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nyheder2019august13

Trump is attacking the Endangered Species Act when we need it most

Bald eagles used to be on the U.S. endangered list, but thanks to measures taken by the original law their numbers have been rising dramatically. (Holger Link/Unsplash/) On Monday, the Trump Administration announced sweeping changes to the Endangered Species Act, a move that conservation advocates say will greatly weaken the historic legislation and push more species toward extinction. In a press

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Minister: Ladestandere skal være obligatoriske ved nye, større byggerier

Fra 10. marts næste år skal der i alle større nybyggerier etableres et antal ladestandere til elbiler eller forberedes etablering af ladestandere, fremgår det af et nyt lovforslag. Samme krav til eksisterende bygninger følger efter i 2025.

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Research brief: High fat foods can increase CBD absorption into the body

U of M researchers compared CBD absorption in patients on an empty stomach versus a standardized fatty breakfast.

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James Webb Space Telescope could begin learning about TRAPPIST-1 atmospheres in a year

New research from astronomers at the University of Washington uses the intriguing TRAPPIST-1 planetary system as a kind of laboratory to model not the planets themselves, but how the coming James Webb Space Telescope might detect and study their atmospheres, on the path toward looking for life beyond Earth.

25min

Non-native invasive insects, diseases decreasing carbon stored in US forests

A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States.

39min

Facebook Has Been Secretly Transcribing Your Conversations

Listening In Facebook has been clandestinely accumulating written transcriptions of its users’ conversations, which the social media giant recorded through their phone microphones. That’s according to third-party contractors who spoke to Bloomberg about the practice. The contractors said that they were paid to listen in on countless, occasional vulgar conversations among Facebook Messenger users,

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This $600 Million Supercomputer Will Manage the US’s Nukes

Nuclear Deterrent In 2000, Congress created the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to manage the United States’ nuclear stockpile — and starting in 2023, the agency will do so with the help of El Capitan , an incredibly powerful supercomputer. “NNSA is modernizing the Nuclear Security Enterprise to face 21st- century threats,” NNSA administrator Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty said in a state

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Futurism’s New ‘Cartoons From Tomorrow’ Book Is a ‘Wry and Often Ingenious’ Look at Our High-Tech World

In the future, all books will be digital. They’ll have to be. We’ve all seen science fiction movies. At some point Earth will become completely uninhabitable, whether because of a global thermonuclear war against the machines, or because we refused to give up plastic straws. When that happens, and the human race realizes it must take to the cosmos to survive, there’s just not going to be enough r

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Hookah may be worse for you than cigarettes

Smoking hookah waterpipes could be even more dangerous than other forms of smoking, according to a new study. Using a custom-built testing apparatus, chemists analyzed emissions during a typical communal waterpipe session and found that one draw from a pipe can contain as many noxious substances as smoke from an entire cigarette. One in five college students in the US and Europe have tried a hook

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Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old

Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology and coauthored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old

Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology and coauthored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

52min

Not the Mayflower, but Close: Greta Thunberg Prepares to Sail for America

The 16-year-old climate activist is crossing the Atlantic to attend a United Nations climate summit. She refuses to fly because aviation has such an enormous carbon footprint.

52min

These Structures Can Make Objects 'Invisible' to Water Waves

The cloaked objects leave no wake. Ripples_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Woods People via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Physics Tuesday, August 13, 2019 – 16:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists have designed devices that can hide objects from water waves similar to how invisibility cloaks hide objects from light waves. The inventions might one day help reduce th

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Watch: Robot maps underground mine with Wi-Fi ‘breadcrumb trail’

Researchers are competing to make robots that can autonomously map and navigate an underground mine. The first scored event in the multi-year DARPA Subterranean Challenge will take place from August 15-22 in the research mine the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health operates in South Park Township, outside of Pittsburgh. Explorer, a team from Carnegie Mellon University, is one of

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Studying largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years

About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. Its impact formed a 25-mile diameter crater that now lies buried beneath the Chesapeake Bay. A team of researchers has obtained drilling samples from the Ocean Drilling Project site 1073 and dated them with the "uranium-thorium-helium technique" for the first time.

55min

Deadly protein duo reveals new drug targets for viral diseases

New research details how two highly lethal viruses have greater pathogenic potential when their proteins are combined.

55min

Global tracking devices negatively affect the survival rate of sage-grouses

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that currently-available global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices, previously thought to not alter animal survival rates, can decrease greater sage-grouse survival.

55min

Arctic could be iceless in September if temps increase 2 degrees

Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study.

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Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old

Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a new study.

55min

Arctic Ocean could have no September sea ice if global average temperatures increase by 2 degrees

Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati.

55min

Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old

Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology and coauthored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Treatment doctor tested on himself can put others into remission

Castleman Disease patients who do not respond to the only drug currently approved by the FDA may have another option that targets a specific pathway called PI3K/Akt/mTOR.

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How Weather Forecasts Are Made

Meteorologists are better at their jobs than you might think. Here's how heaps of data are turned into a forecast relevant to you.

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Afraid of Needles? You May Want to Blame Your Genes

You might have your relatives to thank for some specific fears.

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Facebook paid contractors to transcribe Messenger calls – CNET

The social network says it halted the process last week.

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Teens Now Trust YouTubers More Than Journalists

Kids These Days Teens would rather keep up on current events through YouTube and other social media platforms instead of news agencies, a new survey found. Over half of the 1,000 teens who responded to the poll, sponsored by SurveyMonkey and the media advocacy non-profit Common Sense Media, said they prefer YouTube to established news outlets, according to USA Today . Given recent news about how

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The best way to help cows and zebras? Make them live together

Surprising study finds benefits to ranches that open themselves up to wildlife

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Two Experimental Drugs Effective at Treating Ebola

REGN-EB3 and mAb114 reduced mortality in a clinical trial carried out during the ongoing outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo.

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Certain Personality Types Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

Some people go on dates just to score a free meal—a phenomenon known as a ‘foodie call.’ But it takes a certain personality type. Karen Hopkin reports.

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CBS, Viacom to reunite as media giants bulk up for streaming

CBS and Viacom announced a long-anticipated reunion Tuesday, bringing together their television networks and the Paramount movie studio as traditional media giants bulk up to challenge streaming …

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Arctic could be iceless in September if temps increase 2 degrees

Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati. The study by an international team of researchers was published in Nature Communications.

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Vaccin mot klamydia har testats på människor: ”Ett genombrott”

För första gången har ett vaccin för den sexuellt överförbara sjukdomen klamydia prövats på människor. Resultaten är lovande, säger Björn Herrmann, docent i klinisk mikrobiologi. – Immunförsvaret har gått igång på ett sätt som gör att man kan förvänta sig ett skydd mot klamydiainfektion.

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Teaching Toni Morrison

Christian Bourcart / Getty Every year, I get goosebumps. “Here is your copy of Beloved or Song of Solomon or Home ,” I say to my high-school students. And in that moment I am struck again by my awesome and humbling role in this seemingly mundane ritual: My God, I’m the person—me—who gets to introduce a new generation of readers to the work of Toni Morrison. I feel the tremendous honor of my role,

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Monarchs caught up in rewrite of endangered species rule

Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from its chrysalis. Eager to play his part, 3-year-old Thomas Powell flaps his arms and exclaims, "I'm flying! I'm flying!"

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Global tracking devices negatively affect the survival rate of sage-grouses

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that currently-available global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices, previously thought to not alter animal survival rates, can decrease greater sage-grouse survival.

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Researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years

About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. Its impact formed a 25-mile diameter crater that now lies buried beneath the Chesapeake Bay, an estuary in Virginia and Maryland. From this impact, the nearby area experienced fires, earthquakes, falling molten glass droplets, an air blast and a devastating tsunami.

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Monarchs caught up in rewrite of endangered species rule

Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from its chrysalis. Eager to play his part, 3-year-old Thomas Powell flaps his arms and exclaims, "I'm flying! I'm flying!"

1h

Global tracking devices negatively affect the survival rate of sage-grouses

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that currently-available global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices, previously thought to not alter animal survival rates, can decrease greater sage-grouse survival.

1h

Climate Shocks Could Reverse Gains in Child Malnutrition

Drought fueled by global warming could exacerbate food insecurity, particularly in developing countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Fight Over Section 230—and the Internet as We Know It

Mass shootings and executive orders have dragged the web's most consequential law back into the spotlight.

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Global tracking devices negatively affect the survival rate of sage-grouses

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that currently-available global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices, previously thought to not alter animal survival rates, can decrease greater sage-grouse survival.

2h

ASU researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years

About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. Its impact formed a 25-mile diameter crater that now lies buried beneath the Chesapeake Bay. A team of researchers has obtained drilling samples from the Ocean Drilling Project site 1073 and dated them with the "uranium-thorium-helium technique" for the first time.

2h

Deadly protein duo reveals new drug targets for viral diseases

New research from Cornell University details how two highly lethal viruses have greater pathogenic potential when their proteins are combined.

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Apple’s tap-to-use student IDs let pupils buy food and badge into their dorms

Apple Today’s college students rely on their ID cards for almost everything, including using them to get into the gym or to buy the cafeteria’s beloved turkey-avocado sandwich. …

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29 US states and cities sue Trump over climate protections

A coalition of 22 US states and seven cities on Tuesday sued President Donald Trump's administration to block it from easing restrictions on coal-burning power plants.

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Nate Mitchell Exits Facebook, Taking Oculus Era With Him

The executive, in announcing his departure, was the last of the Oculus founders still at the company.

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Rain Clouds Are Dropping Microplastic on the Rocky Mountains

Plastic Wrap There’s so much microplastic pollution out in the world that it’s now accumulating in rain clouds and pouring down onto the Earth. Gregory Weatherbee, a scientist from the US Geological Survey, was conducting an analysis of rainwater in the Rocky Mountains when he found an assortment of microscopic plastic fibers, according to The Guardian — an alarming sign of the breadth of contemp

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Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy

Scientists have discovered how diatoms—a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth's oxygen—harness solar energy for photosynthesis.

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Atomic 'Trojan horse' could inspire new generation of X-ray lasers and particle colliders

Scientists have demonstrated a potentially much brighter electron source based on plasma that could be used in more compact, more powerful particle accelerators.

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Fluorescent glow may reveal hidden life in the cosmos

Astronomers have uncovered a new way of searching for life in the cosmos. Harsh ultraviolet radiation flares from red suns, once thought to destroy surface life on planets, might help uncover hidden biospheres. Their radiation could trigger a protective glow from life on exoplanets called biofluorescence, according to new research.

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Marijuana may boost risky effects of drinking alcohol

Compared to people who only drank alcohol, those who used alcohol and marijuana simultaneously were more likely to drink heavier and more often, according to researchers. They were also more likely to experience alcohol-related problems — like impulsive actions they later regretted.

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Flavonoid-rich diet protects against cancer and heart disease, study finds

Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research.

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Certain Personality Types Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

Some people go on dates just to score a free meal—a phenomenon known as a ‘foodie call.’ But it takes a certain personality type. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy

Scientists have discovered how diatoms—a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth's oxygen—harness solar energy for photosynthesis.

2h

Growth mindset intervention boosts confidence, persistence in entrepreneurship students

A low-cost intervention aimed at fostering a growth mindset in students gave the students more confidence in their entrepreneurship abilities and helped them persist when challenges arose.

2h

Fluorescent glow may reveal hidden life in the cosmos

Astronomers have uncovered a new way of searching for life in the cosmos. Harsh ultraviolet radiation flares from red suns, once thought to destroy surface life on planets, might help uncover hidden biospheres. Their radiation could trigger a protective glow from life on exoplanets called biofluorescence, according to new Cornell University research.

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Deckhand Freddy Takes a Hit to the Knee | Deadliest Catch

Freddy pays a price as The Wizard hauls crab pots in intense seas. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/Discovery

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16 million Americans will vote on hackable paperless machines

Experts agree that paper ballots are needed, but eight American states will use completely paperless machines in the 2020 elections.

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Certain Personality Types Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

Some people go on dates just to score a free meal—a phenomenon known as a ‘foodie call.’ But it takes a certain personality type. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Growth mindset intervention boosts confidence, persistence in entrepreneurship students

A low-cost intervention aimed at fostering a growth mindset in students gave the students more confidence in their entrepreneurship abilities and helped them persist when challenges arose.

2h

A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm

A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study. The study was performed in mice, but the technique is likely to be widely applicable to other mammals as well.

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Near-Earth asteroid 2006 QV89 not a threat for next century

Observations of the near-Earth asteroid 2006 QV89 made on August 11, 2019 with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) have ruled out any potential future impact threat to the Earth by this asteroid for the next century.

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Too Much Karaoke Sent a Man to the Hospital with a Collapsed Lung

A man in China sang karaoke for so long and with such intensity that he suffered a collapsed lung.

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Fluorescent glow may reveal hidden life in the cosmos

Astronomers have uncovered a new way of searching for life in the cosmos. Harsh ultraviolet radiation flares from red suns, once thought to destroy surface life on planets, might help uncover hidden biospheres. Their radiation could trigger a protective glow from life on exoplanets called biofluorescence, according to new Cornell University research.

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Atomic 'Trojan horse' could inspire new generation of X-ray lasers and particle colliders

an international team of researchers, including scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has demonstrated a potentially much brighter electron source based on plasma that could be used in more compact, more powerful particle accelerators.

2h

Marijuana may boost risky effects of drinking alcohol

Compared to people who only drank alcohol, those who used alcohol and marijuana simultaneously were more likely to drink heavier and more often, according to researchers. They were also more likely to experience alcohol-related problems — like impulsive actions they later regretted.

2h

Maybe Neutron Stars 'Glitch Out' So Much Because They're Full of Soup

Why do some pulsars "glitch out" every few years? The answer could be in neutron soup.

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Telescopes in Hawaii reopen after deal with protesters

Construction of Thirty Meter Telescope remains stalled, but other astronomers return to work

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Key factors in how some algae harness solar energy

Scientists have discovered how diatoms — a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth's oxygen — harness solar energy for photosynthesis. The discovery could help lead to more efficient and affordable algae-based biofuels and combat climate change from fossil fuel burning.

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Heat Wave Sweeps Through Southern United States

Millions of people across Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee faced excessive heat warnings and high humidity.

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Ads Pitching CBD as a Cure-All Are Everywhere. Oversight Hasn’t Kept Up.

“Basically nobody” is overseeing the quality of the many cannabidiol products that have proliferated, one researcher said. The F.D.A. says it is doing everything it can.

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This Evil Charging Cable Will Infect Your Computer With a Virus

Not-so-Basic Cable Using a tiny implant, a security researcher was able to rig an Apple charging cable to give himself access to a user’s devices — meaning he could use it to steal your data or even infect your computer with a virus . “It looks like a legitimate cable and works just like one,” the researcher, who goes by the handle MG, told Motherboard . “Not even your computer will notice a diff

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Is self-actualization a biological need?

Maslow's hierarchy of needs sets self-actualization apart from many of the "baser" needs, like needing food or belonging. However, research in evolutionary psychology suggests that self-actualization may not be so different after all. Instead, it may simply be another way of attaining status, ensuring that the self-actualized individual can acquire a mate and care for offspring. None Although his

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Watch anything you want without signing up for every streaming service

As all the streaming services crowd 'round and shout, "Sign up for all of us!" you can look down and whisper, "No." (David Nield/) If you thought it was already hard to keep up with shows and the different platforms to stream them on, let us tell you that things just got even more complicated. This year, established players like Netflix , Amazon Prime Video, and Hulu will be joined by services fr

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Russia’s Gun-Shooting Robot Is Heading to the Space Station

Space Soldier The Russian space agency, Roscosmos, just unveiled test footage of a semi-autonomous robot named Fedor that will be sent up to the International Space Station next Thursday. The robot, which was previously shown aiming and firing guns in a 2017 video , is expected to help Russia develop and construct future bases and settlements on the Moon or other planets, according to Daily Mail

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Tarnished plant bug management strategies for Mid-Atlantic cotton

Tarnished plant bug is one of the most harmful pests of cotton in the mid-Atlantic states of Virginia and North Carolina. To learn more about this threat, Sally Taylor and Seth Dorman, of Virginia Tech Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center (AREC), scouted and studied cotton fields from 2016 to 2018. They present their findings in the webcast 'Tarnished Plant Bug Management Strategie

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The growing threat of tarnished plant bug

The tarnished plant bug is a profligate pest, which means it can feed on many different species, including cotton. Over the last 10 years, the tarnished plant bug has become one of the most important pests of cotton in North Carolina and Virginia. In the webcast 'Tarnished Plant Bug in North Carolina and Virginia,' Dominic Reisig introduces the pest, discusses its threat to cotton, and makes gener

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A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm

A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on Aug. 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The study was performed in mice, but the technique is likely to be widely applicabl

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Invasive Species Could Kill Nearly Half of U.S. Forests

Hemlock trees killed by hemlock woolly adelgid in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina. (Courtesy Songlin Fei) With its sparkling green wings, the emerald ash borer, a tiny beetle no longer than a knuckle-length, is almost beautiful. The insect however has been ravaging America’s forests for nearly 20 years. First seen in Michigan in the early 2000s, the invasive pest has killed mil

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Supernova Dust Found Hidden in Antarctic Snow

In this artist illustration, the sun (the yellow star at center) moves through a clump of interstellar gas that may still be raining down radioactive iron from a long-ago supernova explosion. (Credit: NASA/Goddard/Adler/U. Chicago/Wesleyan) Antarctica is one of the most pristine places on the planet. Thanks to its generally inhospitable nature, as well as its natural isolation, it’s a good place f

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An Italian Volcano Turned Out to Be a Fraud

Janine Krippner was the first to notice something amiss with the volcano. A volcanologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s Global Volcanism Program , Krippner was doing a routine fact-check in the program’s volcano registry, scrolling through photos of all kinds of volcanoes—from sleeping geological giants to actively raging mountains—while checking the accuracy of their captions. When she stumbl

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'Conversation-based' activities reduce mental illness stigma among college students

The first study to systematically survey a single graduating class on the effect of a multi-year campaign against mental illness has found that college students exposed to certain anti-stigma messages and activities are significantly less likely to stigmatize people with these conditions.

