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nyheder2019august09

Physicists solve 2,000-year-old optical problem

A trio of physicists from the National Autonomous University of Mexico and Tec de Monterrey has solved a 2,000-year-old optical problem—the Wasserman-Wolf problem. In their paper published in the journal Applied Optics, Rafael González-Acuña, Héctor Chaparro-Romo, and Julio Gutiérrez-Vega outline the math involved in solving the puzzle, give some examples of possible applications, and describe the

8h

Society should shift towards a technology and science focus and away from consumerism and amassing wealth

It seems that humanities' current purpose is largely to make money, pay taxes, and die. If you're able to escape to a different purpose it still revolves around your capacity to earn money, which usually is driven by a consumer based economy, pay taxes, and die. If you're an artist, you are typically only making money if your art can make money for someone. For video games, if there isn't a profi

14h

Dårlige svejsninger forsinker fransk atomkraftværk i tre år

Den franske atomkraftmyndighed, ASN, vil ikke lade en ny reaktortype starte, før otte svejsninger er blevet repareret. Det forsinker reaktoren i mindst tre år yderligere.

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A Teen Hacker Found Bugs in School Software That Affects Millions

Some kids play in a band after school. Bill Demirkapi hacked two education software giants.

21min

Just the facts?

In the wake of the appalling mass shootings last weekend, Neil DeGrasse Tyson (the pre-eminent scientist/communicator in the US) tweeted some facts that were, let’s just say, not well received (and for which he kind of apologised ). At least one of the facts he tweeted about was incorrect (deaths by medical errors are far smaller ). However, even if it had been correct, the overall response would

30min

Employees less upset at being replaced by robots than by other people

Generally speaking, most people find the idea of workers being replaced by robots or software worse than if the jobs are taken over by other workers. But when their own jobs are at stake, people would rather prefer to be replaced by robots than by another employee, according to a new study.

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World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young

The first example of 'nest'-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog could explain why they have grown to be giant.

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Watch this fascinating time lapse of crews replacing an overpass in just a weekend

Cranes lifted pre-made pieces into their new home to expedite the process. (VDOT/) You’ve probably heard the joke about how various northern states have two seasons: winter and highway construction season. That’s because big road repair projects often take months and severely disrupt residents’ mobility. Recently, however, the Virginia Department of Transportation swapped a worn out 61-year-old b

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Earth’s Food Supply Is Under Threat. These Fixes Would Go a Long Way.

The food production system accounts for up to a third of greenhouse gas emissions. But if agriculture is done right, experts say, it can actually be a climate change solution.

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Trump’s El Paso Photo Is Obscene

A really exceptional work of obscenity, like a really exceptional work of beauty, exceeds the ability of its viewers to fathom what they just saw. Did that just happen? But … how? What sorcery created it? Words don’t arrive, and the stammering gives way to silence. The latest publicity photograph of the president in El Paso, Texas, knocked me into silence for a good half hour this morning while I

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Older adults more likely to condemn even accidental harm

As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

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Printing flattens polymers, improving electrical and optical properties

Researchers have found a way to use polymer printing to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better.

1h

Nanoparticles' movements reveal whether they can successfully target cancer

Researchers have developed a new way to determine whether or not single drug-delivery nanoparticles will successfully hit their intended targets — by simply analyzing each nanoparticle's distinct movements in real time.

1h

Cyborg organoids offer rare view into early stages of development

Researchers have grown simplified organs known as organoids with fully integrated sensors. These so-called cyborg organoids offer a rare glimpse into the early stages of organ development.

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There are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium

Do only potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel, or are there water molecules between the ions? This question has been a source of controversy for years. Researchers have now been able to show that water molecules do not co-migrate through the potassium channel.

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Ultracold quantum particles break classical symmetry

Many phenomena of the natural world evidence symmetries in their dynamic evolution which help researchers to better understand a system's inner mechanism. In quantum physics, however, these symmetries are not always achieved. In laboratory experiments with ultracold lithium atoms, researchers have shown for the first time the theoretically predicted deviation from classical symmetry.

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Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

'Hydrostatic legless jumping' launches a 3-millimeter maggot of a goldenrod gall midge 20-30 body-lengths away with acceleration rivalling the best legged leapers. The larva latches its head to its tail with a previously unknown adhesive and squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section for launch pressure. This style of flight is about 28 times more efficient than crawling, a finding that m

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Live mitochondria seen in unprecedented detail: photobleaching in STED microscopy overcome

A research team has created a fluorescent marker molecule that does not degrade under a STED microscope: the photobleaching problem has been solved. Images of living cells can now be captured over relatively long periods by an optical microscope with a resolution below the diffraction limit, optimally down to 60 nanometers. Sequences of up to 1000 sharp images of live mitochondria, the power gener

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Hacks, Money, and Russian Trolls

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, August 9. ‣ President Donald Trump said he plans to name Joseph Maguire, the current director of the National Counterterrorism Center, to be the new acting director of national intelligence , after announcing th

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Mathematicians develop new statistical indicator

Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. Mathematicians have now developed a dependence measure called 'distance multivariance'.

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Cyborg organoids offer rare view into early stages of development

Researchers have grown simplified organs known as organoids with fully integrated sensors. These so-called cyborg organoids offer a rare glimpse into the early stages of organ development.

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Maximising alertness and productivity on the nightshift

If you're one of the world's many shiftworkers, eating at irregular times is just par for the course – but have you ever stopped to think about the impact this might have on your body? Researchers have now investigated whether altering food intake during the nightshift could optimize how shiftworkers feel during the night and reduce their sleepiness.

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There are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium

Do only potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel, or are there water molecules between the ions? This question has been a source of controversy for years. Researchers have now been able to show that water molecules do not co-migrate through the potassium channel.

1h

Better tools, better cancer immunotherapy

Researchers have developed an important new tool towards producing therapies for cancer patients using the patient's own cells

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Chicago water pollution may be keeping invasive silver carp out of Great Lakes

Invasive silver carp have been moving north toward the Great Lakes since their accidental release in the 1970s. The large filter-feeding fish, which are known to jump from the water and wallop anglers, threaten aquatic food webs as well as the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery. But, for the past decade, the invading front hasn't moved past Kankakee. A new study suggests that Chicago's water pollution

1h

New perovskite material shows early promise as an alternative to silicon

CsPbI3 is an inorganic perovskite, a group of materials gaining popularity in the solar world due to their high efficiency and low cost. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

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Flat-Earther 'Mad' Mike Hughes Is Being Sponsored by a Dating App to Nearly Get Himself Killed

'Mad' Mike Hughes — a self-taught rocket scientist and avowed flat-Earth conspiracy theorist — is launching himself into the sky again.

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Why your birthplace is linked to your adult income

Children born, raised, and working in big cities tend to be more successful. A mountain of British demographic data reveals the correlation. Are more successful families created by cities, or are they more likely to move there? None A new study in the Journal of Economics finds that the location in which you're born is likely to correlate to the amount of money you earn as an adult. It's not magi

1h

New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs

A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night. The technology could help call attention to important traffic information when it's dark, with potential benefits for both drivers and pedestrians, researchers say.

1h

Nanoparticles' movements reveal whether they can successfully target cancer

Researchers have developed a new way to determine whether or not single drug-delivery nanoparticles will successfully hit their intended targets — by simply analyzing each nanoparticle's distinct movements in real time.

1h

Oral appliances may be highly effective in treating a type of sleep apnea

Certain traits may define a type of obstructive sleep apnea that can be effectively treated with an oral appliance, according to new research.

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Ultracold quantum particles break classical symmetry

Many phenomena of the natural world evidence symmetries in their dynamic evolution which help researchers to better understand a system's inner mechanism. In quantum physics, however, these symmetries are not always achieved. In laboratory experiments with ultracold lithium atoms, researchers have shown for the first time the theoretically predicted deviation from classical symmetry.

1h

The brain inspires a new type of artificial intelligence

Using advanced experiments on neuronal cultures and large scale simulations, scientists have demonstrated a new type of ultrafast artificial intelligence algorithms — based on the very slow brain dynamics — which outperform learning rates achieved to date by state-of-the-art learning algorithms. In an article in Scientific Reports, the researchers rebuild the bridge between neuroscience and adva

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Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria

Strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae transform themselves from small, comma-shaped cells to long filaments in nutrient-poor environments to aid short-term survival.

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Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs

Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a new study.

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Biomarker to avoid safety risk for the sleep deprived

New research shows that a range of eye-movement tests provide a reliable biomarker of individual acute sleep loss.

1h

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

'Hydrostatic legless jumping' launches a 3-millimeter maggot of a goldenrod gall midge 20-30 body-lengths away with acceleration rivalling the best legged leapers. The larva latches its head to its tail with a previously unknown adhesive and squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section for launch pressure. This style of flight is about 28 times more efficient than crawling, a finding that m

1h

Gene protective against fruit fly heat-induced seizures may explain some human seizures

Researchers identified a gene in fruit flies that helps prevent the hyperexcitability of specific neurons that trigger seizures. In humans, mutations in the gene may be linked to seizures associated with Long QT Syndrome.

1h

Studies of fungi provide new knowledge of harmful mutations in cells

Long-lived mushrooms that grow in 'fairy rings' accumulate surprisingly few mutations over time. This finding indicates that their protection against harmful mutations is well developed. The results are interesting in terms of both medicine and evolutionary biology.

1h

Virtual 'universe machine' sheds light on galaxy evolution

By creating millions of virtual universes and comparing them to observations of actual galaxies, a University of Arizona-led research team has made discoveries that present a powerful new approach for studying galaxy formation.

1h

Scientists can now control thermal profiles at the nanoscale

Scientists have designed and tested an experimental system that uses a near-infrared laser to actively heat two gold nanorod antennae to different temperatures. The nanorods are so close together that they are both electromagnetically and thermally coupled. Yet the team measured temperature differences between the rods as high as 20 degrees Celsius and could change which nanorod was cooler and whi

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Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate

A rare bright spot among dismal climate change predictions, new research findings show that some singing insects are likely to manage to reproduce even in the midst of potentially disruptive temperature changes.

1h

Printing flattens polymers, improving electrical and optical properties

Researchers have found a way to use polymer printing to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better.

1h

Thermally stable TB vaccine closer to reality thanks to microscopic silica cages

A new method prevents crucial vaccine components from spoiling outside of a fridge — meaning a thermally stable vaccine that can be reliably delivered to remote areas around the world is more likely.

1h

Back-to-back low snow years will become more common

Consecutive low snow years may become six times more common across the Western United States over the latter half of this century, leading to ecological and economic challenges such as expanded fire seasons and poor snow conditions at ski resorts, according to a new study.

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Persistent impacts of smoke plumes aloft

Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. Scientists now explore implications for climate modeling, including models of nuclear winter and geoengineering.

1h

Why humans in Africa fled to the mountains during the last ice age

People in Ethiopia did not live in low valleys during the last ice age. Instead they lived high up in the inhospitable Bale Mountains where they had enough water, built tools out of obsidian and relied mainly on giant mole rats for nourishment.Researchers provides the first evidence that our African ancestors had already settled in the mountains during the Palaeolithic period, about 45,000 years a

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New SETI Project Will Practice Looking for Alien Life Near Deep-Sea Vents on Earth

InVADER will explore deep-sea vents on Earth to prepare future missions to do the same on watery worlds in the solar system like Europa or Enceladus. (Credit: D. Kelley, University of Washington/NSF-OOI/WHOI) Some of the most intriguing possibilities for finding life outside Earth are on water worlds like Europa or Enceladus — ocean moons orbiting Jupiter and Saturn. However, those worlds are enca

1h

How These Sharks Glow Neon Green to their Friends

The biofluorescent shark Scyliorhinus retifer. (Credit: David Gruber) (Inside Science) — When we look at the seafloor, we might not see the bottom-dwelling sharks that blend in with the rocks and the sand. But to other sharks of the same species, they stand out like green glow sticks. Now scientists know how. In 2014, marine biologist David Gruber, from the City University of New York, and his te

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Ancient African Ancestors Lived In High Mountains, Ate Rodents of Unusual Size

Ethiopia's Bale Mountains. (Credit: Michele Alfieri/Shutterstock) High-altitude environments are not exactly welcoming places to call home. It’s hard to breathe, there’s little shelter and being that much closer to the sun means more exposure to UV radiation. The inhospitable conditions are why high mountains and plateaus were some of the last places on Earth humans occupied. Now researchers find

1h

Did we evolve to see reality as it exists? No, says cognitive psychologist Donald Hoffman.

Donald Hoffman theorizes experiencing reality is disadvantageous to evolutionary fitness. His hypothesis calls for ditching the objectivity of matter and space-time and replacing them with a mathematical theory of consciousness. If correct, it could help us progress such intractable questions as the mind-body problem and the conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics. None What is

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Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap

The scientists captured the acrobatic jumps of a tiny maggot-like creature with high-speed cameras to figure out how it does this trick with no arms, legs, or wings. (Image credit: Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley et al)

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14 Fun Facts About Giant Pandas

Is Mother Mei Xiang pregnant? Giant Panda house is closed to give the much-loved bear some peace and quiet

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Chemists show it's hip to be square

Rice University chemists want to make a point: Nitrogen atoms are for squares.

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Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate

During the mating season, male treehoppers—small plant feeding insects—serenade potential mates with vibrational songs sent through plant stems. If a female treehopper's interest is sparked, a male-female duet ensues until mating occurs.

1h

Mental health specialists boost vets' access to outpatient services

A Veterans Health Administration program that added mental health specialists, care managers or both in primary care clinics significantly improved access to mental health and primary care services to veterans with behavioral health needs. The practice also resulted in 9% higher average annual costs for each patient.

