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nyheder2019august14

Climate deniers get more media play than scientists: study

Climate deniers have garnered far more media attention than prominent climate scientists over the years, fuelling public confusion and slowing the response to global warming, researchers reported Tuesday.

14h

Joint lubricating fluid plays key role in osteoarthritic pain, study finds

A team at the University of Cambridge has shown how, in osteoarthritis patients, the viscous lubricant that ordinarily allows our joints to move smoothly triggers a pain response from nerve cells similar that caused by chilli peppers.

7h

Prisstigning ventes at få fire millioner passagerer til at fravælge metroen

Prisen for at køre med Københavns førerløse metro stiger i næste måned, når Cityringen åbner. Og det vil få mange passagerer til at fravælge metroen, viser notat fra Metroselskabet.

13h

Russian officials give conflicting orders to evacuate near suspected nuclear accident

Residents of Northwestern Russian villages were told to evacuate after a nuclear-powered engine exploded. Russian authorities originally stated they saw radiation levels spike to 16 times above normal. Other reports from officials stated there was no spike and also no need to evacuate, creating confusion for villagers and international reporters. None Earlier this week, Russian authorities initia

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Kostya and Me: How Sam Patten Got Ensnared in Mueller’s Probe

A political consultant crosses paths with Konstantin Kilimnik, Paul Manafort, and Cambridge Analytica, then becomes part of the Russia investigation.

5min

Changing sperm speed can influence offspring’s sex, mouse study suggests

Technique can sort “male” sperm from “female”

8min

Bugatti 3D printed titanium brakes to stop its $3 million Chiron supercar

Bugatti's titanium brake caliper is beautiful on its own. (Bugatti/) Stopping the $3 million, 1,500-horsepower, 16-cylinder, 4,500-lb. Bugatti Chiron from its mind-boggling 261-mph top speed requires locomotive-scale brakes. But big, heavy calipers hinder crucial performance characteristics like ride and handling, so Bugatti has pioneered development of a laser-sintered, 3-D-printed titanium comp

20min

In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free

Open-access requirement diverges from usual U.S. government policy

22min

Neanderthal's Got 'Surfer's Ear' A Lot, Study Says

A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man and child at Vienna's Natural History Museum. (Credit: Wolfgang Sauber/Wikimedia Commons Being a lifelong surfer or diver sometimes comes with an odd side-effect: the growth of small, bony knobs in the ear canals, the result of chronic exposure to cold water and air. They're often referred to as "surfer's ear" because the condition is common among those who ri

27min

Hospital ratings systems get low grades from experts

Experts have turned the tables on hospital rating systems and graded the rating systems on their strengths and weaknesses. Most got low grades. This is the first time hospital rating systems are rigorously compared. Ratings often offer conflicting, confusing results and do not provide an accurate picture, experts said. 'A lot of the so-called 'top hospitals' identified by some rating systems are n

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NIH's All of Us Research Program recaps progress and next steps

The All of Us Research Program at the National Institutes of Health has made strong progress in its efforts to advance precision medicine, according to a paper in the New England Journal of Medicine. With information provided by volunteers across the United States, All of Us is developing a robust data platform to support a wide range of health studies. The program aims to include data from 1 mill

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Surgeons report success in reducing opioid prescribing without increasing patients' pain

A new study shows how one state's surgeons reduced the number of opioids they prescribed to thousands of patients — without causing patients to feel more pain or less satisfied with their surgical experience.

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Microsoft says humans will still transcribe Cortana and Skype audio

Just like seemingly every other major tech company with a voice assistant or voice chat service, it emerged that Microsoft contractors were listening to Skype and Cortana recordings. …

30min

Testosterone has a complicated relationship with moral reasoning, study finds

Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms, suggesting that testosterone's influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought.

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A society's cultural practices shape the structure of its social networks

Biologists used mathematical models to show that societies that favor generalists, who have a wide range of skills, are less well-connected than those societies that favor specialists, who are highly skilled at a smaller number of traits. The findings have implications for improving information flow and problem-solving in settings from business to academia.

34min

Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil

In a 19-year study, scientists dug roughly 6 feet down to compare soil carbon changes in different cropping systems. They found that compost is a key to storing carbon, a strategy for offsetting carbon dioxide emissions.

34min

How President Trump Scooped Me on a Google Story

Kevin Cernekee, a conservative firebrand inside Google, kept a low public profile. Then, WIRED's reporting propelled him to Fox News—and Trump's tweets.

46min

Chemical screening suggests a two-pronged treatment for pediatric Ewing sarcoma

For children with Ewing sarcoma, an aggressive bone cancer, a combination of two different classes of drugs may work synergistically to turn off the drivers fueling this disease, finds a new study. The combination appears to be more powerful than relying on either treatment alone.

50min

NYC has hired hackers to hit back at stalkerware

A New York City government pilot program is bringing technologists and domestic abuse victims together for good.

57min

Facial recognition test mistakenly identified 26 California legislators as criminals

The results of the experiment were similar to last year's, which identified 28 members of the US Congress as criminals. In both studies, the ALCU contends that the majority of misidentifications …

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Nanocapsule reaches cancer that has spread to central nervous system in mice

Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system.

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In difficult times, having multiple husbands can be an advantage

Researchers infer that women can buffer themselves against economic and social crises, and more effectively keep their children alive. Data was collected on nearly 2,000 individuals living in a small village at the north end of the Rukwa Valley, Tanzania.

1h

Sticky proteins help plants know when — and where — to grow

When it comes to plant growth and development, one hormone is responsible for it all: auxin. New research has uncovered a mechanism by which it can affect a plant in a myriad of ways.

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Researchers use blockchain to drive electric-vehicle infrastructure

Researchers have integrated the use of blockchain into energy systems, a development that could result in expanded charging infrastructure for electric vehicles.

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Nanocapsule reaches cancer that has spread to central nervous system in mice

Researchers developed a drug delivery system that can break through the blood-brain barrier in mice.

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Fishing leads to investigation of environmental changes in waterways

A fisherman's curiosity led to identification of the correlation between microbial communities in recreational freshwater locales and seasonal environmental changes, according to a team of researchers from Penn State.

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Leaders of AveXis Out Over Doctored Gene Therapy Data

Novartis, which bought the biotech firm in 2018, announced that the company's top scientists have left, and news reports say it's because they were involved in using manipulated data to get the gene therapy Zolgensma approved.

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Sticky proteins help plants know when—and where—to grow

Depending on the temperature, a plant may synthesize the hormone auxin. Depending on the pathogens present, a plant may synthesize auxin. Depending on the available nutrients, water, stressors or development cues: auxin.

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Sticky proteins help plants know when—and where—to grow

Depending on the temperature, a plant may synthesize the hormone auxin. Depending on the pathogens present, a plant may synthesize auxin. Depending on the available nutrients, water, stressors or development cues: auxin.

1h

When It Comes To Gut Health, Trust Science, Not Gimmicks

Scientists have significantly increased our understanding of the gut microbiome over the past 10 or 15 years, and the future of this field is very promising. However, TV doctors, bloggers, and “natural health food“ companies that tell you what to eat to improve gut health don’t actually know what they’re talking about. Promoting gut health is not as simple as drinking kombucha and eating probioti

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In Defense Of Naked Mole Rats And What We Can Learn From Them

Picture a pinkish, hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato. Researchers are studying naked mole rats to figure out what they can learn about longevity and health.

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Microplastic drifting down with the snow

Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. But these minute particles are also transported by the atmosphere and subsequently washed out of the air, especially by snow — and even in such remote regions as the Arctic and Alps.

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Report: Chipotle, Sweetgreen bowls contain cancer-linked 'forever chemicals'

The results don't suggest that eating from any of these restaurants poses a serious health risk. The Food and Drug Administration allows a certain amount of PFAS to exist in food containers. Still, the science behind the health and environmental effects of PFAS remains largely unclear. None When you buy food from Chipotle or Sweetgreen, what else is inside that fiber takeout bowl besides a burrit

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Modi’s Decision on Kashmir Reveals a Brittleness in India

Nearly two decades ago, President Bill Clinton called Jammu and Kashmir “the most dangerous place in the world.” Now the disputed Himalayan territory, claimed by both India and Pakistan, is again under a global spotlight. The reason: India’s sudden voiding earlier this month of a constitutional provision that gave the country’s only Muslim-majority province a measure of autonomy from New Delhi, a

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Muscle Spasms and Cramps: Causes and Treatments

If you've ever had a muscle seize up, you know it's painful and can stop you in your tracks. But what actually causes muscle cramps or spasms, and what can be done about it?

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Spaceplane gets a ride for space station trips

Dream Chaser will launch into orbit on the future Vulcan rocket for re-supply flights to the space station.

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In difficult times, having multiple husbands can be an advantage

Researchers infer that women can buffer themselves against economic and social crises, and more effectively keep their children alive.Data was collected on nearly 2,000 individuals living in a small village at the north end of the Rukwa Valley, Tanzania.

1h

Sticky proteins help plants know when — and where — to grow

When it comes to plant growth and development, one hormone is responsible for it all: auxin. New Washington University in St. Louis research has uncovered a mechanism by which it can affect a plant in a myriad of ways.

