been believed that the manatee is a solitary animal with a very simple communication system that primarily serves one purpose: to keep mom and a calf in contact. However, in recent years, these assumptions have been questioned, based on new research indicating that manatees may not be that solitary after all and that their communication system might be more complex than we previously r

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Why Mathematicians Hate That Viral Math Equation

It’s formatted to confuse people, and there are no interesting underlying concepts.

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Ebola veteran promises an end to Congo’s epidemic

Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfum, who helped discover the virus in 1976, takes command of the year-old battle

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The best protein powders for a muscle-building boost

Drink it all the whey down. (Tara Evans via Unsplash/) It's truly wild to consider the explosive growth of the protein supplement industry. Google searches for "protein powder" went up 5x between January 2009 and January 2019, and all that interest has funded an endless variety of flavors (espresso! rocket pop! peanut butter delight !) and ingredients (whey! peas! hemp !) Despite its rapid ascent

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Virtual treasure hunt shows brain maps time sequence of memories

We have little difficulty in remembering the chronology of events. We can tell how much time passed between two events and which one occurred first. Apparently, memories of events in the brain are linked when they occur close together. Using an experiment that combines learning in virtual reality and brain scans, Jacob Bellmund and Christian Doeller from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitiv

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Israeli Researchers Find New Way To Eliminate Drug-resistant Cancerous Tumors

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Scientists create blinking human eye replica on a chip

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Why Companies and Armies Are Hiring Science Fiction Writers

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Sony’s New AI Drummer Could Write Beats for Your Band

Team Player We already knew AIs could write jazz and death metal tracks on their own, and even create infinite remixes of others’ songs. Now, Sony has created an AI that can collaborate with other musicians, producing drum beats for songs in a variety of genres that you can listen to here — making it the latest example of AI’s ability to tap into its musical side. Beat Down The Sony researchers c

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NASA finds heavy rain in new tropical storm Krosa

Tropical Storm Krosa had recently developed into a tropical storm when the GPM satellite passed overhead and found heavy rainfall. Fortunately, the storm was over open waters.

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NASA finds tropical storm Francisco in the Korea strait

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Korea Strait and found the center of Tropical Storm Francisco in the middle of it. The AIRS instrument aboard took the temperature of its cloud tops to estimate storm strength and found strong storms over two countries.

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Calcium levels in freshwater lakes declining in Europe and North America

A new global study of how calcium concentrations are changing in freshwater lakes around the world has revealed that in widespread areas in Europe and eastern North America, calcium levels are declining towards levels that can be critically low for the reproduction and survival of many aquatic organisms.

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AT&T employees took bribes to unlock phones and plant malware, DOJ says

Malware installed on AT&T systems helped conspirators unlock 2 million phones.

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Amazon's self-driving delivery robots head to California

Amazon's self-driving robots will be roaming the streets of another neighborhood.

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California’s Wildfires May Be Too Much, Even for Fire-loving Woodpeckers

‘Megafires’ jeopardize the black-backed woodpecker’s habitat. BlackbackedWoodpeaker_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Kurt Bauschardt via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Creature Tuesday, August 6, 2019 – 15:45 Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor (Inside Science) — After the fire, life rises from the charred woods in forests across the Western U.S. But too much fire might leave only ashes, at

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A Half-Degree Temperature Rise Will Kill 30,000 in China Per Year

Hard Limit For countries that signed the Paris Agreement , limiting climate change to two degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels is the ultimate goal — and stopping it at 1.5 degrees would be even better. But new research suggests that even that half degree of warming could have dire consequences for humanity. If the world heats up by two degrees, about 30,000 more people in Chinese cities wi

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This Incredible Real-Time Voice Language Translator Is Also a Global WIFI Hotspot

If you’re getting ready to travel abroad, you’ve probably already started looking into translator apps for your phone. And that makes a lot of sense. There are tons of different translator apps out there, and some of them work really well. The only problem with translator apps? Not only do you need to make sure you have a data connection, which is a whole separate headache, but depending on where

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Friday News Roundup – International

Will the United States get out of Afghanistan?

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Blood pressure recording over 24 hours is the best predictor of heart and vascular disease

High blood pressure is the most important treatable risk factor for diseases of the heart and the arterial system. Blood pressure recorded over 24 hours predicts these complications more accurately than blood pressure measured on a single occasion.

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Kids might be naturally immunized after C. difficile colonization in infancy

Exposure to C. difficile in infancy produces an immune response that might protect against this gastrointestinal infection later in childhood, according to a new study.

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How can robots land like birds?

Birds can perch on a wide variety of surfaces, thick or thin, rough or slick. But can they find stable footing if a branch is covered in Teflon? In the interest of making better robots, researchers found out.

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Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands

A group of scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. They named the new species Gastrodia amamiana.

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A Public Library of, by, and for the People

The public library system in Brownsville, Texas, has a long history of inventing and then reinventing itself to be of, by, and for the people. The library story began modestly at the end of the 19th century, with the personal collection of Irish-born U.S. Army Captain William Kelly, who had settled in Brownsville and become a renowned businessman, proponent of Brownsville’s first public schools,

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NASA finds tropical storm Francisco in the Korea strait

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Korea Strait and found the center of Tropical Storm Francisco in the middle of it. The AIRS instrument aboard took the temperature of its cloud tops to estimate storm strength and found strong storms over two countries.

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Tariffs lead to creative supply chains

Where there's a will to peddle soybeans in the global marketplace, there's a way. Scholars apply a new, more holistic way to examine global agricultural trade to better understand what's going on when a country as enormous as China develops a big appetite for soybeans.

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Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them

A new study investigates for the first time what spotted-wing drosophila adults and larvae eat, and where they lay their eggs, when these short-lived fruits are not in season.

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A hog in wolf's clothing

Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. New research examines the effects of these less-studied relationships, particularly for feral hogs and elephants, and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on liv

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Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers

A team of researchers has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. The team also found that the average body size of sharks and other marine predators fell dramatically in these areas, where sharks are caught and killed intensively for their meat and fins.

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How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern US

Analyzing the full life cycle of long-term droughts and how they relate to El Niño and La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean could eventually lead to better prediction of damaging, multiyear droughts in the Southwestern US.

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Calcium levels in freshwater lakes declining in Europe and North America

A new global study of how calcium concentrations are changing in freshwater lakes around the world has revealed that in widespread areas in Europe and eastern North America, calcium levels are declining towards levels that can be critically low for the reproduction and survival of many aquatic organisms.

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'Weaponized interdependence' wields economic networks as political weapons

Recent incidents make clear that we are in a new era in which one nation's economic interdependence on another can be wielded as a political weapon — a phenomenon described as 'weaponized interdependence' by Henry Farrell (George Washington University) and Abraham L. Newman (Georgetown University) in a new article in International Security.

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NASA finds heavy rain in new tropical storm Krosa

Tropical Storm Krosa had recently developed into a tropical storm when the GPM satellite passed overhead and found heavy rainfall. Fortunately, the storm was over open waters.

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Kids might be naturally immunized after C. difficile colonization in infancy

Exposure to C. difficile in infancy produces an immune response that might protect against this gastrointestinal infection later in childhood, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases journal.

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Blood pressure recording over 24 hours is the best predictor of heart and vascular disease

High blood pressure is the most important treatable risk factor for diseases of the heart and the arterial system. Blood pressure recorded over 24 hours predicts these complications more accurately than blood pressure measured on a single occasion. That is the conclusion of an international study coordinated by Professors Jan A. Staessen and Zhen-Yu Zhang of KU Leuven in Belgium. Dr. Gladys Maestr

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11 reasons you need a tarp in the backcountry

Improvise with a tarp to create a backcountry shelter. (Aram von Benedikt/) This story was originally published by Outdoor Life . Rain drummed on my tarp shelter, occasionally splashing far enough under the opening to sizzle into the fire. Dinner warmed on that same fire as I fashioned a birch-bark moose call, sewing it into shape with paracord threaded through holes that I punched by the small s

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Racist words and acts, like the El Paso shooting, harm children’s health

Racism can take a lifelong toll on children’s and adolescents’ health. U.S. pediatricians are tackling the problem.

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Avocado genome sequence could lead to sturdier crops

Scientists have sequenced the avocado genome. The new research sheds light on the ancient origins of the buttery fruit and lays the groundwork for future improvements in farming. With regard to modern affairs, the study reveals for the first time that the popular Hass avocado inherited about 61% of its DNA from Mexican varieties and about 39% from Guatemalan ones. (Avocados come in many types, bu

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Crashed Israeli lunar lander could have spilled 'water bears' on moon

An Israeli spacecraft carrying tiny animals called tardigrades crashed onto the moon in April. It's unclear whether humans would be able to revive the tardigrades, which were in a dehydrated state. Tardigrades have a unique protein that enables them to survive intense levels of radiation. None There are no humans currently on the moon. But it's very possible that other Earthly animals exist right

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Tariffs lead to creative supply chains

Where there's a will to peddle soybeans in the global marketplace, there's a way. Scholars apply a new, more holistic way to examine global agricultural trade to better understand what's going on when a country as enormous as China develops a big appetite for soybeans.

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Space telescope would turn Earth into a giant magnifying lens

Proposed “Terrascope” could gather light from small exoplanets with the power of a 150-meter mirror

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HRT may boost heart fat in menopausal women

Hormone replacement therapy—a common treatment for women with menopause-related symptoms—affects the accumulation of heart fat, a new study shows. The findings highlight a new risk factor for cardiovascular disease in midlife women and reinforce the importance of tailoring hormone therapy to each patient. Importantly, researchers found that the formulation and delivery route of hormones—whether a

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Finally, white nationalists are being called terrorists. We need this to continue.

At a conference in Las Vegas, Pete Buttigieg said white national terrorism is being condoned at the highest levels of the American government. Officials in El Paso are treating the recent mass shooting as a case of domestic terrorism. Voices ranging from the NY Times Editorial Board to conservative author David French are calling for white nationalists to be labelled terrorists. None Ever since 9

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Heart-on-a-chip mimics drug response seen in humans

Researchers show that TARA's heart-on-a-chip system replicates drug responses found in adult humans, validating it as an accurate model for cardiac safety during drug development.

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USDA Labs' Move to Kansas City Might Be Illegal

An inspector general finds that the agency was supposed to have received congressional approval before relocating facilities out of Washington, DC.

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The Looser a State's Gun Laws, the More Mass Shootings It Has

Researchers have begun to see a trend: The rate of mass shootings is consistently much higher for places with fewer restrictions on guns.

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Spanish scientists are making 'very promising' human-monkey chimeras in China

Leaked research by Spanish scientists claims that they've created the world's first human-monkey chimera embryo. Lead researcher, Juan Carlos Izpisúa has previously worked on pig-human embryos. Their intended goal of the study is to use the animals to create organs for human transplant. Scientists controversial claim that they've created the first human-animal hybrid in a Chinese laboratory has b

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A Woman Needed Her Hands and Legs Amputated After Contracting Infection from Dog 'Kisses'

A little lick from a puppy may have led to a life-threatening infection for one woman in Ohio, who ended up needing her hands and legs amputated.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Tweet on Mass Shooting Deaths Strikes a Nerve

After attacks in El Paso and Dayton killed more than 30 people, the astrophysicist apologized for his ill-timed attempt to add context.

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Guacamole lovers, rejoice! The avocado genome has been sequenced

We now know the DNA of guacamole. Scientists have sequenced the avocado genome, shedding light on the ancient origins of this buttery fruit and laying the groundwork for future improvements to farming.

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Novel school improvement program can raise teaching quality while reducing inequality

A multi-national European study, looking at over 5,500 students, has found that a novel school intervention program can not only improve the mathematics scores of primary school children from disadvantaged areas, but can also lessen the achievement gap caused by socioeconomic status.

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Thyroid screening may not be needed in all youth with psychiatric disorders

A new study looks at the prevalence of abnormal thyroid function in youth with severe mood and anxiety disorder. It is the largest study to date of this population and will help mental health professionals better understand the predictors of abnormal thyroid function, like weight gain, family history, or treatment with specific medications.

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Microbiologists provide framework for assessing ecological diversity

Microbiologists have developed a mathematical framework for quantitatively assessing ecological diversity in an ecological community whether deterministic or stochastic. A recent study examines the mechanisms controlling biological diversity and provides guidance for use of the null-model-based approaches for examining processes within the community.

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Houseplants ability to survive drought can provide useful knowledge for the climate change era

It has long been known that some plants tolerate drought better than others. As some of the first to do so in the past 100 years, scientists have investigated the mechanisms behind the Aloe plant's ability to survive extended periods of drought. New knowledge could contribute to more resilient crops for a future of more weather extremes.

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Sleep interrupted: What's keeping us up at night?

One of the largest longitudinal studies to date examined evening consumption of alcohol, caffeine and nicotine among an African-American cohort and objectively measured sleep outcomes in their natural environments instead of laboratory or observatory settings. The study involved 785 participants and totaled 5,164 days of concurrent actigraphy and daily sleep diaries that recorded how much alcohol,

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The limits of rainforest growth

How much carbon dioxide can tropical rainforests absorb? Investigations indicate that the absorption capacity is severely limited by the phosphorus content of the soil.

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Your favorite pristine beach is founded on mass invertebrate death

Machines used to groom beaches can be seriously harmful to all the life teeming in the sand (Nicholas Schooler/) At first glance, sandy beaches don’t seem very alive. Many of America’s most popular beaches boast broad shores with generous sand, but their picturesque aesthetic often means they’re far removed from their natural state. And in Southern California at least, that comes at a cost. Beach

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The Magnitude of Toni Morrison

This morning, the publishing house Alfred A. Knopf announced that the celebrated writer Toni Morrison had died in New York at the age of 88 following a short illness. Of her inimitable legacy, the Morrison family issued a short statement, which read in part, “The consummate writer who treasured the written word, whether her own, her students or others, she read voraciously and was most at home wh

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Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft have been making traffic worse, report says – Roadshow

The surprising part is that both Uber and Lyft are admitting it.

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Reconstructing histological slices into 3D images

Despite advances in 3D imaging such as MRI and CT, scientists still rely on slicing a specimen into 2D sections to acquire the most detailed information. Using this information, they then try to reconstruct a 3D image of the specimen. Researchers report a new algorithm that can do this task at less cost and higher robustness than standard methods.

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Blinking eye-on-a-chip used for disease modeling and drug testing

The latest iteration of an eye-on-a-chip has a mechanical eyelid to simulate blinking and was used to test an experimental drug for dry eye disease. By incorporating human cells into an engineered scaffolding, the eye-on-a-chip has many of the benefits of testing on living subjects, while minimizing risks and ethical concerns.

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Researchers create first-ever personalized sound projector with £10 webcam

A research team has demonstrated the first sound projector that can track a moving individual and deliver an acoustic message as they move, to a high-profile tech and media conference in LA.

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Scientists create artificial catalysts inspired by living enzymes

Researchers have made a significant advance in the development of artificial catalysts for making cleaner chemicals and fuels at an industrial scale.

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Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level

Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or the use of a contrast dye. This new approach could one day help doctors detect cancer metastasis that is otherwise difficult to see via standard imaging technologies during operat

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Newly developed approach shows promise in silencing HIV infection

Researchers have discovered a new potential medication that works with an HIV-infected person's own body to further suppress the ever present but silent virus that available HIV treatments are unable to combat.

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Amyloid is a less accurate marker for measuring severity, progression of Alzheimer's

Researchers find fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is a better indicator of cognitive performance when compared to PET scans that detect amyloid protein.

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NASA satellite finds strong storms circling Lekima's center

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of strengthening Tropical Storm Lekima.

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Tariffs lead to creative supply chains

Where there's a will to peddle soybeans in the global marketplace, there's a way, even if a trade war creates roadblocks.

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How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern US

The Southwest has always faced periods of drought. Most recently, from late 2011 to 2017, California experienced years of lower-than-normal rainfall. El Niño is known to influence rain in the Southwest, but it's not a perfect match. New research from the University of Washington and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution explores what conditions in the ocean and in the atmosphere prolong drought

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NASA sees Flossie now a remnant low pressure area

Former Hurricane Flossie was nothing more than a remnant low pressure area early on Tuesday, August 6. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a few scattered areas of cold clouds in thunderstorms in the remnants, now northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them

With New York state's $20 million berry industry entering peak season, an invasive fruit fly is thriving.

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Tariffs lead to creative supply chains

Where there's a will to peddle soybeans in the global marketplace, there's a way. Scholars apply a new, more holistic way to examine global agricultural trade to better understand what's going on when a country as enormous as China develops a big appetite for soybeans.

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Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them

A Cornell University study, published in Ecological Entomology, investigates for the first time what spotted-wing drosophila adults and larvae eat, and where they lay their eggs, when these short-lived fruits are not in season.

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NASA satellite finds strong storms circling Lekima's center

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of strengthening Tropical Storm Lekima.

