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nyheder2019august12

Kary Mullis, Inventor of the PCR Technique, Dies

The Nobel laureate was a proponent of LSD, a consultant for O.J. Simpson's legal defense, and the creator of a company that infused jewelry with celebrities' DNA.

20h

U.S. Significantly Weakens Endangered Species Act

The Trump administration announced far-reaching revisions to the Endangered Species Act, which was first enacted in 1973.

6h

Store ildkugler over Danmark i nat: Sådan får du det vildeste stjerneskuds-show

Skyfrit vejr giver gode muligheder for at se meteorsværm i nat.

5h

How do we decrease gun-related deaths? Make it harder for 'high-risk' individuals to buy weapons.

The studies, conducted by researchers at Boston University, compared the efficacy of different types of gun laws across the U.S. The results showed that jurisdictions with a combination of laws that restrict who can buy guns experience relatively fewer gun-related deaths. President Donald Trump recently expressed support for expanding federal gun background checks, though it's unclear whether the

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A Cure for Ebola, A Home-Speaker Cyberattack, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

13min

Two of four Ebola treatments prove highly effective in a clinical trial

An Ebola field trial in Congo is shifting its focus toward treatments that preliminary data suggest can help prevent death from the disease.

15min

Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed

The study is the first to put antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance into an evolutionary context. The findings will help to guide the future discovery of new antibiotics and antibiotic alternatives which are medicines that are vitally needed given the current global threat of antimicrobial resistance.

22min

Impact of largescale tree death on carbon storage

Largescale 'disturbances', including fires, harvesting, windstorms and insect outbreaks, which kill large patches of forest, are responsible for more than a tenth of tree death worldwide, according to new research.

22min

Smoldering spots in the brain may signal severe MS

Aided by a high-powered brain scanner and a 3D printer, researchers peered inside the brains of hundreds of multiple sclerosis patients and found that dark rimmed spots representing ongoing, 'smoldering' inflammation, called chronic active lesions, may be a hallmark of more aggressive and disabling forms of the disease.

22min

Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees — such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer — Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

22min

Potential for Rift Valley fever virus transmission in Colorado livestock

Researchers found that mosquitoes that could transmit the virus were abundant in feedlots and at nearby sites in Northern Colorado.

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From 1% To 30% Solar Power Without Losing Farmland

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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The Age of Solar Energy Abundance Is Coming in Hot

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Ice-making submarine could help restore Arctic

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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The US Navy says no to touchscreens—maybe automakers should, too

submitted by /u/Firoscos [link] [comments]

27min

How to do two-factor authentication like a pro

"Where did I leave the spare key to my email account?" is a phrase you can actually say. (Brina Blum via Unsplash/) If your level of anxiety over online security and privacy is on the healthy side, you probably already have two-factor authentication (2FA) set up for your main accounts. If you don't, you should seriously consider activating it to protect yourself from phishing, hacks, and anybody

38min

The Twisty Physics of Simone Biles' Historic Triple-Double

The star gymnast appears to defy physics in her epic tumbling pass. Here’s how she managed to jump, twist, and flip her way into sports legend.

49min

Astronomers Spot Mysterious Flash From Our Galaxy’s Supermassive Black Hole

The second of three images of ESO’s GigaGalaxy Zoom project is a new and wonderful 340-million-pixel vista of the central parts of our galactic home, a 34 by 20-degree wide image that provides us with a view as experienced by amateur astronomers around the world. Taken by Stéphane Guisard, an ESO engineer and world-renowned astrophotographer, from Cerro Paranal, home of ESO’s Very Large Telescope

52min

Bosch Wants 3D Displays in the Car

Bosch aims to make your car’s instrument panel a 3D display, no goggles required. Crucial warnings would be in 3D; for instance, the forward collision warning — BRAKE! — but not the current fuel level, and perhaps not a low-fuel warning. A 3D warning would visually float above the rest of the instrument panel. The 3D notification could also be used for other time-sensitive warnings such as a shar

52min

This Company Creates Virtual People for You to Fire in VR

Sorry, Barry Firing employees can be one of the toughest tasks a manager faces. So, to make it a bit easier, workplace training company Talespin created Barry — an artificially intelligent virtual character you can practice firing over and over again. Bad Reaction Barry’s reaction to being fired can range from quiet sobs to angry yelling — in other words, the VR employee can react however a human

1h

Do newly discovered mating habits of female Tasmanian devils help or hurt the species?

Wild female Tasmanian devils have mating habits that could pose a challenge for conservationists trying to maintain genetic diversity in species recovery programs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Sydney.

1h

Hackers Are Roasting a Terrible Sponsored Talk at Black Hat

Buzzwords Cybersecurity experts at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas last week ridiculed a bizarre, sponsored presentation by a company called Crown Sterling to the point that its materials got taken off of the conference website. Normally, presentations at the conference are well-vetted. But Crown Sterling paid for the right to present, reports Motherboard — and during its talk, the

1h

Verizon selling Tumblr to Automattic, the owner of WordPress.com

Verizon bought Tumblr owner Yahoo in 2017, is now selling Tumblr to Automattic.

1h

Minecraft’s ‘Super Duper Graphics Pack’ is canceled due to technical difficulties

Minecraft developer Mojang is officially canceling the game’s anticipated “Super Duper Graphics Pack,” originally announced back at E3 2017 as a downloadable update for the popular …

1h

Last Chance: Enter Our Top 10 Innovations Contest Today

Submit your new product by the end of this week to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2019 competition.

1h

CSU team uncovers potential for Rift Valley fever virus transmission in Colorado livestock

Colorado State University researchers found that mosquitoes that could transmit the virus were abundant in feedlots and at nearby sites in Northern Colorado.

1h

Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees — such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer — Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

1h

Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed

The study is the first to put antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance into an evolutionary context. The findings will help to guide the future discovery of new antibiotics and antibiotic alternatives which are medicines that are vitally needed given the current global threat of antimicrobial resistance.

1h

Gut-brain connection helps explain how overeating leads to obesity

A multi-institutional team reveals a previously unknown gut-brain connection that helps explain how those extra servings lead to weight gain.

1h

Osteoporosis drugs linked to reduced risk of premature death

A large cohort study has revealed a common osteoporosis drug significantly decreases premature mortality risk, likely related to a reduction in bone loss.

1h

Colombia confirms that dreaded fungus has hit its banana plantations

World’s largest exporting region makes first confirmation of disease

1h

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak

Drugs tested in the Democratic Republic of Congo are effective in treating Ebola, scientists say. They have run a study in the midst of a deadly epidemic and in the face of armed assaults on doctors. (Image credit: Jerome Delay/AP)

1h

Google’s Hate Speech-Detecting AI is Biased Against Black People

Self-Defeating Artificial intelligence algorithms meant to detect and moderate hate speech online, including the Perspective algorithm built by Google, have built-in biases against black people. Scientists from the University of Washington found alarming anti-black bias in the AI tools that are supposed to protect marginalized communities from online abuse, according to New Scientist — demonstrat

1h

Machine learning for damaging mutations prediction

Scientists from Russia and India have proposed a novel machine-learning-based method for predicting damaging mutations in the protein atomic structure. The new method targets human membrane proteins and will help to develop personalized medicine approaches. The results of their research were published in Plos One journal

1h

Gut-brain connection helps explain how overeating leads to obesity

A multi-institutional team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reveals a previously unknown gut-brain connection that helps explain how those extra servings lead to weight gain.

1h

The Origin of Life May Not Be as Coincidental as Scientists Once Thought

Researchers find that membranes may have helped the building blocks of life come together. EarlyEarth2.jpg Image credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab Creature Monday, August 12, 2019 – 15:30 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — Experts believe the building blocks of life first bumped into each other about 3.5 billion years ago. This serendipitous collision som

1h

Finally, some good news about Ebola: Two new treatments dramatically lower the death rate in a trial

The therapies, both monoclonal antibody preparations, will now be used to treat all patients

2h

Trump administration weakens Endangered Species Act

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02439-1 Changes to the United States' landmark conservation law make it easier to strip threatened species of the strongest protections.

2h

Trendy e-scooters might not be as green as they seem

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02421-x For a small carbon footprint, a bicycle might be a better choice than one of the battery-powered scooters littering many cities.

2h

First cells may have emerged because building blocks of proteins stabilized membranes

Scientists have discovered that the building blocks of proteins can stabilize cell membranes. This finding may explain how the first cells emerged from the primordial soup billions of years ago: The protein building blocks could have stabilized cell membranes against salt and ions that were present in ancient oceans. In addition, membranes may have been a site for these precursor molecules to co-l

2h

How Troxler's fading plays tricks on your brain

Troxler's effect or "fading" causes images to disappear from your field of vision. Scientists don't have a full understanding yet of how this works. The effect is linked to the way neurons are adapted by the visual system. None Why do we some times see things that aren't there? Delighted by stories of vengeful ghosts and spirits, we largely assume there's a world outside of our regular field of v

2h

Elusive Asgard Archaea Finally Cultured in Lab

The 12-year-long endeavor reveals Prometheoarchaeum as a tentacled cell, living in a symbiotic relationship with methane-producing microbes.

2h

Scientists Found a Way to Create Millions of Virtual Universes

Scientists used a supercomputer to simulate the creation and evolution of 8 million virtual universes , each containing 12 million galaxies — and in the process, they discovered something new about the universe we actually live in. Galaxies use hydrogen gas to form stars, but some galaxies stop creating new stars even though they still have plenty of hydrogen gas. Previously, scientists attribute

2h

Cultural factors affect Chinese Americans' health, according to Rutgers research

A compilation of 17 research papers present an unprecedented exploration of cultural factors concerning Chinese Americans' health and provide comprehensive, multigenerational insight into the lives of Chinese Americans.

2h

AI tool characterizes a song's genre & provides insights regarding perception music

An artificial intelligence tool developed by USC computer science researchers can characterize a song's genre and provides increased understanding how we perceive and process music. Applications include how music content is marketed, consumed and tagged; neuropsychology and the mechanisms of human thought; and affective computing systems that impact human emotions.

2h

Natural-gas leaks are important source of greenhouse gas emissions in Los Angeles

Scientist have found that methane in L.A.'s air correlates with the seasonal use of gas for heating homes and businesses.

2h

Poor fit between job demands, reasoning abilities associated with health conditions

Older workers whose reasoning abilities no longer allow them to meet the demands of their jobs may be more likely to develop chronic health conditions and retire early, which may not be ideal for the employee or employer, according to new research.

2h

Osteoporosis drugs linked to reduced risk of premature death

A large cohort study has revealed a common osteoporosis drug significantly decreases premature mortality risk, likely related to a reduction in bone loss.

2h

Research shows human cells assembling into fractal-like clusters

In a finding that could shed light on tissue formation, wound healing and cancer spread, a new study shows that human cells follow the same rules as non-living particles to form fractal-like branching structures.

2h

How Troxler's fading plays tricks on your brain

Troxler's effect or "fading" causes images to disappear from your field of vision. Scientists don't have a full understanding yet of how this works. The effect is linked to the way neurons are adapted by the visual system. None Why do we some times see things that aren't there? Delighted by stories of vengeful ghosts and spirits, we largely assume there's a world outside of our regular field of v

2h

Mapping the structure of protein aggregate that leads to Alzheimer's

A research team has mapped the molecular structure of an aggressive protein aggregate that causes acceleration of Alzheimer's disease.

2h

Natural-gas leaks are important source of greenhouse gas emissions in Los Angeles

Scientist have found that methane in L.A.'s air correlates with the seasonal use of gas for heating homes and businesses.

2h

Leishmania virulence strategy unveiled

A team has made a scientific breakthrough regarding the virulence strategy employed by the Leishmania parasite to infect cells of the immune system. This microorganism is responsible for Leishmaniasis, a chronic parasitic disease that affects more than 12 million people worldwide.

2h

Ebola Is Now Curable. Here’s How the New Treatments Work

Officials cut short a clinical trial in the Democratic Republic of Congo after two treatments appear to greatly increase patients' survival rates.

2h

Scientists Call for Do-Over for Rules on Creating "CRISPR Babies"

On Tuesday, an international commission will meet to develop less ambiguous guidelines for embryo editing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Detention basins could catch more than stormwater

Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to civil and environmental engineers.

2h

This Nuclear Reactor Could Be Shipped to Mars by 2022

Space Power Members from the Kilopower project — a NASA and Department of Energy co-initiative working to develop fission power systems for future space exploration — says that one of its reactor could be ready to be shipped to Mars or another distant location by 2022. “I think we could do this in three years and be ready for flight,” project lead Patrick McClure said late last month, as quoted b

2h

Natural-gas leaks are important source of greenhouse gas emissions in Los Angeles

In discussions of anthropogenic climate change, carbon dioxide generally gets the spotlight, but it is not the only greenhouse gas spewed into the atmosphere by human activity, nor is it the most potent.

2h

NASA-NOAA satellite views massive Tropical Storm Krosa

Tropical Storm Krosa is a large tropical cyclone. When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it captured a visible image of the massive storm.

2h

Poor fit between job demands, reasoning abilities associated with health conditions

Older workers whose reasoning abilities no longer allow them to meet the demands of their jobs may be more likely to develop chronic health conditions and retire early, which may not be ideal for the employee or employer, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

2h

Microplastics in arctic snow suggest widespread air pollution

Wind plays a role in carrying microplastics (shreds of plastic less than five millimeters long) to both the snowy streets of European cities and remote areas of the Arctic Ocean – where ecosystems are already stressed by the effects of climate change. The high concentrations found in snow samples from disparate regions suggest microplastics – which may contain

2h

Northern tropical dry trend may just be normal variation: scientists

Recently, an international team led by Prof. TAN Liangcheng from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a 2700-yr rainfall record of the northern central Indo-Pacific region.

2h

Biologists pioneer first method to decode gene expression

Biologists have developed the first system for determining gene expression based on machine learning. Considered a type of genetic Rosetta Stone for biologists, the new method leverages algorithms trained on a set of known plant genes to determine a species-wide set of transcribed genes, or 'expressome,' then creates an atlas of expressible genes. The method carries implications across biology, fr

2h

Antiseptic resistance in bacteria could lead to next-gen plastics

The molecular machinery used by bacteria to resist chemicals designed to kill them could also help produce precursors for a new generation of nylon and other polymers, according to new research by scientists from Australia and the UK. 'Resistance to artificial antiseptics appears to be a lucky accident for the bacteria, and it could also be useful for humans,' says Professor Ian Paulsen of Austral

2h

Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe

New research led by Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London has resolved a pig paradox. Archaeological evidence has shown that pigs were domesticated in the Near East and as such, modern pigs should resemble Near Eastern wild boar. They do not. Instead, the genetic signatures of modern European domestic pigs resemble European wild boar.

