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nyheder2019august08

Doctors altered a person's genes with CRISPR for the first time in the U.S. Here's what could be next.

Last week, a young woman with sickle cell anemia became the first person in the United States to have her cells altered with CRISPR gene editing technology. (Sam Ward/) Last week, for the first time, doctors in the United States used the gene editing tool CRISPR to attempt to remedy a genetic disease in a living person. Victoria Gray, a 41-year-old woman from Mississippi was born with sickle cell

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Americans have now suffered more measles cases in 2019 than in any year since 1992

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that the U.S. has seen 1,172 measles cases so far in 2019. New York, Michigan and Washington State have been hit especially hard by the virus this year. The majority of infected people were unvaccinated. None In 2000, health officials said measles was eliminated in the U.S. But in 2019, the nation has already recorded at least 1,172

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A Devastating Climate Change Report, a Phone Bug Returns, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young

The first example of 'nest'-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog, has been described in a new article in the Journal of Natural History, and could explain why they have grown to be giant.

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The world’s biggest frogs build their own ponds

Goliath frogs excavate meter-long pools and guard their tadpoles through the night

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Sharing the Stories of Women in Neuroscience

One year ago, Dr. Nancy Padilla was reviewing a list of speaker names for a seminar series organized by postdoctoral fellows in her department. She saw nothing wrong with the list as it was full of prominent and excellent neuroscientists – that is, until her colleague pointed out that the list did not include a … Continue reading

18min

Climate change: Marine heatwaves kill coral instantly

Marine heat waves, associated with climate change, cause the rapid death of corals, research reveals.

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US Appeals Court approves class-action against Facebook's facial recognition

A federal appeals court ruled that a class-action lawsuit against Facebook over its facial recognition technology could proceed as planned. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco …

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Fighting child diarrhea

An automatic chlorine dispenser installed at shared community water points reduces rates of diarrhea in children. The researchers hope the technique can improve uptake by providing good-tasting water and avoiding the need for behavior change.

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The Lancet Global Health: Automatically chlorinating water at public taps cuts child diarrhoea by almost a quarter in urban Bangladesh

A novel water treatment device that delivers chlorine automatically via public taps without the need for electricity, reduced child diarrhoea by 23% compared with controls (156 cases out of 2,073 child measurements [7.5%] vs 216/2,145 [10%]) over 14 months in two urban neighbourhoods of Bangladesh, according to a randomised trial following more than 1,000 children published in The Lancet Global He

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: And Then There Were Nine

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, August 8. ‣ ICE agents raided several food-processing plants in Mississippi yesterday, detaining at least 680 people in the largest immigration raid in a decade. Images spread on social media showing tearful c

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Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

'Hydrostatic legless jumping' launches a 3-millimeter maggot of a goldenrod gall midge 20-30 body-lengths away with acceleration rivalling the best legged leapers. The larva latches its head to its tail with a previously unknown adhesive and squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section for launch pressure. This style of flight is about 28 times more efficient than crawling, a finding that m

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How these tiny insect larvae leap without legs

High-speed filming reveals how a blob of an insect can leap more efficiently than it crawls.

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The Circulatory System: An Amazing Circuit That Keeps Our Bodies Going

The heart, lungs and about 60,000 miles of blood vessels work together to keep blood pumping through our bodies.

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Humanity 3019

What will human life be like on earth in 1000 years, in the year 3019 ? Will civilization even survive that long? What will be the world human population at that time? What languages will people speak? Will the earth's environment still be hospital? What kind of technology would we see? submitted by /u/moschles [link] [comments]

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Legless, Leaping Larvae

Gall midge maggots have some surprising tricks that help them launch themselves into smile-inspiring jumps.

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Apple Gives Hackers a Special iPhone—And a Bigger Bug Bounty

The company’s sometimes rocky relationship with security researchers just got a whole lot smoother.

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Scientists Are Zapping Fake Electrical Grids to Help Us Survive an EMP Attack

(Credit: Quality Stock Arts/Shutterstock) If you’re a doomsday prepper or were alive during the Cold War you may already be aware – and fearful – of an imminent electromagnetic pulse (EMP) event. It’s a disaster scenario that’s captured the imaginations of filmmakers and video game creators, as well as legitimate organizations, like the United States government. EMPs are brief but powerful jolts o

1h

Hubble Settles an Old Debate About Galaxies with Supermassive Black Holes

Galaxies with central black holes can take various forms depending on the angle at which astronomers see them. (Credit: NASA) Every large galaxy has a supermassive black hole at its center. And some of those black holes are actively ejecting huge amounts of high-energy light out into the cosmos. Astronomers divide some of these active galaxies, which otherwise look like normal spirals, into two ty

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The Gyrocopter Could Be the Future's Flying Car

Companies like Jaunt and Skyworks say with a few modern tweaks, the helicopter's predecessor could make a return to the sky.

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Vast pool of new proteins is found, thanks to the human microbiome

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02404-y Scientists identify more than 4,000 protein groups — most previously unknown.

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A Russian Rocket Exploded, Causing a Radiation Spike

Deadly Explosion On Thursday, a Russian military test turned tragic when a rocket engine exploded , killing two people and injuring four others. The explosion occurred in Nyonoksa, which is home to a testing site for intercontinental ballistic missiles Russia intends to use in its nuclear submarines. Reuters reported that the RIA news agency quoted Russia’s Defense Ministry as saying the explosio

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Drinking This Much Coffee May Trigger Migraines

Caffeine may really be a trigger for migraines, but only if you consume a lot of it, a new study suggests.

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Someone Deepfaked Tom Cruise Into The “American Psycho” Sex Scene

Couch Freakout A YouTube channel that makes celebrity deepfakes just put Tom Cruise’s face onto Christian Bale’s body in the 2000 film “American Psycho.” At first, it’s difficult to tell the difference between the deepfake and the original. After all, Christian Bale was inspired by Cruise’s “intense friendliness with nothing behind the eyes” when developing his portrayal of the character Patrick

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Why does airplane gas still have lead in it?

This story was originally published on FlyingMag.com . Unleaded fuel should improve piston-engine operating efficiency. (Jon Whittle/) The dangers posed by lead’s carcinogenic toxicity, whether it’s inhaled or absorbed into the bloodstream, have been well-known for decades. Lead is particularly harmful to children during their developmental years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began di

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The U.K.'s solution for affordable housing? Shipping containers.

The U.K. firm Fraser Brown MacKenna Architects recently obtained approval to construct a number of affordable shipping container houses. Shipping container homes are surprisingly popular across the globe and can be found in Amsterdam and the U.S. A number of firms are available that can build custom shipping container homes, but they're also more straightforward to build yourself than a tradition

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Giving up just half your hamburgers can really help the climate

The bad news: to make really deep emissions cuts, most of us should probably go vegan.

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Radioactive Grain from Chernobyl Has Been Distilled into Vodka

The first consumer product to come out of the Chernobyl exclusion zone in 33 years could help revitalize a long-neglected community — or at least get a lot of tourists drunk.

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Tentacled microbe could be missing link between simple cells and complex life

Twelve-year effort to grow odd microbe found in seabed mud finally succeeds

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Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells

In studying the dynamic skeletons that cells use to move, Caltech researchers develop a new tool for manipulating chemistry and biology.

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Adding MS drug to targeted cancer therapy may improve glioblastoma outcomes

The multiple sclerosis drug teriflunomide, paired with targeted cancer therapy, markedly shrinks patient-derived glioblastomas grown in mice by reaching stem cells at the tumor's root, according to a new UC San Diego School of Medicine study published in Science Translational Medicine.

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Ten years of icy data show the flow of heat from the arctic seafloor

In addition to 10 years of data on the flow of heat in the Arctic ocean seafloor, the USGS and Geological Survey of Canada have published an analysis of that data using modern seismic data.

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Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Researchers Are Trying To Find A Solution To Cut Concrete's Carbon Emissions

Researchers are trying to make a cleaner concrete to cut greenhouse gas emissions and curb climate change. The industry is estimated to account for at least 7% of global carbon dioxide emissions.

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Amazing AI Automatically Turns You Into an Anime Character

Anime AI It was only a matter of time until somebody created an artificial intelligence designed to transmute you into an anime character. And now a team of South Korean researchers from video game company NCSoft has done just that. They created a generative adversarial networks that will ingest your selfies and spit out a picture-perfect cartoon caricature straight out of your favorite anime. Th

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Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology

The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by a team of McGill researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular organisms.

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New design strategy brightens up the future of perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Scientists have discovered a new strategy to design incredibly efficient perovskite-based LEDs with record-setting brightness by leveraging the quantum confinement effect.

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Pupillary response to glare illusions of different colors

Researchers measured people's perceived brightness and pupillary response after viewing glare illusions presented in a variety of different colors. A glare illusion is an optical illusion that has a luminance gradient towards the center and is perceived as brighter by the gradient. The research team found that pupil reduction for glare illusion occurs according to the degree of brightness percepti

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LightSail 2 spacecraft glides on sunlight in orbit around Earth

Extra thrust from reflective sail on tiny craft changed shape of its orbit by about 2km, scientists report A crowdfunded spacecraft has successfully sailed on sunlight while in orbit around the Earth. LightSail 2 was launched in June by the space advocacy group the Planetary Society as a secondary payload on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket . Continue reading…

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These Guys Built a Flying Saucer That Actually Flies Pretty Well

[Theremin Intensifies] A pair of Romanian scientists have built a flying saucer — and it actually flies a lot like the ones you’ve probably seen in the movies. Razvan Sabie and Iosif Taposu unveiled the All-Directional Flying Object (ADIFO) in March , releasing a video that not only showed the saucer in flight, but also broke down the engineering that gives the craft the capability to maneuver in

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Hipster Asteroids Spilled Tardigrades on the Moon Before It Was Cool

Silver Medal This week, Wired broke the news that Israel’s Beresheet lunar lander , which crash-landed back in April, likely contaminated the Moon’s surface with ultra-tough creatures called tardigrades that can survive in the vacuum of space. But it turns out that the resilient little critters had likely already found their way to the Moon long before humans. Columbia University astrobiologist C

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Experts On Climate Change Say How We Use Land To Grow Food Needs To Change

Some of the world's top experts on climate change issued a new warning on Wednesday about how we use land to grow food. They say it's contributing to global warming, but it doesn't have to.

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Cancer survivors in high deductible health plans more likely to have delayed care

A new study from American Cancer Society investigators finds cancer survivors in high deductible health plans were more likely to report delaying or foregoing care.

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How a 10-Year-Old Desk Phone Bug Came Back From the Dead

Avaya patched a problem hackers could exploit in phones. But the bad code never went away.

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A More Active Hurricane Season Could Lie Ahead, Scientists Warn

A revised prediction from federal forecasters sees the potential for as many as 17 named storms this hurricane season, four of which may be major.

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Massive wildfire cloud sheds light on nuclear war’s impact

In August 2017, extreme wildfires in British Columbia, Canada pumped so much smoke into the upper atmosphere that an enormous cloud circled most of the Northern Hemisphere, according to new research. The new finding will help scientists model the climate impacts of nuclear war. The pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud—the largest of its kind ever observed—was quickly dubbed “the mother of all pyroCbs.

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'Elsinore' Smartly Reimagines 'Hamlet' with Ophelia as the Hero

The adventure game gives one of Shakespeare's most tragic characters the story she deserves.

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UC Faculty Protest Elsevier by Suspending Work for Cell Press

More than 30 professors will no longer serve on editorial boards of the journals unless Elsevier and the University of California can reach a contract.

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How cyberattacks could gridlock New York City

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02405-x At rush hour, immobilizing a small fraction of Internet-connected cars would bring Manhattan to a halt.

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Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife

Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments — including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as mar

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This Land Is the Only Land There Is

1. There is no shortage of scary facts in the major new report on climate change and land, a summary of which was released today by a United Nations–led scientific panel. Chief among them: For everyone who lives on land, the planet’s dangerously warmed future is already here. Earth’s land has already warmed more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.6 degrees Fahrenheit) since the industrial revolution, ac

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An attempted heist at Coinbase was scary good, even though it failed

Details of a recent attack on the popular crypto exchange reflect capabilities on par with those of nation-state-sponsored attackers.

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How women shaped the Civil Rights Movement through music

While “freedom songs” were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights in the Civil Rights Movement, music may have also helped empower black women to lead when formal leadership positions were unavailable, according to new research. When Nina Simone belted out “Mississippi Goddam” in 1964, she gave voice to many who were fighting for equal rights during the Civil Righ

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An 88 percent decline in large freshwater animals

Rivers and lakes cover just about one percent of Earth's surface, but are home to one third of all vertebrate species worldwide. At the same time, freshwater life is highly threatened. Scientists …

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The war on pythons: Florida Gov. DeSantis steps up the fight

Gov. Ron DeSantis announced additional steps Wednesday to fight Burmese pythons, the giant snakes that have wiped out much of the mammal population of the Everglades.

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Climate Change and Overfishing are Making Seafood More Toxic

Some fish, like the bluefin tune pictured here, are accumulating higher levels of mercury due to human activities. (Credit: Guido Montaldo/Shutterstock) The USDA recommends Americans eat at least two servings of seafood every week. Most of us turn to tuna – canned or otherwise – and cod. Fish tacos and fish and chips? Yes, please! But now researchers find mercury levels in these popular seafood op

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Nuclear winter researcher: study of wildfires confirms dire climate risk from even a 'small' nuclear war

New research uses wildfire smoke as a natural experiment for testing nuclear winter theory, but uncertainties remain An animation of GOES-16 weather satellite imagery reveals thick palls of smoke billowing up from wildfires in British Columbia on Aug. 11 and 12, 2017. The smoke rose into the stratosphere and ultimately circled the globe. Eight months later, some was still visible to satellites. (S

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The war on pythons: Florida Gov. DeSantis steps up the fight

Gov. Ron DeSantis announced additional steps Wednesday to fight Burmese pythons, the giant snakes that have wiped out much of the mammal population of the Everglades.

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Plant Biologist Killed on Solo Camping Trip in British Columbia

Leonard Dyck is remembered for sharing his passion for plants with students at the University of British Columbia.

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Bernie Sanders Pledges to Release Any Info About Aliens If He's Elected in 2020

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (D-VT) says he's prepared to disclose government information about UFOs if he wins in 2020.

