Search Posts

nyheder2019august07

Ensilication Improves the Thermal Stability of the Tuberculosis Antigen Ag85b and an Sbi-Ag85b Vaccine Conjugate

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47657-9

1d

Uber reports loss of $5.2 billion in the wake of going public

The steep loss reflected the punishing realities of competing as a public company in the gig economy.

1d

Astronomers Discover an Entire Population of Ancient Galaxies

Population Boom A team of astronomers from the University of Tokyo has uncovered a population of 39 massive ancient galaxies — and they could inform our understanding of everything from the universe’s birth to the nature of dark matter. “This is the first time that such a large population of massive galaxies was confirmed during the first 2 billion years of the 13.7-billion-year life of the unive

1d

Bernie Sanders Tells Joe Rogan He’d Declassify Aliens as President

I Want To Believe During a Tuesday appearance on the Joe Rogan Experience, presidential candidate Bernie Sanders promised that he would go public with any news of extraterrestrial life during his term. In short, there’s no need to raid Area 51 because Sanders says he’ll do it for us. The rest of the podcast covered Sanders’ stance on more pressing issues like legislation surrounding guns and drug

1d

Amazon Deforestation Shot Up by 278% Last Month, Satellite Data Show

The world's largest carbon offset is losing ground — fast.

1d

Samsung's New Phones, a Dangerous Boeing 787 Flaw, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1d

Great fans to help you keep your cool

Fans for any situation (Siniz Kim via Unsplash/) Air conditioners can be luxurious, but they also drive up your energy bill and require a tedious cycle of installation and storage. If you’re opting for a lower-impact, more direct cooling device, the fan is your friend. And we’re not talking dollar store box fans here—there’s a variety of amazing options on the market that are perfect for your des

1d

Combination targeted therapy may offer hope to infants with a deadly type of leukemia

City of Hope researchers have identified a potential combination targeted therapy for a deadly type of leukemia found in some infants, a population too young to receive full-blown chemotherapy. Called 'mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL),' this blood cancer subtype comes with bleak health outcomes (overall survival rate is less than 50%), disease rec

1d

Physicians call for an end to conversion therapy

Historically, conversion therapies have used electroshock therapy, chemical drugs, hormone administrations and even surgery. While these extreme practices are becoming rarer, many other harmful actions are still taking place, negatively impacting both children and adolescents as well as adults in the US, according to a perspective in this week's New England Journal of Medicine.

1d

Hackers Can Break Into an iPhone Just by Sending a Text

You don't even have to click anything.

1d

Climate Change is Threatening Air Quality across the Country

Research brief by Climate Central As summers heat up, the air we breathe is increasingly at risk of becoming unhealthy, despite decades of air quality improvements. Download this report as a PDF. Hotter summers come with an increase in “stagnation events ”—stationary domes of hot air that can cause air pollutants to get trapped and persist in the lower atmosphere. Climate Central found a positive

1d

In Hot Water: Warming Waters are Stressing Fish and the Fishing Industry

America’s inland streams, the Great Lakes, and coastal waters are heating up—spelling trouble for fish and the nation’s $46.1 billion dollar recreational fishing industry . Click here to download this report as a PDF. Data analyzed by Climate Central show that water temperatures in the Great Lakes and coastal surface waters are warming throughout the United States, as well as in many freshwater s

1d

Breathing Fire: Change To Oregon Smoke Rules Seeing Early Results For Prescribed Burns

By Maya Miller (Climate Central) and Jes Burns (Oregon Public Broadcasting) Three years ago Willy Crippen had his sights set on lighting a fire in the foothills of the Elkhorn Mountains, the picture-postcard backdrop for the northeast Oregon town of Baker City. Smoke covers a hillside in the Applegate Valley of southwestern Oregon during a prescribed burn operation. (Jes Burns/OPB) The fire manag

1d

Breathing Fire: The threat of a destructive wildfire in South Jersey is growing.Is enough being done to prepare?

By Maya Miller (Climate Central), Disha Raychaudhuri (NJ Advance Media for NJ.com), and Michael Sol Warren (NJ Advance Media for NJ.com) On a Wednesday in mid-May, on the grounds of one of America’s most highly-rated golf courses, forester Bob Williams stepped out of his truck to snap a picture of the fresh shoots of grass springing up between a stand of pine trees. He needed to immortalize this

1d

Breathing Fire: Fighting fire with fire: Should California burn its forests to protect against catastrophe?

By Maya Miller (Climate Central), Ryan Sabalow (The Sacramento Bee) and Dale Kasler (The Sacramento Bee) Brian Crawford and Shelly Allen of the U.S. Forest Service talk on Friday, May 24, 2019, about prescribed burns in the Tahoe National Forest and how policies might change to allow natural fires to burn longer if conditions are right. VIDEO BY PAUL KITAGAKI JR. This story was produced through a

1d

Breathing Fire: ‘If we don’t burn it, nature will’: Georgia blazes old fears, leads nation in prescribed fire

In the face of more intense and frequent wildfires, federal land managers consider adopting burning practices the Southeast has been successfully using for decades. By Maya Miller (Climate Central) and Samantha Max ( The Telegraph ) This story was produced through a partnership between Climate Central, The Telegraph , a newspaper in Macon, Georgia, and Southerly , a nonprofit media organization t

1d

THE BURNING SOLUTION: Prescribed Burns Unevenly Applied Across U.S.

Research brief by Climate Central Prescribed burns — an important tool for reducing wildfire risk — are being unevenly applied across the country. This research brief is part of Breathing Fire , an ongoing Climate Central series of research briefs and journalism projects dealing with wildfires and their causes, impacts, and solutions. As rising temperatures fuel bigger and more deadly wildfires,

1d

As Temperatures Rise in Tucson, so Do Concerns over Health Risks Linked to Higher Ozone Levels

This story was produced and published in partnership with the Arizona Daily Star , a newspaper in Arizona. Read Climate Central's research report, "Fastest Warming Cities and States." By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) and Tony Davis (Arizona Daily Star) Mike Friel of Tucson has suffered from breathing problems his whole life — a consequence of being born with cystic fibrosis. His first hi

1d

POURING IT ON: How Climate Change Intensifies Heavy Rain Events

Research brief by Climate Central Climate change is making the wettest days wetter, heightening flood risks. Related resources: To download data on extreme rainfall from all 244 weather stations analyzed, click here . To download this report as a PDF, click here . To access Climate Central’s toolkit of reports and graphics on heavy rain, click here . In the spring of 2019, floodwaters overwhelmed

1d

FAITH AND FLOODING: How Sea Level Rise Threatens America’s Houses of Worship

Research brief by Climate Central About the data in this report Geographic records of houses of worship come from April 2018 downloads of the Geographic Names Information Systems (GNIS) database, which is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. The GNIS database was created largely by compiling information from federal maps. The dataset is periodically

1d

N.J. Is Warming at An Alarming Rate and It’s Making Our Air Harder to Breathe

By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central), Michael Sol Warren (NJ.com) and Disha Raychaudhuri (NJ.com) This story was produced through a partnership between Climate Central and NJ Advance Media , which publishes NJ.com and the Newark Star-Ledger, Times of Trenton and other newspapers. Danielle Jenkins has spent her whole life struggling to breathe. The 17-year-old high school senior grew up with

1d

AMERICAN WARMING: The Fastest-Warming Cities and States in the U.S.

Research brief by Climate Central In April 1970, Americans celebrated the first Earth Day, an event meant to heighten public awareness of of environmental protection. Since then, humanity has dumped an enormous amount of heat-trapping gas into the atmosphere. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations rose by more than twice as much in the half century after the first Earth Day than they did in the entire ce

1d

Earlier Springs Heighten Allergy Misery in Tennessee

By Ayurella Horn-Muller, Climate Central This story was produced through a partnership between Climate Central, a non-advocacy science and news group, and WVLT , a CBS-affiliated television station in Knoxville. WVLT meteorologist Ben Cathey contributed local reporting. Click here for the Climate Central report, “POLLEN PROBLEMS: Climate Change, the Growing Season, and America’s Allergies.” In th

1d

A Change in the Air: Earlier Springs Bring Allergies and Asthma to Hard-Hit San Antonio

By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) and Brendan Gibbons (Rivard Report) This story was produced through a partnership between Climate Central, a non-advocacy research and news group, and the Rivard Report , a nonprofit, nonpartisan digital news organization with a focus on San Antonio and Bexar County. Angela and Jason Bartels’ children are sensitive to the plant pollens that fill the air a

1d

POLLEN PROBLEMS: Climate Change, the Growing Season, and America’s Allergies

Research brief by Climate Central Nearly 20 million Americans suffer from pollen allergies . Analysis of local temperature data by Climate Central and recent scientific research show that climate change is prolonging their season of suffering. Global warming is extending the freeze-free season, giving plants more time to grow, flower, and produce pollen. And as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) le

1d

‘Protectors of the Coast’ — What the Northward March of Mangroves Means for Fishing, Flooding and Carbon

By Ayurella Horn-Muller, Climate Central ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. — Walking along a wooden path winding through Nease Beachfront Park, Danny Lippi pointed to coastal trees sprouting from the shrubbery around him. The exotic species were brought here by warming temperatures — bringing business opportunities for the local arborist. “All of these are mangroves,” Lippi said, surrounded by the young perenn

1d

How a Green New Deal Could Shape Delaware’s Climate Risks

By Maddy Lauria (Wilmington News Journal) and Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) About four times a year, Clarence White loses customers from his auto repair business in South Wilmington because flooded roads prevent anyone from getting close. Consistent flooding in Southbridge has meant nearly 19 years of learning the best detours or skipping a trip to the grocery store for Diana Dixon. For

1d

How a Green New Deal Could Affect Storms, Floods and Heat in Jacksonville

By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) Brendan Rivers (WJCT) contributed reporting When Hurricane Irma destroyed the house that Tom Davitt was renting on Jacksonville’s Westside, it also wrecked tens of thousands of dollars worth of his uninsured possessions and forced him to find a new home. “I rolled out of bed because I thought it was my alarm and it was a tornado warning — and I stepped in

1d

CLIMATE PILE-UP: Global Warming’s Compounding Dangers

Research brief by Climate Central Recent research shows that unchecked warming pollution could bring concurrent climate crises to U.S. cities by midcentury — and that emissions cuts could reduce the danger. Related resources: To download the data used in this report, click here . To download this report as a PDF, click here . Explore stories produced by Climate Central in partnerships with WJCT a

1d

ON THIN ICE: How Climate Change is Shaping Winter Recreation

Research Brief by Climate Central Download report PDF Winters are heating up, with serious consequences for America’s cold-weather sports economy. To many Americans, a mild winter may seem like a pleasant prospect. Higher temperatures can melt ice from roads, slash home heating costs, and make hats and scarves unneeded. And as the climate heats up because of humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions, p

1d

Dozens of Galaxies Discovered From the Early Universe

The galaxies are clear to ALMA’s radio vision, but disappear in Hubble’s visible light coverage. (Credit: Image (c) 2019 Wang et al.) The universe is 13.8 billion years old, but scientists have trouble seeing back to its earliest days. This cosmic dawn has been obscured by time, distance, and the rest of the universe. Part of the problem is that light gets stretched as it travels across the cosmos

1d

Cancer Patients Get Rare Blood Infection After Nurse Dilutes Opioids with Tap Water

Half a dozen cancer patients in New York developed a rare infection after they received injectable opioids that a nurse had diluted with tap water, according to a new report.

1d

'Read 2,000 books': Werner Herzog's advice on reading.

During Eric Weinstein's podcast, The Portal, Werner Herzog said that reading is essential for any creative endeavor. In the past, Herzog has stated that you can't be a filmmaker without a regular reading habit. Herzog's reading list includes classics by Virgil and J.A. Baker, and even the report on JFK's assassination. None During the latest episode of Eric Weinstein 's podcast, The Portal, an au

1d

News from Annals of Internal Medicine: Organizations urge immediate action to prevent firearm-relate

The American College of Physicians (ACP) and the nation's leading physician and public health organizations called for policies to reduce firearms-related injuries and deaths in the US in a new call-to-action, 'Firearm-Related Injury and Death in the United States: A Call to Action from the Nation's Leading Physician and Public Health Professional Organizations,' published today in the Annals of I

1d

Most People Would Rather a Robot Steal Their Job Than a Person

Next-Level Petty Countless studies have all reached the same conclusion: robots are poised to steal jobs from a lot of humans. But according to yet another automation-focused study, this one by researchers at Technical University of Munich, most people would prefer that scenario to the alternative: losing their job to another human. Robot Envy For the study , published in the journal Nature Human

1d

How AT&T Insiders Were Bribed to 'Unlock' Millions of Phones

One cybersecurity threat that’s proven difficult for wireless carriers to combat? Their own employees.

1d

Elizabeth Warren Reveals $85 Billion Public Broadband Plan

(via Fotocitizen/Pixabay) As if debt, climate change, and poor healthcare weren’t enough, rural communities are often excluded from access to high-speed …

1d

We Took a Ride on NYC’s First Self-Driving Shuttle

Self-driving car company Optimus Ride just debuted the first public autonomous vehicles in New York City, which will shuttle visitors around the private streets of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a historic manufacturing hub turned tech incubator. A launch event on Tuesday evening promised rides on the company’s self-driving shuttles, so I stopped by — to kick the tires and, naturally, see if the shuttle

1d

This Company Says It’ll Build an Entire Skyscraper in 90 Days

Tallest Modular Hotel Hotel giant Marriott announced in April that it’s planning to construct a 26-story skyscraper in New York City in just 90 days — and it’s hoping to save a lot of money in the process. The idea is simple: prefabricate modules off-site and put it all together Lego-style. According to construction website The B1M ‘s new coverage of the project, the costs of such a modular skysc

1d

This is the first 100% solar-powered airport in the U.S.

Tennessee's Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport recently completed construction of a 2.74-megawatt solar farm. The system includes battery storage that enables it to continue operating without constant sunlight. Airport officials hope it will serve as a model to other airports. None Tennessee's Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport recently became the first U.S. airport powered by 100 percent solar energ

1d

5 ways of valuing a human being

Most of us like to think the value of a life is priceless, but numerous institutions have put a price on human beings in the past. These estimates vary depending on the scope. From just $90 to nearly $10 million, how much is a human being worth? None How much are you worth? Maybe the first thing to come to mind is what's left over after you add up all of your assets and subtract all your debts, b

1d

Midbrain may be ‘canary in the coal mine’ for head injuries

While a brain injury can be difficult to locate, a single region of the brain may show the impact of a concussion or repeated hits to the head, according to new research. The finding, which appears in Science Advances , also supports the emerging idea that traumatic brain injury is not limited to people who sustain a concussion; it can result from repetitive head hits that are clinically silent—t

1d

Dark matter may be older than the big bang, study suggests

Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but a new Johns Hopkins University study now suggests that dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang.

1d

Researchers develop method to automatically estimate rooftop solar potential

The progress of rooftop solar installations is often slowed by a shortage of trained professionals who must use expensive tools to conduct labor-intensive structure assessments one by one, say scientists at UMass Amherst. Now they are proposing a new, data-driven approach that uses machine learning techniques and widely available satellite images to identify roofs that have the most potential to p

1d

Home births as safe as hospital births: International study

The study examined the safety of place of birth by reporting on the risk of death at the time of birth or within the first four weeks, and found no clinically important or statistically different risk between home and hospital groups.

1d

Adults with cerebral palsy at increased risk for mental health conditions

A new study finds that adults with cerebral palsy are at an increased risk of experiencing a mental health disorder compared to adults without the condition.

1d

Gorgeous Galaxy Note 10 Plus: A 6.8-inch phone that kills the headphone jack – CNET

You can also use the stylus to control the Note 10 with gestures.

1d

Galaxy Note10 hands on: What Samsung’s $950 big new phone adds — and takes away

Samsung devotees, say goodbye to the headphone jack. And that’s not all.

1d

1d

Rise of the Astropreneurs

submitted by /u/ondro949 [link] [comments]

1d

1d

Space telescope would turn Earth into a giant magnifying lens

submitted by /u/Erocdotusa [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

Researchers find way to measure blood pressure with a selfie video

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

1d

Elon Musk Reveals Future Price Plan for a Return Ticket to Mars

submitted by /u/aptelement [link] [comments]

1d

Samsung Galaxy Note10 and Note10+: Price, Specs, Release Date

The big phablet Note is now joined by a smaller, regular-size version of the Note handset. And there's a 5G version on the way too.

1d

Astronomy impasse: What's next for the Thirty Meter Telescope?

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02354-5 Protestors in Hawaii have prevented construction for more than three weeks, and there is no sign of a resolution in sight.

1d

New research provides better way to gauge pain in mice

Rutgers University-Camden neuroscientist Nathan Fried and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a method that can more accurately gauge pain in mice, which could lead researchers to discover new ways to treat pain in human patients.