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Scientists Create Mice Containing Active Human Brain Cells

Humans are the only species known to suffer from Alzheimer’s, which makes testing potential treatments for the disease incredibly difficult. To address this issue, scientists at University of California, Irvine (UCI), set out to create a new mouse model for research, one with human brain immune cells — the idea being they could then test treatments on the mice to get a better idea of how the huma

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Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them

With New York state's $20 million berry industry entering peak season, an invasive fruit fly is thriving.

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The Lawless Way to Disable 8chan

Two years ago, Matthew Prince, CEO of Cloudflare, saw this controversy coming and begged not to be put in this position. Then and now, his company—which helps provide some of the basic plumbing of the internet—found itself at the center of the battle over which speech should and should not be easily available online. The more fundamental question is who gets to make these decisions, and it’s bein

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A Heatwave in Greenland

Recent unseasonably warm temperatures, brought to Greenland by a heat wave that smashed records across Europe a week before, have accelerated the melting of the ice sheet that covers 82 percent of the country, releasing water at record rates. On Thursday alone, an estimated 12.5 billion tons of meltwater flowed into the ocean, which would be the highest single-day total since 1950 , according to

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'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire

Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. One bird in particular, the Black-backed Woodpecker, specializes in using recently-burned forests in western North America, but new research suggests that these birds actually prefer to nest near the edges of burned patches — and these edges are getting harder t

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1 in 300 thrives on very-early-to-bed, very-early-to-rise routine

A quirk of the body clock that lures some people to sleep at 8 p.m., enabling them to greet the new day as early as 4 a.m., may be significantly more common than previously believed.

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Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California

Changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays.

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Reconstructing histological slices into 3D images

Despite advances in 3D imaging such as MRI and CT, scientists still rely on slicing a specimen into 2D sections to acquire the most detailed information. Using this information, they then try to reconstruct a 3D image of the specimen. Researchers report a new algorithm that can do this task at less cost and higher robustness than standard methods.

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Japan Pledges $900 Million to Cyborg, Human Hibernation Research

Self-Improvement The Japanese government just pledged the equivalent of $921 million for moonshot research projects including artificial hibernation, cleaning environmental waste, and developing technology that could turn us into cyborgs . A government official told Nikkei Asian Review that researchers would be invited to propose projects to tackle ambitious projects that would stave off problems

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Watch This Flying Car Nail Its Flight Demonstration

Float On On Monday, Japanese electronics maker NEC Corp demonstrated its flying car by hovering it 10 feet off the ground for a full minute — putting Japan one step closer to its goal of being the world leader in flying vehicles . “Japan is a densely populated country and that means flying cars could greatly alleviate the burden on road traffic,” Kouji Okada, a project leader at NEC, told Bloombe

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CDC Shuts Down Army Lab's Disease Research

The agency cites lapses in biosafety procedures at the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland.

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NASA sees Flossie now a remnant low pressure area

Former Hurricane Flossie was nothing more than a remnant low pressure area early on Tuesday, August 6, 2019. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a few scattered areas of cold clouds in thunderstorms in the remnants, now northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Research advances to better target debilitating effects of cachexia syndrome

A study published in Cell Reports Aug. 6, 2019 describes the generation of a new mouse model developed at Hollings Cancer Center that could lead to a better understanding of the cachexia syndrome.

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How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern US

Analyzing the full life cycle of long-term droughts and how they relate to El Niño and La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean could eventually lead to better prediction of damaging, multiyear droughts in the Southwestern US.

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Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers

A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. The team also found that the average body size of sharks and other marine predators fell dramatically in these areas, where sharks are caught and killed intensively for their meat and fins.

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Maternal and child health and nutrition: Week 1 of the PLOS Medicine Special Issue

This week, we see the publication of the first papers in PLOS Medicine's special issue on nutrition in maternal and child health, advised by Guest Editors Dr. Lars Åke Persson of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa; Dr. Kathleen M. Rasmussen of the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University, New York; and Dr. Huixia Ya

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A hog in wolf's clothing

Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. New research by Dr. Shari Rodriguez and Dr. Christie Sampson from Clemson University, publishing August 6, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects of these less-studied relationships, particularly for fer

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Facial Recognition Is Suddenly Everywhere. Should You Worry?

As the accuracy of such algorithms improve, governments use facial recognition in more ways—and prompt increasing privacy and fairness concerns.

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Meet Homo naledi: The Mysterious Human Cousin

A reconstructed Homo naledi skeleton made from the bones of multiple individuals. (Credit: Lee Roger Berger research team) In 2013 a couple of spelunkers, caving 100 feet underground in South Africa, wriggled down a narrow vertical chute. They dropped into an uncharted chamber and in the flickers of their headlamps saw human-like bones scattered across the ground. It was a new species of hominin.

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Heat Will Kill Thousands in Chinese Cities Each Year From Climate Change

Beijing commuters drive through a layer of "severe" air pollution in this 2014 photo. A new analysis says that human-caused climate change will lead to thousands of additional deaths across Chinese cities in the decades ahead. (Credit: Hung Chung Chih/Shutterstock) As Europe’s latest heat wave showed, climate change is scorching the Earth. The World Meteorological Organization suspects the period

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I flew in an F-16 with the Air Force and oh boy did it go poorly

Maj. Jason "Flack" Markzon, left, and the author. (US Air Force Thunderbirds/) Somewhere high above New Jersey, I yanked the oxygen mask off my face, worried I was about to throw up. Maj. Jason Markzon, the pilot of our F-16 fighter jet, had just steered the plane through two tight, hard turns, part of an aviation procedure called the G-exercise. A moment later, Markzon—whose Air Force call sign

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In Praise of 'Euphoria,' the Perfect Anti-Binge TV Show

HBO's drug-addled teen drama forces viewers to reckon with a lot of bad habits.

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Get to Know Maxwell's Equations—You're Using Them Right Now

James Clark Maxwell's equations are a big deal in physics, explaining the fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. Here's the gist of how they work.

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New Algorithm Could Make VR Sound More Realistic

You’re probably familiar with the way good sound design can bring a game or video to life. It can take huge teams of creators hour upon hour to make the audio just right, but almost no amount of time is enough to craft the perfect audio for a virtual reality experience. Sound design has been vastly simplified because of the innate unscripted nature of VR simulations, but a new algorithm from rese

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New Evidence Shows Popular Pesticides Could Cause Unintended Harm To Insects

Studies are revealing new, unintended threats that neonicotinoid pesticides pose to insects. The chemicals, widely used by farmers, are difficult to control because they persist in the environment. (Image credit: Alejandro Tena)

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Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers

A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. The team also found that the average body size of sharks and other marine predators fell dramatically in these areas, where sharks are caught and killed intensively for their meat and fins.

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A hog in wolf's clothing

Human and wildlife conflict has increased along with expanding human populations, particularly when wildlife endanger humans or their livelihoods. Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock.

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Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers

A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. The team also found that the average body size of sharks and other marine predators fell dramatically in these areas, where sharks are caught and killed intensively for their meat and fins.

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A hog in wolf's clothing

Human and wildlife conflict has increased along with expanding human populations, particularly when wildlife endanger humans or their livelihoods. Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock.

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CloudFlare dropping 8chan helps fight hate even if 8chan comes back

CloudFlare has changed expectations of the moral obligations of technology companies.

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Facebook's messaging app for kids faces scrutiny from US lawmakers – CNET

A flaw in Facebook Messenger Kids let children chat with people who hadn't been OK'd by their parents.

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Raising the standard for psychology research

Researchers have used supercomputers to apply more rigorous statistical methods to psychological studies of self-regulation. The work aimed to uncover the underlying structures of the mind, a process they call "data-driven ontology discovery." They found that some issues had simple ontological fingerprints, but that others were more complicated. They also found that task-based studies — common

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The growing trend of emotional support animals

Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are showing up in places previously understood to be animal-free. The growing trend includes 'certifying' animals to provide emotional assistance to a person with a diagnosable mental condition or emotional disorder. New research outlines the ethical challenge and offers possible solutions to better serve both people who feel they need ESAs and those who must compl

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Hotter, wetter, dryer: Uptick in extreme weather, temps

Researchers have analyzed seasonal changes in water and energy balances over the Appalachian region. They forecast up to a 10-degree jump in average temperature, increased evaporation along mountain ridges, more frequent droughts and a rise in extreme events for the region.

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New plant galls research includes most comprehensive study of role of hormones

This study is the most complete study to date about the role of hormones in galls, measuring 15 plant hormones belonging to 5 different classes. These findings can be used as a model for pest management and could help the agriculture and forestry industries better understand what makes plants resistant to pests.

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Bullet shape, velocity determine blood spatter patterns

Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located, and researchers have worked toward better understanding the fluid dynamics at play during gunshot spatters. They propose a model for the disintegration of a liquid due to an arbitrarily shaped projectile. Their model focuses on providing predictive

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Simulations demonstrate ion heating by plasma oscillations for fusion energy

Fusion scientists succeeded in proving that ions can be heated by plasma oscillations driven by high-energy particles. This has been confirmed by performing a large-scale simulation with a newly developed hybrid-simulation program that links calculations for plasma oscillations, high-energy particles and ions. This research will accelerate studies of plasma self-heating for realizing fusion energy

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New hormone injection aids weight loss in obese patients

An injection has helped reduce body weight and glucose levels in patients with diabetes and obesity in four weeks.

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Dietary choline associates with reduced risk of dementia

A new study has shown that dietary intake of phosphatidylcholine is associated with a reduced risk of dementia. Phosphatidylcholine was also linked to enhanced cognitive performance. The main dietary sources of phosphatidylcholine were eggs and meat.

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Questions to ask when you're trying to decide on a new app or service

You don't need to make all your decisions by the water, but it doesn't hurt. (Stefan Spassov via Unsplash/) You're probably familiar with the registration box that often pops up when you launch a new app or try a new service online—it seems like you can't give anything a go without providing an email address, and sometimes more. And to make matters worse, you’re usually required to agree to a den

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Instagram Wants Memers to Like It Again

For nearly three years, 15-year-old Rowan Winch has been building a modern media empire out of his bedroom. The Pennsylvania high-schooler has founded several meme and humor pages that have collectively generated tens of millions of likes on Instagram, boosting the platform’s overall engagement numbers and helping keep its most prized users, teenagers, heavily addicted to the app. In order to sup

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Robotic cane shown to improve stability in walking

By adding electronics and computation technology to a simple cane that has been around since ancient times, researchers have transformed it into a 21st century robotic device that can provide light-touch assistance in walking to the aged and others with impaired mobility. The autonomous robot 'walks' alongside a person to provide light-touch support, much as one might lightly touch a companion's a

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Stories offer protesters’ views of Ferguson, Baltimore police

A new book takes readers to the front lines of the protests in Ferguson, Missouri and Baltimore, Maryland that took place following the deaths of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray. Jennifer Cobbina, associate professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, visited the two cities right after the violent 2014 and 2015 protests, and interviewed over 200 residents and protester

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Deal of the day: 32-inch TCL Roku TV for $130 – CNET

Also: the Beats Pill Plus for $100, PlayStation games on sale and Amazon's Music Unlimited for $1 per month.

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A heavy-metal planet spits iron into space

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02390-1 The gassy exoplanet loses its hold over the heavy elements in its atmosphere.

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Service Providers Shut Down 8Chan Over Mass Shooters’ Manifestos

404 After the mass shooter who killed 22 people in Texas last weekend posted his white supremacist manifesto to the online forum 8chan , the web infrastructure company Cloudflare gave the message board the boot. Since then, 8chan has had a rough ride, bouncing to another company before being dropped once more, according to The Associated Press . Knocking one hate-filled site offline won’t stop ma

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Facebook Removes “Storm Area 51” Event

Alien Adventure Facebook has removed a mega-viral event called “Storm Area 51,” claiming it violated community standards. Before it was removed, the tongue-in-cheek event amassed more than 2 million Facebook users , grabbing the attention of the mainstream media . The idea, according to the even description, was to invite an army of memelords and alien enthusisasts to raid the top-secret Air Forc

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HBO's Next Big Idea: Recommendations From Actual Humans

Tired of Netflix's algorithms telling you what to watch? HBO has a solution for you.

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Half-a-degree warmer means 30,000 more deaths yearly in urban China: study

An increase in global warming from 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius above late 19th-century levels would cause tens of thousands of extra deaths in China's cities every year, researchers reported Tuesday.

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Thyme essential oil in corn starch particles combats Aedes aegypti larvae

Corn starch, an abundant, cheap and biodegradable raw material, is the basis for a novel larvicide developed by researchers at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil. The material is used in microcapsules for storage and controlled release of active compounds to kill larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that transmits dengue, zika, yellow fever and chikungunya.

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Wild Bill's Gamble Pays Off | Deadliest Catch

Eager to get back on the crab, Captain Wild Bill heads north betting on grounds far above the fleet. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCa

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Thyme essential oil in corn starch particles combats Aedes aegypti larvae

Corn starch, an abundant, cheap and biodegradable raw material, is the basis for a novel larvicide developed by researchers at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil. The material is used in microcapsules for storage and controlled release of active compounds to kill larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that transmits dengue, zika, yellow fever and chikungunya.

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Critical deployment of NASA Webb's secondary mirror a success

In order to do groundbreaking science, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope must first perform an extremely choreographed series of deployments, extensions, and movements that bring the observatory to life shortly after launch. Too big to fit in any rocket available in its fully deployed form, Webb was engineered to intricately fold in on itself to achieve a much smaller size during transport.

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A Model Hospital Where the Devices Get Hacked—on Purpose

At this year's Defcon Medical Device Village, hackers will attack real medical devices at a pretend hospital.

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Heterostructure crystals could light the way to optical circuits

It may be possible to reach new levels of miniaturization, speed, and data processing with optical quantum computers, which use light to carry information. For this, we need materials that can absorb and transmit photons. Scientists have introduced a new strategy for constructing photonic heterostructure crystals with tunable properties. Using a crystalline rod with stripes that fluoresce in diffe

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How do you forecast eruptions at volcanoes that sit 'on the cusp' for decades?

Some volcanoes take their time — experiencing protracted, years-long periods of unrest before eventually erupting. This makes it difficult to forecast when they pose a danger to their surrounding areas, but scientists are trying to change that.

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July Was the Hottest Month in Recorded History

After a record-breaking heat wave in Europe and the Arctic, last month edged out July 2016 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The growing trend of emotional support animals

Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are showing up in places previously understood to be animal-free. The growing trend includes 'certifying' animals to provide emotional assistance to a person with a diagnosable mental condition or emotional disorder. 'Emotional Support Animal Assessments: Toward a Standard and Comprehensive Model for Mental Health Professionals' outlines the ethical challenge and o

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Raising the standard for psychology research

Researchers from Stanford University, Arizona State University, and Dartmouth College used Texas Advanced Computing Center supercomputers to apply more rigorous statistical methods to psychological studies of self-regulation. The work aimed to uncover the underlying structures of the mind, a process they call "data-driven ontology discovery." They found that some issues had simple ontological fing

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How can robots land like birds?

Birds can perch on a wide variety of surfaces, thick or thin, rough or slick. But can they find stable footing if a branch is covered in Teflon? In the interest of making better robots, Stanford researchers found out.

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Robotic cane shown to improve stability in walking

By adding electronics and computation technology to a simple cane that has been around since ancient times, Columbia Engineering researchers have transformed it into a 21st century robotic device that can provide light-touch assistance in walking to the aged and others with impaired mobility. The autonomous robot 'walks' alongside a person to provide light-touch support, much as one might lightly

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Dealing with High-Conflict People

High-conflict personalities demonstrate a pattern of behavior that increases conflict rather than reducing or resolving it. These patterns include blaming others, all-or-nothing mindsets, unmanaged emotions, and extreme behaviors. By learning to recognize these patterns in others and/or yourself, you can navigate these minefields more safely, or better yet, defuse them.

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How The Sixth Sense Conquered Hollywood in 1999

In 1999 , a creatively fertile year for Hollywood, the most successful movie was an obvious one: Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace . It came out in May, broke opening-day records, and behaved exactly as a brand-name summer sensation would today. The second most successful film of 1999 was an old-fashioned ghost story from a largely unknown Indian American director. The movie came out in Aug

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NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Is Infested With Feral Hogs. Really.

Going Hog Wild In 1962, NASA bought 145,000 acres of land in Florida — and since it only needed 6,000 for Kennedy Space Center, it made a deal with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to transform the rest into the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This seemed like a good idea at the time, because it would prevent humans from building homes in the area, which could prove disastrous if a spa

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An essential bifunctional enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis for itaconate dissimilation and leucine catabolism [Biochemistry]

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the etiological agent of tuberculosis. One-fourth of the global population is estimated to be infected with Mtb, accounting for ∼1.3 million deaths in 2017. As part of the immune response to Mtb infection, macrophages produce metabolites with the purpose of inhibiting or killing the bacterial cell….