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Comfortable office chairs that’ll make your coworkers very jealous

Sit in style (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) If you don’t buy into the whole standing desk lifestyle, make sure your time at the office is as comfortable as possible. If you’re going to spend up to 40 hours a week sitting down, a cushion-y, ergonomic, adjustable seat can make all the difference. While you don’t have to fork over handfuls of cash for a sweet spot for your behind, sometimes the materi

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Great Scots! 'it's' a unique linguistic phenomenon

A new study reveals that in a number of varieties of English spoken in Scotland, the rules of contraction (it's for it is) seem to differ unexpectedly, and asserts that such differences may shed new light on our understanding of language. The study, 'Syntactic variation and auxiliary contraction: the surprising case of Scots', by Gary Thoms (New York University), David Adger (Queen Mary University

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Scientists Brewed Vodka With Grain From Chernobyl

Down The Hatch Scientists brewed a bottle of vodka using water and grains from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the infamous melted-down nuclear reactor of the same name. They only made one bottle of the vodka, which the University of Portsmouth scientists have named ATOMIK, reports Gizmodo . ATOMIK isn’t radioactive at all, so it’s not any more dangerous to drink than any other brand. Bu

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Wild Concept: Build Trash-Sucking Skyscrapers on Ocean Oil Rigs

Float On Architectural designer Honglin Li wants to clean up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — a collection of floating debris about twice as big as Texas and 100 feet thick on average — by building a skyscraper right in the middle of it. Honglin’s idea is to build Filtration , a megastructure containing several material recovery facilities and water treatment plants, on an oil rig platform near

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Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals

A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. Felix Funk and Christoph Hauert of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Uncall Lets You Block Robocalls, Telemarketers, and Junk Texts Forever

It’s not unusual, after a particularly annoying wave of unwanted telemarketing calls or junk texts, to wonder if your phone number somehow ended up on some awful sales list. And, more practically, it’s not uncommon to wonder if there’s a way to remove it, since politely asking the callers to do it never seems to work. But there is, in fact, a way to block robocalls, telemarketers, and unwanted te

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Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals

A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. Felix Funk and Christoph Hauert of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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This new gold nanomaterial is so thin, it's considered 2D

The newly-developed gold-containing nanomaterial is one million times thinner than a human fingernail and one-fifth as thin as the diameter of a strand of human DNA. (University of Leeds/) Scientists at the University of Leeds in England created the thinnest gold nanomaterial yet, just two atoms thick. The newly-developed substance stacks up to a mere .47-nanometers, which is one million times th

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Great Scots! 'it's' a unique linguistic phenomenon

A new study reveals that in a number of varieties of English spoken in Scotland, the rules of contraction (it's for it is) seem to differ unexpectedly, and asserts that such differences may shed new light on our understanding of language. The study, 'Syntactic variation and auxiliary contraction: the surprising case of Scots', will be published in September 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Lang

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Paleontologists Unveil Shovel-Billed Dinosaur

A new hadrosaur from Texas has a striking, shovel-shaped mouth. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Therapy Dogs at Work

Organizations around the world continue to explore the therapeutic benefits of time spent with well-trained and amicable dogs. Some immediate benefits include companionship, soothing of frayed nerves, easing of discomfort, and a breaking down of social barriers. People with intellectual disabilities or mental-health issues can interact with therapy dogs to develop their social skills and gain a s

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Strange cloud trail leaves observers in awe

A strange cloud trail in the early morning sky above Florida left observers on the ground in awe.

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‘4D printing’ creates world’s smallest stent

A new method for making malleable microstructures can produce vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible, researchers report. In the future, these kinds of small stents could help to widen life-threatening constrictions of the urinary tract in fetuses in the womb. Approximately one in every thousand children develops a urethral stricture, sometimes even when they are still

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Hidden Algorithm Flaws Expose Websites to DoS Attacks

Why throw a bunch of junk traffic at a service, when all it takes to stall it out is just a few bytes?

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We Could Be Witnessing the Death of a Tectonic Plate

A gaping hole in the Juan de Fuca plate could explain why central Oregon has volcanoes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Teen girls face pressure to get pregnant

Teen girls experience relationship abuse at alarming rates, according to a new study that specifically focuses on reproductive coercion—pressure from a partner to get pregnant. Researchers found that nearly one in eight young women between ages 14 and 19 experienced reproductive coercion within the last three months. Forms of this kind of abuse can include tampering with condoms and a partner thr

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Tel Aviv U and Technion researchers wrest control of one of world's most secure PLCs

Cybersecurity researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Technion Institute of Technology have discovered critical vulnerabilities in the Siemens S7 Simatic programmable logic controller (PLC), one of the world's most secure PLCs, which are used to run industrial processes.

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Rethinking seizures associated with cardiac disease

Research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that mutations of a gene implicated in long QT syndrome in humans may trigger seizures because of their direct effects on certain classes of neurons in the brain — independent from what the genetic mutations do to heart function. The new work from Arts & Sciences was conducted with fruit flies and is published August 8, 2019 in PLOS Genetics.

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Gene protective against fruit fly heat-induced seizures may explain some human seizures

Researchers identified a gene in fruit flies that helps prevent the hyperexcitability of specific neurons that trigger seizures. In humans, mutations in the gene may be linked to seizures associated with Long QT Syndrome. A research team led by Yehuda Ben-Shahar of Washington University in St. Louis report these findings in a paper published August 8, 2019 in PLOS Genetics.

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Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals

A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. Felix Funk and Christoph Hauert of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Reducing exposure to opioids after cesarean delivery

An effort to improve the scheduled cesarean section delivery experience found that changes to preoperative and postoperative processes can lead to reductions in opioid use without increased pain and with faster recovery, according to research from Kaiser Permanente published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Alternatives to burning can increase Indian farmers' profits and cut pollution

A new study published in Science shows that farmers in northern India could increase their profits if they stop burning their rice straw and adopt no-till practices to grow wheat. Alternative farming practices could also cut farmers' greenhouse gas emissions from on-farm activities by as much as 78% and help lower air pollution in cities like New Delhi.

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Persistent plume

Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. In a new paper in Science, authors led by Pengfei Yu (CIRES, NOAA, Jinan University), explore implications for climate modeling, including models of nuclear winter and geoengineering.

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Explaining why TP53 is commonly mutated in human cancer, and the effects of its mutation

A comprehensive functional analysis of TP53 mutations in human leukemia may refute a working hypothesis — primarily based on mouse studies — that missense mutations confer new cancer-causing functions to the p53 tumor suppressor protein; the new study instead suggests that these mutations exert a 'dominant-negative' effect that reduces the cancer-suppressing activity of wild-type p53, the author

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Pairing prediction and production in AI-informed robotic flow synthesis

Combining machine learning and robotic precision, researchers present an integrated strategy for computer-augmented chemical synthesis, one that successfully yielded 15 different medicinally related small molecules, they say.

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Reevaluating the impacts of smoke plumes aloft, based on the 2017 Pacific Northwest wildfires

Extensive wildfires in the Pacific Northwest in the summer of 2017 unleashed a vast plume of smoke that ascended high into the stratosphere, persisted for more than eight months and provided researchers a rare opportunity to evaluate current models of smoke ascent.

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Ethiopian rock shelter earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric life

Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric living in the form of a rock shelter in Ethiopia, though whether the site was inhabited permanently is unclear.

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New perovskite material shows early promise as an alternative to silicon

CsPbI3 is an inorganic perovskite, a group of materials gaining popularity in the solar world due to their high efficiency and low cost. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge. Writing in Science, the collaborating teams show how the material CsPbI3 has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies

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Mega-cloud from Canadian wildfires will help model impacts of nuclear war

Extreme wildfires in British Columbia, Canada, pumped so much smoke into the upper atmosphere in August 2017 that an enormous cloud circled most of the Northern Hemisphere — a finding in the journal Science that will help scientists model the climate impacts of nuclear war.

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New study in 'Science': Why humans in Africa fled to the mountains during the last ice age

People in Ethiopia did not live in low valleys during the last ice age. Instead they lived high up in the inhospitable Bale Mountains where they had enough water, built tools out of obsidian and relied mainly on giant mole rats for nourishment. In the current issue of 'Science', an international team of researchers provides the first evidence that our African ancestors had already settled in the m

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Living the high life in the stone age

People ventured onto the Ethiopian highlands more than 30,000 years ago. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Agency readies decision on underwater oil pipeline supports

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it's preparing to decide whether to let Canadian oil transport company Enbridge install supports for its underwater oil pipeline in Michigan's Straits of Mackinac.

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The Human Skeletal System

Humans wouldn't get very far without bones — literally.

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A Woman Placed an Octopus on Her Face for a Photo. Then It Bit Her.

Sometimes people have to learn the hard way that octopuses belong in the ocean — not on your face.

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These sharks use unique molecules to glow green

In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see — but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear. Researchers have now identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites.

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Textiles evolving to meet demand for sustainable materials

Whether it's how they're made or what they're made of, textiles are evolving to meet consumer demand for sustainability.

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El Nino fades so forecasters expect busier hurricane season

Government meteorologists say this year's hurricane season may be busier than initially expected now that summer's weak El Nino has faded away.

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Math on trial

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News at a glance

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Ghost catcher

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Dosing time matters

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Dugongs under threat

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Up in smoke

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Perilous traffic

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What's in a name?

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A vicious cycle of {beta} amyloid-dependent neuronal hyperactivation

β-amyloid (Aβ)–dependent neuronal hyperactivity is believed to contribute to the circuit dysfunction that characterizes the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis continues to accrue, the underlying pathological mechanisms are not well understood. In this experiment, we used mouse models of Aβ-amyloidosis to show that hyperactivation

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A single fast radio burst localized to a massive galaxy at cosmological distance

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are brief radio emissions from distant astronomical sources. Some are known to repeat, but most are single bursts. Nonrepeating FRB observations have had insufficient positional accuracy to localize them to an individual host galaxy. We report the interferometric localization of the single-pulse FRB 180924 to a position 4 kiloparsecs from the center of a luminous galaxy a

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Generation and manipulation of Schrödinger cat states in Rydberg atom arrays

Quantum entanglement involving coherent superpositions of macroscopically distinct states is among the most striking features of quantum theory, but its realization is challenging because such states are extremely fragile. Using a programmable quantum simulator based on neutral atom arrays with interactions mediated by Rydberg states, we demonstrate the creation of "Schrödinger cat" states of th

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Generation of multicomponent atomic Schrödinger cat states of up to 20 qubits

Multipartite entangled states are crucial for numerous applications in quantum information science. However, the generation and verification of multipartite entanglement on fully controllable and scalable quantum platforms remains an outstanding challenge. We report the deterministic generation of an 18-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and multicomponent atomic Schrödinger cat state

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Ultrahigh-energy density lead-free dielectric films via polymorphic nanodomain design

Dielectric capacitors with ultrahigh power densities are fundamental energy storage components in electrical and electronic systems. However, a long-standing challenge is improving their energy densities. We report dielectrics with ultrahigh energy densities designed with polymorphic nanodomains. Guided by phase-field simulations, we conceived and synthesized lead-free BiFeO 3 -BaTiO 3 -SrTiO 3 s

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Middle Stone Age foragers resided in high elevations of the glaciated Bale Mountains, Ethiopia

Studies of early human settlement in alpine environments provide insights into human physiological, genetic, and cultural adaptation potentials. Although Late and even Middle Pleistocene human presence has been recently documented on the Tibetan Plateau, little is known regarding the nature and context of early persistent human settlement in high elevations. Here, we report the earliest evidence

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Black carbon lofts wildfire smoke high into the stratosphere to form a persistent plume

In 2017, western Canadian wildfires injected smoke into the stratosphere that was detectable by satellites for more than 8 months. The smoke plume rose from 12 to 23 kilometers within 2 months owing to solar heating of black carbon, extending the lifetime and latitudinal spread. Comparisons of model simulations to the rate of observed lofting indicate that 2% of the smoke mass was black carbon. T

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Thermodynamically stabilized {beta}-CsPbI3-based perovskite solar cells with efficiencies >18%

Although β-CsPbI 3 has a bandgap favorable for application in tandem solar cells, depositing and stabilizing β-CsPbI 3 experimentally has remained a challenge. We obtained highly crystalline β-CsPbI 3 films with an extended spectral response and enhanced phase stability. Synchrotron-based x-ray scattering revealed the presence of highly oriented β-CsPbI 3 grains, and sensitive elemental analyses—

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Synthetic sequence entanglement augments stability and containment of genetic information in cells

In synthetic biology, methods for stabilizing genetically engineered functions and confining recombinant DNA to intended hosts are necessary to cope with natural mutation accumulation and pervasive lateral gene flow. We present a generalizable strategy to preserve and constrain genetic information through the computational design of overlapping genes. Overlapping a sequence with an essential gene

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A dominant-negative effect drives selection of TP53 missense mutations in myeloid malignancies

TP53 , which encodes the tumor suppressor p53, is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. The selective pressures shaping its mutational spectrum, dominated by missense mutations, are enigmatic, and neomorphic gain-of-function (GOF) activities have been implicated. We used CRISPR-Cas9 to generate isogenic human leukemia cell lines of the most common TP53 missense mutations. Functional,

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Emergent ferromagnetism near three-quarters filling in twisted bilayer graphene

When two sheets of graphene are stacked at a small twist angle, the resulting flat superlattice minibands are expected to strongly enhance electron-electron interactions. Here, we present evidence that near three-quarters () filling of the conduction miniband, these enhanced interactions drive the twisted bilayer graphene into a ferromagnetic state. In a narrow density range around an apparent in

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New Products

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A robotic platform for flow synthesis of organic compounds informed by AI planning

The synthesis of complex organic molecules requires several stages, from ideation to execution, that require time and effort investment from expert chemists. Here, we report a step toward a paradigm of chemical synthesis that relieves chemists from routine tasks, combining artificial intelligence–driven synthesis planning and a robotically controlled experimental platform. Synthetic routes are pr

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Comment on "Observation of alkaline earth complexes M(CO)8 (M = Ca, Sr, or Ba) that mimic transition metals"

Wu et al . (Reports, 31 August 2018, p. 912) claim that recently characterized octacarbonyls of Ca, Sr, and Ba mimic the classical Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson bonding motif of transition metals. This claim, which contradicts known chemistry and computed electron density distributions, originates in the assumption of a flawed reference state for energy decomposition analyses.

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Response to Comment on "Observation of alkaline earth complexes M(CO)8 (M = Ca, Sr, or Ba) that mimic transition metals"

Landis et al . claim in their comment that Ca does not bind like a transition metal in Ca(CO) 8 . We reject their statement, which is based on a misconception of bonding models and misleading application and interpretation of quantum chemical methods for analyzing chemical bonds.

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Cortical layer-specific critical dynamics triggering perception

Perceptual experiences may arise from neuronal activity patterns in mammalian neocortex. We probed mouse neocortex during visual discrimination using a red-shifted channelrhodopsin (ChRmine, discovered through structure-guided genome mining) alongside multiplexed multiphoton-holography (MultiSLM), achieving control of individually specified neurons spanning large cortical volumes with millisecond

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Tiny parks for bees line the streets of this Dutch city

A Dutch city is creating tiny parks on top of bus stops to house bees. It's part of a larger initiative to create a healthy urban living environment. Urban beekeeping serves an important ecological function. The Dutch city of Utrecht has set out on a new greenery initiative. Over 316 bus stop roofs were recently covered with grasses and a succulent plant called sedum. The shelters are meant to at

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Up in smoke

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In the Ethiopian Mountains, Ancient Humans Were Living the High Life

Humans may have inhabited sites at high elevations far earlier than once believed, a new study suggests.

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The Amazon Publishing Juggernaut

Have you read Victoria Helen Stone’s False Step ? No? Surprising, given that it’s a best seller, and that you clicked on an article about books and publishing—I thought you were more widely read. Surely you’ve at least gotten through Loreth Anne White’s The Dark Bones ? Julianne MacLean’s A Fire Sparkling ? Claire McGowan’s What You Did ? No? Each of these books beat out Where the Crawdads Sing ,

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The worst wildfires can send smoke high enough to affect the ozone layer

The first direct observations of wildfire smoke in the stratosphere confirm what could happen in a “nuclear winter,” a study finds.