2h

New study finds that race is a factor in investment judgments

According to new research released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, race influences the investment judgments of asset allocators. Experts believe this may contribute to the stark racial disparities in the world of institutional investing.

2h

Pinpointing how cells regulate long-lasting memories

The brain has a knack for safekeeping our most treasured memories, from a first kiss to a child's birth. In a new study in mouse cells, Columbia neuroscientists have mapped some of the molecular machinery that helps the brain maintain these kinds of long-term memories.

2h

Mapping the effects of drought on vulnerable populations

The greater frequency of droughts, combined with underlying economic, social, and environmental risks means that dry spells have an increasingly destructive impact on vulnerable populations, and particularly on children in the developing world. In a new study by researchers from IIASA and the USA, the team set out to map at-risk populations at the global scale.

2h

First cells may have emerged because building blocks of proteins stabilized membranes

Scientists have discovered that the building blocks of proteins can stabilize cell membranes. This finding may explain how the first cells emerged from the primordial soup billions of years ago: The protein building blocks could have stabilized cell membranes against salt and ions that were present in ancient oceans. In addition, membranes may have been a site for these precursor molecules to co-l

2h

Moonquake Detectives Decode Pattern Left on Lunar Surface Jan. 3, 1975

It seems that at some point after astronauts visited the moon, a powerful moonquake sent boulders tumbling across the lunar surface. Here's what they tell us.

2h

Detention basins could catch more than stormwater

Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to Lauren E. McPhillips, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Penn State.

2h

Largest-ever study of coral communities unlocks global solution to save reefs

The largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group of scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other conservation NGOs, government agencies, and universities. The study outlines three viable strategies that can be quickly enacted to help save coral reefs that are threatened

2h

A New Clue to How Life Originated

When Caitlin Cornell looked down her microscope, she saw large bright spots against a black background. They resembled miniatures suns, blazing against the backdrop of space. And when Cornell showed the spots to her supervisor, Sarah Keller , a chemist at the University of Washington, “we got really excited,” she recalls. “It was a bit of an ‘Aha!’ moment.” Those spots, she realized , might help

2h

8 common wild plants that are poisonous to your dog

Keep your hunting dog safe by identifying and avoiding the following plants. (Alex Robinson/) This story originally published on Outdoor Life . Man’s best friend has incredible instincts. We often rely on our dog’s sharp senses and ancient impulses during outdoor pursuits (including everything from bird hunting, to blood trailing deer, to search-and-rescue missions). But any bird hunter with a La

3h

In first-of-its-kind study, researchers highlight hookah health hazards

Hookah waterpipe use has grown in popularity in recent years — 1 in 5 college students in the U.S. and Europe have tried it — but the practice could be more dangerous than other forms of smoking, according to a first-of-its-kind study.

3h

An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. But a research team has identified alternate chemistry that could account for the various pathologies associated with the disease.

3h

Study examines a million corals one by one in urgent call to save reefs

Scientists have completed a landmark study on how to save coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

3h

It's not you, it's the network

The result of the 2016 US presidential election was, for many, a surprise lesson in social perception bias — peoples' tendency to assume that others think as we do, and to underestimate the size and influence of a minority party. Many psychologists attribute the source of these biases to faulty cognitive processes like 'wishful thinking' or 'social projection,' but according to a new study, the s

3h

Bacteria made to mimic cells, form communities

Scientists have found a way to make single-celled bacteria behave like stem cells, differentiating into genetically unique individuals as they divide.

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Southern U.S. Lags North on Disaster Resilience

Though one of the least resilient counties is New York County, or Manhattan — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

These Advanced Life Hacks Are What They Should Have Taught You in School

Have you ever felt like you need to take a class for life? Not a class on the subjects that are normally taught in school, like English or math or history, but rather, something designed to prepare you for more practical matters, like job interviews, career building, memory, productivity, or even just listening? In other words, life hacks . Patience and concentration are in short supply these day

3h

First cells may have emerged because building blocks of proteins stabilized membranes

Life on Earth arose about 4 billion years ago when the first cells formed within a primordial soup of complex, carbon-rich chemical compounds.

3h

Natural-gas leaks are important source of greenhouse gas emissions in Los Angeles

Liyin He, a Caltech graduate student, finds that methane in L.A.'s air correlates with the seasonal use of gas for heating homes and businesses

3h

Researchers first to map structure of protein aggregate that leads to Alzheimer's

A research team including faculty at Binghamton University and University of Colorado Denver are the first to map the molecular structure of an aggressive protein aggregate that causes acceleration of Alzheimer's disease.

3h

Study examines a million corals one by one in urgent call to save reefs

University of California, Irvine biologist Joleah Lamb has contributed one of the largest amounts of data to a landmark study on how to save coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. She is among more than 80 marine researchers worldwide who produced the report. It has been published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

3h

Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe

New research led by Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London has resolved a pig paradox. Archaeological evidence has shown that pigs were domesticated in the Near East and as such, modern pigs should resemble Near Eastern wild boar. They do not. Instead, the genetic signatures of modern European domestic pigs resemble European wild boar.

3h

New study finds that race is a factor in investment judgments

According to new research released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, race influences the investment judgments of asset allocators. Experts believe this may contribute to the stark racial disparities in the world of institutional investing.

3h

First cells may have emerged because building blocks of proteins stabilized membranes

Life on Earth arose about 4 billion years ago when the first cells formed within a primordial soup of complex, carbon-rich chemical compounds.

3h

Mapping the effects of drought on vulnerable populations

The greater frequency of droughts, combined with underlying economic, social and environmental risks, means that dry spells have an increasingly destructive impact on vulnerable populations, and particularly on children in the developing world. In a new study by researchers from IIASA and the U.S., the team set out to map at-risk populations at the global scale.

3h

Northern tropical dry trend may just be normal variation

Rainfall variations in the tropics not only potentially influence 40% of the world's population and the stability of the global ecosystem, but also the global hydrologic cycle and energy balance.

3h

Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients

A robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. The brace should improve patients' quality of life, not only in improving eye contact during conversation, but also in facilitating the use of eyes as a joystick to control movements on a computer,

3h

Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe

New research led by Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London has resolved a pig paradox. Archaeological evidence has shown that pigs were domesticated in the Near East and as such, modern pigs should resemble Near Eastern wild boar. They do not. Instead, the genetic signatures of modern European domestic pigs resemble European wild boar.

3h

Detention basins could catch more than stormwater

Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to civil and environmental engineers.

3h

Diarrhea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals

The gut-infecting bacterium Clostridium difficile is evolving into two separate species, with one group highly adapted to spread in hospitals, according to new research.

3h

Thinnest optical waveguide channels light within just three layers of atoms

Engineers have developed the thinnest optical device in the world — a waveguide that is three layers of atoms thin. The work is a proof of concept for scaling down optical devices to sizes that are orders of magnitude smaller than today's devices. It could lead to the development of higher density, higher capacity photonic chips.

3h

Study finds older adults less distracted by negative information

USC researchers looked at 'emotion-induced blindness,' which refers to distractions caused by emotionally arousing stimuli. In four experiments using a quickly presented sequence of images, they examined how older adults prioritize emotional information. They found both younger and older adults demonstrated emotion-induced blindness, but older adults were more distracted by positive information an

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Chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications

Scientists make hexagonal-boron nitride, a 2D material much stiffer than steel and an excellent conductor of heat, much simpler to modify for applications through a new chemical process.

3h

Android Phone Users Rejoice With New Password-Free Login For Google Services

Companies like Microsoft have been telling us that passwords are dangerous and insecure for years, and leading companies in the tech industry are finally doing something about it. The latest …

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Twitter will now let users subscribe to tweets in an effort to make following conversations easier

Twitter says the feature — announced in a tweet last week — will give iOS and Android users the the option to subscribe to tweets they find interesting and follow conversations more closely.

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Superbug mixes it up to beat ‘last resort’ antibiotic

To combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers are examining how one superbug adapts to fight an antibiotic of last resort. Scientists say they tracked the biochemical changes that the superbug vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) undergo as they adapt to fight the antibiotic, daptomycin, hoping they’ll find clues that prolong the drug’s effectiveness. “We need to get to a stage whe

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Hackers Can Hijack Your Speakers to Play Deafening Noises

Surround Sound The speakers on your phone, computer, and any other internet-connected device can be targeted by hackers to blast out deafening or psychologically-damaging frequencies of sound. A cybersecurity expert named Matt Wixey, from PWC UK, demonstrated that commonplace speakers can be infected with malware that makes them play dangerously high or low-frequency sounds, according to Wired .

3h

Searching for clues to fight antibiotic resistance

To combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers are examining how one superbug adapts to fight an antibiotic of last resort. They're hoping to find clues that can prolong the drug's effectiveness.

3h

Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients

A robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. The brace should improve patients' quality of life, not only in improving eye contact during conversation, but also in facilitating the use of eyes as a joystick to control movements on a computer,

3h

Mosquito 'spit glands' hold key to curbing malaria, study shows

Mosquitoes can harbor thousands of malaria-causing parasites in their bodies, yet while slurping blood from a victim, they transmit just a tiny fraction of them. In an effort to define precisely the location of the parasite bottleneck, scientists say they have discovered that the parasites are stopped by a roadblock along the escape route in the insect's spit glands, a barrier that could potential

3h

Walnuts show protection against ulcerative colitis in early study

Through their complex array of natural compounds and phytochemicals, walnuts provide a multitude of health benefits. A new study says protection against ulcerative colitis may be on that list.

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Inherited pancreatic cancer risk mutation identified

The discovery of the previously unknown mutation could lead to routine testing of individuals with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer to determine if they carry the mutation, occurring in the gene known as RABL3.

3h

How do atoms vibrate in graphene nanostructures?

Researchers have developed a method capable to measure all phonons existing in a nanostructured material. This is a breakthrough in the analysis of nanoscale functional materials and devices.

3h

Structurally complex forests better at carbon sequestration

Forests in the eastern United States that are structurally complex — meaning the arrangement of vegetation is highly varied — sequester more carbon, according to a new study. The study demonstrates for the first time that a forest's structural complexity is a better predictor of carbon sequestration potential than tree species diversity. The discovery may hold implications for the mitigation of

3h

Largest-ever study of coral communities unlocks global solution to save reefs

The largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group of scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other conservation NGOs, government agencies, and universities. The study outlines three viable strategies that can be quickly enacted to help save coral reefs that are threatened

3h

NASA-NOAA satellite views massive Tropical Storm Krosa

Tropical Storm Krosa is a large tropical cyclone. When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it captured a visible image of the massive storm.

3h

An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. But a University of California, Riverside, research team has identified alternate chemistry that could account for the various pathologies associated with the disease.

3h

In first-of-its-kind study, UCI researchers highlight hookah health hazards

Hookah waterpipe use has grown in popularity in recent years – 1 in 5 college students in the U.S. and Europe have tried it – but the practice could be more dangerous than other forms of smoking, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, published recently in Aerosol Science and Technology.

3h

Book: Fat phobia arises from racism and religion

A new book explores the religious and racial origins of society’s obsession with thinness. In Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia (NYU Press, 2019), Sabrina Strings, assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine discusses the stigma of larger—primarily female—body types and how deep racial and religious roots, rather than health concerns, led Wester

3h

Curious Cure: Human Waste

Studies point to the life-saving record of fecal transplants for patients infected with C. diff, despite a recent death. Doctors are now testing the procedure for other conditions.

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What years of playing football do to brain’s white matter

Scientists have discovered a link between dementia, white matter in the brain, and the neurodegenerative disease CTE in former American football players. When it comes to our brain health, both gray and white stuff matter, researchers say. White matter is made up of all the connections linking together the brain’s working neuron cells, collectively known as gray matter. Scientists have long known

3h

Two Ebola drugs show promise amid ongoing outbreak

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02442-6 People who receive either therapy soon after infection have a 90% survival rate, according to data from a clinical trial in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

3h

Environmentalists warn Trump 'weakening' endangered species protections

A new rule will allow officials for the first time to weigh the economic cost of species protection.

3h

The Quantum Computing Party Hasn't Even Started Yet

But your company may already be too late — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Did the mysterious Denisovans make these prehistoric etchings?

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02432-8 Archaeologists have turned up inscribed bones from a site in northern China previously linked to the ancient hominins.

3h

Detention basins could catch more than stormwater

Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to Lauren E. McPhillips, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Penn State.

3h

No sign radiation from a missile explosion has spread beyond Russia

An explosion at a Russian missile testing range led to local spikes in radiation, but it doesn’t seem to have spread to Europe as it did during the Chernobyl incident

4h

New Trump rules would curb U.S. endangered species protections

Changes would allow officials to consider costs, and not just science

4h

New Law Requires “Not for Humans” Label Added to DIY CRISPR Kits

In 2017, biohacker Josiah Zayner famously injected himself with CRISPR gene-editing tech, a move he later admitted to regretting . Now, to prevent any of Zayner’s fellow Californians from following in his footsteps, Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed a bill state senator Ling Ling Chang is calling the first U.S. law to directly regulate CRISPR tech. Chang authored the legislation , which will

4h

Adults who mix cannabis with opioids for pain report higher anxiety, depression

Not a good mix: A researcher has found that adults who combine prescription opioids for severe pain and cannabis report elevated anxiety and depression symptoms, with no increased pain reduction.

4h

Communicating science to policymakers: six strategies for success

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02372-3 Scientists can improve how they inform politicians and other policymakers on how to make decisions, say Hannah Safford and Austin Brown.

4h

Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives

An international team of scientists has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives.

4h

The Quantum Computing Party Hasn't Even Started Yet

But your company may already be too late — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

How mindfulness can help increase your attention span and working memory

submitted by /u/FromTheLabBench [link] [comments]

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Simulation Theory “May Cause the Annihilation of our Universe.”

Hard Reboot If we’re all living inside a complex computer simulation, we should probably accept our fate — lest our universe get unplugged. At least, that’s according to Nanyang Technological University philosophy professor Preston Greene, who penned a New York Times op-ed arguing that we should stop looking for evidence of simulation theory — because proving the universe is simulated would proba

4h

People Are Tweeting About Videogames Now More Than Ever

Also, here's the first trailer for Apple TV+'s Jennifer Aniston-Reese Witherspoon show.

4h

Tissue model reveals role of blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's

A new study shows how the Alzheimer's disease allows toxins to pass through the blood-brain barrier, further harming neurons.

4h

Tool to assess cognitive and language development in two year olds

New research provides standardized scores for language development in 2 year olds.