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Lavender oil may contribute to abnormal breast growth in young girls

Abnormal breast growth in young girls is linked to lavender oil exposure, according to a recent study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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AAN issues guidelines for treatment of migraine in children and teens

For children and teens with migraine, the pain and symptoms that accompany migraine attacks can be debilitating, resulting in missed school days, absence from social or sporting events, and affected home activities. Now the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Headache Society have developed two guidelines that include recommendations for preventing and treating migraine in childre

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This Startup Created a Marijuana Breathalyzer

Driving While Stoned If a police officer suspects you’ve had too much to drink before getting behind the wheel of your car, they can use a breathalyzer to estimate your blood alcohol level on the spot. But if a cop thinks you’re driving stoned, they currently don’t have any evidence-based way to immediately confirm their suspicions — they typically have to rely on subjective roadside sobriety tes

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Cybersickness: Why People Experience Motion Sickness During Virtual Reality

Virtual reality makes between 40% and 70% of people feel nauseated. Experts are trying to figure out why. VR-User.jpg Image credits: Johan Larsson via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Technology Wednesday, August 14, 2019 – 16:00 Meeri Kim, Contributor (Inside Science) — In the 1990s, early attempts at bringing virtual reality to the masses with consumer headsets like Sega VR and Nintendo’s

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Mount Everest: Climbers set to face new rules after deadly season

Only experienced mountaineers should be climbing the world's highest peak, a Nepali panel recommends.

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Immune-Activating Gene Therapy for Gliobastoma

The results of an early trial in 31 brain cancer patients finds immune activity boosted in the tumor, and possibly longer survival.

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Vaping Is Causing Severe Breathing Problems in Some Teens

Teens are coming down with serious breathing problems after vaping. It's a mystery why.

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Newly Discovered 'Monster' Penguin Was As Tall As an Adult Human

Fish swam for their lives when they encountered a forbidding, ancient "monster" penguin that would have towered over today's largest penguin.

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A society's cultural practices shape the structure of its social networks

It's unlikely that someone born today could independently think up all the necessary steps it would take to send a rocket to the moon. They would need to learn from those who came before them.

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The Antarctic ice sheet is melting and, yeah, it’s probably our fault.

Glaciers in West Antarctica have thinned and accelerated in the last few decades. A new paper provides some of the first evidence that this is due to human activities. by Eric Steig It’s been some time since I wrote anything for RealClimate. In the interim there’s been a lot of important new work in the area of my primary research interest – Antarctica. Much of it is aimed at addressing the centr

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Background on the role of natural climate variability in West Antarctic ice sheet change.

This is a summary of some of the key details that underpin the discussion of anthropogenic vs . natural forcing in driving glacier change in West Antarctica. This is useful background for the paper by Holland et al. (2019), discussed in another post ( here ). We’ve known for some time that Pine Island Glacier (PIG) and Thwaites Glacier, the two largest of several fast-moving outlet glaciers that

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Frats Are Signing “Exclusive Contracts” to Use Tinder or Bumble

Swiping In Dating apps Tinder and Bumble are quietly partnering with fraternities at University of Texas, signing “exclusive contracts” that bring the frats more money in exchange for promoting the app to fellow students. That promotion has taken the form of requiring students to download the app before being let into a party, where the frat would get a commission per download, according to Houst

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Physicist advances a radical theory of gravity

The Dutch physicist Erik Verlinde's hypothesis describes gravity as an "emergent" force not fundamental. The scientist thinks his ideas describe the universe better than existing models, without resorting to "dark matter". While some question his previous papers, Verlinde is reworking his ideas as a full-fledged theory. None The Dutch theoretical physicist Erik Verlinde is no stranger to big idea

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How mindfulness can help increase your attention span and working memory

submitted by /u/FromTheLabBench [link] [comments]

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Lead Crisis in Newark Grows, as Bottled Water Distribution Is Bungled

Worries about the safety of the drinking water in New Jersey’s largest city have raised comparisons to Flint, Mich.

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Whistleblower Complaint Highlights CDC Turmoil on Climate

The filing will raise concerns that the agency is shifting climate funds to other programs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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US CEOs earn 278 times more than their workers: study

The top executives at large US companies are paid 278 times more than their company's workers and the gap continues to widen, according to a study published Wednesday.

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A society's cultural practices shape the structure of its social networks

Biologists Erol Akçay and Marco Smolla of the University of Pennsylvania used mathematical models to show that societies that favor generalists, who have a wide range of skills, are less well-connected than those societies that favor specialists, who are highly skilled at a smaller number of traits. The findings, have implications for improving information flow and problem-solving in settings from

2h

Rare Amur leopard cubs go on view at zoo; no names yet

Visitors may now get a look at two rare leopard cubs at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York.

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Rare Amur leopard cubs go on view at zoo; no names yet

Visitors may now get a look at two rare leopard cubs at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York.

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UNH technology helps map the way to solve mystery of pilot Amelia Earhart

Researchers from the University of New Hampshire's Marine School are part of the crew, led by National Geographic Explorer-at-Large Robert Ballard, that is setting out to hopefully find answers to questions around the disappearance of famed pilot Amelia Earhart. UNH's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping has developed an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), or robot, that can explore the seafloor in

2h

Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil

By moving beyond the surface level and literally digging deep, scientists at the University of California, Davis, found that compost is a key to storing carbon in semi-arid cropland soils, a strategy for offsetting CO2 emissions.

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Ketogenic diet may stop migraines by changing the brain’s fuel

A low-carb diet cut the number of days people had migraines in half, possibly by forcing the brain to run on ketones instead of glucose

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Biosensor warns about salmonella before food hits stores

New technology could give retailers and regulators an earlier warning of food dangers like salmonella, improving public health and giving consumers peace of mind. The biosensor provides a rapid way for producers to know if this invisible danger is present in both raw and ready-to-eat food before it reaches the store. Annually, more than 48 million people get sick from foodborne illnesses in Ameri

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Study reveals school savings accounts can dry up in 'financial deserts'

Children's savings accounts (CSAs), offered by elementary schools throughout San Francisco and in schools across the nation, were introduced to boost college-going rates, limit student debt and foster equal opportunity for low-income children. However, San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Management Ian Dunham finds that geography—particularly in neighborhoods that lack brick-and-

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New mapping reveals lost West Coast estuary habitat

An unprecedented survey has revealed the loss of about 85 percent of historical tidal wetlands in California, Oregon, and Washington. The report, published today in PLOS ONE, also highlights forgotten estuary acreage that might now be targeted for restoration.

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How Trump Is Reversing Obama’s Nondiscrimination Legacy

Today, Donald Trump’s administration made another major move in its effort to walk back President Barack Obama’s contested legacy on nondiscrimination policies. Under a proposed new rule, faith-based groups that receive contracts from the Department of Labor would have a wider latitude to make hiring and firing decisions based on their religious teachings. Progressive activists are already worrie

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Photos of Woodstock 1969, on Its 50th Anniversary

Fifty years ago, more than 400,000 people descended on Bethel, New York, headed to a dairy farm owned by Max and Miriam Yasgur, where the Woodstock Music & Art Fair was being held. Planners had told the Yasgurs and town officials that they expected no more than 50,000 attendees, and were overwhelmed by the huge crowds. Over three days, 32 acts performed on stage, including Joan Baez, Santana, the

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Sequential, concurrent multitasking is equally hard for men, women

Women and men perform equally when required to switch attention between tasks or perform two tasks simultaneously, according to a new study. The finding adds to a growing literature that contradicts the widely held belief that women multitask better than men.

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In the shadow of the dinosaurs

Researchers describe Clevosaurus hadroprodon, a new reptile species from Rio Grande do Sul state in southern Brazil.

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Testosterone has a complicated relationship with moral reasoning, study finds

Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms, suggesting that testosterone's influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought.

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New mapping reveals lost west coast estuary habitat

An unprecedented survey has revealed the loss of about 85 percent of historical tidal wetlands in California, Oregon, and Washington. The report, published today in PLOS ONE, also highlights forgotten estuary acreage that might now be targeted for restoration.

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Early-career female physicians experience obstacles to professional and academic success

Individual and systemic challenges specific to female family physicians in their first five years of practice create obstacles that can result in disproportionate rates of burnout and negative impacts on career trajectories, according to a new paper co-authored by Dr. Tali Bogler of St. Michael's Hospital's Academic Family Health Team.

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Misfit's lightweight Vapor X smartwatch starts at $200

It's no secret that the Apple Watch dominates the smartwatch market, with one in every two people buying the device over the alternatives. Still, the latest crop of Wear OS watches looks promising, …

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Engineering multiple bacterial strains reverses antagonistic interactions and results in more balanced consortia

Bacteria, like people, have complicated relationships: they can either be friendly, neutral, or antagonistic toward each other, and those relationships can change depending on the situations in which they find themselves. As interest in identifying the bacterial species present in the human microbiome that contribute to health and disease has exploded in recent years, so too have efforts to unders

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Engineering multiple bacterial strains reverses antagonistic interactions and results in more balanced consortia

Bacteria, like people, have complicated relationships: they can either be friendly, neutral, or antagonistic toward each other, and those relationships can change depending on the situations in which they find themselves. As interest in identifying the bacterial species present in the human microbiome that contribute to health and disease has exploded in recent years, so too have efforts to unders

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Aliens used to keep our fear of extinction at bay—then we realized how alone we are

Earthrise taken from Apollo 8. (NASA/) It is 1950 and a group of scientists are walking to lunch against the majestic backdrop of the Rocky Mountains. They are about to have a conversation that will become scientific legend. The scientists are at the Los Alamos Ranch School, the site for the Manhattan Project , where each of the group has lately played their part in ushering in the atomic age . T

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Astronomers just quintupled the number of known repeating fast radio bursts

A Canadian telescope spotted eight more repeating fast radio bursts. What causes these cryptic flashes of radio waves from deep space remains unclear.