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Key factors in how some algae harness solar energy

Scientists have discovered how diatoms — a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth's oxygen — harness solar energy for photosynthesis. The discovery could help lead to more efficient and affordable algae-based biofuels and combat climate change from fossil fuel burning.

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Sperm sorting method could prevent girls being born, scientists warn

A new way of sorting sperm could lead to products that couples could use at home to make them less likely to conceive a girl, scientists have warned

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ExoMars Parachute Test Fails Again, Casting Doubt on Launch Plans

The European Space Agency (ESA) is hoping to launch a new ExoMars mission to the red planet next year, but the future of that mission is in doubt after a second parachute failure. The ESA confirms a recent parachute test here on Earth has failed, making this the second failure in the last few months. Landing missions on Mars is particularly challenging because of its thin atmosphere. There’s enou

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Nvidia Unveils Conversational AI Tech for Smarter Bots

Now that nearly every possible mobile device and appliance has either adopted or at least experimented with voice control, conversational AI is quickly becoming the new frontier. Instead of handling one query and providing one response or action, conversational AI aims to provide a realtime interactive system that can span multiple questions, answers, and comments. While the fundamental building

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Changing sperm speed can influence offspring’s sex, mouse study suggests

Technique can sort “male” sperm from “female”

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Sperm separation method may allow gender selection in IVF

Technique is based on differences in movement of sperm with X chromosome and Y chromosome A new sperm separation technique may one day allow prospective parents undergoing IVF to choose whether they have a boy or a girl before fertilisation takes place, researchers say. Scientists in Japan have reported a new method which allows them to separate mouse sperm carrying an X chromosome from those car

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Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets.

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How to recognize mental illness in children

Parents, teachers, and other adults can learn to recognize the warning signs of mental illness in children. A recent report shows a rise in suicide attempts via drug overdose by preteens in New Jersey over the past 18 months. The findings align with national trends . “This illustrates the need for people who encounter children regularly to be aware of early signs of mental illness, such as anxiet

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Researchers Develop New Method for Sexing Sperm

Scientists found they could sort mouse sperm prior to IVF by treating semen with a drug that selectively slows down X-bearing cells.

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Growth mindset intervention boosts confidence, persistence in entrepreneurship students

A low-cost intervention aimed at fostering a growth mindset in students gave the students more confidence in their entrepreneurship abilities and helped them persist when challenges arose.

3h

Non-smokers can get emphysema from air pollution

Long-term exposure to air pollution was linked to increases in emphysema between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study.

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Gene linked to Alzheimer's disease is involved in neuronal communication

A new study sheds new light on how the CD2AP gene may enhance Alzheimer's disease susceptibility.

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Mapping the energetic landscape of solar cells

A new spectroscopic method now makes it possible to measure and visualize the energetic landscape inside solar cells based on organic materials. It was developed by a physicist. This novel visualization technique enables scientists to study the physical principles of organic photovoltaics with extreme precision and to better understand processes such as energetic losses.

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UTI discovery may lead to new treatments

Sufferers of recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs) could expect more effective treatments. UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections.

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Human impacts on oceans nearly doubled in recent decade

Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action.

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Treat insomnia before sleep apnea

The 'double whammy' of co-occurring insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea is a complex problem best managed with non-drug targeted psych interventions, a new study has found. By following simple new guidelines, people with the concurrent conditions reported great improvement to both their sleep, and their health — with about 50% improvement in global insomnia severity and night-time insomnia after

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All-optical diffractive neural network closes performance gap with electronic neural networks

A new article demonstrates distinct improvements to the inference and generalization performance of diffractive optical neural networks.

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A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm

A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on August 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The study was performed in mice, but the technique is likely to be widely applica

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‘Stature gene’ may reveal why these hunter-gatherers are among the world’s smallest humans

Study may resolve long-standing debate about origin of Africa’s “Pygmies”

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A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm

A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on August 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The study was performed in mice, but the technique is likely to be widely applica

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Environmental crime goes way beyond poaching

Transnational environmental crime takes an estimated $91 to $259 billion bite out of the global economy and has strong ties to organized crime finance, according to a new study. This category of crime includes wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, dumping hazardous waste, and more. “Transnational environmental crime, or TEC, has become the largest financial driver of social conflicts in the worl

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Induced seismicity and fluid injection House in central Oklahoma damaged in an earthquake on November 6, 2011. Image courtesy of Flickr/US Geological Survey. Over the past decade, the central and eastern United States have experienced an increased number of earthquakes, which are mostly attributed to waste fluid disposal through subsurface…

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Temperature impact on GDP growth is overestimated [Social Sciences]

I am writing about the PNAS article entitled “Global warming has increased global economic inequality” by Diffenbaugh and Burke (1). I believe that all of the numerical results cited in this article are wrong, because the methodology is not valid. The abstract says this research yields “a ratio between the…

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Reply to Rosen: Temperature-growth relationship is robust [Social Sciences]

Rosen (1) argues that because our statistical model relating temperature to economic growth does not explain all of the variation in economic growth over the last half-century it cannot uncover the relationship between temperature and growth. This is a little like saying a medicine cannot possibly be effective at reducing…

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Familial hyperkalemia and hypertension and a hypothesis to explain proximal renal tubular acidosis [Biological Sciences]

Familial hyperkalemia and hypertension (FHHt) is an inherited disease characterized by hyperkalemia, hypertension, and hyperchloremic acidosis (1, 2). The primary defect is a hyperactive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC), expressed exclusively in renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT). FHHt is caused by a mutation in 1 of 4 genes, WNK1, WNK4, KLHL3,…

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Reply to Farfel et al.: Is enhanced chloride reabsorption in proximal tubule a possible mechanism of metabolic acidosis in PHAII? [Biological Sciences]

Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis along with hypertension and hyperkalemia are features of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). Increased activity of sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is believed to be an important mechanism of these phenotypic features (1). Gain-of-function mutations of WNK4 in PHAII activate NCC in the distal convoluted tubule, which leads to…

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QnAs with Elizabeth Ainsworth [QnAs]

The atmosphere of today will be increasingly different in the coming decades as it continues to respond to human influences. Elizabeth Ainsworth, of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS), recently received the 2019 National Academy of Sciences Prize in Food and Agriculture Sciences for her efforts…

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Water and methane stay together at extreme pressures [Chemistry]

Large lakes of liquid methane nestle between mountain ranges of solid water ice in the polar regions of Jupiter’s moon Titan (1, 2). This strange world illustrates in a quite dramatic fashion that the isoelectronic CH4 and H2O molecules display profoundly different physical properties including a 182 °C difference in…

3h

Origin of programmed cell death from antiviral defense? [Genetics]

Viruses and other genetic parasites are ubiquitous in the biosphere, and virtually all cellular organisms evolved multiple defense mechanisms to cope with onslaughts of these parasites (1). In multicellular life forms, a major class of such mechanisms is programmed cell death (PCD), whereby an infected cell “commits altruistic suicide” to…

3h

Universal amplification-free molecular diagnostics by billion-fold hierarchical nanofluidic concentration [Engineering]

Rapid and reliable detection of ultralow-abundance nucleic acids and proteins in complex biological media may greatly advance clinical diagnostics and biotechnology development. Currently, nucleic acid tests rely on enzymatic processes for target amplification (e.g., PCR), which have many inherent issues restricting their implementation in diagnostics. On the other hand, there…

3h

Infants expect leaders to right wrongs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Anthropological and psychological research on direct third-party punishment suggests that adults expect the leaders of social groups to intervene in within-group transgressions. Here, we explored the developmental roots of this expectation. In violation-of-expectation experiments, we asked whether 17-mo-old infants (n = 120) would expect a leader to intervene when observing…

3h

Selective incorporation of proteinaceous over nonproteinaceous cationic amino acids in model prebiotic oligomerization reactions [Biochemistry]

Numerous long-standing questions in origins-of-life research center on the history of biopolymers. For example, how and why did nature select the polypeptide backbone and proteinaceous side chains? Depsipeptides, containing both ester and amide linkages, have been proposed as ancestors of polypeptides. In this paper, we investigate cationic depsipeptides that form…

3h

Two PKA RI{alpha} holoenzyme states define ATP as an isoform-specific orthosteric inhibitor that competes with the allosteric activator, cAMP [Biochemistry]

Protein kinase A (PKA) holoenzyme, comprised of a cAMP-binding regulatory (R)-subunit dimer and 2 catalytic (C)-subunits, is the master switch for cAMP-mediated signaling. Of the 4 R-subunits (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, RIIβ), RIα is most essential for regulating PKA activity in cells. Our 2 RIα2C2 holoenzyme states, which show different conformations…

3h

In vitro 0N4R tau fibrils contain a monomorphic {beta}-sheet core enclosed by dynamically heterogeneous fuzzy coat segments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Misfolding of the microtubule-binding protein tau into filamentous aggregates is characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. Determining the structures and dynamics of these tau fibrils is important for designing inhibitors against tau aggregation. Tau fibrils obtained from patient brains have been found by…

3h

High-speed AFM reveals subsecond dynamics of cardiac thin filaments upon Ca2+ activation and heavy meromyosin binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) can be used to study dynamic processes with real-time imaging of molecules within 1- to 5-nm spatial resolution. In the current study, we evaluated the 3-state model of activation of cardiac thin filaments (cTFs) isolated as a complex and deposited on a mica-supported lipid bilayer….

3h

Structural basis for GPCR-independent activation of heterotrimeric Gi proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Heterotrimeric G proteins are key molecular switches that control cell behavior. The canonical activation of G proteins by agonist-occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has recently been elucidated from the structural perspective. In contrast, the structural basis for GPCR-independent G protein activation by a novel family of guanine-nucleotide exchange modulators (GEMs)…

3h

Regulation of CCL2 expression in human vascular endothelial cells by a neighboring divergently transcribed long noncoding RNA [Cell Biology]

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is driven, in part, by activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). In response to inflammatory stimuli, the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling pathway orchestrates the expression of a network of EC genes that contribute to monocyte recruitment and diapedesis…

3h

Disruption of IRE1{alpha} through its kinase domain attenuates multiple myeloma [Cell Biology]

Multiple myeloma (MM) arises from malignant immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells and remains an incurable, often lethal disease despite therapeutic advances. The unfolded-protein response sensor IRE1α supports protein secretion by deploying a kinase–endoribonuclease module to activate the transcription factor XBP1s. MM cells may co-opt the IRE1α–XBP1s pathway; however, the validity of…

3h

Meiotic viral attenuation through an ancestral apoptotic pathway [Genetics]

The programmed release of apoptogenic proteins from mitochondria is a core event of apoptosis, although ancestral roles of this phenomenon are not known. In mammals, one such apoptogenic protein is Endonuclease G (EndoG), a conserved mitochondrial nuclease that fragments the DNA of dying cells. In this work, we show that…

3h

A deep intronic splice mutation of STAT3 underlies hyper IgE syndrome by negative dominance [Genetics]

Heterozygous in-frame mutations in coding regions of human STAT3 underlie the only known autosomal dominant form of hyper IgE syndrome (AD HIES). About 5% of familial cases remain unexplained. The mutant proteins are loss-of-function and dominant-negative when tested following overproduction in recipient cells. However, the production of mutant proteins has…

3h

TMEM203 is a binding partner and regulator of STING-mediated inflammatory signaling in macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]

Regulation of IFN signaling is critical in host recognition and response to pathogens while its dysregulation underlies the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. STimulator of IFN Genes (STING) has been identified as a critical mediator of IFN inducing innate immune pathways, but little is known about direct coregulators of this…

3h

SLAMF9 regulates pDC homeostasis and function in health and disease [Immunology and Inflammation]

SLAMF9 belongs to the conserved lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF). Unlike other SLAMs, which have been extensively studied, the role of SLAMF9 in the immune system remained mostly unexplored. By generating CRISPR/Cas9 SLAMF9 knockout mice, we analyzed the role of this receptor in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which preferentially express…

3h

Autophagy genes in myeloid cells counteract IFN{gamma}-induced TNF-mediated cell death and fatal TNF-induced shock [Immunology and Inflammation]

Host inflammatory responses must be tightly regulated to ensure effective immunity while limiting tissue injury. IFN gamma (IFNγ) primes macrophages to mount robust inflammatory responses. However, IFNγ also induces cell death, and the pathways that regulate IFNγ-induced cell death are incompletely understood. Using genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screening, we identified autophagy genes…

3h

How Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus stably transforms peripheral B cells towards lymphomagenesis [Medical Sciences]

Primary effusion lymphomas (PELs) are causally associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and 86% of PELs are coinfected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). Understanding how PELs develop has been impaired by the difficulty of infecting B cells with KSHV in vitro, and the inability of KSHV to transform them. We show…

3h

Kinome profiling of non-Hodgkin lymphoma identifies Tyro3 as a therapeutic target in primary effusion lymphoma [Microbiology]

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) make up the majority of lymphoma diagnoses and represent a very diverse set of malignancies. We sought to identify kinases uniquely up-regulated in different NHL subtypes. Using multiplexed inhibitor bead-mass spectrometry (MIB/MS), we found Tyro3 was uniquely up-regulated and important for cell survival in primary effusion lymphoma…

3h

Leptin signaling impairs macrophage defenses against Salmonella Typhimurium [Microbiology]

The dynamic interplay between metabolism and immune responses in health and disease, by which different immune cells impact on metabolic processes, are being increasingly appreciated. However, the potential of master regulators of metabolism to control innate immunity are less understood. Here, we studied the cross-talk between leptin signaling and macrophage…

3h

Dynamic colocalization of 2 simultaneously active VSG expression sites within a single expression-site body in Trypanosoma brucei [Microbiology]

Monoallelic exclusion ensures that the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei exclusively expresses only 1 of thousands of different variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat genes. The active VSG is transcribed from 1 of 15 polycistronic bloodstream-form VSG expression sites (ESs), which are controlled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Unusually, T. brucei uses…

3h

Parvalbumin interneuron in the ventral hippocampus functions as a discriminator in social memory [Neuroscience]

The ability to identify strange conspecifics in societies is supported by social memory, which is vital for gregarious animals and humans. The function of hippocampal principal neurons in social memory has been extensively investigated; however, the nonprincipal neuronal mechanism underlying social memory remains unclear. Here, we first observed parallel changes…

3h

Mutant huntingtin disrupts mitochondrial proteostasis by interacting with TIM23 [Neuroscience]

Mutant huntingtin (mHTT), the causative protein in Huntington’s disease (HD), associates with the translocase of mitochondrial inner membrane 23 (TIM23) complex, resulting in inhibition of synaptic mitochondrial protein import first detected in presymptomatic HD mice. The early timing of this event suggests that it is a relevant and direct pathophysiologic…

3h

In vivo imaging reveals transient microglia recruitment and functional recovery of photoreceptor signaling after injury [Neuroscience]

Microglia respond to damage and microenvironmental changes within the central nervous system by morphologically transforming and migrating to the lesion, but the real-time behavior of populations of these resident immune cells and the neurons they support have seldom been observed simultaneously. Here, we have used in vivo high-resolution optical coherence…

3h

Parietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer [Neuroscience]

Working memory (WM) is a component of the brain’s memory systems vital for interpretation of sequential sensory inputs and consequent decision making. Anatomically, WM is highly distributed over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the parietal cortex (PC). Here we present a biophysically detailed dynamical systems model for a WM buffer…

3h

Blastocyst activation engenders transcriptome reprogram affecting X-chromosome reactivation and inflammatory trigger of implantation [Physiology]

Implantation of the blastocyst into the uterus is the gateway for further embryonic development in mammals. Programming of blastocyst to an implantation-competent state known as blastocyst activation is the determining factor for implantation into the receptive uterus. However, it remains largely unclear how the blastocyst is globally programmed for implantation….