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Gid10 as an alternative N-recognin of the Pro/N-degron pathway [Biochemistry]

In eukaryotes, N-degron pathways (formerly “N-end rule pathways”) comprise a set of proteolytic systems whose unifying feature is their ability to recognize proteins containing N-terminal degradation signals called N-degrons, thereby causing degradation of these proteins by the 26S proteasome or autophagy. Gid4, a subunit of the GID ubiquitin ligase in…

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Assembling multidomain protein structures through analogous global structural alignments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Most proteins exist with multiple domains in cells for cooperative functionality. However, structural biology and protein folding methods are often optimized for single-domain structures, resulting in a rapidly growing gap between the improved capability for tertiary structure determination and high demand for multidomain structure models. We have developed a pipeline,…

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Investigation of the allosteric coupling mechanism in a glutamate transporter homolog via unnatural amino acid mutagenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Glutamate transporters harness the ionic gradients across cell membranes for the concentrative uptake of glutamate. The sodium-coupled Asp symporter, GltPh is an archaeal homolog of glutamate transporters and has been extensively used to understand the transport mechanism. A critical aspect of the transport cycle in GltPh is the coupled binding…

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The allosteric mechanism of substrate-specific transport in SLC6 is mediated by a volumetric sensor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) in the SLC6 family terminate neurotransmission by coupling the thermodynamically favorable transport of ions to the thermodynamically unfavorable transport of neurotransmitter back into presynaptic neurons. Results from many structural, functional, and computational studies on LeuT, a bacterial NSS homolog, have provided critical insight into the mechanism

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Identification of evolutionary and kinetic drivers of NAD-dependent signaling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) provides an important link between metabolism and signal transduction and has emerged as central hub between bioenergetics and all major cellular events. NAD-dependent signaling (e.g., by sirtuins and poly–adenosine diphosphate [ADP] ribose polymerases [PARPs]) consumes considerable amounts of NAD. To maintain physiological functions, NAD consumption and…

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Trading amino acids at the aphid-Buchnera symbiotic interface [Evolution]

Plant sap-feeding insects are widespread, having evolved to occupy diverse environmental niches despite exclusive feeding on an impoverished diet lacking in essential amino acids and vitamins. Success depends exquisitely on their symbiotic relationships with microbial symbionts housed within specialized eukaryotic bacteriocyte cells. Each bacteriocyte is packed with symbionts that are…

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Patronus is the elusive plant securin, preventing chromosome separation by antagonizing separase [Genetics]

Chromosome distribution at anaphase of mitosis and meiosis is triggered by separase, an evolutionarily conserved protease. Separase must be tightly regulated to prevent the untimely release of chromatid cohesion and disastrous chromosome distribution defects. Securin is the key inhibitor of separase in animals and fungi, but has not been identified…

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Regulation of nuclear epigenome by mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy [Genetics]

Diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are highly variable in phenotype, in large part because of differences in the percentage of normal and mutant mtDNAs (heteroplasmy) present within the cell. For example, increasing heteroplasmy levels of the mtDNA tRNALeu(UUR) nucleotide (nt) 3243A > G mutation result successively in diabetes,…

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Human species-specific loss of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase enhances atherosclerosis via intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms [Medical Sciences]

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) events due to atherosclerosis cause one-third of worldwide deaths and risk factors include physical inactivity, age, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, smoking, and red meat consumption. However, ∼15% of first-time events occur without such factors. In contrast, coronary events are extremely rare even in closely related chimpanzees in…

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Epstein-Barr virus reprograms human B lymphocytes immediately in the prelatent phase of infection [Microbiology]

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a human tumor virus and a model of herpesviral latency. The virus efficiently infects resting human B lymphocytes and induces their continuous proliferation in vitro, which mimics certain aspects of EBV’s oncogenic potential in vivo. How lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) evolve from the infected lymphocytes is…

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Exosomes regulate neurogenesis and circuit assembly [Neuroscience]

Exosomes are thought to be released by all cells in the body and to be involved in intercellular communication. We tested whether neural exosomes can regulate the development of neural circuits. We show that exosome treatment increases proliferation in developing neural cultures and in vivo in dentate gyrus of P4…

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Temporal evolution of beta bursts in the parkinsonian cortical and basal ganglia network [Neuroscience]

Beta frequency oscillations (15 to 35 Hz) in cortical and basal ganglia circuits become abnormally synchronized in Parkinson’s disease (PD). How excessive beta oscillations emerge in these circuits is unclear. We addressed this issue by defining the firing properties of basal ganglia neurons around the emergence of cortical beta bursts…

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BDNF is a mediator of glycolytic fiber-type specification in mouse skeletal muscle [Physiology]

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) influences the differentiation, plasticity, and survival of central neurons and likewise, affects the development of the neuromuscular system. Besides its neuronal origin, BDNF is also a member of the myokine family. However, the role of skeletal muscle-derived BDNF in regulating neuromuscular physiology in vivo remains unclear….

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The flowering hormone florigen accelerates secondary cell wall biogenesis to harmonize vascular maturation with reproductive development [Plant Biology]

Florigen, a proteinaceous hormone, functions as a universal long-range promoter of flowering and concurrently as a generic growth-attenuating hormone across leaf and stem meristems. In flowering plants, the transition from the vegetative phase to the reproductive phase entails the orchestration of new growth coordinates and a global redistribution of resources,…

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Homotypic cooperativity and collective binding are determinants of bHLH specificity and function [Systems Biology]

Eukaryotic cells express transcription factor (TF) paralogues that bind to nearly identical DNA sequences in vitro but bind at different genomic loci and perform different functions in vivo. Predicting how 2 paralogous TFs bind in vivo using DNA sequence alone is an important open problem. Here, we analyzed 2 yeast…

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A tumor-targeted immune checkpoint blocker [Applied Biological Sciences]

To direct checkpoint inhibition to the tumor microenvironment, while avoiding systemic immune activation, we have synthesized a bispecific antibody [norleucine4, d-Phe7]-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH)-antiprogrammed cell death-ligand 1 antibody (αPD-L1) by conjugating a melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analog to the antiprogrammed cell death-ligand 1 to (αPD-L1) antibody avelumab.

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The ribosomal protein S1-dependent standby site in tisB mRNA consists of a single-stranded region and a 5' structure element [Biochemistry]

In bacteria, stable RNA structures that sequester ribosome-binding sites (RBS) impair translation initiation, and thus protein output. In some cases, ribosome standby can overcome inhibition by structure: 30S subunits bind sequence-nonspecifically to a single-stranded region and, on breathing of the inhibitory structure, relocate to the RBS for initiation. Standby can…

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Perturbation of the interactions of calmodulin with GRK5 using a natural product chemical probe [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) are responsible for initiating desensitization of activated GPCRs. GRK5 is potently inhibited by the calcium-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM), which leads to nuclear translocation of GRK5 and promotion of cardiac hypertrophy. Herein, we report the architecture of the Ca2+·CaM–GRK5 complex determined by small-angle X-ray scattering…

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OsMTOPVIB is required for meiotic bipolar spindle assembly [Cell Biology]

The organization of microtubules into a bipolar spindle is essential for chromosome segregation. Both centrosome and chromatin-dependent spindle assembly mechanisms are well studied in mouse, Drosophila melanogaster, and Xenopus oocytes; however, the mechanism of bipolar spindle assembly in plant meiosis remains elusive. According to our observations of microtubule assembly in…

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Insights into the origin of the high energy-conversion efficiency of F1-ATPase [Chemistry]

Our understanding of the rotary-coupling mechanism of F1-ATPase has been greatly enhanced in the last decade by advances in X-ray crystallography, single-molecular imaging, and theoretical models. Recently, Volkán-Kacsó and Marcus [S. Volkán-Kacsó, R. A. Marcus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 14230 (2015)] presented an insightful thermodynamic model based on…

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Single-cell genomics unveiled a cryptic cyanobacterial lineage with a worldwide distribution hidden by a dinoflagellate host [Ecology]

Cyanobacteria are one of the most important contributors to oceanic primary production and survive in a wide range of marine habitats. Much effort has been made to understand their ecological features, diversity, and evolution, based mainly on data from free-living cyanobacterial species. In addition, symbiosis has emerged as an important…

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Toxicity drives facilitation between 4 bacterial species [Ecology]

Competition between microbes is extremely common, with many investing in mechanisms to harm other strains and species. Yet positive interactions between species have also been documented. What makes species help or harm each other is currently unclear. Here, we studied the interactions between 4 bacterial species capable of degrading metal…

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Rebuilding global fisheries under uncertainty [Ecology]

Current and future prospects for successfully rebuilding global fisheries remain debated due to uncertain stock status, variable management success, and disruptive environmental change. While scientists routinely account for some of this uncertainty in population models, the mechanisms by which this translates into decision-making and policy are problematic and can lead…

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Plant defenses interact with insect enteric bacteria by initiating a leaky gut syndrome [Ecology]

Plants produce suites of defenses that can collectively deter and reduce herbivory. Many defenses target the insect digestive system, with some altering the protective peritrophic matrix (PM) and causing increased permeability. The PM is responsible for multiple digestive functions, including reducing infections from potential pathogenic microbes. In our study, we…

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Collective sinking promotes selective cell pairing in planktonic pennate diatoms [Ecology]

Finding a partner in an inherently unsteady 3-dimensional system, such as the planktonic marine environment, is a difficult task for nonswimming organisms with poor control over their orientation. We experimentally investigate the process of cell pairing in pennate marine diatoms and present field evidence of its occurrence in the ocean….

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Genetic architecture and adaptations of Nunavik Inuit [Genetics]

The Canadian Inuit have a distinct population background that may entail particular implications for the health of its individuals. However, the number of genetic studies examining this Inuit population is limited, and much remains to be discovered in regard to its genetic characteristics. In this study, we generated whole-exome sequences…

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Methodology and theoretical basis of forward genetic screening for sleep/wakefulness in mice [Neuroscience]

The regulatory network of genes and molecules in sleep/wakefulness remains to be elucidated. Here we describe the methodology and workflow of the dominant screening of randomly mutagenized mice and discuss theoretical basis of forward genetics research for sleep in mice. Our high-throughput screening employs electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) to…

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Transsynaptic Fish-lips signaling prevents misconnections between nonsynaptic partner olfactory neurons [Neuroscience]

Our understanding of the mechanisms of neural circuit assembly is far from complete. Identification of wiring molecules with novel mechanisms of action will provide insights into how complex and heterogeneous neural circuits assemble during development. In the Drosophila olfactory system, 50 classes of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) make precise synaptic…

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Increased ER-mitochondria tethering promotes axon regeneration [Neuroscience]

Translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria to the site of axon injury has been shown to facilitate axonal regeneration; however, the existence and physiological importance of ER–mitochondria tethering in the injured axons are unknown. Here, we show that a protein linking ER to mitochondria, the glucose regulated protein…

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The neural circuit linking mushroom body parallel circuits induces memory consolidation in Drosophila [Neuroscience]

Memory consolidation is augmented by repeated learning following rest intervals, which is known as the spacing effect. Although the spacing effect has been associated with cumulative cellular responses in the neurons engaged in memory, here, we report the neural circuit-based mechanism for generating the spacing effect in the memory-related mushroom…

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Remote sensing and signaling in kidney proximal tubules stimulates gut microbiome-derived organic anion secretion [Physiology]

Membrane transporters and receptors are responsible for balancing nutrient and metabolite levels to aid body homeostasis. Here, we report that proximal tubule cells in kidneys sense elevated endogenous, gut microbiome-derived, metabolite levels through EGF receptors and downstream signaling to induce their secretion by up-regulating the organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1). Remote…

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The Rho-family GTPase OsRac1 controls rice grain size and yield by regulating cell division [Plant Biology]

Grain size is a key factor for determining grain yield in crops and is a target trait for both domestication and breeding, yet the mechanisms underlying the regulation of grain size are largely unclear. Here we show that the grain size and yield of rice (Oryza sativa) is positively regulated…

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Gain control of saccadic eye movements is probabilistic [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Saccades are rapid eye movements that orient the visual axis toward objects of interest to allow their processing by the central, high-acuity retina. Our ability to collect visual information efficiently relies on saccadic accuracy, which is limited by a combination of uncertainty in the location of the target and motor…

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Credit assignment to state-independent task representations and its relationship with model-based decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Model-free learning enables an agent to make better decisions based on prior experience while representing only minimal knowledge about an environment’s structure. It is generally assumed that model-free state representations are based on outcome-relevant features of the environment. Here, we challenge this assumption by providing evidence that a putative model-free…

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Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Despite extensive attention to racial disparities in police shootings, two problems have hindered progress on this issue. First, databases of fatal officer-involved shootings (FOIS) lack details about officers, making it difficult to test whether racial disparities vary by officer characteristics. Second, there are conflicting views on which benchmark should be…

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Prestimulus feedback connectivity biases the content of visual experiences [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Ongoing fluctuations in neural excitability and in networkwide activity patterns before stimulus onset have been proposed to underlie variability in near-threshold stimulus detection paradigms—that is, whether or not an object is perceived. Here, we investigated the impact of prestimulus neural fluctuations on the content of perception—that is, whether one or…

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Effects of policy-driven hypothetical air pollutant interventions on childhood asthma incidence in southern California [Social Sciences]

Childhood asthma is a major public health concern and has significant adverse impacts on the lives of the children and their families, and on society. There is an emerging link between air pollution, which is ubiquitous in our environment, particularly in urban centers, and incident childhood asthma. Here, using data…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Photostable dye improves superresolution imaging of mitochondria STED image and schematic of mitochondria labeled with MitoPB Yellow. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is a superresolution imaging method that can enable live cell imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the strong lasers used in STED microscopy rapidly bleach fluorescent…

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Availability of public databases for triangulation of findings [Biological Sciences]

Struk et al. (1) report evidence that the rs13499 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the PRKG1 gene is associated with foraging and goal pursuit behavior. The authors used an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for PRKG1 obtained from the CommonMind Consortium (n = 467) to test for association between gene expression…

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Reply to Lyon et al.: Self-regulation and the foraging gene: From flies to humans [Biological Sciences]

Below we directly address Lyon et al.’s (1) critique of Struk et al. (2). We do not debate the utility of genome-wide vs. candidate gene studies of complex behavioral phenotypes (3). The Struk et al. (2) paper uses a hypothesis-driven approach to test the association of the rs13499 single-nucleotide polymorphism…

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The buffering capacity of the brain and optic nerve against spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome [Biological Sciences]

We read with great interest and enthusiasm the article by Van Ombergen et al. (1) published in PNAS. We would like to congratulate the authors for doing this prospective study with findings of great importance to the field of space health research, and we appreciate the opportunity to make a…

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Reply to Wostyn et al.: Investigating the spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome and the human brain in lockstep [Biological Sciences]

We thank Wostyn et al. (1) for their positive and insightful comments with respect to the association of the symptoms of the spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS) and our region-of-interest analysis of the brain’s ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system after long-duration spaceflight (2). We would like to expand upon some points…

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QnAs with David Reich [QnAs]

Harvard Medical School geneticist David Reich feels lucky to have found paleogenetics, a field that combines his love of history with his love of science. Reich plumbs data, collected by transcribing ancient DNA, to learn about human history, including migration patterns, social structures, health, and disease. Paleogenetics has exploded in…

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Profile of Rodolphe Barrangou [Profiles]

CRISPR, the Instapot of genome editing tools, has its origins in a bacterial immune system that recognizes and slices the genetic material of invading phages. Rodolphe Barrangou, a professor of food science at North Carolina State University, demonstrated the original function of the characteristic repeating genetic sequences long before it…

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Genomics reveals alga-associated cyanobacteria hiding in plain sight [Ecology]

Cyanobacteria occupy a special place in the pantheon of prokaryotic life. It is in the ancestors of these ubiquitous microbes that oxygenic photosynthesis first evolved more than 2 billion y ago (1), and it is from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria that the plastids (chloroplasts) of plants and algae are derived (2). Modern-day…

5h

Refining the stress gradient hypothesis in a microbial community [Ecology]

Microbial species aren’t often found alone, but rather in complex communities containing dozens to hundreds of other species. These species affect one another in many ways. Species can harm one another by producing antibiotics, by stabbing one another and injecting toxins, or simply by consuming resources that others require (1–3)….