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Rice chemists show it's hip to be square

Rice University chemists found a simple route to synthesize azetidines, precursors that make it easier for drug designers to access nitrogen atoms that are key to building new compounds.

1h

Study proves hepatitis C drugs reduce liver-related deaths by nearly half

A new study from the UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates that antiviral drugs for hepatitis C reduce liver-related deaths by nearly 50% in patients with a history of liver cancer.

1h

Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate

During the mating season, male treehoppers—small plant feeding insects—serenade potential mates with vibrational songs sent through plant stems. If a female treehopper's interest is sparked, a male-female duet ensues until mating occurs.

1h

Making sense of remote sensing data

Remote sensor technologies like cameras, GPS trackers, and weather stations have revolutionized biological data collection in the field. Now researchers can capture continuous datasets in difficult terrain, at a scale unimaginable before these technologies became available. But as this flood of data has rolled into laboratory computers around the world, researchers have found themselves without we

1h

Making sense of remote sensing data

Remote sensor technologies like cameras, GPS trackers, and weather stations have revolutionized biological data collection in the field. Now researchers can capture continuous datasets in difficult terrain, at a scale unimaginable before these technologies became available. But as this flood of data has rolled into laboratory computers around the world, researchers have found themselves without we

1h

NASA gives Typhoon Lekima a twice-over with the Aqua satellite

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared and visible views of Typhoon Lekima as it was approaching landfall in China. China has posted Typhoon and Heavy Rain Warnings for Lekima.

1h

Enormous frogs heave rocks to build tadpole ‘nests’

Nature, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02411-z Huge amphibians’ engineering works protect their offspring from predators and swift currents.

2h

Why These Praying Mantises Are Wearing Itty-Bitty 3D Glasses

How do mantises see in 3D? Researchers find out by gluing tiny 3D glasses to a mantis' face and showing the insect movies.

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Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful

A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata — art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? Beyond useful or brilliant, can an abstract idea be considered beautiful?

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Manipulating dose, timing of two therapies reduces relapse in mouse models of breast cancer

Changing the standard dose and timing of two therapies greatly cut tumor relapse and reduced side effects in mouse models of kinase mutated breast cancer and lung cancer, UT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center researchers have found.

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NASA gives Typhoon Lekima a twice-over with the Aqua satellite

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared and visible views of Typhoon Lekima as it was approaching landfall in China. China has posted Typhoon and Heavy Rain Warnings for Lekima.

2h

Want to Ask This Weird Material to Dance? Just Heat It Up.

Extremely hot materials show off their temperature by doing the twist.

2h

YouTube Lets Its Stars Break Rules, Say Moderators

Double Standard Officially, YouTube only has one set of content guidelines. Unofficially, though, it has two: one for its most popular content creators, and another for everyone else. That’s according to eleven current and past YouTube content moderators, who recently shared their experiences policing the platform’s video content with The Washington Post under condition of anonymity — and, they s

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Why It's So Hard to Build a Wing-Flapping Flying Machine

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Can an open-source AI take on Amazon and Google?

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An algorithm to detect outside influences on the media

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Is dark matter older than the Big Bang?

Dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang, according to a new study. Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe’s mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but the study, which appears in Physical Review Letters , presents a new idea of how dark matter was born and how to identify it wi

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Focus in kindergarten may predict future earnings

The way a child acts in kindergarten may affect how much money he or she earns as an adult, a new study shows. For a new longitudinal study, researchers looked at the link between six prevalent childhood behaviors in kindergarten and annual earnings at ages 33 to 35 years. Both boys and girls who showed inattentive behavior at age 6 earned less in their 30s after taking into consideration their I

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Making sense of remote sensing data

The use of remote sensing equipment for data collection has revolutionized biological data collection in the field, but researchers still need tools to help analyze the data. RadialPheno supports the study of phenology — the timing of developmental events like flowering and fruiting — by providing a visualization system that identifies temporal patterns. Such tools are urgently needed to underst

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The Illusion of Safety

Eye surgery could cause you to misjudge distances while driving — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Double Life of a Truck Driver

On his way to work every day, Andrew Cohn passed a truck stop on the side of the road. One truck was always there: a long, white semi with the words Mobile Chapel painted on the side. Each time he drove past it, he’d imagine the conversations that were going on inside. Who was in there? What kind of stories were being told? “The whole idea of a mobile chapel dedicated to long-haul truckers seemed

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Streets lined with leafy trees boost community's overall health, new research suggests

Increasing tree canopy cover increases residents' mental wellbeing. Research suggests that trees give greater benefits than low-lying grasslands. Adults with 30 percent or more tree coverage in their neighborhood had 31 percent lower odds of developing poor general health. A deluge of studies, personal anecdotes, and some plain old common earthly sense, has found that living near green spaces lea

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Analysis and detoxification in one step

Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate. Researchers have now developed a bioinspired method to detect and detoxify these chemicals in only one step. A combination of two natural enzymatic reactions convert harmful chloro- and nitrophenols into the substance that causes the characteristic glowing of fireflies:

3h

Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals

A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation.

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Targeting apolipoprotein E could be key to eliminating hepatitis B virus

Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) promotes hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and production, according to a new study.

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Recent wildfire smoke was so devastating, scientists used it to study nuclear winter

Operation Crossroads, “Baker Day” underwater atomic bomb test, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946. (National Archives/) In August 2017 wildfires ravaged the Pacific Northwest , funneling enormous clouds of smoke into the sky . As the soot amassed, lifting toward the stratosphere, scientists realized they were observing the first possible test of nuclear winter theory . "Nature did the experiment for us,

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Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate

A rare bright spot among dismal climate change predictions, new research findings show that some singing insects are likely to manage to reproduce even in the midst of potentially disruptive temperature changes.

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Inside the Hidden World of Elevator Phone Phreaking

Eavesdropping, reprogramming, talking to strangers: Welcome to the harmless and not-so-harmless fun of hacking elevator call boxes.

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Radioactive Dust From an Ancient Supernova Is Buried in Antarctica

Splash Damage Radioactive dust from a supernova landed in Antarctica from a star that exploded into a supernova millions of years ago, where it was eventually buried under untold thousands of pounds of snow. After a massive excavation effort, scientists hope that studying the dust will reveal new secrets about the cosmic environment surrounding our solar system, lead researcher Dominik Koll, a do

3h

Future Bionic Eyes Could One Day Give Wearers Infrared Vision

Bionic Eyes Researchers from visual prosthetics company Second Second Sight Medical Products have created a new bionic eye system that sends electrical signals to the wearer’s brain via an implant, allowing them to “see” again. Future iterations could one day not only allow blind people to perceive depth, but they could even give wearers a way to see in the infrared spectrum, according to Engadge

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‘Robochemist’ concocts its own compounds

Nature, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02422-w Teamwork between neural networks and a swivelling robot churns out new compounds.

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Bringing cancer medication safely to its destination

Treating cancer more selectively and more effectively – this could be achieved with an innovative technology. The process transforms proteins and antibodies into stable, highly functional drug transporters, with which tumor cells can be detected and killed.

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NASA's MMS finds first interplanetary shock

NASA's MMS mission just made the first high-resolution measurements of an interplanetary shockwave launched from the Sun.

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Novel strategy uncovers potential to control widespread soilborne pathogens

This study introduces a new strategy for identifying antagonistic bacteria, which can then be used to control important plant pathogens. These findings suggest that biological control of pathogens might be improved by combining different beneficial microorganisms and highlight novel strategies used to control widespread phytopathogenic fungi.

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Analysis and detoxification in one step

Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate. Researchers have now developed a bioinspired method to detect and detoxify these chemicals in only one step. A combination of two natural enzymatic reactions convert harmful chloro- and nitrophenols into the substance that causes the characteristic glowing of fireflies:

3h

Genetic variation contributes to individual differences in pleasure

Differences in how our brains respond when we're anticipating a financial reward are due, in part, to genetic differences, according to research with identical and fraternal twins. The findings suggest that how we experience pleasure and reward is at least partly heritable.

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Existing anti-parasitic drug could offer treatment for Ebola

Amid the worsening Ebola outbreak in the Congo, now threatening to spill into Rwanda, a new study suggests that an existing, FDA-approved drug called nitazoxanide could potentially help contain this deadly, highly contagious infection. In meticulous experiments in human cells, the drug significantly amplified immune responses to Ebola and inhibited Ebola replication.

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Don’t change your DNA at home, says America’s first CRISPR law

A California “human biohacking” bill calls for warnings on do-it-yourself genetic-engineering kits.

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Red algae’s stolen genes may lead to new fuels

Ten species of red algae stole about 1% of their genes from bacteria to cope with toxic metals and salt stress in hot springs, according to a new study. These red algae species, known as Cyanidiales , also stole many genes that allow them to absorb and process different sources of carbon in the environment to provide additional sources of energy and supplement their photosynthetic lifestyle. The

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See How Ice-Making Submarines Could Help Refreeze the Arctic

Need More, Make More A team of Indonesian designers has a plan for addressing Arctic ice melt : make more ice. To do that, they propose building submarines that could serve as giant ice makers in the ocean — though experts warn that the subs could do more harm than good. Arctic Ice, Ice Baby The designers created an animated video to show how their submarine would work, and at first glance, it lo

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Questions Surround Canadian Shipment of Deadly Viruses to China

The same Winnipeg lab that sent Ebola and Henipah viruses to Beijing recently removed a number of researchers for an administrative issue.

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Soylent-Like Ramen Packet Has Every Nutrient Needed to Survive

Soylent Noodles Nissin, the company behind one prominent line of instant ramen noodle packets, is poised to launch a new “All-In Noodles” product that, it says, fully satisfies a typical person’s nutritional requirements. Now, if you wanted to live off of an all-noodle diet, the new line of instant ramen packets could fulfill your daily requirements for vitamins, minerals, and protein if eaten fo

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Nanoparticles' movements reveal whether they can successfully target cancer

A Northwestern University research team has developed a new way to determine whether or not single drug-delivery nanoparticles will successfully hit their intended targets — by simply analyzing each nanoparticle's distinct movements in real time.

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New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs

A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night. The technology could help call attention to important traffic information when it's dark, with potential benefits for both drivers and pedestrians, researchers say.

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Printing flattens polymers, improving electrical and optical properties

Researchers have found a way to use polymer printing to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better. A team led by chemical and biomolecular engineers from the University of Illinois report their findings in the journal Science Advances.

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9 Things You Think Are Environmentally Friendly — But Aren't

Hopefully that bag isn't made out of organic cotton. (Credit: Vasiliy Ptitsyn/Shutterstock) We all care about the environment at least a tiny bit. Some of us more than others. But there are things a few of us do with the best intentions that, it turns out, fall somewhere between not helpful and completely counterproductive. Here are some of the worst offenders and how to avoid them. Recycling some

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Ultrafast nonlocal collective dynamics of Kane plasmon-polaritons in a narrow-gap semiconductor

The observation of ultrarelativistic fermions in condensed-matter systems has uncovered a cornucopia of novel phenomenology as well as a potential for effective ultrafast light engineering of new states of matter. While the nonequilibrium properties of two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hexagonal crystals have been studied extensively, our understanding of the photoinduced dynamics in 3D sing

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Exceptional oxygen evolution reactivities on CaCoO3 and SrCoO3

We investigated the roles of covalent bonding, separation of surface oxygen, and electrolyte pH on the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on transition metal oxides by comparing catalytic onset potentials and activities of CaCoO 3 and SrCoO 3 . Both cubic, metallic perovskites have similar Co IV intermediate spin states and onset potentials, but a substantially smaller lattice parameter and shorter

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Accurate and transferable multitask prediction of chemical properties with an atoms-in-molecules neural network

Atomic and molecular properties could be evaluated from the fundamental Schrodinger’s equation and therefore represent different modalities of the same quantum phenomena. Here, we present AIMNet, a modular and chemically inspired deep neural network potential. We used AIMNet with multitarget training to learn multiple modalities of the state of the atom in a molecular system. The resulting model

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Precise nanofiltration in a fouling-resistant self-assembled membrane with water-continuous transport pathways

Self-assembled materials are attractive for next-generation membranes. However, the need to align self-assembled nanostructures (e.g. cylinders, lamellae) and the narrow stability windows for ordered bicontinuous systems present serious challenges. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach that circumvents these challenges by exploiting size-selective transport in the water-continuous medium of

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Evidence for a strain-tuned topological phase transition in ZrTe5

A phase transition between topologically distinct insulating phases involves closing and reopening the bandgap. Near the topological phase transition, the bulk energy spectrum is characterized by a massive Dirac dispersion, where the bandgap plays the role of mass. We report measurements of strain dependence of electrical transport properties of ZrTe 5 , which is known to host massive Dirac fermi

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Holography and criticality in matchgate tensor networks

The AdS/CFT correspondence conjectures a holographic duality between gravity in a bulk space and a critical quantum field theory on its boundary. Tensor networks have come to provide toy models to understand these bulk-boundary correspondences, shedding light on connections between geometry and entanglement. We introduce a versatile and efficient framework for studying tensor networks, extending

4h

Chemical and physical origins of friction on surfaces with atomic steps

Friction occurs through a complex set of processes that act together to resist relative motion. However, despite this complexity, friction is typically described using a simple phenomenological expression that relates normal and lateral forces via a coefficient, the friction coefficient. This one parameter encompasses multiple, sometimes competing, effects. To better understand the origins of fri

4h

Tuning conformation, assembly, and charge transport properties of conjugated polymers by printing flow

Intrachain charge transport is unique to conjugated polymers distinct from inorganic and small molecular semiconductors and is key to achieving high-performance organic electronics. Polymer backbone planarity and thin film morphology sensitively modulate intrachain charge transport. However, simple, generic nonsynthetic approaches for tuning backbone planarity and the ensuing multiscale assembly

4h

Nitrogen cluster doping for high-mobility/conductivity graphene films with millimeter-sized domains

Directly incorporating heteroatoms into the hexagonal lattice of graphene during growth has been widely used to tune its electrical properties with superior doping stability, uniformity, and scalability. However the introduction of scattering centers limits this technique because of reduced carrier mobilities and conductivities of the resulting material. Here, we demonstrate a rapid growth of gra

4h

Iridescence-controlled and flexibly tunable retroreflective structural color film for smart displays

Structural color materials, which use nano- or microstructures to reflect specific wavelengths of ambient white light, have drawn much attention owing to their wide applications ranging from optoelectronics, coatings, to energy-efficient reflective displays. Although various structural color materials based on specular or diffuse reflection have been demonstrated, neither efficient retroreflectiv

4h

Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate

Researchers have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees.