1d

A simple method to improve heart-attack repair using stem cell-derived heart muscle cells

The heart cannot regenerate muscle after a heart attack, and this can lead to lethal heart failure. Researchers have tried to aid the failing heart by injecting heart muscle cells grown in vitro, but engraftment rates are low. A new and simple method to improve the quality of the delivered cells has now been tested in a mouse heart attack model, and it doubled the engraftment rate of the injected

1d

Internet can be valuable tool for people with undiagnosed rare disorders

The internet can serve as a pathway to diagnosis and care for people who suspect they have a rare condition that has not been identified by their physicians, according to a new study.

1d

New data indicate rise in opioid use for migraine treatment

An increasing number of Americans are using opioids to treat their migraine headaches, despite the fact that opioids are not the recommended first-line therapy for migraine in most cases.

1d

Researchers discover gel reduces scar tissue after surgery in animals

Researchers at Stanford University have found that spraying a gel on the internal tissues of animals after cardiac surgery greatly reduces adhesions, fibrous bands that form between internal organs and tissues. Adhesions can cause serious, even fatal, complications.

1d

New Clock Claims Title of World's Most Accurate – For Now

Regular improvements in so-called optical clocks are setting the stage for a redefinition of the second and powering searches for new laws of physics. Clock_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: CKA/ Shutterstock Physics Wednesday, August 7, 2019 – 15:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — Earlier this year, in a nondescript lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder,

1d

Stanford researchers discover gel reduces scar tissue after surgery in animals

Researchers at Stanford University have found that spraying a gel on the internal tissues of animals after cardiac surgery greatly reduces adhesions, fibrous bands that form between internal organs and tissues. Adhesions can cause serious, even fatal, complications. The gel, developed at Stanford to deliver medications, was far more effective than adhesion prevention materials currently on the mar

1d

Over-sensationalized scandal can actually be a job saver for strong performing leader

A new study from the University of Notre Dame introduces the role of the 'severity gap,' showing that when media or public perceptions of a scandal outpace its actual severity, strong-performing leaders are more likely to keep their jobs.

1d

Mercury levels in fish are rising despite reduced emissions

Climate change and overfishing can increase how much mercury accumulates in fish, counteracting efforts to reduce human-caused emissions.

1d

Over-sensationalized scandal can actually be a job saver for strong performing leader

Scandal gone viral has toppled many a leader, and new research shows it may have saved some too.

1d

A Boeing Code Leak Exposes Security Flaws Deep in a 787's Guts

One researcher's discovery suggests troubling oversights in Boeing's cybersecurity.

1d

Scientists Just Found a Dead Star Lodged Inside Another Star

A Star Is Born Peering at the opposite side of our galaxy, Australian astronomers just spotted the carcass of one of the oldest stars in the known universe — hiding inside another ancient-but-still-living red giant. The first star’s supernova was particularly weak, so most of its cosmic remains stayed in place, serving as an extremely-dense seed for the star that formed around it, according to an

1d

This Stylish Carry on Is the Must-Have Smart Luggage for Tech-Savvy Travelers

Although traveling can be one of the most rewarding experiences, preparing for a trip and, the journey to your destination can actually be insanely stressful. This is because it’s hard to adapt to every curve ball that comes your way while journeying to paradise. From flight delays to undesirable weather, it can feel like something’s constantly trying to prevent you from enjoying your travel. How

1d

‘I Know People Want a Richer, More Thoughtful Explanation’

Yesterday, The New York Times received intense criticism from journalists, readers, and politicians for its initial front-page headline: “Trump Urges Unity vs. Racism.” The article was about the president’s televised address on Monday night, after the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, in which he mentioned the need to “condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy” — a stark cont

1d

Canada Wants Your Help Cleaning up Space Junk

Dangerous Debris Currently, tens of thousands of bits of rockets and retired satellites are orbiting the Earth, and at any moment, one of those pieces of space junk could slam into an active satellite or spacecraft, potentially causing devastating damage that could even kill astronauts . Canada doesn’t know what to do about all this debris — but it’s hoping you might. Help Wanted According to a n

1d

Earth's Magnetic Field Could Take Longer to Flip Than Previously Thought

New research suggests a polarity reversal of the planet takes about 22,000 years, significantly longer than former estimates

1d

Let’s not confuse entanglement with teleportation

Quantum teleportation and "traditional" teleportation are two very different things. The quantum variety involves entanglement; the other kind is even more problematic. Recent successes in quantum teleportation may lead to more secure communication in the future. None Quantum entanglement is absolutely mind-bending . Surprising and weird as it is, it's a genuinely fascinating phenomenon, requirin

1d

This Gadget Puts a Digital Assistant Inside Your Head

Reading Lips A small wearable headset called AlterEgo can detect the subtle electrical stimulations sent to mouth muscles from the brain, letting people send commands to a digital assistant without saying a word. It’s not quite mind-reading, but the still-under-development device could help users silently control their smart homes, translate foreign languages, or overcome speech impediments, acco

1d

A marine microbe could play increasingly important role in regulating climate

Marine microbes with a special metabolism are ubiquitous and could play an important role in how Earth regulates climate.

1d

Why you should join a journal’s editorial board

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02410-0 Susan D’Agostino explains how serving as a board member can pay big career dividends.

1d

Feral hogs aren’t coming for our kids, but they’re definitely coming for our calves

Feral pigs will eat just about anything—including young or small livestock animals. (Wikimedia Commons/) Feral hogs are stirring up trouble. In the U.S. alone, an estimated seven million such pigs are spread across 35 states , where the omnivorous swine tear up soil and habitats looking for something—anything—to eat. They cause $2 billion in damage every year, according to the USDA, and can sprea

1d

When Earth's Magnetic Field Flips, It Could Take Thousands of Years

A computer model of Earth's magnetic field. (Credit: U.S. Department of Energy) North, I was once surprised to learn, is not always north. There’s geographic north, “up” on maps toward the North Pole, and then there’s magnetic north, which is where compass needles point. Right now the two kind of line up, but that isn’t always the case. Earth’s magnetic field — which guides compasses, animals and

1d

Tardigrades May Have Made it to the Moon

An Israeli lunar lander carrying the tiny animals crashed into the moon in April, and now scientists are trying to determine if the creatures are still alive.

1d

Some Data Backing Novartis Gene-Therapy Approval Manipulated: FDA

The agency is now evaluating the implications of the corrupted data behind Zolgensma and whether to “take action” against the pharmaceutical company.

1d

Fast-food availability near commute route linked to BMI

In a study of commuting workers, the number of different types of food stores available near residences and commute routes — but not near workplaces — had a significant association with body mass index (BMI).

1d

Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection

After years of federally mandated protection, scientists see signs that this once ecologically fertile area known as the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain is making a comeback.

1d

Designing a light-trapping, color-converting crystal

A recipe for creating a microscopic crystal structure that can hold 2 wavelengths of light at once is a step toward faster telecommunications and quantum computers.

1d

Permian lizard-like animal suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease

A lizard-like animal that lived 289 million years ago suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease, according to a new study.

1d

Researchers design a light-trapping, color-converting crystal

Five years ago, Stanford postdoctoral scholar Momchil Minkov encountered a puzzle that he was impatient to solve. At the heart of his field of nonlinear optics are devices that change light from one color to another—a process important for many technologies within telecommunications, computing and laser-based equipment and science. But Minkov wanted a device that also traps both colors of light, a

1d

13-Year-Old Encryption Bugs Still Haunt Apps and IoT

RSA encryption has been around for decades. Unfortunately, so have bad implementations that leave it less secure.

1d

Russia’s Top Secret Heavy Strike Stealth Drone Takes Flight

Combat Air Vehicle Russia’s Ministry of Defense just released the first footage of its Sukhoi-S70 Okhotnik-B (Hunter-B) unmanned combat air vehicle taking flight on August 3. The video shows the aircraft taking off, climbing into the sky, turning a few times before landing again — a fairly standard profile for an aircraft’s first flight, according to The Aviationist . The stealthy drone could off

1d

Scenes From the 2019 Pan American Games

For the past week and a half, more than 6,500 athletes from all over North and South America have been competing in hundreds of events in 39 sports in and around Lima, Peru, in the 2019 Pan American Games. Collected below, images of some of the action taking place in the arenas, parks, open fields, beaches, rivers, and streets of Lima.

1d

New data indicate rise in opioid use for migraine treatment

An increasing number of Americans are using opioids to treat their migraine headaches, despite the fact that opioids are not the recommended first-line therapy for migraine in most cases.

1d

Internet can be valuable tool for people with undiagnosed rare disorders

The internet can serve as a pathway to diagnosis and care for people who suspect they have a rare condition that has not been identified by their physicians, according to a study by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.

1d

The Best Probiotics

In April, researchers at Tufts University posed a nutrition riddle. They compared people who took vitamin pills with people who got the same nutrients the old-fashioned way, by eating food. Tracking intake of vitamins A and K, magnesium, and zinc, the scientists found people were less likely to die of heart attacks and other diseases when these nutrients occurred in their diets. As Tufts research

1d

Women’s mid-life stress linked to memory decline

A new study links stressful life experiences among middle-aged women—but not men—to greater memory decline in later life. The researchers say their findings add to evidence that stress hormones play an uneven gender role in brain health, and align with well-documented higher rates of Alzheimer’s disease in women than men. Although the researchers caution their study was designed to show associati

1d

Earth's magnetic poles probably won't flip within our lifetime

Contrary to recent reports, new research suggests the next reversal of Earth’s magnetic pole won’t happen in a human lifetime and could take tens of thousands of years

1d

Forecasters fear 5G wireless technology will muck up weather predictions

U.S. agencies battle over appropriate signal limits

1d

1d

Underwater Temple Revealed by Thailand's Extreme Drought

Thousands are flocking to the temple to pray and take pictures.

1d

Exploring 'harm-joy': Here are the best books on schadenfreude

These books take a deep dive into the psychological and philosophical implications of schadenfreude. Overall, the authors believe that schadenfreude is a fundamental and universal emotion. It stems from a number of unique psychological and social conditions. Is there a better joy than reveling in one's misery? Hide that sly smile. We all experience schadenfreude in one way or another. Thank the G

1d

New intra-nasal imaging to study airways in patients with cystic fibrosis

Researchers describe minimally invasive new tool for viewing differences in the nasal airways of cystic fibrosis patients in vivo at a cellular level.

1d

New 'liquid biopsy' blood test improves breast cancer diagnostics

A new type of blood test for breast cancer could help avoid thousands of unnecessary surgeries and otherwise precisely monitor disease progression, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Mayo Clinic in Arizona. TGen is an affiliate of City of Hope, which along with The Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute at Cambridge University and the Biodesign Ins

1d

Gluten response in celiac patients could lead to diagnostic test

Distinct markers in the blood of people with celiac disease have been detected within a few hours of gluten being consumed. The findings address a longstanding mystery about what drives the adverse reaction to gluten in celiac disease and could lead to a world-first blood test for diagnosing the disease. A potential blood-based test would be a vast improvement on the current approach which require

1d

Football-related head hits that don't cause concussions can still injure the brain

Measures of the integrity of midbrain white matter in 38 college-level American football players changed after a season of play even though all but two of the athletes did not suffer clinically defined concussions, according to a new study. The results indicate that repeated, subconcussive head hits sustained by players over the course of a typical football game can.

1d

Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection

After years of federally mandated protection, scientists see signs that this once ecologically fertile area known as the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain is making a comeback.

1d

Personalized assay surpasses limits for detecting tumor DNA in breast cancer patients

Scientists have developed a personalized platform tailored to patients' specific cancer mutations named TARDIS, which was able to accurately detect circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and signs of residual disease in 33 women with breast cancer.

1d

Earth's last magnetic field reversal took far longer than once thought

Every several hundred thousand years or so, Earth's magnetic field dramatically shifts and reverses its polarity. New work from University of Wisconsin-Madison geologist Brad Singer and his colleagues finds that the most recent field reversal, some 770,000 years ago, took at least 22,000 years to complete. That's several times longer than previously thought, and the results further call into quest

1d

A marine microbe could play increasingly important role in regulating climate

Marine microbes with a special metabolism are ubiquitous and could play an important role in how Earth regulates climate

1d

Study finds routine hits playing football cause damage to the brain

New research led by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Rochester Medical Center indicates that concussions aren't the sole cause of damage to the brain in contact sports. A study of college football players found that typical hits sustained from playing just one season cause structural changes to the brain.

1d

Permian lizard-like animal suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease

A lizard-like animal that lived 289 million years ago suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease, according to a study published August 7, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Yara Haridy of the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin and colleagues. This is the most ancient known case of such a disease.

1d

Fast-food availability near commute route linked to BMI

In a study of commuting workers, the number of different types of food stores available near residences and commute routes–but not near workplaces–had a significant association with body mass index (BMI). Adriana Dornelles of Arizona State University, U.S. presents these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on August 7, 2019.

1d

MSDN Magazine Bows Out

The August edition of MSDN Magazine carries an announcement that will come as a blow not only to its current subscribers, but to all those who have read its articles online. It is ceasing publication …

1d

Recipe for light-trapping crystal may speed up communication

New guidelines for creating a microscopic crystal structure that can hold two wavelengths of light at once could pave the way for faster telecommunications and quantum computers. Five years ago, Momchil Minkov, a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University, encountered a puzzle that he was impatient to solve. At the heart of his field of nonlinear optics are devices that change light from one col

1d

Fast-food outlets on commuter routes may fuel obesity crisis

US study finds link between number of restaurants and higher BMI Fast-food outlets along commuter routes could be contributing to the obesity crisis, research suggests. A study by a US academic found that a greater density of fast-food outlets on commuter routes is linked to higher body mass index (BMI) scores among those travelling along them. Continue reading…

1d

Opioid use and misuse 3 months after ED visit for acute pain

Opioid use at the three-month follow-up in emergency department patients discharged with an opioid prescription for acute pain is relatively low and not necessarily synonymous with opioid misuse.

1d

Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis

A seldom-studied class of immune cells may reduce the friendly fire that drives autoimmune disease, according to a new study. Stimulating these protective cells could lead to new therapies for diseases in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues, such as multiple sclerosis and celiac disease.

1d

Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology

While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. In new experiments, engineers offer fundamental insight into why certain membrane designs work better than others.

1d

Novartis C.E.O. Defends Company’s Decision to Withhold False Data From the F.D.A.

Responding to the agency’s stern rebuke, Vas Narasimhan, the company’s executive, tried to reassure investors that Novartis did not intentionally deceive the F.D.A. while seeking approval for its $2.1 million gene therapy.

1d

Genes show why some flies learn faster than others

Genes in fruit flies may explain differences in the learning speed of flies, researchers report. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people. The research in fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person’s ability to learn and remember. Past experiments studying how fruit flies’ ability to learn and remember have

1d

Ryugu samples bound for Australia

Hayabusa 2 has made its second collection from the asteroid. Richard A Lovett reports.