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Mitochondrial genetics regulate nuclear gene expression through metabolites [Genetics]

Mitochondria contain multiple copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encode genes essential for cellular bioenergetics. When more than one type of mtDNA genome exists within the mitochondrion, or between mitochondria, a condition termed heteroplasmy occurs. In this respect, it has been long observed that differences in mtDNA heteroplasmy involving pathogenic…

5h

A stepwise mechanism for aqueous two-phase system formation in concentrated antibody solutions [Applied Physical Sciences]

Aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) formation is the macroscopic completion of liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS), a process by which aqueous solutions demix into 2 distinct phases. We report the temperature-dependent kinetics of ATPS formation for solutions containing a monoclonal antibody and polyethylene glycol. Measurements are made by capturing dark-field images of…

5h

Conformational switching of chiral colloidal rafts regulates raft-raft attractions and repulsions [Applied Physical Sciences]

Membrane-mediated particle interactions depend both on the properties of the particles themselves and the membrane environment in which they are suspended. Experiments have shown that chiral rod-like inclusions dissolved in a colloidal membrane of opposite handedness assemble into colloidal rafts, which are finite-sized reconfigurable droplets consisting of a large but…

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The final steps of [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation [Chemistry]

The active site (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a blueprint for the design of a biologically inspired H2-producing catalyst. The maturation process describes the preassembly and uptake of the unique [2FeH] cluster into apo-hydrogenase, which is to date not fully understood. In this study, we targeted individual amino acids by site-directed…

5h

Drugging an undruggable pocket on KRAS [Chemistry]

The 3 human RAS genes, KRAS, NRAS, and HRAS, encode 4 different RAS proteins which belong to the protein family of small GTPases that function as binary molecular switches involved in cell signaling. Activating mutations in RAS are among the most common oncogenic drivers in human cancers, with KRAS being…

5h

Label-free chemical imaging flow cytometry by high-speed multicolor stimulated Raman scattering [Engineering]

Combining the strength of flow cytometry with fluorescence imaging and digital image analysis, imaging flow cytometry is a powerful tool in diverse fields including cancer biology, immunology, drug discovery, microbiology, and metabolic engineering. It enables measurements and statistical analyses of chemical, structural, and morphological phenotypes of numerous living cells to…

5h

The neural representation of facial-emotion categories reflects conceptual structure [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans reliably categorize configurations of facial actions into specific emotion categories, leading some to argue that this process is invariant between individuals and cultures. However, growing behavioral evidence suggests that factors such as emotion-concept knowledge may shape the way emotions are visually perceived, leading to variability—rather than universality—in facial-emotion perceptio

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Mapping hole hopping escape routes in proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

A recently proposed oxidative damage protection mechanism in proteins relies on hole hopping escape routes formed by redox-active amino acids. We present a computational tool to identify the dominant charge hopping pathways through these residues based on the mean residence times of the transferring charge along these hopping pathways. The…

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A photostable fluorescent marker for the superresolution live imaging of the dynamic structure of the mitochondrial cristae [Cell Biology]

Stimulation emission depletion (STED) microscopy enables ultrastructural imaging of organelle dynamics with a high spatiotemporal resolution in living cells. For the visualization of the mitochondrial membrane dynamics in STED microscopy, rationally designed mitochondrial fluorescent markers with enhanced photostability are required. Herein, we report the development of a superphotostable fluoresc

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Exposing the inadequacy of redox formalisms by resolving redox inequivalence within isovalent clusters [Chemistry]

In this report we examine a family of trinuclear iron complexes by multiple-wavelength, anomalous diffraction (MAD) to explore the redox load distribution within cluster materials by the free refinement of atomic scattering factors. Several effects were explored that can impact atomic scattering factors within clusters, including 1) metal atom primary…

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Inner Workings: How diamonds embedded in meteorites could offer a glimpse into the mantle of Mars [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

On October 7, 2008, a 13-foot-long asteroid burst through Earth’s atmosphere and exploded above Sudan’s Nubian Desert. Its arrival created a stir because it was the first time that an asteroid that had been tracked and studied in space had collided with our planet. Even more intriguing, the bulk of…

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Genome editing using the endogenous type I CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus crispatus [Microbiology]

CRISPR-Cas systems are now widely used for genome editing and transcriptional regulation in diverse organisms. The compact and portable nature of class 2 single effector nucleases, such as Cas9 or Cas12, has facilitated directed genome modifications in plants, animals, and microbes. However, most CRISPR-Cas systems belong to the more prevalent…

5h

Developmental topography of cortical thickness during infancy [Neuroscience]

During the first 2 postnatal years, cortical thickness of the human brain develops dynamically and spatially heterogeneously and likely peaks between 1 and 2 y of age. The striking development renders this period critical for later cognitive outcomes and vulnerable to early neurodevelopmental disorders. However, due to the difficulties in…

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Reconciling modern machine-learning practice and the classical bias-variance trade-off [Statistics]

Breakthroughs in machine learning are rapidly changing science and society, yet our fundamental understanding of this technology has lagged far behind. Indeed, one of the central tenets of the field, the bias–variance trade-off, appears to be at odds with the observed behavior of methods used in modern machine-learning practice. The…

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Membraneless polyester microdroplets as primordial compartments at the origins of life [Systems Biology]

Compartmentalization was likely essential for primitive chemical systems during the emergence of life, both for preventing leakage of important components, i.e., genetic materials, and for enhancing chemical reactions. Although life as we know it uses lipid bilayer-based compartments, the diversity of prebiotic chemistry may have enabled primitive living systems to…

5h

A Bulwark against Reef Destruction in a Warming World

The island of Bonaire, in the Caribbean Sea, has been protecting its corals for decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How do you forecast eruptions at volcanoes that sit 'on the cusp' for decades?

Some volcanoes take their time—experiencing protracted, years-long periods of unrest before eventually erupting. This makes it difficult to forecast when they pose a danger to their surrounding areas, but Carnegie's Diana Roman and Penn State's Peter LaFemina are trying to change that.

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Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level

Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or the use of a contrast dye. This new approach could one day help doctors detect cancer metastasis that is otherwise difficult to see via standard imaging technologies during operat

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Heterostructure crystals could light the way to optical circuits

It may be possible to reach new levels of miniaturization, speed, and data processing with optical quantum computers, which use light to carry information. For this, we need materials that can absorb and transmit photons. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have introduced a new strategy for constructing photonic heterostructure crystals with tunable properties. Using a crystallin

5h

86 Skeletons Unearthed from Hidden Medieval Graveyard in Wales

Archaeologists discovered dozens of bodies in coffin-like stone boxes called cists.

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When the Child Parents Love Becomes a Shooter

Last weekend, a shooter killed nine people in Dayton, Ohio, before being killed by police. The suspect was identified as Connor Betts, a 24-year-old, and among the victims was his younger sister, Megan. “It seems to just defy believability that he would shoot his own sister,” Dayton’s police chief said . “But it’s also hard to believe he didn’t recognize that was his sister, so we just don’t know

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Thyme essential oil in corn starch particles combats Aedes aegypti larvae

A system created in Brazil using cheap, biodegradable materials permits controlled release of larvicide and can be used in small amounts of water.

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Newly developed approach shows promise in silencing HIV infection

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a new potential medication that works with an HIV-infected person's own body to further suppress the ever present but silent virus that available HIV treatments are unable to combat.

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The California coast is disappearing under the rising sea: Our choices are grim

The California coast grew and prospered during a remarkable moment in history when the sea was at its tamest.

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Prolific Sleep Researcher Christian Guilleminault Dies

He was involved in the first identification and classification of sleep disorders and outlined protocols for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea.

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AT&T’s 5G network comes to NYC, but not for regular customers

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge AT&T technically launched 5G service in New York City today, but as with its other 5G markets, only business customers and developers …

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Scientists shed new light on how we perceive vibrations through touch

Researchers have demonstrated a universal decoding system in humans that determines how we perceive vibrations of different frequencies through touch.

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Smithsonian Scientists Are Using Ginkgo Leaves to Study Climate Change—They Need Your Help

Citizen scientists can submit leaf samples from their hometowns through the end of August

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The Technology of Kindness

How social media can rebuild our empathy—and why it must — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Technology of Kindness

How social media can rebuild our empathy—and why it must — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Agriculture's secret weapon: empowering women

Women farmers face the brunt of the threat posed by climate change, yet they may hold the key to helping limit its fallout, according to a landmark UN report to be released this week.

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New England’s hottest July is a climate change wake-up call

This July was the hottest month ever recorded in several New England cities, including Boston. The month turned out to be the hottest on record dating back to 1872, when weather records for the city began. Portland, Maine, Manchester, New Hampshire, and Hartford, Connecticut also set heat records. The average temperature in Boston was 78.5 degrees for the month with 12 days surpassing 90 degrees.

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Hotter, wetter, dryer: Research forecasts an uptick in extreme weather, temperatures

It's going to rain a lot in West Virginia. It's going to be really dry, too.

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'Siberia is burning': Russians choke on forest fire smog

Svetlana Tuflyakova is in a hurry as she pushes her small son in his pram, keen to get back inside her house and away from the permeating smoke of Siberian wildfires: "It feels like it fills your whole body," she says.

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'Like a miracle': Poo powering Kenya's modern farmers

In 35 years working the land, Kenyan farmer Josphat Muchiri Njonge has never seen his coffee shrubs burst with so much fruit on his verdant hillside plot outside bustling Nairobi.

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Remembering the Peerless Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison, the Nobel laureate, Pulitzer Prize winner, and peerless American author, died on Monday at the age of 88. Since the publication of her debut novel, The Bluest Eye , in 1970, Morrison has been established as one of the most powerful and distinct voices in literature, a lyrical chronicler and witness to the African American experience. Her 1987 novel, Beloved , the story of a former

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Surprising discovery could change the way industry uses nickel

Nickel is one of the most abundant elements on earth. It is hard, yet malleable, magnetic at room temperature, and a relatively good conductor of electricity and heat. Most notably, nickel is highly corrosion resistant, which provides for a variety of uses by industry.

5h

A Bulwark against Reef Destruction in a Warming World

The island of Bonaire, in the Caribbean Sea, has been protecting its corals for decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Striped glow sticks

It may be possible to reach new levels of miniaturization, speed, and data processing with optical quantum computers, which use light to carry information. For this, we need materials that can absorb and transmit photons. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have introduced a new strategy for constructing photonic heterostructure crystals with tunable properties. Using a crystallin

5h

Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level

Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or the use of a contrast dye. This new approach could one day help doctors detect cancer metastasis that is otherwise difficult to see via standard imaging technologies during operat

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UCLA study links progenitor cells to age-related prostate growth

The prostates of older mice contain more luminal progenitor cells — cells capable of generating new prostate tissue — than the prostates of younger mice, UCLA researchers have discovered.

5h

How do you forecast eruptions at volcanoes that sit 'on the cusp' for decades?

Some volcanoes take their time–experiencing protracted, years-long periods of unrest before eventually erupting. This makes it difficult to forecast when they pose a danger to their surrounding areas, but Carnegie's Diana Roman and Penn State's Peter LaFemina are trying to change that.

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Questions during shared book reading with preschoolers need to be more challenging

When it comes to challenging young minds to grow language, asking how and why during shared book reading to preschoolers can be more beneficial, according to new research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

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Animal friendships change with the weather in African savanna

Dry weather drives some herbivores apart, but rain and wildebeests can bring them back together

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Women get Alzheimer’s way more than men—and stress could help explain why

Almost twice as many women as men get Alzheimer’s disease. (Unsplash/) A new study from Johns Hopkins suggests cumulative stress can have an outsize effect on womens' memories, pointing to a possible reason why women experience dementia and related illnesses at a much higher rate than men. Researchers analyzed information from 909 Baltimore-based participants in a long-running National Institute

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Mars-Journey Levels of Radiation Seriously Damaged Mouse Brains

Brain-Melting Bad news: any astronaut en route to Mars will be exposed to brain-melting levels of cosmic radiation. When exposed to the same levels and types of radiation that would bombard a would-be space colonist during their journey to the Red Planet, mice in a lab showed signs of impaired brain function, worsened memory, and an increase in “distress behaviors,” according to research publishe

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Apple will start its own bug bounty program for Mac, give security researchers special iPhones

For the first time, Apple is expected to announce its own bug bounty portal for the Mac OS as well as a new program that provides some security researchers with iPhones designed to help test …

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Road verges provide refuge for pollinators

Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators — but they must be managed better, new research shows.

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Researchers create first-ever personalized sound projector with £10 webcam

A research team has demonstrated the first sound projector that can track a moving individual and deliver an acoustic message as they move, to a high-profile tech and media conference in LA.

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Hidden Water Found on Hawaii’s Kilauea Could Mean Explosive Eruptions

Water on Kilauea could trigger more explosive eruptions.

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Trump’s Words Are Poison

We don’t know, and we may never know, how much President Donald Trump’s rhetoric influenced the white supremacist in El Paso who allegedly killed 22 people. What we do know is that Trump has done more than any politician in living memory to fan the flames of ethnic and racial antipathy and nurture a culture of bigotry. A generation from now, when historians look back at the defining features of t

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Where Does Trump’s ‘Invasion’ Rhetoric Come From?

If you want to know the roots of the “immigration invasion” rhetoric that President Donald Trump has championed time and again—and which was echoed in the racist manifesto linked to the man held for the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, last weekend—you can find them in the anti-Chinese diatribes that circulated on the West Coast a century and a half ago. “THE CHINESE INVASION! They Are Coming, 90

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Why a 7-Year-Old Had 547 Teeth

The tooth fairy is working overtime this week. On Thursday, a group of oral surgeons in Chennai, India, released a case report describing an already rare phenomenon at its most extreme. A young boy, just 7 years old, was being treated for jaw pain last month at Saveetha Dental Hospital near the country’s southeastern coast when clinicians realized he had 547 teeth—the most ever counted in one per

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Tardigrades may have survived spacecraft crashing on moon

Scientists believe the Beresheet’s unusual cargo may be alive and well on the moon The odds of finding life on the moon have suddenly rocketed skywards. But rather than elusive alien moonlings, the beings in question came from Earth and were spilled across the landscape when a spacecraft crashed into the surface. The Israeli Beresheet probe was meant to be the first private lander to touchdown on

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No Tie Between Mental Illness and Gun Violence

President Trump called for better identification of people with mental illness as a way to stop gun violence and mass shootings. But what would that do?

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Hackers Are Cracking Online Banking Sites to Steal Your Cash

I’m In With a couple of relatively unsophisticated tricks, savvy hackers can breach online banking sites and drain wealthy people’s accounts. Banks that offer online services are under assault from hackers who are “constantly probing” for weak or common passwords, according to influential cybersecurity journalist Brian Krebs. According to Krebs, hackers can easily find wealthy targets through bac

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Hotter, wetter, dryer: WVU research forecasts an uptick in extreme weather, temperatures

Nicolas Zegre, director of the Mountain Hydrology Laboratory at WVU, analyzed seasonal changes in water and energy balances over the Appalachian region. He forecasts up to a 10-degree jump in average temperature, increased evaporation along mountain ridges, more frequent droughts and a rise in extreme events for the region.

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Amyloid is a less accurate marker for measuring severity, progression of Alzheimer's

Researchers find fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is a better indicator of cognitive performance when compared to PET scans that detect amyloid protein.

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USPSTF still recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) still recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in adults without symptoms. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services.

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Most independent charity drug assistance programs exclude the uninsured

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health examined independent charity prescription drug assistance programs in the U.S. and found that nearly all–97 percent–did not provide coverage for uninsured patients.

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Bullet shape, velocity determine blood spatter patterns

Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located, and researchers have worked toward better understanding the fluid dynamics at play during gunshot spatters. In the Physics of Fluids, they propose a model for the disintegration of a liquid due to an arbitrarily shaped projectile. Their model focus

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How brain cells pick which connections to keep

A new study shows that the protein CPG15 acts as a molecular proxy of experience to mark synapses for stabilization, a key step in ensuring brain circuits can be refined by experience for optimal functional efficiency.

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Pitt first to grow genetically engineered mini livers to study disease and therapeutics

In a proof-of-concept paper, Pitt researchers chronicle how they transformed genetically engineered human cells into functional, 3D liver tissue that mimics non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) – a condition involving fat buildup in the liver, which can lead to cirrhosis or even liver failure.

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New plant galls research includes most comprehensive study of role of hormones

Some insects have the ability to manipulate plants to produce new organs known as galls, which manifest as abnormal growths on leaves, branches, or twigs. These galls provide insects and their offspring with food and shelter. Insects are also able to redirect the plant's nutrients, such as sugar, toward their galls, sometimes leaving the plant malnourished.

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Seeing how computers 'think' helps humans stump machines and reveals AI weaknesses

Researchers have figured out how to reliably create questions that challenge computers and reflect the complexity of human language through a human-computer collaboration, developing a dataset of more than 1,200 questions that, while easy for people to answer, stump the best computer answering systems today. The system that learns to master these questions will have a better understanding of langu

6h

Surprising discovery could change the way industry uses nickel

Nickel is one of the most abundant elements on earth. It is hard, yet malleable, magnetic at room temperature, and a relatively good conductor of electricity and heat. Most notably, nickel is highly corrosion resistant, which provides for a variety of uses by industry. However, scientists have recently discovered that nickel not only corrodes, but does so in a way that scientists least expected.

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New plant galls research includes most comprehensive study of role of hormones

Some insects have the ability to manipulate plants to produce new organs known as galls, which manifest as abnormal growths on leaves, branches, or twigs. These galls provide insects and their offspring with food and shelter. Insects are also able to redirect the plant's nutrients, such as sugar, toward their galls, sometimes leaving the plant malnourished.