4h

Installing solar panels on agricultural lands maximizes their efficiency

A new study finds that if less than 1% of agricultural land was converted to solar panels, it would be sufficient to fulfill global electric energy demand.

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New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs

A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night, according to a study that will be published on Aug. 9 in Science Advances.

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Printing flattens polymers, improving electrical and optical properties

Researchers have found a way to use polymer printing to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better. A team led by chemical and biomolecular engineers from the University of Illinois report their findings in the journal Science Advances.

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Novel dual stem cell therapy improving cardiac regeneration

As a medical emergency caused by severe cardiovascular diseases, myocardial infarction (MI) can inflict permanent and life-threatening damage to the heart. A joint research team comprising scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently developed a multipronged approach for concurrently rejuvenating both the muscle cells and vascular systems of the heart by utilizing two types of

4h

‘Blueprint’ offers cell-by-cell peek at the liver

Researchers have created a high-resolution picture of the cells at work inside a key hub of metabolism—the liver—and how disease reprograms individual cell types. In every tissue throughout our bodies, various cell types communicate and coordinate their efforts to perform vital functions and maintain health. The new research not only reveals a detailed map of cell-to-cell signaling in the liver,

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Enhancing the quality of AI requires moving beyond the quantitative

Artificial Intelligence engineers should enlist ideas and expertise from a broad range of social science disciplines, including those embracing qualitative methods, in order to reduce the potential harm of their creations and to better serve society as a whole, a pair of researchers has concluded.

4h

Depression symptoms in Alzheimer's could be signs for cognitive decline

Depression symptoms in cognitively healthy older individuals together with brain amyloid, a biological marker of Alzheimer's could trigger changes in memory and thinking over time.

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Teens feel pressured to get pregnant

Female adolescents are experiencing relationship abuse at alarming rates, according to a new study that specifically researched reproductive coercion – a form of abuse in which a woman is pressured to become pregnant against her wishes.

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Researchers identify subtypes of squamous cell lung cancer

Despite improved knowledge of the molecular alterations in SCC, little is understood about how the alterations contribute to the development of the cancer and how potential vulnerabilities could be exploited to treat the disease. Researchers took a closer look at SCC tumors to determine if their characteristics had an impact on patient outcomes.

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Pancreatic cancer: Less toxic, more enduring drug may improve therapy

A new drug that penetrates the protective barrier around pancreatic cancers and accumulates in malignant cells may improve current chemotherapy, a study in mice suggests.

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Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer

Engineering principles developed only 150 years ago were found to have evolved first in biological circuitry that controls cell growth, according to new research.

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Researchers discover oldest fossil forest in Asia

Researchers describe the largest example of a Devonian forest, made up of 250,000 square meters of fossilized lycopsid trees, which was recently discovered in China's Anhui province.

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Where in the universe can you find a black hole nursery?

Gravitational wave researchers have developed a new model that could help astronomers track down the origin of heavy black hole systems in the Universe.

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Communicating science at a music festival — with 135,000 attendees

Nature, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02423-9 Helen Currie has shared her fish-migration research at several UK festivals, including Glastonbury.

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This Genius Used Deepfakes to “Fix” the New “The Lion King”

Circle Of Life Last month, Disney released a remake of its classic film “The Lion King” — and which turned out to be a CGI spectacle that critics said “just doesn’t work with the material.” Now, a video on YouTube made by visual effects artist Jonty Pressinger shows how deepfake technology could be used to combine the two art styles — wide-eyed, expressive faces drawn in the style of the original

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What Joe Biden’s Latest Gaffe Reveals

Another Joe Biden gaffe: “We have this notion that somehow if you’re poor, you cannot do it. Poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids.” That was yesterday, before the Asian and Latino Commission in Des Moines, Iowa. And Biden knew it was one—he immediately tried to clarify with, “Wealthy kids, black kids, Asian kids. No, I really mean it. But think how we think about it. We

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Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer

Engineering principles developed only 150 years ago were found to have evolved first in biological circuitry that controls cell growth, according to new research.

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Huawei's HarmonyOS Is No Android Replacement

HarmonyOS is the very model of a modern operating system. It's also nowhere near ready for smartphones.

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Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty

A new study has linked bone strength to the timing of puberty.

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When working with animals can hurt your mental health

While it might sound like fun to work around pets every day, veterinarians and people who volunteer at animal shelters face particular stressors that can place them at risk for depression, anxiety and even suicide.

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Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells

In studying the dynamic skeletons that cells use to move, researchers develop a new tool for manipulating chemistry and biology.

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Astronomers have discovered the largest black hole ever observed

The monstrous object should be big enough for ground-based radio telescopes to image.

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How to clean retro gaming systems

Ditch the 3D graphics. Haven't you heard? Retro is back. (Lorenzo Herrera via Unsplash/) Collecting retro video game systems can be dirty work. As time goes on, there are fewer consoles in circulation, so if you want to score good deals, you've got to be a lot less picky about condition. Fortunately, there's still plenty of great stuff out there in relatively good shape—you've just got to be will

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Africa's biggest reserve under threat from Chinese oil deal: Activists

Environmental activists said Friday they have launched a petition to stop the break-up of Niger's Termit and Tin Toumma national nature reserve, the biggest in Africa, to honour an oil deal with China.

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Light reflected off fresh snow can outshine the moon

“Snowglow” could exacerbate light pollution in some areas

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Woman Gets Second-Degree Burns from 'Vaginal Steaming'

Ever since Gwyneth Paltrow endorsed vaginal steaming, doctors have warned that the practice isn't without risks.

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Africa's biggest reserve under threat from Chinese oil deal: Activists

Environmental activists said Friday they have launched a petition to stop the break-up of Niger's Termit and Tin Toumma national nature reserve, the biggest in Africa, to honour an oil deal with China.

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Algorithm writes better endings to automated stories

Researchers want to help automated storytelling algorithms write better endings. The problem is that most algorithms for generating the end of a story tend to favor generic sentences, such as “They had a great time,” or “He was sad.” Those may be boring, but Alan Black, a professor in the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, says they aren’t necessarily worse than a non

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Scientists glimpse oddball microbe that could help explain rise of complex life

Nature, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02430-w ‘Lokiarchaea’, previously known only from DNA, is isolated and grown in culture.

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What Threatened Lions Can Teach Us about the Circle of Life

On World Lion Day, it’s good to remember that there’s a global connectedness between ecosystems and the biodiversity they support — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump administration throws cold water on climate change threat to coral reefs

When pollsters informed President Donald Trump that he faces political exposure in the 2020 election with swing voters on environment policy, he decided to respond with a White House address claiming stewardship of clean water, air and oceans.

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To rein in global warming, healthy forests and sustainable diets are key, UN says

Slashing greenhouse gas emissions from cars and power plants won't be enough to avoid the worst effects of climate change. To meet the goals of the Paris climate accord, experts say, humanity also needs a new approach to managing the land beneath its feet.

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A startup that marries AI with empathy is helping women conceive

Univfy uses machine learning to give women personalized predictions—and a sense of hope—for their chances of having a baby.

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Native Americans seek to declare Alamo grounds old cemetery

A local Native American group is bringing a new battle to the Alamo, filing a legal notice declaring the grounds to be an abandoned or unknown cemetery.

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Restart of Notre-Dame restoration pushed back to August 19

Renovation work at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris could resume on August 19, a government official said Friday, after the clean-up was halted last month over fears that workers could be exposed to lead poisoning.

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The Gulf Stream is slowing down. That could mean rising seas and a hotter Florida

The Gulf Stream, the warm current that brings the east coast of Florida the mixed blessings of abundant swordfish, mild winters and stronger hurricanes, may be weakening because of climate change.

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US won't approve labels that say glyphosate causes cancer

The US Environmental Protection Agency has said it will no longer approve warning labels that claim the controversial herbicide glyphosate causes cancer, calling the statement "false and misleading."

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Turbulence meets a shock

Interaction of shocks and turbulence investigated with a focus on high intensity turbulence levels. A new theoretical framework was developed and tested to understand turbulent jumps of mean thermodynamic quantities, shock structure and amplification factors. TACC's XSEDE-allocated Stampede2 ran simulations of shock turbulence interactions at unprecedented levels of realism. Research could help de

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Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells

In studying the dynamic skeletons that cells use to move, researchers develop a new tool for manipulating chemistry and biology.

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US won't approve labels that say glyphosate causes cancer

The US Environmental Protection Agency has said it will no longer approve warning labels that claim the controversial herbicide glyphosate causes cancer, calling the statement "false and misleading."

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Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology

The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular organisms.

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Barriers to fungal infection diagnosis

A new survey identifies several barriers that prevent the consistent use of fungal diagnostic preparations to correctly identify cutaneous fungal infections.

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When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Biologists have completed a comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals — indigenous and exotic — respond to these nonnative plants.

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Scientists make major breakthrough in understanding common eye disease

Scientists have announced a major breakthrough with important implications for sufferers of a common eye disease — dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) — which can cause total blindness in sufferers, and for which there are currently no approved therapies.

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Having a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer increases one's own risk

New data suggest that people who have a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with the disease.

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Brain researchers invent an affordable smartphone measurement for testing of medications

Brain researchers have invented an inexpensive method to measure tremor as known from Parkinson's disease in mice. The method utilises the accelerometer in a smartphone to measure the tremor. The new invention allows researchers to measure how various medications affect tremors, in a much more affordable and expedient way.

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Ultracold quantum particles break classical symmetry

Many phenomena of the natural world evidence symmetries in their dynamic evolution which help researchers to better understand a system's inner mechanism. In quantum physics, however, these symmetries are not always achieved. In laboratory experiments with ultracold lithium atoms, researchers from the Center for Quantum Dynamics at Heidelberg University have proven for the first time the theoretic

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Turbulence meets a shock

This may come as a shock, if you're moving fast enough. The shock being shock waves. A balloon's 'pop' is shock waves generated by exploded bits of the balloon moving faster than the speed of sound. Supersonic planes generate a much louder sonic 'boom,' also from shock waves. Farther out into the cosmos, a collapsing star generates shock waves from particles racing near the speed of light as the s

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Two Genes Conspire in Endometriosis and Cancer to Help Cells Migrate

The genes promote the migration of endothelial cells outside of the uterus, a characteristic of both endometriosis and endometrial cancers, a study of mice and human tissue finds.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds a large ragged eye in Typhoon Krosa

Typhoon Krosa is a large storm moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that the large typhoon also has a large eye.

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Women gain more political and economic power, but gender gap persists

While women have made great strides in entering the workforce, running companies and getting elected to Congress, there remains a persistent gender gap in attitudes about equality between men and women, suggests a University of California, Davis, study.

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What Threatened Lions Can Teach Us about the Circle of Life

On World Lion Day, it’s good to remember that there’s a global connectedness between ecosystems and the biodiversity they support — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China Deploys Its First Robot Traffic Police

We can now add one more initiative to the growing list of ways China is using tech to police its population. On Wednesday, the Handan Public Security Bureau in Northern China deployed three types of traffic robots to assist human officers in the city. A report in state-run news agency Xinhua quotes Zhou Zuoying, deputy head of the Ministry of Public Security’s Traffic Management Research Institut

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Researchers Say They Tricked Apple's FaceID by Putting Taped Glasses on Unconscious People

Researchers presenting at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas this week demonstrated a relatively simple way to break into someone’s iPhone Face ID—so long as they’re completely conked …

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Teen Students Forced to Work Overtime Building Amazon Echo Devices In China

In July, a 17-year-old high school student in China was sticking protective film over 3,000 Amazon Echo dots a day at the Foxconn factory in Hengyang. She was working ten hours a day and six …

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The Choices Facing Community Colleges

America is in the middle of another news emergency, about crises that are genuinely important. But meanwhile, other aspects of public and private life grind on, and because they will matter so much in the long run, they deserve more attention than the permanent emergency-news culture usually allows for. Like many other entries in this series , today’s is an intentionally off-news item about some

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Women gain more political and economic power, but gender gap persists

There remains a persistent gender gap in attitudes about equality between men and women, suggests a University of California, Davis, study. 'Men's overwork,' where men work 50 hours or more a week, is a factor.

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Turbulence meets a shock

Interaction of shocks and turbulence investigated with a focus on high intensity turbulence levels. A new theoretical framework was developed and tested to understand turbulent jumps of mean thermodynamic quantities, shock structure and amplification factors. TACC's XSEDE-allocated Stampede2 ran simulations of shock turbulence interactions at unprecedented levels of realism. Research could help de

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Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls

Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research.