3h

A thylakoid membrane-bound and redox-active rubredoxin (RBD1) functions in de novo assembly and repair of photosystem II [Plant Biology]

Photosystem II (PSII) undergoes frequent photooxidative damage that, if not repaired, impairs photosynthetic activity and growth. How photosynthetic organisms protect vulnerable PSII intermediate complexes during de novo assembly and repair remains poorly understood. Here, we report the genetic and biochemical characterization of chloroplast-located rubredoxin 1 (RBD1), a PSII assembly factor…

3h

Histone acetylation recruits the SWR1 complex to regulate active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Active DNA demethylation is critical for controlling the DNA methylomes in plants and mammals. However, little is known about how DNA demethylases are recruited to target loci, and the involvement of chromatin marks in this process. Here, we identify 2 components of the SWR1 chromatin-remodeling complex, PIE1 and ARP6, as…

3h

Functional selection of protease inhibitory antibodies [Applied Biological Sciences]

Critical for diverse biological processes, proteases represent one of the largest families of pharmaceutical targets. To inhibit pathogenic proteases with desired selectivity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) hold great promise as research tools and therapeutic agents. However, identification of mAbs with inhibitory functions is challenging because current antibody discovery methods rely on…

3h

The role of shape-dependent flight stability in the origin of oriented meteorites [Applied Physical Sciences]

The atmospheric ablation of meteoroids is a striking example of the reshaping of a solid object due to its motion through a fluid. Motivated by meteorite samples collected on Earth that suggest fixed orientation during flight—most notably the conical shape of so-called oriented meteorites—we hypothesize that such forms result from…

3h

Anisotropic spin-orbit torque generation in epitaxial SrIrO3 by symmetry design [Applied Physical Sciences]

Spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the interaction between the electron spin and the orbital angular momentum, can unlock rich phenomena at interfaces, in particular interconverting spin and charge currents. Conventional heavy metals have been extensively explored due to their strong SOC of conduction electrons. However, spin-orbit effects in classes of materials such…

3h

Phase separation and clustering of an ABC transporter in Mycobacterium tuberculosis [Biochemistry]

Phase separation drives numerous cellular processes, ranging from the formation of membrane-less organelles to the cooperative assembly of signaling proteins. Features such as multivalency and intrinsic disorder that enable condensate formation are found not only in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, but also in membrane-associated proteins. The ABC transporter Rv1747, which…

3h

Phosphatidylserine flipping by the P4-ATPase ATP8A2 is electrogenic [Biochemistry]

Phospholipid flippases (P4-ATPases) utilize ATP to translocate specific phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of biological membranes, thus generating and maintaining transmembrane lipid asymmetry essential for a variety of cellular processes. P4-ATPases belong to the P-type ATPase protein family, which also encompasses the ion transporting P2-ATPases: Ca2+-ATPase,..

3h

Mechanical and kinetic factors drive sorting of F-actin cross-linkers on bundles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

In cells, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) sort to different regions to establish F-actin networks with diverse functions, including filopodia used for cell migration and contractile rings required for cell division. Recent experimental work uncovered a competition-based mechanism that may facilitate spatial localization of ABPs: binding of a short cross-linker protein to…

3h

UvrD helicase activation by MutL involves rotation of its 2B subdomain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 helicase/translocase that functions in DNA repair, replication, and recombination. Although a UvrD monomer can translocate along single-stranded DNA, self-assembly or interaction with an accessory protein is needed to activate its helicase activity in vitro. Our previous studies have shown that an Escherichia coli…

3h

Protein stability engineering insights revealed by domain-wide comprehensive mutagenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The accurate prediction of protein stability upon sequence mutation is an important but unsolved challenge in protein engineering. Large mutational datasets are required to train computational predictors, but traditional methods for collecting stability data are either low-throughput or measure protein stability indirectly. Here, we develop an automated method to generate…

3h

Frustration and folding of a TIM barrel protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel proteins have not only a conserved architecture that supports a myriad of enzymatic functions, but also a conserved folding mechanism that involves on- and off-pathway intermediates. Although experiments have proven to be invaluable in defining the folding free-energy surface, they provide only a limited understanding of…

3h

Aging of spermatogonial stem cells by Jnk-mediated glycolysis activation [Cell Biology]

Because spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are immortal by serial transplantation, SSC aging in intact testes is considered to be caused by a deteriorated microenvironment. Here, we report a cell-intrinsic mode of SSC aging by glycolysis activation. Using cultured SSCs, we found that aged SSCs proliferated more actively than young SSCs…

3h

Excitation energy-dependent photocurrent switching in a single-molecule photodiode [Chemistry]

The direction of electron flow in molecular optoelectronic devices is dictated by charge transfer between a molecular excited state and an underlying conductor or semiconductor. For those devices, controlling the direction and reversibility of electron flow is a major challenge. We describe here a single-molecule photodiode. It is based on…

3h

Observation of methane filled hexagonal ice stable up to 150 GPa [Chemistry]

Gas hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water frameworks enclosing guest gas molecules and have been the focus of intense research for almost 40 y, both for their fundamental role in the understanding of hydrophobic interactions and for gas storage and energy-related applications. The stable structure of methane hydrate above 2 GPa,…

3h

Energy conversion via metal nanolayers [Chemistry]

Current approaches for electric power generation from nanoscale conducting or semiconducting layers in contact with moving aqueous droplets are promising as they show efficiencies of around 30%, yet even the most successful ones pose challenges regarding fabrication and scaling. Here, we report stable, all-inorganic single-element structures synthesized in a single…

3h

Hox genes limit germ cell formation in the short germ insect Gryllus bimaculatus [Developmental Biology]

Hox genes are conserved transcription factor-encoding genes that specify the identity of body regions in bilaterally symmetrical animals. In the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a member of the hemimetabolous insect group Orthoptera, the induction of a subset of mesodermal cells to form the primordial germ cells (PGCs) is restricted to the…

3h

Opinion: To advance sustainable stewardship, we must document not only biodiversity but geodiversity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Rapid environmental change is driving the need for complex and comprehensive scientific information that supports policies aimed at managing natural resources through international treaties, platforms, and networks. One successful approach for delivering such information has been the development of essential variables for climate (1), oceans (2), biodiversity (3), and sustainable…

3h

Core Concept: Seismic tomography uses earthquake waves to probe the inner Earth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Computerized tomography (CT) scans revolutionized medicine by giving doctors and diagnosticians the ability to visualize tissues deep within the body in three dimensions. In recent years, a different sort of imaging technique has done the same for geophysicists. Seismic tomography allows them to detect and depict subterranean features. Data gathered…

3h

African biomass burning is a substantial source of phosphorus deposition to the Amazon, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The deposition of phosphorus (P) from African dust is believed to play an important role in bolstering primary productivity in the Amazon Basin and Tropical Atlantic Ocean (TAO), leading to sequestration of carbon dioxide. However, there are few measurements of African dust in South America that can robustly test this…

3h

Radiokrypton unveils dual moisture sources of a deep desert aquifer [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

In arid regions, groundwater is a vital resource that can also provide a long-term record of the regional water cycle. However, the use of groundwater as a paleoclimate proxy has been limited by the complex hydrology and the lack of appropriate chronometers to determine the recharge time without complication. Applying…

3h

Pore-pressure diffusion, enhanced by poroelastic stresses, controls induced seismicity in Oklahoma [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Induced seismicity linked to geothermal resource exploitation, hydraulic fracturing, and wastewater disposal is evolving into a global issue because of the increasing energy demand. Moderate to large induced earthquakes, causing widespread hazards, are often related to fluid injection into deep permeable formations that are hydraulically connected to the underlying crystalline…

3h

Volumetric and shear processes in crystalline rock approaching faulting [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Understanding the approach to faulting in continental rocks is critical for identifying processes leading to fracturing in geomaterials and the preparation process of large earthquakes. In situ dynamic X-ray imaging and digital volume correlation analysis of a crystalline rock core, under a constant confining pressure of 25 MPa, are used…

3h

Dissecting macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns of forest biodiversity across the Hawaiian archipelago [Ecology]

Biodiversity patterns emerge as a consequence of evolutionary and ecological processes. Their relative importance is frequently tested on model ecosystems such as oceanic islands that vary in both. However, the coarse-scale data typically used in biogeographic studies have limited inferential power to separate the effects of historical biogeographic factors (e.g.,…

3h

Increasing crop heterogeneity enhances multitrophic diversity across agricultural regions [Ecology]

Agricultural landscape homogenization has detrimental effects on biodiversity and key ecosystem services. Increasing agricultural landscape heterogeneity by increasing seminatural cover can help to mitigate biodiversity loss. However, the amount of seminatural cover is generally low and difficult to increase in many intensively managed agricultural landscapes. We hypothesized that increasing the..

3h

The empirical relationship between nonstandard economic behaviors [Economic Sciences]

We study the joint distribution of 11 behavioral phenomena in a group of 190 laboratory subjects and compare it to the predictions of existing models as a step in the development of a parsimonious, general model of economic choice. We find strong correlations between most measures of risk and time…

3h

Personal infidelity and professional conduct in 4 settings [Economic Sciences]

We study the connection between personal and professional behavior by introducing usage of a marital infidelity website as a measure of personal conduct. Police officers and financial advisors who use the infidelity website are significantly more likely to engage in professional misconduct. Results are similar for US Securities and Exchange…

3h

NADPH-dependent extracellular superoxide production is vital to photophysiology in the marine diatom Thalassiosira oceanica [Environmental Sciences]

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like superoxide drive rapid transformations of carbon and metals in aquatic systems and play dynamic roles in biological health, signaling, and defense across a diversity of cell types. In phytoplankton, however, the ecophysiological role(s) of extracellular superoxide production has remained elusive. Here, the mechanism and function…

3h

Enhancing humoral immunity via sustained-release implantable microneedle patch vaccination [Immunology and Inflammation]

Sustained exposure of lymphoid tissues to vaccine antigens promotes humoral immunity, but traditional bolus immunizations lead to rapid antigen clearance. We describe a technology to tailor vaccine kinetics in a needle-free platform translatable to human immunization. Solid pyramidal microneedle (MN) arrays were fabricated with silk fibroin protein tips encapsulating a…

3h

Retinal and optic nerve degeneration in liver X receptor {beta} knockout mice [Medical Sciences]

The retina is an extension of the brain. Like the brain, neurodegeneration of the retina occurs with age and is the cause of several retinal diseases including optic neuritis, macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are expressed in the brain where they play a key role in maintenance…

3h

STAT6 induces expression of Gas6 in macrophages to clear apoptotic neutrophils and resolve inflammation [Medical Sciences]

Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils (PMNs) by alveolar macrophages (AMФs) is vital for resolution of inflammation and tissue injury. Here, we investigated the role of AMФ polarization and expression of the efferocytic ligand Gas6 in restoring homeostasis. In the murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI), we observed augmented…

3h

A selective membrane-targeting repurposed antibiotic with activity against persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [Microbiology]

Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is complicated by the development of antibiotic tolerance, a consequence of the ability of S. aureus to enter into a nongrowing, dormant state in which the organisms are referred to as persisters. We report that the clinically approved anthelmintic agent bithionol kills methicillin-resistant S. aureus…

3h

In situ structures of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inside bluetongue virus before and after uncoating [Microbiology]

Bluetongue virus (BTV), a major threat to livestock, is a multilayered, nonturreted member of the Reoviridae, a family of segmented dsRNA viruses characterized by endogenous RNA transcription through an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). To date, the structure of BTV RdRp has been unknown, limiting our mechanistic understanding of BTV transcription…

3h

Hippocampal deletion of NaV1.1 channels in mice causes thermal seizures and cognitive deficit characteristic of Dravet Syndrome [Neuroscience]

Dravet Syndrome is a severe childhood epileptic disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of the SCN1A gene encoding brain voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Symptoms include treatment-refractory epilepsy, cognitive impairment, autistic-like behavior, and premature death. The specific loci of NaV1.1 function in the brain that underlie these global deficits remain unknown. Here we…

3h

Sex-specific neuroprotection by inhibition of the Y-chromosome gene, SRY, in experimental Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons. While the cause of DA cell loss in PD is unknown, male sex is a strong risk factor. Aside from the protective actions of sex hormones in females, emerging evidence suggests that sex-chromosome…

3h

Anomalous relaxation and the high-temperature structure factor of XXZ spin chains [Physics]

We compute the spin-structure factor of XXZ spin chains in the Heisenberg and gapped (Ising) regimes in the high-temperature limit for nonzero magnetization, within the framework of generalized hydrodynamics, including diffusive corrections. The structure factor shows a hierarchy of timescales in the gapped phase, owing to s-spin magnon bound states…

3h

Depletion layer dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions under Poiseuille flow [Physics]

Complex liquids flow through channels faster than expected, an effect attributed to the formation of low-viscosity depletion layers at the boundaries. Characterization of depletion layer length scale, concentration, and dynamics has remained elusive due in large part to the lack of suitable real-space experimental techniques. The short length scales associated…

3h

The overlooked significance of plasma volume for successful adaptation to high altitude in Sherpa and Andean natives [Physiology]

In contrast to Andean natives, high-altitude Tibetans present with a lower hemoglobin concentration that correlates with reproductive success and exercise capacity. Decades of physiological and genomic research have assumed that the lower hemoglobin concentration in Himalayan natives results from a blunted erythropoietic response to hypoxia (i.e., no increase in total…

3h

Parochialism, social norms, and discrimination against immigrants [Political Sciences]

Ingroup bias and outgroup prejudice are pervasive features of human behavior, motivating various forms of discrimination and conflict. In an era of increased cross-border migration, these tendencies exacerbate intergroup conflict between native populations and immigrant groups, raising the question of how conflict can be overcome. We address this question through…

3h

Ethnic networks can foster the economic integration of refugees [Political Sciences]

There is widespread concern in Europe and other refugee-receiving continents that living in an enclave of coethnics hinders refugees’ economic and social integration. Several European governments have adopted policies to geographically disperse refugees. While many theoretical arguments and descriptive studies analyze the impact of spatially concentrated ethnic networks on immigrant…

3h

Reappraising academic and social adversity improves middle school students’ academic achievement, behavior, and well-being [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The period of early adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes, simultaneously affecting physiological, psychological, social, and cognitive development. The physical transition from elementary to middle school can exacerbate the stress and adversity experienced during this critical life stage. Middle school students often struggle to find social and emotional support, and…

3h

Effects of the peer metagenomic environment on smoking behavior [Social Sciences]

Recent scholarship suggests that the genomes of those around us affect our own phenotypes. Much of the empirical evidence for such “metagenomic” effects comes from animal studies, where the socio-genetic environment can be easily manipulated. Among humans, it is more difficult to identify such effects given the nonrandom distribution of…

3h

Power quality and modern energy for all [Sustainability Science]

“Modern energy for all,” an internationally supported initiative to connect populations to electricity services, is expected to help reduce poverty-induced vulnerabilities. It has become a primary strategy for meeting sustainable development goals, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. However, when electricity is supplied by a capacity-constrained grid to a resource-constrained population, the…

3h

Correction for Kohn et al., Shear heating reconciles thermal models with the metamorphic rock record of subduction [Correction]

EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Shear heating reconciles thermal models with the metamorphic rock record of subduction,” by Matthew J. Kohn, Adrian E. Castro, Buchanan C. Kerswell, César R. Ranero, and Frank S. Spear, which was first published October 29, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1809962115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115,…

3h

Correction for Kittur et al., Scaling up analogical innovation with crowds and AI [Correction]

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES, COMPUTER SCIENCES Correction for “Scaling up analogical innovation with crowds and AI,” by Aniket Kittur, Lixiu Yu, Tom Hope, Joel Chan, Hila Lifshitz-Assaf, Karni Gilon, Felicia Ng, Robert E. Kraut, and Dafna Shahaf, which was first published February 4, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1807185116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A….

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Correction for Kashida et al., Nanoparticle-based local translation reveals mRNA as a translation-coupled scaffold with anchoring function [Correction]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Nanoparticle-based local translation reveals mRNA as a translation-coupled scaffold with anchoring function,” by Shunnichi Kashida, Dan Ohtan Wang, Hirohide Saito, and Zoher Gueroui, which was first published June 19, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1900310116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 13346–13351). The authors note that, in Fig….

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Correction for Xie et al., Nanobody-based CAR T cells that target the tumor microenvironment inhibit the growth of solid tumors in immunocompetent mice [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Nanobody-based CAR T cells that target the tumor microenvironment inhibit the growth of solid tumors in immunocompetent mice,” by Yushu Joy Xie, Michael Dougan, Noor Jailkhani, Jessica Ingram, Tao Fang, Laura Kummer, Noor Momin, Novalia Pishesha, Steffen Rickelt, Richard O. Hynes, and Hidde Ploegh, which was…

3h

Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy

Scientists have discovered how diatoms — a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth's oxygen — harness solar energy for photosynthesis. The Rutgers University-led discovery, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help lead to more efficient and affordable algae-based biofuels and combat climate change from fossil fuel burning.

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Study: 'Conversation-based' activities reduce mental illness stigma among college students

The first study to systematically survey a single graduating class on the effect of a multi-year campaign against mental illness has found that college students exposed to certain anti-stigma messages and activities are significantly less likely to stigmatize people with these conditions.

3h

Do crocodile smiles hold the secret to regrowing teeth?

Crocodiles and some of their plant-eating ancestors have thin tooth enamel, a trait that is in stark contrast to humans and other hard-biting species, according to new research. These findings could suggest new approaches for dealing with people’s teeth. Crocodiles have one of the most powerful bites in the animal kingdom, which is necessary to chow down on turtles, wildebeest, and other large pr

3h

NASA studies how arctic wildfires change the world

Wildfires in the Arctic often burn far away from populated areas, but their impacts are felt around the globe. From field and laboratory work to airborne campaigns and satellites, NASA is studying why boreal forests and tundra fires have become more frequent and powerful and what that means for climate forecasting, ecosystems and human health.