1d

A common neural signature of brain injury in concussion and subconcussion

The midbrain is biomechanically susceptible to force loading from repetitive subconcussive head impacts (RSHI), is a site of tauopathy in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and regulates functions (e.g., eye movements) often disrupted in concussion. In a prospective longitudinal design, we demonstrate there are reductions in midbrain white matter integrity due to a single season of collegiat

1d

Forty years of reform and opening up: Chinas progress toward a sustainable path

After 40 years of reform and "opening up," China has made remarkable economic progress. Such economic prosperity, however, has been coupled with environmental degradation. We analyze diverse long-term data to determine whether China is experiencing a decoupling of economic growth and environmental impacts, and where China stands with respect to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in terms of

1d

Bcl11b prevents fatal autoimmunity by promoting Treg cell program and constraining innate lineages in Treg cells

Regulatory T (T reg ) cells are essential for peripheral tolerance and rely on the transcription factor (TF) Foxp3 for their generation and function. Several other TFs are critical for the T reg cell program. We found that mice deficient in Bcl11b TF solely in T reg cells developed fatal autoimmunity, and Bcl11b-deficient T reg cells had severely altered function. Bcl11b KO T reg cells showed dec

1d

Bcl11b prevents catastrophic autoimmunity by controlling multiple aspects of a regulatory T cell gene expression program

Foxp3 and its protein partners establish a regulatory T (T reg ) cell transcription profile and promote immunological tolerance. However, molecular features contributing to a T reg -specific gene expression program are still incompletely understood. We find that the transcription factor Bcl11b is a prominent Foxp3 cofactor with multifaceted functions in T reg biology. Optimal genomic recruitment

1d

A 160,000-year-old history of tectonically controlled methane seepage in the Arctic

The geological factors controlling gas release from Arctic deep-water gas reservoirs through seabed methane seeps are poorly constrained. This is partly due to limited data on the precise chronology of past methane emission episodes. Here, we use uranium-thorium dating of seep carbonates sampled from the seabed and from cores drilled at the Vestnesa Ridge, off West Svalbard (79°N, ~1200 m water d

1d

Origin of alkylphosphonic acids in the interstellar medium

For decades, the source of phosphorus incorporated into Earth’s first organisms has remained a fundamental, unsolved puzzle. Although contemporary biomolecules incorporate P(+V) in their phosphate moieties, the limited bioavailability of phosphates led to the proposal that more soluble P(+III) compounds served as the initial source of phosphorus. Here, we report via laboratory simulation experime

1d

Amid fields of rubble, scars, and lost gear, signs of recovery observed on seamounts on 30- to 40-year time scales

Although the expectation of lack of resilience of seamount vulnerable marine ecosystems has become a paradigm in seamount ecology and a tenet of fisheries management, recovery has not been tested on time scales >10 years. The Northwestern Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamounts have experienced the highest documented fish and invertebrate seamount fisheries takes in the world. Surveys show that, des

1d

Synchronizing volcanic, sedimentary, and ice core records of Earths last magnetic polarity reversal

Reversal of Earth’s magnetic field polarity every 10 5 to 10 6 years is among the most far-reaching, yet enigmatic, geophysical phenomena. The short duration of reversals make precise temporal records of past magnetic field behavior paramount to understanding the processes that produce them. We correlate new 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dates from transitionally magnetized lava flows to astronomically dated sedi

1d

Dynamic tuning of FRET in a green fluorescent protein biosensor

Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between mutants of green fluorescent protein is widely used to monitor protein-protein interactions and as a readout mode in fluorescent biosensors. Despite the fundamental importance of distance and molecular angles of fluorophores to each other, structural details on fluorescent protein FRET have been missing. Here, we report the high-resolution x-ray s

1d

Cell cycle progression in confining microenvironments is regulated by a growth-responsive TRPV4-PI3K/Akt-p27Kip1 signaling axis

In tissues, cells reside in confining microenvironments, which may mechanically restrict the ability of a cell to double in size as it prepares to divide. How confinement affects cell cycle progression remains unclear. We show that cells progressed through the cell cycle and proliferated when cultured in hydrogels exhibiting fast stress relaxation but were mostly arrested in the G 0 /G 1 phase of

1d

Cytokine release and gastrointestinal symptoms after gluten challenge in celiac disease

Celiac disease (CeD), caused by immune reactions to cereal gluten, is treated with gluten -elimination diets. Within hours of gluten exposure, either perorally or extraorally by intradermal injection, treated patients experience gastrointestinal symptoms. To test whether gluten exposure leads to systemic cytokine production time -related to symptoms, series of multiplex cytokine measurements were

1d

Microbial rhodopsins are major contributors to the solar energy captured in the sea

All known phototrophic metabolisms on Earth rely on one of three categories of energy-converting pigments: chlorophyll- a (rarely – d ), bacteriochlorophyll- a (rarely – b ), and retinal, which is the chromophore in rhodopsins. While the significance of chlorophylls in solar energy capture has been studied for decades, the contribution of retinal-based phototrophy to this process remains largely

1d

Indirect pathway from caudate tail mediates rejection of bad objects in periphery

The essential everyday task of making appropriate choices is a process controlled mainly by the basal ganglia. To this end, subjects need not only to find "good" objects in their environment but also to reject "bad" objects. To reveal this rejection mechanism, we created a sequential saccade choice task for monkeys and studied the role of the indirect pathway from the CDt (tail of the caudate nuc

1d

Decreased conformational stability in the oncogenic N92I mutant of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1

Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) functions as a molecular switch by cycling between an inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)–bound state and an active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–bound state. An oncogenic mutant of Rac1, an N92I mutant, strongly promotes cell proliferation and subsequent oncogenic activities by facilitating the intrinsic GDP dissociation in the inactive GDP-bound

1d

Vancomycin relieves mycophenolate mofetil-induced gastrointestinal toxicity by eliminating gut bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase activity

Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is commonly prescribed and has proven advantages over other immunosuppressive drugs. However, frequent gastrointestinal side effects through an unknown mechanism limit its use. We have found that consumption of MMF alters the composition of the gut microbiota, selecting for bacteria expressing the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS) and leading to an up-regulation of GUS acti

1d

Solving a new R2lox protein structure by microcrystal electron diffraction

Microcrystal electron diffraction (MicroED) has recently shown potential for structural biology. It enables the study of biomolecules from micrometer-sized 3D crystals that are too small to be studied by conventional x-ray crystallography. However, to date, MicroED has only been applied to redetermine protein structures that had already been solved previously by x-ray diffraction. Here, we presen

1d

Designing a light-trapping, color-converting crystal

A recipe for creating a microscopic crystal structure that can hold 2 wavelengths of light at once is a step toward faster telecommunications and quantum computers.

1d

Can an immune strategy used to treat cancer also wipe out HIV infections?

A mouse study with engineered “CAR T cells” shows a novel way to stop the virus

1d

Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection

For decades, overfishing and trawling devastated parts of an underwater mountain range in the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii, wrecking deep-sea corals and destroying much of their ecological community.

1d

Why people with celiac disease suffer so soon after eating gluten

In people with celiac disease, some T cells release immune chemicals within hours of encountering gluten, triggering the fast onset of symptoms.

1d

Permian lizard-like animal suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease

A lizard-like animal that lived 289 million years ago suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease, according to a study published August 7, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Yara Haridy of the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin and colleagues. This is the most ancient known case of such a disease.

1d

Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection

For decades, overfishing and trawling devastated parts of an underwater mountain range in the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii, wrecking deep-sea corals and destroying much of their ecological community.

1d

Earth's last magnetic field reversal took far longer than once thought

Earth's magnetic field seems steady and true—reliable enough to navigate by.

1d

A marine microbe could play increasingly important role in regulating climate

A USC-led research team has found that marine microbes with a special metabolism are ubiquitous and could play an important role in how Earth regulates climate.

1d

Earth's Magnetic Field Reversal Took Three Times Longer Than Thought

A new study suggests the last field reversal 773,000 years ago took 22,000 years to occur, which could explain some of the inner workings of our planet’s core — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Access is the biggest food cue of all

If you’re trying to lose weight, think about that drive to work. Paul Biegler reports.

1d

Solving crime with blood and maths

Pattern analysis technique will help crime scene investigators. Mark Bruer reports.

1d

Young Hass has a mixed background

New study sheds light on the avocado's family history.

1d

Can you stare down a seagull?

Taking the initiative may save your lunch.

1d

Meet Hercules, the biggest parrot ever

The list of giant New Zealand birds just got longer.

1d

Earth's Magnetic Field Reversal Took Three Times Longer Than Thought

A new study suggests the last field reversal 773,000 years ago took 22,000 years to occur, which could explain some of the inner workings of our planet’s core — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

1d

Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change

Groundwater – a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa – is resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study.

1d

A rocky relationship: A history of Earth's continents breaking up and getting back together

A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth's plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth's outer shell, evolved over the planet's 4.56-billion-year history.

1d

Key proteins for the repair of nerve fibers identified

Scientists have identified a group of proteins that help to regenerate damaged nerve cells.

1d

A growth mindset intervention can change students' grades if school culture is supportive

Boosting academic success does not have to derive from new teachers or curriculum; it can also come from changing students' attitudes about their abilities through a short online intervention, according to new research.

1d

Climate change likely to increase human exposure to toxic methylmercury

Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind, comprehensive model that simulates how environmental factors, including increasing sea temperatures and overfishing, impact levels of methylmercury in fish. The researchers found that while the regulation of mercury emissions have successfully reduced methylmercury levels in fish, spiking temperatures are driving those levels back up and will play a major

1d

A long time ago, galaxies far, far away

Astronomers used the combined power of multiple astronomical observatories around the world and in space to discover a treasure-trove of previously unknown ancient massive galaxies. This is the first multiple discovery of its kind and such an abundance of this type of galaxy defies current models of the universe. These galaxies are also intimately connected with supermassive black holes and the di

1d

Wearable motion sensors could save unborn babies

Researchers have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby's heartbeat continuously at home with a non-invasive and safe device that is potentially more accurate than any fetal heartrate monitor currently available in the market.

1d

Witnessing the Birth of a Crater Lake Where Lava Just Flowed

The magma mysteriously drained from the crevice last year, and now scorching pools of water are bubbling up from below.

1d

We Could Be Witnessing the Death of a Tectonic Plate, Says Earth Scientist

A gaping hole in a dying tectonic plate beneath the ocean along the West Coast of the United States may be wreaking havoc at Earth's surface, but not in a way most people might expect.

1d

Why Slavoj Žižek is a communist, kind of

Slavoj Žižek is perhaps the world's best known Marxist. He has frequently argued for the replacement of capitalism with a new system. His suggestions for what we do about capitalism are milder than you'd think though. Slavoj Žižek has been called "The most dangerous philosopher in the West" and a "Superstar Communist." His critiques of capitalism are scathing, the portraits of Stalin in the den u

1d

Opioid use and misuse 3 months after ED visit for acute pain

Opioid use at the three-month follow-up in emergency department patients discharged with an opioid prescription for acute pain is relatively low and not necessarily synonymous with opioid misuse.

1d

Galaxy hunters spot hidden giants in the early universe

Ninety percent of the first big galaxies had been invisible until now

1d

Bermuda's baitfish populations

A new study used DNA markers to characterize the genetic diversity of . The island's baitfish were shown to exist in highly mixed populations of up to six different species indicating that individual fish from multiple locations around the island contribute to a single gene pool.

1d

New synthesis method opens up possibilities for organic electronics

Scientists have modified a previous synthesis method to create a new semiconducting polymer with remarkable properties which could be used in organic electronic devices such as thin film transistors.

1d

9 tips to help you find the best spots on Airbnb

No, you can't rent an entire lake, but how about a treehouse with a view? (Simon Migaj via Unsplash/) If you're not roughing it in a tent or treating yourself to a hotel, Airbnb provides lots of lodging options for when you're traveling—from single rooms to fully furnished, multi-bedroom houses. You can even rent treehouses . With millions of places to pick from in the Airbnb catalog—not to menti

1d

How the coolest, smallest stars could help us discover new exoplanets

Exoplanets are abundant near the galaxy's smallest stars. Observing M dwarfs could teach us more about the worlds beyond our solar system, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

1d

We just found dozens of missing galaxies from the early universe

A group of 39 previously unseen galaxies could be the ancestors of the massive galaxies we see in the universe today

1d

Plate tectonics began nearly 2 billion years before we thought

Earth’s continents may have been shifting for 2.5 billion years, according to a study of ancient rocks that finds plate tectonics evolved far earlier than we thought

1d

Looking out for the little guys

A new study, undertaken by a team of scientists from BIOS, the Bermuda Government Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the University of Rhode Island, used DNA markers to characterize the genetic diversity of Bermuda's baitfish populations. The island's baitfish were shown to exist in highly mixed populations of up to six different species indicating that individual fish from multi

1d

New synthesis method opens up possibilities for organic electronics

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) modify a previous synthesis method to create a new semiconducting polymer with remarkable properties which could be used in organic electronic devices such as thin film transistors.

1d

A growth mindset intervention can change students' grades if school culture is supportive

Boosting academic success does not have to derive from new teachers or curriculum; it can also come from changing students' attitudes about their abilities through a short online intervention, according to the latest findings from the National Study of Learning Mindsets published in Nature on Aug. 7, 2019.

1d

Climate change likely to increase human exposure to toxic methylmercury

Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind, comprehensive model that simulates how environmental factors, including increasing sea temperatures and overfishing, impact levels of methylmercury in fish. The researchers found that while the regulation of mercury emissions have successfully reduced methylmercury levels in fish, spiking temperatures are driving those levels back up and will play a major

1d

Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change

Groundwater – a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa – is resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study led by UCL and Cardiff University.

1d

A rocky relationship: A history of Earth's continents breaking up and getting back together

A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth's plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth's outer shell, evolved over the planet's 4.56-billion-year history.

1d

Observation-driven research to inform better groundwater management policies

Groundwater maintains vital ecosystems and strongly influences water and energy budgets. Although at least 400 million people in sub-Saharan Africa depend on this valuable resource for their domestic water needs, the processes that sustain it and their sensitivity to climatic variability, are poorly understood. IIASA contributed to a study that looked into climate impacts on groundwater in light o

1d

A long time ago, galaxies far, far away

Astronomers used the combined power of multiple astronomical observatories around the world and in space to discover a treasure-trove of previously unknown ancient massive galaxies. This is the first multiple discovery of its kind and such an abundance of this type of galaxy defies current models of the universe. These galaxies are also intimately connected with supermassive black holes and the di

1d

Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis

A seldom-studied class of immune cells may reduce the friendly fire that drives autoimmune disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Stimulating these protective cells could lead to new therapies for diseases in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues, such as multiple sclerosis and celiac disease.

1d

A national experiment reveals where a growth mindset improves achievement

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1466-yA US national experiment showed that a short, online, self-administered growth mindset intervention can …

1d

1d

These caterpillars can camouflage themselves, even when blindfolded

Pepper moth larvae sense color with their skin

1d

Giant, active galaxies from the early universe may have finally been found

Overlooked galaxies from when the universe was younger than 2 billion years old could be the ancestors of other ancient and modern monster galaxies.

1d

Assault Rifles Won’t Solve Your Feral Hog Problem, Say Scientists

In the wake of two deadly mass shootings, singer-songwriter Jason Isbell posted a tweet on Sunday asserting that the people arguing about the definition of “assault weapon” on Twitter don’t actually need the guns. The next day, Twitter user William McNabb replied with a tweet seemingly suggesting that he does need an assault weapon — to kill the “30-50 feral hogs” that run into the yard where his

1d

Where did America’s saber-toothed cats go?

The teeth of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits are helping scientists understand why Americans have coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. Larisa DeSantis, an associate professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt University, grew up visiting the one-of-a-kind fossil site in Los Angeles, which contains fossils of predators that tried t

1d

Why the news on dementia deaths is not as bad as it sounds

Dementia has been named the leading cause of death in England and Wales, but individual risk for the condition is falling, and cancer actually kills more people

1d

A versatile cold-molecule collider

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02356-3 Superconducting magnets have been used to trap cold oxygen molecules and study their collisions. This method could lead to a better understanding of low-temperature interactions for a broad range of molecules.

1d

A national experiment reveals where a growth mindset improves achievement

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1466-y A US national experiment showed that a short, online, self-administered growth mindset intervention can increase adolescents’ grades and advanced course-taking, and identified the types of school that were poised to benefit the most.

1d

Regulatory T cells subdue an autoimmune disease

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02271-7 A type of immune cell called a CD8 T cell, which usually kills disease-causing agents, has been found instead to suppress self-reactive immune cells, thereby offering protection against an autoimmune disease in mice.

1d

Pol II phosphorylation regulates a switch between transcriptional and splicing condensates

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1464-0 RNA polymerase II with a hypophosphorylated C-terminal domain preferentially incorporates into mediator condensates, and with a hyperphosphorylated C-terminal domain into splicing-factor condensates, revealing phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism in condensate preference.

1d

A dominant population of optically invisible massive galaxies in the early Universe

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1452-4 Submillimetre-wavelength observations reveal a sample of galaxies that have no detectable emission in the ultraviolet-to-near-infrared region, and are probably the progenitors of the largest present-day galaxies in clusters.

1d

Locally renewing resident synovial macrophages provide a protective barrier for the joint

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1471-1 Analysis of macrophage subsets within joints reveals a population of CX3CR1+ tissue-resident macrophages that form a tight-junction-mediated barrier at the synovial lining, protecting the joint from the invasion of inflammatory cells.

1d

Podcast: A mindset for success, and mercury in fish

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02406-w Listen to the latest science news, with Noah Baker and Nick Howe.

1d

Deep roots for mid-ocean-ridge volcanoes revealed by plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1448-0 Volatile contents of plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions from volcanoes at the Gakkel mid-ocean ridge suggest that magmatic crystallization extends to depths of 16 kilometres, much deeper than suggested by olivine-hosted melt inclusions.

1d

Macrophages form a protective cellular barrier in joints

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02340-x Inflammation and the repair of damaged tissues are regulated by immune cells called macrophages. The finding that they form a layer that shields mouse joints from damage has implications for the treatment of arthritis.

1d

Metamorphism and the evolution of plate tectonics

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1462-2 Variability in Earth’s thermal gradients, recorded by metamorphic rocks through time, shows that Earth’s modern plate tectonics developed gradually since the Neoarchaean era, three billion years ago.

1d

Climate change and overfishing increase neurotoxicant in marine predators

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1468-9 Overfishing and warming ocean temperature have caused an increase in methylmercury concentrations in some Atlantic predatory fish, and this trend is predicted to continue unless stronger mercury and carbon emissions standards are imposed.

1d

Opposing T cell responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1467-x Activated clonally expanded CD4+ T cells display specificity to the myelin peptide MOG, whereas clonally expanded CD8+ T cells depend on T cell receptor recognition of unrelated surrogate peptides and have a regulatory function.

1d

Collisions between cold molecules in a superconducting magnetic trap

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1446-2 Collisions between cold trapped molecules are directly observed by magnetically capturing molecular oxygen in a superconducting trap, without the need for laser cooling.

1d

BORIS promotes chromatin regulatory interactions in treatment-resistant cancer cells

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1472-0 The CTCF paralogue BORIS is upregulated in transcriptionally reprogrammed neuroblastoma cells rendered resistant to targeted therapy, in which it promotes regulatory chromatin interactions that maintain the resistance phenotype.