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New Tech Analyzes Selfie Videos to Determine Your Blood Pressure

There’s a reason hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, has earned the nickname “ the silent killer .” Not only can the condition lead to a host of potentially fatal health problems , from heart attacks to strokes, but it’s also ninja-like in its ability to go undetected, with no obvious symptoms. None that are obvious to the naked eye, that is — but researchers say a newly unveiled sma

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Living the high life in the stone age

People ventured onto the Ethiopian highlands more than 30,000 years ago. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Wildfire smoke ‘supports nuclear winter theory’

Plume from intense Canadian fires kept rising, researchers report. Richard A Lovett reports.

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The Earth began to move 2.5 billion years ago

Rock analysis shifts the likely emergence of continental drift. Barry Keily reports.

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Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral than previously thought

Mortality events a distinct biological phenomenon, researchers say.

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Some sharks glow in the dark, and now we know why

Researchers discover an entirely new form of marine biofluorescence.

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A celestial seagull in full flight

And with a good telescope, you can capture all the details.

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Why humans in Africa fled to the mountains during the last ice age

People in Ethiopia did not live in low valleys during the last ice age. Instead they lived high up in the inhospitable Bale Mountains. There they had enough water, built tools out of obsidian and relied mainly on giant rodents for nourishment. This discovery was made by an international team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) in cooperation with the Universities

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Analysis of wildfire smoke will help calibrate climate models

Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. CIRES and NOAA researchers studying the plume found that black carbon or soot in the smoke was key to the plume's rapid rise: the soot absorbed solar radiation, heating the surrounding air and allowing the plume

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Alternatives to burning can increase Indian farmers' profits and cut pollution

A new economic study in the journal Science shows that thousands of farmers in northern India could increase their profits if they stop burning their rice straw and adopt no-till practices to grow wheat. Alternative farming practices could also cut farmers' greenhouse gas emissions from on-farm activities by as much as 78% and help lower air pollution in cities like New Delhi.

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UN climate report: Change land use to avoid a hungry future

Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious.

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Mystery solved? Why cats eat grass

Scientists say it’s not because they’re feeling sick

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Over a century of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships' logs

Our knowledge of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean comes mostly through satellites, which since 1979 have imaged the dwindling extent of sea ice from above. The University of Washington's Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean and Modeling System, or PIOMAS, is a leading tool for gauging the thickness of that ice. Until now that system has gone back only as far as 1979.

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Over a century of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships' logs

A new study provides a 110-year record of the total volume of Arctic sea ice, using early US ships' voyages to verify the earlier part of the record. The current sea ice volume and rate of loss are unprecedented in the 110-year record.

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Hubble's new portrait of Jupiter

A new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter reveals the giant planet's trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

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Crispr Can Help Solve Our Looming Food Crisis—Here's How

There's not enough land to feed everyone on Earth without ruining the climate, a new IPCC report shows. Gene-edited crops could help reduce agriculture's footprint.

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Human microbiome churns out thousands of tiny novel proteins, researchers find

Your body is a wonderland. A wonderland teeming with trillions of bacteria, that is. But it's not as horrifying as it might sound. In fact, there's mounting evidence that many aspects of our health are closely intertwined with the composition and hardiness of our microscopic compatriots, though exactly how is still mostly unclear.

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Why Don't Poison Frogs Poison Themselves?

A small change in poison frogs' DNA keeps them from being harmed by their own poison. Why Don't Poison Frogs Poison Themselves? Video of Why Don't Poison Frogs Poison Themselves? Creature Thursday, August 8, 2019 – 13:30 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — Some frogs are extremely toxic. So how do they keep from poisoning themselves? Rebecca Tarvin, now an assistant professor at UC

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New Research: There May Have Been Dark Matter Before Big Bang

Older Than Time Bizarre new research suggests that dark matter — the elusive, invisible substance thought to make up most of the matter in the universe — could be older than the Big Bang. If dark matter emerged from the Big Bang, then past experiments trying to directly observe the stuff probably would have succeeded, according to research published in the journal American Physical Society on Wed

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Apple Update Cracks Down on “Unauthorized” iPhone Batteries

Software Lock Tech giant Apple is activating a software lock on its latest iPhones, causing an annoying message to show up on any devices that are using third party batteries not authorized by Apple — and hiding data about the health of the battery. Big picture, it seems like an obvious attempt to stamp out third-party repair shops. “You can’t put a battery in a customer’s phone and have them see

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Human microbiome churns out thousands of tiny novel proteins, researchers find

Your body is a wonderland. A wonderland teeming with trillions of bacteria, that is. But it's not as horrifying as it might sound. In fact, there's mounting evidence that many aspects of our health are closely intertwined with the composition and hardiness of our microscopic compatriots, though exactly how is still mostly unclear.

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Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation

A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects.

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Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation

A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects.

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Jealousy Led Montana Chemist to Taint Colleague’s Water Tests

A judge fined a woman nearly $40,000 in a peculiar case of workplace gaslighting.

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How to juggle tons of accounts in your favorite apps from one phone

Why settle for one account when you can have more? (Rob Hampson via Unsplash/) There are all sorts of reasons why you might be running two accounts on your favorite apps. Maybe one is for everyone you know, and one is just for a select group of friends—like a finsta. Or maybe you want to keep your personal and work lives separate, or you volunteered to help run your softball team’s Facebook page.

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Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health

Researchers at North Carolina State University have shown that "sticky" hairlike structures on tobacco leaves can help attract beneficial insects that scavenge on other insects trapped on the leaves, increasing leaf yield and reducing pest damage to plant structures.

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An 88 percent decline in large freshwater animals

Rivers and lakes cover just about one percent of Earth's surface, but are home to one third of all vertebrate species worldwide. At the same time, freshwater life is highly threatened. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: From 1970 to 2012, global populat

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Lekima becomes Supertyphoon, heading towards Eastern China

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Supertyphoon Lekima as it tracked 214 nautical miles southwest of Okinawa, Japan. Tropical cyclone warning signal #1 is in force for the Luzon provinces of Batanes and Babuyan group of islands. The storm has tracked north-northwest at 10 knots over the past six hours.

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Typhoon Krosa follows leader Supertyphoon Lekima

NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image using NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview application on Aug. 08, 2019 and it shows Supertyphoon Lekima heading towards the coast of China as Typhoon Krosa brings up the rear moving slowly towards Japan.

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Novel strategy uncovers potential to control widespread soilborne pathogens

Soilborne pathogens are a major issue worldwide as they can infect a broad range of agricultural plants, resulting in serious crop losses devastating to farmers. These persistent pathogens are often resistant toward chemical fungicides, making them difficult to control, and have a broad host range, enabling them to damage a variety of important crops.

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How phishing attacks trick our brains

Why you’re more of a sucker than you think.

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Over a century of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships' logs

A new study provides a 110-year record of the total volume of Arctic sea ice, using early US ships' voyages to verify the earlier part of the record. The current sea ice volume and rate of loss are unprecedented in the 110-year record.

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Study shows gun shops can aid in preventing suicides

Firearm retailers throughout Washington are willing to learn about suicide prevention but are reluctant to talk to customers about mental health issues, according to a new study by Forefront Suicide Prevention at the University of Washington.

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Does cable news shape your views?

A new study led by MIT political scientists finds that while partisan media does indeed have 'a strong persuasive impact' on political attitudes, news media exposure has a bigger impact on people without strongly held preferences for partisan media than it does for people who seek out partisan media outlets.

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Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health

Researchers at North Carolina State University have shown that "sticky" hairlike structures on tobacco leaves can help attract beneficial insects that scavenge on other insects trapped on the leaves, increasing leaf yield and reducing pest damage to plant structures.

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An 88 percent decline in large freshwater animals

Rivers and lakes cover just about one percent of Earth's surface, but are home to one third of all vertebrate species worldwide. At the same time, freshwater life is highly threatened. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: From 1970 to 2012, global populat

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Novel strategy uncovers potential to control widespread soilborne pathogens

Soilborne pathogens are a major issue worldwide as they can infect a broad range of agricultural plants, resulting in serious crop losses devastating to farmers. These persistent pathogens are often resistant toward chemical fungicides, making them difficult to control, and have a broad host range, enabling them to damage a variety of important crops.

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Study furthers radically new view of gene control

In recent years, MIT scientists have developed a new model for how key genes are controlled that suggests the cellular machinery that transcribes DNA into RNA forms specialized droplets called condensates. These droplets occur only at certain sites on the genome, helping to determine which genes are expressed in different types of cells.

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Study furthers radically new view of gene control

In recent years, MIT scientists have developed a new model for how key genes are controlled that suggests the cellular machinery that transcribes DNA into RNA forms specialized droplets called condensates. These droplets occur only at certain sites on the genome, helping to determine which genes are expressed in different types of cells.

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New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment

A team of environmental scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and China has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic.

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Hubble showcases new portrait of Jupiter

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter's clouds in this new image taken on 27 June 2019. It features the planet's trademark Great Red Spot and a more intense colour palette in the clouds swirling in the planet's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

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Evidence found for cloaked black hole in early universe

A group of astronomers, including Penn State scientists, has announced the likely discovery of a highly obscured black hole existing only 850 million years after the Big Bang, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is the first evidence for a cloaked black hole at such an early time.

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NASA's MMS finds first interplanetary shock

The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission—MMS—has spent the past four years using high-resolution instruments to see what no other spacecraft can. Recently, MMS made the first high-resolution measurements of an interplanetary shock.

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Back-to-back low snow years will become more common, study projects

Consecutive low snow years may become six times more common across the Western United States over the latter half of this century, leading to ecological and economic challenges such as expanded fire seasons and poor snow conditions at ski resorts, according to a study.

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ATLAS delivers new direct measurement of the top-quark decay width with improved precision

As the heaviest known particle, the top quark plays a key role in studies of fundamental interactions. Due to its short lifetime, the top quark decays before it can turn into a hadron. Thus, its properties are preserved and transferred to its decay products, which can in turn be measured in high-energy physics experiments. Such studies provide an excellent testing ground for the Standard Model and

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Live mitochondria seen in unprecedented detail: photobleaching in STED microscopy overcome

Light microscopy is the only way in which we can look inside a living cell, or living tissues, in three dimensions. An electron microscope only gives a two-dimensional view, and the organic sample would quickly burn up due to the extreme heat of the electron beam, and therefore cannot be observed alive. Moreover, by marking the biomolecules of the structure we are interested in with a specially de

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Fewer cows, more trees and bioenergy

Combatting global warming will require major changes in land use, a new climate change report says. One important change could be decreasing the amount of land used to produce livestock—which means that people would have to eat less meat.

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Studies of fungi provide new knowledge of harmful mutations in cells

Long-lived mushrooms that grow in 'fairy rings' accumulate surprisingly few mutations over time. This finding indicates that their protection against harmful mutations is well developed. The results, to be published in the esteemed journal Current Biology, are interesting in terms of both medicine and evolutionary biology.

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Lake Tahoe shows microplastics aren’t just an ocean problem

Research at one of the clearest, cleanest lakes in the world suggests the problem of microplastics is widespread in freshwater systems and not just in oceans. From the infamous “garbage patch” islands of floating plastic to the guts of fish and bellies of birds , plastics of all sizes are ubiquitous and well-documented in the ocean . But little data exists on microplastics in lakes. “The ocean ge

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Studies of fungi provide new knowledge of harmful mutations in cells

Long-lived mushrooms that grow in 'fairy rings' accumulate surprisingly few mutations over time. This finding indicates that their protection against harmful mutations is well developed. The results, to be published in the esteemed journal Current Biology, are interesting in terms of both medicine and evolutionary biology.

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UK plans ‘fast-track’ visas after Brexit to boost science

Proposal may include abolishing the cap on number of permits for most high-skilled workers

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Meet Generation Alpha, the 9-year-olds shaping our future

submitted by /u/Sdgal01 [link] [comments]

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Thought this was cool – Elizabeth Warren is offering a proposal to pay farmers to fight climate change

https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/456547-warren-to-pay-farmers-to-fight-climate-change-under-new-plan As above. I'm no expert on agriculture, but this is something that I find really exciting. Agricultural land use is currently a major driver of climate change – transport and use of mineral fertilizers, loss of topsoil (topsoil is high-carbon; losing topsoil means a lot of that carbon

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Inside the $170K solar car that drives 500 miles on one charge

submitted by /u/roku44 [link] [comments]

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The future is now

submitted by /u/darkbluedeath [link] [comments]

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These Plants Can Replace Meat–but Will Doing So Help the Environment?

Moving away from meat would reduce fertilizer use, cropland and carbon dioxide emissions. Yet it alone will not save the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere

Molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, but difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes. Researchers hope their new technique of enabling the visualization of gas molecules bouncing off a liquid surface will help climate scientists improve their predictive atmospheric models.

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Electromagnetic fields may hinder spread of breast cancer cells

Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. The study showed that low intensity electromagnetic fields hindered the mobility of specific breast cancer cells by preventing the formation of long, thin extensions at the edge of a migrating cancer cell.

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Oil rigs could pump CO2 emissions into rocks beneath North Sea

North Sea oil and gas rigs could be modified to pump vast quantities of carbon dioxide emissions into rocks below the seabed, research shows.

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Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity. Scientists have now developed a bimodal contrast agent suited for two imaging techniques at once, namely, MRI and a technique called photoacoustic imaging. The use of only one contrast agent for two imaging techniques improves the sensitivity of both, with only littl

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These Plants Can Replace Meat–but Will Doing So Help the Environment?

Moving away from meat would reduce fertilizer use, cropland and carbon dioxide emissions. Yet it alone will not save the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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These Plants Can Replace Meat–but Will Doing So Help the Environment?

Moving away from meat would reduce fertilizer use, cropland and carbon dioxide emissions. Yet it alone will not save the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Harvard launches law firm for animal advocacy

Harvard Law School is launching a new clinic to train lawyers in animal law. They're one of the leading institutions in the animal protection movement. Increased public interest in animal rights has made this discipline expand rapidly. Harvard Law School (HLS) recently announced the exciting launch of their own Animal Law & Policy Clinic. Animal Law is a rapidly growing field that deals with the

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Scientists produce radioactivity-free Chernobyl vodka

A team of British scientists has helped produce a radioactivity-free vodka called "ATOMIK" from crops near the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the University of Portsmouth said …

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A World Without Water

A quarter of the world's population is at high risk of running out of water. (Image credit: ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images)

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Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity. Scientists have now developed a bimodal contrast agent suited for two imaging techniques at once, namely, MRI and a technique called photoacoustic imaging. The use of only one contrast agent for two imaging techniques improves the sensitivity of both, with only littl

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Positive effect of music and dance on dementia proven by New Zealand study

A pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia.

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Despite habitat protection, endangered owls decline in Mount Rainier National Park

When the Northern Spotted Owl was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, the primary threat to the species was the loss of old-growth forest. However, new research shows that the Spotted Owl population in Washington's Mount Rainier National Park has declined sharply in the past two decades despite long-term preservation of habitat within the park. The culprit? The Barred Owl, a compet

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Blackbirds, brains and bleached anemones — July’s best science images

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02383-0 The month’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature’s photo team.

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To Halt Warming and Ensure Food Supplies, Land-Use Practices Must Change

A much-anticipated U.N. report explores the links and feedbacks between climate change and Earth’s land surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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BrainHealth researchers study the neurochemistry of social perception

Cues signaling trust and dominance are crucial for social life. Recent research from Dr. Dan Krawczyk's lab at the Center for BrainHealth® explored whether administering two chemically similar hormones known to affect social cognition — oxytocin and vasopressin — would influence the perception of trustworthiness and/or social dominance. This research extended previous studies on the effects of o

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Depression is the single largest predictor of substance use during pregnancy

Researchers studied health and geographical data from 25,000 pregnant women in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, and have shown that depression is the largest driver of substance use during pregnancy.