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High-energy lasers could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease in the future

The aggregation of amyloid protein fibrils is involved in diseases such as amyloidosis and even Alzheimer's. Thus, dissociation of these amyloid fibrils is crucial from a biological perspective. However, because of their rigid, stacked sheet-like structure, their dissociation is difficult. A group of scientists has explored the use of free-electron laser to break down these aggregates. This techni

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In Three Years, Fukushima Could Overflow With Radioactive Water

Ticking Clock The effort to safely decommission Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant just got hit by a looming deadline. In about three years, the plant will run out of space for the massive quantities of treated but still-radioactive water that officials have been storing there, according to The Associated Press . While a government panel came up with a few possible courses of action ,

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The Books Briefing: What Toni Morrison Saw

The legacy of Toni Morrison, who died this week at the age of 88, seems nearly impossible to summarize . The 1993 Nobel laureate for literature, she was the author of 11 novels, one of which won a Pulitzer Prize, as well as numerous works of nonfiction. As an editor, she published and promoted the work of a generation of black writers—which is to say nothing of the artists she continues to inspir

5h

To Save Tiny Penguins, This Suburb Was Wiped Off the Map

An Australian state restored a habitat for the world’s smallest penguins by removing every home from a coastal development.

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Trump-regering tillader fortsat 'cyanid-bomber’ mod vilde dyr

Brug af fælder med giften natriumcyanid var ellers stoppet flere steder, efter teenager var ude for en ulykke.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds a large ragged eye in Typhoon Krosa

Typhoon Krosa is a large storm moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that the large typhoon also has a large eye.

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Milky Way's black hole has got 75 times brighter and we don't know why

Astronomers were shocked to find the area around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way growing 75 times brighter in just two hours

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How these foot-long, 7-pound frogs got so jacked

Adorably chunky. (Schäfer et al (2019)/) Goliath frogs are, somehow, even bigger than you think they're going to be. They're more than a foot long from snout to butt (or "vent," if you're a herpetologist), but that doesn't capture the bulk of their thick, muscular legs, which can propel them 10 feet in a single jump. All of this makes them the largest frogs on Earth—and honestly, thank goodness t

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Trump’s Own Aides Doubt His Latest Push on Guns

Early this morning, President Donald Trump—perhaps unwittingly—encapsulated the core tension that has consumed much of his first term: He’s a leader perpetually torn between his desire for bipartisan deal making and his overriding fear of losing his electoral base. Now, on the issue of gun control, the president’s aides suspect, those twin concerns may be irreconcilable. “Serious discussions are

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A proposed space telescope would use Earth’s atmosphere as a lens

One astronomer has a bold solution to the high cost of building big telescopes.

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The Real Differences Between Human and Artificial Intelligence – Facts So Romantic

Sabine Hossenfelder Artificial Intelligence, it seems, is now everywhere. Text translation, speech recognition, book recommendations, even your spam filter is now “artificially intelligent.” But just what do scientists mean with “artificial intelligence,” and what is artificial about it? Artificial intelligence is a term that was coined in the 1980s, and today’s research on the topic has many fac

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Turbulence meets a shock

Interaction of shocks and turbulence investigated with a focus on high intensity turbulence levels. A new theoretical framework was developed and tested to understand turbulent jumps of mean thermodynamic quantities, shock structure and amplification factors. TACC's XSEDE-allocated Stampede2 ran simulations of shock turbulence interactions at unprecedented levels of realism. Research could help de

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Catastrophe by Mail

A gift led me to think about an old geologic controversy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump’s Intel Vacancies Put Americans in Danger

Sue Gordon's departure is the latest sign that US national security might be stretching its leaders too thin—and risks putting the wrong people into roles that American lives depend upon.

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Star scientist out at Scripps Research

Reasons for biochemist Floyd Romesberg’s departure not disclosed

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Pollution is behind 1/3 of new asthma cases in Europe

If European countries complied with current World Health Organization air quality guidelines, it could prevent up to 11% of new childhood asthma cases each year, according to a new study. Overall, 33% of new asthma cases in the 18 European countries researchers studied can be attributed to air pollution levels. Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Emerging evidence suggests that

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Curiosity Spots Unexpectedly Complex Martian Rock

NASA’s Curiosity rover has seen a lot of rocks. In fact, that’s almost all it sees on the surface of Mars . Recently, the rover spotted a rock so strange that the team decided to move in for a closer look. The so-called “Strathdon” has dozens of sedimentary layers squished together , a geological quirk scientists didn’t expect to see on Mars. This points to a potentially complicated and watery pa

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Foxconn Used Child Labor to Manufacture Amazon Alexa Gadgets

Prime Day In China, more than 1,500 schoolchildren are working illegal jobs to manufacture Amazon Echo devices and other Alexa-enabled gadgets for Amazon’s supplier, Foxconn. The children are considered interns, according to The Guardian , while their teachers are paid to accompany them to work jobs that violate Chinese labor laws. Documents from an investigation by the New York-based labor watch

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When Is a Caption Close Enough?

In March, Rikki Poynter flew to Orlando for a YouTuber convention. The event, Playlist Live, boasted a roster of performers who had collectively racked up billions of views: a 16-year-old who put elastic bands around a pumpkin until it exploded , the twins who played the evil stepsisters on Jane the Virgin , a guy who pranked people from inside a snowman suit. Poynter, whose own YouTube channel h

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Climate Deniers Launch Personal Attacks on Teen Activist

They also bash Greta Thunberg's autism, creating collateral damage for others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deep-sea microbe could answer one of evolution's biggest mysteries

At last, scientists have managed to grow, study and photograph a mysterious deep-sea microbe that could explain the evolutionary origin of our complex cells

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Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food

Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.

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Debris From the Satellite India Blew Up Still Polluting Orbit

Anti-Satellite In March, India shot down a satellite with a missile. “India is now a major space power,” declared Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the time, according to local news . But the event was an environmental catastrophe: debris created by the space explosion are still whipping around the Earth at thousands of miles per hour, putting spacecraft and other satellites in danger, accor

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UK Announces Fast-Track Visa to Recruit Top Scientists

Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the immigration program will help the nation remain a science superpower post-Brexit.

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Clouds ‘cloak’ black hole from the early universe

Researchers may have discovered a highly obscured black hole existing only 850 million years after the Big Bang using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. It’s the first evidence for a ‘cloaked black hole’ at an early time in the universe’s history. Supermassive black holes typically grow by pulling in material from a disk of surrounding matter. For the most rapid growth, this process generates prod

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Something Enormous Just Smashed Into Jupiter

Planetary Punch On Wednesday night, Jupiter got hit by something so big that a photographer was able to capture the impact using a telescope in his backyard. Based on the stunning images, astronomers believe it could’ve been a meteor impact — an event so fleeting, it’s rarely caught on camera. Imaged Jupiter tonight. Looks awfully like an impact flash in the SEB. Happened on 2019-08-07 at 4:07 UT

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Ancient Egyptian Yeast Is This Bread’s Secret Ingredient

A self-professed “bread nerd” extracted yeast from 4,000-year-old artifacts to make a loaf of sourdough. “The aroma and flavor are incredible,” he said.

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The ‘warspeak’ permeating everyday language puts us all in the trenches

In a manifesto posted online shortly before he went on to massacre 22 people at an El Paso Walmart, Patrick Crusius cited the “invasion" of Texas by Hispanics. In doing so, he echoed President Trump's rhetoric of an illegal immigrant “invasion." Think about what this word choice communicates: It signals an enemy that must be beaten back, repelled and vanquished. Yet this sort of language – what I

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Cyborg organoids offer rare view into early stages of development

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have grown simplified organs known as organoids with fully integrated sensors. These so-called cyborg organoids offer a rare glimpse into the early stages of organ development.

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Enhancing the quality of AI requires moving beyond the quantitative

Artificial Intelligence engineers should enlist ideas and expertise from a broad range of social science disciplines, including those embracing qualitative methods, in order to reduce the potential harm of their creations and to better serve society as a whole, a pair of researchers has concluded.

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Depression symptoms in Alzheimer's could be signs for cognitive decline

Depression symptoms in cognitively healthy older individuals together with brain amyloid, a biological marker of Alzheimer's could trigger changes in memory and thinking over time.

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Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty

A new study from the University of Bristol has linked bone strength to the timing of puberty.

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Extreme heat associated with increased risk of hospitalization, death for patients with ESRD

This observational study looked at whether extreme heat is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or death among the vulnerable population of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study included 7,445 patients with ESRD who underwent long-term hemodialysis treatment at clinics in Boston, Philadelphia or New York from 2001 to 2012. During that time, 2,953 of the patients died

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Analysis of medical aid in dying in Oregon, Washington

An examination of a combined 28 years of data finds similarities in the characteristics and illnesses of patients requesting medical aid in dying in Oregon and Washington. The study included 3,368 prescriptions written for medical aid in dying, with 2,558 patients dying by lethal ingestion of medication, in the two states from 1998 to 2017 in Oregon and from 2009 to 2017 in Washington.

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Artificial intelligence could yield more accurate breast cancer diagnoses

UCLA researchers have developed an artificial intelligence system that could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately and to better detect and diagnose breast cancer.

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Famous 'X-Shaped' Galaxy Isn't Actually X-Shaped

There's a galaxy not too far from our own that astronomers were very sure was shaped like an X, at least from the perspective of radio telescopes. But a new, clearer radio telescope image shows that the galaxy is more like a stretched-out blob.

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Fuzzy Baby T. Rex Is One of 4 New Stamps Featuring the Dinosaur King

A set of four new stamps created by the U.S. Postal Service highlight the fearsome and much-loved king of the Cretaceous — Tyrannosaurus rex.

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Walmart pulls violent game displays but will still sell guns

Walmart has ordered workers to remove video game signs and displays that depict violence from stores nationwide after 22 people died in a shooting at one of its Texas stores but will continue …

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The Age of Solar Energy Abundance Is Coming in Hot

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Reprogramming genes may extend human life by 30 to 50 years

submitted by /u/mytwm [link] [comments]

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When ‘Back to School’ Means Back to Mass-Shooting Fears

Phyllis Fagell, a counselor at the private K–8 Sheridan School in Washington, D.C., got an email from a colleague on Sunday that’s been on her mind ever since. The email itself didn’t contain any distressing information. It didn’t tell of a sick relative or a friend in need. It was a promotion for a new active-shooter training course at a nearby gym. What struck Fagell was in large part the email

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Russia Is Floating a Nuclear Power Plant Across the Arctic

Russia’s massive floating nuclear power plant is destined to make its way across the Arctic Ocean to supply electricity to a remote eastern region, The Guardian reports . The plant, called the Akademik Lomonosov, will travel about 4,000 miles from St. Petersburg to provide power for Pevek, a remote North Eastern Arctic port town. The 70-megawatt plant is capable of generating enough electricity f

7h

Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

Slight changes around the eyes are indeed a giveaway as to whether a smile is sincere or faked.

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Weird microbe could answer one of the biggest mysteries of evolution

At last, scientists have managed to grow, study and photograph a mysterious deep-sea microbe that could explain the evolutionary origin of our complex cells

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Health effects of eating marijuana is subject of a new study

Researchers have conducted a study in which mice voluntarily ate a dough containing THC, the primary psychoactive component in marijuana. That opens the door to additional studies that will help shed light on behavioral and physiological effects that occur in people when they eat food infused with marijuana.

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Employees less upset at being replaced by robots than by other people

Generally speaking, most people find the idea of workers being replaced by robots or software worse than if the jobs are taken over by other workers. But when their own jobs are at stake, people would rather prefer to be replaced by robots than by another employee. That is the conclusion of a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Erasmus University in Rotterdam.

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Ultracold quantum particles break classical symmetry

Many phenomena of the natural world evidence symmetries in their dynamic evolution which help researchers to better understand a system's inner mechanism. In quantum physics, however, these symmetries are not always achieved. In laboratory experiments with ultracold lithium atoms, researchers from the Center for Quantum Dynamics at Heidelberg University have proven for the first time the theoretic

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Mathematicians develop new statistical indicator

Most of us know this phenomenon only too well: when it's hot outside, you feel the urge for a cooling ice cream. But would you have thought that mathematics could be involved?

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Apple is now selling the AirPower, basically, only it’s not made by Apple

It doesn't have all the same features, but the basic concept is the same.

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Chicago water pollution may be keeping invasive silver carp out of Great Lakes, study says

Invasive silver carp have been moving north toward the Great Lakes since their accidental release in the 1970s. The large filter-feeding fish, which are known to jump from the water and wallop anglers, threaten aquatic food webs as well as the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery. But, for the past decade, the invading front hasn't moved past Kankakee. A new study, led by scientists at the University of

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Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Is Behaving Strangely

If on a clear and starry night in mid-May you had trained a high-powered telescope on just the right part of Jupiter, you would have seen something very, very strange. The Great Red Spot, one of our solar system’s most famous features, would have appeared to be slowly unraveling. You would have seen the swirling storm system casting off ribbons of rose-colored gas like petals in the wind. It woul

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Biodegradable alternative to replace microplastics in cosmetics and toiletries

Plastic microbeads were banned from shower gels and toothpaste in the UK last year, but could still be hiding in your suncream or lipstick. Now start-up company Naturbeads, based at the University of Bath, is working with companies to replace microplastics in these products with biodegradable microbeads made from cellulose.

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Development of simplified new mass spectrometric technique using laser and graphene

A technology that can obtain high-resolution, micrometer-sized images for mass spectrometric analysis without sample preparation has been developed. DGIST Research Fellow Jae Young Kim and Chair-professor Dae Won Moon's team succeeded in developing the precise analysis and micrometer-sized imaging of bio samples using a small and inexpensive laser.