4h

Arctic sea-ice loss has 'minimal influence' on severe cold winter weather

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change has only a 'minimal influence' on severe cold winter weather across Asia and North America, new research has shown.

4h

Artificial intelligence helps banana growers protect the world's most favorite fruit

Using artificial intelligence, scientists created an easy-to-use tool to detect banana diseases and pests. With an average 90 percent success rate in detecting a pest or a disease, the tool can help farmers avoid millions of dollars in losses.

4h

Glitch in neutron star reveals its hidden secrets

Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. Until they don't.

4h

Trump Is Too Thin-Skinned to Protect the United States

Stop me if you’ve heard this one: There’s a dangerous threat to United States security. It’s widely acknowledged by many top officials in the Trump administration. But the government remains stuck in neutral, paralyzed by a fear of offending the president. This is the story of Russian electoral interference, but it is also the story of white racist violence. In the face of a verified—and lethal—t

4h

That Pixel 20x zoom photo isn't from the Pixel 4, but is still impressive – CNET

The photo that got the internet buzzing was taken with a Pixel 3A, but there is still reason to be hyped for the Pixel 4.

4h

Trump administration weakens Endangered Species Act

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02439-1Changes to the United States' landmark conservation law make it easier to strip threatened species of …

4h

SUNY Downstate researchers identify key mechanism linked to neuropsychiatric lupus

A breakthrough study by a SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University research team has identified a specific antibody target implicated in neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus. These symptoms, including cognitive impairment, mood disorders, seizures, headaches and psychosis, are among the most prevalent manifestations of the disease and occur in as many as 80% of adults and 95% of children with lupus

4h

Goals to fight fire with fire often fall short in US West

The thick scent of smoke hung in the midday air when a trail along the Kings River opened up to an ominous scene: flames in the trees and thick gray smoke shrouding canyon walls.

4h

Trump administration weakens endangered species law

US President Donald Trump's administration on Monday finalized rollbacks to key provisions of the Endangered Species Act, a law supported by a large majority of Americans and credited with saving the gray wolf, bald eagle and grizzly bear.

4h

Trump overhauls endangered species protections

The Trump administration on Monday rolled out some of the broadest changes in decades to enforcement of the landmark Endangered Species Act, allowing the government to put an economic cost on saving a species and other changes critics contend could speed extinction for some struggling plants and animals.

4h

Dangerous heat to grip parts of 13 states in South, Midwest

Forecasters are warning of scorching heat across a wide stretch of the U.S. South and Midwest, where it will feel as high as 115 degrees (46 degrees Celsius) in some spots.

4h

Russians killed in missile test blast were working on 'new weapons'

Russia's nuclear agency chief on Monday confirmed that five scientists killed last week were developing "new weapons" and vowed to continue testing "until the end," despite the explosion.

4h

A new timeline of Earth's cataclysmic past

Recent research shows that our planet may have been pummeled with asteroids long before some scientists had previously thought.

4h

Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives

An international team of scientists has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives.

4h

Bacterial resistance to two critical antibiotics widespread in Southeast Asia

Resistance to two critical antibiotic types, one a 'drug of last resort' when all others fail against some 'superbugs,' are widely distributed in Southeast Asia, raising the risk of untreatable infections, say a team of investigators.

4h

Over-55s shouldn't wait for retirement to make time for their health

People in middle-age need to keep up their physical activity levels if they are to enjoy a fit and healthy retirement — according to a new report. The study reveals that over-55s in particular should be doing more to keep fit as they approach retirement age — because of the physical, mental and social benefits of being active. But health problems, not having enough time or energy because of work

4h

Aspirin may help some breast cancer survivors, but changes in DNA may mean harm for others

Previous studies have shown that while some women who use aspirin and are later diagnosed with breast cancer may live longer, a portion of aspirin users with breast cancer appeared to have a higher risk of mortality following breast cancer. According to a new study, the reason for this reverse effect could be explained by DNA methylation of genes in breast cancer tumors or peripheral blood.

4h

Alzheimer's disease destroys neurons that keep us awake

Researchers have noted excessive daytime napping can develop long before memory problems of Alzheimer's disease appear. Prior studies considered excessive daytime napping compensation for poor nighttime sleep caused by Alzheimer's-related disruptions in sleep-promoting brain regions; others argued that the sleep problems contribute to progression of the disease. But now scientists have provided a

4h

Watch a Tesla Model 3 Explode on the Side of a Russian Highway

Model 3 Explosion Videos on social media over the weekend show a Tesla Model 3 exploding into flames on the side of Moscow’s Ring Road highway after colliding with a stationary tow truck. The vehicle belonged to Aleksey Tretyakov, who got away with a broken nose and leg, according to Reuters . His children only suffered bruises. But the incident does shine yet another spotlight on Autopilot, an a

4h

NASA measures rain rate in tiny Tropical Storm Henrietta

Tiny Tropical Storm Henrietta is the newest addition to the tropical cyclone line-up in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The storm developed early on Aug. 12 and soon after the GPM satellite passed overhead and found heavy rain happening around its center.

4h

You're not so tough, h-BN

Hexagonal-boron nitride is tough, but Rice University scientists are making it easier to get along with.

4h

Structurally complex forests better at carbon sequestration

Forests in the eastern United States that are structurally complex—meaning the arrangement of vegetation is highly varied—sequester more carbon, according to a new study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.

4h

Estrogen improves Parkinson's disease symptoms

Brain-selective estrogen treatment improves the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in male mice, according to new research published in JNeurosci. These findings may help explain the sex differences in Parkinson's disease and could lead to estrogen-based treatments.

4h

Negative memory storage affects depression symptoms

Physical manifestations of negative memories in the hippocampus could underlie cognitive symptoms of depression, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci. Inhibiting these manifestations could be a future treatment route.

4h

Lupus antibody target identified

Researchers have identified a specific target of antibodies that are implicated in the neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus, according to human research published in JNeurosci.

4h

Wildlife trafficking and more hinder nations' sustainable development

Transnational environmental crime—wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, dumping hazardous waste and more—takes an estimated $91 to $259 billion bite out of the global economy and has strong ties to organized crime finance, says a new study from Michigan State University and published in Nature Sustainability.

4h

Locked on Target: Antibody Validation 101

Learn more about antibody specificity, the importance of antibody validation, how to validate an antibody, and what parameters to consider when using an antibody.

4h

Techathlon podcast: Unlikely smart gadgets, unwise company names, and Impossible Whoppers

Listen to our latest episode in the player embedded below. (Techathlon/) We’re back in full-force here at Techathlon HQ, which means we have an episode for you this week that’s packed with useful information about technology, bad puns, and HR-approved smack talk. It was nice to take a little time away, but we were itching to get back in front of the microphones. In the next few months, we’re goin

5h

Smart sensors listen to healing wounds

Researchers are developing a new technique that can hear what is going on below a patient's bandages.

5h

No sign Russian missile explosion radiation has reached Europe

An explosion at a Russian missile testing range led to local spikes in radiation, but it doesn’t seem to have spread to Europe as it did during the Chernobyl incident

5h

British explorer is first person to complete 4,000-mile Yangtze trek

Ash Dykes, 28, had to overcome a landslide, blizzards and being followed by a pack of wolves A 28-year-old British explorer has become the first person to complete a 4,000-mile (6,437km) trek along the Yangtze River in China. Ash Dykes, from Old Colwyn in north Wales, finished the year-long expedition on Monday, overcoming blizzards, a landslide and temperatures as low as -20C (-4F). Continue rea

5h

Astronomers Catch a Pulsar 'Glitching,' Offering Insights Into the Strange Stars

The Vela pulsar is known to glitch something like once every three years, when it speeds up for a few seconds. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Toronto/M.Durant et al; Optical: DSS/Davide De Martin) When a massive star dies, it leaves behind a dense core called a neutron star. Many of these exotic suns spin rapidly, sending out beams of radiation like lighthouses, and these are called pulsars. The

5h

Report confirms wind technology advancements continue to drive down cost of wind energy

Wind energy pricing remains attractive, according to a report released by the US Department of Energy and prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). With prices averaging below 2 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for newly built projects, wind is competitive with other generation sources.

5h

California fix for surprise doctor bills works, but drives physician consolidation

Efforts are growing to address the issue of surprise medical bills that many patients receive when their hospital care is provided by out-of-network physicians. An approach taken in California to cap doctor bills appears to be protecting patients' financial liability, but has shifted bargaining leverage in favor of insurance plans and has had unintended consequences such as encouraging more consol

5h

Good Boys Goes Beyond the Dirty Jokes

The title of Good Boys is not a misnomer. The three 11-year-old heroes of Gene Stupnitsky’s new comedy are somewhat foul-mouthed, occasionally girl-crazy, and drawn into plenty of wild antics over the course of the movie—but every joke is about how bad these kids are at being bad. The film’s R rating is prominently displayed in promo materials, which also tout the movie’s association with raunchy

5h

Flies suggest different link between heart condition and seizures

Gene mutations implicated in long QT syndrome in humans may trigger seizures because of their direct effects on certain brain neurons—independent from what they do to heart function, a new study with fruit flies shows. Most people with long QT syndrome have a mutation in a gene that causes bouts of fast, chaotic heartbeats. They also experience fainting spells and seizures. Previously the clinica

5h

Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients

A Columbia Engineering-designed robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. The brace should improve patients' quality of life, not only in improving eye contact during conversation, but also in facilitating the use of eyes as a joystick to co

5h

Cigarette butts pose big microplastic hazard in the oceans

You've seen it before: A driver idling at a stoplight flicks a cigarette butt out the window or a worker during a smoking break drops one to the sidewalk.

5h

Ebola now curable after trials of drugs in DRC, say scientists

Congo results show good survival rates for patients treated quickly with antibodies Ebola can no longer be called an incurable disease, scientists have said, after two of four drugs being trialled in the major outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo were found to have significantly reduced the death rate. ZMapp, used during the massive Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea,

5h

The Power of a Community College

Last week I reported on a conference of community-college leaders that Deb Fallows and I attended in Michigan, and about some of the reasons we’ve come to believe that community colleges are so important to America’s economic and civic future. Readers weighed in with their experiences and views. First, from a reader in Texas: Unless I missed it, I think you missed one of the additional key assets

5h

Five ways your safety depends on machine learning

Your safety depends on machine learning. It's not a cure-all — unfortunately, there's no way to achieve 100% guaranteed security in this life. Here are some example insights that help predict peril, which were told to us by data. None Your safety depends on machine learning. This technology protects you from harm every day by guiding the maintenance of bridges, buildings, and vehicles, and by gu

5h

A Cure for Ebola? Two New Treatments Prove Highly Effective in Congo

The therapies saved roughly 90 percent of the patients who were newly infected, a turning point in the decades-long fight against the virus.

5h

Researchers grow Lokiarchaea in special tank over 12-year study

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has succeeded in cultivating samples of Lokiarchaea in a special tank in their lab. They have published a paper describing their work on the bioRxiv preprint server as they await publication.

5h

A Newfound Neuron Might Help Keep the Brain's Cells in Sync

The discovery of a clock-like cell in mouse brains adds a new twist to the debate over how information travels across neurons.

5h

Researchers grow Lokiarchaea in special tank over 12-year study

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has succeeded in cultivating samples of Lokiarchaea in a special tank in their lab. They have published a paper describing their work on the bioRxiv preprint server as they await publication.

5h

Ancient Sea Life May Have Hitched Across Oceans on Giant Living Rafts

Enormous crinoids of the Jurassic era, related to sea stars and sea urchins, could have carried whole ecosystems around the world

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Volcano forecasts could soon be a reality, thanks to AI

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Giant Batteries Supercharge Wind and Solar Plans

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

6h

Auto-grabbing bed to hold patient in zero gravity

submitted by /u/yannydubs [link] [comments]

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6h

Apple's Messy Teaser Prompts a Lot of Questions, Most Notably: Why?

It feels like it’s been years—rather than mere months—since Apple introduced its roster of original programming for its forthcoming streaming service Apple TV+. But even prior to its official …

6h

King's Cross developer defends use of facial recognition

The tech is one of "a number of detection and tracking methods" used at the London site, the firm said.

6h

Did you solve it? Get the gossip with Bobby Seagull

The solution to today’s text message teaser Earlier today I set you the following problem, suggested by maths influencer Bobby Seagull: Four friends each have a different piece of gossip. They are all in separate locations, and can communicate only via their phones. Continue reading…

6h

NASA finds deadly Lekima's remnants over China

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible picture of the remnant clouds of deadly former Typhoon Lekima over eastern China.

6h

Artificial intelligence helps banana growers protect the world's favorite fruit

Artificial intelligence-powered tools are rapidly becoming more accessible, including for people in the more remote corners of the globe. This is good news for smallholder farmers, who can use handheld technologies to run their farms more efficiently, linking them to markets, extension workers, satellite images, and climate information. The technology is also becoming a first line of defense again

6h

Artificial intelligence helps banana growers protect the world's favorite fruit

Artificial intelligence-powered tools are rapidly becoming more accessible, including for people in the more remote corners of the globe. This is good news for smallholder farmers, who can use handheld technologies to run their farms more efficiently, linking them to markets, extension workers, satellite images, and climate information. The technology is also becoming a first line of defense again

6h

Academia to FBI on Monitoring Chinese Scientists: "Tread Carefully"

Nearly two dozen higher education groups warn the government to be cautious when advising US research universities to keep an eye on students and faculty with ties to certain Chinese institutions.

6h

Scientists Say Mice Could Detect Deepfakes. Seriously.

Rodent Research Some researchers are exploring ways to use artificial intelligence to detect deepfakes, AI-generated video and audio recordings that seem real but aren’t. But another team of scientists thinks it can expose the fakes with a lower-tech tool: mice. It sounds bizarre, but researchers at the University of Oregon believe they can train mice to listen for irregularities in recorded spee

6h

Can’t solve the Rubik’s Cube? A gel version offers a hack

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02391-0 Cubes made from colourful ‘hydrogels’ are joined together to make a miniature model of the classic puzzle.

6h

A new timeline of Earth's cataclysmic past

Welcome to the early solar system. Just after the planets formed more than 4.5 billion years ago, our cosmic neighborhood was a chaotic place. Waves of comets, asteroids and even proto-planets streamed toward the inner solar system, with some crashing into Earth on their way.

6h

How do atoms vibrate in graphene nanostructures?