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Installing solar panels on agricultural lands maximizes their efficiency, new study shows

A new study finds that if less than 1% of agricultural land was converted to solar panels, it would be sufficient to fulfill global electric energy demand.

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James Lovelock at 100: Ecclectic conference considers Gaia's future

A conference celebrating James Lovelock, the scientist who formulated the Gaia hypothesis, saw researchers questioning the future of our living planet

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PM vows to 'supercharge' UK science with fast-track visas

Boris Johnson wants a new fast-track visa system to attract leading scientists to work in the UK.

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How These Sharks Glow Neon Green

Newly discovered family of fluorescent molecules explains how two kinds of seafloor-dwelling sharks glow. GreenFishGlow.jpg Biofluorescent shark Scyliorhinus retifer. Image credits: David Gruber Creature Thursday, August 8, 2019 – 12:15 Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor (Inside Science) — When we look at the seafloor, we might not see the bottom-dwelling sharks that blend in with the rocks and

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We can’t keep eating as we are – why isn’t the IPCC shouting this from the rooftops? | George Monbiot

In its crucial land and climate report, the IPCC irresponsibly understates the true carbon cost of our meat and dairy habits It’s a tragic missed opportunity. The new report on land by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shies away from the big issues and fails to properly represent the science. As a result, it gives us few clues about how we might survive the century. Has it been

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New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment

A team of environmental scientists has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic.

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The Surprisingly Cozy Truths of Sleeping in Space

Sleeping astronauts look like strapped-in zombies surrounded by whirring machines and always-on lights. But for Mike Massimino, it might have been the best sleep of his life.

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Report: Monsanto Paid Google to Bury Unfavorable News

Damage Control Monsanto, the agrochemical company that’s attained notoriety for its agricultural pesticides and genetically modified organisms, reportedly worked overtime to discredit investigative journalists criticizing the company — and even paid the search giant Google to suppress the findings. Carey Gillam , a journalist with Reuters , was reporting on the health effects of Monsanto’s produc

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Climate Change Is Officially a TikTok Meme

Global Trend The trendy teens of TikTok have turned global warming into a meme. The shortform video app is full of posts tagged with #GlobalWarning, BBC News reports . In them, people convey a future ravaged by environmental destruction, typically by pretending to cough up garbage, covering themselves in waste plastic, and applying disease-like makeup. The videos, TikTok users told BBC , are inte

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Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

Go full monty on that python! (Image credit: Conservancy of Southwest Florida)

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Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health

Researchers show beneficial relationship between 'sticky' tobacco plants and helpful insects that consume tobacco pests.

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Implantable 3D blastocyst-like embryonic structure generated from mouse stem cells

Researchers have generated 3D blastocyst-like structures from stem cells. The study shows that the blastocyst-like structures very closely resemble actual blastocysts, and even induce proper changes in the uterus after being implanted in pseudo-pregnant mice.

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Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation

A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects.

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Why intense light can protect cardiovascular health

Researchers have found that intense light amplifies a specific gene that bolsters blood vessels and offers protection against heart attacks.

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Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere

Molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, but difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes. Researchers hope their new technique of enabling the visualization of gas molecules bouncing off a liquid surface will help climate scientists improve their predictive atmospheric models.

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Electromagnetic fields may hinder spread of breast cancer cells

Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. The study showed that low intensity electromagnetic fields hindered the mobility of specific breast cancer cells by preventing the formation of long, thin extensions at the edge of a migrating cancer cell.

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The world's smallest stent

Researchers have developed a new method for producing malleable microstructures — for instance, vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible. In the future, such stents could be used to help to widen life-threatening constrictions of the urinary tract in fetuses in the womb.

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Stony corals: Limits of adaption

Corals have been dominant framework builders of reef structures for millions of years. Ocean acidification, which is intensifying as climate change progresses, is increasingly affecting coral growth. Scientists have now answered some questions regarding whether and how corals can adapt to these changes by having gained important insights into the regulatory processes of coral calcification.

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Oil rigs could pump CO2 emissions into rocks beneath North Sea

North Sea oil and gas rigs could be modified to pump vast quantities of carbon dioxide emissions into rocks below the seabed, research shows.

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Chris Kraft obituary

Nasa’s first flight director who controlled the Apollo moon landings The engineer Chris Kraft, who has died aged 95, was Nasa’s first flight director, the man who shaped the team – and the control centre – at Cape Canaveral in Florida and, from 1963, in Houston, Texas. Kraft’s work spanned the era from Nasa’s first faltering manned missions during the space race of the 1960s to the space shuttle i

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Lekima becomes Supertyphoon, heading towards Eastern China

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Supertyphoon Lekima as it tracked 214 nautical miles southwest of Okinawa, Japan. Tropical cyclone warning signal #1 is in force for the Luzon provinces of Batanes and Babuyan group of islands. The storm has tracked north-northwest at 10 knots over the past six hours.

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Restructuring Medicare Shared Savings Program can yield 40% savings in health costs

More than a trillion dollars was spent on healthcare in the United States in 2018, with Medicare and Medicaid accounting for some 37% of those expenditures. With healthcare costs expected to continue to rise by roughly 5% per year, a continued debate in healthcare policy is how to reduce costs without compromising quality.

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Typhoon Krosa follows leader Supertyphoon Lekima

NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image using NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview application on Aug. 08, 2019 and it shows Supertyphoon Lekima heading towards the coast of China as Typhoon Krosa brings up the rear moving slowly towards Japan.

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Analysis and detoxification in one step

Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate. Researchers from Thailand have now developed a bioinspired method to detect and detoxify these chemicals in only one step. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a combination of two natural enzymatic reactions convert harmful chloro- and nitrophenols into the

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Bringing cancer medication safely to its destination

Treating cancer more selectively and more effectively – this could be achieved with an innovative technology developed by teams of researchers at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU). The process transforms proteins and antibodies into stable, highly functional drug transporters, with which tumor cells can be detecte

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Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate

Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees.

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Existing anti-parasitic drug could offer treatment for Ebola

Amid the worsening Ebola outbreak in the Congo, now threatening to spill into Rwanda, a new study suggests that an existing, FDA-approved drug called nitazoxanide could potentially help contain this deadly, highly contagious infection. In meticulous experiments in human cells, led by Boston Children's Hospital, the drug significantly amplified immune responses to Ebola and inhibited Ebola replicat

7h

Genetic variation contributes to individual differences in pleasure

Differences in how our brains respond when we're anticipating a financial reward are due, in part, to genetic differences, according to research with identical and fraternal twins published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that how we experience pleasure and reward is at least partly heritable.

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Oceanic Bacteria Trap Vast Amounts of Light Without Chlorophyll

Microbes that dwell in nutrient-poor waters use a photopigment called retinal to harvest energy from sunshine at levels at least equal to those stored by chlorophyll-based systems.

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Catastrophe by Mail

A gift led me to think about an old geologic controversy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ghostpartum: Why Many Women Don't Get Sexual Health Care They Need

The many factors that impact a woman’s ability and desire to have intercourse after giving birth are rarely addressed during a standard postpartum visit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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‘Popular’ Kids Aren’t That Special

In school, “popularity” is a slippery concept, with kids falling in and out of it for no apparent reason. The hierarchies of middle and high school can be as mystifying years later as they were at the time. But researchers have been studying “popularity” in a systematic way for a while now, and one question they’ve dug into is to what degree the actions and customs of kids considered to be popula

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We can’t stop climate change unless we drastically change how we use our land

Agriculture has to change fundamentally if we're going to secure our future. (Josh Withers/Unsplash/) We can’t halt the climate crisis without changing how we use land, warns a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Today, humans are impacting over 70 percent of the Earth’s ice-free surface. And our heavy use is having a big impact: the report states that agriculture, fore

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88 percent decline of big freshwater animals

Scientists have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: From 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88 percent – twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. Large fish species are particularly affected.

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Potential treatment target for Crohn's disease

Crohn's Disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body's own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of the disease in its acute phase and managing it in remission. But recently, researchers have identified a pathway in the immune system activated in CD and which holds promise for investigating new treatments.

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New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment

A team of environmental scientists has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic.

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Bacteria on tumors influences immune response and survival of patients with pancreatic cancer

Researchers find tumor microbiome influences immune response and patient survival in pancreatic cancer. Study points to fecal transplant as possible treatment.

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Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, scientists find

Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown.

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Scientists discover why two shark species emit green glow

Previously undiscovered group of molecules found to be behind phenomenon The secret behind the eerie glow of two shark species has been revealed in a study which sheds light on the origin and possible advantages of their fluorescent green bodies. Chain catsharks and swell sharks are deep-dwelling and live in the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific respectively, where they hide among rocks and ru

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Mysterious signals from space could teach us how dark energy works

Weird bursts of radio waves from space could be used to measure cosmic distances, which would help us learn about dark energy and the universe’s expansion

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Back-to-back low snow years will become more common, study projects

Consecutive low snow years may become six times more common across the Western United States over the latter half of this century, leading to ecological and economic challenges such as expanded fire seasons and poor snow conditions at ski resorts, according to a new study.

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Novel strategy uncovers potential to control widespread soilborne pathogens

This study introduces a new strategy for identifying antagonistic bacteria, which can then be used to control important plant pathogens. These findings suggest that biological control of pathogens might be improved by combining different beneficial microorganisms and highlight novel strategies used to control widespread phytopathogenic fungi.

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NASA's MMS finds first interplanetary shock

NASA's MMS mission just made the first high-resolution measurements of an interplanetary shockwave launched from the Sun.

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New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment

A team of environmental scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and China has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic.

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88 percent decline of big freshwater animals

Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: From 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88 percent – twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. Large fish species are particularly affected.

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Teens feel pressured to get pregnant

Female adolescents are experiencing relationship abuse at alarming rates, according to a new Michigan State University study that specifically researched reproductive coercion – a form of abuse in which a woman is pressured to become pregnant against her wishes.

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US Gov: Tesla Made “Misleading” Safety Claims About Model 3

Cease-and-Desist The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) sent Tesla a cease-and-desist letter in October 2018 claiming it had made “misleading statements” about the safety rating of the Model 3, according to documents obtained by government transparency watchdog PlainSite. The letter, written by NHTSA Chief Counsel Jonathan Morrison, mostly concerns a Tesla blog post publi

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Ghostpartum: Why Many Women Don't Get Sexual Health Care They Need

The many factors that impact a woman’s ability and desire to have intercourse after giving birth are rarely addressed during a standard postpartum visit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cosmologists Debate How Fast the Universe Is Expanding

In 1998, two teams of cosmologists observed dozens of distant supernovas and inferred that they’re racing away from Earth faster and faster all the time. This meant that — contrary to expectations — the expansion of the universe is accelerating, and thus the fabric of space must be infused with a repulsive “dark energy” that comprises more than two-thirds of everything. For this discovery, the te

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Fosfor från Marocko styr världens matproduktion

Enligt Statens Geologiska Undersökningar är Marocko världens tredje största producent av fosfor som är en av huvudingredienserna i konstgödsel. Bara Kina och USA producerar mer. Marocko uppskattas även ha 75 procent av världens reserver, varav majoriteten tros ligga i Västsahara som sedan 1975 ockuperas av Marocko. Så varför är fosfor är så viktigt för mänskligheten? – En växt kräver 17 kemiska e

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Major surgery associated with small, long term decline in brain functioning

Major surgery is associated with a small long-term decline in cognitive functioning – equivalent, on average, to less than five months of natural brain aging, finds a new study.

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Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae

As an alternative to traditional fossil fuels, biofuels represent a more environmentally friendly and sustainable fuel source. Plant or animal fats can be converted to biofuels through a process called transesterification. In particular, the storage molecule triacylglycerol (TAG), found in microscopic algae, is one of the most promising sources of fat for biofuel production, as microalgae are smal

7h

Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health

Researchers show beneficial relationship between 'sticky' tobacco plants and helpful insects that consume tobacco pests.

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Researchers discover why intense light can protect cardiovascular health

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that intense light amplifies a specific gene that bolsters blood vessels and offers protection against heart attacks.

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GW researchers identify barriers to fungal infection diagnosis

A new survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, identifies several barriers that prevent the consistent use of fungal diagnostic preparations to correctly identify cutaneous fungal infections.

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You Can Now Buy a Tesla Hearse for $200,000

Coffin Carrier We’ve already seen do-it-yourselfer Tesla owners convert their cars into pickup trucks and police cruisers . Now, a man in Norway has transformed a Model S into a Tesla hearse — and he’s ready to sell it to you for about $200,000. Funeral Ferry Electrek spotted the hearse listed for sale on Finn, a Norwegian classifieds website, for SEK 1,999,000, which converts to about $208,000.

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Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae

As an alternative to traditional fossil fuels, biofuels represent a more environmentally friendly and sustainable fuel source. Plant or animal fats can be converted to biofuels through a process called transesterification. In particular, the storage molecule triacylglycerol (TAG), found in microscopic algae, is one of the most promising sources of fat for biofuel production, as microalgae are smal

7h

Using recent gene flow to define microbe populations

Identifying species among plants and animals has been a full-time occupation for some biologists, but the task is even more daunting for the myriad microbes that inhabit the planet. Now, MIT researchers have developed a simple measurement of gene flow that can define ecologically important populations among bacteria and archaea, including pinpointing populations associated with human diseases.

7h

Using recent gene flow to define microbe populations

Identifying species among plants and animals has been a full-time occupation for some biologists, but the task is even more daunting for the myriad microbes that inhabit the planet. Now, MIT researchers have developed a simple measurement of gene flow that can define ecologically important populations among bacteria and archaea, including pinpointing populations associated with human diseases.

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Researchers to study physics of underwater walking

Around 360 million years ago, creatures trekked out of the water and onto dry land, becoming the first terrestrial animals. The colonization of land by animals may be one of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life, but our understanding of the physics of this event is limited. Professor Henry Astley, Ph.D., from The University of Akron (UA) seeks to find answers.

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A smart chemoenzymatic method detects and removes hazardous phenols

Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate. Researchers from Thailand have now developed a bioinspired method to detect and detoxify these chemicals in only one step. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a combination of two natural enzymatic reactions convert harmful chloro- and nitrophenols into the

8h

The reasons behind aerosol pollution over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau

The aerosol optical depth over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau (ESTP) is extremely large—and even more so than some important industrialized regions and deserts, which is the result of a combination of human activities and natural conditions, according to Prof. Yuzhi Liu at Lanzhou University.

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These sharks use unique molecules to glow green

In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see—but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear. In a study publishing August 8 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites. Not only is

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Giant freshwater fishes are in alarming decline

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02403-z The plunge in numbers of these enormous species is part of a broader downward trend in freshwater megafauna.

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These sharks use unique molecules to glow green

In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see—but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear. In a study publishing August 8 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites. Not only is

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'Wu Assassins' Gives Netflix New Footing in Streaming's Battle Royale

The series proves Netflix sees a future in martial arts action shows.

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Hubble's new portrait of Jupiter

This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter, taken on June 27, 2019, reveals the giant planet's trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years. The colors, and their changes, provide important clues to ongoing processes in Jupiter's atmosphere.