7h

Researchers find electron current direction in photon-drag effect is dependent on surrounding environment

A team of researchers at the U.S. National Institute for Standards and Technology has found that electron current flow direction produced by the photon-drag effect is dependent on the environment in which a metal is sitting. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they conducted with polarized light striking a gold film and what they learned.

7h

Freezing Part of a Woman’s Ovaries Could Delay Menopause for Years, UK Company Says

A medical procedure that has been used to freeze a woman's ovaries is being offered for the first time as a way to delay menopause.

7h

Verdens største frø bygger egne swimmingpools til haletudser

Forskere har opdaget, at den gigantiske Goliath-frø, der vejer op til 3,3 kg., kan flytte sten på op til to kg., når de bygger små damme til at beskytte æg og haletudser. Den nye viden kan bruges til at sikre den truede frøs overlevelse i Cameroon og Ækvatorial Guinea

7h

Hormonbehandling vid bröstcancer skyddar länge

Östrogenreceptor-positiv (hormonkänslig) bröstcancer är den vanligaste formen av bröstcancer och innebär att tumören är beroende av det kvinnliga könshormonet östrogen för att kunna växa. Kvinnor som får sådan bröstcancer har en kvar en långsiktig risk att drabbas av spridd cancer och dö. Det finns otillräcklig kunskap om hur biologiska faktorer hos tumören och hormonbehandling påverkar denna lån

7h

Chicago water pollution may be keeping invasive silver carp out of Great Lakes, study says

Invasive silver carp have been moving north toward the Great Lakes since their accidental release in the 1970s. The large filter-feeding fish, which are known to jump from the water and wallop anglers, threaten aquatic food webs as well as the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery. But, for the past decade, the invading front hasn't moved past Kankakee. A new study suggests that Chicago's water pollution

7h

New method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms that could help dental treatment

Stem cells hold the key for tissue engineering, as they develop into specialised cell types throughout the body including in teeth. An international team of researchers, including scientists from the Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden (BIOTEC), has found a new mechanism that could offer a potential new solution to tooth repair.

7h

Better tools, better cancer immunotherapy

Researchers from DTU have developed an important new tool towards producing therapies for cancer patients using the patient's own cells.

7h

There are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium

Do only potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel, or are there water molecules between the ions? This question has been a source of controversy for years. Researchers led by Prof. Adam Lange from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin have now been able to show that water molecules do not co-migrate through the potassium channel

7h

Medical research ranked higher by people receiving health-related news while they wait

Could large TV monitors in waiting rooms, informing visitors about current local medical research, be a good idea? A study shows that people provided with news in this way are more interested in medical research than those randomly excluded from the news flow.

7h

Regular exercise may slow decline in those at risk of Alzheimer's

Moderate exercise is not only good for memory as people age, it also appears to help prevent the development of physical signs of Alzheimer's, known as biomarkers, in those who are at risk for the disease, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

7h

Gorillas crack into walnuts despite having the wrong teeth

A population of western lowland gorillas in Loango National Park, Gabon, use their teeth to crack open the woody shells of African walnuts, researchers report. Despite their large body size, gorillas have a vegetarian diet consisting almost exclusively of leafy vegetation and fruit. They have large and high-crested teeth when compared to other great apes, which researchers see as an adaptation to

8h

The Ukulele Queens of Deerfield, Illinois

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a group of women who all picked up the ukulele after they retired. They’ve formed a four-piece band called the Shenanigans, and an unexpected new late-in-life friendship. Just before putting on a

8h

The Physics of Falling Magnets in *Stranger Things* Season 3

Can magnets really just demagnetize suddenly and fall off a fridge? Yes—sort of, though the show doesn't quite nail it.

8h

What you might have missed

From that age-old discussion about the moon, to solving crime with maths and Colombia’s ex-guerillas learning biodiversity – here are some highlights from a week in science.

8h

The Age of Solar Energy Abundance Is Coming in Hot

Every five days, the sun provides the Earth with as much energy as all proven supplies of oil, coal, and natural gas. If humanity could capture just one 6,000 th of Earth’s available solar energy, we’d be able to meet 100 percent of our energy needs. And today, we are riding a tremendous wave of advancements in both solar panel efficiency and novel methods of expanding surface area coverage . Mea

8h

The Crazy Superstitions and Real-Life Science of the Northern Lights

In the latest episode of ‘Re:Frame,’ Smithsonian curators take a deep dive into the dramatic painting ‘Aurora Borealis’ by Frederic Church

8h

Microneedling improves appearance of acne scars

It turns out creating tiny injuries on your face with needles actually helps decrease the appearance of acne scars.

8h

Mathematicians of TU Dresden develop new statistical indicator

Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. Dr. Björn Böttcher, Prof. Martin Keller-Ressel and Prof. René Schilling from TU Dresden's Institute of Mathematical Stochastics have developed a dependence measure called "distance multivariance".

8h

Comparison between major types of arthritis based on diagnostic ultrasonography

Ultrasound is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive means of diagnosing a number of medical conditions. This review presents an analysis of the diagnostic value of ultrasound to draw comparison between different types of arthritic conditions.

8h

A Finnish study finds bowel preparation for colon surgery unnecessary

As indicated by a recently completed Finnish study, antibiotics administration and bowel cleansing before colon surgery do not improve patients' treatment outcomes. According to the researchers, bowel preparation, a procedure strenuous for patients, is not needed.

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Archaeology can help us learn from history to build a sustainable future for food

What we eat can harm not only our health, but the planet itself. About a quarter of all the greenhouse gas emissions that humans generate each year come from how we feed the world. Most of them are methane released by cattle, nitrogen oxides from chemical fertilisers and carbon dioxide from the destruction of forests to grow crops or raise livestock.

8h

Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy

Researchers have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease.

8h

Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae

Scientists have identified a protein, Lipid Remodeling reguLator 1 (LRL1), in microscopic algae that is involved in the production of triacylglycerol, a biofuel precursor. They further reveal additional proteins and biochemical pathways that contribute to the production of this precursor, and show that the protein particularly functions by limiting phosphorus in the environment. Their results coul

8h

New diagnostic method for fungal infections could combat a major global health risk

A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) has demonstrated how dual DNA barcoding could help improve the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases, giving patients access to potentially life-saving treatment much sooner.

8h

Development of simplified new mass spectrometric technique using laser and graphene

DGIST Research Fellow Jae Young Kim and Chair-professor Dae Won Moon's team developed a mass spectrometric technology using graphene substrate and continuous wave laser without complex sample preparation. Expected to be used for precise medical diagnosis and surgery with easy high-resolution analysis image processing.

8h

Scientists at DGIST discovered how chronic stress causes brain damage

Chronic stress induces autophagic death of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). Expected to offer new opportunities for development of early treatment options for stress-associated brain diseases.

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Sleep, snacks and shift work

If you're one of Australia's 1.4 million shiftworkers, eating at irregular times is just par for the course – but have you ever stopped to think about the impact this might have on your body? In a new research study by the University of South Australia, researchers have investigated whether altering food intake during the nightshift could optimise how shiftworkers feel during the night and reduce

8h

How a huge forest of extinct trees sparked transformation of life on Earth

If you were to step back in time some 365 million years, you might see a landscape more akin to the wilder shores of science fiction than earthly reality. Imagine a forest made up only of one kind of tree. A thin, straight, leaf-covered trunk just a few metres tall, dividing at the very top into four short hanging branches. A little like a green, living version of an art deco streetlamp.

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Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae

Scientists have identified a protein, Lipid Remodeling reguLator 1 (LRL1), in microscopic algae that is involved in the production of triacylglycerol, a biofuel precursor. They further reveal additional proteins and biochemical pathways that contribute to the production of this precursor, and show that the protein particularly functions by limiting phosphorus in the environment. Their results coul

8h

Rare baby panda twins born at Belgian zoo

A Belgian zoo announced Friday the "extremely rare" birth of twin baby giant pandas, three years after the arrival of a young male, which was a first for Belgium at the time.

8h

Researchers prove there are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium channels

Do potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel alone, or are there water molecules between the ions, too? This question has been a source of controversy for years. Researchers led by Prof. Adam Lange from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin have now demonstrated that water molecules do not co-migrate through the potassium channe

8h

Vegan food's sustainability claims need to give the full picture

The IPCC special report, Climate Change and Land, released last night, has found a third of the world's greenhouse gas emissions come from the "land": largely farming, food production, land clearing and deforestation.

8h

Disrupted genetic clocks in schizophrenia-affected brains reveal clues to the disease

Researchers studying schizophrenia-affected brains have discovered that the daily timing of gene expression is highly disrupted in the region responsible for cognition and memory. The findings could help reveal previously missed genetic links to the disease.

8h

A new method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms to inform future treatment

Stem cells hold the key to wound healing, as they develop into specialized cell types throughout the body — including in teeth. Now an international team of researchers has found a mechanism that could offer a potential novel solution to tooth repair.

8h

A genetic chaperone for healthy aging?

Researchers have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging. It's a protein that controls muscle integrity, lifespan and levels of an essential sugar. How does one protein have that much power?

8h

This designer clothing lets users turn on electronics while turning away bacteria

Purdue University researchers have developed a new fabric innovation that allows the wearer to control electronic devices through the clothing.

8h

Promising clinical trial results for drug for rare disease in which patients can't eat fat

In a Phase III clinical trial, the drug volanesorsen significantly reduced blood fat (triglyceride) levels in participants with a rare disease called familial chylomicronemia syndrome; finding could also help inform better prevention methods and treatments for many types of heart disease.

8h

Fish preserve DNA 'memories' far better than humans do

We are all familiar with the common myth that fish have poor memory, but it turns that their DNA has the capacity to hold much more memory than that of humans. Rwesearchers report that memory in the form of 'DNA methylation' is preserved between generations of fish, in contrast to humans where this is almost entirely erased.

8h

Dismantling Tucker Carlson’s White-Supremacy Argument

After a white gunman killed 22 people in El Paso, Texas, citing a mythical “Hispanic invasion of Texas” as his motive, Republican Senator Ted Cruz declared on Twitter that “what we saw yesterday was a heinous act of terrorism and white supremacy.” Republican Congressman Dan Crenshaw tweeted, “White supremacy has no place in this world. Violence inflicted because of someone’s race or ethnicity is

8h

Rare baby panda twins born at Belgian zoo

A Belgian zoo announced Friday the "extremely rare" birth of twin baby giant pandas, three years after the arrival of a young male, which was a first for Belgium at the time.

8h

Researchers prove there are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium channels

Do potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel alone, or are there water molecules between the ions, too? This question has been a source of controversy for years. Researchers led by Prof. Adam Lange from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin have now demonstrated that water molecules do not co-migrate through the potassium channe

8h

Asteroid's features to be named after mythical birds

Working with NASA's OSIRIS-REx team, the International Astronomical Union's Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) approved the theme "birds and bird-like creatures in mythology" for naming surface features on asteroid (101955) Bennu.

8h

NASCAR may be the fastest way to learn about physics

There's just something thrilling about traveling at high speeds. Throughout history people have always pushed themselves to go faster, whether on foot, on horseback, on a boat or on a bicycle.

8h

Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria

Certain strains of cholera can change their shape in response to environmental conditions to aid their short-term survival, according to new research from Dartmouth College.

8h

Abundant screen time linked with overweight among children

A recently completed study indicates that Finnish children who spend a lot of time in front of screens have a heightened risk for overweight and abdominal obesity, regardless of the extent of their physical activity.

8h

Single-cell sequencing reveals glioblastoma's shape-shifting nature

Glioblastoma, a cancer that arises in the brain's supporting glial cells, is one of the worst diagnoses a child can receive. The grade IV, highly malignant tumor aggressively infiltrates healthy brain tissue, and most children die of the disease within one to two years of diagnosis, similar to adults.

8h

Enhanced natural gas storage to help reduce global warming

Researchers have designed plastic-based materials that can store natural gas more effectively. These new materials can not only make large-scale, cost-effective, and safe natural gas storage possible, but further hold a strong promise for combating global warming.

8h

Direct toxic action of beta-amyloid identified

Hyperactive neurons in specific areas of the brain are believed to be an early perturbation in Alzheimer's disease. For the first time, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to explain the reasons and mechanisms underlying this early and therefore important neuronal dysfunction. They found that the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate persists for too long near active neur

8h

Take a break! Brain stimulation improves motor learning

In a joint study, Jost-Julian Rumpf from the University of Leipzig and Gesa Hartwigsen from MPI CBS suggest the process of motor learning probably already begins during short interruptions of practice. Further, the solidification process can be improved with brain stimulation.

8h

Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites

An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome. In the long term, the results can help to understand and remedy some of the genetic problems in humans, such as low fertility.

8h

When working with animals can hurt your mental health

While it might sound like fun to work around pets every day, veterinarians and people who volunteer at animal shelters face particular stressors that can place them at risk for depression, anxiety and even suicide, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

8h

Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria

Certain strains of cholera can change their shape in response to environmental conditions to aid their short-term survival, according to new research from Dartmouth College.

8h

Contamination-eating microbes to be tested in the field

For years, the University of Toronto's Elizabeth Edwards and her team have been developing a potent mix of microbes that can chow down on toxic chemicals. Now, they are preparing to let them loose in the wild for the first time.

8h

Cyborg organoids offer rare view into early stages of development

What happens in the early days of organ development? How do a small group of cells organize to become a heart, a brain, or a kidney? This critical period of development has long remained the black box of developmental biology, in part because no sensor was small or flexible enough to observe this process without damaging the cells.