In order to understand advanced materials like graphene nanostructures and optimize them for devices in nano-, opto- and quantum-technology it is crucial to understand how phonons—the vibration of atoms in solids—influence the materials' properties. Researchers from the University of Vienna, the Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, the company JEOL and La Sapienza University in R

6h

How to Watch the 2019 Perseid Meteor Shower Live Online

One of the year's brightest meteor showers is about to take flight. If you face cloudy or light-polluted skies at home, however, never fear — the Perseids will also be streamed online.

6h

Some viruses can actually protect our health

Bacteriophages are viruses that attack and infect bacteria. (Shutterstock/) Viruses are mostly known for their aggressive and infectious nature. It's true, most viruses have a pathogenic relationship with their hosts—meaning they cause diseases ranging from a mild cold to serious conditions like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). They work by invading the host cell , taking over its cellul

6h

Rice, UTHealth search for clues to fight antibiotic resistance

To combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers in Houston are examining how one superbug adapts to fight an antibiotic of last resort. They're hoping to find clues that can prolong the drug's effectiveness.

6h

Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds

When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone — a jury, for example — individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found.

6h

Netflix’s 'The Crown' returns November 17th

After almost two years since the last installment dropped, Netflix has revealed a release date for season three of The Crown: November 17th. It will chart the Royal Family's history …

6h

Leaked Executive Order Would Let US Gov Control Social Media

Cracking Down Trump wants to do something most Twitter users could only dream about: enlisting the federal government to make sure his posts get more engagement. A leaked draft of an executive order reviewed by CNN Business would give the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) broader power to regulate how social media sites like Facebook and Twitter moderate and curate content on their platform

6h

Clemson adds 'vampire elephants,' 'ecological zombies' to human-wildlife conflict debate

New research by Clemson University scientists Shari Rodriguez and Christie Sampson in the open-access journal 'PLOS Biology,' examines the effects non-carnivorous species such as feral hogs and elephants can have on humans and livestock and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock.

6h

NASA measures rain rate in tiny Tropical Storm Henrietta

Tiny Tropical Storm Henrietta is the newest addition to the tropical cyclone line-up in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The storm developed early on Aug. 12 and soon after the GPM satellite passed overhead and found heavy rain happening around its center.

6h

Women and elderly at higher risk of dangerous drug interactions

Indiana University data scientists have found evidence that women and older adults are more likely to be prescribed multiple drugs that interact dangerously.

6h

NASA finds deadly Lekima's remnants over China

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible picture of the remnant clouds of deadly former Typhoon Lekima over eastern China.

6h

A new timeline of Earth's cataclysmic past

Recent research shows that our planet may have been pummeled with asteroids long before some scientists had previously thought.

6h

African forest elephant helps increase biomass and carbon storage

Un international study with key contributions from Brazilian researchers shows that an endangered species, famed as a 'forest gardener,' influences African forest composition in terms of tree species and increases the aboveground biomass over the long term.

6h

Tissue model reveals role of blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's

Study shows how the disease allows toxins to pass through the blood-brain barrier, further harming neurons.

6h

Wildlife trafficking and more hinder nations' sustainable development

Transnational environmental crime — wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, dumping hazardous waste and more — takes an estimated $91 to $259 billion bite out of the global economy and has strong ties to organized crime finance, says a new study from Michigan State University and published in Nature Sustainability.

6h

Genomic research unravels mystery of invasive apple snails

Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that …

6h

Beetles threaten Yorkshire's purple heather moorland

Yorkshire's moors could be losing their purple colour because of an "infestation" of heather beetles.

6h

The Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole Just Did Something Wild

Bright Flare The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, Sagittarius A*, grew 75 times brighter than usual over a two hour span — a flabbergasting cosmic event, since it’s usually not very active and doesn’t fluctuate much in brightness. “I was pretty surprised at first and then very excited,” astronomer Tuan Do of the University of California Los Angeles told ScienceAlert . “The

6h

USDA tried to cast doubt on study about climate effects on nutrients in rice

U.S. Department of Agriculture officials made a behind-the-scenes effort last year to cast doubt on a study co-authored by two University of Washington researchers about how climate change would affect the nutrients in rice.

6h

Dyes and viruses create new composite material for photooxidation reactions

A recent study shows that native viruses can be employed as a scaffold to immobilize photoactive molecules to potentially oxidise organic pollutants present in wastewater, under visible light irradiation.

6h

Turning off backscattering to improve optical data transmission

Engineers have found a way to redirect misfit light waves to reduce energy loss during optical data transmission. In a study, researchers exploited an interaction between light and sound waves to suppress the scattering of light from material defects — which could lead to improved fiber optic communication.

6h

A planetary telescope would use Earth’s atmosphere as a giant lens

The “terrascope” could outperform the light-gathering power of any feasible ground-based telescope.

6h

Droves of Blacktip Sharks Are Summering in Long Island for the First Time

In the past, the Carolinas were the sharks' destination of choice. But not anymore, thanks to Climate Change.

6h

Bacterial resistance to two critical antibiotics widespread in Southeast Asia

Resistance to two critical antibiotic types, one a 'drug of last resort' when all others fail against some 'superbugs,' are widely distributed in Southeast Asia, raising the risk of untreatable infections, say a team of investigators led by Georgetown University Medical Center.

6h

Study finds older adults less distracted by negative information

USC researchers looked at 'emotion-induced blindness,' which refers to distractions caused by emotionally arousing stimuli. In four experiments using a quickly presented sequence of images, they examined how older adults prioritize emotional information. They found both younger and older adults demonstrated emotion-induced blindness, but older adults were more distracted by positive information an

6h

Artificial intelligence helps banana growers protect the world's most favorite fruit

Using artificial intelligence, scientists created an easy-to-use tool to detect banana diseases and pests. With an average 90 percent success rate in detecting a pest or a disease, the tool can help farmers avoid millions of dollars in losses.

6h

You're not so tough, h-BN

Rice University scientists make hexagonal-boron nitride, a 2D material much stiffer than steel and an excellent conductor of heat, much simpler to modify for applications through a chemical process partially developed at Rice.

6h

How do atoms vibrate in graphene nanostructures?

Researchers from the University of Vienna, the Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, the company JEOL and La Sapienza University in Rome have developed a method capable to measure all phonons existing in a nanostructured material. This is a breakthrough in the analysis of nanoscale functional materials and devices.

6h

Inherited pancreatic cancer risk mutation identified

The discovery of the previously unknown mutation, reported in Nature Genetics by investigators from Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, could lead to routine testing of individuals with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer to determine if they carry the mutation, occurring in the gene known as RABL3.

6h

Icebergs delay Southern Hemisphere future warming

Future warming can accelerate the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet. A large fraction of the ice will enter the Southern Ocean in form of icebergs, which melt and provide a cooling and freshening effect to the warmer and denser ocean water. This process will increase the formation of sea-ice and shift winds and ocean currents. The overall effect is a slowdown in the magnitude of human

6h

Bacteria made to mimic cells, form communities

Rice University scientists have found a way to make single-celled bacteria behave like stem cells, differentiating into genetically unique individuals as they divide.

6h

Monash University study finds way to disarm dangerous bacteria

Researchers from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) have discovered an antibiotic that could prevent the life-threatening diarrhoea caused by Clostridioides difficile — a serious bacterial infection often acquired in hospital. The treatment strategy could also potentially counter diseases caused by other similar spore-producing bacteria, including the lethal anthrax, a key bioterror

6h

Thinnest optical waveguide channels light within just three layers of atoms

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the thinnest optical device in the world — a waveguide that is three layers of atoms thin. The work is a proof of concept for scaling down optical devices to sizes that are orders of magnitude smaller than today's devices. It could lead to the development of higher density, higher capacity photonic chips.

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It's not you, it's the network

The result of the 2016 US presidential election was, for many, a surprise lesson in social perception bias — peoples' tendency to assume that others think as we do, and to underestimate the size and influence of a minority party. Many psychologists attribute the source of these biases to faulty cognitive processes like 'wishful thinking' or 'social projection,' but according to a study published

6h

Study shows pediatricians can help parents to quit smoking

An NIH-funded study published in JAMA Pediatrics has shown pediatricians can help parents quit smoking.

6h

New study shows impact of largescale tree death on carbon storage

Largescale 'disturbances', including fires, harvesting, windstorms and insect outbreaks, which kill large patches of forest, are responsible for more than a tenth of tree death worldwide, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

6h

Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives

An international team of scientists, including a professor of chemistry from the University of Bristol, has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives.

6h

Arctic sea-ice loss has 'minimal influence' on severe cold winter weather, research shows

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change has only a 'minimal influence' on severe cold winter weather across Asia and North America, new research has shown.

6h

Diarrhea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals

Scientists have discovered that the gut-infecting bacterium Clostridium difficile is evolving into two separate species, with one group highly adapted to spread in hospitals. Researchers identified genetic changes in the newly emerging species that allow it to thrive on the Western sugar-rich diet, evade common hospital disinfectants and spread easily. They estimated this emerging species started

6h

Likelihood of marijuana use among young people who used e-cigarettes

This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 21 studies with about 128,000 participants to quantify the association between electronic cigarette use and marijuana use among adolescents and young adults.

6h

Analysis of out-of-network billing of privately insured patients at in-network hospitals

An analysis of claims data for privately insured patients suggests out-of-network billing for inpatient admissions and emergency department (ED) visits to in-network hospitals has increased along with the patient financial liability associated with it. This study included 5.4 million inpatient admissions and nearly 13.6 million ED visits to in-network hospitals between 2010-2016.

6h

Smoldering spots in the brain may signal severe MS

Aided by a high-powered brain scanner and a 3D printer, NIH researchers peered inside the brains of hundreds of multiple sclerosis patients and found that dark rimmed spots representing ongoing, 'smoldering' inflammation, called chronic active lesions, may be a hallmark of more aggressive and disabling forms of the disease.

6h

Diabetes treatment targets have not improved in the US since 2005

Advances in diabetes care over the past two decades have not effectively improved diabetes outcomes for American adults, in particular young, female and non-white adults with diabetes.

6h

Cold winters not caused by Arctic climate change

Recent studies into the relationship between decrease in the sea ice in the Arctic and ice-cold winters in moderate latitudes, like the Polar Vortex cold waves in North America, seem to suggest that such a connection does indeed exist. However, the mechanisms behind this relationship have remained unclear so far, mainly due to the chaotic nature of the climate system.

6h

Glitch in neutron star reveals its hidden secrets

Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. Until they don't.

6h

Scientists identify brain region that enables young songbirds to change their tune

In a scientific first, Columbia scientists have demonstrated how the brains of young songbirds become tuned to the songs they learn while growing up. The results of this study, published today in Nature Neuroscience, illustrate the extraordinary flexibility of the growing brain.

6h

Stanford-led study gauges trees' potential to slow global warming in the future

By analyzing decades of experiments, the researchers mapped the potential of carbon dioxide to increase forest biomass by the end of the century, when atmospheric concentrations of the gas could nearly double. This, in turn, will enable plants and trees to store more carbon.

6h

Neuroscientists make major breakthrough in 200-year-old puzzle

Weber's law is the most firmly established rule of psychophysics — the science that relates the strength of physical stimuli to the sensations of the mind. Despite being almost 200 years old, no clear way has been found to select among its many proposed explanations. Now, scientists have discovered a new psychophysical rule that allowed them to identify a unique and robust explanation of Weber's

6h

Sound volume and decision-making linked by maths

The field of psychophysics receives much-needed experimental validation. Barry Keily reports.

6h

TP-Link won't be supporting HomeKit in its Smart Plug Mini after all

TP-Link will not be updating their popular Kasa Smart Plug Mini to support Apple's HomeKit, according to the product's FAQ page. The networking brand had previously announced …

6h

Position and momentum mapping of vibrations in graphene nanostructures

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1477-8 Investigation of a free-standing graphene monolayer using a technique based on transmission electron microscopy allows identification of atomic vibrations characteristic of the bulk or the edge of the sample.

7h

Key concepts for making informed choices

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02407-9 Teach people to think critically about claims and comparisons using these concepts, urge Andrew D. Oxman and an alliance of 24 researchers — they will make better decisions.

7h

Novo investerer en halv mia. kroner i gasspisende kaninbakterie

PLUS. Novo Holdings har lagt en stor investering i en virksomhed, som bruger bakterier til at omdanne industrigasser til ethanol.

7h

Goldsmiths bans beef from university cafes to tackle climate crisis

University of London college will also seek to limit single-use plastics A university has banned the sale of beef in campus food outlets in order to help tackle the climate emergency. Goldsmiths, University of London, is also attempting to phase out single-use plastics and installing more panels to power its buildings in New Cross, as part of a move to become carbon neutral by 2025. Continue read

7h

In 'The Mosquito,' Humans Face A Predator More Deadly Than The Rest

Timothy C. Winegard has written a well-researched work of narrative nonfiction that offers a history of the world through the role that mosquitoes — and mosquito-borne illnesses — have played in it. (Image credit: Dutton)

7h

Turning off backscattering to improve optical data transmission

Engineers have found a way to redirect misfit light waves to reduce energy loss during optical data transmission. In a study, researchers exploited an interaction between light and sound waves to suppress the scattering of light from material defects — which could lead to improved fiber optic communication.

7h

Genomic research unravels mystery of invasive apple snails

Biologists have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. The findings could facilitate the development of effect

7h

Bowel preparation for colon surgery unnecessary, study suggests

As indicated by a recently completed study, antibiotics administration and bowel cleansing before colon surgery do not improve patients' treatment outcomes. According to the researchers, bowel preparation, a procedure strenuous for patients, is not needed.

7h

Bacteria made to mimic cells, form communities

Rice University scientists have found a way to engineer a new kind of cell differentiation in bacteria, inspired by a naturally occurring process in stem cells.

7h

Songbirds show remarkable flexibility in learning tunes

The findings could give new insights into human speech development. Natalie Parletta reports.

7h

Alzheimer's disease destroys neurons that keep us awake

New research explains why daytime napping is a warning sign.

7h

Sound volume and decision-making linked by maths

The field of psychophysics receives much-needed experimental validation. Barry Keily reports.

7h

Can switchgrass make better biofuels?

It ticks a lot of boxes, but we need to know more. Richard A. Lovett reports.

7h

Arctic sea-ice loss not the reason for cold winters

Research suggests a ‘minimal influence’ at best.

7h

Watching pancreatic cancer spread

Researchers discover the cells remodel their environment.

7h

New study shows impact of largescale tree death on carbon storage

Largescale 'disturbances', including fires, harvesting, windstorms and insect outbreaks, which kill large patches of forest, are responsible for more than a tenth of tree death worldwide, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

7h

Arctic sea-ice loss has 'minimal influence' on severe cold winter weather, research shows

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change has only a "minimal influence" on severe cold winter weather across Asia and North America, new research has shown.