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Pancreatic cancer: Less toxic, more enduring drug may improve therapy

A new drug that penetrates the protective barrier around pancreatic cancers and accumulates in malignant cells may improve current chemotherapy, a study in mice suggests.

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A new pathway: researchers identify potential treatment target for Crohn's disease

Crohn's Disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body's own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of the disease in its acute phase and managing it in remission. But recently, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine identified a pathway in the immune system activated in CD and which

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Ezetimibe reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes

Given in addition to statin therapy, ezetimibe has a preventive effect in patients with CHD and acute coronary syndrome.

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Hubble showcases new portrait of Jupiter

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter's clouds in this new image taken on June 27, 2019. It features the planet's trademark Great Red Spot and a more intense colour palette in the clouds swirling in the planet's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

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Scientists make major breakthrough in understanding common eye disease

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today [Thursday August 8, 2019] announced a major breakthrough with important implications for sufferers of a common eye disease — dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) — which can cause total blindness in sufferers, and for which there are currently no approved therapies.

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Balance of 'stop' and 'go' signaling could be key to cancer immunotherapy response

A crucial signaling pathway that can tell the immune system to fight off cancer can also be co-opted by cancer cells to put the brakes on the immune system.

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Using recent gene flow to define microbe populations

Identifying species among plants and animals has been a full-time occupation for some biologists, but the task is even more daunting for the myriad microbes that inhabit the planet. Now, MIT researchers have developed a simple measurement of gene flow that can define ecologically important populations among bacteria and archaea, including pinpointing populations associated with human diseases.

8h

Bacteria on tumors influences immune response and survival of patients with pancreatic cancer

MD Anderson researchers find tumor microbiome influences immune response and patient survival in pancreatic cancer. Study points to fecal transplant as possible treatment.

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Is giant cell arteritis associated with race?

Giant cell arteritis is an inflammation of the blood vessels that typically occurs in adults over 50 and, if left untreated, can result in irreversible vision loss and death. This study examined whether occurrence of the disorder was associated with race.

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6 in 10 children receive opioids after tonsillectomy

Sixty percent of privately insured children undergoing tonsil removal received opioids — with average prescriptions lasting about six to 10 days — a new study finds.

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Study furthers radically new view of gene control

Researchers have discovered physical interactions between proteins and DNA that help explain why specialized droplets called condensates, which contain the machinery needed to copy DNA into RNA, tend to cluster at genomic regions that are particularly active in a given cell. The work is from MIT and the Whitehead Institute.

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Opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy

National private insurance claims data were used to examine opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy and return visits for complications. Opioids are commonly used after tonsillectomy, although American Academy of Otolaryngology clinical practice guidelines recommend nonopioids such as NSAIDs. This analysis included 2016 and 2017 claims data coded for tonsillectomy for nearly 16

8h

Decoding touch

Study in mice reveals several distinct molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal touch sensitivity in autism spectrum disorders. Gene mutations in the peripheral nervous system lead to touch aversion and interfere with normal brain development in young mice, underscoring importance of early intervention. Treatment with an old experimental compound that selectively targets the peripheral nervous sys

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Studies of fungi provide new knowledge of harmful mutations in cells

Long-lived mushrooms that grow in 'fairy rings' accumulate surprisingly few mutations over time. This finding indicates that their protection against harmful mutations is well developed. The results, to be published in the esteemed journal Current Biology, are interesting in terms of both medicine and evolutionary biology.

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One cell at a time, researchers create a blueprint of liver cells in health and disease

In every tissue throughout our bodies, various cell types are communicating and coordinating their efforts to perform vital functions and maintain health.

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Lassa virus' soft spot revealed

A new study identified and then reverse engineered the molecular properties shared by antibodies that are particularly efficient at inactivating or 'neutralizing' Lassa virus. The team's findings also revealed that most neutralizing antibodies bind to the same spot on the surface of Lassa virus, providing a map for rational vaccine design.

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Insights on timing of Huntington's Disease onset

New research results published in the journal Cell, call into question an accepted theory about the timing of HD onset.

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Implantable 3D blastocyst-like embryonic structure generated from mouse stem cells

An international collaboration of researchers from the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan and the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in the USA have generated 3D blastocyst-like structures from stem cells. Published in the journal Stem Cell Reports, the study shows that the blastocyst-like structures very closely resemble actual blastocysts, and even induce pro

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Human microbiome churns out thousands of tiny novel proteins, Stanford researchers find

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that the human microbiome is churning out tens of thousands of proteins so small that they've gone unnoticed in previous studies.

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Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation

A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects.

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Rapid coral death and decay, not just bleaching, as marine heatwaves intensify

When ocean temperatures rise, corals are put at risk of a phenomenon known as bleaching, in which corals expel the algae living in their tissues and turn white. Bleached corals are at increased risk of disease and death. But, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 8, 2019 now show that more severe marine heatwaves–as occurred on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 2016

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Researchers discover oldest fossil forest in Asia

The Devonian period (419 million to 359 million years ago), called the 'age of the fishes,' saw significant evolutionary progress in plants. Researchers reporting August 8 in the journal Current Biology describe the largest example of a Devonian forest, made up of 250,000 square meters of fossilized lycopsid trees, which was recently discovered in China's Anhui province. Larger than Devonian fores

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These sharks use unique molecules to glow green

In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see — but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear. In a study publishing August 8, 2019 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites.

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Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, scientists find

Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown.

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‘We’re the Workaholics of the World’

Should a job provide a paycheck or a purpose? For Americans, the edict is both. “Work has become the centerpiece of our identity, the focal point of our lives, and the organizing principle of society,” says Derek Thompson in a new video from The Atlantic . The concept of an all-consuming career—Thompson calls it workism —has rendered Americans the workaholics of the world. Where traditional relig

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Researchers discover oldest fossil forest in Asia

The Devonian period, which was 419 million to 359 million years ago, is best known for Tiktaalik, the lobe-finned fish that is often portrayed pulling itself onto land. However, the "age of the fishes," as the period is called, also saw evolutionary progress in plants. Researchers reporting August 8 in the journal Current Biology describe the largest example of a Devonian forest, made up of 250,00

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Myanmar floods force tens of thousands from homes

Raging floods across Myanmar have forced tens of thousands of people from their homes in recent weeks, officials said Thursday, as monsoon rains pummel the nation.

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Rapid coral death and decay, not just bleaching, as marine heatwaves intensify

When ocean temperatures rise, corals are put at risk of a phenomenon known as bleaching, in which corals expel the algae living in their tissues and turn white. Bleached corals are at increased risk of disease and death. But, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 8 now show that more severe marine heatwaves—as occurred on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 2016—are ev

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Gene combo linked to endometrial cancer

Researchers have identified a combination of two gene mutations that link to endometrial cancer, according to a new study. “More than 63,000 women are likely to be diagnosed with endometrial cancer this year, making it the most commonly identified type of gynecologic cancer,” says Ronald Chandler, an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology in the College of Human M

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Nature-forskere: Her er gevinsterne ved at droppe al kød i USA

USA kan frigive landbrugsområder på syv gange danmarks størrelse og spare klimaet for 280 mio ton CO2, hvis de dropper kødet, lyder det fra amerikanske forskere.

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Sharks use a special kind of protein to glow green in deep water

Chain catsharks and swell sharks have evolved a special way to glow-in-the-dark skin that is completely different from other biofluorescent marine animals

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How Sharks Glow to Each Other Deep in the Ocean

Scientists have identified the molecular magic that makes the creatures into neon beacons.

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Why does El Niño decay faster than La Niña?

Warm and cold phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) exhibit a significant asymmetry in their decay speed. Generally, El Niño tends to turn into a La Niña event in the following June-July after its mature phase; however, the negative sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTAs) associated with La Niña events can persist for more than one year after peaking, resulting in a longer duration than th

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New research provides better way to gauge pain in mice

Neuroscientists have developed a method that can more accurately gauge pain in mice, which could lead researchers to discover new ways to treat pain in human patients.

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Dark matter may be older than the Big Bang

Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but a new study now suggests that dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang.

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Beyond the Apollo 50th Anniversary, with Poppy Northcutt

Frances "Poppy" Northcutt at work in the Mission Planning and Analysis room at NASA's Mission Control (Houston) during the Apollo program, circa 1968. The 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 came and went in a blaze of nostalgia for the moment when humans made their first awkward footfall on another world–a moment when (for the true believers, at least) it seemed like humans might keep going and start

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This shark glows using a process previously unknown to science

Discovery uncovers new kind of fluorescence

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Personalised breast cancer test could tell when to stop treatment

A blood test for a person’s specific breast cancer mutations – which is 100 times more sensitive than existing tests – seems to tell when treatment is working and when more is needed

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Can voting online via phone boost turnout?

The ability to vote with a mobile device increased turnout by three to five percentage points in the 2018 federal election in West Virginia, according to new research. The finding suggests that mobile voting has the potential to significantly boost turnout in future elections. West Virginia became the first US state to use mobile voting in a federal election, allowing it for overseas voters from

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Neural networks will help manufacture carbon nanotubes

Thin films made of carbon nanotubes hold a lot of promise for advanced optoelectronics, energy and medicine, however with their manufacturing process subject to close supervision and stringent standardization requirements, they are unlikely to become ubiquitous anytime soon.

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Forget 'Obamageddon', 'Prepping' is now part of mainstream US politics and culture

Long considered an extreme reaction to fears of Armageddon and imminent nuclear disaster, 'preppers' in the US have traditionally been portrayed as motivated by extreme right-wing or apocalyptic views. New research from Dr. Michael Mills, from the University of Kent, challenges this view.

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Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere

Invisible to the human eye, molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, including the absorption of oxygen molecules into our lungs, many industrial processes and the conversion of organic compounds within our atmosphere. But difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes.

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A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics

Researchers have, for the first time, identified the sufficient and necessary conditions that the low-energy limit of quantum gravity theories must satisfy to preserve the main features of the Unruh effect.

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The 2004 USS Nimitz UFO Incident | Contact

In 2004, an American fighter plane from the USS Nimitz, an aircraft carrier stationed off the coast of San Diego, engaged with a UFO over the open ocean. Stream Full Episodes of Contact on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/contact/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.co

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How cigarette smoke makes head and neck cancer more aggressive

A change in the tumor metabolism due to tobacco exposure could open new treatment avenues in head and neck cancer.

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Can eating poop save you from this deadly bacteria? (video)

Every year around half a million people in the United States get sick from the bacterium C. diff, often after taking antibiotics. Sound counterintuitive? This week on Reactions we break down why that happens, and how an unlikely hero could save the day.

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Moffitt researchers identify subtypes of squamous cell lung cancer

Despite improved knowledge of the molecular alterations in SCC, little is understood about how the alterations contribute to the development of the cancer and how potential vulnerabilities could be exploited to treat the disease. Researchers in Moffitt Cancer Center's Lung Cancer Center of Excellence took a closer look at SCC tumors to determine if their characteristics had an impact on patient ou

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The world's smallest stent

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new method for producing malleable microstructures — for instance, vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible. In the future, such stents could be used to help to widen life-threatening constrictions of the urinary tract in foetuses in the womb.

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Electromagnetic fields may hinder spread of breast cancer cells

Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. The study showed that low intensity electromagnetic fields hindered the mobility of specific breast cancer cells by preventing the formation of long, thin extensions at the edge of a migrating cancer cell.

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Method to automatically estimate rooftop solar potential

The progress of rooftop solar installations is often slowed by a shortage of trained professionals who must use expensive tools to conduct labor-intensive structure assessments one by one, say scientists. Now researchers are proposing a new, data-driven approach that uses machine learning techniques and widely available satellite images to identify roofs that have the most potential to produce cos

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Good heart health at age 50 linked to lower dementia risk later in life

Good cardiovascular health at age 50 is associated with a lower risk of dementia later in life, finds a new study.

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Gluten response in celiac patients could lead to diagnostic test

Distinct markers in the blood of people with celiac disease have been detected within a few hours of gluten being consumed. The findings address a longstanding mystery about what drives the adverse reaction to gluten in celiac disease and could lead to a world-first blood test for diagnosing the disease. A potential blood-based test would be a vast improvement on the current approach which require

8h

Routine hits playing football cause damage to the brain

New research indicates that concussions aren't the sole cause of damage to the brain in contact sports. A study of college football players found that typical hits sustained from playing just one season cause structural changes to the brain.

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New intra-nasal imaging to study airways in patients with cystic fibrosis

Researchers describe minimally invasive new tool for viewing differences in the nasal airways of cystic fibrosis patients in vivo at a cellular level.

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Summer briefing: The five must-read and science-fiction books of the season

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02413-x Five books to open your mind this summer, plus award-winning stories from Nature this year.

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Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer

In the last 150 years, engineers have developed and mastered ways to stabilize dynamic systems, without lag or overshoot, using what's known as control theory. Now, a team of University of Arizona researchers has shown that cells and organisms evolved complex biochemical circuits that follow the principles of control theory, millions of years before the first engineer put pencil to paper.

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No one has yet been killed by re-entering space junk

Engineers are working hard to keep it that way

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AI learns to predict the outcomes of human rights court cases

AI is going into law. It can now predict the outcomes of human rights cases and next year Estonia is planning to use the technology to moderate disputes in small claims courts

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Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer

In the last 150 years, engineers have developed and mastered ways to stabilize dynamic systems, without lag or overshoot, using what's known as control theory. Now, a team of University of Arizona researchers has shown that cells and organisms evolved complex biochemical circuits that follow the principles of control theory, millions of years before the first engineer put pencil to paper.

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Kepler's forgotten ideas about symmetry help explain spiral galaxies without the need for dark matter

The 17th-century astronomer Johannes Kepler was the first to muse about the structure of snowflakes. Why are they so symmetrical? How does one side know how long the opposite side has grown? Kepler thought it was all down to what we would now call a "morphogenic field" – that things want to have the form they have. Science has since discounted this idea. But the question of why snowflakes and simi

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Fish that follow 'gourmet diet' more threatened by climate change

Fish that follow a 'gourmet diet' may be more threatened by climate change and other environmental variations than those that are not picky eaters, new research from the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia, the University of New Brunswick, and the Fisheries Department at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has found.

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Stony corals: At the limits of adaption?

Corals fascinate amateurs and experts alike: small polyps that extract calcium carbonate from seawater and use it to build their elaborate skeletons. But climate change, with rising water temperatures and increasing ocean acidification, is changing the living conditions of corals at an unprecedented rate. Whether they can keep pace with these changes and adapt is an open question.

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GLOW Goes Post-plot

The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling are bored. The scrappy professional women’s wrestling troupe has moved to Las Vegas for a three-month residency at the Fan-Tan Hotel and Casino, and the wear of repeating things is starting to show. “I don’t know how you can do the same show night after night,” Big Kurt Jackson (played by Carlos Colón Jr.) tells his sister, Carmen (Britney Young). “There’s no stor

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Fish that follow 'gourmet diet' more threatened by climate change

Fish that follow a 'gourmet diet' may be more threatened by climate change and other environmental variations than those that are not picky eaters, new research from the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia, the University of New Brunswick, and the Fisheries Department at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has found.

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Stony corals: At the limits of adaption?

Corals fascinate amateurs and experts alike: small polyps that extract calcium carbonate from seawater and use it to build their elaborate skeletons. But climate change, with rising water temperatures and increasing ocean acidification, is changing the living conditions of corals at an unprecedented rate. Whether they can keep pace with these changes and adapt is an open question.