3h

Storm Area 51 Creator Announces Alienstock Music Festival

Alienstock According to a Facebook event , two million people are going to “ Storm Area 51 ” on September 20 in the hopes of seeing any alien evidence that might be hidden on the Air Force facility. Matty Roberts created the Storm Area 51 event as a joke , but it quickly drew the attention of millions of Facebook users, as well as the U.S. military , which made clear its intentions to defend the

3h

Trump Administration Weakens Endangered Species Protections

Enforcement of the Endangered Species Act will be altered, easing protections for the most critically threatened plants and animals.

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Danger lurks in Californian fault long presumed dead

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02448-0 A Los Angeles fault could unleash significant destruction — but isn’t factored into the region’s earthquake planning.

4h

Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets.

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Greater blood pressure control linked to better brain health

For adults with high blood pressure, greater blood pressure control than what's currently considered standard is associated with fewer adverse changes of the brain, which could mean lower risks of dementia and cognitive impairment.

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Single enzyme helps drive inflammation in mice, provides target for new sepsis drugs

Researchers have discovered that removing a single enzyme in mice dramatically boosts survival from sepsis, an often fatal over-reaction of the immune system to infection. The finding provides a new and unexpected therapeutic target for new drug development.

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How media around the world frame climate change news

Researchers analyzed thousands of climate change articles from 45 countries and territories around the world to determine how they frame the issue, and differences were revealed mostly by the wealth of the nation.

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Not just genes: Environment also shaped population variation in first Americans

A new study shows that facial differences resulting from population divergence in first Americans is due to the complex interaction of environment and evolution on these populations and sheds light on how human diversification occurred after settlement of the New World.

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No teeth cleaning needed: Crocodiles shed old teeth, grow new ones

Having one of the most powerful bites in the animal kingdom, crocodiles must be able to bite hard to eat their food such as turtles, wildebeest and other large prey. Now, researchers have found that crocodiles — and even their plant-eating ancestors — had thin tooth enamel, a trait that is in stark contrast to humans and other hard-biting species. These findings could suggest new approaches for

4h

High fat foods can increase oral cannabidiol absorption into the body

Researchers compared CBD absorption in patients on an empty stomach versus a standardized fatty breakfast.

4h

Making microbes that transform greenhouse gases

A new technique will help not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the potential to reduce the overall dependence on petroleum.

4h

Lost in translation: Researchers discover translator gene may play a role in disease

A molecule called tRNA is an essential component of the human genome that acts as a translator. When researchers and clinicians investigate the genome's relation to disease, they have traditionally focused on mutations in the code for proteins. But now researchers have shown that the genes encoding tRNAs can also have mutations that cause the code to be misread, and in greater numbers than previou

4h

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early

Scientists have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely.

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No teeth cleaning needed: Crocodiles shed old teeth, grow new ones

Unlike people, crocodiles do not clean their teeth to slow down wear and tear. Instead, they get rid of them and replace them with new copies.

4h

Lost in translation: Researchers discover translator gene may play a role in disease

A molecule called tRNA, or transfer ribonucleic acid, is an essential component of the human genome that acts as a translator. It reads the genetic code and translates it into proteins—one of the key building blocks of the human body.

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3 unsung heroes who helped society overcome division

History's great men and women may enjoy name recognition, but everyday heroes can be anyone willing to talk. We profile three everyday heroes who helped society overcome adversity through civil discourse. Their stories validate John Stuart Mill's belief that good things happen when you converse with people with whom you disagree. None If your history class was like ours, it focused on the great-m

4h

No teeth cleaning needed: Crocodiles shed old teeth, grow new ones

Unlike people, crocodiles do not clean their teeth to slow down wear and tear. Instead, they get rid of them and replace them with new copies.

4h

Lost in translation: Researchers discover translator gene may play a role in disease

A molecule called tRNA, or transfer ribonucleic acid, is an essential component of the human genome that acts as a translator. It reads the genetic code and translates it into proteins—one of the key building blocks of the human body.

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Mosquitoes may have killed half the people who ever lived

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Supercomputer Generates Virtual Universes to Study Galaxy Formation

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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Archaeologists uncover 'sorcerer's treasure trove' in Pompeii ruins

The artefacts include dozens of good luck charms, including miniature penises and a small skull figurine, used to invoke fortune and fertility and for protection …

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Gene linked to Alzheimer's disease is involved in neuronal communication

A new study sheds new light on how the CD2AP gene may enhance Alzheimer's disease susceptibility.

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Study finds link between long-term exposure to air pollution and emphysema

Long-term exposure to air pollution was linked to increases in emphysema between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

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Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets.

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Making microbes that transform greenhouse gases

Researchers at the University of South Florida are harnessing the power of human physiology to transform greenhouse gases into usable chemical compounds—a method that could help lessen industrial dependence on petroleum and reduce our carbon footprint.

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Not just genes: Environment also shaped population variation in first Americans

The first Americans—humans who crossed onto the North American continent and then dispersed throughout Central and South America—all share common ancestry. But as they settled different areas, the populations diverged and became distinct. A new study from North Carolina State University shows that facial differences resulting from this divergence were due to the complex interaction of environment

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Making microbes that transform greenhouse gases

Researchers at the University of South Florida are harnessing the power of human physiology to transform greenhouse gases into usable chemical compounds—a method that could help lessen industrial dependence on petroleum and reduce our carbon footprint.

4h

Not just genes: Environment also shaped population variation in first Americans

The first Americans—humans who crossed onto the North American continent and then dispersed throughout Central and South America—all share common ancestry. But as they settled different areas, the populations diverged and became distinct. A new study from North Carolina State University shows that facial differences resulting from this divergence were due to the complex interaction of environment

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Ancient plankton hint at climate to come

The Pliocene, a geological epoch between two and five million years ago with CO2 levels similar to today, is a good analog for future climate predictions, according to a new study. The Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii recently recorded the highest concentration of carbon dioxide levels in human history. The last time CO2 levels surpassed 400 parts per million was during the Pliocene, when oceans s

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NASA Astronauts Test SpaceX Spacesuits for Crew Dragon Launch

SpaceX Apparel Last week, NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley got a chance to test out the sleek new outfits they’ll be wearing on launch day of SpaceX’s long-awaited Crew Dragon test flight — Demo-2 — to the International Space Station. The astronauts ran through “all of the activities, procedures and communication that will be exercised on launch day when a Crew Dragon spacecraft launch

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Lost in translation: Researchers discover translator gene may play a role in disease

A molecule called tRNA is an essential component of the human genome that acts as a translator. When researchers and clinicians investigate the genome's relation to disease, they have traditionally focused on mutations in the code for proteins. But now researchers at Western University have shown that the genes encoding tRNAs can also have mutations that cause the code to be misread, and in greate

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Making microbes that transform greenhouse gases

A new technique will help not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the potential to reduce the overall dependence on petroleum.

4h

No teeth cleaning needed: Crocodiles shed old teeth, grow new ones

Having one of the most powerful bites in the animal kingdom, crocodiles must be able to bite hard to eat their food such as turtles, wildebeest and other large prey. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that crocodiles — and even their plant-eating ancestors — had thin tooth enamel, a trait that is in stark contrast to humans and other hard-biting species. These findings cou

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Single enzyme helps drive inflammation in mice, provides target for new sepsis drugs

UC San Diego researchers discovered that removing a single enzyme in mice dramatically boosts survival from sepsis, an often fatal over-reaction of the immune system to infection. The finding provides a new and unexpected therapeutic target for new drug development.

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Greater blood pressure control linked to better brain health

For adults with high blood pressure, greater blood pressure control than what's currently considered standard is associated with fewer adverse changes of the brain, which could mean lower risks of dementia and cognitive impairment, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Understanding where patients live can improve patient health

Family physicians typically don't consider where patients live when assessing their health care needs, despite research that indicates a person's environment can significantly affect their health. With the emergence of value-based health care, there are more incentives for providers to take those factors into account. However, a new study found that family physicians could not accurately estimate

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Not just genes: Environment also shaped population variation in first Americans

A new study shows that facial differences resulting from population divergence in first Americans is due to the complex interaction of environment and evolution on these populations and sheds light on how human diversification occurred after settlement of the New World.

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Space Dust from Ancient Supernova Found Hiding in Antarctica

Researchers recently identified cosmic iron traces in snow that fell in Antarctica. Preserved in the snow was dust containing a rare isotope that originated in a supernova.

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Apple 'Service' Alerts for DIY iPhone Battery Swaps Are a Blow Against Right to Repair

A report from iFixit finds that a "Service" alert pops up if you try to swap your own iPhone battery, even if that battery works perfectly fine.

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This Guy Got the License Plate “NULL” and It Was a Total Disaster

Backfired A cybersecurity expert tested a galaxy-brain plan to hide his car from license plate readers and ticketing systems: registering the vanity license plate “NULL.” His plan worked, sort of — the NULL plates definitely caused a problem within the system. But they also caused a citation processing center to send the guy, who goes by “Droogie” in the cybersec community, $18,000 worth of parki

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Study examines how media around the world frame climate change news

Climate change is a problem facing countries around the world, but media coverage of the topic differs from one nation to the next. A new study from the University of Kansas shows the way media frame climate change coverage can be predicted by several national factors, yet none tend to frame it as an immediate problem requiring national policies to address the issue.

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NASA finds Henriette fading

Infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite found just a few scattered areas of cold clouds in the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression Henriette on August 13.

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Through the kidneys to the exit

Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" (NUST MISIS) have identified a new mechanism for removing magnetic nanoparticles through the kidneys, which will help to create more effective and safe drugs. The results of the study are published in the Journal of Controlled Release.

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Conservationists urge 'tighter wildlife laws' after Trump move

Countries should be strengthening their laws protecting endangered species, not weakening them, international conservationists said Tuesday, after US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans to alter the country's Endangered Species Act.

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NYT Writer: Jeffrey Epstein Told Me He Advised Tesla, Elon Musk

Tesla Talk In August 2018, New York Times columnist James B. Stewart met with sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein , agreeing that he wouldn’t reveal Epstein as the source of any quotes from the conversation. But now that Epstein has died of an apparent suicide , The New York Times has published a detailed account of the 90-minute-long meeting — and it had a lot to do with Tesla CEO Elon Musk. Musk’s M

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Conservationists urge 'tighter wildlife laws' after Trump move

Countries should be strengthening their laws protecting endangered species, not weakening them, international conservationists said Tuesday, after US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans to alter the country's Endangered Species Act.

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Greta Thunberg says the climate debate is slowly shifting

A year after starting a school strike that made her a figurehead for the fight against global warming, Greta Thunberg believes her uncompromising message is getting through—even if action remains thin on the ground.

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States Sue Trump Administration Over Rollback of Obama-Era Climate Rule

The legal fight over how to regulate coal-burning plants could ultimately determine how much leverage the government has to fight global warming.

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How The Hunt Became a Political Rorschach Test

Universal’s decision to cancel the release of its upcoming thriller The Hunt was a necessary and sober move taken after the recent mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas —at least, that’s according to an op-ed in Variety . National Review saw it differently , blaming a misreading of the film by President Donald Trump for the cancellation of a movie that definitely shares his politics.

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Elon Musk: Mars City Could Cost Up to $10 Trillion

Marsopolis No doubt about it: constructing a city on a planet that’s hundreds of millions of miles away is going to be hella expensive. In fact, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk estimates the cost to be anywhere “between $100 billion and $100 trillion,” according to a tweet from last week . To put that range into perspective, Marsopolis could cost us anywhere between 10 percent of the United States’ 2019 mil

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New tariffs would have jacked up the price of iPhones. Delay buys time for Big Tech

With the season for announcing new products fast approaching, the US technology industry dodged a bullet after the White House pushed back new tariffs that could have forced companies to raise …

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No, Climate Change Will Not End the World in 12 Years

Stoking panic and fear creates a false narrative that can overwhelm readers, leading to inaction and hopelessness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Penn Jillette Performed a Séance at a Steven Spielberg Party

Then the 'E.T.' director came really close to screwing it up.

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This cautionary tale shows how dangerous dentures can be

You’ve been warned: dentures are for mouths, not for throats. (Formlabs Inc/Flickr/) It was supposed to be a minor operation for the 72-year-old retired electrician. After surgeons removed a harmless lump from his abdominal wall, he went home to recover. At some point, he noticed his dentures had gone missing. Can you guess where this is going? Six days later, he was back in the emergency room. H

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Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers

Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes have now proven able to bridge damaged heart tissues and deliver the electrical signals needed to keep those hearts beating.

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Machine learning tool improves tracking of tiny moving particles

Scientists have developed an automated tool for mapping the movement of particles inside cells that may accelerate research in many fields, a new study reports.

5h

How two water molecules dance together

Researchers have gained new insights into how water molecules interact. For the first time, they were able to completely observe all of the movements between the water molecules, known as intermolecular vibrations. A certain movement of individual water molecules against each other, called hindered rotations, is particularly important. Among other things, the findings help to better determine the

5h

Through the kidneys to the exit

Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' (NUST MISIS) have identified a new mechanism for removing magnetic nanoparticles through the kidneys, which will help to create more effective and safe drugs. The results of the study are published in the Journal of Controlled Release.

5h

NASA finds Henriette fading

Infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite found just a few scattered areas of cold clouds in the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression Henriette on August 13, 2019.

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Study examines how media around the world frame climate change news

Researchers from the University of Kansas analyzed thousands of climate change articles from 45 countries and territories around the world to determine how they frame the issue, and differences were revealed mostly by the wealth of the nation.

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No, Climate Change Will Not End the World in 12 Years

Stoking panic and fear creates a false narrative that can overwhelm readers, leading to inaction and hopelessness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Foraging for information: Machine learning decodes genetic influence over behavior

Mice scurry around while foraging for food, but genetics may be the unseen hand controlling these meandering movements. Researchers are using machine learning to draw links between genetic controls that shape incremental steps of instinctive and learned behaviors.

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New water-beetle species show biodiversity still undiscovered in at-risk South American habitats

Researchers have described three genera and 17 new species of water scavenger beetles from the Guiana and Brazilian Shield regions of South America.

5h

Finding a cosmic fog within shattered intergalactic pancakes

In a new study, researchers report on the most detailed simulation ever of a large patch of the intergalactic medium (IGM). For the first time, they were able to see how cold, dense gas clouds in the IGM organize themselves and react within much larger 'sheets' or 'pancakes' of matter in the vastness of space.

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What's more powerful, word-of-mouth or following someone else's lead?

Researchers have published new research that reveals the power of word-of-mouth in social learning, even when compared to the power of following the example of someone we trust or admire. The same research found, however, that both word-of-mouth and following someone else's lead are two of the most powerful dynamics in influencing others through social learning.

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Satellite study reveals that area in Africa emits one billion tonnes of carbon

A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests.

5h

Growth of wind energy points to future challenges, promise

Advances in adapting the technology and better methods for predicting wind conditions have fanned significant growth of the use of wind turbines for electricity in the last 40 years. A new report takes stock of where the field is now and what lies ahead. Researchers surveyed the growth of wind technology as a source of renewable energy and assessed its viability for continuing to capture larger sh

5h

Anti-viral immune discovery could lead to better vaccines

Researchers have identified a molecular switch that impacts immune responses to viral infections, and whether or not protective antibodies are produced. The team also made the surprising discovery that the immune system protects against different viruses via distinct pathways. Their findings could lead to better strategies to develop vaccines for previously hard-to-prevent viruses.

5h

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers

Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes have now proven able to bridge damaged heart tissues and deliver the electrical signals needed to keep those hearts beating.

5h

A leap forward in kidney disease research: Scientists develop breakthrough in vitro model

Researchers have developed the first model of kidney filtration in the lab that accurately mimics human kidney physiology. The model represents a leap in chronic kidney disease research and could help doctors understand disease progression in individual patients.

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Naltrexone to treat opioid use disorder during pregnancy, favorable for mom, baby

Infants born to mothers taking naltrexone to treat opioid use disorder during pregnancy developed no signs of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) during their hospitalization, a new study shows. In comparison to infants of mothers taking buprenorphine during pregnancy, infants exposed to naltrexone had shorter hospital stays, and mothers reported no use of other opioids during their pregnan

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How two water molecules dance together

Researchers have gained new insights into how water molecules interact. For the first time, they were able to completely observe all of the movements between the water molecules, known as intermolecular vibrations. A certain movement of individual water molecules against each other, called hindered rotations, is particularly important. Among other things, the findings help to better determine the

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Jeffrey Epstein’s Death, in Context

Jeffrey Epstein’s name and face are everywhere following his death. Even as an investigation reveals that the Metropolitan Correctional Center, where he died, was terminally short-staffed and relied on untrained guards who failed to monitor him , conspiracy theories persist. Americans who believe in their justice system assert that it is obvious that he was murdered, and that jailers could not po

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What Toni Morrison Knew About Trump

I think a lot about Toni Morrison’s 1993 Nobel Prize lecture. Morrison, who died last week at the age of 88, was one of the nation’s most revered novelists and thinkers, and has left behind an immense opus that has generated renewed interest. Her acceptance speech serves as a prescient reference to the fact that journalists and political leaders today are wrestling with the language necessary to

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Gadzooks! Snap Inc. Is Making a New Pair of Doomed AR Glasses

Why Tho Snap Inc, the company behind the has-been photo-sharing app Snapchat, just announced the third iteration of its camera-equipped AR glasses, Spectacles 3. At $380, the glasses will be double the cost of Spectacles 2 when they launch in November, according to The Verge . Perhaps that’s because they come with a second HD camera — one rests over each eye, like those old school flip-up sunglas

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What's more powerful, word-of-mouth or following someone else's lead?