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Amazon Claims Rekognition Can Now Detect Fear

Amazon Web Services’ facial recognition technology, Rekognition, can now detect fear. At least, that’s according to Amazon — but given that the tech has been proven inaccurate again and again , it’s hard to say whether the newly announced capability actually works as advertised. On Monday, Amazon Web Services (AWS) published a blog post detailing several updates to its controversial tech , includ

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Why is there microplastic in Arctic snow?

Scientists have found that particles of plastic are falling out of the sky with snow in the Arctic.

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Scientists Discover New Cure for the Deadliest Strain of Tuberculosis

Once, a diagnosis of extensively drug-resistant TB meant quick death. A three-drug regimen cures most patients in just months.

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A Worrisome Discovery in High Arctic Snowfall

When Melanie Bergmann , an ecologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany, collected snow and ice samples for her new study, she had to work extra hard not to contaminate them. She and her colleagues always looked for the freshest snow. They always stood with their backs to the wind. They picked up the ice with unorthodox metal tools—including, at one point, a household soup ladle—and depos

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The Patriarchal Allure of The Family

In 2007, the Nevada senator John Ensign was a glittering star in the Republican firmament with a maple-syrup tan, born-again bona fides, and presidential ambitions. He was one of a handful of congressmen who lived in a C Street rowhouse owned by an organization known as “the Fellowship,” an unorthodox group home that the New Yorker once likened to a frat house for Jesus. Its members crossed party

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Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil

For their 19-year study, UC Davis scientists dug roughly 6 feet down to compare soil carbon changes in different cropping systems. They found that compost is a key to storing carbon, a strategy for offsetting CO2 emissions.

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Brain molecule identified as key in anxiety model

Boosting a single molecule in the brain can change 'dispositional anxiety,' the tendency to perceive many situations as threatening, in nonhuman primates, researchers from UC Davis and UW-Madison have found. The molecule, neurotrophin-3, stimulates neurons to grow and make new connections.

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How Flashlight Fish Swim Together in the Dark

The fish have organs filled with glowing bacteria that they use to flash. How Flashlight Fish Swim Together in the Dark Video of How Flashlight Fish Swim Together in the Dark Creature Wednesday, August 14, 2019 – 14:45 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — A quarter of fish species swim in groups called schools. This behavior is rare at night – but flashlight fish school even in the dark.

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Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane, study suggests

submitted by /u/NjalBorgeirsson [link] [comments]

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Neanderthal's Got 'Surfer's Ear' A Lot, Study Says

A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man and child at Vienna's Natural History Museum. (Credit: Wolfgang Sauber/Wikimedia Commons Being a lifelong surfer or diver sometimes comes with an odd …

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Jupiter May Have Absorbed a Smaller Planet

Yo Dawg Jupiter’s core is a bizarre mix of solid rocks mixed with a diffuse bubble of hydrogen gas. And the story of how it got that way has long eluded explanation. But now scientists think they’re on to something, suggesting that gas giant absorbed another protoplanet during a head-on collision some 4.5 billion years ago when our solar system was forming, according to Science News . The brutal

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Genes linked to Alzheimer's risk, resilience ID'd

Scientists have identified a pair of genes that influence risk for both late-onset and early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

3h

Helping bacteria be better friends

Bacteria, like people, have complicated relationships. A group of researchers was able to engineer the genomes of 4 species of gut bacteria to make them rely on each other for essential nutrients rather than competing for them, and the whole community was stronger and more balanced as a result. This technology could enable bacteria-based therapies and tools that could be used to improve human heal

3h

Study reveals school savings accounts can dry up in 'financial deserts'

College of Business Professor studies the impact geography has on San Francisco's Children's Savings Accounts program.

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Do financial incentives change length-of-stay performance in ED? Study results are mixed

The results of a retrospective study on a pay-for-performance (P4P) program implemented in Vancouver, British Columbia suggest mixed consequences — it can reduce access block for admitted patients but may also lead to discharges associated with return visits and admissions.

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Charcoal-based drug delivery system improves efficacy of common herpes drug

A study led by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that combining acyclovir — a commonly prescribed topical herpes medication — with particles of activated carbon improves efficacy of the drug.

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Researchers use blockchain to drive electric-vehicle infrastructure

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have integrated the use of blockchain into energy systems, a development that could result in expanded charging infrastructure for electric vehicles.

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Study predicts modest impact from additional dose of rotavirus vaccine

Giving children an additional dose of rotavirus vaccine when they are nine months old would provide only a modest improvement in the vaccine's effectiveness in low-income countries, according to a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health and the Institute of Infection and Global Health at the University of Liverpool.

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Comcast Is Gouging People Who Watch Too Much Netflix

Bandwidth Hammer People who stream high definition movies and shows are blowing through internet service provider data caps and getting slapped with higher monthly payments . The fines paid by these so-called power users, as providers like Comcast and AT&T call them, are a prominent source of revenue for the companies as they try to make up for cancelled cable subscriptions, The Los Angeles Times

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Treatment for extreme drug-resistant tuberculosis wins US government approval

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02464-0 The three-drug regimen cures 90% of people who have the deadliest form of the disease.

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Plant growth has declined drastically around the world due to dry air

A lack of water in the air has resulted in a 59 per cent decline in vegetated areas around the world over the past twenty years

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Microplastics in the Arctic and the Alps may have blown in on the wind

Microplastics have been found in the snow in remote areas, and they may have drifted in on the wind, raising questions about how much plastic we are inhaling

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Neanderthals spent a surprising amount of time underwater

Neanderthals’ bony ear growths – similar to “surfer’s ear” in modern water-loving humans – suggest they spent lots of time foraging in aquatic environments

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New drug targets early instigator of Alzheimer's disease

Medicinal chemists are exploring a small molecule drug known as DYR219. The promising therapy, while still in the experimental stages, may succeed where other treatments have failed, and could be effective against a range of neurodegenerative illnesses in addition to Alzheimer's.

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Neanderthals commonly suffered from 'swimmer's ear'

Abnormal bony growths in the ear canal were surprisingly common in Neanderthals, according to a new study.

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Early exposure to manganese could affect teens' cognitive ability and motor control

Early-life exposure to the mineral manganese disrupts the way different areas of the brain involved in cognitive ability and motor control connect in teenagers, Mount Sinai researchers report in a study published in PLOS ONE in August.

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Scientists make first observation of fish schooling using bioluminescent flashes

A new study is the first to demonstrate that schooling in fishes can be facilitated by bioluminescent flashes in the absence of ambient light. Led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, the research raises the possibility that fish schooling may occur in the deep sea, where it was previously assumed to be too dark for fish to coordinate their movements with each other. The study

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ASU study shows positive lab environment critical for undergraduate success in research

An Arizona State University study, conducted by 14 undergraduate students and their research mentors, found that more than 50% of life sciences students who participated in the study considered leaving their undergraduate research experience. Ultimately, more than 50% decided to leave. They also found the most important factors that influence whether a student decides to continue working in resear

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Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits

A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens of the Pacific Northwest.

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Genes linked to Alzheimer's risk, resilience ID'd

An international team of researchers led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a pair of genes that influence risk for both late-onset and early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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Two-pronged gene therapy for glioblastoma proves safe in phase 1 trial

A phase 1 clinical trial has demonstrated that a two-step gene therapy treatment was safe and effective in 31 patients with recurrent glioblastoma — a stubborn form of brain cancer — potentially overcoming a major hurdle that has hindered the use of systemically administered interleukin 12 (IL-12)-based regimens.

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Microplastic drifting down with the snow

Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. But these minute particles are also transported by the atmosphere and subsequently washed out of the air, especially by snow — and even in such remote regions as the Arctic and Alps. This was demonstrated in a study conducted by experts at the Alfred Wegener Institu

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AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology.

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First clinical trial of drug-inducible gene therapy yields encouraging preliminary results

A new clinical trial by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute set out to test the safety and effectiveness of controlling a powerful immunotherapy, known as human interleukin-12 (hIL-12), by using an oral activator — a drug that can give finer control over when a gene gets turned on — in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

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Virtual reality experiences may help treat severe pain

Therapeutic virtual reality can be used to reduce severe pain in hospitalized patients, according to a study published August 14, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Brennan Spiegel of Cedars-Sinai Health System, USA, and colleagues.

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Neanderthals commonly suffered from 'swimmer's ear'

Abnormal bony growths in the ear canal were surprisingly common in Neanderthals, according to a study published Aug. 14, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Erik Trinkaus of Washington University and colleagues.

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Flashlight fish use bioluminescence to school at night

Flashlight fish use their bioluminescent organs to school at night – and only a few need actively flash to maintain the group, according to a study published Aug. 14, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Gruber from the City University of New York, USA, and colleagues.

3h

Sequential, concurrent multitasking is equally hard for men, women

Women and men perform equally when required to switch attention between tasks or perform two tasks simultaneously, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Hirsch of Aachen University in Germany and colleagues. The finding adds to a growing literature that contradicts the widely held belief that women multitask better than men.

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Microplastics are Seemingly Everywhere, Even in the Remote Frozen North

New research finds plastic particles in Arctic snow, in amounts that surprise scientists. ArticSnow_topNteaser.jpg Scientists use a helicopter to collect snow samples in the Arctic. Image credits: Mine Tekman, Alfred-Wegener-Institut Earth Wednesday, August 14, 2019 – 14:00 Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor (Inside Science) — Human-made plastic waste is everywhere . It’s abundant in the ocean.