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Stare at Seagulls and They'll Leave Your Food Alone

Scientists recently discovered there's a simple solution for deterring thieving seagulls: Stare at them.

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Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer

In the last 150 years, engineers have developed and mastered ways to stabilize dynamic systems, without lag or overshoot, using what's known as control theory. Now, a team of University of Arizona researchers has shown that cells and organisms evolved complex biochemical circuits that follow the principles of control theory, millions of years before the first engineer put pencil to paper.

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Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere

Molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, but difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes. Researchers in the U.K. hope their new technique of enabling the visualization of gas molecules bouncing off a liquid surface will help climate scientists improve their predictive atmospheric models. T

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When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Jacob Barney, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, graduate researcher Becky Fletcher, and a team of five other doctoral students conducted the first-ever comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals — indigenous and exotic — respond to these nonnative pl

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Teachers' 'controlling behavior' linked to lowered student interest

For many students, pressure and expectation are just another part of the school experience. There is pressure to perform certain tasks, conform to uniform standards and to achieve one's full potential. Then there are the expectations—that students will do their homework, turn up on time, and perform to the best of their ability.

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Myth about how science progresses is built on a misreading of the story of penicillin

Many professions have creation myths about much-revered pioneers. For nursing, it is Florence Nightingale in Scutari, flitting between beds bearing her lamp. For engineers, it is Isambard Kingdom Brunel, driving railway lines across the countryside and building ships. These myths often tell us more about how professions want to be seen than about the historic events on which they are based.

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It’s Back: Facebook Resurrects “Storm Area 51” Event

It’s Back After being removed by Facebook, the event called “Storm Area 51” has been resurrected. But no advanced extraterrestrial technology was behind the move: according to a spokesperson for Facebook , the event was removed by “mistake.” The BBC reports that the founder of the group, Mathew Roberts, received a message on Saturday claiming that his tongue-in-cheek event broke Facebook’s commun

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Climate crisis may be increasing jet stream turbulence, study finds

Potential impacts of rise in vertical shear include longer, bumpier and dearer flights The climate crisis could be making transatlantic flights more bumpy, according to research into the impact of global heating on the jet stream. Jet streams are powerful currents of air at the altitudes which planes fly. . They result from the air temperature gradient between the poles and the tropics, and reach

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Scientists produce 'Atomik' vodka from Chernobyl grain

Alcohol is free of radioactivity and could help economic recovery in region What do you call vodka produced from grain grown in the exclusion zone around Chernobyl, scene of the world’s worst nuclear disaster 33 years ago? Atomik, of course. Continue reading…

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Researchers find neonicotinoids present a danger to pollinators

A small team of environmentalists with Friends of the Earth, Toxicology Research International and Pesticide Research Institute has carried out a study of insecticide toxicity loading of chemical pesticides that are used on agricultural lands in the U.S. They have concluded that neonicotinoids present a major danger to pollinating insects and have posted their results on the open-access site PLOS

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Climate-driven extreme weather threatens old bridges with collapse

The recent collapse of a bridge in Grinton, North Yorkshire, raises lots of questions about how prepared we are for these sorts of risks. The bridge, which was due to be on the route of the cycling world championships in September, collapsed after a month's worth of rain fell in just four hours, causing flash flooding.

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How Does Wind Energy Work?

How do wind turbines convert wind into electricity? And can living near one really affect your health? Everyday Einstein explains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers find neonicotinoids present a danger to pollinators

A small team of environmentalists with Friends of the Earth, Toxicology Research International and Pesticide Research Institute has carried out a study of insecticide toxicity loading of chemical pesticides that are used on agricultural lands in the U.S. They have concluded that neonicotinoids present a major danger to pollinating insects and have posted their results on the open-access site PLOS

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1,100-Year-Old Viking 'Beer Hall' Discovered. But It Was Only for the Elites.

There was likely no shortage of ale and good cheer at a recently unearthed Viking drinking hall, discovered in northern Scotland.

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David Berman Sang the Truth

“All my favorite singers couldn’t sing,” David Berman once sang , in a line that I have probably, whether I’ve noticed myself doing so or not, referenced in my own mind every single day since I first heard it. So many great vocalists don’t sound pretty in the conventional sense, and to list their names is to also list the masters in whose lineage Berman, then of Silver Jews, absolutely worked: Le

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Stony corals: Limits of adaption

Corals have been dominant framework builders of reef structures for millions of years. Ocean acidification, which is intensifying as climate change progresses, is increasingly affecting coral growth. Scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the University of California have now answered some questions regarding whether and how corals can adapt to these changes by hav

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FutureNeuro researchers integrate genomics data in to electronic patient records

Researchers from the HSE Epilepsy Lighthouse Project and FutureNeuro, the SFI Research Centre for Chronic and Rare Neurological Diseases hosted by RCSI, have developed a new genomics module in the Irish National Epilepsy Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system.

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Fewer cows, more trees and bioenergy

Combatting global warming will require major changes in land use, a new climate change report says. One important change could be decreasing the amount of land used to produce livestock — which means that people would have to eat less meat.

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Study finds changes in mindset key to helping college students exercise more

According to the survey, respondents indicated that sustaining the weekly 150 minutes of exercise would require the support of family and friends, as well as an emotional shift, in which students would use exercise as an outlet for stressors. Respondents also said social changes, like making friends who also exercise regularly would improve their ability to persist.

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Having a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer increases one's own risk

New data suggest that people who have a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with the disease.

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Fighting a mighty weed

Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. Palmer amaranth, a member of the pigweed family, is spreading across states and growing in strength. If farmers and weed scientists cannot find a new solution, crop yields could decline substantially, according to an article in Chemical and Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly new

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Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy

Researchers at Oregon State University have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease.

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Health care is a major source of carbon emissions

Climate change presents an unprecedented public health emergency and the global health care sector is contributing to the worldwide climate change crisis in a big way, researchers argue “The health care industry is responsible for responding to many of the most dangerous effects of pollution and climate change, and yet it is a significant source of greenhouse gases and other deadly environmental

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Oil rigs could pump emissions below North Sea

North Sea oil and gas rigs could be modified to pump vast quantities of carbon dioxide emissions into rocks below the seabed, research shows.

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Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy

Researchers at Oregon State University have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease.

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In Photos: Biblical 'Church of the Apostles' Discovered

Jesus is said to have healed a blind man at the site, located along the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel.

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Early Christian 'Church of the Apostles' Possibly Unearthed Near Sea of Galilee

Jesus is said to have healed a blind man and split bread at this holy site.

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Jeffrey Epstein Dreamed of 'Improving' Humanity With a Baby-Making Ranch (and His DNA)

Epstein is thought to have drawn inspiration from an ideology known as "transhumanism."

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A Russian Space Cargo Ship Just Fell to Earth. See Its Fiery Demise.

"It looked like a big firework," astronaut says.

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Flesh-Eating Bacteria Thrive in Warm Coastal Waters. That Doesn't Mean You'll Get Sick.

Rising water temperature encourage the spread of harmful bacteria in ocean waters.

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Photos: 'Millennium Falcon' Predator Hunted Seas Half a Billion Years Ago

About a half-billion years ago, a predator that looked just like the Millennium Falcon terrorized tiny prey.

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This Bizarre Ancient Sea Monster Looked Like the Millennium Falcon

A long time ago, in a galaxy not at all far away, a carnivore with an uncanny resemblance to the Millennium Falcon from "Star Wars" scuttled through the seas.

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This Mathematician's 'Mysterious' New Method Just Solved a 30-Year-Old Problem

The proof took 30 years to be solved, but it's so simple and elegant that you can summarize it in a single tweet.

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Ancient Roman 'Pen' Was a Joke Souvenir

"I went to Rome and all I got you was this pen."

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'Talking Lasers' That Beam Messages into Your Head Could Be Here in 5 Years, Pentagon Says

A laser beam hits the wall next to you — and suddenly, the wall talks.

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Millions of Black Holes Are Hiding in Our Galaxy. Here's How Astronomers Plan to Find Them.

In a new paper, a pair of Japanese astronomers hatch a plan for finding dozens or hundreds of the black holes that are hiding out in the Milky Way.

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Moving to a New Home While Pregnant Could Raise Risk of Preterm Birth

In some cases, moving during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm birth, a new study suggests.

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Newly-Discovered, Nearby Alien World Has 3 Blazing-Red Suns

The next step, researchers said, is to figure out whether it has an atmosphere.

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UN climate change report: Land clearing and farming contribute a third of the world's greenhouse gases

We can't achieve the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement without managing emissions from land use, according to a special report released today by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

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Camera system tells farmers when crops need a drink

A new camera system could allow farmers to precisely and inexpensively monitor and irrigate crops, researchers say. A hot plant is an early warning sign of an under-watered, unhealthy plant, which makes monitoring crop temperatures a priority for many farmers. But to do so, they need the right equipment. Infrared cameras can detect heat and convert it into an image, but they’re large, unwieldy, a

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Singapore’s Ambassador: ‘Our Laws Are for Us to Make’

Singapore Says It’s Fighting ‘Fake News.’ Journalists See a Ruse. In May, Singapore passed the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA), which gives government ministers the power to unilaterally declare online content “false or misleading” and demand that it be corrected or taken down. The consequences of POFMA, Peter Guest wrote last month , could be profound for Singapore

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Three Invaluable Ways AI and Neuroscience Are Driving Each Other Forward

DeepMind’s Demis Hassabis once pointed to the human brain as a paramount inspiration for building AI with human-like intelligence. He’s not the only one. The meteoric success of deep learning showcases how insights from neuroscience—memory, learning, decision-making, vision—can be distilled into algorithms that bestow silicon minds with a shadow of our cognitive prowess. But what about the other

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Ledende overlæge bliver ny lægefaglig vicedirektør på Sjællands Universitetshospital

Jesper Gyllenborg bliver Sjælland Universitetshopitals nye lægefaglige vicedirektør. Han vil i sin nye stilling udfordre mange af de rutiner, der er opbygget i sundhedsvæsnet.

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Blood signature for β-cell autoimmunity — potential tool for disease prevention

Using cutting-edge genomics methods a gene signature predicting type 1 diabetes was discovered. This signature is detectable already before the appearance of type 1 diabetes associated autoantibodies. The finding could help in identifying early on the children who are likely to develop the disease later.

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Why does El Niño decay faster than La Niña?

Generally, El Niño tends to turn into a La Niña event in the following June-July after its mature phase; however, the negative sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTAs) associated with La Niña events can persist for more than one year after peaking, resulting in a longer duration than that of El Niño. Scientists explain why El Niño decay faster than La Niña.

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Live mitochondria seen in unprecedented detail: photobleaching in STED microscopy overcome

A research team led by Nagoya University has created a fluorescent marker molecule that does not degrade under a STED microscope: the photobleaching problem has been solved. Images of living cells can now be captured over relatively long periods by an optical microscope with a resolution below the diffraction limit, optimally down to 60 nanometres. Sequences of up to 1000 sharp images of live mito

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Researchers identify a possible therapeutic target for Kennedy's disease and prostate cancer

A study led by scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in Nature Communications proposes chaperone protein Hps70 as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Kennedy's disease–a rare neuromuscular condition–and of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

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Building the future of federal science

The work of federal scientists is essential to support the health, security, and well-being of people in Canada, from exploring the high Arctic, to safeguarding the effective and ethical use of AI, to ensuring the food that ends up on our dinner plates is safe to eat. Their work takes place across a variety of departments and agencies with diverse mandates.

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Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls

Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research.

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Nanovectors could improve the combined administration of antimalarial drugs

According to the study, the strategy has the added advantage of targeting the transmissible phase of the parasite- the gametocyte

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Climate crisis cannot be tackled without shift away from damaging land use, major report warns

The way we currently use land is both a major contributor to climate change and placing unsustainable demands on the land systems on which humans and nature depend, according to an authoritative new report presented in Geneva today.

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Igen igen: Apple spænder ben for uafhængige reparationer

Nyere iPhones kan angiveligt ikke længere skiftes af uafhængige reparatører, men kun af autoriserede Apple-forhandlere. Ellers mister iPhone-brugeren adgangen til information om batteriets tilstand.

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More than milk and bread: Corner store revival can rebuild neighborhood ties

Do you have a corner store? Once an icon of suburban Australia, many neighborhood corner stores vanished in the face of unrelenting competition from large supermarkets, global convenience franchises, modern service stations and extended trading hours.

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Students distracted by tech leave professors longing for eye contact

When I started my undergraduate education 21 years ago, computers were a luxury and talking to the professor meant coming to office hours—emails were not a thing. A student's room would be filled with course syllabi, lecture notes and marked papers.

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Oil rigs could pump CO2 emissions into rocks beneath North Sea

North Sea oil and gas rigs could be modified to pump vast quantities of carbon dioxide emissions into rocks below the seabed, research shows.

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Graphite intercalation compounds may offer keys to prolonging battery life

Graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) are formed by insertion of certain atomic and molecular species between the graphene layers of graphite. The resulting compounds possess a range of unique properties, which are not specific for the parent materials. Among the most intriguing properties of GIC is its superconductivity, a discovery that triggered much interest. D

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Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity. A Belgian team of scientists has now developed a bimodal contrast agent suited for two imaging techniques at once, namely, MRI and a technique called photoacoustic imaging. The use of only one contrast agent for two imaging techniques improves the sensitivity of both

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Brain researchers invent an affordable smartphone measurement for testing of medications

Brain researchers from the University of Copenhagen have invented an inexpensive method to measure tremor as known from Parkinson's disease in mice. The method utilises the accelerometer in a smartphone to measure the tremor. The new invention allows researchers to measure how various medications affect tremors, in a much more affordable and expedient way.

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Forget 'Obamageddon', 'Prepping' is now part of mainstream US politics and culture

Criminologist Dr Michael Mills challenges the traditional view that US 'preppers' are motivated by extreme right-wing or apocalyptic views.

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Lancaster University programme brings clarity to hard-to-decipher company annual reports

New software from Lancaster University cuts through hard-to-understand financial reports, to help investors and regulators.

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Many risk factors contribute to worsening of quality of life in people with knee OA

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that the health-related quality of life of most people who have or have a higher risk of knee osteoarthritis remained unchanged over an eight-year trajectory. Worsening of quality of life was associated with several risk factors, such as obesity and smoking, and it also reflected the patient's need for treatment.

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High-energy lasers could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease in the future

The aggregation of amyloid protein fibrils is involved in diseases such as amyloidosis and even Alzheimer's. Thus, dissociation of these amyloid fibrils is crucial from a biological perspective. However, because of their rigid, stacked sheet-like structure, their dissociation is difficult. A group of Japanese scientists has explored the use of free-electron laser to break down these aggregates. Th

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Scientists uncover deep-rooted plumbing system beneath ocean volcanoes

Cardiff University scientists have revealed the true extent of the internal 'plumbing system' that drives volcanic activity around the world.

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New monkey species discovered in the Amazon's 'arc of deforestation'

A new species of marmoset has been discovered in the southwest of Pará State in Brazil, a discovery that, while thrilling, already has conservationists worrying about its long-term prospects.

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Climate change could wipe out California's Joshua trees by end of century

Joshua trees, an iconic species of the arid southwestern United States, may totally disappear by the end of the century because of climate change, according to a new study.

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New monkey species discovered in the Amazon's 'arc of deforestation'

A new species of marmoset has been discovered in the southwest of Pará State in Brazil, a discovery that, while thrilling, already has conservationists worrying about its long-term prospects.