1d

Observed controls on resilience of groundwater to climate variability in sub-Saharan Africa

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1441-7 Analysis of multidecadal hydrograph and precipitation data for sub-Saharan Africa shows a complex relationship between groundwater recharge and precipitation, and that a drier climate does not necessarily mean less recharge.

1d

Increased shear in the North Atlantic upper-level jet stream over the past four decades

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1465-z The North Atlantic jet stream has become 15 per cent more sheared in the upper atmosphere since 1979, an expected consequence of climate change, and consistent with increased aircraft turbulence.

1d

Molecular architecture of lineage allocation and tissue organization in early mouse embryo

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1469-8 Spatially resolved transcriptomes of cell populations at defined positions in the early mouse embryo reveal molecular bases of lineage specification and tissue patterning.

1d

Controlling organization and forces in active matter through optically defined boundaries

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1447-1 Light is used to guide the behaviour of an engineered active-matter system, producing structures and properties that can be dynamically manipulated and controlled.

1d

The future of groundwater in sub-Saharan Africa

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02337-6 An analysis of aquifer replenishment in sub-Saharan Africa shows that reduced precipitation does not always deplete groundwater reserves, challenging the idea that these reserves will decrease in response to global warming.

1d

Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change

Groundwater—a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa—is resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study led by UCL and Cardiff University.

1d

Climate change likely to increase human exposure to toxic methylmercury

Add another item to the ever-growing list of the dangerous impacts of global climate change: Warming oceans are leading to an increase in the harmful neurotoxicant methylmercury in popular seafood, including cod, Atlantic bluefin tuna and swordfish, according to research led by the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public

1d

A rocky relationship: A history of Earth's continents breaking up and getting back together

A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth's plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth's outer shell, evolved over the planet's 4.56-billion-year history.

1d

Astronomers discover vast ancient galaxies, which could shed light on dark matter

Astronomers have used the combined power of multiple astronomical observatories around the world and in space to discover a treasure trove of previously unknown ancient massive galaxies. This is the first multiple discovery of its kind, and such an abundance of this type of galaxy defies current models of the universe. These galaxies are also intimately connected with supermassive black holes and

1d

A growth mindset intervention can change students' grades if school culture is supportive

Boosting academic success does not have to derive from new teachers or curriculum; it can also come from changing students' attitudes about their abilities through a short online intervention, according to the latest findings from the National Study of Learning Mindsets published in Nature on Aug. 7.

1d

Some Fish Are Still Full of Mercury, for a Worrying Reason

Environmental success stories are seemingly in short supply, but the fall of mercury is one of them. Released by coal-burning power plants and other industries, mercury—a toxic metal—circulates in the atmosphere, enters the ocean, worms up the food web and, via the seafood we eat, ends up in our bodies. For decades mercury in seafood has been a health scourge, because it inflicts long-term harm o

1d

Trump Says There Are Some Very Bad People on Both Sides

When a president goes to visit the scene of a tragedy, it’s typically a moment to focus attention on the victims and on the causes. Donald Trump is a different sort of president, and as he left the White House this morning ahead of visits to El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, he made sure the focus was, instead, on himself and his political foes. “Whether it’s white supremacy, whether it’s any oth

1d

Meaning, Without the White Gaze

I had been writing it for her. For her, and for Pecola Breedlove. Perhaps too ambitious or presumptuous or high-minded, I had, until the announcement of her death this week, been writing my memoir, Surviving the White Gaze , for Toni Morrison and Pecola Breedlove. Because I survived the white gaze for Pecola, and Morrison taught me how. I knew Pecola first. I lived inside her skin, her ache; felt

1d

Wearable motion sensors could save unborn babies

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby's heartbeat continuously at home with a non-invasive and safe device that is potentially more accurate than any fetal heartrate monitor currently available in the market.

1d

Mouse Study Raises Concerns About Human Brain Function During Space Travel

Other researchers dispute whether astronauts would experience the type of radiation used in the experiment. Another-World-Astronaut.jpg Image credits: Gorodenkoff/ shutterstock Space Wednesday, August 7, 2019 – 10:00 Meeri Kim, Contributor (Inside Science) — Next summer, NASA will launch its fifth rover to Mars to look for signs of ancient life on the Red Planet. But the latest robotic mission,

1d

Working Scientist podcast: Career transitions from physics to data science

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02408-8 Industry has long courted physicists for their data science expertise, but will this change as more undergraduates acquire these skills?

1d

The next loot box will give me that legendary skin, won't it? You're about to find out

Before you plonk down $20 for some virtual crates in Overwatch or Call of Duty, would it give you pause to learn that the super rare character skin you're hoping …

1d

White House invites tech companies to discussion of violent online extremism

The gathering marks the Trump administration's first major engagement on the issue days after two mass shootings left 31 dead.

1d

Sesame allergy is surprisingly common

Sesame allergy affects more than 1 million children and adults in the US, more than previously known, according to a new study. But unlike the other top eight allergens like peanuts and milk, laws don’t currently require sesame labeling—and sesame may be labeled in a potentially confusing way, such as tahini. That can increase the risk that someone with an allergy will accidentally eat it. The st

1d

Mysterious, Ancient Radio Signals Keep Pelting Earth. Astronomers Designed an AI to Hunt Them Down.

Sudden shrieks of radio waves from deep space keep slamming into our radio telescopes, spattering those instruments' recordings with confusing data. And now, astronomers are using artificial intelligence to detect those outbursts.

1d

Collaboration sees sustained increase in imaging history quality from ordering providers

American Journal of Roentgenology 'Original Research' article standardizes the definition of complete imaging history and engineers systems to include supportive prompts in the order entry interface with a single keystroke–sustainably improving the quality of all imaging histories.

1d

Study evaluates effects of noninvasive neuromodulation used to treat obesity

The results of a clinical trial published in the journal Appetite show that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can reduce or increase appetite, depending on the patient's genetic profile.

1d

Why so fly? Scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others

Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember. Scientists are studying genes of fruit flies to explore why an individual fly can be a better learner than another. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people.

1d

Caution Urged for Comparing Ancient and Modern Humans' Oral Microbes

Microbial species that are commonly associated with oral diseases in modern humans are unreliable proxies for determining tooth health status in ancient samples, a new study finds.

1d

Astronomers Search for Radio Signals From 'Dead Planets'

The dense cores of past planets might survive a star’s expansion period into its white dwarf phase. (Credit: CfA/Mark A. Garlick) In five or six billion years, our sun will expand into a red giant star hundreds of times larger than it is now. It will envelop Mercury and Venus, and possibly Earth as well, and then slowly puff away its outer layers. The hot, dense core left behind is called a white

1d

Heracles the Giant Parrot Stood 3-Feet-Tall

A reconstruction of the newly-discovered giant parrot Heracles, dwarfing a group of small New Zealand wrens on the forest floor. (Credit: Illustration by Dr Brian Choo, Flinders University) If you tried to feed a cracker to this polly you might lose a hand in the process. Paleontologists say they’ve discovered the ancient fossil remains of the world’s only known giant parrot. The bird stood roughl

1d

SNAPSHOT: Swirling Clouds on Jupiter

Photo by NASA/JPL-CalTech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin Gill Looking a bit like earthly thunderheads, a white band of high-altitude clouds emerge above the colorful, swirling patterns of Jupiter in a photo taken last summer by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Jupiter, the solar system’s largest planet, has no Earth-like surface. Instead of an outer crust, the gas giant consists mainly of hydrogen and helium that condens

1d

SNAPSHOT: The Dangerous Dance of the Jackdaw

Image by Alex Thornton Despite a spirograph-like appearance, these loops and twists actually represent the flight paths and wingbeats of a flock of jackdaws, members of the wily crow family that mate for life. Researchers had thought that each member of a flock flew independently of their mates, allowing them to pay close attention to others and rapidly communicate to evade predators. But new rese

1d

Climate Change Exacerbates the Affordable Housing Shortage

Disabled people and minority communities are disproportionately affected and have the fewest resources to recover from disasters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Why some older adults experience memory mix-ups

New research may explain why some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time. The findings offer an initial snapshot of what happens in the brain as young and old people try to access long-term memories, and could shed light on why some people’s cognitive abilities decli

1d

The Increasing Irrelevance of Climate Change Denial

Even if you don’t accept the science, you’ll need to deal with the consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Fighting a mighty weed

Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. Palmer amaranth, a member of the pigweed family, is spreading across states and growing in strength. If farmers and weed scientists cannot find a new solution, crop yields could decline substantially, according to an article in Chemical and Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly new

1d

Robot, heal thyself: scientists develop self-repairing machines

submitted by /u/NineteenSkylines [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Why so fly: Scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others

Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember. Scientists at the University of Missouri are studying genes of fruit flies to explore why an individual fly can be a better learner than another. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people.

1d

Gold glue really does bond nanocages 'contradicting' logic

It has long been known that gold can be used to do things that philosophers have never even dreamed of. The Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow has confirmed the existence of 'gold glue': bonds involving gold atoms, capable of permanently bonding protein rings. Skilfully used by an international team of scientists, the bonds have made it possible to construct m

1d

Why so fly: Scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others

Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember. Scientists at the University of Missouri are studying genes of fruit flies to explore why an individual fly can be a better learner than another. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people.

1d

Train station experiment reveals one way to counteract bias against Muslims

An experiment conducted in German train stations involving paper cups and escaping oranges has found that people are less likely to help a woman if she appears to be Muslim—but they're more likely to help that same woman if she somehow proves that she shares their social values.

1d

The CDC Could Totally Study Gun Violence—It Just Needs Money

Congress clarified last year that the CDC can use its budget for gun research, after decades of effectively banning it. But Democrats are still fighting to get actual funding approved.

1d

Anatomy of a cosmic seagull

Colourful and wispy, this intriguing collection of objects is known as the Seagull Nebula, named for its resemblance to a gull in flight. Made up of dust, hydrogen, helium and traces of heavier elements, this region is the hot and energetic birthplace of new stars. The remarkable detail captured here by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST) reveals the individual astronomical objects that make up the c

1d

Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology

With water scarcity a critical challenge across the globe, scientists and engineers are pursuing new ways to harvest purified water from unconventional sources, like seawater or even wastewater.

1d

Subway to Start Selling Meatless Meatball Marinara Subs

Meatless Marinara What do Del Taco , Burger King , Tim Horton’s , and Little Caesars have in common? They’ve all started selling plant-based meat alternatives. And now, sandwich juggernaut Subway is joining the fray — the ultimate sign that fake meat is going mainstream. Italian Herbs and Protein The international franchise has announced a partnership with rising fake meat star Beyond Meat to tes

1d

‘There Will Be a Next Time’: A GOP Congressman Talks About Gun Violence

Americans have experienced nearly one mass shooting a da y since a gunman murdered 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida, a year and a half ago. The country’s mass-shooting epidemic reentered the public consciousness over the weekend, when 22 people were shot and killed inside a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, and, less than 24 hours later, 10 were killed outside a bar in Dayton, Ohio. In th

1d

Why so fly: MU scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others

Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember. Scientists at the University of Missouri are studying genes of fruit flies to explore why an individual fly can be a better learner than another. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people.

1d

The Increasing Irrelevance of Climate Change Denial

Even if you don’t accept the science, you’ll need to deal with the consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Thief Steals 'Cursed' Medieval Bell from 'Harry Potter' Island in Scotland

The bronze bell is a religious relic that may be 1,000 years old.

1d

Direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples

Tumor cells circulating in blood are markers for the early detection and prognosis of cancer. However, detection of these cells is challenging because of their scarcity. Scientists have now introduced an ultrasensitive method for the direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples. It is based on the amplified, time-resolved fluorescence measurement of luminescent lanthanide ions rele

1d

Optimistic people sleep better, longer, study finds

People who are the most optimistic tend to sleep better and longer, suggests a new study. The study included 3,500 young and middle-aged adults in four US regions.

1d

Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals

A new study demonstrates that the fear predators inspire can leave long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of wild animals and induce enduringly fearful behavior, comparable to effects seen in PTSD research.

1d

ALMA dives into black hole's 'sphere of influence'

ALMA has made the most precise measurements of cold gas swirling around a supermassive black hole — the cosmic behemoth at the center of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 3258.

1d

Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology

While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. In new experiments, engineers offer fundamental insight into why certain membrane designs work better than others.

1d

Medical mistrust impacts African American men's preventive health, but racism also matters

Mistrust of health care providers, fueled by painful experiences with racism, makes African American men more likely to delay routine screenings and doctor's appointments, with potentially serious implications for their overall health.

1d

Gene mutation combo linked to common cancer in women

Researchers have identified a combination of two gene mutations that is linked to endometrial cancer.

1d

Blue sharks use eddies for fast track to food

Blue sharks use large, swirling ocean currents, known as eddies, to fast-track their way down to feed in the ocean twilight zone.

1d

Right or left, Americans value hard work to achieve success

Conservatives and liberals may agree on at least one thing: the importance of working hard in order to succeed.

1d

Microsoft says it 'listens' to conversations only with permission

Microsoft said Wednesday its contractors listen to conversations to hone voice translation features offered by Skype and its digital assistant Cortana, but only when obtaining user permission.

1d

Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals

Fear can be measured in the brain and fearful life-threatening events can leave quantifiable long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of the brain with enduring effects on behaviour, as shown most clearly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

1d

Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals

Fear can be measured in the brain and fearful life-threatening events can leave quantifiable long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of the brain with enduring effects on behaviour, as shown most clearly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

1d

Direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples

Tumor cells circulating in blood are markers for the early detection and prognosis of cancer. However, detection of these cells is challenging because of their scarcity. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced an ultrasensitive method for the direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples. It is based on the amplified, time-resolved fluorescence measurement o

1d

ALMA dives into black hole's 'sphere of influence'

What happens inside a black hole stays inside a black hole, but what happens inside a black hole's "sphere of influence"—the innermost region of a galaxy where a black hole's gravity is the dominant force—is of intense interest to astronomers and can help determine the mass of a black hole as well as its impact on its galactic neighborhood.

1d

Philippines on alert with Typhoon Lekima

Lekima is now a typhoon and has triggered warnings in the Philippines. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided a visible image of the storm that shows a clear eye.

1d

Research cruise off California finds life lacking in parts of the ocean

In parts of the California Current this summer, the ocean was clear, azure and almost empty.

1d

Tropical Storm Krosa gets a comma shape

Tropical Storm Krosa continued on its journey northward in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NOAA's NOAA-20 polar orbiting satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the strengthening storm in a classic tropical cyclone shape.

1d

Right or left, Americans value hard work to achieve success

Conservatives and liberals may agree on at least one thing: the importance of working hard in order to succeed.

1d

How birds perch could lead to nimbler flying robots

The way birds can successfully perch on the Teflon and other materials is teaching researchers how they might create flying robots that land like a bird. Under the watchful eyes of five high-speed cameras, a small, pale-blue bird named Gary waits for the signal to fly. Diana Chin, a graduate student at Stanford University and Gary’s trainer, points her finger to a perch about 20 inches away. The

1d

Research cruise off California finds life lacking in parts of the ocean

In parts of the California Current this summer, the ocean was clear, azure and almost empty.

1d

Virginia's 'Founding Forest' was decimated. Now the longleaf pine is making a comeback

On a cloudy day, Rebecca Wilson strolled along a sandy path at a nature preserve brimming with young longleaf pine—a peculiar tree with long green needles and a taste for fire.

1d

Body found in search for scientist in Greece

Natalie Christopher, 35, was last seen on Monday going for a run on the island of Ikaria.

1d

Air pollution cuts are saving lives in New York state

Lower air pollution levels saved an estimated 5,660 lives in New York State in 2012, compared to 2002 levels, according to a new study.

1d

Brain stimulation for PTSD patients

Electrical engineers report that the tiny beads of sweat, which appear in patients experiencing PTSD or other neuropsychiatric disorders can be measured and used to design and more responsive brain stimulator for therapy.

1d

Entropy explains RNA diffusion rates in cells

Small-scale analysis of RNA diffusion rates throughout cells of yeast and bacteria reveals that rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher diffusion rates, according to new research.

1d

Chemotherapy drugs react differently to radiation while in water

Researchers have studied the way various molecules, found in chemotherapy drugs, react to ionization by radiation similar to that used in cancer treatment.

1d

Spinning towards robust microwave generation on the nano scale

Many physicists have attempted to produce reliable macroscale microwave fields by combining nanoscale spin-torque oscillators, but so far without success. Physicists have now theoretically demonstrated why connecting these devices in series is doomed to fail.

1d

New test to snare those lying about a person's identity

A new test could help police to determine when criminals or witnesses are lying about their knowledge of a person's identity.

1d

Quantum momentum

Occasionally we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world. A new mathematical model has provided some insights into one of them: momentum. The model uses another classical concept, that of time-of-flight.