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Kepler helps count Earth-like planets around sun-like stars

A new study provides the most accurate estimate of the frequency that planets similar to Earth in size and in distance from their host star occur around stars similar to our sun. Knowing the rate that these potentially habitable planets occur will be important for designing future astronomical missions to characterize nearby rocky planets around sun-like stars that could support life, researchers

3h

Trekants-dating-app afslører brugernes private billeder og intime data

Det er ikke første gang, en dating-app afslører sine brugeres hemmeligheder

3h

Airborne Plastic Is Blowing All the Way to the Arctic

Tiny plastic particles have turned up in samples of Arctic snow, pointing to their ubiquity in the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Airborne Plastic Is Blowing All the Way to the Arctic

Tiny plastic particles have turned up in samples of Arctic snow, pointing to their ubiquity in the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI validates evolution's oldest mathematical model

Researchers test Müllerian mimicry with a very different ButterflyNet. Nick Carne reports.

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Why Secular Humanism can do what Atheism can't.

Atheism is increasingly popular, but the lack of an organized community around it can be problematic. The decline in social capital once offered by religion can cause severe problems. Secular Humanism can offer both community and meaning, but it has also attracted controversy. None People aren't as religious as they used to be . The decline of these traditional belief systems is a tragedy for som

3h

Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits

A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens of the Pacific Northwest.

3h

Scientists make first observation of fish schooling using bioluminescent flashes

A new study is the first to demonstrate that schooling in fishes can be facilitated by bioluminescent flashes in the absence of ambient light. Led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, the research raises the possibility that fish schooling may occur in the deep sea, where it was previously assumed to be too dark for fish to coordinate their movements with each other. The study

3h

Neanderthals also got 'surfer's ear,' suggesting they liked to fish

What do surfers, kayakers and Neanderthals have in common?

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Study shows positive lab environment critical for undergraduate success in research

Getting involved in research as an undergraduate can have significant benefits, such as enhancing a student's ability to think critically, increasing their understanding of how to conduct a research project and improving the odds that they'll complete a degree program in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

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Reduction of intratumoral brain perfusion by noninvasive transcranial electrical stimulation

Malignant brain neoplasms have a poor prognosis despite aggressive treatments. Animal models and evidence from human bodily tumors reveal that sustained reduction in tumor perfusion via electrical stimulation promotes tumor necrosis, therefore possibly representing a therapeutic option for patients with brain tumors. Here, we demonstrate that transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) allows to sa

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SBP2 deficiency in adipose tissue macrophages drives insulin resistance in obesity

Proinflammatory activation and accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) are associated with increased risk of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we described the previously unidentified role of selenocysteine insertion sequence–binding protein 2 (SBP2) in maintaining insulin sensitivity in obesity. SBP2 was suppressed in ATMs of diet-induced obese mice and was correlated with adipose t

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BRAF inhibitors promote intermediate BRAF(V600E) conformations and binary interactions with activated RAS

Oncogenic BRAF mutations initiate tumor formation by unleashing the autoinhibited kinase conformation and promoting RAS-decoupled proliferative RAF-MEK-ERK signaling. We have engineered luciferase-based biosensors to systematically track full-length BRAF conformations and interactions affected by tumorigenic kinase mutations and GTP loading of RAS. Binding of structurally diverse αC-helix-OUT BRA

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Deglacial grounding-line retreat in the Ross Embayment, Antarctica, controlled by ocean and atmosphere forcing

Modern observations appear to link warming oceanic conditions with Antarctic ice sheet grounding-line retreat. Yet, interpretations of past ice sheet retreat over the last deglaciation in the Ross Embayment, Antarctica’s largest catchment, differ considerably and imply either extremely high or very low sensitivity to environmental forcing. To investigate this, we perform regional ice sheet simula

3h

Cultural selection shapes network structure

Cultural evolution relies on the social transmission of cultural traits along a population’s social network. Research indicates that network structure affects information spread and thus the capacity for cumulative culture. However, how network structure itself is driven by population-culture co-evolution remains largely unclear. We use a simple model to investigate how populations negotiate the

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Genotype-by-environment interactions inferred from genetic effects on phenotypic variability in the UK Biobank

Genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) is a fundamental component in understanding complex trait variation. However, it remains challenging to identify genetic variants with GEI effects in humans largely because of the small effect sizes and the difficulty of monitoring environmental fluctuations. Here, we demonstrate that GEI can be inferred from genetic variants associated with phenotypic va

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Deep learning on butterfly phenotypes tests evolutions oldest mathematical model

Traditional anatomical analyses captured only a fraction of real phenomic information. Here, we apply deep learning to quantify total phenotypic similarity across 2468 butterfly photographs, covering 38 subspecies from the polymorphic mimicry complex of Heliconius erato and Heliconius melpomene . Euclidean phenotypic distances, calculated using a deep convolutional triplet network, demonstrate si

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Engineered collagen-binding serum albumin as a drug conjugate carrier for cancer therapy

Serum albumin (SA) is used as a carrier to deliver cytotoxic agents to tumors via passive targeting. To further improve SA’s tumor targeting capacity, we sought to develop an approach to retain SA-drug conjugates within tumors through a combination of passive and active targeting. SA was recombinantly fused with a collagen-binding domain (CBD) of von Willebrand factor to bind within the tumor str

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The histone code reader PHD finger protein 7 controls sex-linked disparities in gene expression and malignancy in Drosophila

The notable male predominance across many human cancer types remains unexplained. Here, we show that Drosophila l(3)mbt brain tumors are more invasive and develop as malignant neoplasms more often in males than in females. By quantitative proteomics, we have identified a signature of proteins that are differentially expressed between male and female tumor samples. Prominent among them is the cons

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Noninvasive monitoring of chronic kidney disease using pH and perfusion imaging

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a cardinal feature of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA), a prototypic organic acidemia. Impaired growth, low activity, and protein restriction affect muscle mass and lower serum creatinine, which can delay diagnosis and management of renal disease. We have designed an alternative strategy for monitoring renal function based on administration of a pH sensitive MRI agent

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Drug-encapsulated carbon (DECON): A novel platform for enhanced drug delivery

Current drug-delivery systems are designed primarily for parenteral applications and are either lipid or polymer drug conjugates. In our quest to inhibit herpes simplex virus infection via the compounds found in commonly used cosmetic products, we found that activated carbon particles inhibit infection and, in addition, substantially improve topical delivery and, hence, the efficacy of a common a

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The histone modification reader ZCWPW1 is required for meiosis prophase I in male but not in female mice

Meiosis is a specialized type of cell division that creates haploid germ cells and ensures their genetic diversity through homologous recombination. We show that the H3K4me3 reader ZCWPW1 is specifically required for meiosis prophase I progression in male but not in female germ cells in mice. Loss of Zcwpw1 in male mice caused a complete failure of synapsis, resulting in meiotic arrest at the zyg

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White and wonderful? Microplastics prevail in snow from the Alps to the Arctic

Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous, and considerable quantities prevail even in the Arctic; however, there are large knowledge gaps regarding pathways to the North. To assess whether atmospheric transport plays a role, we analyzed snow samples from ice floes in Fram Strait. For comparison, we investigated snow samples from remote (Swiss Alps) and populated (Bremen, Bavaria) European sites. MPs we

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Increased atmospheric vapor pressure deficit reduces global vegetation growth

Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is a critical variable in determining plant photosynthesis. Synthesis of four global climate datasets reveals a sharp increase of VPD after the late 1990s. In response, the vegetation greening trend indicated by a satellite-derived vegetation index (GIMMS3g), which was evident before the late 1990s, was subsequently stalled or reversed. Terrestrial gross p

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Inhaled GM-CSF in neonatal mice provides durable protection against bacterial pneumonia

Pneumonia poses profound health threats to preterm infants. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) eliminate inhaled pathogens while maintaining surfactant homeostasis. As AM development only occurs perinatally, therapies that accelerate AM maturation in preterms may improve outcomes. We tested therapeutic rescue of AM development in mice lacking the actin-bundling protein L-plastin (LPL), which exhibit impa

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Functional protein dynamics on uncharted time scales detected by nanoparticle-assisted NMR spin relaxation

Protein function depends critically on intrinsic internal dynamics, which is manifested in distinct ways, such as loop motions that regulate protein recognition and catalysis. Under physiological conditions, dynamic processes occur on a wide range of time scales from subpicoseconds to seconds. Commonly used NMR spin relaxation in solution provides valuable information on very fast and slow motion

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Microplastics Are Blowing Into the Pristine Arctic

In snow samples collected across the Arctic and Europe, researchers find tens of thousands of microplastic particles per liter of snow—even in remote areas.

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Plastic particles falling out of sky with snow in Arctic

Even in the Arctic, microscopic particles of plastic are falling out of the sky with snow, a study has found.

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Obama Warned Trump—But He Didn’t Listen

August is traditionally a slow time in Washington, but this week, President Donald Trump has already notched two major policy changes. On Monday, the Interior Department announced changes in the way it would apply the Endangered Species Act, the landmark 1973 environmental law, which would, in effect, do less to protect endangered species and more to allow resource extraction. The same day, Ken C

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Can ‘brain zapping’ tackle tumours?

Early proof-of-concept study produces encouraging results. Paul Biegler reports.

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Women may not multitask better than men after all

It seems that neither gender is very good at it. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Fracking blamed for all that methane

Chemical fingerprint reveals a tell-tale change in carbon composition.

3h

Now that's a penguin

Prehistoric giant had a close Antarctic relative.

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UNH technology helps map the way to solve mystery of pilot Amelia Earhart

Researchers from the University of New Hampshire's Marine School are part of the crew, led by National Geographic Explorer-at-Large Robert Ballard, that is setting out to find answers to disappearance of famed pilot Amelia Earhart. UNH has developed an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), or robot, that can explore the seafloor in waters that may be too deep for divers.