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Stopping Early

There was a mention yesterday in the comments section about a clinical trial that was stopped early due to efficacy. I’ve never been involved with a project that this has happened to myself – pretty much the opposite, for the most part! – but it does happen, and is generally cause for celebration. Although not always. I wanted to link to this blog post by Hilda Bastian that has some examples of t

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World warned: change now or endanger food and climate

Humanity faces increasingly painful trade-offs between food security and rising temperatures within decades unless it curbs emissions and stops unsustainable farming and deforestation, a landmark climate assessment said Thursday.

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1-2 caffeinated drinks not linked with higher risk of migraines; 3+ may trigger them

Researchers have evaluated the role of caffeinated beverages as a potential trigger of migraine.

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Earth's last magnetic field reversal took far longer than once thought

Every several hundred thousand years or so, Earth's magnetic field dramatically shifts and reverses its polarity. Geologist found that the most recent field reversal, some 770,000 years ago, took at least 22,000 years to complete. That's several times longer than previously thought, and the results further call into question controversial findings that some reversals could occur within a human lif

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Google adds playable podcast episodes to search results

Google is making it easier to find and listen to audio content specific to your search interests, with playable episodes surfaced in results that start rolling out today. Playable podcasts will …

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UBC-developed sensor provides next-generation ice detection

A new sensor, that can detect ice accumulation in real-time, might be a game-changer when it comes to airline safety and efficiency.

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Positive effect of music and dance on dementia proven by New Zealand study

Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia.

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Study finds fish preserve DNA 'memories' far better than humans

We are all familiar with the common myth that fish have poor memory, but it turns that their DNA has the capacity to hold much more memory than that of humans. In a study published recently in the journal Nature, University of Otago researchers report that memory in the form of 'DNA methylation' is preserved between generations of fish, in contrast to humans where this is almost entirely erased.

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Einstein’s ideas hold up in black hole test

Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity hold up in the crucible of the monstrous black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, according to new research. For now, that is. The researchers followed a star orbiting so close to the black hole that the black hole’s intense gravity affects the light the star gives off. The effect, a gravitational redshift, matched exactly what Einstein’s theories

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With tiny technological tweezers, researchers uncover new aspects of cell division

The body's cells are constantly dividing—which, somewhat counterintuitively, means that they're constantly multiplying. Because when a cell divides it doesn't split into two useless halves, but rather into two fully functional cells.

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With tiny technological tweezers, researchers uncover new aspects of cell division

The body's cells are constantly dividing—which, somewhat counterintuitively, means that they're constantly multiplying. Because when a cell divides it doesn't split into two useless halves, but rather into two fully functional cells.

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Hydrophobic nanostructured wood membrane for thermally efficient distillation

During water desalination, membrane distillation (MD) is challenged by the inefficiency of water thermal separation from dissolved solutes, due to its dependence on membrane porosity and thermal conductivity. For instance, existing petroleum-derived membranes have faced major development barriers. In a new report now on Science Advances, Dianxun Hou and colleagues at the interdisciplinary departme

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Volcano near Tokyo erupts, prompting warnings

A volcano near Tokyo has erupted for the first time in four years, throwing ash and smoke nearly two kilometres into the sky and sparking warnings not to approach the mountain.

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TikTok videos spread climate change awareness

The play-on-words hashtag #Globalwarning has been viewed more than 24 million times by users of the app.

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Archaeologists discover almost 40 new monuments close to Newgrange

A team from University College Dublin have unearth almost 40 previously unknown monuments close to Newgrange, including a "spectacular" monument that aligns with the Winter Solstice sunrise.

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Viruses aren't all nasty: Some can actually protect our health

Viruses are mostly known for their aggressive and infectious nature.

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The end of the world: A history of how a silent cosmos led humans to fear the worst

It is 1950 and a group of scientists are walking to lunch against the majestic backdrop of the Rocky Mountains. They are about to have a conversation that will become scientific legend. The scientists are at the Los Alamos Ranch School, the site for the Manhattan Project, where each of the group has lately played their part in ushering in the atomic age.

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When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Imagine a new breed of pirate not only able to sail the high seas, but to exploit nearly any mode of transportation without detection. And these raiders' ambitions have little to do with amassing treasure and everything to do with hijacking ecosystems.

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City coyotes' poor diets could make them more aggressive, study suggests

City coyotes' garbage-based diets are affecting their gut bacteria and that could affect how they interact with humans, new University of Alberta research shows.

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Viruses aren't all nasty: Some can actually protect our health

Viruses are mostly known for their aggressive and infectious nature.

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When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Imagine a new breed of pirate not only able to sail the high seas, but to exploit nearly any mode of transportation without detection. And these raiders' ambitions have little to do with amassing treasure and everything to do with hijacking ecosystems.

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City coyotes' poor diets could make them more aggressive, study suggests

City coyotes' garbage-based diets are affecting their gut bacteria and that could affect how they interact with humans, new University of Alberta research shows.

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Andy Serkis Will Direct 'Venom 2'

Also, David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are going to Netflix, and Taika Waititi has a secret film in the works.

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Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo Team Up to Demystify Loot Boxes

Activision Blizzard and major publishers will also boost transparency for players.

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Rosalind Franklin Mars rover nears completion

Engineers are close to finishing the assembly of the joint Europe-Russia robot set for launch in 2020.

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Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kyoto University, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, and Tohoku University have identified a protein, Lipid Remodeling reguLator 1 (LRL1), in microscopic algae that is involved in the production of triacylglycerol, a biofuel precursor. They further reveal additional proteins and biochemical pathways that contribute to the production of this precursor, and s

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Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy

Researchers at Oregon State University have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease.

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Neural networks will help manufacture carbon nanotubes

A team of scientists from Skoltech's Laboratory of Nanomaterials proposed a neural-network-based method for monitoring the growth of carbon nanotubes, preparing the ground for a new generation of sophisticated electronic devices. The results of the study were published in Carbon Journal.

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Pupillary response to glare illusions of different colors

Toyohashi University of Technology researchers in cooperation with researchers at the University of Oslo measured people's perceived brightness and pupillary response after viewing glare illusions presented in a variety of different colors. A glare illusion is an optical illusion that has a luminance gradient towards the center and is perceived as brighter by the gradient. The research team found

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Promising clinical trial results for drug for rare disease in which patients can't eat fat

In a Phase III clinical trial, the drug volanesorsen significantly reduced blood fat (triglyceride) levels in participants with a rare disease called familial chylomicronemia syndrome; finding could also help inform better prevention methods and treatments for many types of heart disease.

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A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics

In a new study, led by researchers from SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Waterloo, a solid theoretical framework is provided to discuss modifications to the Unruh effect caused by the microstructure of space-time.

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The reasons behind aerosol pollution over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau

The aerosol optical depth over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau (ESTP) is extremely large–and even more so than some important industrialized regions and deserts, which is the result of a combination of human activities and natural conditions.

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Activated charcoal, the wellness scam

Charcoal lemonade is yet another detox scam aimed at separating customers from their money.

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Two planets orbiting Teegarden's star described as most earthlike found yet

A pair of researchers, one with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the other Tel Aviv University, has found evidence that suggests two of Teegarden's star planets are the most Earth-like found yet. In their paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Amri Wandel and Lev Tal-Or describe their study of the two exoplanets and what they found.

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California roadkill report maps costs, hot spots and solutions

California drivers lost about $232 million to costs associated with wildlife-vehicle conflicts in 2018 and over $1 billion since 2015, according to the sixth annual Wildlife Vehicle Conflict report from the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Davis.

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Has this scientist finally found the fountain of youth?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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California roadkill report maps costs, hot spots and solutions

California drivers lost about $232 million to costs associated with wildlife-vehicle conflicts in 2018 and over $1 billion since 2015, according to the sixth annual Wildlife Vehicle Conflict report from the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Davis.

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New research on garden-variety snake sheds light on how reptiles evolved

New research on a garden-variety snake in Alberta provides an unprecedented look at how their skulls develop—and may offer new clues into how reptiles evolved.

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In search of signals from the early universe

,On a hot morning in early July, a seven-foot wide, 8,000-pound metallic structure made its way from Boston to Penn's David Rittenhouse Laboratory. The large aperture telescope receiver (LATR) was carefully loaded onto a forklift and carried through narrow alleyways and parking lots before being placed in the High Bay lab, while students and researchers watched in eager anticipation.

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Tiny snapping worms make one of the loudest noises in the ocean, study shows

When marine biologist Richard Palmer saw a video of sea-dwelling worms snapping at each other and making one of the loudest sounds ever measured in aquatic animals, he couldn't believe his ears.

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Squishy ‘Rubik’s Cube’ could one day store tons of data

A new cube of colored hydrogel blocks might inspire new ways to store and detect information and possibly even help patients monitor their medical conditions. The cube, which looks and acts like a Rubik’s Cube, contains rotatable individual rows and columns; manipulating them changes the color pattern on the cube’s six faces. But unlike the rigid plastic of a Rubik’s Cube, the new structure is ma

10h

New research on garden-variety snake sheds light on how reptiles evolved

New research on a garden-variety snake in Alberta provides an unprecedented look at how their skulls develop—and may offer new clues into how reptiles evolved.

10h

Tiny snapping worms make one of the loudest noises in the ocean, study shows

When marine biologist Richard Palmer saw a video of sea-dwelling worms snapping at each other and making one of the loudest sounds ever measured in aquatic animals, he couldn't believe his ears.

10h

Latest Pixel 4 Leak Points to 90Hz Display, 6GB of RAM

A new report includes information about the basic specs like RAM and battery capacity, but we're also learning some tantalizing details about the displays. The …

10h

Microplastics are not just a problem for the oceans

From the infamous "garbage patch" islands of floating plastic to the guts of fish and bellies of birds, plastics of all sizes are ubiquitous and well-documented in the ocean. But little data exists on microplastics in lakes.

10h

'Raucous' seagulls: Parisians' new noisy neighbours

Parisians need no longer go to the beach, in the time-honoured August tradition, to hear the plaintive cries of seagulls, but the birds' growing cacophony is ruffling many feathers in the French capital.

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Brazil government slams 'sensationalist' deforestation data

Brazil's environment minister said on Tuesday data showing surging deforestation in the Amazon was "sensationalist," as the government faces scrutiny over destruction of the rainforest seen as vital to combating climate change.

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Scientists produce radioactivity-free Chernobyl vodka

A team of British scientists has helped produce a radioactivity-free vodka called "ATOMIK" from crops near the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the University of Portsmouth said on Thursday.

10h

Partisan news coverage has a bigger impact on viewers without strong media preferences

It's a classic question in contemporary politics: Does partisan news media coverage shape people's ideologies? Or do people decide to consume political media that is already aligned with their beliefs?

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Pine trees send chemical warning to each other when pine beetles attack

Lodgepole pines attacked by mountain pine beetles release volatile chemical compounds to warn related trees of the incoming threat, according to a new University of Alberta study.

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Pine trees send chemical warning to each other when pine beetles attack

Lodgepole pines attacked by mountain pine beetles release volatile chemical compounds to warn related trees of the incoming threat, according to a new University of Alberta study.

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Vi skal være klar til den digitale revolution

Den digitale revolution inden for sundhed er reel. Vi skal gøre fremtidens læger klar til en situation, hvor meget kompleks klinisk information bearbejdes af algoritmer, skriver Henrik Ullum, formand for Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber.

11h

More intense non-tropical storms causing increased rainfall in U.S. southeast

In the Southeastern United States, the increasing amount of rain during hurricane season is coming not from hurricanes but from non-tropical storms created by weather fronts, new research finds.

11h

Kommentar: Nyt sygesikringssystem – tyndbenet kravspec eller tyndbenet leverandør?

Man bør gøre op med forståelsen af, at digitale projekter har et fast bagkant – de bør udvikles løbende, som apps på en mobiltelefon, lyder det i en kommentar fra redaktionschef Henning Mølsted.

11h

MEDLI2 installation on Mars 2020 aeroshell begins

Hardware installed onto NASA's Mars 2020 entry vehicle this week will help to increase the safety of future Mars landings.

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Early seismic waves hold the clue to the power of the main temblor

Scientists will be able to predict earthquake magnitudes earlier than ever before thanks to new research by Marine Denolle, assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS).

11h

QAnon – A New Kind of Conspiracy

The details of the conspiracy theory itself are not the most interesting thing about QAnon. The core of this particular conspiracy is that Trump is secretly very competent, that he is investigating a world-wide sex-trafficking, demonic pedophilia ring run by the Democrats, and that Robert Mueller is secretly working with him and the whole Russia investigation is just a cover for this. Further, JF

11h

Intels nye serverprocessor har 56 kerner og AI-accelleration

De nye Xeon Scalable-processorer får indbygget accelleration til træning af maskinlæringsalgoritmer.

11h

8 Great Grilling Accessories and Tools (2019)

Upgrade your BBQ with these grates, gloves, and other tools for getting the perfect sear, smoke, roast, even pizza on any grill.

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An Old-School Auto Supplier Is Betting on an Electric Future

Germany's Continental, the world's fourth-largest auto-parts maker, says it will stop investing in parts for internal combustion engines.

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50 years ago, Fermilab turned to bubbles

The National Accelerator Laboratory, now called Fermilab, used to have a bubble chamber to study particles. Today, most bubble chambers have gone flat.

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Supernovadamm faller ännu på Antarktis

Ett tyskt forskarlag har analyserat järnisotoper i snö som har fallit på Antarktis under de senaste 20 åren. De hittade tecken på att vår planet fortfarande tar emot stoft från ett interstellärt moln av material från supernovor. Isotopen järn-60 har en halveringstid på 2,6 miljoner år, vilket betyder att att järn-60 som hittas idag måste ha uppstått långt efter att solsystemet blev till. Järn-60 k

11h

Resurrected detector will hunt for some of the strangest particles in the universe

In its second life, the ICARUS detector will stalk sterile neutrinos, which can never be directly observed

11h

Ex2SM: A text mining method to detect repeated strings in biological sequences

For several years, researchers have been trying to use computational methods for exact string matching, which entails identifying repeating patterns in long strings of text or digits. This is because tools that can automatically identify these repeating patterns could have numerous important applications in fields such as genetics and biology.

11h

Image of the Day: Tamed Gut Bacteria

Curbing the growth of harmful bacteria in mouse microbiomes reduces the animals’ incidence of inflammation-related colorectal cancer.

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Ex2SM: A text mining method to detect repeated strings in biological sequences

For several years, researchers have been trying to use computational methods for exact string matching, which entails identifying repeating patterns in long strings of text or digits. This is because tools that can automatically identify these repeating patterns could have numerous important applications in fields such as genetics and biology.

11h

U.N. Says Agriculture Must Change To Prevent Worst Effects Of Climate Change

Humans must drastically alter food production in order to prevent the most catastrophic effects of global warming, according to a U.N. report.

11h

Earth's Last Magnetic-Field Reversal Took 22,000 Years

Volcanic records revealed the complexity of the magnetic-field reversal.

11h

Readers respond to Lyme disease, fossil teeth and a Tesseract look-alike

Readers had questions and comments on Lyme disease prevention, speciation, and a mysterious uranium cube.

11h

Why this warmer world is not just a passing phase

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses climate change and the uncertainty of science.

11h

Watch This Plant Shoot Its Seeds Like Spiraling Footballs

Chinese witch hazel takes a ballistic approach to reproduction.