9h

If we want livable cities in 2060 we'll have to work together to transform urban systems

Not everyone wants to live in the inner city and it's insulting to describe the outer suburbs as the fringe.

9h

Timing the market in specific industries delivers for hedge fund managers

Hedge fund mangers who time the market ahead of positive and negative news within the manufacturing industry outperform competitors, research from FIU Business finds.

9h

Tardigrades: We're now polluting the moon with near indestructible little creatures

An Israeli spacecraft called Beresheet almost made it to the moon in April. It took a selfie with the lunar surface in the background, but then lost contact with Earth and presumably crashed onto the lunar surface. Now it's been revealed that the mission was carrying a cargo of dehydrated microscopic lifeforms known as tardigrades.

9h

FBI vil have systematisk overvågning af Twitter, Facebook og Instagram for terror-opslag

Et udbud fra FBI viser, at USAs nationale sikkerhedstjeneste og forbundspoliti vil have etableret en realtime overvågning af opslag på de sociale medier for at sikre viden om aktivitet fra bl.a. terrorister og udenlandske efterretningstjenester.

9h

The mind-muscle connection: For aesthetes, not athletes?

The 'mind-muscle connection.' Ancient lore for bodybuilders, latest buzz for Instragram fitness followers. But when the goal is muscle performance rather than growth alone, does the idea still carry any weight? A new analysis suggests that to lift heavier, or longer, it is better to focus on moving the weight itself — not your muscles.

9h

Conservative treatment with a sling can replace surgery for shoulder fractures

An arm in a sling cures a shoulder fracture just as well as an operation with plates and screws. This is shown by a comprehensive study.

9h

Genome Study Reveals Clues to Komodo Dragon’s Unique Abilities

A new study reveals evidence of a large number of mutations in important Komodo genes.

9h

Review: Onewheel's Pint Is Pocket-Sized Fun

Be warned, though: Street snowboarding is not for the faint of heart.

9h

Video Review Is Changing Soccer, and No One Seems to Want It

Studies suggest that VAR is slowing down the game and changing refs' calls. But the tech is here to stay: The last big soccer league just adopted it.

9h

When Limiting Online Speech to Curb Violence, We Should Be Careful

Opinion: Silencing forums that spread mass violence can also silence the marginalized

9h

2K Games Probed YouTuber Over Alleged 'Borderlands 3' Leaks

Also: 'Duck Tales: Remastered' just disappeared from online storefronts with no explanation.

9h

These sharks glow in the dark thanks to a newly identified kind of marine biofluorescence

In a study publishing August 8, 2019 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites.

9h

Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria

Strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae transform themselves from small, comma-shaped cells to long filaments in nutrient-poor environments to aid short-term survival.

9h

‘Brain boost’ drugs hamper sleep and memory with little upside

Taking nonprescribed psychostimulants may slightly improve a person’s short-term focus but impede sleep and mental functions that rely on it—such as working memory. The use of prescription stimulants by those without medically diagnosed conditions marks a growing trend among young adults—particularly college students seeking a brain boost. “Healthy individuals who use psychostimulants for cogniti

9h

Earliest Evidence of Human Mountaineers Found in Ethiopia

Previous research had suggested that high-altitude regions such as Tibet and the Andes were among the last places peopled by humans.

9h

Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

Slight changes around the eyes are indeed a giveaway as to whether a smile is sincere or faked. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Revelations of Meek Mill's Legal Limbo

Midway through Episode 3 of Amazon’s new documentary Free Meek , the rapper and entertainment-industry mogul Jay-Z appears on-screen to offer a de facto thesis statement for the five-installment series. He ties the experience of the Philadelphia musician to those of the 4.5 million people whose stories of protracted injustice are less readily heard by wide audiences. “I really believe a lot of pe

9h

Star scientist out at Scripps Research Institute

Reasons for biochemist Floyd Romesberg’s departure not disclosed

9h

X-37B Military Space Plane's Latest Mystery Mission Hits 700 Days

The U.S. Air Force's X-37B military space plane has now been circling Earth for 700 days, just a few weeks shy of the vehicle's spaceflight-duration record.

9h

COP26: Glasgow could host 2020 UN climate change summit

The city will host the UN summit next year if the UK wins the right to hold the conference for up to 200 world leaders.

9h

Boris Johnson pledges to ease U.K. research visas, but plows ahead toward Brexit

A new immigration system could soften the blow to science from the United Kingdom’s impending departure from the European Union

9h

Svamp i häxring ger kunskap om mutationer

Studien ökar kunskapen om de utmaningar och lösningar som krävs för att individer ska kunna nå en hög ålder, vilket är av intresse bland annat inom områden som evolutionsbiologi och cancerforskning. DNA finns i varje cell i alla levande varelser och kodar för de funktioner som cellen kan utföra. Förändringar i DNA (mutationer) kan innebära att cellen förlorar sin funktion, vilket innebär ökad ris

9h

Elektrisk mad: Finner bruger nasa-koncept til at producere proteiner

Et billigt protein-pulver, der kan dyrkes med elektricitet, næring og CO2 er udviklet af finske Solar Foods. Dansk forsker er skeptisk, men ikke afvisende.

9h

Study finds tourism industry pays lowest wages nationwide

Florida's booming tourism industry is the state's leading industry with an annual economic impact of $86 billion supporting 1.5 million jobs, yet new research from Florida State University reveals wages for hospitality workers have not kept pace with the rising economy.

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Some Climate Change Cherry Picking

There is an industry of misinformation fueling climate change denial. It is often fairly sophisticated, and because it is dealing with a highly complex technical area, it’s easy to create an argument that sounds compelling. This results (as if often evidenced right here in the comments) in people who are confident that they are good skeptics and climate fearmongering is all nonsense. Of course th

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10h

The Art of Giving a Damn

On Sunday, a day after the mass-shooting tragedy in El Paso, Texas, a reporter asked the Democratic presidential candidate and El Paso resident Beto O’Rourke whether there was anything President Donald Trump could do “to make this any better.” It was not a very good question. O’Rourke answered it like this : “Uh, what do you think? You know the shit he’s been saying. He’s been calling Mexican imm

10h

Salvini Puts Italy on a Collision Course With Europe

It was always a matter of time before Italy’s government—the first populist coalition in the heart of Europe—ran out of steam. The liaison between the anti-establishment Five Star Movement and the right-wing populist League party has been less a marriage of convenience than a rather transactional fling that’s kept on flinging for 15 months in spite of many ideological differences. Power is a stro

10h

Sorry, But We Can’t Just Hack Our Way Out of Climate Doom

We have to suck carbon out of the atmosphere. That alone won’t fix the mess we’ve made.

10h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Amazon’s Prime Mission

Jason Del Rey, host of Land of the Giants, a new podcast all about Amazon, joins the Gadget Lab to talk about the company’s quest for world domination.

10h

Iceye satellites return super-sharp radar images

Helsinki-based Iceye showcases high-resolution radar images from its growing satellite constellation.

10h

Tales From FDA Site Inspections

It’s a summer Friday, so I’ll just send along this link to a story at Wired . It’s similar to this recent post , in that it details some of the ridiculous ways that small overseas manufacturers have tried to get around FDA site inspections. As a correspondent noted, though, the title of the Wired article isn’t quite right: it should be how these people tried to dupe the FDA, because all of these

10h

Are researchers asking the right questions to prevent mass shootings?

Understanding how to thwart these violent events may be more effective than analyzing perpetrators’ backgrounds.

10h

A new metric to capture the similarity between collider events

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have recently developed a metric that can be used to capture the space of collider events based on the earth mover's distance (EMD), a measure used to evaluate dissimilarity between two multi-dimensional probability distributions. The metric they proposed, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, could enable the devel

10h

Image of the Day: Super Speedy Microscopy

Two-photon imaging captures chemical signaling between live mouse neurons on a millisecond timescale.

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Better diagnostic imaging for pet rabbits

Gastrointestinal issues are the most common emergency that brings pet rabbits—the third most popular companion small mammal in the U.S.—to the Foster Hospital for Small Animals.

10h

Like moths to a colorful flame

A nocturnal moth may be using its colorful wing patterns to attract a female mate, according to new research led by The University of Western Australia and the Adolphe Merkle Institute in Switzerland.

10h

Better diagnostic imaging for pet rabbits

Gastrointestinal issues are the most common emergency that brings pet rabbits—the third most popular companion small mammal in the U.S.—to the Foster Hospital for Small Animals.

10h

Like moths to a colorful flame

A nocturnal moth may be using its colorful wing patterns to attract a female mate, according to new research led by The University of Western Australia and the Adolphe Merkle Institute in Switzerland.

10h

Stop the Slaughter of Our Children With These Weapons of War

Since the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in which 20 of our first graders were slaughtered with an AR-15-style rifle, I have pondered despairingly how long it would take for America to put an end to the killing generated by these weapons of war. I very briefly had hope that the massacre of our little ones would bring us to our senses, spurring Congress to pass commonsense legislation, i

10h

World's Largest Frogs Can Move Rocks Half Their Weight … for Their Wee Pollywogs

The world's largest frogs may also have the best pollywog daycare on the market.

10h

Nanowire arrays could improve solar cells

Transparent electrodes are a critical component of solar cells and electronic displays. To collect electricity in a solar cell or inject electricity for a display, you need a conductive contact, like a metal, but you also need to be able to let light in (for solar cells) or out (for displays).

10h

Survey explores trans, non-binary population

Researchers hope findings from a new nationwide survey will offer greater insights into trans and non-binary communities where little data currently exist—doing for Canada what a similar survey did for Ontario a decade ago. The findings will inform a near endless string of areas from health care and social services, to public policy and education.

10h

Increasing workplace diversity: It's simpler than you think

In the United States, nearly 90 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are white males, while less than four percent of CEOs are African American or Hispanic. With these numbers in mind, companies are constantly trying different strategies to increase diversity in the workplace.

10h

Rock scratches hint at future quakes

Curved scratches in rock faces may give clues to where big quakes could strike next, a study led by Victoria University of Wellington Master's student Jesse Kearse has shown.

10h

Epigenetic mechanism appears to strongly influence healthy aging

Researchers at the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging. It's a protein that controls muscle integrity, lifespan and levels of an essential sugar. How does one protein have that much power?

10h

Upcycling of proteins protects DNA from parasites

Of the three billion base pairs in the human genome, less than two percent contain the information encoding the ~20,000 proteins. That is, because at least half of our genetic material originated from selfish genetic elements such as transposons. Scattered throughout the genomes of plants, fungi and animals, transposons can 'jump' from one genomic position to another. In doing so, they provide an

10h

Epigenetic mechanism appears to strongly influence healthy aging

Researchers at the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging. It's a protein that controls muscle integrity, lifespan and levels of an essential sugar. How does one protein have that much power?

10h

Upcycling of proteins protects DNA from parasites

Of the three billion base pairs in the human genome, less than two percent contain the information encoding the ~20,000 proteins. That is, because at least half of our genetic material originated from selfish genetic elements such as transposons. Scattered throughout the genomes of plants, fungi and animals, transposons can 'jump' from one genomic position to another. In doing so, they provide an

10h

Oceans of Noise: Episode One – Science Weekly podcast

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson begins a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019 Contrary to popular belief, and the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life beneath the ocean surface is not a silent

11h

British ethicists are challenging justice by algorithm

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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What is the future of education?

Like how will people learn, prepare for the future, what will teachers be like etc. submitted by /u/Zakku_Rakusihi [link] [comments]

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How Safecrackers Can Unlock an ATM in Minutes—Without Leaving a Trace

At Defcon this week, security researcher Mike Davis will show how he can pick the lock of an ATM safe in no time, thanks to its electric leaks.

11h

Blow Out Your Knee? Hope Your Surgeon's Got a VR Headset

After years of promise, virtual reality gets some much-needed clinical validation as a surgical training tool.

11h

It's Justice League vs. Algorithmic Justice League in Court

DC Comics wants to block a proposed trademark for the Algorithmic Justice League, brainchild of an MIT researcher.

11h

Here’s What Foreign Interference Will Look Like in 2020

Russia is “doing it as we sit here.” This stray line, buried in seven hours of testimony on Capitol Hill, wasn’t just Robert Mueller’s way of rebutting the charge that his investigation into the Kremlin’s interference in the 2016 presidential election amounted to a two-year, $32 million witch hunt. It was also a blunt message to the lawmakers arrayed before him, the journalists hunting for a bomb

11h

The Kitchen Is an Amoral, Atonal Mess of a Movie

The glamor of the gangster film is as old as Hollywood itself. There’s transgressive appeal to a mob boss rising to power and keeping it, through whatever murder and graft is necessary. Andrea Berloff’s directorial debut, The Kitchen , is steeped in the iconography of 1970s crime classics such as The Godfather and Mean Streets , aiming to invoke a seedier New York where only intimidation and migh

11h

Bending the rules: A revolutionary new way for metals to be malleable

For nearly 100 years, scientists thought they understood everything there was to know about how metals bend. They were wrong.