7h

Study gauges trees' potential to slow global warming in the future

Like the eponymous character in Shel Silverstein's classic children's tale, trees are generous with their gifts, cleaning the air we breathe and slowing the ravages of global warming by absorbing about a quarter of all human-caused carbon dioxide emissions. But this generosity likely can't last forever in the face of unabated fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. Scientists have long wondered

7h

Glitch in neutron star reveals its hidden secrets

Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. Until they don't.

7h

Perception biases in social networks

The result of the 2016 US presidential election was, for many, a surprise lesson in social perception bias—peoples' tendency to assume that others think as we do, and to underestimate the size and influence of a minority party.

7h

Bacteria made to mimic cells, form communities

Rice University scientists have found a way to engineer a new kind of cell differentiation in bacteria, inspired by a naturally occurring process in stem cells.

7h

Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives

An international team of scientists, including a professor of chemistry from the University of Bristol, has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives.

7h

Icebergs delay Southern Hemisphere future warming

New research, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, has found that Antarctic icebergs can weaken and delay the effect of Global Warming in the Southern Hemisphere.

7h

Thinnest optical waveguide channels light within just three layers of atoms

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the thinnest optical device in the world—a waveguide that is three layers of atoms thin.

7h

How Forests Pay Dividends

In a new study, we found that by the end of the century, substantial plant growth could help sequester fossil-fuel emissions—if we protect our forests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

How Forests Pay Dividends

In a new study, we found that by the end of the century, substantial plant growth could help sequester fossil-fuel emissions—if we protect our forests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

For Embryo’s Cells, Size Can Determine Fate

The developing embryo is a finely tuned machine. Its cells know what to do, and when to do it. They know to grow or shrink, to divide or lie dormant, to come together into a beating heart or hurtle through the bloodstream in search of a distant invader. And they know to do all that without a central command station or an objective map of their surroundings to guide them. Instead, cells are left t

7h

Launch of standardised tool to assess cognitive and language development in two year olds

A new paper published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health co-authored by a University of Warwick researcher provides standardised scores for The Parent Report of Children's Abilities Revised (PARCA-R) questionnaire.

7h

Structurally complex forests better at carbon sequestration

Forests in the eastern United States that are structurally complex — meaning the arrangement of vegetation is highly varied — sequester more carbon, according to a new study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University. The study demonstrates for the first time that a forest's structural complexity is a better predictor of carbon sequestration potential than tree species diversity. The

7h

Revolutionary way to bend metals could lead to stronger military vehicles

A US Army project discovery upends previous notions about how metals deform and could help guide the creation of stronger, more durable materials for military vehicles.

7h

Adults who mix cannabis with opioids for pain report higher anxiety, depression

Not a good mix: A researcher from the University of Houston has found that adults who combine prescription opioids for severe pain and cannabis report elevated anxiety and depression symptoms, with no increased pain reduction.

7h

The formula that makes bacteria float upstream

Bacteria can swim against the current — and often this is a serious problem, for example when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. Researchers were able to answer this question: With the help of experiments and mathematical calculations, a formula was found that describes all essential aspects of this amazing bacterial motion behavior. This could make it possible to prevent or at l

7h

Researchers refute theory of collective (non-)action

Democracy, environmental protection, peace—the great issues of our time are collective goods that can only happen if many people make a voluntary contribution. However, the theory of collective action, which has been held for over 50 years, states that there is no incentive for individuals in large groups to participate in the provision of work for public benefit. Frankly speaking, individuals lac

7h

Scent brings all the songbirds to the yard

Chickadees can smell! That is the news from a study out of Lehigh University, the first to document naturally hybridizing songbirds' preference for the scent of their own species.

7h

New target found for disease of the heart's smallest blood vessels

When we race walk, for example, part of our healthy heart muscle may want a little more blood and oxygen, so our tiniest blood vessels send a message upstream to the larger vessels to send more. Researchers have found that a chemical in our bodies known to help blood vessels dilate also sends that signal to the larger blood vessels that more blood is needed.

7h

Sharp meets flat in tunable 2D material

Scientists have created unique two-dimensional flakes with two distinct personalities: molybdenum diselenide on one side of a sharp divide with rhenium diselenide on the other. The materials show promise for optoelectronics.

7h

Diet change needed to save vast areas of tropics

One quarter of the world's tropical land could disappear by the end of the century unless meat and dairy consumption falls, researchers have warned.

7h

Dyes and viruses create new composite material for photooxidation reactions

A recent study shows that native viruses can be employed as a scaffold to immobilize photoactive molecules to potentially oxidise organic pollutants present in wastewater, under visible light irradiation.

7h

Fast food availability linked with more heart attacks

Areas with a higher number of fast food restaurants have more heart attacks, according to new research. The study also found that for every additional fast food outlet, there were four additional heart attacks per 100,000 people each year.

7h

Robots need a new philosophy to get a grip

Robots need to know the reason why they are doing a job if they are to effectively and safely work alongside people in the near future. In simple terms, this means machines need to understand motive the way humans do, and not just perform tasks blindly, without context.

7h

Scent brings all the songbirds to the yard

Chickadees can smell! That is the news from a study out of Lehigh University, the first to document naturally hybridizing songbirds' preference for the scent of their own species.

7h

Smartphone apps may connect to vulnerable backend cloud servers

Cybersecurity researchers have discovered vulnerabilities in the backend systems that feed content and advertising to smartphone applications through a network of cloud-based servers that most …

7h

Dark energy mapper will reconstruct 11 billion years of cosmic history

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02424-8 A telescope in Arizona will conduct the largest spectroscopic survey of galaxies.

7h

Scent brings all the songbirds to the yard

Lehigh University scientists found that not only can chickadees smell, but the males and females prefer the smell of their own species over the smell of the opposite species. These preferences could be impacting hybridization. Their results have been published in an article entitled: 'Conspecific olfactory preferences and interspecific divergence in odor cues in a chickadee hybrid zone' in Ecology

7h

Leishmania virulence strategy unveiled

A team from the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) has made a scientific breakthrough regarding the virulence strategy employed by the Leishmania parasite to infect cells of the immune system. This microorganism is responsible for Leishmaniasis, a chronic parasitic disease that affects more than 12 million people worldwide.

7h

Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds

When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone—a jury, for example—individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found.

7h

Elon Musk Endorses Andrew Yang for President

“I Support Yang” On Saturday, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk endorsed Democratic candidate Andrew Yang for the 2020 presidential election. “I support Yang,” Musk tweeted on Saturday, in response to a different Twitter user who was commenting on Yang’s tweet about how “changing one’s mind is not a bad thing.” “Thank you Elon – this means a great deal,” Yang replied . “Congrats on building the futu

7h

Fewer gun injuries and deaths after demolitions in Detroit

Demolitions aimed at fighting neighborhood blight appear to have reduced gun injuries and deaths in Detroit neighborhoods, researchers report. For the past half-decade, Detroit’s government and community groups have worked to tear down abandoned houses and other buildings in the city’s most blight-stricken neighborhoods, in the name of public safety and quality of life. The new study shows an 11%

7h

When naproxen breaks down, toads croak

A new study takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. There have been many studies that review the toxicity of naproxen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, but none until now that have reviewed the effects it or its degradation products might have on amphibians.

7h

The formula that makes bacteria float upstream

Bacteria can swim against the current — and often this is a serious problem, for example when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. Researchers were able to answer this question: With the help of experiments and mathematical calculations, a formula was found that describes all essential aspects of this amazing bacterial motion behavior. This could make it possible to prevent or at l

7h

A licence to parent?

It's a comment we often hear in response to stories of child neglect: that parenting should require a licence. Researchers say that while the suggestion is based on concern for children, it is fraught with problems.

7h

Diet change needed to save vast areas of tropics, study warns

One quarter of the world's tropical land could disappear by the end of the century unless meat and dairy consumption falls, researchers have warned.

7h

Researchers turn off backscattering, aim to improve optical data transmission

Engineers at the University of Illinois have found a way to redirect misfit light waves to reduce energy loss during optical data transmission. In a study, researchers exploited an interaction between light and sound waves to suppress the scattering of light from material defects—which could lead to improved fiber optic communication. Their findings are published in the journal Optica.

7h

Genomic research unravels mystery of invasive apple snails

Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. T

7h

A licence to parent?

It's a comment we often hear in response to stories of child neglect: that parenting should require a licence.

7h

Hong Kong Shows the Flaws in China’s Zero-Sum Worldview

At first glance, the intensifying protests in Hong Kong would appear to have little in common with Beijing’s escalating trade war with the United States. The trade dispute is about controversial Chinese economic policies that Washington believes damage both U.S. companies and the international trading system. The confrontation in Hong Kong is between the autocratic Chinese Communist Party and cit

7h

Even without concussions, just one football season may damage players’ brains

A group of college football players underwent brain scans after a season of play. The results suggest the sport could impact neural signaling.

7h

Genomic research unravels mystery of invasive apple snails

Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. T

7h

Jordmagneten vände långsamt

Jordens magnetfält bildar en bubbla runt jorden, som skyddar vår närmaste omgivning från en stor del av den partikelstrålning som kommer från solen. Var och en som har använt en vanlig kompass har också själv sett effekten av magnetfältet. Men kompassriktningen är inte helt konstant, och geofysiker har sedan 1960-talet känt till att jordens magnetfält förutom mindre variationer också kan byta rikt

7h

Immigration: Why the well-meaning ‘successful immigrant’ narrative is faulty

There's a tendency to fight dehumanizing narratives about immigrants and refugees with stories about how much value they have to the United States, in terms of economic and academic achievements and abilities. Though these counternarratives might come from a good place, Adam Waytz doesn't believe they "really consider people in terms of human dignity." They fail to call out immigrants and refugee

7h

Singapore to ban sale of elephant ivory from 2021

Singapore said Monday it will impose a blanket ban on the domestic sale of elephant ivory and products from 2021 as the government tightens its campaign against illegal wildlife trade.

7h

Kortlægning af grønlandske beboeres syn på klimaforandringer

I dag offentliggøres den første landsdækkende undersøgelse, som kortlægger de…

7h

Singapore to ban sale of elephant ivory from 2021

Singapore said Monday it will impose a blanket ban on the domestic sale of elephant ivory and products from 2021 as the government tightens its campaign against illegal wildlife trade.

7h

Vattenfall bygger hybrid-energipark til 40.000 husstande i Holland

Anlægget, der både består af solceller, vindmøller og batteri-anlæg, forventes i drift til september 2020.

7h

Study finds racial disparities in pregnancy rates for kidney transplant recipients

Research from the University of Cincinnati finds that among women who are kidney transplant recipients, Hispanic women have a higher likelihood of pregnancy than white women.

7h

New target found for disease of the heart's smallest blood vessels

When we race walk, for example, part of our healthy heart muscle may want a little more blood and oxygen, so our tiniest blood vessels send a message upstream to the larger vessels to send more. Researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University have found that a chemical in our bodies known to help blood vessels dilate also sends that signal to the larger blood vessels that more

7h

Sharp meets flat in tunable 2D material

Rice University scientists have created unique two-dimensional flakes with two distinct personalities: molybdenum diselenide on one side of a sharp divide with rhenium diselenide on the other. The materials show promise for optoelectronics.

7h

Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds

When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone — a jury, for example — individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found.

7h

Researchers turn off backscattering, aim to improve optical data transmission

Engineers at the University of Illinois have found a way to redirect misfit light waves to reduce energy loss during optical data transmission. In a study, researchers exploited an interaction between light and sound waves to suppress the scattering of light from material defects — which could lead to improved fiber optic communication. Their findings are published in the journal Optica.

7h

Of mice and babies: New mouse model links transfusions to deadly infant digestive disease

Physicians have long suspected that red blood cell transfusions given to premature infants with anemia may put them in danger of developing a potentially lethal inflammatory disease of the intestines.

7h

States brace for long-term flood fight as damages

After devastating flooding this year, Iowa put $15 million into a special fund to help local governments recover and guard against future floods. Missouri allotted more money to fight rising waters, including $2 million to help buy a movable floodwall for a historic Mississippi River town that's faced flooding in all but one of the past 20 years.

7h

Australian coal use an 'existential threat' to islands: Fiji PM

Fiji on Monday challenged Australia to do more on climate change ahead of a regional summit of Pacific nations this week, warning Canberra's reliance on coal posed an "existential threat" to low-lying islands.

7h

Great Lakes' latest pollution threat: Microplastics

A new contaminant has turned up in western Lake Superior—tiny snarls, tangles and shreds of plastic that are appearing by the hundreds of thousands, mystifying scientists and Minnesota pollution regulators.

8h

Is this the world map of the future?

Europe has dominated cartography for so long that its central place on the world map seems normal However, as the economic centre of gravity shifts east and the climate warms up, tomorrow's map may be very different Focusing on both China and Arctic shipping lanes, this vertical representation could be the world map of the future The world, but not as we know it Europe is tucked away in a corner,

8h

Mars: Cause of methane spikes still unknown

New study rules out wind erosion as the source of methane gas on Mars and moves a step closer to answering the question of whether life exists on other planets.

8h

A novel method to characterize genes with high-precision in single cells

A method of targeted RNA sequencing (transcriptome analysis) has now been developed, which precisely detects the smallest amounts of gene transcripts in single cells. The method enables the identification and enrichment of individual selected molecules in a sample in order to investigate their cellular function. This makes it possible to selectively characterize genes in each cell with high precis

8h

Asian carp capable of surviving in much larger areas of Lake Michigan than previously thought

Asian carp are capable of surviving and growing in much larger portions of Lake Michigan than scientists previously believed and present a high risk of becoming established, according to a new modeling study.

8h

More than just jaundice: Mouse study shows bilirubin may protect the brain

In studies in mice, researchers report they have found that bilirubin, a bile pigment most commonly known for yellowing the skin of people with jaundice, may play an unexpected role in protecting brain cells from damage from oxidative stress.

8h

Methane not released by wind on Mars, experts find

Wind erosion has been ruled out as the primary cause of methane gas release on Mars, Newcastle University academics have shown.

8h

How Cheap Must Batteries Get for Renewables to Compete With Fossil Fuels?

While solar and wind power are rapidly becoming cost-competitive with fossil fuels in areas with lots of sun and wind , they still can’t provide the 24/7 power we’ve become used to. At present, that’s not big a problem because the grid still features plenty of fossil fuel plants that can provide constant baseload or ramp up to meet surges in demand. But there’s broad agreement that we need to dra

8h

Charter schools don’t always push publics to improve

Charter schools that offer an alternative style of instruction have very little, if any, effect on student performance at nearby public schools, say researchers. Their new research suggests that maximizing any benefits requires a careful examination of charter schools’ organization and the policies that influence their location. Charter schools receive government funding, yet operate independentl

8h

Walnuts show protection against ulcerative colitis in early study

Through their complex array of natural compounds and phytochemicals, walnuts provide a multitude of health benefits. A new study says protection against ulcerative colitis may be on that list.