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To vaccinate against gonorrhea, take away zinc?

Keeping the bacterial pathogen that causes gonorrhea from uptaking the mineral zinc can stop infection, research finds. The findings, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens , could move gonorrhea vaccine development forward because they provide insight into how to block growth of this pathogen. No vaccine has been developed to prevent this serious infection. “Our results are significant because

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In Brain’s Electrical Ripples, Markers for Memories Appear

“It’s very easy to break things in biology,” said Loren Frank , a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco. “It’s really hard to make them work better.” Yet against the odds, researchers at the New York University School of Medicine reported earlier this summer that they had improved the memory of lab animals by tinkering with the length of a dynamic signal in their brains —

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China is going to get hot

Global warming will bring thousands of deaths each year, research suggests. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Looking back on exploding white dwarfs

Astronomers find they don't need to reach a critical mass first.

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A clever way to find killer bacteria

Australian approach uses quantum dots and a smartphone.

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Kendt som hjemsted for voldelige ekstremister: ‘Internettets mørkeste afkrog’ er lukket efter massekyderi

Men det er et spørgsmål om tid, før 8chan genopstår, siger it-sikkerhedsekspert.

6h

What can you do with two omes that you can't do with one?

What can you learn from two omes that you can't tell from one? You might determine how different bacterial strains in a water sample contribute specific functions to its overall microbiome. You might find that duplication of a section of a chromosome in cancer cells has wide-reaching effects on important proteins—or that it has a smaller effect than expected. First, though, you need to find a way

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Mass starvation of reindeer linked to climate change and habitat loss

Reindeer are incredibly hardy creatures—they survived the last Ice Age and today live in some of the world's most inhospitable landscapes. Despite their fine-tuned adaptations to life in the Arctic and after over 600,000 years of living there, reindeer are struggling to survive the rapid changes happening all around them.

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Firearms Are 2nd-Leading Cause of Death in Kids and Teens

Here are the facts on the U.S. children and teens killed by guns.

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New plant galls research includes most comprehensive study of role of hormones

This study, published in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, is the most complete study to date about the role of hormones in galls, measuring 15 plant hormones belonging to 5 different classes. These findings can be used as a model for pest management and could help the agriculture and forestry industries better understand what makes plants resistant to pests.

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What can you do with two omes that you can't do with one?

In an issue on multiomics, researchers report new approaches to study the microbiome, cancer and other diseases by combining proteomics, genomics, transcriptomics and other high-throughput ways to collect data.

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Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Introducing the skinny but efficient ‘nanoseaweed’.

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Fierce leopard seals can be unexpected 'buffet buddies'

Australian and UK researchers find them working together when king penguin is on the menu.

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Now that’s an eye test

NASA ‘optometrists’ verify Mars 2020 rover’s 20/20 vision.

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What can you do with two omes that you can't do with one?

What can you learn from two omes that you can't tell from one? You might determine how different bacterial strains in a water sample contribute specific functions to its overall microbiome. You might find that duplication of a section of a chromosome in cancer cells has wide-reaching effects on important proteins—or that it has a smaller effect than expected. First, though, you need to find a way

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Novel school improvement program can raise teaching quality while reducing inequality

A multi-national European study, looking at over 5,500 students, has found that a novel school intervention program can not only improve the mathematics scores of primary school children from disadvantaged areas, but can also lessen the achievement gap caused by socioeconomic status.

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Mass starvation of reindeer linked to climate change and habitat loss

Reindeer are incredibly hardy creatures—they survived the last Ice Age and today live in some of the world's most inhospitable landscapes. Despite their fine-tuned adaptations to life in the Arctic and after over 600,000 years of living there, reindeer are struggling to survive the rapid changes happening all around them.

6h

Bullet shape, velocity determine blood spatter patterns

Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located at the time of the crime.

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Robot cameras reveal secret lives of basking sharks

An autonomous SharkCam has been used in the UK for the first time to observe the behavior of basking sharks in the Inner Hebrides.

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Robot cameras reveal secret lives of basking sharks

An autonomous SharkCam has been used in the UK for the first time to observe the behavior of basking sharks in the Inner Hebrides.

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Expert warns of climate change aggravating land degradation

Land degradation is hindering progress towards the UN's Sustainable Development goals, warns Professor Jane Rickson—as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) this week (8 August) publishes its Special Report on climate change and land management. Already, 75% of earth's land areas have been affected, with the figure predicted to rise to 95% by 2050. Professor Rickson anticipates that

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Data tool helps decipher mouse's calls

Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research.

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Simulations demonstrate ion heating by plasma oscillations for fusion energy

A research team of fusion scientists succeeded in proving that ions can be heated by plasma oscillations driven by high-energy particles. This has been confirmed by performing a large-scale simulation with a newly developed hybrid-simulation program that links calculations for plasma oscillations, high-energy particles and ions. This research will accelerate studies of plasma self-heating for real

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Houseplants ability to survive drought can provide useful knowledge for the climate change era

Researchers from the Natural History Museum of Denmark and the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at the University of Copenhagen, have in collaboration with researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew in England, demonstrated that certain Aloe species shrink, or more scientifically speaking—fold—their cell walls together. In doing so, the plants preserve resources during drought. Con

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The limits of rainforest growth

Trees are seen as saviors in an era of climate change. Via their leaves, they absorb carbon dioxide and transform the greenhouse gas into oxygen and biomass. According to estimates by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the Amazon rainforests absorb a quarter of the carbon dioxide that is released each year from the combustion of fossil fuels. To date, global climate models have assu

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US trust in scientists is now on par with the military

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02389-8 Confidence in researchers might be on the rise, but concerns about misconduct and potential conflicts of interest remain.

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Data tool helps decipher mouse's calls

Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research.

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Houseplants ability to survive drought can provide useful knowledge for the climate change era

Researchers from the Natural History Museum of Denmark and the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at the University of Copenhagen, have in collaboration with researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew in England, demonstrated that certain Aloe species shrink, or more scientifically speaking—fold—their cell walls together. In doing so, the plants preserve resources during drought. Con

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A OnePlus 5G smartphone is headed to Sprint

Sprint is adding yet another smartphone to its 5G lineup.

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Crashed Moon Lander Splattered Live Organisms Onto Lunar Surface

Lunar Life Israeli lunar lander Beresheet crashed onto the surface of the Moon on April 11 — and it may have left more than a pile of wreckage. It was also carrying thousands of tardigrades, small micro-animals often referred to as “water bears.” Why it matters: because, according to Wired , tardigrades are the “toughest animal in the known universe” — so resilient that they’ve been found living

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Dead planets can 'broadcast' for up to a billion years

Astronomers are planning to hunt for cores of exoplanets around white dwarf stars by 'tuning in' to the radio waves that they emit.

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Surprising discovery could change the way industry uses nickel

Nickel is one of the most abundant elements on earth. It is hard, yet malleable, magnetic at room temperature, and a relatively good conductor of electricity and heat. Most notably, nickel is highly corrosion resistant, which provides for a variety of uses by industry. However, a surprising discovery by a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has found that nickel not only corrodes, but does

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APOE variants' effect on mortality studied in 38,000

Researchers of the E2-CHARGE consortium, led by Sudha Seshadri, M.D., of UT Health San Antonio, discover that a little-studied variant of the APOE gene may have protective effects. This is in contrast to a more-studied APOE variant that increases mortality.

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Streamlining fee waiver requests helped low-income immigrants become citizens

Researchers from the Immigration Policy Lab at Stanford University studied the impact of a USCIS reform that streamlined the process to request a fee waiver for citizenship applications. After the reform, those eligible for the fee waiver became more likely to apply for citizenship than those who were ineligible. The boost in naturalization rates among these low-income applicants amounted to about

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Seeing how computers 'think' helps humans stump machines and reveals AI weaknesses

Researchers from the University of Maryland have figured out how to reliably create questions that challenge computers and reflect the complexity of human language through a human-computer collaboration, developing a dataset of more than 1,200 questions that, while easy for people to answer, stump the best computer answering systems today. The system that learns to master these questions will have

6h

Novel school improvement program can raise teaching quality while reducing inequality

A multi-national European study, looking at over 5,500 students, has found that a novel school intervention program can not only improve the mathematics scores of primary school children from disadvantaged areas, but can also lessen the achievement gap caused by socioeconomic status.

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OU microbiologists provide framework for assessing ecological diversity

A University of Oklahoma team of microbiologists have developed a mathematical framework for quantitatively assessing ecological diversity in an ecological community whether deterministic or stochastic. A recent study by the team published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences examines the mechanisms controlling biological diversity and provides guidance for use of the null-model-

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Thyroid screening may not be needed in all youth with psychiatric disorders

A new study from researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and Cincinnati Children's looks at the prevalence of abnormal thyroid function in youth with severe mood and anxiety disorder. It is the largest study to date of this population and will help mental health professionals better understand the predictors of abnormal thyroid function, like weight gain, family history, or treatment with

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Qantas' cloud-based flight sim saving millions in fuel

submitted by /u/JoseTwitterFan [link] [comments]

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GM humans are possible, but do we really want them?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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If one drone isn't enough, try a drone swarm

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SA approves plans for wind, solar, battery and hydrogen superhub

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Self-Driving Trucks Are Ready to Do Business in Texas

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Mantle rock behind Yellowstone's supereruptions extends to Northern California

Victor Camp has spent a lifetime studying volcanic eruptions all over the world, starting in Saudi Arabia, then Iran, and eventually the Pacific Northwest. The geology lecturer finds mantle plumes that feed the largest of these eruptions fascinating, because of their massive size and the impact they can have on our environment.

6h

Ionic thermal up-diffusion boosts energy harvesting

Salinity gradient energy is recognized as a promising candidate for the substitution of traditional fossil fuels. Recently nanofluidic salinity gradient energy harvesting via ion channels or membranes has drawn increasing interest due to the advances in materials science and nanotechnology, which could offer much higher power density than the macro reverse electrodialysis systems, indicating its p

6h

Physicists who came up with supergravity win $3m Breakthrough Prize

Supergravity is an idea that could unite general relativity with quantum mechanics, and the three physicists who formulated it have now won a $3 million prize for their work

6h

The Left Needs a Language Potent Enough to Counter Trump

Perhaps it isn’t possible to establish a direct connection between the El Paso massacre and the president. Anticipating that Donald Trump would be held responsible, the killer insisted in an online rant that his own white-supremacist views predated the 2016 election, and that blaming the president would be “fake news.” Perhaps the killer’s denunciations of a “Hispanic invasion” and of Democratic

7h

The Key to Life's Emergence? Bubbles, New Study Argues

They just want to create order in this chaotic world.

7h

Top U.S. biodefense lab pauses work after safety lapses

Infectious disease institute has faulty wastewater system, inspectors found

7h

Antineutrino detection could help remotely monitor nuclear reactors

Technology to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors could allow continuous remote monitoring designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate the diversion of nuclear materials. The monitoring could be done from outside the reactor vessel, and the technology may be sensitive enough to detect substitution of a single fuel assembly.

7h

The front line of environmental violence

Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a new study.

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How an online community can support your career — and change things for the better

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02368-z Aliyah Weinstein explains how engaging with other researchers outside of academic spaces is beneficial to scientists’ career development.

7h

A Condensate-Modifying Compound, Put to the Test

I’ve written several times here about phase-separated condensates in cells, but now comes a rarity: a paper with some evidence for a therapeutic application. Everyone in the field has been thinking along such lines, naturally, but this is the first small-molecule screen that I’ve seen that tries to tie modifying condensate behavior in that way to a disease state. In this case, it’s the handling o

7h

Is A2 Milk Really Better for You?

This pricey designer milk comes with some big claims. Let’s explore the science behind the hype — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Aloe has a trick that thirsty crops could use

The aloe plant’s ability to survive extended periods of drought could contribute to more resilient crops. “Our results tie changes in carbohydrate composition with the aloe plant’s ability to manage extended periods of drought. It is highly relevant that we understand the physiological mechanisms that allow certain plants to survive under extreme conditions, due to climate change and the potentia

7h

Speculative ‘supergravity’ theory wins US$3-million prize

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02397-8 Three physicists honoured for theory that has been hugely influential — but might not be a good description of reality.

7h

Why Woodstock Can Never Happen Again

In the final moments of PBS’s Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation , a new documentary packed with remarkable images of the epochal 1969 music festival, comes perhaps the most remarkable shot of all: the view from a helicopter above the fest, taking in what 400,000 hippies looks like. The frame is filled entirely with people-as-dots, a gobsmackingly huge number of them, crammed against

7h

Apple revives the retro Claris name as it expands beyond FileMaker

Apple is going back to its roots, although not necessarily in the way you'd expect. The tech giant is changing the name of FileMaker back to Claris, the company Apple spun out …

7h

The limits of rainforest growth

How much carbon dioxide can tropical rainforests absorb? Investigations by an international team of researchers with significant involvement from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) indicate that the absorption capacity is severely limited by the phosphorus content of the soil.

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Houseplants ability to survive drought can provide useful knowledge for the climate change era

PLANTS It has long been known that some plants tolerate drought better than others. As some of the first to do so in the past 100 years, Danish scientists have investigated the mechanisms behind the Aloe plant's ability to survive extended periods of drought. New knowledge could contribute to more resilient crops for a future of more weather extremes.

7h

Sleep interrupted: What's keeping us up at night?

One of the largest longitudinal studies to date examined evening consumption of alcohol, caffeine and nicotine among an African-American cohort and objectively measured sleep outcomes in their natural environments instead of laboratory or observatory settings. The study involved 785 participants and totaled 5,164 days of concurrent actigraphy and daily sleep diaries that recorded how much alcohol,

7h

Leak Shows AMD Epyc 7742 Slugging it Out With Intel Xeon Platinum 8280

AMD has kept details about its upcoming Epyc product family remarkably close to its chest. A recent leak (now deleted) at the publicly available Open Benchmarking database shows a tough competition between AMD’s upcoming 7nm Epyc CPUs and Intel’s equivalent Xeon products. Intel CEO Bob Swan has referred to AMD as offering increased competition in the back half of 2019, particularly in data center

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Supergravity pioneers win $3m Special Breakthrough prize

Daniel Freedman, Peter van Nieuwenhuizen and Sergio Ferrara developed landmark theory in 1970s The most lucrative prize in science has been awarded to three researchers for a landmark theory that married particle physics with Einstein’s description of gravity, and proposed a candidate for the mysterious cosmic goo known as dark matter to boot. Daniel Freedman, Peter van Nieuwenhuizen and Sergio F

7h

Samarbejde mellem Cloudflare og ekstreme sider går langt tilbage

Hjemmesiden 8-Chan, der giver en platform til ekstremister, er ikke Cloudflares eneste tvivlsomme kunde. Flere medier beskriver, hvordan kundeporteføljen får de seneste dages gode hensigtserklæringer til at klinge hult.

7h

A fungus makes a chemical that neutralizes the stench of skunk spray

A compound produced by fungi reacts with skunk spray to form residues that aren’t offensive to the nose and can be more easily washed away.

7h

Många kräftor att fånga i Vättern

SLU Aqua vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU) presenterar en prognosen. I Vättern beräknas att den relativa fångsten 2019 landar på 137 gram matkräftor per bur och natt, en rejäl uppgång med nästan trettio procent jämfört med förra året, då fångsterna hade gått ner sedan 2017. Totalfångsten i yrkesfisket beräknas till 151 ton om fisketrycket blir normalt och fisket pågår säsongen ut. Så här da

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Why Companies and Armies Are Hiring Science Fiction Writers

Are you a science fiction writer? Do you have command of the French language? If you can answer yes to both questions, a new job opportunity may be just the thing for you. The recently formed French Defense Innovation Agency (DIA) is looking to assemble a ‘red team’ of science fiction writers and futurists. The BBC reports that the team will use “[…]role play and other techniques to imagine how t

7h

Nope, ‘environmentally friendly’ cigarettes aren’t healthy

People perceive cigarettes marketed as being environmentally friendly as less harmful to health and the environment, a new survey shows. Few people would consider a handgun with a sustainably harvested wood stock any less lethal than one with a steel stock. But the same logic doesn’t apply to cigarettes—the leading preventable cause of death globally and in the United States. As reported in Preve

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Ugly or Beautiful? The Housing Blocks Communism Left Behind

Zupagrafika's new book captures modernist and brutalist architecture in Germany, Hungary, Poland, Ukraine, and Russia.

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Attention Apple Retro-Heads: Claris is Back!

Apple revives the original name of its software subsidiary, which it abandoned in 1998. The rebranded Claris also is acquiring an Italian software company.

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Supergravity Snags Super Award: $3-Million Special Breakthrough Prize

The theory, which emerged in the 1970s as a way to unify the fundamental forces of nature, has profoundly shaped the landscape of particle physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Supergravity Snags Super Award: $3-Million Special Breakthrough Prize

The theory, which emerged in the 1970s as a way to unify the fundamental forces of nature, has profoundly shaped the landscape of particle physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dead planets can 'broadcast' for up to a billion years

Astronomers are planning to hunt for cores of exoplanets around white dwarf stars by 'tuning in' to the radio waves that they emit.