1d

Record-breaking analytical method for fingerprinting petroleum and other complex mixtures

Scientists have developed a more powerful method of analyzing chemical mixtures, which has been able to assign a record-breaking number of 244,779 molecular compositions within a single sample of petroleum.

1d

Natural gas storage research could combat global warming

To help combat global warming, a team is working on a new porous polymer that can store natural gas more effectively than anything currently being used.

1d

Transport by mobile stroke units get patients quicker treatment than ambulance

Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute. Researchers have recently shown that patients transported to the hospital by mobile stroke unit instead of standard ambulance received a clot-busting procedure an average of 10 minutes faster, which could potentially save up to 270 million neurons per patient.

1d

Virginia's 'Founding Forest' was decimated. Now the longleaf pine is making a comeback

On a cloudy day, Rebecca Wilson strolled along a sandy path at a nature preserve brimming with young longleaf pine—a peculiar tree with long green needles and a taste for fire.

1d

Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body

Patients fitted with an orthopedic prosthetic commonly experience a period of intense pain after surgery. In an effort to control the pain, surgeons inject painkillers into the tissue during the operation. When that wears off a day or two later, the patients are given morphine through a catheter placed near the spine. Yet catheters are not particularly comfortable, and the drugs spread throughout

1d

Researchers develop a new quantum-mechanical model

Quantum mechanics is an extraordinarily successful way of understanding the physical world at extremely small scales. Through it, a handful of rules can be used to explain the majority of experimentally observable phenomena. Occasionally, however, we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world.

1d

Spinning towards robust microwave generation on the nano scale

Spin-torque oscillators (STOs) are nanoscale devices that generate microwaves using changes in magnetic field direction, but those produced by any individual device are too weak for practical applications. Physicists have attempted—and, to date, consistently failed—to produce reliable microwave fields by coupling large ensembles. Michael Zaks from Humboldt University of Berlin and Arkady Pikovsky

1d

July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded on Earth

A new report from the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Programme describes how 2019 has already logged several record-hot months. Alarmingly, these temperature increases are occurring even though the planet is transitioning into a more neutral El Niño phase. This year brought several severe heat waves to Europe, India, and Pakistan, among other areas. None , with temperatures narrowly e

1d

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, Toni Morrison, dies at 88

Morrison was the first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Over her nearly five-decade career, Morrison wrote 11 novels, a libretto and collections of nonfiction, and also worked as an editor who wanted to participate in developing a "canon of black work." Morrison's family wrote that they were grateful she had a "long, well lived life." None Toni Morrison — the acclaimed Ameri

1d

Watch SpaceX Catch a Rocket’s Nose Cone With a Giant Net

One Last Thing On Tuesday, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from Florida’s Cape Canaveral. Approximately 30 minutes later, it successfully delivered its payload — Israel’s AMOS-17 communications satellite — into orbit. Mission accomplished, right? Not quite. SpaceX still needed to recover the rocket’s fairing, the nose cone that protected the payload — and CEO Elon Musk just shared a stunning vi

1d

This three-foot-tall parrot proves New Zealand is the mecca of giant weird birds

Heracles inexpectatus A reconstruction of what Heracles inexpectatus might have looked like. (Dr Brian Choo, Flinders University/) If you're going to find fossils of a three-foot-tall parrot anywhere, it's probably going to be in New Zealand. The island nation is still full of unusual specimens, including the world's only alpine parrot, but it used to be home to a wide variety of gigantic birds —

1d

Natural gas storage research could combat global warming

To help combat global warming, a team is working on a new porous polymer that can store natural gas more effectively than anything currently being used.

1d

Data om vind og vejr skal give billigere elektronik

Elektronikproducenter kan i fremtiden producere billigere produkter ved at tage højde for klimaforhold. Nyt dansk projekt udvikler konkrete værktøjer til bedre elektronikdesign.

1d

Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology

While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. In new experiments, CSU engineers offer fundamental insight into why certain membrane designs work better than others.

1d

Lung lining fluid key to elderly susceptibility to tuberculosis disease

Texas Biomed researchers published an article in the Journal of Infectious Diseases in July 2019. The study details an experiment that took place in vitro (in the lab) and in vivo (in animals) that showed fluid in the lining of the lungs plays a big role in the elderly's susceptibility to infection with the bacterium Mtb.

1d

Researchers identify key proteins for the repair of nerve fibers

Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) have identified a group of proteins that help to regenerate damaged nerve cells. Their findings are reported in the journal Neuron.

1d

ALMA dives into black hole's 'sphere of influence'

ALMA has made the most precise measurements of cold gas swirling around a supermassive black hole — the cosmic behemoth at the center of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 3258.

1d

Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals

A new study by Western University demonstrates that the fear predators inspire can leave long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of wild animals and induce enduringly fearful behaviour, comparable to effects seen in PTSD research.

1d

Enhanced glow

Tumor cells circulating in blood are markers for the early detection and prognosis of cancer. However, detection of these cells is challenging because of their scarcity. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced an ultrasensitive method for the direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples. It is based on the amplified, time-resolved fluorescence measurement o

1d

Tech-enhanced intervention tested for female adolescents, young adults with pelvic inflammatory disease

This randomized clinical trial compared a technology-enhanced community health nursing intervention that included text message medication reminders with standard care for female adolescents and young adults with pelvic inflammatory disease.

1d

Persistent inflammation in sepsis survivors linked to higher mortality rates

One out of four sepsis patients who survive their hospital stay have elevated levels of inflammation a year after discharge, and they are at higher risk for major health problems and death. The results give tantalizing clues to future treatments that may improve outcomes for sepsis survivors.

1d

Study in Taiwan examines association of ADHD, causes of death

A nationwide population-based study in Taiwan suggests attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be associated with a higher risk of death from injury causes, including suicide, unintentional injury and homicide. Although the risk of suicide-related death was higher in patients with ADHD than in those without, the absolute risk of death was low and suicide deaths were rare, with natural-

1d

Association of coexisting psychiatric disorders, risk of death in patients with ADHD

This observational study of Swedish national register data included nearly 87,000 people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and examined the association of coexisting psychiatric disorders with risk of death.

1d

How much energy storage costs must fall to reach renewable energy's full potential

The cost of energy storage will be critical in determining how much renewable energy can contribute to the decarbonization of electricity. But how far must energy storage costs fall? In a new study to be published August 7 in the journal Joule, MIT researchers answer this question. They quantify cost targets for storage technologies to enable solar and wind energy with storage to reach competitive

1d

Federal safety regulators scolded Musk over 'misleading statements’ on Tesla safety

Federal safety regulators accused Elon Musk of issuing “misleading statements” on his company’s Tesla Model 3 last year, sending a cease-and-desist letter after the chief executive claimed it …

1d

Air pollution cuts are saving lives in New York state

Lower air pollution levels saved an estimated 5,660 lives in New York State in 2012, compared to 2002 levels, according to a new study.

1d

The US Army is Building a Supercomputer Inside a Storage Container

Portable Supercomputer The U.S. Army has built a six petaflop — $12 million supercomputer, complete with a liquid cooling system and fire suppression system — that’s small enough to fit inside a shipping container. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, it could give soldiers a tactical edge in combat in remote locations. “Because of the sensitive nature of the work involved, we here at H

1d

Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation

When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are increasingly at risk of damage from air pollution, acid rain and other factors. Researchers now report a new, calcium-based conservation treatment inspired by nature that overcomes many drawbacks

1d

Entropy explains RNA diffusion rates in cells

Recent studies have revealed that within cells of both yeast and bacteria, the rates of diffusion of RNA proteins—complex molecules that convey important information throughout the cell—are distributed in characteristic exponential patterns. As it turns out, these patterns display the highest possible degree of disorder, or 'entropy', of all possible diffusion processes within the cell.

1d

Chemotherapy drugs react differently to radiation while in water

Cancer treatment often involves a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy uses medication to stop cancer cells reproducing, but the medication affects the entire body. Radiotherapy uses radiation to kill the cancer cells, and it is targeted to the tumour site. In a recent study, published in the journal European Physical Journal D, researchers from the Leopold-Franzens-Universit

1d

Designing a better low-fat potato chip

Munching on low-fat potato chips might reduce the guilt compared with full-fat versions, but many people don't find the texture as appealing. Now, researchers have developed a technique to analyze potato chips' physical characteristics from simulated first bite to swallow, which they say could be used to help formulate a tastier low-fat snack. They report their results in the Journal of Agricultur

1d

Universal background checks really do cut gun deaths

Controlling who has access to guns has much more impact on reducing gun-related homicides than controlling what guns people have, researchers report. As the US reels from three back-to-back mass shootings—which occurred within the span of eight days in Gilroy, California, El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio—Michael Siegel, a researcher at the School of Public Health at Boston University, says that m

1d

The Strategy of Violent White Supremacy Is Evolving

Just over 27 years ago, the prominent white supremacist Louis Beam Jr. published a now-infamous essay titled “Leaderless Resistance.” Extremist organizations, Beam argued, were too vulnerable to government disruption. The future of white supremacy was individual—lone actors and small, self-organized groups that could take action at their own initiative. You might be forgiven for thinking this was

1d

To Learn About the Far Right, Start With the ‘Manosphere’

Most mass shooters are men. Sophie Walker, the former leader of Britain’s Women’s Equality Party, tweeted that fact soon after 51 people were killed by a gunman in Christchurch, New Zealand. (A Mother Jones database of all U.S. killing sprees since 1982 records four female killers and 111 male ones.) In response, she was deluged with angry emails and accused of “ playing the gender card .” A BBC

1d

Optimistic people sleep better, longer, study finds

People who are the most optimistic tend to sleep better and longer, suggests a new study led by University of Illinois social work professor Rosalba Hernandez. The study included 3,500 young and middle-aged adults in four US regions.

1d

Virtual patients and in silico clinical studies improve blue light treatment for psoriasis

A new study supports the use of virtual patients and in silico clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness of blue light to reduce the symptoms of psoriasis.

1d

Blue sharks use eddies for fast track to food

Blue sharks use large, swirling ocean currents, known as eddies, to fast-track their way down to feed in the ocean twilight zone.

1d

“Solar Sail” Spacecraft Climbs Two Miles of Orbit Using Sun Power

Solar Sailing Mission accomplished. The Planetary Society’s LightSail 2 has officially raised its orbit by just shy of two miles using its solar sail. It reached it’s furthest point of Earth at 729 kilometers on Monday — an increase of 3.2 kilometers since it deployed the sail roughly two weeks ago. Tumbling Through Space That’s an extraordinary accomplishment. The sail is designed to capture the

1d

Amazing Robot Tail Helps You Balance

Third Leg A prototype robot tail, inspired by that of a seahorse, can help users balance or maybe make VR gaming more immersive. The Keio University scientists who built the tail call it Arque, according to Fast Company . With built-in artificial muscles and vertebrae, the tail uses a pneumatic system to bend and move along with the wearer, acting as a smart counterbalance as they lean over or sw

1d

Geneticists unlock the secret of mutant flies' longevity

Russian researchers determined which genes are affected by mutation that extends lifespan of fruit flies. Comparing gene activity of long-living fly strains to the control insects helped reveal mechanisms of aging and identify drug targets associated with aging-related diseases.

1d

Medical mistrust impacts African American men's preventive health, but racism also matters

Mistrust of health care providers, fueled by painful experiences with racism, makes African American men more likely to delay routine screenings and doctor's appointments, according to a new study in the journal Behavioral Medicine by the Health Disparities Institute (HDI) at UConn Health, with potentially serious implications for their overall health.

1d

Air pollution cuts are saving lives in New York state

Lower air pollution levels saved an estimated 5,660 lives in New York State in 2012, compared to 2002 levels, according to a new study.

1d

Gene mutation combo linked to common cancer in women

Michigan State University researchers, in collaboration with the Van Andel Institute, have identified a combination of two gene mutations that is linked to endometrial cancer.

1d

Designing a better low-fat potato chip

Munching on low-fat potato chips might reduce the guilt compared with full-fat versions, but many people don't find the texture as appealing. Now, researchers have developed a technique to analyze potato chips' physical characteristics from simulated first bite to swallow, which they say could be used to help formulate a tastier low-fat snack. They report their results in the Journal of Agricultur

1d

Spinning towards robust microwave generation on the nano scale

Many physicists have attempted to produce reliable macroscale microwave fields by combining nanoscale spin-torque oscillators, but so far without success. Michael Zaks from Humboldt University of Berlin and Arkady Pikovsky from the University of Potsdam in Germany have now theoretically demonstrated why connecting these devices in series is doomed to fail. Their work was recently published in EPJ

1d

Quantum momentum

Occasionally we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world. A new mathematical model published in EPJ D has provided some insights into one of them: momentum. The model uses another classical concept, that of time-of-flight.

1d

Research advances to better target debilitating effects of cachexia syndrome

A study describes the generation of a new mouse model that could lead to a better understanding of the cachexia syndrome.

1d

What Is Metabolic Profiling, and Can It Help You?

Is a malfunctioning metabolism really why you can’t lose weight and keep it off? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The surprising merit of giant clam feces

Coral reefs are a hotspot of biodiversity, hosting numerous species of animals and fish that help one another maintain a harmonious environment. One of these species is the giant clam. They are the biggest shellfish in the world, with 13 species found so far. One of the most famous species, Tridacna gigas, can live more than 100 years and grow to more than a meter wide. Their size and beautiful sh

1d

Enormous ‘cannonballs’ of plasma spotted hurtling around the sun

Huge blobs of hot plasma are flying around at high speeds on the sun, and they may help us figure out why the sun's outermost layers are so surprisingly hot

1d

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields activate immune cells

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are strong electrical pulses over a very short period of time (nanoseconds) that results in high electrical power. They are used in many fields and now researchers have found that stimulating immune cells with nanosecond pulsed electric fields can cause the cells to respond as if they were being stimulated by bacteria.

1d

NASA catches transitioning Tropical Storm Francisco near Korean Peninsula

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Sea of Japan and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Francisco as it was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.

1d

The surprising merit of giant clam feces

Coral reefs are a hotspot of biodiversity, hosting numerous species of animals and fish that help one another maintain a harmonious environment. One of these species is the giant clam. They are the biggest shellfish in the world, with 13 species found so far. One of the most famous species, Tridacna gigas, can live more than 100 years and grow to more than a meter wide. Their size and beautiful sh

1d

1d

Philippines on alert with Typhoon Lekima

Lekima is now a typhoon and has triggered warnings in the Philippines. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided a visible image of the storm that shows a clear eye.

1d

Chemotherapy drugs react differently to radiation while in water

In a new study in EPJ D, researchers at the Leopold-Franzens-University Innsbruck, in Innsbruck, Austria studied the way various molecules, found in chemotherapy drugs, react to ionization by radiation similar to that used in cancer treatment.

1d

New quantitative method standardizes phage virulence determination

Researchers have developed a simple, fast, and standardized method for measuring phage virulence quantitatively, which can expediate phage therapy development by allowing robust individual and combined testing of phage efficacy.

1d

Tropical Storm Krosa gets a comma shape

Tropical Storm Krosa continued on its journey northward in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NOAA's NOAA-20 polar orbiting satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the strengthening storm in a classic tropical cyclone shape.

1d

BU researchers: 'Set' of gun laws needed to reduce gun violence

First-ever study to examine gun control effects on urban and suburban/rural firearm homicide rates finds different laws are more effective in different areas.

1d

Entropy explains RNA diffusion rates in cells

Small-scale analysis of RNA diffusion rates throughout cells of yeast and bacteria reveals that rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher diffusion rates, according to research published in EPJ B.

1d

Anatomy of a cosmic seagull

Colourful and wispy, this intriguing collection of objects is known as the Seagull Nebula, named for its resemblance to a gull in flight. Made up of dust, hydrogen, helium and traces of heavier elements, this region is the hot and energetic birthplace of new stars. The remarkable detail captured here by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST) reveals the individual astronomical objects that make up the c

1d

New test to snare those lying about a person's identity

A new test developed by the University of Stirling could help police to determine when criminals or witnesses are lying about their knowledge of a person's identity.

1d

Cancer in the oldest old: The fastest growing age group in the US

A new report looks at cancer in adults 85 and older and finds incidence and mortality trends are generally similar to those in people 65 to 84, but screening is unexpectedly high and survival is poorer.

1d

Want to Stop Gulls From Stealing Your Food? Stare Them Down, Study Says

New research in Britain suggests that gulls take behavioral cues from people when foraging in urban environments.

1d

Medicine in Space: What Microgravity Can Tell Us about Human Health

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor discusses her experience in microgravity and doing biological experiments in space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

FedEx cuts ties with Amazon in sign of new rivalry

FedEx said Wednesday it would stop making ground deliveries for Amazon in the latest sign of competition between the two firms.

1d

Twitter is secretly building a 'snooze button' function which will pause notifications

If it's eventually launched, the utility will appear to global users as a crossed-out bell in the upper-right corner of the notifications tab.