8h

National report card rates states' safety policies for high school athletes

In the two years since the Korey Stringer Institute (KSI) first assessed all 50 states and the District of Columbia on key health and safety policies for high school athletes, 31 states have adopted new policies — 16 this year alone.

8h

Magdeburg researchers refute theory of collective (non-)action

The theory of collective action states that there is no incentive for individuals in large groups to participate in the provision of work for public benefit. With the largest laboratory experiment in economic research to date, a group of German experimental economists have now shaken this theory to the core and made an astonishing discovery: Our commitment is by no means only dependent on the infl

8h

Mosquito 'spit glands' hold key to curbing malaria, study shows

Mosquitoes can harbor thousands of malaria-causing parasites in their bodies, yet while slurping blood from a victim, they transmit just a tiny fraction of them. In an effort to define precisely the location of the parasite bottleneck, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have discovered that the parasites are stopped by a roadblock along the escape route in the insect's spit glands, a barri

8h

Genomic research led by HKBU unravels mystery of invasive apple snails

Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. T

8h

Dyes and viruses create new composite material for photooxidation reactions

A recent study, published in Advanced Materials, shows that native viruses can be employed as a scaffold to immobilise photoactive molecules to potentially oxidise organic pollutants present in wastewater, under visible light irradiation.

8h

Diet change needed to save vast areas of tropics, study warns

One quarter of the world's tropical land could disappear by the end of the century unless meat and dairy consumption falls, researchers have warned.

8h

Laser and sensor research to be advanced by new inquiries into plasmonic-photonic crystals

A group of researchers led by Professor Myakzyum Salakhov has been working on the problem of optical states in plasmonic-photonic crystals (PPCs).

8h

U.S. groups urge restraint in investigating academic espionage by China

Open letter urges the Federal Bureau of Investigation “to tread carefully”

8h

Robotic Flow Synthesis: The Latest Version

Here’s another step along the way to automated synthesis, in a new paper from MIT. The eventual hope is to unite the software and the hardware in this area, both of which are developing these days, and come up with a system that can produce new compounds with a minimum of human intervention. Let’s stipulate up front that we’re not there yet; this paper is both a very interesting look at the state

8h

Divers Find 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Graveyard Near Tiny Greek Island

Ancient sailors courted adventure and risked death on the Aegean Sea, as shown in five 2,000-year-old shipwrecks and a giant, granite anchor pole found near the Greek island of Levitha.

8h

When naproxen breaks down, toads croak

A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. There have been many studies that review the toxicity of naproxen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, but none until now that have reviewed the effects it or its degradation products might have on amphibians.

8h

2019 Range Rover Sport HSE P400e Hybrid Review: The Premier Off-Roader Conquers the HOV Lane

Land Rover 2019 Range Rover Sport HSE P400e Land Rover’s 2019 Range Rover Sport HSE P400e is a big, roomy plug-in hybrid SUV. A battery motivates its 5,500 pounds for about 25 miles before handing off to a turbo-four-cylinder engine, at which point the battery still providing reserve electric power under acceleration. The HSE costs a ton, the driver’s seat is not for small people, and a full rech

8h

Pedagogies in bilingual education

In the Netherlands approximately 130 out of 700 secondary schools offer a bilingual stream. However, research about CLIL (content and language integrated learning) is limited. With her dissertation Evelyn van Kampen (Ph.D. student at ICLON) wants to contribute to the understanding of the nature and range of pedagogies employed by CLIL teachers. Defence on 5 September.

8h

Archaeologists exiled from Syria mourn the cost of war

I used to be a Near Eastern archaeologist working in Syria. Nowadays, I am stuck in academic purgatory, observing from a great distance as the country burns, unable to help protect its history or its present.

8h

When naproxen breaks down, toads croak

A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. There have been many studies that review the toxicity of naproxen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, but none until now that have reviewed the effects it or its degradation products might have on amphibians.

8h

Asian carp capable of surviving in much larger areas of Lake Michigan than previously thought

Asian carp are capable of surviving and growing in much larger portions of Lake Michigan than scientists previously believed and present a high risk of becoming established, according to a new modeling study from University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues.

8h

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

Researchers trained machine-learning algorithms to read Amazon reviews for hints that a food product would be recalled by the FDA. Christopher Intagliata reports.

8h

Microsoft’s subscription software push continues with Office 2019

Microsoft's march through subscription land continues apace.

8h

Deliveroo quits Germany to focus on other markets

British food delivery service Deliveroo will cease operations in Germany on Friday to focus on other markets in Europe and beyond, a spokesman for the Amazon-backed company said on Monday. …

8h

Läsning i skolan samma som på 60-talet

Att människor oroas över barns läsning och teknikskiften är knappast nytt, menar Anna Lundh, docent vid Bibliotekshögskolan, Högskolan i Borås och Mats Dolatkhah, numera forskningsrådgivare vid högskolan. I sin forskning tog de avstamp från de senaste årens debatt om att läsvanorna har förändrats, från koncentrerad djupläsning till ytlig och fragmentarisk läsning. Anledningen sägs vara övergången

8h

How the search for football's next big thing is fueling a modern-day slave trade

It's estimated that more than 15,000 children are trafficked into Europe every year with false hopes of making it as professional footballers. In the UK alone, there are more than 2,000 minors who have been trafficked to apparently play football, though the true figure is likely to be even higher.

8h

New atom-flat compounds show promise for optoelectronics, advanced computing

A Rice University lab wants its products to look sharp, even at the nanoscale. Its latest creation is right on target.

8h

Laser and sensor research to be advanced by new inquiries into plasmonic-photonic crystals

The research was dedicated to modelling light transmission throughout photonic crystals with a continuous gold layer on their surface. Photonic crystals don't pass a certain wavelength (color) of light. This is called the photonic bandgap — the range of light wavelength where propagation through a crystal is difficult.

8h

Methane not released by wind on Mars, experts find

New study rules out wind erosion as the source of methane gas on Mars and moves a step closer to answering the question of whether life exists on other planets.

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A novel method to characterize genes with high-precision in single cells

At Helmholtz Zentrum München, a method of targeted RNA sequencing (transcriptome analysis) has now been developed, which precisely detects the smallest amounts of gene transcripts in single cells. The method enables the identification and enrichment of individual selected molecules in a sample in order to investigate their cellular function. This makes it possible to selectively characterize genes

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A novel method to characterize genes with high-precision in single cells

The analysis of gene products in cells is an important tool for diagnosing disease and the design of new active substances in biological and medical research. At Helmholtz Zentrum München, a method of targeted RNA sequencing (transcriptome analysis) has now been developed, which precisely detects the smallest amounts of gene transcripts in single cells. The method enables the identification and en

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Malevolent creativity: When evil gets innovative

Many of history's most cherished figures were fiercely creative individuals, but creativity by itself doesn't have a moral direction. "Malevolent creativity" is the production of innovative and novel solutions with the express intent of harming others. How does malevolent creativity arise, and how can we manage it? None Without a doubt, creativity is one of our most cherished characteristics. Wit

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A novel method to characterize genes with high-precision in single cells

The analysis of gene products in cells is an important tool for diagnosing disease and the design of new active substances in biological and medical research. At Helmholtz Zentrum München, a method of targeted RNA sequencing (transcriptome analysis) has now been developed, which precisely detects the smallest amounts of gene transcripts in single cells. The method enables the identification and en

8h

Why even a small change in Earth's carbon dioxide makes a big difference

In July 2015, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency head Gina McCarthy was being grilled by lawmakers over President Obama's Clean Power Plan requiring states to limit carbon emissions, when she was asked, "What percentage of the atmosphere is CO2?"

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Astrophysicists measure key cosmic step in formation of early stars

Astrophysicists in Ireland have, for the first time, measured a crucial step in the formation and evolution of stars.

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Dyes and viruses create new composite material for photo-oxidation reactions

A recent study, published in Advanced Materials, shows that native viruses can be employed as a scaffold to immobilise photoactive molecules to potentially oxidise organic pollutants present in wastewater, under visible light irradiation

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Zinc oxide nanowires: Novel solution for cheaper, cleaner production of electronic components

Although nanowires are answering the demands of the market for innovative, smaller, flexible electronic devices by enabling electronic circuits on the molecular scale, assembly of nanowires into functional materials remains a problem. Group of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are offering a novel solution for high-yield nanowire production from zinc oxide—cheaper a

8h

Evidence reveals risk assessment algorithms show bias against Hispanic population

Automated risk assessment has become increasingly popular in the criminal justice system, but a new study published in the American Criminal Law Review assessed the accuracy, validity and predictive ability of a risk assessment algorithm tool to reveal algorithmic unfairness against Hispanics.

8h

What we know about the dangers of e-cigarettes

Traditional cigarettes have the benefit of decades' worth of research on their harmful effects. E-cigarettes are relatively new, and our understanding of their long-term effects is limited. To fill this gap, researchers are conducting studies to identify exactly how e-cigarettes effect our bodies. To date, it appears that e-cigarettes are better for you than traditional cigarettes, but that doesn

8h

Professor i plastikkirurgi skifter AUH ud med Riget

Tine Engberg Damsgaard er ny professor og overlæge på Klinik for Plastikkirurgi og Brandsårsbehandling på Rigshospitalet. Hun kommer fra en stilling ved Aarhus Universitetshospital, hvor hun efter blot et år sagde op.

8h

Hvordan er det med ledelsen af psykiatrien?

Ledelse i psykiatrien er stort set det samme som i somatikken, men alligevel kræver det hårdt pressede område andre evner hos lederne, skriver direktør og psykolog i rekrutteringsfirma.

8h

The formula that makes bacteria float upstream

Bacteria can swim against the current — and often this is a serious problem, for example when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. An international research team was able to answer this question: With the help of experiments and mathematical calculations, a formula was found that describes all essential aspects of this amazing bacterial motion behavior. This could make it possible

8h

Robots need a new philosophy to get a grip

Robots need to know the reason why they are doing a job if they are to effectively and safely work alongside people in the near future. In simple terms, this means machines need to understand motive the way humans do, and not just perform tasks blindly, without context.

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Smartphone apps may connect to vulnerable backend cloud servers

Cybersecurity researchers have discovered vulnerabilities in the backend systems that feed content and advertising to smartphone applications through a network of cloud-based servers that most users probably don't even know exists.

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A licence to parent?

It's a comment we often hear in response to stories of child neglect: that parenting should require a licence. Researcher Dr Frank Ainsworth from James Cook University in Australia says that while the suggestion is based on concern for children, it is fraught with problems.

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New solution to elderly falls: drones, smartphones and sensors

Drones, smartphones and sensors could provide a lifeline to the world's growing elderly population at risk of falls, helping to cut global hospital costs.

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Fast food availability linked with more heart attacks

Areas with a higher number of fast food restaurants have more heart attacks, according to research presented at CSANZ 2019. The study also found that for every additional fast food outlet, there were four additional heart attacks per 100,000 people each year.

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Young adults in Asia get the least sleep due to cultural habits

Are you tired? A new study of young and middle-aged adults shows it could be happening because of the way society functions in your part of the world. Researchers from Flinders University and the University of Helsinki collaborated with Finnish company, Polar, to compare the sleeping habits of 17,335 people wearing fitness trackers to measure their 14 day sleep patterns.

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When naproxen breaks down, toads croak

A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. There have been many studies that review the toxicity of naproxen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, but none until now that have reviewed the effects it or its degradation products might have on amphibians.

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More than just jaundice: Mouse study shows bilirubin may protect the brain

In studies in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have found that bilirubin, a bile pigment most commonly known for yellowing the skin of people with jaundice, may play an unexpected role in protecting brain cells from damage from oxidative stress.

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Asian carp capable of surviving in much larger areas of Lake Michigan than previously thought

Asian carp are capable of surviving and growing in much larger portions of Lake Michigan than scientists previously believed and present a high risk of becoming established, according to a new modeling study from University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues.

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Adobe Fresco shows oil and water(colors) do mix – CNET

Adobe is really, really late to the game with its sketching and painting app for the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, but that's not such a bad thing.

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Gap growing between irrigated, rain-fed crop yields

A 65-year comparative analysis between U.S. yields of irrigated and rain-fed crops has sounded a message to farmers, land managers and policymakers: Mind the gap.

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Aalborg-forskere udvikler glas der heler sig selv med vand

Et helt nyt og ekstremt modstandsdygtig glasmateriale kan lukke revner ved at optage fugt fra luften. Den nye viden kan på sigt lede til tyndere glas i biler og vinduer.

9h

Star Wars News: But Really, What Are Sith Troopers?

One fan site has a theory. Also, the onslaught of rumors about the ending of 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' continues.

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A.I. rivals expert eyes at reading breast tissue biopsies

A new artificial intelligence system could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately, and lead to better detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, researchers say. Doctors examine images of breast tissue biopsies to diagnose breast cancer. But the differences between cancerous and benign images can be difficult for the human eye to classify. The new algorithm helps interpret them, and does

9h

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

Researchers trained machine-learning algorithms to read Amazon reviews for hints that a food product would be recalled by the FDA. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Motivations for sexting can be complicated, UA researcher says

Young women report a mix of empowering and disempowering reasons for sending sexual images of themselves to others electronically. The odds are four times higher for women than men to send these types of images in order to prevent the recipient from losing interest, a University of Arizona researcher found.

9h

The proteins that maintain formicamycin biosynthesis fidelity

Formicamycins are a set of antibiotics produced by the bacteria Streptomyces formicae that have shown useful activity against antibiotic resistant strains of the pathogenic bacteria Staphyloccus aureus.

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Dark matter search yields technique for locating heavy metal seams

A method for locating seams of gold and other heavy metals is the unlikely spin-off of Swinburne's involvement in a huge experiment to detect dark matter down a mine in Stawell, Victoria.

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The proteins that maintain formicamycin biosynthesis fidelity

Formicamycins are a set of antibiotics produced by the bacteria Streptomyces formicae that have shown useful activity against antibiotic resistant strains of the pathogenic bacteria Staphyloccus aureus.