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Wits University PhD student discovers new species of early dinosaur

The team of scientists, led by PhD Student Kimberley Chapelle, recognised that the dinosaur was not only a new species of sauropodomorph, but an entirely new genus. The specimen has now been named Ngwevu intloko which means 'grey skull' in the Xhosa language.

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Dead planet cores ‘broadcast’ long after their sun burns out

New models reveal that planetary cores can survive for over 100 million years and as long as a billion years after their stars have burnt up their nuclear fuel, researchers report. Astronomers are planning to hunt for cores of exoplanets around white dwarf stars by “tuning in” to the radio waves that they emit. In new research, scientists have determined the best candidate white dwarfs to start t

7h

Breaking the cycle between family violence and homelessness

Women who become homeless as a result of family and domestic violence are also facing legal and financial issues that make it hard for them to make a fresh start, according to an evaluation report on the Safe as Houses pilot program.

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Image: Washington state suffers from Williams Flats Fire caused by lightning

Washington state endured a band of early morning thunderstorms near the Colville Indian Reservation west of Spokane on August 02, 2019. The result of those storms were various lightning strikes and one of which caused the outbreak of the Williams Flats Fire. The 10,438 acre fire is burning south of Silver Creek Road, within the Colville Indian Reservation and is currently 20% contained. Firefighti

7h

Det samlede sundhedsvæsen skal løftes, hvis det skal kunne følge med

Medarbejderne i regionerne knokler for at følge med. Det lykkes langt hen ad vejen at give patienterne en behandling i verdensklasse. Men når der år for år bliver flere patienter og mere arbejde at udføre, så skal der følge ressourcer med, skriver Stephanie Lose (V), formand for Danske Regioner.

7h

Scientists shed new light on how we perceive vibrations through touch

Researchers have demonstrated a universal decoding system in humans that determines how we perceive vibrations of different frequencies through touch.

7h

Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience

A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.The discovery was made by University of Queensland and CSIRO researchers investigating whether corals that split their spawning over multiple months are more successful at spreading their offspring across different reefs.

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Dietary choline associates with reduced risk of dementia

A new study by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland is the first to observe that dietary intake of phosphatidylcholine is associated with a reduced risk of dementia. Phosphatidylcholine was also linked to enhanced cognitive performance. The main dietary sources of phosphatidylcholine were eggs and meat. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Study on attosecond timescale casts new light on electron dynamics in transition metals

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg and the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland, together with the Center for Computational Sciences of University of Tsukuba, has unraveled the light-induced electron-localization dynamics in transition metals at the attosecond timescale. The team investigated for the first tim

7h

Simulations demonstrate ion heating by plasma oscillations for fusion energy

A research team of fusion scientists succeeded in proving that ions can be heated by plasma oscillations driven by high-energy particles. This has been confirmed by performing a large-scale simulation with a newly developed hybrid-simulation program that links calculations for plasma oscillations, high-energy particles and ions. This research will accelerate studies of plasma self-heating for real

7h

Energy development wins when it's pitted against endangered species

Widespread species decline at the hands of humans is a powerful tale. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, more than 27 percent of 100,000 assessed species are threatened with extinction. This disappearance is a warning that something is amiss on Earth.

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Energy development wins when it's pitted against endangered species

Widespread species decline at the hands of humans is a powerful tale. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, more than 27 percent of 100,000 assessed species are threatened with extinction. This disappearance is a warning that something is amiss on Earth.

7h

A Charismatic Leader for White Nationalists

From my work as a former national-security prosecutor, I know that many individuals who engage in terrorism are alienated from society and are looking for something larger than themselves to find meaning in their lives. They have endured loss or unfulfilled expectations, and are looking for scapegoats. A powerful leader who speaks to their grievances can inspire them to act. For many radical Isla

7h

Sex worker rights: Hysteria, surveillance and threats to fundamental freedoms

2:00 a.m. The phone rang, abruptly awakening me. It was the hotel night clerk calling to tell me that members of the Montréal Police Service were downstairs and wanting to search my room. When I asked why, I was told there was a report of a missing youth being held in the hotel. Knowing I couldn't refuse without negative consequences, I reluctantly agreed.

8h

Can we really restore or protect natural habitats to 'offset' those we destroy?

In the forests of northern Sweden, a major train line cuts through land originally protected for migratory birds—so new seasonal wetlands have been established for the birds nearby. In southern Uganda, a huge hydropower dam has flooded swathes of tropical forest—so degraded forests nearby have been restored and the lands they sit on protected. On the remote, wild shores of the Caspian Sea, a strat

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Defending the environment now more lethal than soldiering in some war zones

Despite centuries of persecution, indigenous groups still manage or have tenure rights over at least a quarter of the world's land surface. Often inhabiting these lands as far back as memory extends, they share a deep and unique connection to their environment.

8h

Neonicotinoids may have an unexplored harmful exposure route to beneficial insects

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Spain has found neonicotinoids represent an unexplored harmful exposure route to beneficial insects via honeydew. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of beneficial insect exposure to neonicotinoids and what they learned.

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Can we really restore or protect natural habitats to 'offset' those we destroy?

In the forests of northern Sweden, a major train line cuts through land originally protected for migratory birds—so new seasonal wetlands have been established for the birds nearby. In southern Uganda, a huge hydropower dam has flooded swathes of tropical forest—so degraded forests nearby have been restored and the lands they sit on protected. On the remote, wild shores of the Caspian Sea, a strat

8h

Neonicotinoids may have an unexplored harmful exposure route to beneficial insects

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Spain has found neonicotinoids represent an unexplored harmful exposure route to beneficial insects via honeydew. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of beneficial insect exposure to neonicotinoids and what they learned.

8h

Saildrone is first to circumnavigate Antarctica, in search for carbon dioxide

It was an audacious idea: To send an unmanned saildrone on a 13,670-nautical-mile journey around Antarctica alone, at the mercy of the most hostile seas on the planet. In winter.

8h

Thyroid hormone can alter color vision in zebrafish, potentially in humans

Exposure to thyroid hormone can alter eye function in zebrafish, a result with implications for curing color blindness and retinal degeneration in humans.

8h

Ionic thermal up-diffusion boosts energy harvesting

Recently nanofluidic salinity gradient energy harvesting via ion channels or membranes has drawn increasing concerns due to the advances in materials science and nanotechnology, which exhibits much higher power density than the macro reverse electrodialysis systems, indicating its potential to harvest the huge amount blue energy released by mixing seawater and river water and enhance power extract

8h

Reconstructing histological slices into 3D images

Despite advances in 3D imaging such as MRI and CT, scientists still rely on slicing a specimen into 2D sections to acquire the most detailed information. Using this information, they then try to reconstruct a 3D image of the specimen. Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology report a new algorithm that can do this task at less cost and higher robustness than standard methods.

8h

New hormone injection aids weight loss in obese patients

An injection has helped reduce body weight and glucose levels in patients with diabetes and obesity in four weeks.

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Kappa opioid receptor influences naltrexone's effects on drinking alcohol

Researchers at Yale University have identified how naltrexone, a medication used to treat alcohol use disorder, reduces craving and consumption in heavy drinkers. The findings appear in Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier. The new findings may provide a better understanding of how naltrexone works in the brain, which could help identify people who would benefit from the treatment.

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Thyroid hormone can alter color vision in zebrafish, potentially in humans

Exposure to thyroid hormone can alter eye function in zebrafish, a result with implications for curing color blindness and retinal degeneration in humans.

8h

'Lost' Statue of Alexander the Great (Minus the Nose) Turns Up in Museum Warehouse

No one knew this bust featured Alexander the Great, until now.

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Syriza may have lost the election, but Greece’s research reforms deserve to stay

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02323-y The incoming government should respect its predecessor’s research policies, including public-funding increases and an independent national funding agency.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02358-1 How Nature reported the camouflage strategies of nesting birds in 1919, and devices for getting rid of wasps in trees in 1969.

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Space travel might fry your brain, causing permanent learning and memory problems

During the course of a deep space mission, astronauts are routinely in various degrees of peril. Depending on which Hollywood sci-fi thrillers you choose, these intrepid explorers are at the mercy of malicious aliens, psychotic computers, or collisions with asteroids or space debris. While these might all be possible concerns, remote or otherwise, the greatest real danger to astronauts may in fact

8h

Stueplantes værn mod tørke kan give nyttig viden i en tid med klimaforandringer

Det har længe været kendt at nogle planter håndterer tørke bedre end andre. Nu har…

8h

Method may finally unleash graphene for faster computers

A new method could get graphene a step closer to replacing less-effective copper interconnects in the world’s computer devices. Ever since scientists discovered graphene, the flexible, two-dimensional form of graphite (think a 1-atom-thick sheet of pencil lead), in 2004, researchers around the world have been working to develop commercially scalable applications for this high-performance material

8h

Mesoamerican Sculptures Reveal Early Knowledge of Magnetism

Stone figures with magnetized cheeks and navels suggest the pre-Maya civilization of Monte Alto understood the attractive force

8h

New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations

A new study from Iowa State University scientists could flip the established framework for how scientists believe geography influences sex determination in painted turtles on its shell.

8h

Ancient soil provides a window to the past

Noelle Purcell, a senior in the Columbian College of Arts and Science, spent the first half of her summer in northern Kenya trying to better understand the environmental context of human evolution by studying the morphology of preserved ancient soils called paleosols. The preserved ancient soils contain information about atmospheric composition, which sheds light on what the Earth's environment wa

8h

New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations

A new study from Iowa State University scientists could flip the established framework for how scientists believe geography influences sex determination in painted turtles on its shell.

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»5G har en pris, og den pris er batteriforbrug«: Televirksomheder jagter allerede ny teknologi

PLUS. De første erfaringer fra Kina og Finland tyder på et meget højt strømforbrug på smartphones og basestationer på det nye 5G-mobilnetværk. Det er især encoding-teknologien, som afsender radiosignalerne, der sluger strøm.

8h

Paper device shows rogue collagen’s role in heart disease

Paper is at the heart of an experimental device to study heart disease, researchers report. Researchers are using paper-based structures that mimic the layered nature of aortic valves, the tough, flexible tissues that keep blood flowing through the heart in one direction only. The devices allow the engineers to study in detail how calcifying diseases slow or stop hearts from functioning. The rese

8h

Maya Civilization Was Ultraviolent, Even Before Its Collapse

Hieroglyphic inscription may overturn view of the Maya.

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NASA 'optometrists' verify Mars 2020 rover's 20/20 vision

Equipped with visionary science instruments, the Mars 2020 rover underwent an "eye" exam after several cameras were installed on it. The rover contains an armada of imaging capabilities, from wide-angle landscape cameras to narrow-angle high-resolution zoom lens cameras.

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New finds for Mars rover, seven years after landing

NASA's Curiosity rover has come a long way since touching down on Mars seven years ago. It has traveled a total of 13 miles (21 kilometers) and ascended 1,207 feet (368 meters) to its current location. Along the way, Curiosity discovered Mars had the conditions to support microbial life in the ancient past, among other things.

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New study traces Io's volcanic tides

Hundreds of volcanoes pockmark the surface of Io, the third largest of Jupiter's 78 known moons, and the only body in our solar system other than Earth where widespread volcanism can be observed. The source of the moon's inner heat is radically different than Earth's, making the moon a unique system to investigate volcanism.

8h

How a Data Detective Exposed Suspicious Medical Trials

Anaesthetist John Carlisle has spotted problems in hundreds of research papers—and spurred a leading medical journal to change its practice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Repeating outflows of hot wind found close to black hole

An international team of astrophysicists from Southampton, Oxford and South Africa have detected a very hot, dense outflowing wind close to a black hole at least 25,000 light-years from Earth.

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Study documents the first human occupation in North Africa

Scientists from el Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) (Burgos, Spain) and from the Algerian Centre de Recherches Préhistoriques, Anthropologiques et Historiques (CNRPAH) (Algiers, Algeria) have collaborated in a new round of fieldwork in July 2019 at the site of Ain Hanech in northeastern Algeria to investigate the Tempo and Mode of the earliest human occupation in

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Scientists develop filter to suppress radio interference

Researchers from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics have proposed a new design for a multimode stripline resonator. The use of such resonators allows scientists to create miniature band-pass filters with unique frequency-selective properties that are in demand by modern telecommunication systems. The main results of the study are published in Technical Physics Letters.

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India’s Flipkart bets on free video streaming service and Hindi support to win next 200 million internet users

India’s e-commerce giant Flipkart said on Tuesday that it is revamping its shopping app to add support for Hindi language, a video streaming service, and an audio-visual assistant, the latest …

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Trump revives political bias accusations against Google

US President Donald Trump revived his criticism of Google on Tuesday, referencing a fired engineer who claimed the internet giant was working against his re-election.

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Green growth is trusted to fix climate change, but that's a problem

You may have missed it, but a recent report declared that the main strategy of world leaders for tackling climate change won't work. It's called green growth, and it's favoured by some of the largest and most influential organisations in the world, including the United Nations and the World Bank.

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How scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations

A study that looks at how temperature influences the development of painted turtles may lead biologists to rethink the theoretical frameworks they use when analyzing the topic. The study found wide variation within local populations, suggesting temperature sensitivity of embryonic development can vary significantly from one turtle nest to another within a single population.

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Blood pressure monitoring may one day be easy as taking a video selfie

Future blood pressure monitoring could become as easy as taking a video selfie. Transdermal optical imaging is a smartphone-based technology that accurately measured blood pressure from a video of a person's face in a recent study.

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Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California

Changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays.

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Formand for Diabetesforeningen trækker sig fra posten

Helbredsproblemer får professor Torsten Lauritzen til at træde tilbage fra formandsposten i Diabetesforeningen.

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Ny professor skal forske i at forbedre kræftpatienters forløb

Helle Pappot er ny professor i klinisk onkologi på Rigshospitalet og forsker i, hvordan man bedst kan forbedre kræftpatienters forløb ved at inddrage patienterne mere systematisk.

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Study suggests use of gender-neutral terms to describe people leads to gender equality

A pair of researchers, one with Washington University in St. Louis, the other with the University of California, has found evidence that suggests the use of gender-neutral terms to describe people promotes gender equality. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Margit Tavits and Efrén Pérez describe experiments they conducted with Swedish volunteers and what t

8h

'Remainers' suffered mental distress equivalent to migraine after Brexit vote

Warwick Business School research has found evidence that "Remainers" suffered "mental distress" in the aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the European Union—equivalent to a chronic migraine.

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Giant 'sandscaping' plan to save Norfolk coast will only put off the inevitable

This summer, the UK's Norfolk coast is undergoing a transformation that has only been seen once in the world before. A giant sandscaping scheme will see 1.8m cubic metres of sand added to the area's beaches to reshape them as a way of reducing coastal erosion. This is an amazing engineering defence, designed to increase the resilience of the adjacent cliffs to erosion. But it may have a sting in i

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Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience

A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.

8h

Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience

A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.

9h

Is that avocado brown already? Genetic research could help

Avocados are famous for having a frustratingly short period of consumption. They're hard as rocks for a while and as soon as you try to eat one, they've turned to brown mush.

9h

Coming to a farm near you: The humble microbe boosting Europe's food industry

Farmers who want to produce bigger chickens, fewer greenhouse gas-filled cow burps or healthier animals are increasingly able to turn to one tiny source: microbes.

9h

We could use Earth's atmosphere as a giant lens for a space telescope

A space telescope could use the whole Earth as a lens by capturing light deflected off the atmosphere to help us search for signs of life on exoplanets

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Researchers suggest Lomonosov crater could be more evidence of mega-tsunami on Mars

A team of researchers from France, Australia and Spain has found evidence that suggests the Lomonosov crater impact event on Mars could have been the source of a mega-tsunami on the Red Planet billions of years ago. In their paper, published in Journal of Geophysical Research, the group outlines their study of the crater and the evidence that suggests it could have been ground zero for a massive t

9h

Is that avocado brown already? Genetic research could help

Avocados are famous for having a frustratingly short period of consumption. They're hard as rocks for a while and as soon as you try to eat one, they've turned to brown mush.

9h

Coming to a farm near you: The humble microbe boosting Europe's food industry

Farmers who want to produce bigger chickens, fewer greenhouse gas-filled cow burps or healthier animals are increasingly able to turn to one tiny source: microbes.