1d

Kids may need to learn to love nature

Children in a recent study preferred pictures of urban environments to those of nature. Past research has shown that adults prefer natural scenes to urban ones, but it’s been unclear whether that preference is inherent, or if people learn it through experience. To help answer that question, a team of University of Chicago psychologists surveyed the 239 children aged 4 to 11. The researchers found

1d

Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation

When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are increasingly at risk of damage from air pollution, acid rain and other factors. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a new, calcium-based conservation treatment inspired by nature

1d

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields activate immune cells

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are strong electrical pulses over a very short period of time (nanoseconds) that results in high electrical power. They are used in many fields and now researchers have found that stimulating immune cells with nanosecond pulsed electric fields can cause the cells to respond as if they were being stimulated by bacteria.

1d

Outbursts of hot wind detected close to black hole

Astrophysicists have detected a very hot, dense outflowing wind close to a black hole at least 25,000 light-years from Earth.

1d

Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks

Researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks.

1d

Staring at seagulls could save your chips

Staring at seagulls makes them less likely to steal your food, new research shows.

1d

Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body

Researchers have developed biodegradable microresonators that can be heated locally with a wireless system. Doctors could soon be using them in implants to control the release of painkillers within tissue.

1d

Substituting poultry for red meat may reduce breast cancer risk

Results from a new study suggest that red meat consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer, whereas poultry consumption may be protective against breast cancer risk.

1d

Marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths

A new study finds that marijuana access leads to reductions in opioid-related deaths.

1d

Cannabis' effects on brain neurochemistry

A new study provides the first evidence of a blunted response to stress-induced dopamine signaling in the brain's prefrontal cortex in individuals at high risk for psychosis who regularly used cannabis.

1d

Characteristics of older adults with moderately severe dementia

A study has found that many characteristics among older adults with moderately severe dementia differ depending on whether they live at home or in residential care or nursing facilities.

1d

Study links progenitor cells to age-related prostate growth

The prostates of older mice contain more luminal progenitor cells — cells capable of generating new prostate tissue — than the prostates of younger mice, researchers have discovered.

1d

A Call for Courage as Physicists Confront Collider Dilemma

All the world is built out of 17 known elementary particles. Carlo Rubbia led the team that discovered two of them. In 1984, Rubbia shared the Nobel Prize in Physics with Simon van der Meer for their “decisive contributions” to the experiment that, the year before, had turned up the W and Z bosons. These particles convey one of the four fundamental forces, called the weak force, which causes radi

1d

Your guide to the carbon sucking tech we need to save the planet

Humans have emitted so much carbon dioxide that we must find ways of sucking it from the air. Can that be done without wrecking the environment in other ways?

1d

Fact-Check the Physics of Captain America Hammering Thanos

Sure, Captain America and Thanos (and their superpowers) break some laws of physics. But let's see if they obey the momentum principle in *Avengers: Endgame*.

1d

Watch China’s New Hybrid AI Chip Power an Autonomous Bike

When I lived in Beijing back in the 90s, a man walking his bike was nothing to look at. But today, I did a serious double-take at a video of a bike walking his man. No kidding. The bike itself looks overloaded but otherwise completely normal. Underneath its simplicity, however, is a hybrid computer chip that combines brain-inspired circuits with machine learning processes into a computing behemot

1d

Medicine in Space: What Microgravity Can Tell Us about Human Health

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor discusses her experience in microgravity and doing biological experiments in space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Gold glue really does bond nanocages 'contradicting' logic

It has long been known that gold can be used to do things that philosophers have never even dreamed of. The Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow has confirmed the existence of 'gold glue': bonds involving gold atoms, capable of permanently bonding protein rings. Skilfully used by an international team of scientists, the bonds have made it possible to construct m

1d

Brain stimulation for PTSD patients

University of Houston assistant professor of electrical engineering Rose T. Faghih reports that the tiny beads of sweat, which appear in patients experiencing PTSD or other neuropsychiatric disorders, can be measured and used to design and more responsive brain stimulator for therapy.

1d

NASA catches transitioning Tropical Storm Francisco near Korean Peninsula

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Sea of Japan and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Francisco as it was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.

1d

Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation

When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are increasingly at risk of damage from air pollution, acid rain and other factors. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a new, calcium-based conservation treatment inspired by nature

1d

Transport by mobile stroke units get patients quicker treatment than ambulance

Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute. Researchers at UTHealth recently published new findings in Stroke that show patients transported to the hospital by mobile stroke unit instead of standard ambulance received a clot-busting procedure an average of 10 minutes faster, which could potentially save up to 270 million neurons p

1d

Medicine in Space: What Microgravity Can Tell Us about Human Health

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor discusses her experience in microgravity and doing biological experiments in space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Meeri Kim

Contributor is a science journalist based in Los Angeles. She received her physics Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Slate.com, Huffington Post, VICE's Tonic, CURE Magazine, and Wareable. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, cooking, and riding her bike. Follow her at @meeri_kim . Author social media Twitter

1d

Elizabeth Warren Unveils a Plan to Expand Broadband Access

The senator and presidential candidate wants to offer $85 billion in grants to nonprofits and municipalities to bring the internet to underserved areas.

1d

The surprising merit of giant clam feces

Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure.

1d

Astronomers reveal true colors of evolving galactic beasts

Astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe's most energetic objects.

1d

Cooperation with high status individuals may increase one's own status

Researchers have shown that cooperation between individuals can be driven by opportunities to acquire status over others and that decisions with whom to cooperate are often based on who has more or less status.

1d

NZ big bird a whopping 'squawkzilla'

Australasian palaeontologists have discovered the world's largest parrot, standing up to 1m tall with a massive beak able to crack most food sources. The new bird has been named Heracles inexpectatus to reflect its Herculean myth-like size and strength — and the unexpected nature of the discovery.

1d

Cover crops, compost and carbon

Comparing techniques in organic farming that influence soil health.

1d

Concerns about prevalent orchid viruses

Researchers have investigated the evolution of the two most prevalent orchid viruses using information representing their global distribution. The study revealed that considerable international trade of cultivated orchids has effectively 'homogenized' the genetic diversity of the viruses. In other words, the two viruses have displayed few genetic differences since their first emergence, across cou

1d

New insights into the origin of life

A famous experiment in 1953 showed that amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, could have formed spontaneously under the atmospheric conditions of early Earth. However, just because molecules could form doesn't mean that the process was likely. Now, researchers have demonstrated that energetically feasible interactions between just two small molecules — hydrogen cyanide and water — could

1d

Eating more plant-based foods may be linked to better heart health

Diets higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods were linked with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death in a new study.

1d

How Artist Teresita Fernández Turns Graphite, the Stuff of Stardust, Into Memories

A new episode of the Smithsonian’s ‘Re:Frame,’ explores the origin of graphite, a material artists have used for centuries

1d

A hybrid material that switches reversibly between two stable solid states

Solid matter typically contains a single, stable solid state for a specific set of conditions. Materials scientists envision that new materials with interchangeable solid states will be advantageous for diverse technical applications. In a new report now published on Nature Materials, Fut (Kuo) Yang and colleagues in the interdisciplinary departments of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Bio

1d

How to change the world and solve global problems – with cash prizes

Challenge prizes – which offer a cash incentive to those working to solve a particular problem—are becoming a force for change by allowing entrepreneurs and innovators, often overlooked by existing grant and procurement systems, to develop solutions to the world's greatest problems.

1d

Record-breaking analytical method for fingerprinting petroleum and other complex mixtures

Scientists at the University of Warwick have developed a more powerful method of analysing chemical mixtures, which has been able to assign a record-breaking number of 244,779 molecular compositions within a single sample of petroleum.

1d

Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body

EPFL researchers have developed biodegradable microresonators that can be heated locally with a wireless system. Doctors could soon be using them in implants to control the release of painkillers within tissue.

1d

Natural gas storage research could combat global warming

To help combat global warming, a team led by Dr. Mert Atilhan from Texas A&M University and Dr. Cafer Yavuz at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), is working on a new porous polymer that can store natural gas more effectively than anything currently being used.

1d

Asbestosis toxicity study identifies potential of novel mineral treatment

Scientists investigating the ability of a micronized mineral compound to counteract the carcinogenic effects of mesothelioma and asbestosis, say results from both cell culture and animal model studies are very promising, warranting further investigation, including the commencement of clinical trials.

1d

Stranger sea things turning up off Nova Scotia shores

Lloyd Bond has been diving the waters of Nova Scotia for the last 20 years, often coming across flatfish, lobster and sea urchins that typically populate cooler northern climates.

1d

New Analysis of Kepler Data Finds Hundreds of New Exoplanets

The Kepler Space Telescope ended its wildly successful planet-hunting mission last year, but it’s still making discoveries from the grave. NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has since taken up the planet-hunter banner, but it’s got a long way to go before it’s on the same level as Kepler. The gap between the probes just got wider, too. A new analysis of data from Kepler has revea

1d

Stranger sea things turning up off Nova Scotia shores

Lloyd Bond has been diving the waters of Nova Scotia for the last 20 years, often coming across flatfish, lobster and sea urchins that typically populate cooler northern climates.

1d

Salesperson ambidexterity and company profitability are dependent on customer base

A new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Collat School of Business has broken new ground on identifying and improving upon effective "hunters" and "farmers" in the sales world. The study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, analyzes the importance of customer base characteristics on the effectiveness of salesperson hunting, such as seeking out new customer

1d

Dinosaur egg bonanza gives vital clues about prehistoric parenting

Perhaps the most amazing thing about fossils is that they don't just show us what extinct animals looked like, they can also reveal how those animals lived. Even a fossilized dinosaur egg can provide a wealth of clues about its parents' behavior.

1d

Weaponizing vulnerability to climate change: Countermeasures often hurt the poor

As the world struggles to battle the effects of climate change, not everyone benefits equally from the remedies. In a recent paper titled "Weaponizing vulnerability to climate change," Benjamin Warner, an assistant professor of geography and environmental studies at The University of New Mexico, and his colleague Kimberley Thomas, a political ecologist at Temple University, examine the way the fig

1d

Moonquakes tumble boulders, build lunar scarps

The Apollo Moon buggies weren't the only things rolling over the Moon's surface in the early 1970s.

1d

Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate

Researchers at UEA and the Earlham Institute (EI) have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees.

1d

Secrets of Chimanimani revealed in biodiversity surveys

Despite not boasting the fame of the Serengeti or Kruger National Park, Chimanimani, straddling the Mozambican and Zimbabwean border, is an area like no other. Diverse landscapes and unique plant and animal species coexist together in this comparatively unheralded region of southern Africa.

1d

Don't fear the pholcid: Daddy long-legs' venom is only dangerous if you're an insect

You've probably heard the urban legend: Daddy long-leg spiders possess extremely toxic venom—so toxic that it would kill a human if only their fangs were long/strong enough to penetrate human skin.

1d

Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate

Researchers at UEA and the Earlham Institute (EI) have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees.

1d

Secrets of Chimanimani revealed in biodiversity surveys

Despite not boasting the fame of the Serengeti or Kruger National Park, Chimanimani, straddling the Mozambican and Zimbabwean border, is an area like no other. Diverse landscapes and unique plant and animal species coexist together in this comparatively unheralded region of southern Africa.

1d

Nations agree landmark UN climate report after marathon talks

Negotiators from 195 countries on Wednesday finalized the most comprehensive scientific assessment yet of how the land we live off affects climate change, after marathon talks in Geneva, sources told AFP.

1d

Don't fear the pholcid: Daddy long-legs' venom is only dangerous if you're an insect

You've probably heard the urban legend: Daddy long-leg spiders possess extremely toxic venom—so toxic that it would kill a human if only their fangs were long/strong enough to penetrate human skin.

1d

Cheap renewable energy: Cracking the photosynthetic process that enables plants to split wat

Scientists have cracked a key step in nature's water-splitting recipe, which powers all plant life on Earth and may be harnessed to make a limitless supply of cheap renewable fuel.

1d

Blue sharks ride deep-swirling currents to the ocean's midwater at mealtime

When you're hungry, wouldn't it be nice to just slip into a tunnel that rushes you off to a grand buffet? It sounds like something Elon Musk might dream up, but it turns out, certain species of sharks appear to have this luxury.

1d

Astronomers reveal true colors of evolving galactic beasts

Astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe's most energetic objects.

1d

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields activate immune cells

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are strong electrical pulses over a very short period of time (nanoseconds) that results in high electrical power. They are used in many fields and now researchers in Japan have found that stimulating immune cells with nanosecond pulsed electric fields can cause the cells to respond as if they were being stimulated by bacteria.

1d

The surprising merit of giant clam feces

Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure.

1d

Outbursts of hot wind detected close to black hole

An international team of astrophysicists from Southampton, Oxford and South Africa have detected a very hot, dense outflowing wind close to a black hole at least 25,000 light-years from Earth.

1d

Manipulating brain cells by smartphone

Researchers have developed a soft neural implant that can be wirelessly controlled using a smartphone. It is the first wireless neural device capable of indefinitely delivering multiple drugs and multiple colour lights, which neuroscientists believe can speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases

1d

Storm Area 51 event removed from Facebook 'by accident'

For a harrowing couple of days, Facebook removed the page of the Storm Area 51 event that has gone viral in recent weeks, a decision it said was an accident.

1d

Blue sharks ride deep-swirling currents to the ocean's midwater at mealtime

When you're hungry, wouldn't it be nice to just slip into a tunnel that rushes you off to a grand buffet? It sounds like something Elon Musk might dream up, but it turns out, certain species of sharks appear to have this luxury.

1d

Those close-knit communities of the past never existed

The happy, close-knit communities some claim England had in the past are a myth and never existed, new research shows.

1d

Experiments help differentiate between nuclear tests and natural events

Sandia National Laboratories researchers, as part of a group of National Nuclear Security Administration scientists, have wrapped up years of field experiments to improve the United States' ability to differentiate earthquakes from underground explosions, key knowledge needed to advance the nation's monitoring and verification capabilities for detecting underground nuclear explosions.

1d

Cheap renewable energy: Cracking the photosynthetic process that enables plants to split wat

Scientists have cracked a key step in nature's water-splitting recipe, which powers all plant life on Earth and may be harnessed to make a limitless supply of cheap renewable fuel.

1d

Tech Meets Health Care, Sometimes Shakily

Katie Thomas, who covers health care, has chronicled how the technology disruption in her field has raised questions that are still unanswered.

1d

What are light echoes? Using reflections of light to see even further back in time

When we look outward into space, we're looking backward in time. That's because light moves at the speed of light. It takes time for the light to reach us.

1d

Astronomers identify dozens of new Beta Cephei stars

Using the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT), astronomers have detected 86 new Beta Cephei (β Cep) stars in the Milky Way galaxy. The discovery, detailed in a paper published July 26 on the arXiv pre-print repository, greatly improves the number of galactic β Cep stars known to date.

1d

Opioids in the home up risk for relatives

When one person at home uses opioids it can double the chances someone else living there will seek out the addictive drugs, too, according to new research. The new study in the American Sociological Review shows that the chances that a person gets a prescription for opioids climbs between 19% and 100% when a relative living in the same household already uses the drugs, depending on circumstances.

1d

Black men in U.S. face 1 in 1,000 chance of being killed by police

Police violence is a leading cause of death of young men in the United States with black men 2.5 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement over their lifetime than white men, research finds. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , examines fatality risks during police encounters—some 11,456 between 2013 and 2017—and finds that African American men and

1d

Ökad näring vinst för växter vid bete

I en nyligen publicerad studie har forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU) jämfört hur växternas energi- och näringsinnehåll påverkas av att djur betar markerna året om jämfört med om man klipper dem en gång i månaden. Det ökade energi- och proteininnehållet på den betade marken kan bero på en snabbare föryngring men också på en ökad variation av växter som gynnas av betet. Det i sin tur

1d

Tardigrades: 'Water bears' stuck on the moon after crash

Tiny animals called tardigrades are thought to have survived a crash-landing on the moon.

1d

Development of flexible sensors mimicking human finger skin by DGIST

Senior Researcher Changsoon Choi's team at DGIST and Dr. Sungwoo Chun at SKKU developed a new tactile sensor mimicking human skin. Can recognize more sensitive tactile than the existing sensors… Expected to contribute greatly to the development of artificial skin.

1d

Record-breaking new analytical method for fingerprinting petroleum and other complex mixtures

Scientists at the University of Warwick have developed a more powerful method of analysing chemical mixtures, which has been able to assign a record-breaking number of 244,779 molecular compositions within a single sample of petroleum.

1d

Two heads better than one? Homing pigeons flap faster to fly together

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks, ranging from structured V-formations to loose clusters that involve complex aerodynamic interactions between group members. Frequently cited benefits of collective travel include improved flight efficiency, enhanced navigation and greater safety from predators.

1d

Two heads better than one? Homing pigeons flap faster to fly together

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks, ranging from structured V-formations to loose clusters that involve complex aerodynamic interactions between group members. Frequently cited benefits of collective travel include improved flight efficiency, enhanced navigation and greater safety from predators.