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High levels of microplastics found in fresh snow

Samples from remote Arctic and Alpine areas contain thousands of particles per litre

3h

Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits

A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens of the Pacific Northwest.

3h

Scientists make first observation of fish schooling using bioluminescent flashes

A new study is the first to demonstrate that schooling in fishes can be facilitated by bioluminescent flashes in the absence of ambient light. Led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, the research raises the possibility that fish schooling may occur in the deep sea, where it was previously assumed to be too dark for fish to coordinate their movements with each other. The study

3h

AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology.

3h

Microplastic drifting down with the snow

Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in seawater, drinking water, and even in animals. But these minute particles are also transported by the atmosphere and subsequently washed out of the air, especially by snow—and even in such remote regions as the Arctic and the Alps. This was demonstrated in a study conducted by experts at the Alfred Wegener Institu

3h

AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology.

3h

Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

Scientists found an interstellar iron isotope in Antarctic snow samples—which hints that our region of the universe may be the remnant of an ancient exploding star. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Survive the great outdoors by making your own drinkable water

"If the water is clear, then it's safe to drink. See?" were words he would come to regret. (Bit Cloud via Unsplash/) In the wilderness, fighting dehydration by collecting water from streams or springs is often necessary. But a single sip from that crystal clear, ice-cold flow could mean uncomfortable gastrointestinal distress that will have you running to dig a cat hole every 30 minutes. Because

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A new view of old eyes

Fossilisation process may have altered structures.

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‘Ethical’ eggs could save male chicks from mass slaughter

Scientists find ways to sex chicks before they hatch

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Watch Leaves Change Color in a Matter of Seconds

A new time-lapse video of over 6,000 leaf photos reveals the biology behind fall foliage

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Space Dust from Ancient Supernova Found Hiding in Antarctica

Iron traces in snowfall originated in a stellar explosion millions of years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How They (Online Graduate Programs) Get You

Many online graduate programs from the nation’s top universities promise an experience that’s nearly indistinguishable from studying on campus. They offer live seminars taught by tenured professors, close collaboration with talented classmates, and degrees identical to those granted by traditional programs. But in one area, even the best online programs differ drastically from their in-person cou

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Researchers propose new topological phase of atomic matter hosting 'photonic skyrmions'

The field of topology or the study of how surfaces behave in different dimensions has profoundly influenced the current understanding of matter. The prime example is the topological insulator, which conducts electricity only on the surface while being completely insulating inside the bulk. Topological insulators behave like a metal, i.e., silver on the surface, but inside, it would behave like gla

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Young Jupiter was smacked head-on by massive newborn planet

A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a still-forming planet in the early solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago, could explain surprising readings from NASA's Juno spacecraft, according to a study this week in the journal Nature.

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New drug targets early instigator of Alzheimer's disease

Travis Dunckley, a researcher at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center, and Christopher Hulme, D. Phil, medicinal chemist at the Arizona Center for Drug Discovery based at the UA College of Pharmacy, are exploring a small molecule drug known as DYR219. The promising therapy, while still in the experimental stages, may succeed where other treatments have failed, and could be effe

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A massive collision may have made Jupiter's core so weird

A few years ago we learned Jupiter’s core is much messier than expected. Now simulations suggest a huge collision with a planetary embryo could explain why

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Federal agency to consider protections for lake sturgeon

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it will consider whether to list the lake sturgeon as an endangered or threatened species.

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Federal agency to consider protections for lake sturgeon

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it will consider whether to list the lake sturgeon as an endangered or threatened species.

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Portland land value tax would improve equity for homeowners, incentivize development

Shifting Oregon's property tax structure to a land-value tax base could improve equity among homeowners of various income levels, according to a study conducted by Portland State University's Northwest Economic Research Center (NERC).

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NASA follows tropical storm Krosa's approach to landfall in southern Japan

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Krosa contains powerful thunderstorms with heavy rain capabilities as it moves toward landfall in southern Japan. Krosa's center is expected to make landfall in the western part of Shikoku Island, Japan.

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Nanoparticle therapy targets lymph node metastases

Metastasis, in which cancer cells break free from the primary tumor and form tumors at other sites, worsens the prognosis for many cancer patients. The lymph nodes — glands of the immune system located throughout the body — are typically the traveling cells' first destination. Now, researchers have developed a strategy to target metastases in lymph nodes for destruction, before they can cause ca

4h

A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Scientists have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used.

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Scientists find powerful potential weapon to overcome antibiotic resistance

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are a major cause of serious infections that often persist despite antibiotic treatment, but scientists have now discovered a way to make these bacteria much more susceptible to some common antibiotics.

4h

Amateur investors fail to diversify and are better off choosing stocks at random

A new study has found that less-experienced investors are failing to diversify — and could be putting themselves at serious financial risk. The effect is so pronounced that many amateur investors would be better off choosing stocks at complete random.

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How to fight mental illness stigma at college with fun

College students who participate in fun, peer-directed activities that openly and honestly address mental illness are significantly less likely to stigmatize people with these conditions, according to a new study. The study is the first to systematically survey a single graduating class over the course of their college careers on attitudes toward people with mental illness in conjunction with a s

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An In-Depth Introduction to Hybridoma-Based Antibody Development

This white paper from GenScript introduces the process of creating hybridomas and using them for monoclonal antibody production.

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The Guardian view on treating Ebola: science is the start | Editorial

Researchers have developed and trialled drugs that can cure this deadly disease. The problem now is to deliver them This week has seen a heartening triumph of medical science: Ebola is now curable, doctors say. The announcement is also a timely one. The outbreak in the war-ravaged territories of the north-eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, which began over a year ago, has defied the sustain

4h

What Is Epilepsy?

There are many different kinds of epilepsy with symptoms ranging from mild to potentially life-threatening.

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A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Scientists at EPFL have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used. The scientists' work has just been published in Nature.

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Cambridge scientists reverse aging process in rat brain stem cells

Scientists say the results have far reaching implications for how we understand the aging process, and how we might develop much-needed treatments for age-related brain diseases.

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New proteomics technique gives insights into ubiquitin signalling

Australian researchers are among the first in the world to have access to a new approach to understand intricate changes that control how proteins function in our cells in health and disease. The new proteomics technique called 'ubiquitin clipping' allows researchers to create high-definition maps of how proteins are modified by a process called ubiquitination.

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Too much inequality impedes support for public goods

Too much inequality in society can result in a damaging lack of support for public goods and services, which could disadvantage the rich as well as the poor, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School, the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and Harvard University. It is published in the journal Nature.

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Astronomers Detect Eight New Potential Alien Signals

Fast Radio Bursts In 2007, astronomers discovered a high-energy radio signal emanating from far beyond our galaxy. And because it turned up for no obvious reason, some academics began speculating that the signal could’ve been a message from an alien civilization. Scientists have detected dozens of fast radio bursts (FRBs) since then, but only twice did they notice multiple signals coming from a s

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How much vitamin D is enough? It depends

When recommending vitamin D supplements, doctors should look at each individual patient as having different requirements and not rely on “one-size-fits-all” guidelines, according to a new study. According to the Institute of Medicine, people with less than 20 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood are deficient. The Endocrine Society sets a higher threshold of 30 nanograms. Neither guidel

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Ny studie: Adhd-medicin påverkar hjärnans utveckling

Allt fler barn och unga får adhd-medicin. Ämnet som ingår i flera av dessa mediciner, metylfenidat, tycks påverka utvecklingen av hjärnan hos barn men inte hos vuxna. Forskare efterlyser nu en större försiktighet vid förskrivning av dessa preparat till barn.

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Trial in Africa Probes Antibiotic's Effects on Child Mortality

In Niger, fewer kids die when health workers administer azithromycin routinely, perhaps because of a shift in the composition of gut microbes.

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Invasive Carp Could Spread Across Lake Michigan on Detritus Diet

The fishs undiscerning palate might make more of the lake habitable to the species than once thought, according to a new study.

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Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

Scientists found an interstellar iron isotope in Antarctic snow samples—which hints that our region of the universe may be the remnant of an ancient exploding star. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cataclysmic collision could explain Jupiter’s fuzzy core

Study may resolve surprising new observations

4h

NASA follows tropical storm Krosa's approach to landfall in southern Japan

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Krosa contains powerful thunderstorms with heavy rain capabilities as it moves toward landfall in southern Japan. Krosa's center is expected to make landfall in the western part of Shikoku Island, Japan.

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Signs that Jupiter was mixed by a giant impact

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02401-1 Simulations suggest that Jupiter’s dilute core might be the result of a collision between the planet and a Uranus-mass planetary embryo. This finding indicates that giant impacts could be common during planet formation.

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Podcast: Atomic espionage in the Second World War, and exploring the early Universe

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02460-4 Hear the latest from the world of science, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

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What makes flatworms go to pieces

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02376-z Flatworms called planarians can break off fragments of themselves that regenerate to form new, complete worms. The molecular cues that regulate the frequency of such fission events have been revealed.

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Imaging magnetic polarons in the doped Fermi–Hubbard model

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1463-1 Magnetic polarons are imaged with single-site spin and density resolution in the low-doping regime of the atomic Fermi–Hubbard model, showing that mobile delocalized doublons are necessary for polaron formation.

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X marks the spot for fast radio bursts

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02400-2 Fast radio bursts are enigmatic astronomical signals that originate from deep in extragalactic space. Observations using an array of radio telescopes have identified a likely host galaxy for one of these signals.