9h

Writing a will: What to leave behind after you die

A will is not a simple, one-piece-of-paper kind of document. There are many different kinds of wills: There's a will to handle your things. There's a will to handle your body. And there are wills to handle your legacy. If you don't prepare a will, and if you don't set up a trust, and if you don't arrange your advance directives, then you, and your loved ones, fall into these default legal mechani

9h

Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity. A Belgian team of scientists has now developed a bimodal contrast agent suited for two imaging techniques at once, namely, MRI and a technique called photoacoustic imaging. The use of only one contrast agent for two imaging techniques improves the sensitivity of both

9h

First sea trials of a revolutionary new undersea robot

In late June researchers from MBARI joined engineers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to test a new breed of undersea robot designed to open up new avenues of research in the mesopelagic, also known as the ocean's twilight zone. This vehicle, the Mesobot, originated at WHOI and was developed over the past two years with critical input from scientists and engineers at MBARI, Stanfor

9h

Artificial 'tongue' can distinguish between whiskies

Scientists revealed Monday they have come up with an artificial "tongue" which can distinguish subtle differences between whiskies.

9h

Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California

Ocean acidification is bad news for shellfish, making it harder for them to form their calcium-based shells. But several other factors related to climate change could also make California bays less hospitable to shelled organisms like oysters, which are a key part of the food web.

9h

People of color don’t get credit for climate concern

While their contributions to the climate change movement remain largely unrecognized, people of color are just as concerned—or even more so—as whites, the United States’ majority group, according to new research. People of color have good reason for their concern. Although racial and ethnic minorities comprise 38% of the US population, studies have found that environmental racism leaves them disp

9h

Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California

Ocean acidification is bad news for shellfish, making it harder for them to form their calcium-based shells. But several other factors related to climate change could also make California bays less hospitable to shelled organisms like oysters, which are a key part of the food web.

9h

Habitat loss could have negative implications for long-term health of polar bears

Retreating sea ice in the Arctic is altering the gut bacteria of polar bears, potentially holding negative implications for the long-term health of the species, finds a new study by Cardiff University and the United States Geological Survey.

9h

A Reformed White Nationalist Says the Worst Is Yet to Come

It’s going to get worse. That’s the warning of a former violent extremist, Christian Picciolini, who joined a neo-Nazi movement 30 years ago and now tries to get people out of them. White-supremacist terrorists—the ones who have left dozens dead in attacks in Pittsburgh, New Zealand, and El Paso, Texas, in recent months—aren’t just trying to outdo one another, he told us. They’re trying to outdo

9h

The Endangered Sex Scene

John Cuneo “T his is my kit.” Alicia Rodis, who since early last year has been HBO’s lead intimacy coordinator, a new title that translates roughly to chief sex-scene coach, held up a clear vinyl case filled with what at first glance appeared to be toiletries and packages of pantyhose. On closer examination, though, the products and their names were mysterious. Shibue. Hibue. Stanga. “Let’s say w

9h

Two weeks of science and Beyond

Over two weeks have flown by since ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano was launched to the International Space Station for his second six-month stay in orbit. His arrival, alongside NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan and Roscosmos Soyuz commander Alexander Skvortsov, boosted the Station's population to six and the crew has been busy ever since—performing a wide range of science in space.

9h

Habitat loss could have negative implications for long-term health of polar bears

Retreating sea ice in the Arctic is altering the gut bacteria of polar bears, potentially holding negative implications for the long-term health of the species, finds a new study by Cardiff University and the United States Geological Survey.

9h

Attack of the Seaweed

Sargassum is piling up on Caribbean beaches, smothering nearshore ecosystems, driving off tourists, and compelling researchers to figure out why it's suddenly so abundant.

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Paris scrambles to allay Notre-Dame lead poisoning fears

Paris officials moved Tuesday to downplay the risk of lead poisoning from the massive fire that tore through Notre-Dame cathedral in April, as tests continue to show worrying levels of the toxic metal at nearby schools.

9h

Video Game Violence

Recent mass shootings have once again fueled discussion about the role of video game violence (VGV) and aggressive behavior. This is an enduring controversy, which is a real scientific controversy (not just a political one) because the research is highly complex. Part of that complexity is that there is just one question, does VGV cause aggressive behavior – there are many subquestions, and many

9h

A modified device fabrication process achieves enhanced spin transport in graphene

Researchers from the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group have proposed a modified graphene-based nanodevice fabrication technique that increases up to three times the spin lifetime and relaxation length compared to previous work of the same kind. The work was fruit of the collaboration with Imec and K.U. Leuven (Belgium). The results have been published in 2-D Materials and are expec

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A new way to block unwanted genetic transfer

We receive half of our genes from each biological parent, so there's no avoiding inheriting a blend of characteristics from both. Yet, for single-celled organisms like bacteria that reproduce by splitting into two identical cells, injecting variety into the gene pool isn't so easy. Random mutations add some diversity, but there's a much faster way for bacteria to reshuffle their genes and confer e

9h

Image of the Day: Artificial Snake Bite

A microneedle delivers liquid medicines through tiny, fang-like points.

9h

A new way to block unwanted genetic transfer

We receive half of our genes from each biological parent, so there's no avoiding inheriting a blend of characteristics from both. Yet, for single-celled organisms like bacteria that reproduce by splitting into two identical cells, injecting variety into the gene pool isn't so easy. Random mutations add some diversity, but there's a much faster way for bacteria to reshuffle their genes and confer e

9h

Why science needs the humanities to solve climate change

Large wildfires in the Arctic and intense heat waves in Europe are just the latest evidence that climate change is becoming the defining event of our time. Unlike other periods that came and went, such as the 1960s or the dot-com boom, an era of unchecked climate change will lead to complex and irreversible changes in Earth's life support systems.

9h

Could a national buyback program reduce gun violence in America?

Americans own nearly half of the world's guns, with approximately 120 firearms for every 100 U.S. residents.

9h

Whaley Bridge dam collapse is a wake-up call: Concrete infrastructure demands maintenance

Torrential rain in the Midlands and North of England that saw half a month's rain fall in one day caused such volumes of water to pass through the spillway of the Toddbrook Reservoir dam, above the town of Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire, that the protective concrete facing was damaged—badly enough to put the dam at risk of a full collapse.

9h

Hyundai gets its solar roof to market atop the Sonata Hybrid

Hyundai is launching its first car with a solar rooftop as part of the vehicle's charging system. The solar panels in the new Sonata Hybrid's roof are expected to provide up to 60 percent …

9h

Why Thousands of Hawaiians (Including Jason Momoa) Are Protesting a Giant Telescope on Mauna Kea

Native Hawaiians argue that the Thirty Meter Telescope, set for construction on the sacred site, was planned without care for their concerns.

9h

#66 At forske på et af verdens bedste universiteter

Podcasten Stetoskopet undersøger, hvordan det er at forske på Standford Universitet, og hvad vi i Danmark kan lære af et universitet som Stanford.

9h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad sker der med solceller, hvis man frakobler kredsløbet?

En læser undrer sig over, hvad der sker med energien i en solcelle, hvis den fjernes fra det elektriske kredsløb. Det svarer European Energy på.

9h

Why do so many working class Americans feel politics is pointless?

In sociologist Jennifer Silva's first book, "Coming Up Short," she interviewed working-class young adults in Lowell, Mass., and Richmond, Virginia.

9h

The fourth industrial revolution risks leaving women behind

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is, ostensibly, upon us. The term was coined in 2016 by Klaus Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Form.

9h

Could you be charged on Earth for killing someone in outer space?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts There is no sovereignty up there … Peter Martin, Continue reading…

10h

Boost in high school students taking advanced computer science could change the face of tech

Often when I speak with students who are majoring in computer sciences, many of them tell me that they have never taken a computer science course until college. This is especially true for the female, black, and Latino students I've spoken with as a computer science professor.

10h

Ghosts of ancient explosions live on in stars today

When small, dense stars called white dwarfs explode, they produce bright, short-lived flares called Type Ia supernovae. These supernovae are informative cosmological markers for astronomers—for example, they were used to prove that the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

10h

ATLAS Experiment releases new search for Higgs boson interactions with the lightest charged lepton

Does the Higgs boson follow all of the rules set by the Standard Model? Since discovering the particle in 2012, the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations have been hard at work studying the behaviour of the Higgs boson. Any unexpected observations could be a sign of new physics beyond the Standard Model.

10h

What do you mean the hamburger isn't all that American?

Say you're a scientist who studies the origins and history of food, and you want to communicate to the world your findings that the all-American hamburger—including the side of fries—doesn't contain a single ingredient that originally came from the United States. You could publish an article in a top-notch journal, ask a communications officer to write a press release about the paper, or take to T

10h

What do you mean the hamburger isn't all that American?

Say you're a scientist who studies the origins and history of food, and you want to communicate to the world your findings that the all-American hamburger—including the side of fries—doesn't contain a single ingredient that originally came from the United States. You could publish an article in a top-notch journal, ask a communications officer to write a press release about the paper, or take to T

10h

Study finds that recent global sea level acceleration started in the 1960s

A new study led by the University of Siegen (Germany) finds an acceleration in sea-level rise starting in the 1960s that can be linked to changes in Southern Hemispheric westerly winds. The study, published on August 5 in the journal Nature Climate Change, examined a global set of coastal tide gauge records in combination with spatial information from satellite altimetry to retrace the acceleratio

10h

New milestone reached in the study of electroweak symmetry breaking

In the Standard Model of particle physics, elementary particles acquire their masses by interacting with the Higgs field. This process is governed by a delicate mechanism: electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Although EWSB was first proposed in 1964, it remains among the least understood phenomena of the Standard Model as a large dataset of high-energy particle collisions is required to probe it.

10h

Why green bonds could be key to fighting climate change

Finance has a role to play in confronting climate change, and green bonds could be one of the tools to do it. The idea behind green bonds is not complicated, but the application of this simple financial mechanism could be transformational.

10h

The Bauhaus at 100: science by design

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02355-4 Nicholas Fox Weber uncovers the scientific currents threading through the history of this pioneering German school of design.

10h

RFK's Secret Role in the Cuban Missile Crisis

Recently declassified information shows the critical part JFK’s younger brother played in resolving the Cold War’s most dangerous moment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

How to Collapse the Distinction Between Art and Biology – Facts So Romantic

What Xenotext does is cause its audience to reevaluate their ideas of creation, both literary and biological. Illustration by GiroScience / Shutterstock Language,” the Beat writer William S. Burroughs supposedly once exclaimed, “is a virus from outer space.” Burroughs was making a metaphorical extrapolation about the ways in which words, phrases, idioms, sentences, lines, and narratives can seemi

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How to Reduce Gun Violence: Ask Some Scientists

Researchers have clear policy suggestions on how to see fewer gun deaths. They'd have many more, if they weren't starved for funding and data.

10h

Self-Driving Trucks Are Ready to Do Business in Texas

Kodiak Robotics will begin commercial service between Dallas and Houston, though a host of other self-driving startups have already been testing in the state.

10h

A Submarine Goes Under a Failing Glacier to Gauge Rising Seas

Scientists believe Antarctica's massive Thwaites Glacier is teetering on the brink of collapse, though just how fast that could happen remains an open question.

10h

The search for a dementia cure rests on helping innovators

Governments must steer private funding towards difficult diseases

10h

RFK's Secret Role in the Cuban Missile Crisis

Recently declassified information shows the critical part JFK’s younger brother played in resolving the Cold War’s most dangerous moment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

The difference between schadenfreude and sadism

Schadenfreude is an emotional state, whereas sadism is a personality trait. A sadist plays an active role and enacts substantial misery on someone. The passivity and natural feeling schadenfreude sets it apart from sadism. Schadenfreude is a German-borrowed word defined as the pleasure derived from someone from another's misfortune. Some of the first English-speaking people exposed to this word,

10h

"Qutrit" Experiments Are a First in Quantum Teleportation

The proof-of-concept demonstrations herald a major step forward in quantum communications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

"Qutrit" Experiments Are a First in Quantum Teleportation

The proof-of-concept demonstrations herald a major step forward in quantum communications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Kvalitet i arbetet viktigt för socialsekreterare

I en aktuell studie visar forskare vid Malmö universitet vad som får socialsekreterare att stanna i yrket och på arbetsplatsen. Vad är det som ger tillfredsställelse och glädje i arbetet och vilja att stanna kvar? Socialsekreterare har länge haft det tufft i Malmö och övriga Sverige. Inte blev det lättare med den omfattande flyktingströmmen 2015 och 2016. Stress, underbemanning, fler administrati

11h

Alzheimer’s and dementia leading cause of death in England and Wales

Experts call for urgent action to tackle ‘biggest health crisis of our time’ Dementia is the biggest health crisis of our time, experts have said, as statistics show the condition was the primary cause of death in England and Wales last year. Almost one in eight people died from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in 2018, with the proportion increasing for the fourth consecutive year – up from 12.7

11h

Humans versus Earth: the quest to define the Anthropocene

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02381-2 Researchers are hunting for nuclear debris, mercury pollution and other fingerprints of humanity that could designate a new geological epoch.

11h

NEC “flying car”

submitted by /u/rexpistol [link] [comments]

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Clean energy buses launched for horticulture expo (China)

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

11h

Europe and Japan celebrate major milestone in validating LIPAc

submitted by /u/Bosseffs [link] [comments]

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Do-it-yourself gene therapy

Anyone know of countries outside of the U.S. where they are performing human gene therapy treatments. Besides Bioviva in Columbia? submitted by /u/TotallyStoiched [link] [comments]

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Why Asia and America are trading places | Parag Khanna

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

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Study explores blood-brain barrier leakage in CNS infections

A new study published in the journal mBio shines light on the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that occurs during many infections of the central nervous system. The findings implicate interferon gamma, a major cytokine upregulated in most central nervous system (CNS) viral infections, as a major contributor of blood brain barrier breakdown.

11h

Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick — the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

11h

Thailand: Hidden temple emerges from drought-hit landscape

An underwater temple in Thailand has emerged as water levels drop in a reservoir.

11h

The Jeffrey Epstein–Victoria’s Secret Connection

Jeffrey Epstein reportedly told women and young girls that he was a modeling scout for Victoria’s Secret. The financier never worked for the lingerie retailer, or even, technically, for its parent company, L Brands. But he had a close relationship with the head of L Brands, Leslie Wexner, assuming an unusual degree of control over Wexner’s assets and personal life, according to reporting by The N

11h

How the Republican Majority Emerged

In July 1969, Kevin Phillips, a 28-year-old staffer in the Nixon White House and special assistant to Attorney General John Mitchell, published a book boldly titled The Emerging Republican Majority . For nearly four decades, the Democratic Party’s New Deal coalition had dominated American politics. But in the book, Phillips argued that the old order had come to an end, and that a new conservative

11h

How Trump Obscures Mass Shootings with Doublespeak

On Sunday morning, Dee Margo, the mayor of El Paso, Texas, joined the CNN show State of the Union to speak about the tragedy his city had just endured: a mass shooting the day before in a Walmart that killed 22 people and injured at least 26 others. “It was an evil perpetrator, from outside of El Paso,” Margo told the host, Jake Tapper, referencing the fact that the alleged shooter had traveled f

11h

Why Everyone in Washington Is Talking About Great-Power Competition

Grand narratives about global affairs have a way of seizing Washington, D.C., with sudden force. Not long after World War II, the U.S. government settled on the mission of containing the Soviet Union. The War on Terror commenced within days of the 9/11 attacks. And now we’re in the early, heady days of a newly entrenched narrative, one with no less potential to transform the United States and the

11h

Materials scientist up to five retractions as publishers investigate dozens of his papers

A materials scientist in Australia, by way of Iran, has recently had five papers retracted for duplicating his prior work, and the reader who brought the issue to publishers’ attention says it could affect some 100 articles. Ali Nazari, now of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, was at Islamic Azad University in Iran when … Continue reading

11h

How much CO2 your country can still emit, in three simple steps

Everyone is talking about emissions budgets – what are they and what do they mean for your country? Our CO2 emissions are causing global heating. If we want to stop global warming at a given temperature level, we can emit only a limited amount of CO2. That’s our emissions budget. I explained it here at RealClimate a couple of years ago: First of all – what the heck is an “emissions budget” for CO

11h

Tusindvis af bilister har ikke fået klip i kørekortet på grund af it-bøvl hos Rigspolitiet

Over 15.000 bilister burde have fået et klip i kørekortet siden årsskiftet. Synderne har dog kun modtaget en bøde, fordi it-systemer hos Rigspolitiet ikke virker. Systemet forventes at fungere til september.

11h

The Apple Card Is Now Available. Here Are the Details

A select group of iPhone users are getting early access to Apple's digital credit card. Everyone else will get it later in August.

11h

With nowhere to hide from rising seas, Boston prepares for a wetter future

Boston has armed itself with a science-driven master plan to protect itself from increasingly inevitable storm surges and rising seas.

11h

How the 5 riskiest U.S. cities for coastal flooding are preparing for rising tides

The five U.S. cities most at risk of coastal flooding from rising sea levels are in various stages of preparedness.