1d

Record-breaking new analytical method for fingerprinting petroleum and other complex mixtures

Scientists at the University of Warwick have developed a more powerful method of analysing chemical mixtures, which has been able to assign a record-breaking number of 244,779 molecular compositions within a single sample of petroleum.

1d

Astronomers reveal true colors of evolving galactic beasts

Astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe's most energetic objects. Quasars were first observed 60 years ago, but their origins still remain a mystery. Now researchers at Durham University, UK, have spotted what they suggest is a "brief transition phase" in the development of these galactic giants that could shed light on how quasars and their host galaxies evol

1d

Video: Sådan lærer førerløse skibe at undgå kollision ved hjælp af sensorer

PLUS. Nordmænd har nu prøvesejlet autonome skibe, der navigerer ved hjælp af blandt andet billedsensorer. En demonstrationsvideo viser, hvordan skibet undgår et skib på direkte kollisionskurs.

1d

How a Revolutionary Technique Got People with Spinal-Cord Injuries Back on Their Feet

Electrical stimulation has promised huge gains for people with paralysis. Now comes the hard part—getting beyond those first steps — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Planting trees is no substitute for natural forests

Tomorrow a special report on how land use affects climate change will be released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

1d

An Awful Idea: Paying to Get Into a Clinical Trial

This article at Stat by Rebecca Robbins really caught me eye. It describes clinical trials where the participants are being asked to pay thousands of dollars just to join the trial. There seems to have been an increase in this sort of thing lately, and I’ll be completely clear: I think that’s a terrible idea that needs to be dealt with quickly. FDA regulations permit such charges in “extraordinar

1d

Trio behind supergravity breakthrough win Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics

The three physicists credited with "the invention of supergravity" have won the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for their work nearly 40 years ago. The announcement was made by the Selection Committee. In addition to the award, the three physicists—Sergio Ferrara, Daniel Freedman and Peter van Nieuwenhuizen—will also share 3 million dollars.

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

The Digital Skill Gap is widening Fast!

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

1d

1d

Plant-based fish could be the next Impossible Foods win, and save the oceans

submitted by /u/AbraSLAM_Lincoln [link] [comments]

1d

Years and years, an prophetical HBO series about Futurology.

submitted by /u/Fausto_Rodeios [link] [comments]

1d

1d

Gary Null’s Attack on SBM

Gary Null's fact- and logic-free attack on SBM.

1d

Breadcrumbs for an alien

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02382-1 Missed connections.

1d

Milky Way map, arrested biologist and missile-treaty withdrawal

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02380-3 The week in science: 2–8 August 2019.

1d

New insights into the origin of life

A famous experiment in 1953 showed that amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, could have formed spontaneously under the atmospheric conditions of early Earth. However, just because molecules could form doesn't mean that the process was likely. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have demonstrated that energetically feasible interactions between just two small molecules — hyd

1d

Behov for læger i ledelsen af sundhedsvæsenet

Hvis læger skal blive mere interesseret i ledelse, kræver det, at vi får den naturvidenskabelige lægelige identitet og den administrative samfundsvidenskabelige identitet til at mødes.

1d

Researchers study what motivates rural LGBTQ youths to take part in activism

When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage was legal, it was a major victory for generations who fought to achieve equality. However, the decision was far from the end of oppression for the LGBTQ community, especially queer and transgender youths in rural areas. A University of Kansas researcher co-wrote a study to gauge what issues are most important to this population and what moti

1d

1d

Surprising level of biodiversity found among western New York lichen populations

The iron smelters and coal-fired power plants may be gone, but the imprint of a rust-belt region's industrial legacy remains in its lichen communities. Lichens are the proverbial "canaries in the coal mine" when it comes to looking at the damaging effects of pollution in a given area, said Robert J. Warren, associate professor of biology.

1d

Surprising level of biodiversity found among western New York lichen populations

The iron smelters and coal-fired power plants may be gone, but the imprint of a rust-belt region's industrial legacy remains in its lichen communities. Lichens are the proverbial "canaries in the coal mine" when it comes to looking at the damaging effects of pollution in a given area, said Robert J. Warren, associate professor of biology.

1d

Scratching the surface: Metallic glass implants

A class of biomaterials called bulk metallic glasses could transform future implanted medical devices and other engineered objects.

1d

Link between women's gun ownership and increased political participation

Politicians pay close attention to the demands of gun owners. They also pay attention to women voters. But little of their focus is aimed at women who are gun owners.

1d

The compelling mathematical challenge of the three-body problem

From its origins more than 300 years ago in Newton's work on planetary orbits, the three-body problem has blossomed into a rich subject that continues to yield new insights for mathematicians.

1d

Whole genome sequencing may help officials get a handle on disease outbreaks

Whole genome sequencing technology may give epidemiologists and healthcare workers a powerful weapon in tracking and, possibly, controlling outbreaks of serious diseases, according to a team of researchers.

1d

Whole genome sequencing may help officials get a handle on disease outbreaks

Whole genome sequencing technology may give epidemiologists and healthcare workers a powerful weapon in tracking and, possibly, controlling outbreaks of serious diseases, according to a team of researchers.

1d

Popular anti-HIV drugs result in ‘10 years of weight gain in 2 years’ for some women

Dolutegravir-tenofovir alafenamide combo seems to trigger massive gain in South African women, but not men

1d

Global team of scientists finish assembling next-generation dark matter detector

The key component of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment is ready to be sealed and lowered nearly 1.5 km underground, where it will search for dark matter.

1d

Astrophysical shock phenomena reproduced in the laboratory

Vast interstellar events where clouds of charged matter hurtle into each other and spew out high-energy particles have now been reproduced in the lab with high fidelity. The work, by MIT researchers and an international team of colleagues, should help resolve longstanding disputes over exactly what takes place in these gigantic shocks.

1d

Researchers uncover hidden topological insulator states in bismuth crystals

The search for better materials for computers and other electronic devices has focused on a group of materials known as "topological insulators" that have a special property of conducting electricity on the edge of their surfaces like traffic lanes on a highway. This can increase energy efficiency and reduce heat output.

1d

New insights into the origin of life

A famous experiment in 1953 showed that amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, could have formed spontaneously under the atmospheric conditions of early Earth. However, just because molecules could form doesn't mean that the process was likely. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have demonstrated that energetically feasible interactions between just two small molecules—hydrog

1d

1d

Image of the Day: Smartphone-Controlled Brains

A device implanted into mice can modulate brain circuit activity over long periods of time.

1d

How Economists’ Faith in Markets Broke America

A little more than a generation ago, a stealthy revolution swept America. It was a dual changing of the guard: Two tribes, two attitudes, two approaches to a good society were simultaneously displaced by upstart rivals. In the world of business, the manufacturing bosses gave way to Wall Street dealmakers, bent on breaking up their empires. “ Organization Man,” as the journalist William H. Whyte h

1d

New insights into the origin of life

A famous experiment in 1953 showed that amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, could have formed spontaneously under the atmospheric conditions of early Earth. However, just because molecules could form doesn't mean that the process was likely. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have demonstrated that energetically feasible interactions between just two small molecules—hydrog

1d

Chrome protects high-profile hacking targets against risky downloads

Google's Advanced Protection Program now protects high-risk hacking targets even while they're casually surfing the web. Users who turn on account syncing in Chrome now have …

1d

3 Physicists Win $3 Million Prize for 'Supergravity' Discovery

Supergravity has inspired physicists for decades and may contain deep truths about the nature of reality.

1d

Brazil's Sacked Space Director Speaks Out on Attacks on Science

Ricardo Galvão discusses his dismissal after Amazon deforestation data rankled President Bolsonaro — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Bizarre 'Nanoseaweed' Is the Thinnest Gold in the World

The thinnest gold in the world will, sadly, not be adorning your fingers anytime soon.

1d

This Parrot Stood 3 Feet Tall and Ruled the Roost in New Zealand Forests 19 Million Years Ago

It was the largest parrot that ever lived, and is the only known giant parrot in the world.

1d

A Tiny Magma Blob May Rewrite Earth's History of Plate Tectonics

An International team of scientists finds evidence that Earth began recycling itself more than 3 billion years ago.

1d

Cellulose nanofibers to improve the sensitivity of lateral flow tests

Scientists from the ICN2 Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group led by ICREA Prof. Arben Merkoçi have carried out a study to enhance the sensitivity of lateral flow tests. They included cellulose nanofibers in the test area, producing an average increase of 36.6 percent of the colorimetric signal on positive tests. The proposed modification can be easily applied to any kind of lateral flow strip,

1d

Brazil's Sacked Space Director Speaks Out on Attacks on Science

Ricardo Galvão discusses his dismissal after Amazon deforestation data rankled President Bolsonaro — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

A common honey bee disease is spread through flowers

James Cook University scientists have discovered a common honey bee disease can be deadly to native Australian wild bees and can be transmitted by flowers—the first time this link has been made.

1d

A common honey bee disease is spread through flowers

James Cook University scientists have discovered a common honey bee disease can be deadly to native Australian wild bees and can be transmitted by flowers—the first time this link has been made.

1d

A 'switch' that regulates traffic across blood vessels

NUS scientists have discovered a control mechanism that regulates the traffic of cells and substances across blood vessels. This effect can have significant impact on cancer metastasis.

1d

Businesses Need to Embrace the New Science of Learning

“Learning loop,” an innovative way employees can pick up new skills, is a good example — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Businesses Need to Embrace the New Science of Learning

“Learning loop,” an innovative way employees can pick up new skills, is a good example — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

8 Ways Overseas Drug Manufacturers Dupe the FDA

From taking inspectors hostage to making stuff up, generic drug makers can try to look like they were following the regulations while actually subverting them.

1d

Listen, Here’s Why the Value of China’s Yuan Really Matters

President Trump is accusing China of currency manipulation in the ongoing trade war—a cheaper yuan could erase the impact of US tariffs.

1d

The Fight Against White Nationalism Is Different

During the war with the Islamic State, I sometimes heard U.S. officials and analysts express something like relief that the group had declared a “caliphate” with recognizable borders in Syria and Iraq, even flying its flag atop Mosul’s historic Great Mosque of al-Nuri. A state was something the U.S. military could take away. An ideology is much harder to defeat. That’s the problem America faces a

1d

Businesses Need to Embrace the New Science of Learning

“Learning loop,” an innovative way employees can pick up new skills, is a good example — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Staring at seagulls helps protect food, say scientists

The seaside birds are less likely to steal your chips when you watch them, according to scientists.

1d

Polly wants many crackers: fossils reveal first known giant parrot

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02377-y Extinct bird lived in what is now New Zealand and stood roughly 1 metre tall.

1d

Midsize Black Holes May Explain the Milky Way's Speediest Stars

Some stars moving fast enough to escape the galaxy likely come from a never before seen class of intermediate-mass black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Microsoft Patches Windows Bug That Neutralized Spectre And Meltdown Fixes On Intel CPUs

You might not have even been aware of this, but last month's Patch Tuesday update for Windows contained a long overdue mitigation for a security flaw in Intel processors. Left upatched, the …

1d

Midsize Black Holes May Explain the Milky Way's Speediest Stars

Some stars moving fast enough to escape the galaxy likely come from a never before seen class of intermediate-mass black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Do these icebergs produce the world's purest water?

Selling water from melted icebergs is big business on Canada's eastern coast, but there are concerns over Arctic warming.

1d

Ancient parrot in New Zealand was 1m tall, study says

The parrot roamed New Zealand 19 million years ago, and may have been flightless and carnivorous.

1d

Trump the Bulldozer

Fifteen months ago, which was 16 months into the Trump administration, I surveyed the president’s agenda and noted that in high-stakes confrontations, he almost always folded . While he was tenacious in pursuing his central promise of a border wall, Donald Trump often talked a big game, especially on foreign affairs, only to flinch or punt when the moment of decision came. But over the past year

1d

Snowglow can cause the night sky to be twice as bright as a full moon

A combination of snow and cloud cover can make light pollution in the sky over 180 times brighter, potentially affecting the sleep cycles of nocturnal animals

1d

Scientists must rise above politics — and restate their value to society

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02379-w Scholars globally are feeling the heat from politicians. They should take inspiration from scientists in the 1950s who raised the alarm over nuclear weapons.

1d

Entreprenører skal lære at håndtere problemramt EPS-beton ordentligt

Brancheforeningen Dansk Byggeri vil med nye vejledninger undgå, at letvægtsbetonen bruges på forkert vis. Det skal standse skader og fejl på byggeprojekter, der bruger EPS-beton.

1d

How pieces of live human brain are helping scientists map nerve cells

Experiments on live nerve cells — donated from patients undergoing brain surgery — may turn up clues about how the human brain works.

1d

Conflicts of disinterest: Why does it take a publisher 18 months, and counting, to correct papers?

On February 23, 2018, Stephen Barrett — a physician in the United States perhaps best known for his work at Quackwatch — sent Dove Press this message: I believe you have published 20 articles in 6 of your journals in which the lead author did not make a full conflict-of-interest disclosure. Please email me directly … Continue reading

1d

Insiders and outsiders keep democracy alive: Whistleblowing, civil disobedience and discourse

The first U.S. whistleblower protection law was passed unanimously in 1778 in response to the misconduct of Navy Commodore Esek Hopkins. Whistleblowing and civil disobedience are tools of discourse that keep elites honest and protect democracy. The difference? Whistleblowers are insiders who expose improper conduct to the authorities or to the press. Civil disobedience starts with outsiders whose

1d

Tens of thousands additional deaths annually in cities of China between 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C warming

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11283-w Heatwaves are expected to increase under climate change, and so are the associated deaths. Here the authors determine the regional high temperature thresholds for 27 metropolises in China and analyze the changes to heat-related mortality, showing that the additional global-warming temperature increase of 0.5°C

1d

Don’t Give White Nationalists the Post-9/11 Treatment

Many mass shootings spur pedantic debates about whether an attack “counts” as an act of terrorism. But the man who allegedly shot 22 people dead in El Paso, Texas, left no doubt. According to his manifesto , posted on a favorite political-extremism website minutes before the shooting, he was inspired by other recent white-nationalist terrorist attacks and hoped to stem what he called the “Hispani

1d

The Reason Musicians Speak Up About Mass Shootings

A spate of violence as horrific as the one recently experienced in the United States is the sort of thing everyone is entitled to have a reaction to. And “everyone” includes entertainers. Yet an odd, shaming script plays out when musicians in particular make their feelings known about matters of national importance. That script was highlighted this week, after Kacey Musgraves, the alternative-cou

1d

My Father’s Gun

I own a gun. It’s under a couch in my family room, which is a weird place for a gun, but maybe not for a gun owned by an American. How many stories of children who find a gun and accidentally shoot themselves or a sibling report the odd location where they picked it up—on the edge of a bathroom sink, on a kitchen counter, on a parent’s bedside table? Our country is so full of guns that we’ve run

1d

The Comic With the Amazing Technicolor Wardrobe

P icture a stand-up comedian onstage. There’s probably a mic stand, a stool, and a spotlight. The comedian probably jokes, pauses for laughs, and develops a rhythm. Maybe there’s a little pacing back and forth, some physical comedy, a prop or two at the most. My Favorite Shapes , Julio Torres’s first special on HBO, filters all of that—the very concept of a stand-up act—through a marvelous theatr

1d

Rekordmange vil være praktiserende læge

Aldrig har der været så mange besatte HU-stillinger i almen medicin som i år. Kun Region Sjælland halter bagefter.

1d

Coop-medlemmer kan optjene bonus med online lægekonsultationer

1,8 danskere kan nu med deres Coop-medlemskab optjene bonus ved at købe særlige lægekonsultationer. Problematisk, siger PLO-formand.

1d

Anode interfacial layer formation via reductive ethyl detaching of organic iodide in lithium–oxygen batteries

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11544-8 To fulfill the great promise of Li-O2 batteries, the high charge overpotential is a major challenge that has to be addressed. Here the authors introduce triethylsulfonium iodide as a redox mediator as well as an enabler of a protective layer on Li anode, leading to notable electrochemical performance.

1d

Visualisation of dCas9 target search in vivo using an open-microscopy framework

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11514-0 Single-particle tracking PALM (sptPALM) provides quantitative information in vivo if the protein of interest remains in a single diffusional state during track acquisition. Here the authors develop a custom-built sptPALM microscope and a Monte-Carlo based diffusion distribution analysis to study dynamic DNA-dC

1d

ARID1A and PI3-kinase pathway mutations in the endometrium drive epithelial transdifferentiation and collective invasion

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11403-6 PIK3CA mutations and ARID1A loss co-exist in endometrial neoplasms. Here, the authors show that these co-mutations drive gene expression profiles correlated with differential chromatin accessibility and ARID1A binding in the endometrial epithelium, resulting in partial EMT and myometrial invasion.

1d

On-chip wavefront shaping with dielectric metasurface

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11578-y Metasurfaces can be programmed for a spatial transformation of the wavefront, allowing on-chip optical signal processing. Here, the authors demonstrate a one-dimensional high-contrast transmitarray metasurface-based lens on SOI substrate and demonstrate functionalities of Fourier transformation and differentia

1d

S100A9 extends lifespan in insulin deficiency

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11498-x Insulin replacement is a valuable therapy for insulin deficiency, however, other therapies are being investigated to restore metabolic homeostasis. Here, the authors identify S100A9 as a leptin induced circulating cue that improves glucose and lipid homeostasis and extends survival in insulin deficient mice.