11h

MYC competes with MiT/TFE in regulating lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy through an epigenetic rheostat

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11568-0 Genes related to lysosomal and autophagic systems are transcriptionally regulated by the Mit/TFE family of transcription factors. Here the authors show that MYC, in association with HDACs, suppresses the expression of lysosomal and autophagy genes by competing with the Mit/TFE transcription factors for occupan

11h

Caspase-2 promotes AMPA receptor internalization and cognitive flexibility via mTORC2-AKT-GSK3β signaling

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11575-1 Caspase-2 is constitutively expressed in neurons yet its physiological function is not known. Here, the authors report a role for Caspase-2 activity in synaptic plasticity via a reduction in dendritic spine density through cleavage of Rictor suggesting a mechanism to explain the impairments in cognitive flexib

11h

Measurement of the combined quantum and electrochemical capacitance of a carbon nanotube

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11589-9 Contact between electrons in a nanotube and solvated ions in an electrolyte yield electric fields confined to small dimensions and electrostatics that are affected by quantum density of states. Here the authors measure quantum effects on capacitance in a reduced-dimension system in a liquid electrolyte.

11h

Myosin IIA and formin dependent mechanosensitivity of filopodia adhesion

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10964-w Fiolopodia are involved in cell migration and their attachment to the ECM is mediated by integrin receptors. Here the authors show that myosin X induced filipodia adhesion to fibronectin requires activity of myosin IIA at the filopodium base and formin at the tip to support force transmission through the actin

11h

Protein determinants of dissemination and host specificity of metallo-β-lactamases

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11615-w Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) confer resistance to carbapenem antibiotics. Here, López et al. show that the host range of MBLs depends on the efficiency of MBL signal peptide processing and secretion into outer membrane vesicles, which affects bacterial fitness.

11h

Insight into genetic predisposition to chronic lymphocytic leukemia from integrative epigenomics

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11582-2 The definition of regulatory landscape at chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) risk loci is limited. Here, the authors perform an epigenomic characterisation of 42 known risk loci in CLL and normal B cells at different developmental stages and show active chromatin and target genes in the risk loci.

11h

WWP2 regulates pathological cardiac fibrosis by modulating SMAD2 signaling

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11551-9 Pathological cardiac fibrosis is a hallmark of diseases leading to heart failure. Here, the authors used systems genetics to identify a pro-fibrotic gene network regulated by WWP2, a E3 ubiquitin ligase, which orchestrates the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and transcriptional activity of SMAD2 in the diseased he

11h

Tunable giant magnetoresistance in a single-molecule junction

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11587-x Molecular electronics or spintronics relies on manipulating the electronic transport through microscopic molecule structures. Here the authors demonstrate the selective electron pathway in single-molecule device by magnetic field which enables a tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance up to 93%.

11h

Oceans of Noise: Episode One – Science Weekly podcast

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson begins a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

11h

Carlton Marshes expansion 'could protect homes from flooding'

A £5m expansion of Suffolk's Carlton Marshes could reduce the impact of surge tides, say its owners.

11h

Put it Over There with the Others: More “Promising Preliminary” Evidence for Acupressure

Another day, another legitimate journal publishing a preliminary study practically designed to spit out a positive result. Also, acupuncture robots?

11h

Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food

Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.

11h

Introducing Registered Reports, a New Way to Make Science Robust

To encourage the replication of findings, we should ask researchers to describe their methods before they conduct experiments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Introducing Registered Reports, a New Way to Make Science Robust

To encourage the replication of findings, we should ask researchers to describe their methods before they conduct experiments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food

Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.

11h

The Scientific Underpinnings and Impacts of Shame

People who feel shame readily are at risk for depression and anxiety disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Scientific Underpinnings and Impacts of Shame

People who feel shame readily are at risk for depression and anxiety disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Scientific Underpinnings and Impacts of Shame

People who feel shame readily are at risk for depression and anxiety disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Efter eksplosion: Norsk energibranche kræver bedre godkendelser af brintstationer

PLUS. Usikkert om striksere godkendelse vil øge sikkerheden, siger det norske direktorat for samfundssikkerhed og beredskab.

11h

AMD lancerer verdens første 7 nm serverprocessor: Google vil bruge den i datacentre

AMD har lanceret anden generation processorer i Epyc-familien og verdens første serverprocessor lavet med en 7 nanometer produktionsproces.

12h

Forensics Friday: You’re the reviewer. What do you recommend for this panel?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the twelfth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue readi

12h

Exploding stars scattered traces of iron over Antarctic snow

Researchers melted half a ton of snow to find just 10 atoms of a radioactive variety of iron.

12h

The breakthrough that’s reshaping our world

The Japanese scientist’s research could pave the way for lightweight cars and artificial muscles

12h

Physician Hugh Montgomery: ‘Great leaps often need eccentric thought’

Q&A with the professor of intensive care on musical ambitions, the ‘diseased’ body politic, and saying yes to too much

12h

Automated trucks: Blue-collar disaster or economic win?

There are 3.5 million truck drivers in the U.S.; it's the most common job in 29 states. Yet there is a $168 billion financial incentive for Silicon Valley to automate truck drivers. The pros? Automation will lower the 4,000-person annual death toll caused by truck collisions, and it will save companies and consumers money. The cons? Truck drivers with families to support and loans to pay will soo

12h

The Media Erased Latinos From the Story

I’ve been a professional journalist for 20 years. But this week, the media failed Latinos in America during what was perhaps our darkest hour in my lifetime. On Monday, days after a deadly attack on Latino shoppers at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, President Donald Trump gave a statement calling for unity and condemning white supremacy, a message he’s delivered after other mass-casualty gun massacr

12h

What Ails the Right Isn’t (Just) Racism

What if the left was right on race? That’s the question Jane Coaston posed to movement conservatives in Vox . She was mulling claims from the right that the GOP would never have united around a man like President Donald Trump if not for what many Republicans see as decades of unfair accusations of racism against figures such as George W. Bush, John McCain, and Mitt Romney. Yet long before any suc

12h

Trump Wants Social Media to Prevent Shootings. Experts Say It’s the Wrong Approach.

President Donald Trump called on social media companies, in partnership with law enforcement agencies, “to develop tools that can detect mass shooters before they strike.” But experts say even the most advanced predictive AI systems aren't ready to spot shooters and could be used to target the wrong people.

12h

How We Brought Our Understanding of Gravity Down to Earth

From Newton's “Principia” to today's dauntingly weird notions about the so-called multiverse, gravity has proven to be frustratingly difficult to comprehend, but science writer Richard Panek does his best in an entertaining history of our attempts to understand a force that is as familiar as it is elusive.

12h

Bending the rules: A revolutionary new way for metals to be malleable

For nearly 100 years, scientists thought they understood everything there was to know about how metals bend. They were wrong. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have demonstrated that the rules of metal-bending aren't so hard and fast after all. Their surprising discovery not only upends previous notions about how metals deform, but could help guide the creation of stronger, more d

12h

A new method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms to inform future treatment

This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in mice.Stem cells hold the key to wound healing, as they develop into specialized cell types throughout the body — including in teeth. Now an international team of researchers has found a mechanism that could offer a potential novel solution to tooth repair.

12h

Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food

Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.

12h

The brain inspires a new type of artificial intelligence

Using advanced experiments on neuronal cultures and large scale simulations, scientists at Bar-Ilan University have demonstrated a new type of ultrafast artifical intelligence algorithms — based on the very slow brain dynamics — which outperform learning rates achieved to date by state-of-the-art learning algorithms. In an article in Scientific Reports, the researchers rebuild the bridge between

12h

Disrupted genetic clocks in schizophrenia-affected brains reveal clues to the disease

Researchers studying schizophrenia-affected brains have discovered that the daily timing of gene expression is highly disrupted in the region responsible for cognition and memory. The findings could help reveal previously missed genetic links to the disease.

12h

Manipulating the visibility of barriers to improve spatial navigation efficiency and cognitive mapping

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48098-0

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Horses associate individual human voices with the valence of past interactions: a behavioural and electrophysiological study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47960-5

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Diet-related selectivity of macroplastic ingestion in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the eastern Mediterranean

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48086-4 Diet-related selectivity of macroplastic ingestion in green turtles ( Chelonia mydas ) in the eastern Mediterranean

12h

The Electro-Optical Performance of Silver Nanowire Networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47777-2

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Extending Cardiac Functional Assessment with Respiratory-Resolved 3D Cine MRI

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47869-z

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MMP12 Inhibits Corneal Neovascularization and Inflammation through Regulation of CCL2

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47831-z

12h

What To Feed Locusts

Researchers at Arizona State University are studying locusts in hopes of finding better ways of preventing swarms from destroying crops. (Image credit: Joe Palca/NPR)

13h

Trump Passed the Tax Cuts. Now He’s Undermining Them.

In the year and a half since President Donald Trump signed the $1.5 trillion Republican tax cut , polling shows that the law has produced two unexpected results. The first is that, according to most surveys taken before and after the law’s passage, Congress gave the nation an enormous tax cut it didn’t want and hasn’t come to appreciate. The second and far more stunning discovery is that few Amer

13h

What is geoengineering—and why should you care?

As the threats of climate change grow, we’re all likely to hear more and more about the possibilities, and dangers, of geoengineering. Here’s what it means.

13h

Huawei launches own operating system to rival Android

Chinese telecom giant Huawei unveiled its own operating system on Friday, as it faces the threat of losing access to Android systems amid escalating US-China trade tensions.

13h

Australia pledges to stop exporting its trash

Australia pledged Friday to stop exporting recyclable waste amid global concerns about plastic polluting the oceans and increasing pushback from Asian nations against accepting trash.

13h

Super Typhoon Lekima barrels towards China

China issued a red alert for incoming Super Typhoon Lekima which is expected to batter eastern Zhejiang province early Saturday with high winds and torrential rainfall.

13h

Fagudvalgsformænd: Vigtigt med kompensation for fagudvalgsarbejde

Lægeforeningen vil have kompensation til læger for deres arbejde i Medicinrådet. To fagudvalgsformænd er enige. De oplever dog allerede en tidsmæssig kompensation fra arbejdsgiveren, men måske burde regningen ligge hos Medicinrådet og ikke på hospitalsafdelingen.

13h

Skrønen om de dataløse kommuner

Der har aldrig været flere data i kommunerne, end der er i dag. Problemet er alle udfordringerne, der gør det svært at sætte data i spil, skriver kommunalsdirektør Annemarie Schou Zacho-Broe.

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The Computer Scientist's Creed

We are beholden to ourselves, as a computationally literate entity, to create artificial intelligence and synthetic life. To refuse to do so is to doom ourselves to oblivion. We must create a more robust form of existence; something outside the whims of chemistry and biology. We must cast off the shackles of mortality and inscribe our spirit upon the canvas of infinity. The mechanisms that we cre

14h

Ændring i vaccine-betaling kan få stor betydning for lunge- og allergiafdelinger

Når patienter fremover får gratis vaccination på bl.a. lungeafdelingerne – og selv skal betale hos egen læge – vil det skabe større travlhed på hospitalerne, siger overlæge. Men lægerne skal holde fast i, at det er lægerne – ikke patienter – der bestemmer, siger politiker.

14h

Stig Krarup Petersen er ansat som ledende overlæge på Sydvestjysk Sygehus

Efter 15 måneder som konstitueret ledende overlæge på øre-, næse- og halsafdelingen på Sydvestjysk Sygehus, har Stig Krarup Petersen sagt ja til en fastansættelse.

14h

VOXPOP: Sådan behandler kirurgerne skulderbrud hos ældre

På landets store hospitaler er der en klar tendens for, hvilken behandling ældre patienter med to-parts frakturer på skulderen får. Tre ortopædkirurgiske overlæger forklarer.

14h

Blommors hörsel

Många av oss har väl läst historier om hur gamla gummor pratar med sina krukväxter eller om hur växter reagerar på olika slags musik. Men man har också gjort olika vetenskapliga försök över hur växter kan uppfatta ljud. Senast har israeliska forskare (Veits och medarbetare) visat hur blommor av ett slags nattljus reagerar på surret av bin med att öka sockerhalten i sin nektar. Blommorna är mekanis

14h

Ortopædkirurger: Vi bevæger os væk fra kirurgien

Ortopædkirurgerne vælger i stigende grad at behandle konservativt frem for kirurgisk. Det er blevet en trend, siger Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber.

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Ny forskning fastslår: Kirurgi ved skulderbrud er unødvendigt

Nyt forskningsstudie slår fast, at ældre mennesker, der får skulderbrud kan undvære operation. Det glæder ortopædkirurger.

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Ny klinik hjælper sportsfolk med diabetes med at holde styr på blodsukkeret

Ny klinik i Aarhus hjælper sportsudøvere med at få styr på blodsukkeret. På sigt skal det også gavne alle med type 1-diabetes, der dyrker motion.

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16h

The return of Mitch McConnell’s campaign Twitter account

Twitter unlocked the Team Mitch account on Friday, two days after it shared a video of protestors screaming obscenities outside the Senate Majority Leader's home.

16h

Enormous frogs heave rocks to build tadpole ‘nests’

Nature, Published online: 09 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02411-zHuge amphibians’ engineering works protect their offspring from predators and swift currents.

16h

Can we eat Big Macs and still avoid climate chaos?

Not everyone needs to become a vegetarian, much less vegan, to keep the planet from overheating, but it would probably make things a lot easier if they did.

16h

Trump administration re-authorizes 'cyanide bombs' to kill wildlife

US President Donald Trump's administration has re-authorized the use of controversial poison traps known as "cyanide bombs" to kill wild foxes, coyotes and feral dogs despite overwhelming opposition from conservation groups.

16h

Trash for tickets on Indonesia's 'plastic bus'

Dozens of people clutching bags full of plastic bottles and disposable cups queue at a busy bus terminal in the Indonesian city of Surabaya—where passengers can swap trash for travel tickets.

16h

Hidden mysteries lie in wait inside Kenya's fossil treasury

The only hint that something extraordinary lay inside the plain wooden drawer in an unassuming office behind Nairobi National Museum was a handwritten note stuck to the front: "Pull Carefully".