9h

Kameraövervakning har gjort utsatta områden säkrare

Sedan 2015 har polisen övervakningskameror på och omkring Sevedsplan i södra Sofielund i Malmö. Forskarna Anna-Karin Ivert och Karl Kronkvist har följt utvecklingen både vad gäller brott och skadegörelse och hur de boende och näringsidkare upplevt trygghet före och efter kamerorna kom upp. Öppen narkotikahandel Enligt polisen är södra Sofielund ett särskilt utsatt område. Den huvudsakliga brottsp

9h

Always Have Three Beverages

The phrase rule of three is a Rorschach test. When people hear it, it can conjure an array of disparate guidelines. Celebrity deaths . Rhetorical technique . Aesthetic pleasure . Free markets . Joke writing . There are so many rules of three across disciplines and superstitions that the concept requires its own disambiguation page on Wikipedia, which lists 17 different options. Some of those rule

9h

How to make a better water filter? Turn it inside out

More than 800 million people lack access to clean and safe water. Recent advances in water filtration technology have created new ways to filter water and make it drinkable, but many of these applications are too costly and cumbersome to be used in remote parts of the world. Reverse osmosis, for example, can make sea water drinkable, but the process is incredibly expensive and requires a large amo

9h

Know garden pests before deciding on a path to control

You look around the garden and see aphids suck the life out of your rose buds, flea beetles chomp on the cauliflower and cabbage butterflies lay eggs that will turn into voracious caterpillars. What to do?

9h

Know garden pests before deciding on a path to control

You look around the garden and see aphids suck the life out of your rose buds, flea beetles chomp on the cauliflower and cabbage butterflies lay eggs that will turn into voracious caterpillars. What to do?

9h

Want to predict if your non-violent movement will succeed? Ask Isaac Newton

When Isaac Newton first attempted to describe momentum in his 1687 work Principia, he hit upon an eloquent formula—an object's momentum is its mass times its velocity. Or P=MV.

9h

Tug of war around gravity

In the summer of 2009, theoretical physicist Erik Verlinde had a brainwave that developed into a radical new idea about gravity and the universe as an ocean of information. Ten years later, the last word about this has not yet been said.

9h

Environmental destruction is a war crime, but it's almost impossible to fall foul of the laws

An open letter from 24 scientists published in Nature last month calls on governments to draft a new Geneva Convention dedicated to protecting the environment during armed conflict.

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The Longest Matrilineal Chain in Math

Tracing our mathematical foremothers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How close are we to stem cell generated artificial hearts and what are some recent and upcoming heart disease treatments and medicine ?

And are those tested in humans or rats ? Which ones would reach clinical trials ? submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

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Instagram eco-advocate Emma Kennan makes Mondays mellow yellow

Emma Kennan hopes her #MellowYellowMonday hashtag will encourage people to flush less and save water.

9h

Bosch is working on glasses-free 3D displays for in-car use

German auto industry giant Bosch is developing new technology that will add glasses-free 3D imaging to future versions of its in-car digital display technology. These 3D displays use passive …

9h

Researchers take a direct image of magic-angle twisted graphene sheets

Just over a year after researchers at MIT stunned the physics world with the discovery of the "magic angle" for stacked sheets of graphene, researchers at Caltech have directly observed and studied this material using a scanning tunneling microscope that can image electronic properties at atomic-length scales.

9h

Maggots as recyclers and protein sources

Black soldier fly maggots provide a zero waste option for organic recycling, according to Jeff Tomberlin, Ph.D., professor in the department of entomology at Texas A&M University and director of EVO Conversion Systems, LLC.

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Maggots as recyclers and protein sources

Black soldier fly maggots provide a zero waste option for organic recycling, according to Jeff Tomberlin, Ph.D., professor in the department of entomology at Texas A&M University and director of EVO Conversion Systems, LLC.

10h

A single-photon source you can make with household bleach

Quantum computing and quantum cryptography are expected to give much higher capabilities than their classical counterparts. For example, the computation power in a quantum system may grow at a double exponential rate instead of a classical linear rate due to the different nature of the basic unit, the qubit (quantum bit). Entangled particles enable the unbreakable codes for secure communications.

10h

Behavioral science models can help identify the greenest dietary changes

Spreading the gospel of veggie-only diets may not be the most effective way to help reduce overall, food-related greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new model based on behavioral science.

10h

A probiotic treatment for obesity?

Alterations in the gut microbiota—the microorganisms residing in the gastrointestinal tract—have been implicated in the development of obesity and other chronic diseases.

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Why home DNA tests might not be as private as you think

Spit in the tube, seal up the envelope, wait three to five weeks, receive a litany of information about your ancestry and health for less than $200. This thrilling, futuristic model has become the cornerstone of several direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies over the past decade, and at such a low price point, such tests might seem like the perfect gift for friends and family. But in

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Key to targeting the spread of pancreatic cancer

Targeting the tissue around pancreatic cancer cells may be the key to stopping their spread and improving chemotherapy outcomes.

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Evaluating blood flow is key to early diagnosis and treatment for people with critical limb ischemia

The strengths and limitations of non-invasive and other imaging techniques used to diagnose critical limb ischemia are reviewed in a new statement. Sex and ethnic disparities exist in the diagnosis and treatment of critical limb ischemia.

10h

Researchers advocate for using local norms instead of national standards to identify academically gifted students

"Who are the highest-performing students in my school?" This is the question K-12 school administrators should be asking as they seek to identify academically advanced students and accommodate their learning needs this school year.

10h

An emerging view of RNA transcription and splicing

Cells often create compartments to control important biological functions. The nucleus is a prime example; surrounded by a membrane, it houses the genome. Yet cells also harbor enclosures that are not membrane-bound and more transient, like oil droplets in water. Over the past two years, these droplets (called "condensates") have become increasingly recognized as major players in controlling genes

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10 Best Wirefree Earbuds WIRED Has Tried (True Wireless Buds)

The best true wireless earbuds, fully wireless earbuds, completely wireless earbuds. No matter what you call them, if you're ready to cut the cord between your ears, these are the best buds WIRED has tested.

10h

A Photographer Made a Working Replica of NASA’s Moon Camera

Cole Rise sold a startup, designed the first Instagram logo, and became obsessed with creating a copy of the Apollo 11 camera.

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A probiotic treatment for obesity?

Alterations in the gut microbiota—the microorganisms residing in the gastrointestinal tract—have been implicated in the development of obesity and other chronic diseases.

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An emerging view of RNA transcription and splicing

Cells often create compartments to control important biological functions. The nucleus is a prime example; surrounded by a membrane, it houses the genome. Yet cells also harbor enclosures that are not membrane-bound and more transient, like oil droplets in water. Over the past two years, these droplets (called "condensates") have become increasingly recognized as major players in controlling genes

10h

The Epstein Conspiracies

This was highly predictable. Of course there are conspiracies surrounding the apparent recent suicide of Jeffrey Epstein while in prison. That’s just background noise now. There are conspiracies about everything. Apparently the two shootings last weekend were false flag operations, because #conspiracies. Just as predictably, news about the conspiracy theories, how they spread, and how they are tr

10h

Modeling a core collapse supernova

Stars greater than eight solar-masses end their lives spectacularly—as supernovae. These single-star supernovae are called core collapse supernovae because when their dense cores (at this stage composed primarily of iron) are no longer able to withstand the inward pressure of gravity they collapse inward before exploding. Core collapse supernovae with strong hydrogen emission lines are thought to

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Key phosphorus-based molecule for life on Earth may have come from space

The answer to "How did the first organisms on Earth incorporate the critical element phosphorus?" has been a quandary for researchers, but, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa physical chemists believe a meteoric visitor could be the critical link. Phosphorus is a key element for the molecules that compose all living organisms and helps form the backbone of DNA molecules, cell membranes (phospholipids)

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Image of the Day: Legless Leaps

The goldenrod gall midge, a type of fly, bears larvae that can jump through the air despite their lack of limbs.

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Google's hate speech-detecting AI appears to be racially biased

AIs that spot abusive online content are up to twice as likely to identify tweets as offensive when by people who identify as African American

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Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser

We credit Socrates with the insight that 'the unexamined life is not worth living' and that to 'know thyself' is the path to true wisdom. But is there a right and a wrong way to go about such self-reflection? Simple rumination – the process of churning your concerns around in your head – isn't the answer. It's likely to cause you to become stuck in the rut of your own thoughts and immersed in the

10h

Patterns typically observed in water can also be found in light

Sometimes in shallow water, a type of wave can form that is much more stable than ordinary waves. Called solitons, these phenomena emerge as solitary waves and can travel long distances while maintaining their shape and speed, even after colliding with other waves.

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How to Love Your Enemies

The behavioral science of DIY depolarization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Windows into Science: Scientific Conferences

I am writing this on my way home from attending two scientific conferences. These meetings are critical components of the modern scientific enterprise, and they provide a lot of insights into how science works, so I thought it would be … Continue reading →

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Mosquitoes, war and power

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02418-6 Karen Masterson appraises the disease vector’s role in scientific and military history.

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The Hypocrisy of SoulCycle

The four-story shrine to bodily perfection known as Equinox in New York’s Gramercy neighborhood was empty on Friday afternoon. Actually, there were people, but it was not full. Of course, it was a gym on a Friday in a part of the city where people leave town for the Hamptons on Thursday in the summer. But according to Instagram and the news, the gym was quiet because it has become a hotbed of pol

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Dear Therapist: When I Bring Up Anything Serious, My Boyfriend Falls Apart

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist , I have an ongoing issue with my partner of seven years. If I ever bring up a “serious” topic, he won’t just resist talking about it, but have something bordering on a panic attack before shutting down complet

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ByteDance launches new search engine in China

ByteDance, the owner of short-video app TikTok, has launched a new search engine in China, entering a sector currently dominated by Baidu Inc.

11h

In Brain’s Electrical Ripples, Markers for Memories Appear – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog. For decades, scientists have been building a case for a link between memory and a particular type of brain signal. New work finally offers up proof positive of that connection. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda / Quanta Magazine It’s very easy to break things in biology,” said Loren Frank , a neuroscientist at the University of California, Sa

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Meet the next generation of entrepreneurs. They’re all over 65.

Inside Senior Planet, the tech-savviest retirement community on earth.

11h

Glohede motordele fra Boeing 787 regnede ned over Rom-forstad

Norwegian-flyet var udstyret med Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-motorer, som længe har været et problembarn for flyselskaber, der flyver med Dreamliner.

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How to Love Your Enemies

The behavioral science of DIY depolarization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How Smaller Cities Are Luring High-Tech Talent

To offset the loss of educated workers to “superstar cities,” more places are offering perks like relocation stipends and the option to work remotely.

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Touchless Gesture Controls on Phones? Think Bigger

The new gesture controls on Samsung, LG, and Google's smartphones feel like a failure of imagination—but really, it's a failure of application.

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How to Love Your Enemies

The behavioral science of DIY depolarization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Debate Arises over Teaching "Growth Mindsets" to Motivate Students

Research shows conflicting data on the impact of the intervention, but a major new study confirms it can work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Debate Arises over Teaching "Growth Mindsets" to Motivate Students

Research shows conflicting data on the impact of the intervention, but a major new study confirms it can work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A company has used trees to find gold deep underground in Australia

A technique that uses trees to spot minerals in the ground has had one of its first major successes, after a company struck gold in South Australia

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Saudi Aramco says half-year net income slips to $46.9 bn

Saudi energy giant Aramco said Monday its first half net income for 2019 slipped nearly 12 percent to $46.9 billion, a first such disclosure that still reinforces its position as the world's …

11h

Trafikforsker: GDPR kan skubbe os ud af EU

Myndigheder i EU afviser, at forskere må bruge data fra videooptagelser af personer til udvikling af ny teknologi. Konsekvensen kan blive at flytte forskningen ud af EU, anfører forsker.

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Debate Arises over Teaching "Growth Mindsets" to Motivate Students

Research shows conflicting data on the impact of the intervention, but a major new study confirms it can work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dozens Arrested at #JewsAgainstICE Protest at Amazon Store in NYC

Jewish community groups protesting Amazon Web Service’s (AWS) cloud computing contracts with and other technical support for Immigration and Customs Enforcement say that dozens of their members …

11h

“This Land Was Our Land”

In the decades since World War II, massive dispossession has destroyed black farming in America. An occupation that has defined the African American experience has nearly ceased to exist, as 98 percent of black agricultural landowners have lost their land since the 1950s, often under circumstances that amount to theft. Through a variety of means—sometimes legal, often coercive, in many cases lega

12h

Democrats Should Just Stick to What’s Popular

Donald Trump poses a terrible threat to minority communities throughout the country, is deepening the chasm between rich and poor, and is inflicting serious damage on democratic institutions. It’s therefore a matter of the greatest moral urgency to make sure that somebody—anybody—stops Trump from winning a second term in office. But many of the problems facing the country started well before Trum

12h

The New Servant Class

In an age of persistently high inequality, work in high-cost metros catering to the whims of the wealthy—grooming them, stretching them, feeding them, driving them—has become one of the fastest-growing industries. The MIT economist David Autor calls it “wealth work.” Low-skill, low-pay, and disproportionately done by women, these jobs congregate near dense urban labor markets, multiplying in neig

12h

The Great Land Robbery

Images above: A sign on a utility pole to deter hunters, near the old Scott-family homestead, Drew, Mississippi; Willena's brother Isaac Daniel Scott Sr. amid soybeans in Mound Bayou. I. Wiped Out “You ever chop before?” Willena Scott-White was testing me. I sat with her in the cab of a Chevy Silverado pickup truck, swatting at the squadrons of giant, fluttering mosquitoes that had invaded the in

12h

An Identity Crisis for the Australian Dingo

To some Australians, the iconic, free-roaming dingo is a beloved member of the nation’s unique fauna. To others, it is little more than an agricultural pest. Its future could hinge on the question of whether it should be officially classified as a unique species or just another wild dog.

12h

Techtopia #118: Dansk bakteriedræber laver penicillins afløser

Hvert år dør ca. 100 danskere som følge af bakterier, der er resistente overfor antibiotika. Det problem vil den danske start-up SniprBiome løse ved hjælp af genredigeringsteknologien Crispr.

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Plants don’t have feelings and aren’t conscious, a biologist argues

The rise of the field of “plant neurobiology” has this scientist and his colleagues pushing back.

12h

Band-collision gel electrophoresis

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11438-9 Electrophoretic mobility shift assays are widely used in gel electrophoresis to study binding interactions between different molecular species, but these assays access only a subset of reaction possibilities. Here, the authors develop a band-collision gel electrophoresis (BCGE) approach that demonstrates a muc

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Robust continuous in vitro culture of the Plasmodium cynomolgi erythrocytic stages

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11332-4 Present understanding of Plasmodium vivax biology is hampered by its inability to grow in vitro. Here, the authors developed an in vitro culture of its simian counterpart, P. cynomolgi, which shares morphological and phenotypic similarities with P. vivax, initiating a new phase in vivax research.