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Genetics and mechanics combine to guide the embryonic gut

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02398-7 An analysis of gut formation in the fruit fly has revealed how gene expression and mechanical forces are coordinated in adjacent populations of cells. The findings highlight the tissue-level control of embryonic development.

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The formation of Jupiter’s diluted core by a giant impact

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1470-2 An energetic head-on collision between a large impactor and the proto-Jupiter with a primordial compact core could have mixed the heavy elements within the deep interior, leading to a ‘diluted’ core for Jupiter.

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Too much inequality impedes support for public goods

Too much inequality in society can result in a damaging lack of support for public goods and services, which could disadvantage the rich as well as the poor, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School, the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and Harvard University. It is published in the journal Nature.

4h

New proteomics technique gives insights into ubiquitin signalling

Australian researchers are among the first in the world to have access to a new approach to understand intricate changes that control how proteins function in our cells in health and disease.

4h

Boris Johnson’s Carefully Crafted Political Stunt

LONDON—When Boris Johnson was running to be leader of the Conservative Party, he only had to woo a small subset of the British electorate. As prime minister, though, Johnson has more than just Conservative members to think about. As Britain gears up to leave the European Union—and, possibly, a general election —Johnson must bring a divided country together. To do that, he decided to go directly t

4h

'Lithium' Is A Homage To A Drug — And To The Renegade Side Of Science

By celebrating those who applied the substance as a drug, Walter A. Brown aims to raise awareness — and to demolish what remains of the myth that scientific progress is driven by rigorous dispassion. (Image credit: Liveright)

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A planetary body may have smashed into Jupiter, creating its weird core

A planetary body smashing into Jupiter may have jostled the gas giant’s insides during its formative years, creating the strange interior seen today.

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Amateur investors fail to diversify and are better off choosing stocks at random

Whether they're aiming to avoid high financial management fees, control their own investments, or enjoy the thrill of playing the market, more consumers are opening investment accounts and making their own stock picks.

4h

Nanoparticle therapy targets lymph node metastases

Metastasis, in which cancer cells break free from the primary tumor and form tumors at other sites, worsens the prognosis for many cancer patients. The lymph nodes—glands of the immune system located throughout the body—are typically the traveling cells' first destination. Now, researchers have developed a strategy to target metastases in lymph nodes for destruction, before they can cause cancer a

4h

CRISPR can now edit multiple genes at once

It’s now possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously with a refined version of the CRISPR-Cas method, researchers report. CRISPR-Cas offers a relatively quick and easy way to manipulate single genes in cells, meaning scientists can precisely delete, replace, or modify them. In recent years, researchers have also been using technologies based on CRISPR-Cas to syst

5h

Här levde jättepingvinen – som var lika stor som en människa

Ett ben från en utdöd jättepingvin har hittats i Nya Zeeland. Pingvinen var stor som en människa och simmade i havet för cirka 60 miljoner år sedan.

5h

Scientists find powerful potential weapon to overcome antibiotic resistance

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are a major cause of serious infections that often persist despite antibiotic treatment, but scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have now discovered a way to make these bacteria much more susceptible to some common antibiotics.

5h

Scientists find powerful potential weapon to overcome antibiotic resistance

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are a major cause of serious infections that often persist despite antibiotic treatment, but scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have now discovered a way to make these bacteria much more susceptible to some common antibiotics.

5h

Where Does the Fecal Transplant Industry Get its Poop?

A fecal transplant capsule from OpenBiome. (Credit: Erik Jacobs) Mark Smith dares you to come up with a fecal joke he hasn’t heard. It’s not your typical industry parlance, but when you’re in the business of transplanting the stuff, it helps to have a sense of humor about it. “I think we’ve gone through just about every poop pun under the sun,” says Smith, who makes a living reallocating the conte

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'Catcher of the rye' method detects rye gluten proteins in foods

Gluten-free diets have been trendy for several years now, with adherents claiming that avoiding grains that contain the substance helps with weight loss or improves general health. However, for people with celiac disease, avoiding gluten is not a fad but a necessity. Now, researchers have developed a method to detect proteins from rye, which could help food manufacturers meet regulatory requiremen

5h

New tools of data science used to capture single molecules in action

Capturing the motion of single molecules is achieved by a method known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The catch? It takes many detections of light particles — photons — emitted by single molecules to get a clear picture of molecular motion.

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Does the endocannabinoid system link depression and exercise?

How does exercise improve the mood of people with depression? New research looks to the endocannabinoid system for answers. The endocannabinoid system is made up of the body’s naturally occurring cannabinoid molecules and their receptors, says Jacob Meyer, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. Activation of these receptors appears to strengthen connections in the brain a

5h

Nanoparticle therapy targets lymph node metastases

Metastasis, in which cancer cells break free from the primary tumor and form tumors at other sites, worsens the prognosis for many cancer patients. The lymph nodes — glands of the immune system located throughout the body — are typically the traveling cells' first destination. Now, researchers have developed a strategy to target metastases in lymph nodes for destruction, before they can cause ca

5h

Amateur investors fail to diversify and are better off choosing stocks at random

A new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found that less experienced investors are failing to diversify — and could be putting themselves at serious financial risk. The effect is so pronounced that many amateur investors would be better off choosing stocks at complete random.

5h

The New Stephen Miller

When President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday rolled out its so-called public-charge rule, which would allow the government to deny permanent residence to legal immigrants receiving public assistance, whispers of Stephen Miller were immediate. Miller, the 33-year-old Trump adviser, has created many of the White House’s most controversial immigration policies over the past two and half ye

5h

LGBTQ YouTubers File Suit Over Discrimination

Taking Action A group of YouTubers has filed suit against YouTube for demonetizing or otherwise restricting access to videos about LGBTQ issues. The plaintiffs argue that YouTube unlawfully targets creators within the LGBTQ community, both by demonetizing their videos and by blocking or not recommending their content to viewers, according to The Verge — a troubling list of accusations against the

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'Catcher of the rye' method detects rye gluten proteins in foods

Gluten-free diets have been trendy for several years now, with adherents claiming that avoiding grains that contain the substance helps with weight loss or improves general health. However, for people with celiac disease, avoiding gluten is not a fad but a necessity. Now, researchers have developed a method to detect proteins from rye, which could help food manufacturers meet regulatory requiremen

5h

New tools of data science used to capture single molecules in action

Capturing the motion of single molecules is achieved by a method known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The catch? It takes many detections of light particles — photons — emitted by single molecules to get a clear picture of molecular motion.

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Physical and mental exercise lower chances for developing delirium after surgery

A team of researchers has designed a study to see whether older adults who are physically active before having surgery had less delirium after surgery. The research team had previously found that people who enjoy activities such as reading, doing puzzles, or playing games experienced lower rates of delirium.

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The World's Oldest People Might Not Be As Old As We Think

Many of the world's oldest people are probably less old than we thought.

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Archaeologists Who Are Banned from Syria Mourn the Cost of War

Archaeologist says she's in academic purgatory, observing from a distance as Syria burns, unable to help protect its history or its present.

5h

Alaska governor halves massive funding cut to state university system

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02462-2 Researchers at the University of Alaska still face possibility of layoffs.

5h

'Catcher of the rye' method detects rye gluten proteins in foods

Gluten-free diets have been trendy for several years now, with adherents claiming that avoiding grains that contain the substance helps with weight loss or improves general health. However, for people with celiac disease, avoiding gluten is not a fad but a necessity. Now, researchers reporting in the Journal of Proteome Research have developed a method to detect proteins from rye, which could help

5h

Researchers use new tools of data science to capture single molecules in action

In high school chemistry, we all learned about chemical reactions. But what brings two reacting molecules together? As explained to us by Einstein, it is the random motion of inert molecules driven by the bombardment of solvent molecules. If brought close enough together, by random chance, these molecules may react.

5h

FCC set to vote on Sprint/T-Mobile merger, though states' lawsuit still looms large – CNET

The merger is taking its next expected step, but the battle with 16 attorneys general still looms large.

5h

Scientists find powerful potential weapon to overcome antibiotic resistance

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are a major cause of serious infections that often persist despite antibiotic treatment, but scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have now discovered a way to make these bacteria much more susceptible to some common antibiotics.

5h

ASU researchers use new tools of data science to capture single molecules in action

Capturing the motion of single molecules is achieved by a method known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The catch? It takes many detections of light particles — photons — emitted by single molecules to get a clear picture of molecular motion.

5h

'Catcher of the rye' method detects rye gluten proteins in foods

Gluten-free diets have been trendy for several years now, with adherents claiming that avoiding grains that contain the substance helps with weight loss or improves general health. However, for people with celiac disease, avoiding gluten is not a fad but a necessity. Now, researchers reporting in the Journal of Proteome Research have developed a method to detect proteins from rye, which could help

5h

The risk of death from yellow fever can be detected sooner

A FAPESP-funded study with results published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases has identified markers capable of predicting mortality in patients with symptoms of yellow fever, potentially helping to prevent the development of severe conditions.

5h

Why Are Deepfakes So Effective?

It's because we often want them to be true. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Archaeologists Who Are Banned from Syria Mourn the Cost of War

Archaeologist says she's in academic purgatory, observing from a distance as Syria burns, unable to help protect its history or its present.

5h

Impulsive behavior linked to sleep and screen time

A new article suggests that children and youth who do not sleep enough and use screens more than recommended are more likely to act impulsively and make poorer decisions.