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, UCLA and the University of Texas published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), that reveals the power of word-of-mouth in social learning, even when compared to the power of following the example of someone we trust or admire. The same research found, however, that both word-of

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NASA sees wide center in tropical storm Krosa

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a good shot of the wide, ragged center of circulation in Tropical Storm Krosa.

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Amulets of Deities, Skulls and Phalluses Found in Ancient Pompeii

A stash of ancient amulets is seeing the light of day, now that archaeologists in Pompeii have unearthed the treasures from under a pile of ash dating to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

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Finding a cosmic fog within shattered intergalactic pancakes

To understand the most ordinary matter in the universe—and the extraordinary things that happen to it—a Yale-led team of astronomers took a deep dive into the cosmic fog.

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What's more powerful, word-of-mouth or following someone else's lead?

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, UCLA and the University of Texas published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, that reveals the power of word-of-mouth in social learning, even when compared to the power of following the example of someone we trust or admire. The same research found, however, that both word-of-mouth and following someone else's lead are two of the

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NASA sees wide center in tropical storm Krosa

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a good shot of the wide, ragged center of circulation in Tropical Storm Krosa.

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Finding a cosmic fog within shattered intergalactic pancakes

In a new study, Yale postdoctoral associate Nir Mandelker and professor Frank C. van den Bosch report on the most detailed simulation ever of a large patch of the intergalactic medium (IGM). For the first time, they were able to see how cold, dense gas clouds in the IGM organize themselves and react within much larger 'sheets' or 'pancakes' of matter in the vastness of space.

5h

New water-beetle species show biodiversity still undiscovered in at-risk South American habitats

Researchers from the University of Kansas have described three genera and 17 new species of water scavenger beetles from the Guiana and Brazilian Shield regions of South America.

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New water-beetle species show biodiversity still undiscovered in at-risk South American habitats

Researchers from the University of Kansas have described three genera and 17 new species of water scavenger beetles from the Guiana and Brazilian Shield regions of South America, areas seen as treasure houses of biodiversity. The beetles from the countries of French Guiana, Suriname, Brazil, Guyana and Venezuela were discovered through fieldwork and by combing through entomological collections at

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New water-beetle species show biodiversity still undiscovered in at-risk South American habitats

Researchers from the University of Kansas have described three genera and 17 new species of water scavenger beetles from the Guiana and Brazilian Shield regions of South America, areas seen as treasure houses of biodiversity. The beetles from the countries of French Guiana, Suriname, Brazil, Guyana and Venezuela were discovered through fieldwork and by combing through entomological collections at

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Survival-time dependent increase in neuronal IL-6 and astroglial GFAP expression in fatally injured human brain tissue

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48145-w

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Satellite study reveals that area emits one billion tonnes of carbon

A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests.

5h

Blood Tests for Alzheimer's: Two Experts on Why New Studies Are Encouraging

Diagnoses could be made of individuals with AD pathology years before the first symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health

Moose are picky eaters, and that's a good thing for their ecosystems.

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Machine learning tool improves tracking of tiny moving particles

Scientists have developed an automated tool for mapping the movement of particles inside cells that may accelerate research in many fields, a new study reports.

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Monitoring the Matterhorn with millions of data points

A unique project is linking in-situ measurements with natural hazards research. For the past ten years, a network of wireless sensors on the Matterhorn's Hoernli ridge has been constantly streaming measurement data on the condition of steep rock faces, permafrost and prevailing climate.

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Cell biology: Compartments and complexity

Biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. The results of the study provide new insights into the dynamics of metabolic processes in cells.

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Coca and conflict: The factors fuelling Colombian deforestation

Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived. A new study found that conflict between illegal groups and the governmental military forces, proximity to coca plantations, mining concessions, oil wells and roads were all associated with increased deforestation.

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Schrödinger's cat with 20 qubits

Dead or alive, left-spinning or right-spinning—in the quantum world particles such as the famous analogy of Schrödinger's cat can be all these things at the same time. An international team, including researchers from several leading American universities, together with experts from Forschungszentrum Jülich, have now succeeded in transforming 20 entangled quantum bits into such a state of superpos

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Blood Tests for Alzheimer's: Two Experts on Why New Studies Are Encouraging

Diagnoses could be made of individuals with AD pathology years before the first symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gene for acid-sensitive ion channel identified

In the human body the salt content of cells and their surrounding is regulated by sophisticated transport systems. Special channels in the cell membrane selectively permit salt ions to flow in and out of cells. A research team led by Professor Thomas Jentsch at the FMP and MDC has now identified the molecular components of a previously unknown ion channel.

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Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health

Given the choice between ice cream and vegetables, for many people it'll be the ice cream. But sometimes it depends on the situation. If you'd eaten ice cream every day for a week, you might prefer the salad. Human preferences for different foods often depend on what's common fare and what's rare.

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Cell biology: Compartments and complexity

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. The results of the study provide new insights into the dynamics of metabolic processes in cells.

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Gene for acid-sensitive ion channel identified

In the human body the salt content of cells and their surrounding is regulated by sophisticated transport systems. Special channels in the cell membrane selectively permit salt ions to flow in and out of cells. A research team led by Professor Thomas Jentsch at the FMP and MDC has now identified the molecular components of a previously unknown ion channel.

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Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health

Given the choice between ice cream and vegetables, for many people it'll be the ice cream. But sometimes it depends on the situation. If you'd eaten ice cream every day for a week, you might prefer the salad. Human preferences for different foods often depend on what's common fare and what's rare.

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Cell biology: Compartments and complexity

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. The results of the study provide new insights into the dynamics of metabolic processes in cells.

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How plants synthesise salicylic acid

The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid, now sold as Aspirin, has been known for thousands of years. Besides being a useful drug with numerous health applications, it is a stress hormone made by plants which is essential in enabling them to fight off damaging pathogens. What was not known, however, is how plants generated this hormone. Now, an international research team led by the University

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Nature beat engineers to ‘control theory’ by millions of years

Engineering principles that humans developed only 150 years ago first evolved in biological circuitry that controls cell growth, research finds. In the last 150 years, engineers have developed and mastered ways to stabilize dynamic systems, without lag or overshoot, using what’s known as control theory. A team of researchers has shown that cells and organisms evolved complex biochemical circuits

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Study: Naltrexone to treat opioid use disorder during pregnancy, favorable for mom, baby

Infants born to mothers taking naltrexone to treat opioid use disorder during pregnancy developed no signs of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) during their hospitalization, a new study shows. In comparison to infants of mothers taking buprenorphine during pregnancy, infants exposed to naltrexone had shorter hospital stays, and mothers reported no use of other opioids during their pregnan

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A leap forward in kidney disease research: Scientists develop breakthrough in vitro model

Researchers at CHLA develop first model of kidney filtration in the lab that accurately mimics human kidney physiology. The model represents a leap in chronic kidney disease research and could help doctors understand disease progression in individual patients.

6h

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers

Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes have now proven able to bridge damaged heart tissues and deliver the electrical signals needed to keep those hearts beating.

6h

Satellite study reveals that area emits one billion tonnes of carbon

A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests.

6h

Anti-viral immune discovery could lead to better vaccines

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have identified a molecular switch that impacts immune responses to viral infections, and whether or not protective antibodies are produced. The team also made the surprising discovery that the immune system protects against different viruses via distinct pathways. Their findings could lead to better strategies to develop vaccines for previously hard-to-

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Pollutant linked to climate change accelerates lung disease

A new multicenter study at Columbia University links long-term exposure to air pollution, especially ozone, to development of emphysema, accelerating lung disease progression as much as a pack a day of cigarettes.

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Platform for lab-grown heart cells lets researchers examine functional effects of drugs

The human heart's energy needs and functions are difficult to reproduce in other animals; one new system looks to circumvent these issues and provide a functional view of how different treatments can help ailing cells in the heart following oxygen and nutrient deprivations. Researchers have unveiled a new silicon chip that holds human lab-grown heart muscle cells for assessing the effectiveness of

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Preclinical research suggests anti-cancer effect of keto diet

It's well known that keeping blood glucose levels in check can help individuals avoid or manage diabetes, but new research led by biologists at The University of Texas at Dallas suggests that restricting blood glucose levels might also keep certain cancers at bay.

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Intensive blood pressure control may slow age-related brain damage

In a nationwide study, researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of hundreds of participants in the National Institutes of Health's Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and found that intensively controlling a person's blood pressure was more effective at slowing the accumulation of white matter lesions than standard treatment of high blood pressure.

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Growth of wind energy points to future challenges, promise

Advances in adapting the technology and better methods for predicting wind conditions have fanned significant growth of the use of wind turbines for electricity in the last 40 years. A new report, in Applied Physics Reviews, takes stock of where the field is now and what lies ahead. Researchers surveyed the growth of wind technology as a source of renewable energy and assessed its viability for co

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Air pollution can accelerate lung disease as much as a pack a day of cigarettes

Air pollution — especially ozone air pollution which is increasing with climate change — accelerates the progression of emphysema of the lung, according to a new study led by the University of Washington, Columbia University and the University at Buffalo.

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Do internal medicine residents feel bullied during training?

This research letter uses survey data to report on perceived bullying by internal medicine residents during training.

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Exposure to outdoor air pollutants, change in emphysema, lung function

Whether exposure to outdoor air pollutants is associated with emphysema progression and change in lung function was the focus of this observational study. The study included 7,071 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis studies conducted in six US metropolitan regions (New York; Los Angeles; Chicago; Baltimore; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; and St. Paul, Minnesota). Computed t

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Study examines gluten consumption in childhood, celiac disease risk in genetically at-risk kids

Consuming more gluten during the first 5 years of life was associated with increased risk of celiac disease and celiac disease autoimmunity (the presence of antibodies in the blood) among genetically predisposed children. It remains unclear whether the amount of gluten consumed can trigger celiac disease. This observational study included 6,605 children born between 2004 and 2010 in Finland, Germa

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Is intensive blood pressure control associated with less progression of brain vascular disease?

Intensive blood pressure control among adults with high blood pressure was associated with a smaller increase in brain white matter lesions (a marker of small vessel disease and a risk factor for dementia) compared to standard blood pressure control, although the difference was small. Hypertension is a risk factor for developing white matter lesions.

6h

Blood pressure patterns in middle-age, older adults associated with dementia risk

Patterns of high blood pressure in midlife that extend to late life or high blood pressure in midlife followed by low blood pressure later in life was associated with increased risk for dementia compared to having normal blood pressure. This observational study included nearly 4,800 participants who had blood pressure measurements taken over 24 years at five visits plus a detailed neurocognitive e

6h

Foraging for information: Machine learning decodes genetic influence over behavior

Mice scurry around while foraging for food, but genetics may be the unseen hand controlling these meandering movements. Researchers at University of Utah Health are using machine learning to draw links between genetic controls that shape incremental steps of instinctive and learned behaviors. The results are available online in Cell Reports.

6h

How plants synthesise salicylic acid

The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid, now sold as Aspirin, has been known for thousands of years. Besides being a useful drug with numerous health applications, it is a stress hormone made by plants which is essential in enabling them to fight off damaging pathogens. What was not known, however, is how plants generated this hormone. Now, an international research team led by the University

6h

Nyt DTU-studie: Elnettet kræver ikke voldsomme investeringer til elbiler

Elbiler kommer ikke til at belaste elnettet så meget, som det tidligere har været antaget, viser nyt studie fra DTU. Folk lader nemlig ikke op på samme tid.

6h

How plants synthesize salicylic acid

The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid has been known for thousands of years. Besides being a useful drug with numerous health applications, it is a stress hormone made by plants, which is essential for them to fight off damaging pathogens. What was not known, is how plants generated this hormone. Now, biologists have unraveled the biosynthesis of this crucial hormone.

6h

Researchers study protein ancestors to understand their role in growth

'Resurrecting' the ancestors of key proteins yields evolutionary insights into their role in human cells and in most cancers, a new study finds.

6h

Gene for acid-sensitive ion channel identified

In the human body the salt content of cells and their surrounding is regulated by sophisticated transport systems. Special channels in the cell membrane selectively permit salt ions to flow in and out of cells. A research team has now identified the molecular components of a previously unknown ion channel.

6h

Interbreeding turned grey squirrels black

New research has shed new light on why some grey squirrels are black.

6h

Schrödinger's cat with 20 qubits

Dead or alive, left-spinning or right-spinning — in the quantum world particles such as the famous analogy of Schrödinger's cat can be all these things at the same time. An international team, together with experts from Forschungszentrum Jülich, have now succeeded in transforming 20 entangled quantum bits into such a state of superposition. The generation of such atomic Schrödinger cat states is

6h

Better criteria for gifted programs can cut racial gaps

Changing the way schools designate their students as “gifted” could address the gaps in racial and income representation in advanced education programs, according to a new study. Adopting local norms is one relatively easy and cost-effective way to address this inequality, the study finds. Comparing students across national standards, in which only the top 5 or 15% of test-takers qualify for gift

6h

Japanese Whaling Is Not the Greatest Threat to Whale Conservation

Global outrage should focus on North American fishing and shipping industries as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Screen All Adult Patients for Drug Abuse, National Panel Urges

With 1 in 10 Americans saying they misuse drugs, doctors should ask everyone about both illegal and prescription use, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said.

6h

New and old media give climate contrarians visibility

They get the headlines when balance isn’t sought, study suggests. Nick Carne reports.

6h

Superbugs could lead to next-gen plastics

What makes them hard to kill may also make them highly useful. Mark Bruer reports.

6h

European pigs shook off their ancestry

Modern breeds show virtually no signs of their arrival from the Near East. Dyani Lewis reports.

6h

Lost volcanoes among oil and gas

Scientists make unexpected Jurassic discovery under central Australia.

6h

Increased troponin after exercise predicts risk of cardiovascular event

An increased concentration of cardiac troponin (a regulatory protein) in the blood after prolonged walking is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death. This was the conclusion of a study involving 725 participants in a long-distance walking event (Nijmegen Four Days Marches) that was published in the journal Circulation.

6h

Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health

Moose are picky eaters, and that's a good thing for their ecosystems.

6h

Gene for acid-sensitive ion channel identified

In the human body the salt content of cells and their surrounding is regulated by sophisticated transport systems. Special channels in the cell membrane selectively permit salt ions to flow in and out of cells. A research team led by Professor Thomas Jentsch at the FMP and MDC has now identified the molecular components of a previously unknown ion channel.

6h

Japanese Whaling Is Not the Greatest Threat to Whale Conservation

Global outrage should focus on North American fishing and shipping industries as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

A word of advice – dentures out before anaesthetic

In one notable case, a simple operation turned into quite a saga. Amelia Nichele reports.

6h

Hubble captures galaxies interacting

Eventually the luminescent two will become one.

6h

A mussel poop diet could fuel invasive carp’s spread across Lake Michigan

Asian carp, just a human-made waterway away from reaching Lake Michigan, could live in much more of the lake than previously thought.

6h

Jurassic world of volcanoes found in central Australia

Subsurface explorers have uncovered a previously undescribed 'Jurassic World' of around 100 ancient volcanoes buried deep within the Cooper-Eromanga Basins of central Australia.

6h

Color Me Polynomial

In 2015, the poet-turned-mathematician June Huh helped solve a problem posed about 50 years earlier. The problem was about complex mathematical objects called “matroids” and combinations of points and lines, or graphs. But it was also a question about polynomials — those familiar expressions from math class involving sums of variables raised to different powers. At some point in school you were p

6h

Researchers study protein ancestors to understand their role in growth

"Resurrecting" the ancestors of key proteins yields evolutionary insights into their role in human cells and in most cancers, a new study finds.

6h

Researchers study protein ancestors to understand their role in growth

"Resurrecting" the ancestors of key proteins yields evolutionary insights into their role in human cells and in most cancers, a new study finds.

6h

This Biohacker Implanted Her Tesla Model 3 Keycard Into Her Arm

Arm Chip YouTuber and software engineer Amie DD published a video last week in which she has a small RFID tag that doubles as her Model 3 keycard implanted into her forearm. As a result, she’ll never technically be locked out of her Tesla — even if she leaves both her smartphone and backup keycard at home. Rather then electronically transferring the data, she dissolved the physical keycard — abou

6h

Researchers study protein ancestors to understand their role in growth

'Resurrecting' the ancestors of key proteins yields evolutionary insights into their role in human cells and in most cancers, a new study finds.

6h

How plants synthesize salicylic acid

The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid has been known for thousands of years. Besides being a useful drug with numerous health applications, it is a stress hormone made by plants, which is essential for them to fight off damaging pathogens. What was not known, is how plants generated this hormone. Now, an international research team led by the University of Göttingen has unravelled the biosyn

6h

Monitoring the Matterhorn with millions of data points

A unique project is linking in-situ measurements with natural hazards research. For the past ten years, a network of wireless sensors on the Matterhorn's Hoernli ridge has been constantly streaming measurement data on the condition of steep rock faces, permafrost and prevailing climate. The project leader, Jan Beutel, reviews progress to date.

6h

Machine learning tool improves tracking of tiny moving particles

Scientists have developed an automated tool for mapping the movement of particles inside cells that may accelerate research in many fields, a new study in eLife reports.