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Engineering a microbial biosynthesis platform for de novo production of tropane alkaloids

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11588-w Tropane alkaloids (TAs) are a group of phytochemicals that are used to treat neurological disorders. Here, the authors engineer baker’s yeast to produce tropine, a key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of TAs, and cinnamoyltropine, a non-canonical TA, from simple carbon and nitrogen sources.

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Publisher Correction: Chip-scale atomic diffractive optical elements

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11529-7

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Anomalous quantum Griffiths singularity in ultrathin crystalline lead films

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11607-w Evidence of quantum phase transitions is normally difficult to be detected. Here, Liu and Wang et al. report divergent critical exponent in ultrathin Pb films with superconducting fluctuations and spin-orbit interaction, indicating an anomalous quantum Griffiths singularity of superconductor-metal transition.

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CAF hierarchy driven by pancreatic cancer cell p53-status creates a pro-metastatic and chemoresistant environment via perlecan

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10968-6 Subtypes of cancer associated fibroblasts can both promote and suppress tumorigenesis. Here, the authors investigate how p53 status in pancreatic cancer cells affects their interaction with cancer associated fibroblasts, and report perlecan as a mediator of the pro-metastatic environment.

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Towards general network architecture design criteria for negative gas adsorption transitions in ultraporous frameworks

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11565-3 Porous framework material DUT-49 was recently demonstrated to exhibit a unique counterintuitive negative gas adsorption (NGA) behaviour. Here the authors identify framework DUT-50 as an additional pressure amplifying material that features distinct NGA transitions, and suggest structural design criteria to acc

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Parallels in the sequential organization of birdsong and human speech

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11605-y By examining the organization of bird song and human speech, the authors show that the two types of communication signals have similar sequential structures, following both hierarchical and Markovian organization.

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Aluminum paper foiled by slew of errors

The authors of a 2019 paper on the properties of an aluminum alloy have retracted the work because, well, it was pretty much wrong. The article, “Effect of ultrasonic temperature and output power on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast 6063 aluminum alloy,” appeared in the March issue of the Journal of Alloys and Compounds, … Continue reading

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Dense gas detected in intercore bridges in the S235 star-forming region

Using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO), astronomers have investigated a massive star-forming region known as S235. The study resulted in detecting high-density gas in this region, which could be helpful in advancing the knowledge of star-formation mechanisms. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 2 on arXiv.org.

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Hackers Can Now Target DSLR Cameras With Sophisticated Remote Ransomware Attacks

Security researchers have discovered it is possible to hack a digital SLR camera with Wi-Fi capabilities (fast becoming a common feature in modern DSLR cameras) to install ransomware, thereby …

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China's sovereign digital currency is 'almost ready': PBOC official

China's central bank is "almost ready" to issue the country's own sovereign digital currency, a senior central bank officer said.

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Biohacker Implants RFID Chip Into Her Arm To Unlock Her Tesla Model 3

The idea of implanting technology into our bodies isn’t exactly new. However, it seems that one particular biohacker by the name of Amie DD has gone one step further by implanting an …

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A Spotlight on: The New Digital Economy

submitted by /u/dreamersonder [link] [comments]

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Færre kulhydrater forbedrer type 2-diabetikeres evne til at regulere blodsukkeret

Patienter med type 2-diabetes forbedrer evnen til at regulere blodsukkeret, hvis de spiser mad med et…

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Nu kommer ‘sorptiv køling’: Fjernvarme skal køle bygninger i sommervarmen

PLUS. Flere bygninger i Norge ibrugtager nu teknologi, som gør, at fjernvarmen gør nytte selv i varme sommeruger.

12h

Key to targeting the spread of pancreatic cancer

Targeting the tissue around pancreatic cancer cells may be the key to stopping their spread and improving chemotherapy outcomes.

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Evaluating blood flow is key to early diagnosis and treatment for people with critical limb ischemia

The strengths and limitations of non-invasive and other imaging techniques used to diagnose critical limb ischemia are reviewed in a new statement from the American Heart Association.Sex and ethnic disparities exist in the diagnosis and treatment of critical limb ischemia.

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Recent pace of change in human impact on the world’s ocean

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47201-9

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Exosomal miR-16-5p as a target for malignant mesothelioma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48133-0

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Microbiota-derived Trimethylamine N-oxide Predicts Cardiovascular Risk After STEMI

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48246-6

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Enlarged Egg Size Increases Offspring Fitness of a Frog Species on the Zhoushan Archipelago of China

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48147-8

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Light needle microscopy with spatially transposed detection for axially resolved volumetric imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48265-3

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Improved culture of fastidious Gemmata spp. bacteria using marine sponge skeletons

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48293-z

13h

Telegram’s latest update helps you cut down on notification overload

The messaging app Telegram has been updated with a number of features that should cut down on the amount of notifications and noise generated by the app. Up first is a new silent …

13h

Finding Amelia Earhart’s Plane Seemed Impossible. Then Came a Startling Clue.

Robert Ballard has found the Titanic and other famous shipwrecks. This month his crew started trying to solve one of the 20th century’s greatest mysteries.

13h

Perseid Meteor Shower Will Peak in Night Skies

Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you’re lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.

13h

The Contradictory Americana on Display at the Iowa State Fair

DES MOINES—Children are being shot, another apocalyptic climate report just hit, but the 2020 Democratic candidates still made time for fried Oreos at the Iowa State Fair. And fried cheese curds, fried PB&J, and giant turkey legs. Senator Kamala Harris of California bought a six-pack of pork chops on a stick. Former Vice President Joe Biden walked into the fair saying, “I tell ya what. I’m an ice

13h

Twinfluencers Are Taking Over the Internet

You’re not imagining it: Influencers really are multiplying. There are the Dolan Twins, a pair of square-jawed 19-year-olds who have amassed more than 10 million subscribers on YouTube and millions more on Instagram. They are joined by the Merrell Twins , t he Rybka Twins , Niki and Gabi DeMartino , and Brooklyn and Bailey McKnight —massive YouTube stars, all. At this point, every up-and-coming Y

13h

Almen praksis bøder for IT-slendrian i Hovedstaden

Region Hovedstaden bruger millioner på at rette op på Sundhedsplatformen – samtidig fjerner regionen de praktiserende lægers mulighed for at sende patienter til røntgenundersøgelser på Gentofte Hospital uden forudgående aftale.

13h

Hackers could use Wi-Fi to install ransomware on DSLR cameras

Digital cameras with built-in Wi-Fi let people quickly send images to other devices. But a vulnerability in the process could leave people’s cameras exposed

13h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor placerer man ikke vindmøller på gitre på samme vis som højspændingsmaster?

En læser undrer sig over, at vindmøller ikke er placeret på tårne til gittermaster. Seniorforsker på DTU Vindenergi forklarer, hvorfor det foreløbig hører til sjældenhederne.

13h

Americans still (mostly) trust scientists and doctors, but there are some troubling warning signs

Given all the denial of the science behind vaccines, GMOs, evolution, and climate science, you might think that Americans in general distrust scientists and physicians. It's actually not true. Trust in scientists and doctors remains high, but there are still areas where mistrust of scientists is a significant problem. What can be done?

14h

Our Galaxy's Supermassive Black Hole Has Emitted a Mysteriously Bright Flare

Astronomers are trying to figure out what that was.

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Alzheimer's disease destroys neurons that keep us awake

Researchers have noted excessive daytime napping can develop long before memory problems of Alzheimer's disease appear. Prior studies considered excessive daytime napping compensation for poor nighttime sleep caused by Alzheimer's-related disruptions in sleep-promoting brain regions; others argued that the sleep problems contribute to progression of the disease. But now UC San Francisco scientists

14h

Here There Be Dragons. But Can They Survive an Invasion of Tourists?

Barring tourists from the giant lizards’ island lair may save them, but the moratorium could doom residents, who will have to leave, too. If they refuse? “It’s their own fault if the Komodo eat them.”

14h

Grouse shooting: Labour calls for review amid habitat concerns

Labour raises environmental concerns ahead of the four-month grouse shooting season from Monday.

15h

China new-energy vehicle sales drop for first time in over two years

Sales of new energy vehicles (NEVs) in China fell 4.7% in July from a year earlier, the first drop in more that two years, data from the country's biggest auto industry association showed. …

15h

Lumske omdirigeringer understreger, at internettet er bygget af hippier til hippier

Internettet er strukturelt set tillidsbaseret og er derfor skrøbeligt, hvis aktører enten laver fejl eller ikke spiller efter reglerne.

15h

Understanding China's robot phenomenon

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Can you solve it? Get the gossip with Bobby Seagull

How to spread the word UPDATE: To read the solution click here Today’s puzzle was suggested to me by Bobby Seagull, who was told it by his brother, who was told it by a Cambridge don. Four friends each have a different piece of gossip. They are all in separate locations, and can communicate only via their phones. Continue reading…

15h

Breast Milk's Unique Composition May Actually Help Babies Tell Day From Night

This could be important for those who feed pumped milk.

16h

Aspirin may help some breast cancer survivors, but changes in DNA may mean harm for others

Previous studies have shown that while some women who use aspirin and are later diagnosed with breast cancer may live longer, a portion of aspirin users with breast cancer appeared to have a higher risk of mortality following breast cancer. According to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, the reason for this reverse effect could

16h

In the name of community outreach, chemical firms invest in education

Industry sees an opportunity to engage with communities while ensuring a field of well-trained recruits

16h

The Imperial Myths Driving Brexit

For more than three years, the world has watched Britain attempt to act on the result of its 2016 referendum and leave the European Union. Yet while the causes of the Brexit vote were complex, the causes of the catastrophic handling of the Brexit process might be familiar to anyone versed in imperial and postimperial history. They stem from what appears to be a belief in British exceptionalism: t

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Drug maker 'will make $21bn from treating cystic fibrosis'

Vertex is accused of raking in vast profits while making Orkambi unaffordable to NHS A US company, which is refusing to drop its price for the life-changing cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi to make it affordable to NHS England, is set to make $21bn (£17bn) in profit from that and a sister medicine, according to research. Countries around the world are struggling to pay for Orkambi, made by Vertex, wh

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Over-55s shouldn't wait for retirement to make time for their health

People in middle-age need to keep up their physical activity levels if they are to enjoy a fit and healthy retirement — according to a new report.The study reveals that over-55s in particular should be doing more to keep fit as they approach retirement age — because of the physical, mental and social benefits of being active. But health problems, not having enough time or energy because of work,

17h

New test enhances ability to predict risk of developing cervical cancer in HPV-positive women

Ninety-nine percent of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). More than 200 HPVs associated with varying degrees of cancer risk complicate diagnosis and treatment. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new 'two-for-one' diagnostic approach that not only detects the type of HPV infection, but also indicates precancerous markers. This test may improve the a

17h

Aspirin may interact with cells' DNA modifications to alter breast cancer outcomes

New findings suggest that women with specific DNA characteristics in certain areas of the genome may live longer if they take aspirin before they are diagnosed with breast cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings point to the need for studies on the potential of aspirin to prevent or treat breast cancer in some individuals.

17h

Managing ovarian cancer risk in women with BRCA1/2 genetic variants

A new review to help physicians manage the risk of ovarian cancer in women who carry the BRCA1/2 gene mutations is published in CMAJ.

17h

Hospital harms total $1 billion for health care system in Ontario in fiscal year 2015/16

Experiencing harm in hospital significantly increases the length of stay, length of recovery after discharge and health system costs, which amounted to more than $1 billion in Ontario in fiscal year 2015/16, according to new research in CMAJ.

17h

Lumske re-routes understreger, at internettet er bygget af hippier til hippier

Internettet er strukturelt set tillidsbaseret og er derfor skrøbeligt, hvis aktører enten laver fejl eller ikke spiller efter reglerne.

18h

Vestgrønland brænder på 35. dag: Antallet af brande i Arktis er stigende

PLUS. Alene i Alaska er der registreret 400 brande i år, og i Sibirien har flammerne fortæret et område på størrelse med Belgien.

18h

The Lion King Has Edged Out Frozen As the Highest-Grossing Animated Film of All Time, More Proof That Disney’s Monopoly Is Inescapable and Nothing Matters

This is what entertainment journalism is, in 2019: watching Disney score an unending series of victories over itself as the film industry grows smaller and smaller. Read more…

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Manipulating Visual Cortex to Induce Hallucinations

from Terence McKenna – Ayahuasca Stories What is a hallucination? The question seems simple enough. “A hallucination is a perception in the absence of external stimulus that has qualities of real perception. Hallucinations are vivid, substantial, and are perceived to be located in external objective space.” When we think of visual hallucinations, we often think of trippy colorful images induced b

19h

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #32

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… El Niño/La Niña Update… Toon of the Week… SkS in the News… Coming Soon on SkS… Poster of the Week… SkS Week in Review… Story of the Week… Change food production and stop abusing land, major climate report warns Land degradation, including deforestation, produces almost a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. Pictured: An aeria

19h

Recombinant Human Proteins 101

Learn more about why we need recombinant proteins, how human recombinant proteins are produced, the pros and cons of different protein expression hosts, and human recombinant protein applications.

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Expanded Droplet Digital PCR Multiplexing Capability Using Two Different Strategies

Download this white paper to learn about two strategies for measuring multiple targets simultaneously by creating a unique endpoint fluorescence for each target.

20h

A Direct Comparison Between Common Antibody Generation Platforms

Download this white paper from GenScript to learn more about the benefits of the hybridoma technique and alternative approaches for mAb generation.

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Is this the world's most sustainable building?

An enormous logistics warehouse in the Netherlands is helping to power 750 households a year.

22h

Equinox and the dangers of cancel culture

A boycott of Equinox and SoulCycle has been called as owner Stephen Ross held a fundraiser for Donald Trump. While the story has made headlines, the actual consequences of member cancellations are not what many think. The episode provides another example of the dangers of cancel culture. None Now that billionaire Stephen Ross's fundraiser for Donald Trump is a footnote, backlash over a handful of

22h

Fortnite star Ninja left Twitch. Then the platform recommended porn to his followers

Tyler Blevins, a.k.a "Ninja," alleged Twitch mishandled his dormant account after he moved to Microsoft's Mixer.

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How to build a motion-controlled fan

With this setup, you'll never have to turn on your fan again. (Jeremy S. Cook/) With summer in full swing in North America, finding a way to keep cool is a must. If you’re someone like me who relies on a fan to keep yourself from soaking your clothes in sweat, you’ve probably forgotten to turn it on, or simply wished it’d activate automatically the moment you walked in the room. Fortunately, with

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