16h

Trump administration re-authorizes 'cyanide bombs' to kill wildlife

US President Donald Trump's administration has re-authorized the use of controversial poison traps known as "cyanide bombs" to kill wild foxes, coyotes and feral dogs despite overwhelming opposition from conservation groups.

16h

World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young

The first example of "nest"-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog, has been described in a new article in the Journal of Natural History, and could explain why they have grown to be giant.

16h

World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young

The first example of "nest"-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog, has been described in a new article in the Journal of Natural History, and could explain why they have grown to be giant.

16h

Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology

The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by a team of McGill researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular organisms.

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Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology

The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by a team of McGill researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular organisms.

16h

A genetic chaperone for healthy aging?

Researchers at the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging. It's a protein that controls muscle integrity, lifespan and levels of an essential sugar. How does one protein have that much power?

16h

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

Attaching its head to its tail to form a ring, a 3-millimeter larva of the goldenrod gall midge squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section, swelling it and raising the pressure like …

16h

Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells

You know you have a skeleton, but did you know that your cells have skeletons, too? Cellular skeletons, or cytoskeletons, are shapeshifting networks of tiny protein filaments, enabling cells to propel themselves, carry cargo, and divide. Now, an interdisciplinary team of Caltech researchers has designed a way to study and manipulate the cytoskeleton in test tubes in the lab. Understanding how cell

17h

Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife

Destruction of tropical rainforests reduces many unprotected habitats to small fragments of remnant forests within agricultural lands, and to date, these remnant forest fragments have been largely disregarded as wildlife habitat.

17h

Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs

Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in Cell Research.

17h

Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells

You know you have a skeleton, but did you know that your cells have skeletons, too? Cellular skeletons, or cytoskeletons, are shapeshifting networks of tiny protein filaments, enabling cells to propel themselves, carry cargo, and divide. Now, an interdisciplinary team of Caltech researchers has designed a way to study and manipulate the cytoskeleton in test tubes in the lab. Understanding how cell

17h

Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife

Destruction of tropical rainforests reduces many unprotected habitats to small fragments of remnant forests within agricultural lands, and to date, these remnant forest fragments have been largely disregarded as wildlife habitat.

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Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs

Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in Cell Research.

17h

London’s Falling, and a U.S. Trade Deal Won’t Save It

If there is light at the end of the Brexit tunnel, Brexiteers say, it’s this: Britain, finally unshackled from the stringent restraints of the European Union, will soon be able to go out and strike its own trade deals, and realize its dream of becoming a “ truly global Britain .” Although Brexit hasn’t happened yet, global Britain’s first test has begun . This week, British Trade Secretary Liz Tr

17h

Automatically chlorinating water at public taps cuts child diarrhoea by almost a quarter in urban Bangladesh

A novel water treatment device that delivers chlorine automatically via public taps without the need for electricity, reduced child diarrhoea by 23% compared with controls (156 cases out of 2,073 child measurements [7.5%] vs 216/2,145 [10%]) over 14 months in two urban neighbourhoods of Bangladesh, according to a randomised trial following more than 1,000 children published in The Lancet Global He

17h

Ten years of icy data show the flow of heat from the arctic seafloor

Scientists have taken the temperature of a huge expanse of seafloor in the Arctic Ocean in new research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada. The study, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, is accompanied by the release of a large marine heat flow dataset collected by the USGS from an ice island drifting in the Arctic Ocean between 1963 and 1973. These nev

17h

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

Attaching its head to its tail to form a ring, a 3-millimeter larva of the goldenrod gall midge squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section, swelling it and raising the pressure like an inner tube.

17h

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

Attaching its head to its tail to form a ring, a 3-millimeter larva of the goldenrod gall midge squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section, swelling it and raising the pressure like an inner tube.

17h

Flere danskere får gonorré: Nu kan en vaccine være på vej

Amerikanske forskere har opdaget, hvordan kønssygdommen snyder vores immunforsvar.

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Photos of the Week: Pikachu Outbreak, Dinosaur Crossing, Ducky Derby

Clashes in Kyrgyzstan, the Pan American Games in Peru, Iowa State Fair preparations, the Amsterdam Canal Pride Parade, memorials for shooting victims in the U.S., the Jember Fashion Carnival in Indonesia, animal rescue in Colombia, the Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, Hiroshima memorials in Japan, a massive geode in Spain, Yemen’s ongoing civil war, the Wacken Open Air heavy metal festival in Ge

17h

Conservative treatment with a sling can replace surgery for shoulder fractures

An arm in a sling cures a shoulder fracture just as well as an operation with plates and screws. This is shown by a comprehensive study from Aarhus University in Denmark which forms part of a Nordic research collaboration.

17h

Oral appliances may be highly effective in treating a type of sleep apnea

Certain traits may define a type of obstructive sleep apnea that can be effectively treated with an oral appliance, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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The mind-muscle connection: For aesthetes, not athletes?

The 'mind-muscle connection.' Ancient lore for bodybuilders, latest buzz for Instragram fitness followers. But when the goal is muscle performance rather than growth alone, does the idea still carry any weight?Published in Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, new analysis suggests that to lift heavier, or longer, it is better to focus on moving the weight itself — not your muscles.

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Amazon Deforestation Shot Up by 278% Last Month, Satellite Data Show

The world's largest carbon offset is losing ground — fast.

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Cancer Patients Get Rare Blood Infection After Nurse Dilutes Opioids with Tap Water

Half a dozen cancer patients in New York developed a rare infection after they received injectable opioids that a nurse had diluted with tap water, according to a new report.

17h

Underwater Temple Revealed by Thailand's Extreme Drought

Thousands are flocking to the temple to pray and take pictures.

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We Could Be Witnessing the Death of a Tectonic Plate, Says Earth Scientist

A gaping hole in a dying tectonic plate beneath the ocean along the West Coast of the United States may be wreaking havoc at Earth's surface, but not in a way most people might expect.

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Mysterious, Ancient Radio Signals Keep Pelting Earth. Astronomers Designed an AI to Hunt Them Down.

Sudden shrieks of radio waves from deep space keep slamming into our radio telescopes, spattering those instruments' recordings with confusing data. And now, astronomers are using artificial intelligence to detect those outbursts.

17h

Thief Steals 'Cursed' Medieval Bell from 'Harry Potter' Island in Scotland

The bronze bell is a religious relic that may be 1,000 years old.

17h

86 Skeletons Unearthed from Hidden Medieval Graveyard in Wales

Archaeologists discovered dozens of bodies in coffin-like stone boxes called cists.

17h

3 Physicists Win $3 Million Prize for 'Supergravity' Discovery

Supergravity has inspired physicists for decades and may contain deep truths about the nature of reality.

17h

Bizarre 'Nanoseaweed' Is the Thinnest Gold in the World

The thinnest gold in the world will, sadly, not be adorning your fingers anytime soon.

17h

This Parrot Stood 3 Feet Tall and Ruled the Roost in New Zealand Forests 19 Million Years Ago

It was the largest parrot that ever lived, and is the only known giant parrot in the world.

17h

A Tiny Magma Blob May Rewrite Earth's History of Plate Tectonics

An International team of scientists finds evidence that Earth began recycling itself more than 3 billion years ago.

17h

A Woman Needed Her Hands and Legs Amputated After Contracting Infection from Dog 'Kisses'

A little lick from a puppy may have led to a life-threatening infection for one woman in Ohio, who ended up needing her hands and legs amputated.

17h

Hidden Water Found on Hawaii’s Kilauea Could Mean Explosive Eruptions

Water on Kilauea could trigger more explosive eruptions.

17h

Thousands of Tardigrades Stranded on the Moon After Lunar Lander Crash

When you look up at the moon, there may now be a few thousand water bears looking back at you.

17h

No Tie Between Mental Illness and Gun Violence

President Trump called for better identification of people with mental illness as a way to stop gun violence and mass shootings. But what would that do?

17h

Firearms Are 2nd-Leading Cause of Death in Kids and Teens

Here are the facts on the U.S. children and teens killed by guns.

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The Key to Life's Emergence? Bubbles, New Study Argues

They just want to create order in this chaotic world.

17h

'Lost' Statue of Alexander the Great (Minus the Nose) Turns Up in Museum Warehouse

No one knew this bust featured Alexander the Great, until now.

17h

Maya Civilization Was Ultraviolent, Even Before Its Collapse

Hieroglyphic inscription may overturn view of the Maya.

17h

Is anyone at all concerned about the global "Democratic Recession" the world is experiencing these last 13 years?

And also, how many years do you think we have left before this "Democratic Recession" transitions into an Age of Orwellian Authortiarianism and Autocracy? Some argue that we are in the early stages, but how long do we have before it reaches the same or exceeds the level of Oppression the citizens of Mainland China and North Korea live under? how long before it gets that bad if not worse . Where i

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Giving up just half your hamburgers can really help the climate

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Electrifying Your Home Is Good for You

submitted by /u/POMCube [link] [comments]

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IPCC Special Report on Land

Thread for discussions of the new special report. [Boosting a comment from alan2102]. Climate Change and Land An IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems Land degradation accelerates global climate change. Al Jazeera English Published on Aug 8, 2019 New UN report highli

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Invasiv plante lukker danske søer: »De kan blive op til 10 meter lange«

PLUS. Nu skal en aggressiv, sydamerikansk akvarieplante udryddes fra to søer på Sjælland. Den ser fredelig ud, men kan både kvæle andre planter og fisk og medvirke til oversvømmelser.

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Could activating these immune cells protect against MS?

New research in mice suggests that stimulating a particular group of immune cells could counteract the autoimmune reaction in multiple sclerosis.

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The CDC says more prescriptions of overdose reversal drug naloxone are needed

Pharmacies only dispensed an average of one naloxone prescription for every 69 prescriptions for high-dose opioids between 2012 and 2018. (Wikimedia Commons/) The overdose reversal drug naloxone isn't new—it was first approved to treat opioid overdose in the United States in 1971, so first responders and emergency room physicians have been using it for decades. But as overdose deaths and the numb

20h

How Apple Pay Buttons Can Make Websites Less Safe

Apple Pay itself is safe. But the way websites implement it can cause serious problems.

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A closer look at Samsung's new gadgets, including the Note 10 smartphone and Galaxy Book S

The smaller Galaxy Note 10 is the same size as the largest iPhone. (Stan Horaczek/) Samsung makes a ton of gadgets and the company updated a wide swath of them this week. Those updates included its massive Galaxy Note 10 smartphone and a unique Windows 10 laptop with a mobile processor inside. Here’s a rundown of everything Samsung announced as well as a look at how it compares to competing produ

20h

Pete Buttigieg: Racism Isn’t Something That ‘Happened a Long Time Ago’

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg was ready for the question. It’s one that has dogged the 37-year-old since his long-shot White House bid caught fire in the spring, launching him into the top tier of 2020 Democratic candidates: How does he remedy his near-nonexistent support among black voters? Speaking onstage at the National Association of Black Journalists’ convention in Miami, Buttig

20h

Uber and Lyft Suggest the Days of Cheap Rides Could Be Over

Both continue to record big losses, but executives at the companies hinted in recent calls that they are trying to cut back on discounts, and subtly raise prices.

20h

Liquid-crystalline phase transitions in lipid droplets are related to cellular states and specific organelle association [Cell Biology]

Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles comprising a central hub for cellular lipid metabolism and trafficking. This role is tightly associated with their interactions with several cellular organelles. Here, we provide a systematic and quantitative structural description of LDs in their native state in HeLa cells enabled by cellular cryoelectron…

21h

MiR223-3p promotes synthetic lethality in BRCA1-deficient cancers [Medical Sciences]

Defects in DNA repair give rise to genomic instability, leading to neoplasia. Cancer cells defective in one DNA repair pathway can become reliant on remaining repair pathways for survival and proliferation. This attribute of cancer cells can be exploited therapeutically, by inhibiting the remaining repair pathway, a process termed synthetic…

21h

The crystal structure of human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein [Biochemistry]

Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) plays an essential role in lipid metabolism, especially in the biogenesis of very low-density lipoproteins and chylomicrons via the transfer of neutral lipids and the assembly of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MTP has been hindered by a lack of structural…

21h

iASPP mediates p53 selectivity through a modular mechanism fine-tuning DNA recognition [Medical Sciences]

The most frequently mutated protein in human cancer is p53, a transcription factor (TF) that regulates myriad genes instrumental in diverse cellular outcomes including growth arrest and cell death. Cell context-dependent p53 modulation is critical for this life-or-death balance, yet remains incompletely understood. Here we identify sequence signatures enriched in…

21h

21h

Biomarker to avoid safety risk for the sleep deprived

New research published today in the The Journal of Physiology shows that a range of eye-movement tests provide a reliable biomarker of individual acute sleep loss.

21h

Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs

Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in Cell Research.

21h

Flight of the Midge Larva: How These Tiny Creatures Blast Off

via GIPHY Imagine trying to bend an inflated bicycle tire tube in half. It's a bit difficult, though not impossible. When you let go, the pressure inside snaps the tube back to its normal shape, as if spring-loaded. What you're doing when you bend the tube is essentially storing energy inside it, to be released all at once when you let go. The trick isn't very useful when it comes to bike tires, o

21h

Report: Facebook offering 'millions' to publishers for news

Facebook is reportedly in talks with news publishers to offer "millions of dollars" for the rights to publish their material on its site. The move follows years of criticism over its growing …

22h

World’s largest frog builds its own ponds using heavy rocks

To build nests, goliath frogs move heavy rocks to create little ponds in the middle of streams, which may explain how these frogs have evolved to be so enormous

22h

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