6h

Second baby planet found using pioneering technique

Monash astrophysicists using the ALMA telescope in Chile have a made a world-first discovery with the sighting of a second new 'baby' planet (two to three times heavier than Jupiter) inside a gas and dust gap.

6h

Interbreeding turned grey squirrels black: study

Research published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology has shed new light on why some grey squirrels are black.

6h

Interbreeding turned grey squirrels black: study

Research published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology has shed new light on why some grey squirrels are black.

6h

Climate change is turning Florida's sea turtles female. How long can these species survive?

Two dozen tiny leatherback turtles swam around in small tanks, attached by fishing lines to a system that kept them from hitting walls and hurting themselves. As an open-water species, leatherbacks don't recognize barriers, so they are kept on leashes at Florida Atlantic University's lab at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton.

6h

Study shows human impacts on oceans nearly doubled in recent decade, could double again without adequate action

Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. That's according to a new study by researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara.

6h

Climate change is turning Florida's sea turtles female. How long can these species survive?

Two dozen tiny leatherback turtles swam around in small tanks, attached by fishing lines to a system that kept them from hitting walls and hurting themselves. As an open-water species, leatherbacks don't recognize barriers, so they are kept on leashes at Florida Atlantic University's lab at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton.

6h

Modern mating market values women more: Australian study

A new study by QUT researchers debunks some theories of sexual economics (and wider societal thinking) when it comes to the market value of women as they age.

7h

Editorial: Trump guts the Endangered Species Act. Polar bears and bald eagles, take notice

The Trump administration announced reckless and potentially devastating new rules Monday that will weaken the Endangered Species Act, which currently bestows a mantle of protection over 1,663 species of animals and plants. Of those, 1,275 are considered endangered and close to extinction. Another 388 are listed as threatened—the polar bear is one—and at risk of becoming endangered.

7h

Nvidia just made it easier to build smarter chatbots and slicker fake news

Chipmaker Nvidia is betting that AI’s language skills will advance rapidly—it’s releasing a powerful tool for putting together chatty programs.

7h

Interbreeding turned grey squirrels black — study

Research published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology has shed new light on why some grey squirrels are black.

7h

Cell biology: Compartments and complexity

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. The results of the study provide new insights into the dynamics of metabolic processes in cells.

7h

Schrödinger's cat with 20 qubits

Dead or alive, left-spinning or right-spinning — in the quantum world particles such as the famous analogy of Schrödinger's cat can be all these things at the same time. An international team, together with experts from Forschungszentrum Jülich, have now succeeded in transforming 20 entangled quantum bits into such a state of superposition. The generation of such atomic Schrödinger cat states is

7h

How two water molecules dance together

Researchers have gained new insights into how water molecules interact. For the first time, they were able to completely observe all of the movements between the water molecules, known as intermolecular vibrations. A certain movement of individual water molecules against each other, called hindered rotations, is particularly important. Among other things, the findings help to better determine the

7h

New study helps to understand human defence mechanisms and spread of cancer

With the help of new technology, the researchers of the University of Turku in Finland have gained more detailed information on the diversity of the human lymphatic system than before. The research results can help to understand the human defence mechanisms on the molecular level even better than before. Several cancers, such as breast cancer and head and neck cancers, spread primarily via the lym

7h

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early

A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely.

7h

ADHD medication may affect brain development in children

A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect the development of the brain's signal-carrying white matter in children with the disorder, according to a new study. The same effects were not found in adults with ADHD.

7h

Editorial: Trump guts the Endangered Species Act. Polar bears and bald eagles, take notice

The Trump administration announced reckless and potentially devastating new rules Monday that will weaken the Endangered Species Act, which currently bestows a mantle of protection over 1,663 species of animals and plants. Of those, 1,275 are considered endangered and close to extinction. Another 388 are listed as threatened—the polar bear is one—and at risk of becoming endangered.

7h

Farms turn to technology amid water warnings in Southwest US

A drone soared over a blazing hot cornfield in northeastern Colorado on a recent morning, snapping images with an infrared camera to help researchers decide how much water they would give the crops the next day.

7h

Cloaked Black Hole Found Hidden Behind Gas Cloud in Early Universe

A cloaked black hole found lurking behind a cloud of gas dates to the early cosmic years of the universe.

7h

UN Warning: Food Is Going to Get Really, Really Expensive

Hunger Pains The global food supply is on the brink of disaster, according to a newly published report by the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. More than 100 experts contributed to the report, which concludes that climate change is already negatively impacting food production in real ways. And the problem is poised to get even worse if global temperatures continue to incr

7h

Having mastered Space Invaders, chess, and Go, AI tackles video soccer

Google’s artificial-intelligence researchers have created a football simulator for training the next generation of machine-learning algorithms.

7h

High arsenic levels found in children near former French mine

Tests of dozens of children living near what was once the world's biggest arsenic mine have revealed worrying levels of the toxic element, French officials said Tuesday, heightening fears that waste from the site is leaching into soil and groundwater.

7h

Wait, What? The First Human-Monkey Hybrid Embryo Was Just Created in China

Last week, news broke that a prominent stem cell researcher is making human-monkey chimeras in a secretive lab in China. The story, first reported by the Spanish newspaper El País , has all the ingredients of a bombshell. First, its protagonist is the highly-respected Dr. Juan Carlos Izpisúa Belmonte , a Spanish-born stem cell biologist at the Salk Institute in California known for his breakthrou

7h

LGBT bias can set in early for future doctors

More contact with LGBT people during medical school may reduce bias in new doctors, according to recent research. In the study, early-career doctors expressed less bias towards sexual minorities two years after medical school if they had more contact and favorable interactions they had with LGBT people during medical school. Conversely, the more negative views students were exposed to about sexua

7h

The Anthropocene Is a Joke

H umans are now living in a new geological epoch of our own making: the Anthropocene. Or so we’re told. Whereas some epochs in Earth history stretch more than 40 million years, this new chapter started maybe 400 years ago, when carbon dioxide dipped by a few parts per million in the atmosphere. Or perhaps, as a panel of scientists voted earlier this year , the epoch started as recently as 75 year

7h

Mapping the energetic landscape of solar cells

A new spectroscopic method now makes it possible to measure and visualize the energetic landscape inside solar cells based on organic materials. It was developed by a research team led by Prof. Dr. Yana Vaynzof, a physicist at Heidelberg University. This novel visualization technique enables scientists to study the physical principles of organic photovoltaics with extreme precision and to better u

7h

Two Ebola Drugs Show Promise amid Ongoing Outbreak

People who receive either therapy soon after infection have a 90 percent survival rate, a clinical trial finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Higher risk of dangerous drug reactions for women in Brazil

A review of the Brazilian health system finds that women have a 90% increased risk for prescription combinations known to produce dangerous reactions. The analysis, which appears in the journal npj Digital Medicine , reveals a 60% increased risk for adverse drug reactions in women compared to men—and a 90% increased risk in cases of medicines whose interaction is known to produce dangerous reacti

7h

Bill Nye: Green Energy Will Make You “Filthy $@!% Rich”

Filthy Rich Why should anybody care about climate change? Well, childhood hero and TV presenter Bill Nye has an extremely simple answer. In an advertisement for Google Chromebooks, Bill Nye argues that investing in green energy will make you “filthy $@!% rich.” View this post on Instagram Change. Is. Hard. I get it. But we’re all going to need to change if we want to fix the climate crisis. Watch

7h

Merging with AI would be suicide for the human mind

There may come a moment when the brain is so diminished it is destroyed

7h

Using satellites to measure water scarcity

Today, more than 700 million people around the world drink water from unsafe or untreated sources, such as wells, springs and surface water.

7h

Indonesia ships back tonnes of Australian waste

Indonesia has shipped tonnes of Australian garbage out of the country, an official said Tuesday, as Southeast Asian nations push back against serving as dumping grounds for foreign trash.

7h

Critical observation made on Maunakea during first night of return to operations

Observations of the near-Earth asteroid 2006 QV89 made on August 11, 2019 with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) have ruled out any potential future impact threat to the Earth by this asteroid for the next century.

7h

Exomars: Parachute test failure threat to launch date

A European-Russian effort to land on Mars has been hit by another parachute failure, during a drop test in Sweden.

7h

Paris launches Notre-Dame lead decontamination work

French workers on Tuesday began efforts to remove lead from the area around Notre-Dame cathedral which was contaminated by the devastating April fire, sparking public health concerns and forcing the suspension of restoration work.

7h

We could put enough wind turbines on European land to power the world

An analysis has found there is enough land in Europe to host 11.6 million wind turbines, with a capacity three times that of estimates made a decade ago

7h

A Neutron Star “Glitched” — and Scientists Noticed Something Amazing

Cosmic Bug Back in 2016, a neutron star named Vela “glitched” — it suddenly started spinning much more rapidly due to yet-unconfirmed causes. Now, a closer look at the data capturing during that glitch is giving astronomers their first glance at the interior of a neutron star, according to research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy . By diving into the data, a team from Monash Univ

7h

The Puzzle of Economic Progress

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

7h

Restoring soil to address climate change

It's time to take soil seriously. As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states with very high confidence in its latest report, land degradation represents "one of the biggest and most urgent challenges" that humanity faces.

7h

How two water molecules dance together

An international research team has gained new insights into how water molecules interact. A laser with especially high brightness, as is available at the FELIX laboratory at Radboud University, was needed for the experiments. Their findings help to better better understand the strange properties of water and are published in Angewandte Chemie.

7h

Why plastic bags are so hard to get rid of

In June, Canada joined a growing list of countries frustrated with the inability of market forces to shrink our plastics dependency and announced a plan to ban single-use plastics as early as 2021.

7h

Cow gut study finds bugs that could up yields

Cutting-edge DNA technologies have discovered thousands of bugs in cows' stomachs that could improve meat and dairy production, and keep cattle healthy.

7h

Cow gut study finds bugs that could up yields

Cutting-edge DNA technologies have discovered thousands of bugs in cows' stomachs that could improve meat and dairy production, and keep cattle healthy.

7h

Graphene paves the way for novel product enabling industrial users

NPL, Chalmers University of Technology and Graphensic, have demonstrated the long-term stability of the epigraphene quantum Hall chip, which represents a key step towards enabling end-users to maintain their own resistance standards

7h

Mysterious m6A marks on RNA begin to yield their secrets

Chemical modifications that appear on some RNA transcripts may have evolved in part to help cells repair themselves after damage, and may also be a key to understanding important human diseases, according to new research from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and Cornell's Ithaca campus.

7h

North America is About to Get Its Largest Copper Mine

10 Shaft in the Superior-Resolution copper prospect in Arizona. Resolution Copper. Copper is one of the most valuable metals on the planet. Sure, it lacks the cachet of gold, silver or platinum — those are "precious metals" after all. Yet, without copper, the world as we know it would not operate. If you have electricity, you need copper. This week, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton, one of the world's

7h

Equinox and the dangers of cancel culture

A boycott of Equinox and SoulCycle has been called as owner Stephen Ross held a fundraiser for President Donald Trump. While the story has made headlines, the actual consequences of member cancellations are not what many think. The episode provides another example of the dangers of cancel culture. None Now that billionaire Stephen Ross's fundraiser for Donald Trump is a footnote, backlash over a

7h

Mysterious m6A marks on RNA begin to yield their secrets

Chemical modifications that appear on some RNA transcripts may have evolved in part to help cells repair themselves after damage, and may also be a key to understanding important human diseases, according to new research from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and Cornell's Ithaca campus.

7h

Undervisere er bekymrede over medicinstuderendes internetbrug

Medicinstuderende klikker sig i højere grad frem til information på nettet, end de køber fysiske lærebøger. Det bekymrer undervisere, forklarer flere studieledere. De studerendes formand kan ikke genkende problemet.

8h

NASA's Spitzer spies a perfectly sideways galaxy

This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope might look like a lightsaber floating in space, but it's actually an entire galaxy viewed on its side.

8h

The first metal-organic coordination polymers were synthesized at the Samara Polytech

Fullerenes, metamaterials, composites and superconductors — these are all the materials from which the world of the future will be created. A relatively new class of metal-organic coordination polymers immediately attracted the attention of specialists around the world.Samara scientists, like their colleagues, have been actively engaged in predicting their structure and properties, creating a mod

8h

Coca and conflict: the factors fuelling Colombian deforestation

Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived. A University of Queensland-led study found that conflict between illegal groups and the governmental military forces, proximity to coca plantations, mining concessions, oil wells and roads were all associated with increased deforestation.

8h

UTI discovery may lead to new treatments

Sufferers of recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs) could expect more effective treatments thanks to University of Queensland-led research. UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections according to Professor Mark Schembri from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences.

8h

Doubling down

Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. That's according to a new study by researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara.

8h

Research drives acceleration of practice transformation and community health improvement

Early findings from two major federally funded initiatives aimed at accelerating the development and dissemination of health care innovation in the United States were published today as a special supplement to the Annals of Family Medicine. The collective body of work, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, will help inform how the United States will support medical practice tra

8h

Solutions for leading sleep woes

The 'double whammy' of co-occurring insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea is a complex problem best managed with non-drug targeted psych interventions, a new Australian study has found. By following simple new guidelines, people with the concurrent conditions reported great improvement to both their sleep, and their health — with about 50% improvement in global insomnia severity and night-time ins

8h

Jurassic world of volcanoes found in central Australia

An international team of subsurface explorers from the University of Adelaide in Australia and the University of Aberdeen in Scotland have uncovered a previously undescribed 'Jurassic World' of around 100 ancient volcanoes buried deep within the Cooper-Eromanga Basins of central Australia.

8h

DJI's Osmo 3 smartphone gimbal has a travel-friendly folding design

DJI continues to improve its smartphone gimbal technology with the launch of the Osmo Mobile 3, a cheaper and more travel-friendly version of its last model. The electronic stabilizer …

8h

SnapChat's Pricey Spectacles 3 Pair A Sleek New Design With 3D Recording Capabilities

SnapChat has once again redesigned its Spectacles, both in form and function. The newly announced Spectacles 3 feature a sleeker and more stylish look than either of the two previous generation …

8h

Solar physics with the Square Kilometre Array

Although solar physics is one of the most mature branches of astrophysics, the sun confronts researchers with a large number of outstanding fundamental problems. These problems include the determination of the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, the magnetic field evolution in the chromosphere and corona, coronal heating, the physics of impulsive energy release, energetic particle acce

8h

New technique can show link between prey and microplastics

Scientists have developed a new method to investigate links between top predator diets and the amount of microplastic they consume through their prey.

8h

The automobile and New York City

New York City's residential population, business population and number of tourists continues to grow, and our streets have become more crowded as pedestrians and motor vehicles compete for the same finite spaces. While many American sprawl cities continue to spread out and build more roads and auto parking spaces, New York City and scores of cities around the world become more densely settled. Whe

8h

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early

A team of scientists from the University of Southampton, Bangor University and the National Oceanography Centre have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely.

8h

One year, two trips around sun for NASA's Parker Solar Probe

Since NASA's Parker Solar Probe launched on Aug. 12, 2018, Earth has made a single trip around the sun—while the daring solar explorer is well into its third orbit around our star. With two close passes by the sun already under its belt, Parker Solar Probe is speeding toward another close solar approach on Sept. 1, 2019.

8h

High temperature thermal shocks increase stability of single-atom catalysts

Catalysts are essentially boosters that increase the rate of a chemical reaction, and are widely used in the fields of petroleum refining, coal and natural gas conversion, and ammonia production, to name a few. Catalysts also drive emerging battery and fuel cell technology, which is usually (thermally or electrically) energy-intensive, thus requiring catalysis to reduce the reaction temperature, p

8h

Nvidia just made it easier to build smarter chatbots and slicker fake news

Chipmaker Nvidia is betting that AI’s language skills will advance rapidly—it’s releasing a powerful tool for putting together chatty programs.

8h

New technique can show link between prey and microplastics

Scientists have developed a new method to investigate links between top predator diets and the amount of microplastic they consume through their prey.

8h

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early

A team of scientists from the University of Southampton, Bangor University and the National Oceanography Centre have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely.

8h

Rat detective uses DNA to uncover how rats scurry around cities

It's dark and I'm parked in an alley near a lopsided compost bin. I have a notepad, binoculars and a lukewarm cup of coffee—everything needed for a successful stakeout. I am waiting for them.

8h

Trees in the U.S. facing devastating threats due to invasive species

A team of researchers from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has found that trees in the United States are facing devastating threats due to invasive species. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes analyzing thousands of forest plots across the U.S. and the mortality rates due to 15 major tree pest infestations, and w

8h

Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets.

8h

How much would you pay to change a game before playing it?

When most people think of a "game," they might imagine checkers or hopscotch. But in game theory, a game is defined as any type of scenario where there's an interaction between different decision-makers, or players, each of whom has well-defined preferences. Oftentimes, players have the option to pay to change the rules before the game is played, like bribing an umpire in baseball.

8h

Innovative surveillance technique gives vital time needed to track a cereal killer

Scientists have created a new mobile surveillance technique to rapidly diagnose one of agriculture's oldest enemies—wheat rusts.

8h

Flame retardant may cause hyperthyroidism in cats

An epidemic of cats with hyperthyroidism may be explained by exposure to a chemical contained in flame retardants commonly found in furniture, according to an Oregon State University study.