1d

CD146-HIF-1α hypoxic reprogramming drives vascular remodeling and pulmonary arterial hypertension

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11500-6 Vascular remodelling contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Here Luo and colleagues find that increases in CD146 levels drive vascular remodelling in PH through a cross-talk with hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signalling, and show that inhibition of CD146 can attenuate disease progressi

1d

Enantioselective benzylic C–H arylation via photoredox and nickel dual catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11392-6 Chiral 1,1-diaryl alkanes are important targets in pharmaceutical industry. Here, the authors report report a redox-neutral enantioselective benzylic C−H bond arylation via photoredox/nickel dual catalysis accessing chiral 1,1-diarylalkane compounds under mild conditions.

1d

Ultra-sensitive digital quantification of proteins and mRNA in single cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11531-z Digital proximity ligation assay (dPLA) can measure proteins and mRNAs in single cells, but is not compatible with cell imaging and cannot quantify rare proteins due to a high dilution factor. Here the authors present an automated microfluidic device that combines live-cell imaging, chemical stimulation, and d

1d

British Airways cancels flights following IT failure

British Airways was forced to cancel some flights to and from London on Wednesday after it suffered "a systems issue".

1d

As Elephants and Whales Disappear, They Take Valuable Cancer Clues With Them

Scientists have found that whales and elephants evolved clever ways of dealing with cancer — and somewhere hiding in their genetic code or evolutionary history could be a new cancer treatment for humans. But if the researchers are correct, their window to study these megafauna may be closing.

1d

I Found the Outer Limits of My Pro-choice Beliefs

One day about seven months ago, I was standing in a dark room in a hospital not far from Tel Aviv, performing an ultrasound on the taut belly of a woman well into her third trimester. She was 35 weeks pregnant, due in about a month. She and I felt the fetus kick, right under the ultrasound probe. “Strong one!” I said in Hebrew. She smiled. I managed to freeze a sweet picture of the bow-shaped fet

1d

Proteinet kryptokrom styr flugans inbyggda kompass

Nu läggs ytterligare en pusselbit till att förstå hur djur kan orientera sig med hjälp av jordens magnetfält. I en studie, som publiceras i Science Advance, har forskare lyckats avbilda strukturförändringar i flugans inbyggda kompass. – Än så länge är det oklart hur kompassen fungerar. Men tar man bort kryptokromet så flyger fågeln eller insekten vilse, säger Sebastian Westenhoff, professor i bio

1d

Cibio knocks out cystic fibrosis

The fight against cystic fibrosis continues, targeting in particular some of the mutations that cause it. This time, scientists relied on genome editing. A research team of the Cibio Department of the University of Trento was able to prove the efficacy of Crispr-Cas, the molecular scissors it has been working on for some time, in solving once and for all the problem that causes the disease.

1d

Eating more plant-based foods may be linked to better heart health

Diets higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods were linked with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death.

1d

The Counteroffensive Against Conspiracy Theories Has Begun

From Hong Kong to Moscow, Tbilisi to Belgrade, swelling crowds are protesting on the streets, often facing down twitchy, armed police with their tear gas and batons, returning week after week. Some rallies have been the biggest since 1989, the great year of pro-democracy revolutions. But something fundamental has changed in the 30 years since. In 1989, in the “color” revolutions of the early 2000

1d

Gun Violence Prevention Research

NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Garen Wintemute, director of the Violence Prevention Research Program at UC Davis, about the shift in people's behaviors in the aftermath of mass shootings.

1d

Understanding The Statements Of Mass Shooters

Rachel Martin talks with Patrick Blanchfield of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research about what we should focus on in the manifestos left behind and published by recent mass shooters.

1d

Wind-down of stem-cell institute leaves a void

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02346-5 Funds paved the way for rigorous tests of therapies, but unintentionally boosted a market for potentially dangerous fakes, says Jeanne F. Loring.

1d

DSAM-formand på genvalg: »Der er nok nogle, der synes, jeg har været lidt for meget«

Nuværende formand for Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin, Anders Beich, håber at blive genvalgt, når selskabet har formandsvalg til efteråret. Han mener, at almen praksis har fået en større stemme de sidste år på trods af evig politisk indblanding.

1d

Emotional response to city design could guide urban planning

Virtual reality and scenario-testing models are being built to help urban planners and architects get real-time feedback about the impact of their designs on mental health, particularly for older people.

1d

1d

Glycerylphytate compounds with tunable ion affinity and osteogenic properties

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48015-5

1d

Shape programming of polymeric based electrothermal actuator (ETA) via artificially induced stress relaxation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47949-0

1d

Role of p53 isoforms in the DNA damage response during Drosophila oogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47913-y

1d

Endoplasmic reticulum stress disrupts lysosomal homeostasis and induces blockade of autophagic flux in human trophoblasts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47607-5

1d

Up-regulation of heat shock protein 27 inhibits apoptosis in lumbosacral nerve root avulsion-induced neurons

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48003-9

1d

An Effective Electric Dipole Model for Voltage-induced Gating Mechanism of Lysenin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47725-0

1d

Lipophilic statins inhibit Zika virus production in Vero cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47956-1

1d

AT&T-ansatte blev bestukket: Hjalp med at bryde ind i millioner af telefoner ulovligt

Flere ansatte har indrømmet, at de har modtaget penge for at unlocke telefoner ulovligt. Angiveligt ved blandt andet at installere malware på teleubyderens computere.

1d

Study of microfossils maps extreme global warming and environmental change

Studies of marine microfossils, known as conodonts, have allowed a team of researchers from Australia and China to map extreme global warming which coincided with the most severe mass extinction on Earth approximately 252 million years ago at the end of the Permian period.

1d

A prehistory of blindness

Fossils that had gone unstudied since the early 20thcentury helped a team led by University of New England (UNE) palaeontologist Dr Russell Bicknell to address a long-standing puzzle: were ancestors of the iconic horseshoe crab blind?

1d

These companies claim to provide “fair-trade” data work. Do they?

Companies like CloudFactory, iMerit, and Samasource promise data sets provided by workers who are well paid and cared for. It’s not an easy business.

1d

1d

1d

1d

Liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'

There are longstanding debates in the United States about how society should distribute resources and support, from education to public health. Examining fairness through the lens of Moral Foundation Theory, researchers show that people on the political left (Democrats and liberals) tend to focus on equity, or need based on where people start, more than people on the political right (Republicans a

1d

Denne mikrorobot skal reparere skader inden i din krop

De små ben kan bevæge en robot med en hastighed på op til fire gange sin kropslængde per sekund.

1d

Liberals & conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'

American liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, according to a new study focusing on Moral Foundations Theory, but are not that different from each other when it comes to the 'Protestant work ethic."

1d

Gazans struggle to protect antiquities from neglect, looting

Walid al-Aqqad's Gaza home would be the envy of many an antiquities collector.

1d

Cover crops, compost and carbon

Soil organic matter has long been known to benefit farmers. The carbon in this organic matter acts as a food source for soil microbes, which then provide other nutrients to the crops grown. Microbes, insects and small soil critters produce materials that can improve soil structure and water retention. It's a healthy ecosystem every farmer wants to encourage.

1d

Medication in the environment affects feeding behavior of fish

Scientists are increasingly warning that prescription drugs can affect wildlife and ecosystems when they find their way into the environment. In a new Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry study, investigators found that the anxiety and depression drug Escitalopram—at concentrations similar to those measured in the environment—can inhibit fish foraging and eating behavior.

1d

Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks

In a new Ethology study, researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks.

1d

Medication in the environment affects feeding behavior of fish

Scientists are increasingly warning that prescription drugs can affect wildlife and ecosystems when they find their way into the environment. In a new Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry study, investigators found that the anxiety and depression drug Escitalopram—at concentrations similar to those measured in the environment—can inhibit fish foraging and eating behavior.

1d

Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks

In a new Ethology study, researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks.

1d

Study raises concerns about prevalent orchid viruses

In a Plants, People, Planet study, researchers investigated the evolution of the two most prevalent orchid viruses using information representing their global distribution. The study revealed that considerable international trade of cultivated orchids has effectively "homogenised" the genetic diversity of the viruses. In other words, the two viruses have displayed few genetic differences since the

1d

Study raises concerns about prevalent orchid viruses

In a Plants, People, Planet study, researchers investigated the evolution of the two most prevalent orchid viruses using information representing their global distribution. The study revealed that considerable international trade of cultivated orchids has effectively "homogenised" the genetic diversity of the viruses. In other words, the two viruses have displayed few genetic differences since the

1d

Hordes of Earth's toughest creatures may now be living on Moon

There might be life on the Moon after all: thousands of virtually indestructible creatures that can withstand extreme radiation, sizzling heat, the coldest temperatures of the universe, and decades without food.

1d

Brazilian Amazon deforestation surges, embattled institute says

Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon increased 278 percent year-over-year in July, according to official data released Tuesday by a government institute embroiled in a row with President Jair Bolsonaro over the scale of the problem.

1d

Italian hydroponics farm bets on 'red gold'

The Italian tomato is prized around the world, but its reputation has soured in recent years over reports of mafia infiltration, slave labour and toxic fires that poison water sources.

1d

Italian hydroponics farm bets on 'red gold'

The Italian tomato is prized around the world, but its reputation has soured in recent years over reports of mafia infiltration, slave labour and toxic fires that poison water sources.

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

The People Who Love to Watch Other People Clean

Shelly Hendy was at home, recovering from a miscarriage, and depressed. When a few friends suggested that she watch cleaning videos to relax, Hendy thought the idea was “ridiculous,” she told me recently. But then she started watching videos posted by Sophie Hinchliffe, who has more than 2 million Instagram followers. Soon enough, she was hooked. Hinchcliffe, better known as Mrs. Hinch , is perha

1d

The darkness of Lulea

Lulea University of Technology is a dark and violent place, according to these victim accounts. Bullying, blackmail, sexual nepotism, robbery and even threats of physical violence and even of murder are not unheard of. LTU leadership seems to be part of the problem, and money plays a role.

1d

Rumfartøj fyldt med bjørnedyr styrter ned på Månen

De mikroskopiske bjørnedyr har tidligere vist sig at kunne overleve i rummet.

1d

The consensus on consensus messaging

A scientist would never tolerate statements about climate change that weren't based on scientific research and empirical evidence. However, the same evidentiary standards don't always seem to apply to statements about how to communicate about climate change. For example, on the topic of communicating the scientific consensus on human-caused global warming, there are lots of opinions on whether co

1d

Surgical planning for head and neck cancer benefits from FDG-PET/CT

The reliability of FDG-PET/CT in detecting lymph node metastases in head/neck cancer is well proven in patients with cN0 necks. Most data is single-institutional and retrospective. Surgeons often perform elective neck dissections in patients at high risk for recurrence because clinical exam/structural imaging don't reliably identify all metastases. This can improve survival but cause substantial c

1d

Cover crops, compost and carbon

Comparing techniques in organic farming that influence soil health.

1d

Study raises concerns about prevalent orchid viruses

In a Plants, People, Planet study, researchers investigated the evolution of the two most prevalent orchid viruses using information representing their global distribution. The study revealed that considerable international trade of cultivated orchids has effectively 'homogenized' the genetic diversity of the viruses. In other words, the two viruses have displayed few genetic differences since the

1d

Substituting poultry for red meat may reduce breast cancer risk

Results from a new study suggest that red meat consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer, whereas poultry consumption may be protective against breast cancer risk. The findings are published in the International Journal of Cancer.

1d

Marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths

A new Economic Inquiry study finds that marijuana access leads to reductions in opioid-related deaths.

1d

Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks

In a new Ethology study, researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks.

1d

Medication in the environment affects feeding behavior of fish

Scientists are increasingly warning that prescription drugs can affect wildlife and ecosystems when they find their way into the environment. In a new Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry study, investigators found that the anxiety and depression drug Escitalopram — at concentrations similar to those measured in the environment–can inhibit fish foraging and eating behavior.

1d

Study examines characteristics of older adults with moderately severe dementia

A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has found that many characteristics among older adults with moderately severe dementia differ depending on whether they live at home or in residential care or nursing facilities.

1d

Erectile dysfunction associated with lower work productivity in men

Erectile dysfunction (ED) was linked with loss of work productivity and with lower health-related quality of life in an International Journal of Clinical Practice study of more than 52,000 men from eight countries.

1d

Nordic walking can provide multiple benefits for patients with breast cancer

An analysis of published studies found that Nordic walking–a low impact aerobic activity consisting in walking with poles–can benefit patients with breast cancer by having a positive impact on swelling, physical fitness, disability, and quality of life.

1d

Pain medications linked to higher cardiovascular risks in patients with osteoarthritis

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help to control the pain and inflammation in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA), but a new Arthritis & Rheumatology study suggests that NSAIDs contribute to cardiovascular side effects in these patients.

1d

Study examines cannabis' effects on brain neurochemistry

A new Addiction Biology study provides the first evidence of a blunted response to stress-induced dopamine signaling in the brain's prefrontal cortex in individuals at high risk for psychosis who regularly used cannabis.

1d

The impacts of smoking on patients with ulcerative colitis

Because smokers are less likely to develop ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease, patients with UC may be tempted to start smoking to lessen their symptoms.

1d

Low vitamin D levels linked to non-motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease

In an Acta Neurologica Scandinavia study of 182 patients with Parkinson's disease and 185 healthy controls, patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower levels of vitamin D in their blood. Also, patients with lower vitamin D levels were more likely to fall, and to experience sleep problems, depression, and anxiety.

1d

Younger colorectal cancer patients: A missed opportunity for non-emergency diagnoses

In an analysis of information on 10,463 UK patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 2006 to 2013, patients under the age of 50 years were more likely to initially experience non-specific symptoms before being referred to cancer specialists.

1d

Danske banker tvinges nu til at gennemgå omfattende it-sikkerhedstjek

Der er endnu ingen der har prøvet at gennemgå TIBER-proceduren i Danmark, men de første banker er blevet pålagt at gå i gang med testen, der ikke er helt ufarlig.

1d

EU’s elpære-krav sparer 16 TWh i Norge

PLUS. EU’s krav til belysning får nordmændene til at konvertere til LED. Det bidrager til at halvere strømforbruget til belysning i landet.

1d

1d

India to host first-ever hyperloop project

submitted by /u/JamburaStudio [link] [comments]

1d

Floating Solar Gets Ready for the High Seas

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Facebook sues two app developers for click fraud

Facebook has filed a lawsuit today against two Android app developers for infecting their users with malware that faked clicks on ads. Both the Hong Kong-based JediMobi and the Singapore-based …

1d

Nearly 25% of The World's Population Faces a Water Crisis, And We Can't Ignore It

There are 17 countries in particularly dire straits.

1d

Another food is primed to join the 'big eight' allergens

Sesame seed buns are hazardous for more people than previously thought (Tom Sodoge/Unsplash/) Just a handful of foods, ominously referred to as the "big eight," are considered major allergens in the United States: milk, eggs, peanuts , tree nuts, fish, crustacean shellfish, wheat , and soy. They're the products that, according to federal law, must be clearly labeled on packaged foods, and are wha

1d

Most seniors with dementia live at home, despite pain, anxiety, poor health

Contrary to popular belief, most older Americans with advancing dementia remain in their own homes — many until they die. But a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has revealed that this population may endure more pain and have more complex or unaddressed medical needs than their counterparts in nursing homes.

1d

Deregulated mTOR is responsible for autophagy defects exacerbating kidney stone formation

Kidney stone disease is a lifestyle-related disease prevalent; however, effective medical treatment for the disease is not yet well established. As cellular damage in renal tubular cells is responsible for the disease, here, we focused on the role of autophagy. We found that autophagy compromised by mTOR deregulation is a fundamental feature in the pathology of kidney stone formation, and propose

1d

Now is the perfect time to get an HD TV antenna

Internal TV antennas mount inside your house and look different than the old school bunny ears. This Erode model is a good all-around option with a long range. (Amazon/) It’s the streaming era, but still surprisingly annoying to get local network TV channels without a cable subscription. Some streaming services support local stations, but they often require live TV subscriptions that cost extra.

1d

tardigrades

[no content]

1d

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, Toni Morrison, dies at 88

Morrison was the first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Over her nearly five-decade career, Morrison wrote 11 novels, a libretto and collections of nonfiction, and also worked as an editor who wanted to participate in developing a "canon of black work." Morrison's family wrote that they were grateful she had a "long, well lived life." None Toni Morrison — the acclaimed Ameri

1d

Yelp is quietly replacing restaurants' phone numbers and redirecting calls to Grubhub

GrubHub collects a 'referral fee' from restaurants that ranges between 15 to 20 percent of the order total, despite the fact that many patrons had been attempting to call the restaurant directly.

1d