5h

What a million corals in 2,500 reefs tell us about saving them

Researchers examined more than a million individual corals across 44 countries for a new study on how to save coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. When Joleah Lamb strapped on a scuba tank and plunged into the ocean over a decade ago, it was the first of many expeditions to examine the effects of climate change and other human-produced factors on coral. Now, 13 years after that foray, sh

5h

FAA Bans Exploding MacBooks From Airplanes

Burning ‘Books In June, Apple issued a recall on 15-inch MacBook Pros sold between September 2015 and February 2017, after determining that the computers’ batteries “may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” “My MacBook Pro exploded today during normal use,” complained one user . “No injuries, luckily. Some damage to the house. Could have been worse — good thing I wasn’t on a plane.” Now, the U.

5h

These toilets use worms to compost your poop, and they are our future

A vermicomposting toilet in Valhalla Provincial Park, British Columbia (BC Parks/) When I visited Squamish, British Columbia for a rock climbing trip, I did not know I was also visiting the origin of a backcountry toilet revolution. One day during the trip, my gut rumbled just as we reached the granite cliff we’d spend the rest of the day scaling. I thought back to the little building we’d passed

5h

Why Are Deepfakes So Effective?

It's because we often want them to be true. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Physical and mental exercise lower chances for developing delirium after surgery

A team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine designed a study to see whether older adults who are physically active before having surgery had less delirium after surgery. The research team had previously found that people who enjoy activities such as reading, doing puzzles, or playing games experienced lower rates of delirium. The team published new findings on physical activity

5h

Everything you need to know about toxic algae blooms

Green pond scum floating on a lake is not just unsightly. As animal lovers have learned the hard way, it can be deadly.

5h

This Powerful Acupressure Mat Obliterates Stress in Just 15 Minutes a Day

Are you looking for a simple way to relieve stress , tension, and anxiety that won’t break the bank and doesn’t require time-consuming trips to a massage therapist or yoga studio? If so, there’s an exciting Kickstarter campaign you need to check out for an innovative new acupressure mat called GoRelax . So far, it’s raised over $120,000 from more than 1,100 backers, and it just might change the w

5h

New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed

The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. Parasitoid wasps are one of the animal groups that are the most rich in species. However, the tropical species are still very poorly known. Understanding the diversity of parasitoid wasps inhabiting rainforests is important, because

6h

Rapid evolution: New findings on its molecular mechanisms

The mechanisms by which new species arise are still not fully understood. What are the evolutionary processes that drive the evolution of new species? Evolutionary biologists traditionally assumed that geographical barriers between animal populations play a decisive role (allopatric speciation): a species is physically separated into two or more isolated populations, thereby preventing gene flow b

6h

New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed

The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. Parasitoid wasps are one of the animal groups that are the most rich in species. However, the tropical species are still very poorly known. Understanding the diversity of parasitoid wasps inhabiting rainforests is important, because

6h

New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling

A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems.

6h

Rapid evolution: New findings on its molecular mechanisms

The mechanisms by which new species arise are still not fully understood. What are the evolutionary processes that drive the evolution of new species? Evolutionary biologists traditionally assumed that geographical barriers between animal populations play a decisive role (allopatric speciation): a species is physically separated into two or more isolated populations, thereby preventing gene flow b

6h

Automated observing network inaugurated at SOAR telescope

Supernovae, neutron star mergers, black holes at the center of galaxies, erupting young stars—these are all examples of objects in the night sky that change their brightness over time. In the coming years, astronomers expect to discover millions of these variable astronomical events with new sensitive telescopes like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). But to characterize these objects and

6h

Flooded Mississippi a threat as hurricane season heats up

The river that drains much of the flood-soaked United States is still running higher than normal, menacing New Orleans in multiple ways just as the hurricane season intensifies.

6h

New drug shows encouraging survival in pancreatic cancer

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a new drug in pancreatic cancer had promising initial results, report researchers. The trial looked at AZD1775, an inhibitor designed to block an enzyme called Wee1, which plays a role in DNA damage repair.

6h

Up to half of patients withhold life-threatening issues from doctors

Facing the threat of domestic violence, being a survivor of sexual assault, struggling with depression or thoughts of suicide are four topics that are difficult to broach with anyone. Including those who can help you. A new study reveals up to 48% of patients who feel they face one or more of these four threats do not disclose this critical information to care providers out of embarrassment, fear

6h

Airline Tests VR Entertainment — But Only For First Class Passengers

Peasant Blockers In the near future, first class airline passengers won’t even need to look at the poor proles in economy class as they file by during boarding. British Airways is testing a range of new virtual reality entertainment features for select first class flights between London Heathrow and JFK in New York, The Verge reports . Passengers will be able to choose between a catalogue of 2D,

6h

Impulsive behaviour linked to sleep and screen time, CHEO study finds

A paper published today in Pediatrics suggests that children and youth who do not sleep enough and use screens more than recommended are more likely to act impulsively and make poorer decisions.

6h

Greta Thunberg: Climate change activist sets sail from Plymouth

The teenage climate change activist is waved off by supporters as she sets sail from the UK.

6h

Museum shrouds endangered wildlife exhibits in mourning veil

Bristol Museum to highlight biodiversity crisis after children demand true stories of exhibits One of Britain’s largest natural history collections is to shroud its exhibits of extinct and endangered species in black mourning veils to highlight the global biodiversity crisis. Related: Trump officials weaken protections for animals near extinction Continue reading…

6h

How Flat Earthers Nearly Derailed a Space Photo Book

What a photographer’s struggle to raise money for his book of images tells us about Facebook and conspiracy theorists.

6h

Bon Iver’s Inexplicable Power

Many of them were mad at him then, but the baffled Grammy viewers who tweeted out “Who is Bonnie Bear? ” when Bon Iver won Best New Artist over Nicki Minaj in 2012 were really paying tribute to the band whose name they had butchered. Bon Iver, once a one-man folk brand and now an experimental noise-pop collective, thrives on being misheard. I thought the Wisconsin band’s impressive new album, i,i

6h

Future Bioweapons Could Kill People With Specific DNA

Future Weapons In the future, we may have to deal with biological weapons that target specific groups of people, passing over everyone else. That’s according to a new report out of Cambridge University’s Centre for the Study of Existential Risk reviewed by The Telegraph . In it, the Cambridge researchers argue that world governments have failed to prepare for futuristic weapons based on advanced

6h

New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed

Parasitoid wasps are one of the animal groups that are the most rich in species. However, the tropical species are still very poorly known. Understanding the diversity of parasitoid wasps inhabiting rainforests is important, because tropical biodiversity is dwindling at an accelerating rate.

6h

Gay Penguins, and Their Hope for a Baby, Have Enchanted Berlin

Two male penguins at Zoo Berlin have adopted an egg, delighting Germans and raising the prospect of the zoo’s first penguin chick in almost two decades.

6h

New drug shows encouraging survival in pancreatic cancer

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a new drug in pancreatic cancer had promising initial results, report researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. The trial looked at AZD1775, an inhibitor designed to block an enzyme called Wee1, which plays a role in DNA damage repair.

6h

Age distribution of new obesity-associated cancer cases

This observational study examines changes in the age distribution of new obesity-associated cancer cases and nonobesity-associated cancer cases from 2000 to 2016 by sex and race/ethnicity.

6h

Are refugees at increased risk of developing mental disorders?

Whether the experience of being a refugee increases the probability of developing a mental disorder such as schizophrenia was the focus of this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis that combined the results of nine studies involving 540,000 refugees in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Canada. The relative risk of refugees developing nonaffective psychosis (which includes several mental disorder

6h

Is blood pressure measured outside of clinic associated with cardiovascular disease in African-Americans?

This observational study examined whether daytime and nighttime blood pressure (BP) levels measured outside a clinical setting are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk of death. Blood pressure levels measured at a clinic may not accurately reflect levels that a person experiences at home, work or while asleep.

6h

Up to half of patients withhold life-threatening issues from doctors

Facing the threat of domestic violence, being a survivor of sexual assault, struggling with depression or thoughts of suicide are four topics that are difficult to broach with anyone. Including those who can help you. A new study reveals up to 48% of patients who feel they face one or more of these four threats do not disclose this critical information to care providers out of embarrassment, fear

6h

Solving the big problem of measuring tiny nanoparticles

Tiny nanoparticles play a gargantuan role in modern life, but experts have struggled to reach a consensus on the best way to assess and measure them. NIST scientists have concluded that measuring the range of sizes in nanoparticles — instead of just the average particle size — is optimal for most applications.

6h

Genetic census of the human microbiome

Scientists have analyzed the genetic repertoire of bacteria in the human mouth and gut. The effort marks the first chapter in efforts to compile a compendium of all genes in the human microbiome. Mapping the microbial genome can reveal links between bacterial genes and disease risk and could inform the development of precision therapies.

6h

Brandfarlige MacBook-computere må ikke længere boarde amerikanske fly

Forbuddet er trådt i kraft, efter Apple advarer om, at batterier fra visse MacBook-modeller risikerer at bryde i brand ved normal brug.

6h

AT&T and T-Mobile team up in a first step toward identifying robocalls across networks

AT&T and T-Mobile announced today the carriers are offering robocall identification across networks in a first step toward SHAKEN/STIR implementation.

6h

Males of a feather flock together

'Birds of a feather flock together' or rather 'opposites attract'? The recently published study on male macaques in Thailand speaks for the former: Behavioral biologists and psychologists have observed that the more similar male Assamese macaques are in their personality, the closer they get and the stronger their social bonds.

6h

Attackers could be listening to what you type

You likely know to avoid suspicious emails to keep hackers from gleaning personal information from your computer. But a new study suggests that it's possible to access your information in a much subtler way: by using a nearby smart phone to intercept the sound of your typing.