8h

Study finds an unexpected link between farming and immune system evolution

Researchers have long theorized that cultural shifts thousands of years ago from hunting and gathering to agriculture and living in permanent settlements spurred an increase in diseases like smallpox and measles. Compared to hunter-gatherers, farmers stayed put, living close to one another and their animals.

8h

All-optical diffractive neural network closes performance gap with electronic neural networks

A new paper in Advanced Photonics demonstrates distinct improvements to the inference and generalization performance of diffractive optical neural networks.

8h

Rat detective uses DNA to uncover how rats scurry around cities

It's dark and I'm parked in an alley near a lopsided compost bin. I have a notepad, binoculars and a lukewarm cup of coffee—everything needed for a successful stakeout. I am waiting for them.

8h

Trees in the U.S. facing devastating threats due to invasive species

A team of researchers from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has found that trees in the United States are facing devastating threats due to invasive species. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes analyzing thousands of forest plots across the U.S. and the mortality rates due to 15 major tree pest infestations, and w

8h

Innovative surveillance technique gives vital time needed to track a cereal killer

Scientists have created a new mobile surveillance technique to rapidly diagnose one of agriculture's oldest enemies—wheat rusts.

8h

Flame retardant may cause hyperthyroidism in cats

An epidemic of cats with hyperthyroidism may be explained by exposure to a chemical contained in flame retardants commonly found in furniture, according to an Oregon State University study.

8h

Study finds an unexpected link between farming and immune system evolution

Researchers have long theorized that cultural shifts thousands of years ago from hunting and gathering to agriculture and living in permanent settlements spurred an increase in diseases like smallpox and measles. Compared to hunter-gatherers, farmers stayed put, living close to one another and their animals.

8h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02402-0 How Nature reported wartime advances in underwater microphones in 1919, and predictions of overcrowding in geostationary orbits in 1969.

8h

How We Are Wired for Smell

Scientists explore the brain’s “olfactory map” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Counterintuitive physics property found to be widespread in living organisms

Ever since the late 19th century, physicists have known about a counterintuitive property of some electric circuits called negative resistance. Typically, increasing the voltage in a circuit causes the electric current to increase as well. But under some conditions, increasing the voltage can cause the current to decrease instead. This basically means that pushing harder on the electric charges ac

8h

Coal is on the road to becoming completely uninsurable

The announcement by Suncorp that it will no longer insure new thermal coal projects, along with a similar announcement by QBE Insurance a few months earlier, brings Australia into line with Europe where most major insurers have broken with coal.

8h

Allbirds Steps Into Apparel with Sustainable Socks

They’re made from a new proprietary yarn and meant to keep your feet sweat-free, whether you're wearing Allbirds' ubiquitous shoes or not.

8h

The Desperate Race to Neutralize a Lethal Superbug Yeast

*Candida auris* spreads explosively in hospitals, but little is known about its origins. Figuring that out could help prevent a pandemic.

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Snap Bets Its Future on a Stylish New Pair of Spectacles

The camera-enabled sunglasses get a face-lift, a second camera, and a few new viewing powers. It's all part of Snap's plan to dominate augmented reality.

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Modern mating market values women more: Australian study

A new study by QUT researchers debunks some theories of sexual economics when it comes to the market value of women as they age. Unlike other market commodities like oil or gold, an individual's reproductive or relationship value is not directly observable but QUT behavioural economists Dr Stephen Whyte and Professor Benno Torgler, along with Professor Robert C. Brooks from the University of New S

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How We Are Wired for Smell

Scientists explore the brain’s “olfactory map” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Making the case for managing the ocean's twilight zone

Sustainable management of open-ocean marine life should extend to the ocean midwater, argue MBARI President and CEO Chris Scholin and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution President and Director Mark Abbott in a column published in The Hill today.

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South Africa's construction industry could become safer. Here's how

Construction is tough, sometimes dangerous work. Globally, the construction industry accounts for about 7% of employment. But it's responsible for between 30% and 40% of all work-related fatalities. The figure is at its highest in developing countries. This is because contractor organizations in those countries tend to lack a safety culture. Health and management systems are also less robust there

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Researchers identify glial cells as critical players in brain's response to social stress

Exposure to violence, social conflict, and other stressors increase risk for psychiatric conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. A new paper suggests that the behavior of oligodendrocytes — the glial cells that produce the myelin sheath that protects nerve fibers — plays a critical role in determining whether we succumb to or tolerate stress.

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Mode of delivery at birth may play key role in shaping the child's skin microbiome

In a new study, investigators found that bacterial genera in children were more similar to those of their own mothers than to those of unrelated women. Their data suggest that the mode of delivery at birth could be an important factor in shaping the child's microbiome.

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High-fat diet and gut bacteria linked to insulin resistance

Researchers have discovered how our choice of diet can weaken our gut immune system and lead to the development of diabetes.

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How vaginal microbiome can elicit resistance to chlamydia

The vaginal microbiome is believed to protect women against Chlamydia trachomatis, the etiological agent of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in developed countries. New research shows how the microbiome can either protect or make a woman more susceptible to these serious infections.

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Making the case for managing the ocean's twilight zone

Sustainable management of open-ocean marine life should extend to the ocean midwater, argue MBARI President and CEO Chris Scholin and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution President and Director Mark Abbott in a column published in The Hill today.

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Improving the accuracy of long-read genome sequencing

A team of researchers from institutions in the U.S., Germany and China has developed a way to improve the accuracy of long-read genome sequencing. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group outlines how they improved an existing technique, and how well it works.

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Improving the accuracy of long-read genome sequencing

A team of researchers from institutions in the U.S., Germany and China has developed a way to improve the accuracy of long-read genome sequencing. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group outlines how they improved an existing technique, and how well it works.

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Nintendo's Latest FCC Filing Hints at SNES Games Finally Coming to the Switch

To coincide with the launch of the Nintendo Switch Online service which included a bunch of classic 8-bit games as part of the subscription, Nintendo also released a pair of NES gamepad shaped …

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Pixel-krigen fortsætter: Ny kamerasensor rammer 100 megapixels

Samsung er verdens første sensorproducent til at fremstille en kamerasensor til smartphones, der kan tage billeder med over 100 millioner pixels.

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Brain-chip engineer tapped to lead South Korea’s science ministry

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02434-6 Choi Ki-young is set to take the job as tensions with Japan spill into the semiconductor industry.

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The Enantiomers Did What, Now?

In today’s episode of “Fun With Chirality”, we have a look at phenomenon that could be very useful, come out of the blue, and which the very authors who report it have no explanation for. This is from a new paper in Angewandte Chemie from a team in Germany (TU-München) who have been looking at the behavior of enantiomers when adsorbed onto a glass surface (in this case, plain old borosilicate BK7

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The Dawn of Self-Consciousness

A sudden moment of self-awareness in childhood propels people on a quest to explore life’s mysteries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Do our electronic devices make it tougher to grasp science?

Excessive interaction with electronic devices may be related to weaker activity in areas of the brain that are key to understanding scientific texts, say researchers. In a study that used neuroimaging to explore brain activity, the researchers found the frequent e-device use—such as texting on a smartphone or reading on a tablet—was negatively correlated with activity in brain areas that are crit

8h

The Life of a Person Who Wakes Up Really, Really Early

They walk among us, endowed with a superpower invisible to the naked eye. Before an important early meeting, they never have to forgo a shower and settle for dry shampoo and a baby wipe. They rarely wake with a jolt at 10 in the morning and stare groggily at a phone screen with five missed calls and texts that say, “You on your way? ETA?” They are people who wake up early— naturally . Not just “e

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A million pulses per second: How particle accelerators are powering X-ray lasers

About 10 years ago, the world's most powerful X-ray laser—the Linac Coherent Light Source—made its debut at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Now the next revolutionary X-ray laser in a class of its own, LCLS-II, is under construction at SLAC, with support from four other DOE national laboratories.

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Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients

A new study analyzing samples from patients with and without acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) provides additional evidence for an association between the rare but often serious condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and infection with non-polio enteroviruses.

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Excess body fat, particularly around the waist, is a major risk factor for premature death among Hispanics

Both general and abdominal obesity were strongly associated with mortality among Mexican adults. Each 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI above 25 kg/m2 was associated with a 30 percent increase in mortality. These findings refute previous research showing that being overweight was not strongly associated with mortality in Hispanic populations.

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Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe

New research has resolved a pig paradox. Archaeological evidence has shown that pigs were domesticated in the Near East and as such, modern pigs should resemble Near Eastern wild boar. They do not. Instead, the genetic signatures of modern European domestic pigs resemble European wild boar.

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Researchers identify key mechanism linked to neuropsychiatric lupus

A breakthrough study has identified a specific antibody target implicated in neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus. These symptoms, including cognitive impairment, mood disorders, seizures, headaches and psychosis, are among the most prevalent manifestations of the disease and occur in as many as 80% of adults and 95% of children with lupus.

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Estrogen improves Parkinson's disease symptoms

Brain-selective estrogen treatment improves the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in male mice, according to new research. These findings may help explain the sex differences in Parkinson's disease and could lead to estrogen-based treatments.

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Negative memory storage affects depression symptoms

Physical manifestations of negative memories in the hippocampus could underlie cognitive symptoms of depression, according to new research.

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Do aliens exist? If they did, would we know?

One of the biggest questions is whether we are alone in the universe — could there be other intelligent life, besides us, out there? Currently, we don't have any evidence aliens exist. There may have been a chance for a civilization to start billions of years before life began on Earth — one that is far more advanced, technologically speaking, than us. However, they're not making it very obvious.

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Millions of virtual universes hint at how galaxies form

Supercomputer simulations are bringing scientists one step closer to figuring out how galaxies like our own Milky Way form, grow, and change over time. Observing real galaxies in space can only provide snapshots in time, so researchers who want to study how galaxies evolve over billions of years have to revert to computer simulations. Traditionally, astronomers have used this approach to invent a

9h

The DNC Debate Rules Are a Game

DES MOINES, Iowa—Qualifying for the Democratic debates has become a game, and Tom Steyer has more than enough money to play it. In the span of five weeks, the San Francisco–based billionaire activist has channeled millions of dollars of his own money into trying to win a spot on the stage in September. If the effort works—and he’s getting close—Steyer could beat out many major candidates who have

9h

David Berman Saw the Source of American Sadness

One early Silver Jews EP was named The Arizona Record , and another one, nearly a decade later, was Tennessee . After the singer David Berman’s death at age 52 last week, the albums that fans turned to included 1998’s American Water , with its lyrics about “Protestant thighs” and “blue, blue jeans,” and Purple Mountains , the self-titled debut of his new band, named for a commonly misheard line f

9h

Why Washing Machines Are Learning to Play the Harp

Paul Spella T he roar of the MGM lion. NBC’s iconic chimes. The godlike C-major chord of a booting Apple computer. Companies have long used sound to distinguish their brands and to create a sense of familiarity with, and even affection for, their products. Microsoft went so far as to tap the ambient-sound legend Brian Eno to score the six-second overture for Windows 95, a starry ripple trailed by

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Researchers identify glial cells as critical players in brain's response to social stress

Exposure to violence, social conflict, and other stressors increase risk for psychiatric conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. A new paper suggests that the behavior of oligodendrocytes — the glial cells that produce the myelin sheath that protects nerve fibers — plays a critical role in determining whether we succumb to or tolerate stress.

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Army wants high-energy laser weapons on Strykers by 2022

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Q: When will we see in-body measure taking devices?

There is some stunning advances in medicine going on… but in my opinion the key to a healthy life lays with knowing what is actually going on in the body… Being able to live track/measure bp, cholestrol, vitamin/mineral levels maybe even cancers etc? I am wondering when(estimate) we will see these kind of advanced devices to appear and would it require surgery? submitted by /u/ExoHop [link] [

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World's largest urban farm to open – on a Paris rooftop

submitted by /u/WALL_OF_GAMMON [link] [comments]

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Sociologist explores the religious and racial origins of society's obsession with thinness

When your breakout book is reviewed by Essence, Bitch Media and Ms., you know your topic has struck a chord. That's the case with Sabrina Strings' Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia, which hit shelves in May. In it, the UCI assistant professor of sociology discusses the stigma of larger—primarily female—body types and how deep racial and religious roots, rather than health co

9h

Why Lightning Strikes in an Arctic Gone Bizarro

Some rather peculiar weather over the weekend struck 300 miles from the North Pole. Here’s why that may be the new normal.

9h

Weber’s Law

I confess I have never heard (or at least don’t remember ever hearing) about (pronouned vayber) until reading about it with this news item. It is the Law of Just Noticeable Differences. It deals with the minimum difference in a stimulus necessary to notice. While clearly established, and there are many hypotheses to explain the phenomenon, there has never been a way to test which hypothesis is c

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Image of the Day: Fluorescent Sharks

A newfound family of metabolites emits green light in response to the blue light of the deep ocean, causing certain sharks to glow.

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How our biological clocks are locked in sync

Scientists from EPFL's Institute of Bioengineering have discovered that the circadian clock and the cell-cycle are, in fact, synchronized.

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Mapping the energetic landscape of solar cells

A new spectroscopic method now makes it possible to measure and visualize the energetic landscape inside solar cells based on organic materials. It was developed by a research team led by Prof. Dr. Yana Vaynzof, a physicist at Heidelberg University. This novel visualization technique enables scientists to study the physical principles of organic photovoltaics with extreme precision and to better u

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Google job search service draws antitrust complaint – CNET

A group of job search sites claimed the search giant is abusing its dominant position, Reuters reported.

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Monitoring the Matterhorn with millions of data points

A unique project is linking in-situ measurements with natural hazards research. For the past ten years, a network of wireless sensors on the Matterhorn's Hörnli ridge has been constantly streaming measurement data on the condition of steep rock faces, permafrost and prevailing climate. The project leader, Jan Beutel, reviews progress to date.

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Report: Governments need to take urgent action against global catastrophic risks

Governments are failing to understand the human-driven catastrophic risks that threaten global security, prosperity and potential, and could in the worst case lead to mass harm and societal collapse, say researchers at the University of Cambridge.

9h

Coca and conflict: The factors fueling Colombian deforestation

Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived.

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Ebola breakthrough: two drugs could treat up to 90 per cent of cases

A drug trial has found two experimental drugs for Ebola to be so effective that scientists have stopped the trial early so that more people can receive these drugs

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Taking the pulse of peatland carbon emissions could measure climate impact of development

A new way to take the pulse of carbon emissions could help track how the industrial development of peatlands contributes to climate change, as well as measure their recovery once development ends.

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New type of electrolyte could enhance supercapacitor performance

Supercapacitors, electrical devices that store and release energy, need a layer of electrolyte—an electrically conductive material that can be solid, liquid, or somewhere in between. Now, researchers at MIT and several other institutions have developed a novel class of liquids that may open up new possibilities for improving the efficiency and stability of such devices while reducing their flammab

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Probiotic hydrogels heal gut wounds other bandages can't reach

External wounds such as skin cuts or abrasions can often be easily covered with a simple Band-Aid or a larger wound patch to protect them and facilitate their healing. When it comes to some internal surfaces like those of the gut that are coated with a mucus layer, however, such conventional wound healing materials are ineffective because the mucus hinders their firm attachment and quickly carries

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Image: Small object spotted orbiting 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Last week marked five years since ESA's Rosetta probe arrived at its target, a comet named 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (or 67P/C-G). Tomorrow, 13 August, it will be four years since the comet, escorted by Rosetta, reached its perihelion—the closest point to the sun along its orbit. This image, gathered by Rosetta a couple of months after perihelion, when the comet activity was still very intense, de

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A squishy Rubik's Cube that chemists built from polymers holds promise for data storage

A team of chemists from the U.S. and China have constructed a cube of colored, hydrogel blocks, which looks and acts much like a Rubik's Cube. The researchers say their work is more than just fun to play with: it might inspire new ways to store and detect information, and possibly even help patients monitor their medical conditions.

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Atomic 'Trojan horse' could inspire new generation of X-ray lasers and particle colliders

How do researchers explore nature on its most fundamental level? They build "supermicroscopes" that can resolve atomic and subatomic details. This won't work with visible light, but they can probe the tiniest dimensions of matter with beams of electrons, either by using them directly in particle colliders or by converting their energy into bright X-rays in X-ray lasers. At the heart of such scient

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Probiotic hydrogels heal gut wounds other bandages can't reach

External wounds such as skin cuts or abrasions can often be easily covered with a simple Band-Aid or a larger wound patch to protect them and facilitate their healing. When it comes to some internal surfaces like those of the gut that are coated with a mucus layer, however, such conventional wound healing materials are ineffective because the mucus hinders their firm attachment and quickly carries

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Greta Thunberg's zero carbon journey

Climate change activist Greta Thunberg will travel to New York on a boat with very few home comforts.

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Pandemic bonds: designed to fail in Ebola

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02415-9 The World Bank’s funding scheme for disease outbreaks drained potential resources from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, says Olga Jonas.