11h

Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick—the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

11h

Conservatives Cannot Defend Trump and Also Defeat White Nationalism

This time looks different, at least at first. After 22 people were killed in El Paso by a white supremacist seeking to halt a “Hispanic invasion” of Texas, many conservative outlets issued condemnations of white nationalism. National Review referred to white supremacy as an “evil” ideology that must be crushed. The Washington Examiner urged President Donald Trump to “name and condemn the evil of

11h

Amid Protests In Hawaii Against Giant Telescope, Astronomers Look To 'Plan B'

An international consortium planning the Thirty Meter Telescope still prefers to site it atop the Big Island's Mauna Kea. But local protests may drive the project to the Canary Islands. (Image credit: Caleb Jones/AP)

11h

‘Environmental Footprints’ Tend to Underestimate Resource Use

Each country’s ecological footprint is an estimate of the biological resources required to meet its population’s consumption demands and absorb its carbon emissions. The calculations underlying the metric leave out key impacts of human activities like land use and natural resource extraction.

11h

LVS ønsker bedre arbejdsvilkår i Medicinrådet

Arbejdet i Medicinrådet tager for meget af medlemmernes tid. Derfor ønsker LVS, at de skal have fri til at udføre arbejdet eller honoreres herfor, siger formand for LVS.

11h

Understanding hydrogen-bonding structures of molecular crystals via electron and NMR nanocrystallography

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11469-2 Electron diffraction can be used to determine nanocrystal structures, but is unsuitable for locating hydrogen atoms. Here the authors combine electron diffraction, solid-state NMR and first-principles calculations to resolve the crystal structures and hydrogen-bonding networks of L-histidine and cimetidine for

12h

Aortic pathology from protein kinase G activation is prevented by an antioxidant vitamin B12 analog

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11389-1 Individuals carrying a gain-of-function mutation in PKG1 develop thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Here Schwaerzer et al. show that mice carrying the same mutation recapitulate the human disease, and find that treatment with anti-oxidants including cobinamide, a vitamin B12 analog, prevents disease pr

12h

Action boosts episodic memory encoding in humans via engagement of a noradrenergic system

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11358-8 Goal-directed movement is known to promote release of noradrenaline in the brain, and noradrenaline is known to enhance memory encoding. Here, the authors provide evidence that active movement, compared to action inhibition, boosts episodic memory encoding in humans via a noradrenergic mechanism.

12h

Microporous methacrylated glycol chitosan-montmorillonite nanocomposite hydrogel for bone tissue engineering

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11511-3 Injectable hydrogels could be used to repair bone defects. Here the authors incorporate nanoclay particles into chitosan creating an interconnected microporous hydrogel and show that this hydrogel can support MSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro, and support the recruitment of native cells and bone r

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Cytokinin functions as an asymmetric and anti-gravitropic signal in lateral roots

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11483-4 Lateral roots emerge from the primary root at right angles but briefly grow asymmetrically to set a distinct growth angle. Here Waidmann et al. show that cytokinin acts as an anti-gravitropic signal that impairs growth on the upper side of emerged lateral roots to promote radial expansion of the root system.

12h

Subseafloor life and its biogeochemical impacts

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11450-z Subseafloor microbial activities are central to global biogeochemical cycles, affecting Earth’s surface oxidation, ocean chemistry, and climate. Here the authors review present understanding of subseafloor microbes and their activities, identify research gaps, and recommend approaches to fill those gaps.

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Structural basis for the target specificity of actin histidine methyltransferase SETD3

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11554-6 SETD3 is the first known metazoan protein histidine methyltransferase but the molecular basis for its target specificity is unclear. Here, the authors elucidate the structural and molecular determinants for the histidine specificity of SETD3.

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Rapid fabrication of vascularized and innervated cell-laden bone models with biomimetic intrafibrillar collagen mineralization

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11455-8 Bone tissue is a complex organic-inorganic nanocomposite and strategies that replicate the characteristics of bone tissue are scarce. Here the authors demonstrate the deposition of nanoscale apatite in collagen embedded with mesenchymal, vascular and nerve cells, using a protein-guided biomineralization approa

12h

'Bone in a dish' opens new window on cancer initiation, metastasis, bone healing

Researchers in Oregon have engineered a material that replicates human bone tissue with an unprecedented level of precision, from its microscopic crystal structure to its biological activity. They are using it to explore fundamental disease processes, such as the origin of metastatic tumors in bone, and as a treatment for large bone injuries.

12h

What do you mean the hamburger isn't all that American?

Say you're a scientist who studies the origins and history of food, and you want to communicate to the world your findings that the all-American hamburger — including the side of fries — doesn't contain a single ingredient that originally came from the United States. You could publish an article in a top-notch journal, ask a communications officer to write a press release about the paper, or tak

12h

Blood pressure monitoring may one day be easy as taking a video selfie

Future blood pressure monitoring could become as easy as taking a video selfie. Transdermal optical imaging is a smartphone-based technology that accurately measured blood pressure from a video of a person's face in a recent study.

12h

A Rare Gun-Control Proposal That Could Unite Congress

More than two decades of federal inaction on gun-control measures have understandably conditioned the public to expect little from Congress after mass shootings, no matter the death toll. But President Donald Trump’s endorsement yesterday of red-flag laws could generate momentum for legislation that has already won some bipartisan support on Capitol Hill. “We must make sure that those judged to p

12h

Nonlinear optical characterization of copper oxide nanoellipsoids

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47941-8

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Effect of Time of Day of Infection on Chlamydia Infectivity and Pathogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47878-y

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Thermostability as a highly dependent prion strain feature

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47781-6

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The role of ESCO2, SALL4 and TBX5 genes in the susceptibility to thalidomide teratogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47739-8 The role of ESCO2 , SALL4 and TBX5 genes in the susceptibility to thalidomide teratogenesis

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Deep Learning using Convolutional LSTM estimates Biological Age from Physical Activity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46850-0

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Anthromes displaying evidence of weekly cycles in active fire data cover 70% of the global land surface

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47678-4

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Complex Patterns of Cannabinoid Alkyl Side-Chain Inheritance in Cannabis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47812-2

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Why smartphones’ “cop mode” might not keep cops out for much longer

The debate over “compelled decryption” is likely headed for the US Supreme Court.

12h

Happy birthday, ultracold neutron!

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02375-0

12h

Tree plantations: we must get them right

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02366-1

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Denmark’s exemplary gender balance trips up in science

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02369-y

12h

Tribute to Suzanne Eaton, from her lab members

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02371-4

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Coding system to track research progress towards SDGs

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02367-0

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Industrial fishing boats leave few safe havens for sharks on the high seas

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02357-2 Global satellite tracking of the oceans has revealed a high degree of spatial overlap between where sharks and industrial fishing vessels are found. This finding underscores the need for shark-conservation efforts.

13h

Facebook still full of groups trading fake reviews, says consumer group

Facebook has failed to clean up the brisk trade in fake product reviews taking place on its platform, an investigation by the consumer association Which? has found. In June both Facebook and …

13h

New study reveals impact of mining on coral reefs

A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has shown the impact phosphate mining is having on our coral reefs.

13h

Tyske myndigheder godkender førerløs parkering i Stuttgart

Mercedes-biler har nu fået tilladelse til at parkere førerløst i et p-hus i Stuttgart. Den selvkørende teknologi er dog begrænset til meget få biler.

13h

Quarter of world's population facing extreme water stress

Nearly a quarter of the world's population lives in 17 countries facing extremely high water stress, close to "day zero" conditions when the taps run dry, according to a report released Tuesday.

14h

32 years after poisoning, cleanup launched at arsenic site

In the weeks after they moved from New York City to their dream home in the leafy countryside, Norman and Alicia Berns grew ill with nausea, numbness and crushing fatigue.

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Improving the magnetic bottle that controls fusion power on Earth

Scientists who use magnetic fields to bottle up and control on Earth the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars must correct any errors in the shape of the fields that contain the reactions. Such errors produce deviations from the symmetrical form of the fields in doughnut-like tokamak fusion facilities that can have a damaging impact on the stability and confinement of the hot, charged pla

14h

What Does It Feel Like to Die?

We're all going to die; we wonder what it will feel like. This book describes what typically happens during the period between diagnosis of a fatal illness and death.

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These Medical Devices Are Inserted Into 500,000 Patients Each Year — but Are Tough to Sterilize

Duodenoscopes have sickened hundreds of patients in hospital outbreaks. Now some experts are demanding the devices be redesigned or taken off the market.

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McMindfulness by Ronald Purser; Mindfulness by Christina Feldman and Willem Kuyken – review

Mindfulness may have become a tool of capitalism, but if it works, does it matter? In a frequently quoted passage, the American professor of medicine Jon Kabat-Zinn defines mindfulness as “a way of being in a wise and purposeful relationship with one’s experience… cultivated by systematically exercising one’s capacity for paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment and non-judgmentally”. I

15h

He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases – study

Researchers find usage boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people More than 100 failures litter the battleground that is the hunt for an English gender-neutral singular pronoun. From thon, ip and hiser to hem, ons and lers, the discarded terms have piled up since the mid-19th century. But the quest for the right word is not in vain, a new study suggests. Using a gender-neutral pronoun

16h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #31, 2019

56 articles this week. What articles are open access? When Ari was running this page open access articles were flagged as such. That feature is now restored. Note that identification of open access articles is largely mechanized under the new regime and so it's possible there will be omissions. Performance should improve over time. Open access article titles are appended with " (open access) " in

16h

Climate change made Europe’s 2019 record heatwave up to ‘100 times more likely’

This is a re-post from Carbon Brief by Daisy Dunne The run of unprecedented temperatures in July – which sent records tumbling in the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany – would have been “extremely unlikely” without climate change, according to a new quick-fire analysis. The hot weather seen in the Netherlands and France was made up to “100 times more likely” by climate change, the study fi

16h

Where Veterans Aren’t Thanked for Their Service

BERLIN—Just three weeks after the German military sent him to Afghanistan, Alex found himself in the middle of a deadly 10-hour standoff with Taliban fighters near the northern city of Kunduz. He recalls an enemy fighter firing a rocket-propelled grenade straight at him, only for it to whiz past his head, missing him by just a few feet. As the battle intensified, he began thinking about which of

16h

Undersøgelse: Dine børn opfører sig bedre, hvis du venter lidt med at få dem

Der er en klar psykologisk fordel ved at være lidt oppe i årene, når du får børn.

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Tokyo offers $1 billion research grant for human augmentation, cyborg tech

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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How This Engineer Hacked Together His Own “Artificial Pancreas"

submitted by /u/wyndwatcher [link] [comments]

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Scientists develop novel nano-vaccine for melanoma

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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24 year old invents AlterEgo to read inner thoughts and monologues out loud

submitted by /u/sustainabledev [link] [comments]

16h

1 in 300 thrives on very-early-to-bed, very-early-to-rise routine

A quirk of the body clock that lures some people to sleep at 8 p.m., enabling them to greet the new day as early as 4 a.m., may be significantly more common than previously believed.

17h

New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations

A study that looks at how temperature influences the development of painted turtles may lead biologists to rethink the theoretical frameworks they use when analyzing the topic. The study, led by an Iowa State scientist, found wide variation within local populations, suggesting temperature sensitivity of embryonic development can vary significantly from one turtle nest to another within a single po

17h

Many post on social media under the influence of drugs — and regret it

Posting on social media, texting, and appearing in photos while high is prevalent among people who use drugs–and many regret these behaviors, according to a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health.

17h

'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire

Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. One bird in particular, the Black-backed Woodpecker, specializes in using recently-burned forests in western North America, but new research suggests that these birds actually prefer to nest near the edges of burned patches — and these edges are getting harder t

17h

One therapy bests others at motivating kids with autism to speak, Stanford study finds

Pivotal response treatment involving parents works better than other existing therapies at motivating children with autism and significant speech delays to talk, according to the results of a large study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

17h

Canada's new dementia strategy needs commitment to be successful

Canada's new national dementia strategy can be successful with sustained political will, adequate funding, measurable targets and a commitment from all Canadians to achieve its goals, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190929.

17h

Climate change: how the jet stream is changing your weather

Northern Atlantic current is shifting course — with implications for crops and sea levels

17h

'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire

Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. One bird in particular, the Black-backed Woodpecker, specializes in using recently-burned forests in western North America, but like humans looking for a new family home, it's picky about exactly where it settles. New research published in The Condor: Ornithologi

17h

'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire

Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. One bird in particular, the Black-backed Woodpecker, specializes in using recently-burned forests in western North America, but like humans looking for a new family home, it's picky about exactly where it settles. New research published in The Condor: Ornithologi

17h

Matematisk logik verificerer sikkerhed i skyen

Hvad er forbindelsen mellem græske filosoffer og cloudsikkerhed? En engelsk datalogi-professor med en central rolle for Amazons cloudsikkerhed taler med Version2.

18h

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Trods udfasning: Tandlæger fylder 30.000 tænder med kviksølv hvert år

PLUS. En kattelem i lovgivningen tillader stadig tusindvis af patienter at få ’sølv’ i tænderne. Det på trods af, at stoffet udfases for at beskytte miljø og sundhed. Patientforening påpeger, at svenskerne fint klarer sig uden.

18h

Extinction Wipes Out Evolution's Hard Work

By killing off many of New Zealand’s endemic birds, humans destroyed 50 million years’ worth of evolutionary history. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Extinction Wipes Out Evolution's Hard Work

By killing off many of New Zealand's endemic birds, humans destroyed 50 million years' worth of evolutionary history. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Extinction Wipes Out Evolution's Hard Work

By killing off many of New Zealand's endemic birds, humans destroyed 50 million years' worth of evolutionary history. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

A Huge Fireball Above Ontario May Have Scattered Meteorite Shards on The Ground

"We'd love for people to get out and maybe find some of these."

19h

In some heatwaves, fans do more harm than good

In arid heatwaves, flipping on an electric fan may not help cool you down—and may even spike your body temperature. (Wikimedia Commons/) Not all heatwaves are made equal. Some—like the ones that shattered high-temperature records in Europe and swept the United States in late July—are a mix of heat and high humidity. Others in regions like the Southwestern U. S., the Middle East, and parts of Aust

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Prenatal parental stress linked to behaviour problems in toddlers

Expectant parents' emotional struggles predict emotional and behavioral problems in 2-year-olds, new research shows. The same study reveals, for the first time, that couple conflict helps explain emotional problems in very young children.

21h

Deadly Germ Research Is Shut Down at Army Lab Over Safety Concerns

Problems with disposal of dangerous materials led the government to suspend research at the military’s leading biodefense center.

21h

Paper trail leads to heart valve discoveries

Bioengineers are studying heart disease with paper-based structures that mimic the layered nature of aortic valves, the tough, flexible tissues that keep blood flowing in one direction only. The devices allow them to see in detail how calcifying diseases slow or stop hearts from functioning.

21h

When to start worrying that a dog bite (or lick) might kill you

Most dogs don't bite, and most dog bites aren't serious—but in some cases, even a lick can be incredibly dangerous. (Pexels/) You might think your dog's mouth is gross, and in some ways it is—but it's not much worse than you own. A moist, warm climate means human and pup maws are both attractive homes for many species of bacteria, and the constant flow of nutritious substances keeps those microbe

21h

$30 off V-MODA running headphones and other good deals happening today

For more deals and product chatter, check out our exclusive Facebook group . V-MODA (Amazon/) For the next couple weeks, save $30 on V-MODA's BassFit in-ear headphones. They are designed for running, but work as an everyday audio option if you don't want to carry around large over-ear or on-ear headphones. To stay secure in your ears while you workout, they come with ear hooks, flexible ear fins,

22h

Water Bears Crash Onto the Moon, Cloudflare Ditches 8Chan, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

22h

Artificial tongue could taste whisky to make sure it isn't counterfeit

An artificial tongue can taste subtle differences between drams of whisky and could one day help tackle the counterfeit alcohol trade

22h

Road verges provide refuge for pollinators

Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators — but they must be managed better, new research shows.

22h

Prenatal parental stress linked to behaviour problems in toddlers

Expectant parents' emotional struggles predict emotional and behavioural problems in 2-year-olds, new research shows. The same study reveals, for the first time, that couple conflict helps explain emotional problems in very young children.

22h

Climate change: Hungry nations add the least to global CO2

Impoverished African countries are the most food-insecure, stemming from climate change, says a charity.

22h

Scientists develop 'artificial tongue' to detect fake whiskies

The technology can also be used to identify poisons as well as to monitor rivers Being palmed off with a young whisky when expecting an 18-year-old single malt can be a glass-half-empty moment. But now scientists have developed an “artificial tongue” that might make such skulduggery a thing of the past. The team, based in Scotland, say their device can be used to tell apart a host of single malts

22h

Road verges provide refuge for pollinators

Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators—but they must be managed better, new research shows.

22h

Road verges provide refuge for pollinators

Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators—but they must be managed better, new research shows.

22h

Improving the magnetic bottle that controls fusion power on Earth

The exhaustive detection method that discovered the error field in the initial run of the NSTX-U tokamak could serve as a model for error-field detection in future tokamaks.

22h

Is it safe to use an electric fan for cooling?

The safety and effectiveness of electric fans in heatwaves depend on the climate and basing public health advice on common weather metrics could be misleading, according to a new study.

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