11h

Astronomers investigate AGN jet in the Messier 87 galaxy

Astronomers have taken a closer look at the relatively nearby Messier 87 (or M87) galaxy to investigate the jet of its active galactic nucleus (AGN). The new research, described in a paper published July 31 on arXiv.org, delivers important insights into the parameters of the jet, which could improve the understanding of AGNs in general.

12h

Simulated chemical vapor deposition from a tungsten carbonitride precursor

Thin films play a key role in the production of electronics. They can be grown directly on a substrate surface through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process, which involves a reaction of vapor phase precursor compounds. Based on in situ Raman spectroscopy during simulated CVD in a customized reactor, the decomposition of a tungsten carbonitride precursor was examined under realistic conditio

12h

Graphite intercalation compounds may offer keys to prolonging battery life

In 2012-2013, an international research collaborative discovered a phenomenon that could be observed via optical microscope during the stage transitions in graphite intercalation compounds. It took team leader Dr. Ayrat M. Dimiev six years of further research, including additional experiments at Kazan Federal University, to fully comprehend the driving forces behind the observed phenomena.

12h

Synchronization of ice cores using volcanic ash layers

Thin, brownish layers of a thickness of about a millimeter or two are sometimes observed in the whitish/transparent ice cores. These brown layers consist of material originating from volcanic eruptions.

12h

Jet stream study confirms aircraft turbulence risk from climate change

Climate change is having a greater impact on the jet stream than previously thought, according to a new study published in Nature.

12h

New bio-inspired technology is poised to disrupt the composites industry

A new lightweight, impact-resistant technology inspired by a tiny crustacean could change the way we play sports, and also improve wind-farm productivity and automotive fuel economy.

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New synthesis method opens up possibilities for organic electronics

Semiconducting polymers, large, chain-like molecules made from repeating subunits, are increasingly drawing the attention of researchers because of their potential applications in organic electronic devices. Like most semiconducting materials, semiconducting polymers can be classified as p-type or n-type according to their conducting properties. Although p-type semiconducting polymers have seen dr

12h

Looking out for the little guys: Overfishing of small fishes affects food chain

Small fishes play an important role in the marine food chain, providing food for larger fishes and water birds, but they are also caught for use as bait in both commercial and recreational fisheries. Over the past 30 years, a decline has been noted in some species of baitfish, leading scientists and resource managers to look more closely at the population dynamics of these important fish. However,

12h

New bio-inspired technology is poised to disrupt the composites industry

A new lightweight, impact-resistant technology inspired by a tiny crustacean could change the way we play sports, and also improve wind-farm productivity and automotive fuel economy.

12h

Looking out for the little guys: Overfishing of small fishes affects food chain

Small fishes play an important role in the marine food chain, providing food for larger fishes and water birds, but they are also caught for use as bait in both commercial and recreational fisheries. Over the past 30 years, a decline has been noted in some species of baitfish, leading scientists and resource managers to look more closely at the population dynamics of these important fish. However,

12h

Our Brains Tell Stories So We Can Live – Issue 75: Story

We are all storytellers; we make sense out of the world by telling stories. And science is a great source of stories. Not so, you might argue. Science is an objective collection and interpretation of data. I completely agree. At the level of the study of purely physical phenomena, science is the only reliable method for establishing the facts of the world. But when we use data of the physical wor

12h

The Storytelling Computer – Issue 75: Story

What is it exactly that makes humans so smart? In his seminal 1950 paper, “Computer Machinery and Intelligence,” Alan Turing argued human intelligence was the result of complex symbolic reasoning. Philosopher Marvin Minsky, cofounder of the artificial intelligence lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, also maintained that reasoning—the ability to think in a multiplicity of ways that a

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The Big Bang Is Hard Science. It Is Also a Creation Story. – Issue 75: Story

In some ways, the history of science is the history of a philosophical resistance to mythical explanations of reality. In the ancient world, when we asked “Where did the world come from?” we were told creation myths. In the modern world, we are instead told a convincing scientific story: Big Bang theory, first proposed in 1927 by the Belgian Roman Catholic priest Georges Lemaître. It is based on

12h

The Death of Social Reciprocity in the Era of Digital Distraction

Honor your right to disconnect and focus on strengthening real relationships — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Has this scientist finally found the fountain of youth?

Editing the epigenome, which turns our genes on and off, could be the “elixir of life.”

12h

Backcountry Semiannual Sale: 18 Favorite Summer Deals

From camp chairs to three-season tents, snag these deals while there's still plenty of summer left.

12h

Shoot-'Em-Up Videogames Don't Warp Minds—Big Tech Does

It takes a lot of effort, research, and efficiency to manipulate people online and influence their behavior in the real world. Silicon Valley has it down to a science.

12h

AI Needs Your Data—and You Should Get Paid for It

A new approach to training artificial intelligence algorithms involves paying people to submit medical data, and storing it in a blockchain-protected system.

12h

Havareret popstjerne-fly ramte antenner 400 meter før Tirstrups landingsbane

Cessna-business jetten kom så lavt ind, at de knap tre meter høje localizer-antenner beskadigede flyet, deriblandt venstre vinges brændstoftank. Efter standsning brød vingen i brand.

12h

The Death of Social Reciprocity in the Era of Digital Distraction

Honor your right to disconnect and focus on strengthening real relationships — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Does Birth Order Affect Personality?

Researchers examine the old adage that birth order plays a significant role in shaping who we are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Does Birth Order Affect Personality?

Researchers examine the old adage that birth order plays a significant role in shaping who we are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Does Birth Order Affect Personality?

Researchers examine the old adage that birth order plays a significant role in shaping who we are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Your Google Maps Is About to Get an AR-Directions Upgrade—Here's What to Expect

GPS has done wonders for the directionally challenged, but there’s still a few quirks. Every time I emerge from the stinky depths of the New York City subway, for instance, my phone’s compass …

13h

Apple locks new iPhone batteries to prevent third-party repair, report says

It's yet another change that keep iPhone owners inside Apple's ecosystem.

13h

IPCC: Kloden holder ikke til vores kødproduktion

Vi kan ikke holde klodens temperatur i skak uden markante ændringer i den klimaskadelige kødproduktion, lyder det i ny IPCC-rapport. Dansk minister lover hurtig omstilling.

13h

Prof who lost emeritus status for views on race and intelligence has paper flagged

A former emeritus professor who has been called “one of the most unapologetic and raw ‘scientific’ racists operating today” has had one of his papers subjected to an expression of concern. Richard Lynn, who was stripped of his emeritus status at Ulster University last year after students there protested his views, published “Reflections on Sixty-Eight … Continue reading

13h

PET fik i årevis ulovlige overvågnings-oplysninger fra FE

I mindst fire år delte Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste borgerdata ulovligt med Politiets Efterretningstjeneste.

13h

One in 4 people live in places at high risk of running out of water

An update to the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas reveals that 17 countries withdraw more than 80 percent of water available yearly.

13h

Getting 16.4 million people better post-secondary education? Lumina Foundation has a plan for that.

Lumina Foundation's goal is to help people across the U.S. get a quality post-secondary education. To do that, it's providing grants, helping to shape policy, and it's investing in innovative entrepreneurs through the Lumina Impact Ventures program. Lumina is looking to partner with entrepreneurs who are dedicated to helping students gain a fulfilling post-secondary education and for whom Lumina

13h

A Lynch Mob of One

Everyone seemed to be fleeing the brutality of the Chicago sun. There was no haven that compared to the cooling waters of Lake Michigan. Thousands of blacks and whites flocked to its beaches. That is where 17-year-old Eugene Williams and his friends fled. They knew all about the racial battles at the 29th Street Beach—or, they did not. The boys splashed into the black side of the lake. Williams c

13h

The Real Costs of the U.S. Health-Care Mess

With more than 20 people vying for the Democratic presidential nomination, it can be difficult to get a handle on the policy terrain. This is especially true in health care, where at least eight different plans are floating around, including from candidates whom few support, such as Michael Bennet, who wants to offer a public health plan in the small individual-insurance market. Among the candida

13h

What Happened to Aung San Suu Kyi?

1. Icon The first time I met Aung San Suu Kyi, she embodied hope. It was November 2012, and we were in her weathered house at 54 University Avenue, in Yangon, where she’d been held prisoner by the ruling Burmese junta for the better part of two decades. She sat at a small, round table with Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Derek Mitchell, who had recently been named the first U.S. ambassador to

13h

The NHS is setting up a lab for medical artificial intelligence

The National Health Service in England is setting up a research lab to build artificial intelligence that could help treat conditions including cancer, dementia and heart disease

13h

Hjerneforskere opfinder billig smartphone-måling til medicintest

Hjerneforskere fra Københavns Universitet har opfundet en billig metode til at måle rystelser,…

13h

Psykisk ohälsa risk för ökad dödlighet vid ADHD

Tidigare forskning har visat att personer med diagnosen ADHD (uppmärksamhetsproblem med hyperaktivitet och impulsivitet) löper ökad risk att dö i förtid, men det har rått osäkerhet om riskernas orsaker och huruvida psykiatrisk samsjuklighet har betydelse. Med hjälp av de nationella sjukvårdsregistren med 2 675 615 individer (86 670, 3,2% med ADHD diagnos) födda i Sverige mellan 1983 och 2009 kund

13h

Tardigrades Were Already on the Moon

It may not be smart to add more, but nature probably beat us to it anyway — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Trump’s White Identity Politics Appeals to Two Different Groups

Over the past month, President Donald Trump has embarked on a concerted push to place race at the heart of the 2020 election, first by saying that a group of four progressive congresswomen of color should “go back [to] the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came” and then with a sustained campaign against Representative Elijah Cummings, an African American Democrat. Trump ha

13h

Past–future information bottleneck for sampling molecular reaction coordinate simultaneously with thermodynamics and kinetics

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11405-4 Efficient sampling of rare events in all-atom molecular dynamics simulations remains a challenge. Here, the authors adapt the Predictive Information Bottleneck framework to sample biomolecular structure and dynamics through iterative rounds of biased simulations and deep learning.

14h

Proteogenomic landscape of squamous cell lung cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11452-x Squamous cell lung cancer has dismal prognosis due to the dearth of effective treatments. Here, the authors perform an integrated proteogenomic analysis of the disease, revealing three proteomics-based subtypes and suggesting potential therapeutic opportunities.

14h

Bis-naphthopyrone pigments protect filamentous ascomycetes from a wide range of predators

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11377-5 It is thought that fungi protect themselves from predators by the production of toxic compounds. Here, Xu et al. show that a wide range of animal predators avoid feeding on Fusarium fungi, and this depends on fungal production of a bis-naphthopyrone pigment that is not toxic to the predators.

14h

Identification of drug-specific public TCR driving severe cutaneous adverse reactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11396-2 Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) is a T cell-mediated, potentially lethal drug hypersensitivity (DH). Here, the authors identify a carbamazepine-specific TCR common among patients with carbamazepine-induced SCAR that confers SCAR-like pathology in mice upon carbamazepine exposure, thereby implicating

14h

Strengthening in multi-principal element alloys with local-chemical-order roughened dislocation pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11464-7 Multi-principal-element alloys have been assumed to have the configurational entropy of an ideal solution. Here, the authors use atomistic simulations to show that instead NiCoCr exhibits local chemical order, raising the activation barriers of dislocation activities to elevate mechanical strength.

14h

Microbial carbon use efficiency predicted from genome-scale metabolic models

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11488-z Microbial respiration releases carbon from the soil. Here, the authors estimate bacterial carbon use efficiency in soils for over 200 species using constraint-based modeling, incorporate the values into an ecosystem model, and find that shifts in community composition may impact carbon storage.

14h

Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of cell lines as models of primary tumors across 22 tumor types

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11415-2 Cell lines are used ubiquitously in cancer research but how well they represent the tumor type they were derived from is variable. Here, the authors compare transcriptomic profiles of 22 tumor types and cell lines and propose a new comprehensive cell line panel for pan-cancer studies.

14h

Three-dimensional aromaticity in an antiaromatic cyclophane

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11467-4 Little is known about interactions between two antiaromatic molecules. Here, the authors synthesised a cyclophane, in which two antiaromatic porphyrin moieties adopt a stacked face-to-face geometry with a distance shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the atoms involved.

14h

Thermally stable TB vaccine closer to reality thanks to microscopic silica cages

A new method prevents crucial vaccine components from spoiling outside of a fridge — meaning a thermally stable vaccine that can be reliably delivered to remote areas around the world is more likely.

14h

Extended indirect calorimetry with isotopic CO2 sensors for prolonged and continuous quantification of exogenous vs. total substrate oxidation in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47977-w Extended indirect calorimetry with isotopic CO 2 sensors for prolonged and continuous quantification of exogenous vs . total substrate oxidation in mice

14h

Biocompatibility between Silicon or Silicon Carbide surface and Neural Stem Cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48041-3

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Interspecific competition among catch crops modifies vertical root biomass distribution and nitrate scavenging in soils

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48060-0

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Radio-selective effects of a natural occurring muscle-derived dipeptide in A549 and normal cell lines

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47944-5

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Water oxidation by Ferritin: A semi-natural electrode

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47661-z

14h

For Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemicals, We Need More Than a Temporary Fix

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, have found their way into drinking water supplies and foods, and almost all Americans have detectable levels of the toxic chemicals in their blood. Yet federal regulators have taken few measures to protect citizens from PFAS’s harms. That must change.

14h

Zooming in on top-quark production

As the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark has a special place in the physics studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Top quark-antiquark pairs are copiously produced in collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector, providing a rich testing ground for theoretical models of particle collisions at the highest accessible energies. Any deviations between measurements and predict

14h

This Bread Recipe Starts With 4,000-Year-Old Yeast

A self-professed “bread nerd” extracted yeast from ancient Egyptian artifacts to make a loaf of sourdough. “The aroma and flavor are incredible,” he said.

14h

Why Competition Hasn't Brought Down The High Price Of Snakebite Treatment

The snakebite antivenin CroFab, on the U.S. market since 2000, now faces competition from a drug called Anavip. But both are expensive. "Perverse incentives" keep prices high, says one legal scholar. (Image credit: Tais Policanti/Getty Images)

14h

Eat less meat: UN climate change report calls for change to human diet

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02409-7 The report on global land use and agriculture from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change comes amid accelerating deforestation in the Amazon.

14h

Cory Booker Challenges America’s Disneyfied History

CHARLESTON, S.C. —In the basement of Mother Emanuel, Cory Booker’s eyes turned red. The senator from New Jersey and 2020 Democratic candidate had just addressed a small crowd that had gathered in the church sanctuary upstairs. “The act of anti-Latino, anti-immigrant hatred we witnessed this weekend did not start with the hand that pulled the trigger,” Booker told the room. “To love our country in

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Gloom from the climate-change front line

But not complete doom, if people behave sensibly

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HBO’s controversial Confederate series is canceled as showrunners ink Netflix deal

ABC Confederate, HBO’s controversial series that was to imagine a time after the Civil War where the South won, is no longer in development at HBO, according to Vulture. Sources …

14h

Mexican science suffers under debilitating budget cuts

Nature, Published online: 08 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02332-x Some researchers have turned to crowdfunding campaigns to pay for supplies and several scientific institutes are rationing electricity to save money.

14h

UN warns most plans for limiting climate change would wreck the planet

Almost every plan for limiting warming to 2°C or less relies heavily on bioenergy, but the latest UN report says we don’t have enough land to spare

14h