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Scientists link climate change to melting in West Antarctica

A new study has for the first time presented solid evidence that human-caused global warming is linked to melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Scientists already knew that periodically changing winds in the region have caused an increase in warm ocean conditions around key glaciers in West Antarctica, and that this is causing them to lose ice. But they did not know whether changes in the winds

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Meteorite strikes made life on Earth possible

Meteorites from the far reaches of the solar system delivered large amounts of water, carbon and volatile substances to the Earth. Only then could the Earth host life. Dr. María Isabel Varas-Reus, Dr. Stephan König, Aierken Yierpan and Professor Dr. Ronny Schönberg from Tübingen University's Isotope Geochemistry Group, and Dr. Jean-Pierre Lorand from the Université de Nantes, provide evidence for

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NASA mission selects final four site candidates for asteroid sample return

After months grappling with the rugged reality of asteroid Bennu's surface, the team leading NASA's first asteroid sample return mission has selected four potential sites for the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft to "tag" its cosmic dance partner.

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Critical observation made on Maunakea during first night of return to operations

The existing astronomical observatories on Maunakea returned to operations this weekend, and it didn't take long for a significant result to be achieved, not only for science, but for assuring the safety of the Earth.

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Jurassic world of volcanoes found in central Australia

An international team of subsurface explorers from the University of Adelaide in Australia and the University of Aberdeen in Scotland has uncovered a previously undescribed Jurassic world of around 100 ancient volcanoes buried deep within the Cooper-Eromanga Basins of central Australia.

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Is Guilt Good for Your Health?

Negative feedback helps some people make better health choices, but we need a different approach to motivate others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Biomechanical Perfection of Simone Biles in Flight

Behold the triple double: The gymnast’s precise control of her body as she moves through space sets her apart. Add tremendous strength and speed, and you’ve got a champion.

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WFH: Chinese Engineers Abroad Come Back

As companies like Alibaba and apps like WeChat took off, China’s startup scene began to exert a growing pull on Chinese engineers overseas.

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Is Grass-Fed Beef Really Better For The Planet? Here's The Science

There are many elements to consider: climate, animal welfare, greenhouse gas emissions, land use. And with so many factors at play, sometimes the answer gets complicated. (Image credit: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images)

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Is Guilt Good for Your Health?

Negative feedback helps some people make better health choices, but we need a different approach to motivate others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Oversvømmelser kender ingen kommunegrænser: Manglende klimasikring rammer nabokommunen

Hvor kommer vandet fra, hvem skal betale for at styre det bedre, og hvordan samarbejder vi om at begrænse klimaskader langs de danske åer? Det forsøger et ambitiøst projekt i Nordsjælland at svare på.

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Despite Controversy, Human Studies of CRISPR Move Forward in the U.S.

The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Despite Controversy, Human Studies of CRISPR Move Forward in the U.S.

The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Despite Controversy, Human Studies of CRISPR Move Forward in the U.S.

The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rapport talte oksekødets CO2-aftryk ned: »Underlig sammenligning« var betalt af landbruget

Eksperter påpeger metodiske problemer i forskningsstudie fra Aarhus Universitet og DTU, der sammenligner klimabelastningen fra oksekød med alkohol, kaffe og slik.

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'Mad' Flat-Earther's Steam Rocket Launch Grounded by Bad Water Heater Bought on Craigslist

"Mad" Mike Hughes will have to wait until this weekend to launch after having issues with the water heater for his steam-powered rocket.

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Tardigrades and Poop: What Does Space Law Say About Moon Clutter?

In recent decades, the moon has gathered a bit of invisible clutter.

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Ebola drugs trial raises prospect of cure

More than 90% of patients in Democratic Republic of Congo survived when treated early

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Jeffrey Epstein’s Final Act of Impunity

How did Jeffrey Epstein’s story capture so much attention in 2019? The financier, who was found dead in his cell at a Manhattan jail on Saturday, was a monster, but unfortunately monsters—even child rapists—exist in society. In fact, Epstein’s story wasn’t all that new. While Julie K. Brown’s stunning Miami Herald series brought new information about Epstein’s crimes, the basic outlines were alre

11h

One Child Nation Reveals the Human Costs of an Infamous Chinese Law

Early on in Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang’s new documentary, One Child Nation , an 84-year-old midwife is asked how many babies she has delivered throughout her career. She brushes the question aside and instead spills out a startling admission. “I really don’t know how many I delivered. What I do know is that I’ve done a total of between 50,000 to 60,000 sterilizations and abortions,” she says. T

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Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients

A new study analyzing samples from patients with and without acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) provides additional evidence for an association between the rare but often serious condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and infection with non-polio enteroviruses. NIAID, part of the NIH, funded the research, which was conducted by investigators at Columbia University's Center for Infection an

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All-optical diffractive neural network closes performance gap with electronic neural networks

A new paper in Advanced Photonics, an open-access journal co-published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and Chinese Laser Press (CLP), demonstrates distinct improvements to the inference and generalization performance of diffractive optical neural networks.

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Researchers identify how vaginal microbiome can elicit resistance to chlamydia

The vaginal microbiome is believed to protect women against Chlamydia trachomatis, the etiological agent of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in developed countries. New research by the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) shows how the microbiome can either protect or make a woman more susceptible to these serious infections.

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New evidence points to viral culprit in AFM child paralysis

Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the University of California San Diego report antibody evidence in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that points to enterovirus (EV) infection as a cause for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a disease responsible for partially paralyzin

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Bättre beslut när Lean kombineras med simulering

Managementfilosofin Lean består av olika principer, metoder och verktyg och används inom bland annat industrin, byggbranschen och sjukvården. Lean handlar om att minska onödigt slöseri och fokuserar på människors delaktighet, för att förbättra verksamheten och maximera kundnyttan. Simulering är en teknik där man i en mjukvara bygger verkliga system där det går att testa olika scenarier, innan de

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One giant leap for Indian cinema: how Bollywood embraced sci-fi

As the country seeks to establish itself as a space power, audiences are developing an appetite for the extraterrestrial on the big screen In 2014, India sent the Mars Orbiter Mission into space, and became the first country to send a satellite to orbit the planet at its first attempt – putting its much richer regional rival China in the shade as it became the first Asian nation to get to the red

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Grave Robbers Missed These Ancient Greek Graves, Filled with More than a Dozen Skeletons

Grave robbers are usually a determined bunch, but for the past 3,400 years, unsavory burglars have managed to miss two ancient burial chambers just outside of Corinth, Greece.

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'Lost Village' Found at Site of Most Infamous Clan Massacre in Scotland

Archaeologists excavating the scene of the most infamous clan massacre in Scottish history have unearthed parts of a 'lost village' in the Highlands valley of Glencoe.

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Doing the right thing: Psychology researchers retract paper three days after learning of coding error

We always hesitate to call retraction statements “models” of anything, but this one comes pretty close to being a paragon. Psychology researchers in Germany and Scotland have retracted their 2018 paper in Acta Psychologica after learning of a coding error in their work that proved fatal to the results. That much is routine. Remarkable in … Continue reading

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India monsoon floods kill more than 200

The death toll from India's monsoon floods climbed to 202 on Tuesday as heavy rainfall kept pounding coastal regions in the west and south.

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Syrian War Puts Researchers in Limbo and Artifacts in Jeopardy

Since war broke out in the region in 2011, archaeologists and other scholars have stopped working in Syria. Scientists aren’t uncovering new sites or digging deeper into the long human history of the region, and many have had to flee the country and pursue other work. Artifacts and sites are being destroyed.

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Three Years of Misery Inside Google, the Happiest Company in Tech

Sexual harassment. Hate speech. Employee walkouts. The Silicon Valley giant is trapped in a war against itself. And there’s no end in sight.

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How Many Uber and Lyft Drivers Are in Recalled Cars?

The Center for Auto Safety wants ride-hail companies to crack down on drivers whose cars have been recalled.

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Nets: Vi har haft udfald i produktionen af nøglekort

Flere brugere har måttet vente længere end normalt på deres NemID-nøglekort.

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New millisecond pulsar discovered

Astronomers have reported a serendipitous discovery of a new millisecond pulsar as part of an observational campaign using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope. The newly detected pulsar has a spin period of about 2.77 ms and received designation PSR J1431−6328. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 8 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Mælkevejens sorte hul forvirrer astronomer: Udsender pludselig voldsom infrarød stråling

PLUS. Uventede voldsomme variationer i den infrarøde udstråling fra Mælkevejens sorte hul er observeret over meget korte tidsrum. Er det begyndt at opsluge mere materiale end tidligere?

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A glomerulus-on-a-chip to recapitulate the human glomerular filtration barrier

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11577-z The glomerular filtration barrier is a complex structure in charge of renal ultrafiltration. Here the authors present a glomerulus-on-a-chip for disease modelling and high-throughput drug screening where human podocytes and human glomerular endothelial cells are separated by an extracellular matrix resembling

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Cellular internalization of bystander nanomaterial induced by TAT-nanoparticles and regulated by extracellular cysteine

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11631-w To enter the cells, nanomaterials often need covalent conjugation with cell-penetrating ligands such as TAT. Here, the authors show that simple mixing with TAT-coupled nanoparticles enables the cellular uptake of unfunctionalized nanoparticles, and its activity is stimulated by cysteine in the medium.

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Mul1 restrains Parkin-mediated mitophagy in mature neurons by maintaining ER-mitochondrial contacts

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11636-5 Little is known about the pathways that maintain mitochondrial structure and function under neuronal stress conditions. Here, authors demonstrate that the Mul1-Mfn2 pathway plays a checkpoint role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity and energy maintenance by ensuring ER-mitochondrial tethering and preventin

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Local orbital degeneracy lifting as a precursor to an orbital-selective Peierls transition

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11372-w A common feature of many transition metal materials is global symmetry breaking at low temperatures. Here the authors show that such materials are characterized by fluctuating symmetry-lowering distortions that exist pre-formed in higher temperature phases with greater average symmetry.

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Horse immunization with short-chain consensus α-neurotoxin generates antibodies against broad spectrum of elapid venomous species

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11639-2 Antivenoms, obtained by venom immunization, have narrow species coverage due to low immunogenicity of venom neurotoxins. Here the authors immunize horses with a designed recombinant consensus neurotoxin, and the resulting antisera protect mice from envenomation by a broad spectrum of elapid snakes.

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Mutations in topoisomerase IIβ result in a B cell immunodeficiency

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11570-6 Topoisomerases are required to release topological stress on DNA during replication and transcription. Here, Broderick et al. report genetic variants in TOP2B that cause a syndromic B cell immunodeficiency associated with reduced TOP2B function, defects in B cell development and B cell activation.

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Flavonoid intake is associated with lower mortality in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Cohort

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11622-x The studies showing health benefits of flavonoids and their impact on cancer mortality are incomplete. Here, the authors perform a prospective cohort study in Danish participants and demonstrate an inverse association between regular flavonoid intake and both cardiovascular and cancer related mortality.

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Visualization and design of the functional group distribution during statistical copolymerization

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11368-6 Understanding the functional group distribution in a polymer chain has been difficult, but this information can be very useful. Here the authors visualize the monomer distribution in individual polymer chains by combining experimental and theoretical analysis of the construction of functionality-chain length d

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Vi er faret vild, men vi skyder en god fart

På kræftområdet har man lavet en langtidsplan, som virker. Den kan vi på psykiatriområdet i høj grad kopiere. Men det kræver politisk fokus, prioritering og ressourcer, skriver Gitte Ahle, formand for Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab.

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New study links high-fat diet and gut bacteria to insulin resistance

Researchers at Toronto's University Health Network have discovered how our choice of diet can weaken our gut immune system and lead to the development of diabetes.

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Apples, tea and moderation — the 3 ingredients for a long life

Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research.

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Risks of novel oral prostate cancer therapies and pre-existing conditions

Common prostate cancer therapy may increase short-term risk of death in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.

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Glioblastoma multiforme restructures the topological connectivity of cerebrovascular networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47567-w

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Signature profile of cyclooxygenase-independent F2 series prostaglandins in C. elegans and their role in sperm motility

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48062-y Signature profile of cyclooxygenase-independent F2 series prostaglandins in C . elegans and their role in sperm motility

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Shape transition from elliptical to cylindrical membrane tubes induced by chiral crescent-shaped protein rods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48102-7

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Cerumenogram: a new frontier in cancer diagnosis in humans

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48121-4

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An active metasurface for field-localizing wireless power transfer using dynamically reconfigurable cavities

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48253-7

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Sand particles — an overlooked occupational hazard

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02443-5

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Astronomy must respect rights of Indigenous peoples

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02441-7

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Don’t squander sand — save it for sea-level rise

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02444-4

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Danger to science of no-deal Brexit

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02433-7

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Rule out conflicts of interest in psychology awards

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02429-3

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From reproduction to the right to die: bioethics now

Nature, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02412-y Eric J. Topol weighs up a book on a field sprinting to keep up with biotechnology.

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What is Section 230 and why does Donald Trump want to change it?

This provision of the Communications Decency Act is being blamed for everything from social-media bias to enabling revenge porn. Here’s how to understand the law that created the modern internet.

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Creating Hallucinations Without Any Drugs Is Surprisingly Easy

You can even try this at home, but don't blame us if things get weird.

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Vitamin D and Diabetes: Another Case Where Supplementation Sounded Like a Good Idea But Wasn’t

A new study shows vitamin D supplements don't prevent diabetes. But there are still unanswered questions.

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Cosmos article wins journalist another award

Winning entry reflects her commitment to promoting food security.

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This Carnivorous Plant Invaded New York. That May Be Its Only Hope.

The waterwheel lives a double life: facing extinction in its native habitat even as it creeps into places where it doesn’t belong.

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What Makes a Red Sky at Night (and at Morning)

The cartoonist behind the strip XKCD explains how the skies blush and why sailors care.

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Pier Paolo and Pier Giuseppe, the titans of IFOM-IEO

Meet two grand cancer researchers from Milan: Pier Paolo Di Fiore and Pier Giuseppe Pelicci. Then decide if you want to give them your tax and charity money.

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Firefighters contain Canary Islands blaze: officials

Firefighters have managed to contain a fire raging on the Spanish holiday island of Gran Canaria which sparked the evacuation of hundreds of people, local officials said Monday.

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Australia offers climate funding to Pacific islands

Australia announced a Aus$500 million ($340 million) climate change package for Pacific countries Tuesday but received a lukewarm response from low-lying island nations demanding urgent action from their powerful neighbour to curb its carbon emissions.

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The 'gift' of Tunisia's delicate date palm drink

As soon as the sun is up, people in southern Tunisia rush out to buy a glass or bottle of legmi, a coveted date palm drink that is too delicate to be sold far from the oasis.

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Do newly discovered mating habits of female Tasmanian devils help or hurt the species?

Wild female Tasmanian devils have mating habits that could pose a challenge for conservationists trying to maintain genetic diversity in species recovery programs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Sydney.

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Do newly discovered mating habits of female Tasmanian devils help or hurt the species?

Wild female Tasmanian devils have mating habits that could pose a challenge for conservationists trying to maintain genetic diversity in species recovery programs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Sydney.

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Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees—such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer—Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

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Analysis shows large decline in criminal sentencing race gap

Racial and ethnic gaps in criminal sentences have declined, in some cases significantly, since the mid-1990s, a new analysis of state, county and federal data suggests.

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Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees—such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer—Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

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Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed

A study from McMaster University has unearthed new details about the evolutionary history of both antibiotic production and resistance and dates their co-emergence as far back as 350 to 500 million years.

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Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed

A study from McMaster University has unearthed new details about the evolutionary history of both antibiotic production and resistance and dates their co-emergence as far back as 350 to 500 million years.

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #32, 2019

Clinical speech From Barber and Burgiess' Scarcity and Safe Operating Spaces: The Example of Natural Forests Scientists suggest placing planetary boundaries on human-induced threats to key Earth system sinks and resources. Such boundaries define a “safe operating space” on depletion and pollution. Treating any remaining “space” as a depletable economic asset allows derivation of optimal and actua

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The Legal Clause That Makes Brexiteers Furious—And Why They Have a Point

On at least one crucial issue when it comes to Brexit, Boris Johnson has a point, though not entirely for the reasons many of his supporters claim. The new British prime minister has threatened to take Britain out of the European Union on October 31, the deadline by which the country must exit the bloc, without a deal unless a contentious clause is removed wholesale from the exit package negotiat

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Owners of defective 2016 Google Pixels can now claim up to $500

The class action lawsuit settlement site for defective Pixel microphones has gone live.

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Klamydia-vaccine testet på mennesker: ’Virker præcis, som vi havde håbet’

Vi er et skridt tættere på at have en vaccine for den mest udbredte kønssygdom herhjemme.

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Mode of delivery at birth may play key role in shaping the child's skin microbiome

In a new study, investigators in China found that bacterial genera in children were more similar to those of their own mothers than to those of unrelated women. Their data suggest that the mode of delivery at birth could be an important factor in shaping the child's microbiome. They report their findings in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier.

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Analysis shows large decline in criminal sentencing race gap

Racial and ethnic gaps in criminal sentences have declined, in some cases significantly, since the mid-1990s, a new analysis of state, county and federal data suggests.For example, the overall sentence length gap between whites and blacks in federal courts decreased by more than 80% between 1996 and 2016.

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A vaccine that may prevent chlamydia is being tested in people

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Ebola drugs trial shows ‘90% survival rate’

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Scientists Call for Do-Over for Rules on Creating "CRISPR Babies"

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AI Will Teach Us to Be Human

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Nuclear Reactor for Mars Outpost Could Be Ready to Fly by 2022

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Daimler's first large electric semi trucks are ready to roll

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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