6h

Rapid evolution: New findings on its molecular mechanisms

Evolutionary biologists have analyzed the role of microRNAs in the evolution of new species.

6h

New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling

A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems.

6h

How our brain remembers the order of events

For centuries understanding how the order of events is stored in memory has been a mystery. However, researchers have worked out how the order of events in memory could be stored and later recalled in the hippocampal memory system in the brain.

6h

What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals

Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved.

6h

Moles on the body largely influenced by genetics, finds new study

A new study has found that genes have a greater influence than previously thought not only on the number of moles you have but also where they are on your body.

6h

Association between celiac disease risk and gluten intake confirmed

An extensive study has confirmed that the risk of developing celiac disease is connected to the amount of gluten children consume. The new study is observational and therefore does not prove causation; however, it is the most comprehensive of its kind to date.

6h

How many Earth-like planets are around sun-like stars?

A new study provides the most accurate estimate of the frequency that planets that are similar to Earth in size and in distance from their host star occur around stars similar to our Sun.

6h

New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed

The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. Parasitoid wasps are one of the animal groups that are the most rich in species. However, the tropical species are still very poorly known. Understanding the diversity of parasitoid wasps inhabiting rainforests is important, because

6h

Simple protocol for assessing maturation of HPCs from induced pluripotent stem cells

Researchers have developed a guide to help labs standardize the production of mature hepatic-like cells (HPCs) from stem cells and easily compare gene expression of HPCs to actual human liver tissue.

6h

Rapid evolution: New findings on its molecular mechanisms

Evolutionary biologists from Konstanz analyze the role of microRNAs in the evolution of new species.

6h

Attackers could be listening to what you type

You likely know to avoid suspicious emails to keep hackers from gleaning personal information from your computer. But a new study from SMU (Southern Methodist University) suggests that it's possible to access your information in a much subtler way: by using a nearby smart phone to intercept the sound of your typing.

6h

Should cognitive behavioral therapy be taught in school?

Adolescents are experiencing higher rates of mental disorders than ever before. One possible solution to this crisis would be to teach students cognitive behavioral therapy, an effective, modern therapeutic technique that focuses on addressing "distorted" thinking. What are the arguments for and against teaching cognitive behavioral therapy in school? None Nearly half of all young people aged 13

6h

Solving the big problem of measuring tiny nanoparticles

Tiny nanoparticles play a gargantuan role in modern life, even if most consumers are unaware of their presence. They provide essential ingredients in sunscreen lotions, prevent athlete's foot fungus in socks, and fight microbes on bandages. They enhance the colors of popular candies and keep the powdered sugar on doughnuts powdery. They are even used in advanced drugs that target specific types of

6h

Climate expert at CDC poised to file whistleblower complaint over treatment

George Luber not allowed in office without armed escort

6h

IV at home can keep sick kids out of the hospital

Treating children with intravenous antibiotics at home is safe and effective, and compared with hospitals, significantly more cost-effective for the health system and families, according to new research. Laila Ibrahim, a researcher at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and PhD candidate in the pediatrics department at the University of Melbourne Medical School and Penelope Bryant, an assis

6h

How Silicon Valley went from conservative, to anti-establishment, to liberal

From its inception right up until the 1980s, Silicon Valley, and particularly its leaders, were Republican leaning. Dave Packard, cofounder of Hewlett-Packard, was Richard Nixon's deputy secretary of defense. This trend changes in the 1990s, when the techie generation who came of age during the Vietnam War and Watergate represent a more cynical and liberal class of leaders. In 1984, Steve Jobs ad

7h

What the ban on gene-edited babies means for family planning

Technology surrounding the human embryo has moved out of the realm of science fiction and into the reality of difficult decisions. Clinical embryologists fertilize human eggs for the purpose of helping couples conceive. The genetic makeup of these embryos are tested on a routine basis. And today, we no longer ask “can we," but rather, “should we" edit human embryos with the goal of implantation a

7h

Monster penguin find in Waipara, New Zealand

A new species of giant penguin — about 1.6 metres tall — has been identified from fossils found in Waipara, North Canterbury in New Zealand.

7h

Revolutionizing the CRISPR method

Researchers have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. Now, for the very first time, it is possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously.

7h

Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies

A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges.

7h

Exercise associated with benefit to patients with advanced colorectal cancer

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who engaged in moderate exercise while undergoing chemotherapy tended to have delayed progression of their disease and fewer severe side effects from treatment, according to a new study.

7h

Develop your personal skills: New research offers lessons for young people heading for university

New research on the importance of non-cognitive skills — such as conscientiousness, self-esteem and feeling in control of one's life — for graduates' earnings potential offers important lessons for young people receiving their A-level results.

7h

Study finds that female leadership affects wage-gap and firm performance

A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that female executives decrease the wage-gap for women at the top of a firm while widening it at the bottom.

7h

Revolutionizing the CRISPR method

Researchers have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. Now, for the very first time, it is possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously.

7h

How many Earth-like planets are around sun-like stars?

A new study provides the most accurate estimate of the frequency that planets that are similar to Earth in size and in distance from their host star occur around stars similar to our Sun. Knowing the rate that these potentially habitable planets occur will be important for designing future astronomical missions to characterize nearby rocky planets around sun-like stars that could support life. A p

7h

New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today (14 August) in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union.

7h

Making sense of a '7.1' earthquake

The fault underneath the town of Ridgecrest, California, has no name because scientists did not discover it until the 7.1 magnitude earthquake it produced on July 5.

7h

America Has Never Been So Desperate for Tomato Season

On Saturday, I walked a mile from my Brooklyn apartment to a farmers’ market with a clarity of purpose that felt ordained by the heavens. I didn’t really have time for the errand, or a solid idea of how I would use its spoils, but I was compelled onto the sidewalk for a very specific task. It’s tomato season, and I was a woman in want of tomatoes. I don’t know when tomatoes became an object of su

7h

Study finds that female leadership affects wage-gap and firm performance

A new paper in The Economic Journal, published by Oxford University Press, finds that female executives decrease the wage-gap for women at the top of a firm while widening it at the bottom.

7h

Revealed: How our brain remembers the order of events

For centuries understanding how the order of events is stored in memory has been a mystery. However, researchers from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Warwick have worked out how the order of events in memory could be stored and later recalled in the hippocampal memory system in the brain.

7h

New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling

A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems.

7h

Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies

A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges.

7h

Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years

A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years, ensuring a welcome success story for wildlife, say scientists.

7h

Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics

An innovative way to pattern metals could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper.

7h

This Tesla Surveillance Hack Can Tell You if You’re Being Followed

It Follows Hacker and security analyst Truman Kain has created a tool that can tell you in real-time if you’re being followed while driving your Tesla. The “Surveillance Detection Scout” hack scans license plates and uses facial detection to create an in-depth log of cars your Tesla spots using its Sentry Mode camera software suite. The list can then be accessed by the driver, and each license pl

7h

Radioactive dust in Antarctic ice could help map interstellar clouds

Interstellar dust has been found in Antarctic snow samples. The discovery could provide a way of mapping the clouds of dust Earth has passed through in space

7h

How diatoms grab sunlight could lead to better biofuels

Researchers have discovered how diatoms—a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen—harness solar energy for photosynthesis. The finding could help lead to more efficient and affordable algae-based biofuels, which could help fight climate change by cutting fossil fuel burning. Oceans and other waterways are rich with algae—energy factories that convert sunlight and carbon dioxide

7h

Revolutionising the CRISPR method

Everyone's talking about CRISPR-Cas. This biotechnological method offers a relatively quick and easy way to manipulate single genes in cells, meaning they can be precisely deleted, replaced or modified. Furthermore, in recent years, researchers have also been using technologies based on CRISPR-Cas to systematically increase or decrease the activity of individual genes. The corresponding methods ha

7h

Revolutionising the CRISPR method

Everyone's talking about CRISPR-Cas. This biotechnological method offers a relatively quick and easy way to manipulate single genes in cells, meaning they can be precisely deleted, replaced or modified. Furthermore, in recent years, researchers have also been using technologies based on CRISPR-Cas to systematically increase or decrease the activity of individual genes. The corresponding methods ha

7h

Endelig: Ærøs elfærge stævner ud torsdag morgen

Efter flere års udsættelser og ombygninger er elfærgen E/F Ellen endelig klar til at tage afsted på sin jomfrutur. Torsdag morgen klokken 6:20 går den første tur fra Søby til Fynshav.

7h

British Airways adds another perk to first class, virtual reality – CNET

The airline is testing VR on passengers flying from London's Heathrow airport to New York's JFK airport.

7h

Males of a feather flock together

'Birds of a feather flock together' or rather 'opposites attract'? The recently published study on male macaques in Thailand speaks for the former: Behavioral biologists from the German Primate Centre — Leibniz Institute for Primate Research and psychologists from the University of Göttingen have observed that the more similar male Assamese macaques are in their personality, the closer they get a

7h

AAV9 gene therapy vector dramatically increases life span in krabbe disease mouse model

An optimized and newly engineered form of the adeno-associated vector 9 (AAV9) vec-tor used to deliver the galactosylceramidase gene to a mouse model of the inherited neu-rogenerative and rapidly fatal form of Krabbe disease improved clinical symptoms and prolonged median survival by 275%.

7h

Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years

A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years. The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology analysed data from the regular monitoring of both chemicals and invertebrates in the River Ray in Wiltshire — downstream from Swindon's large wastewater treatment plant – between 1977 and 2016.

7h

Develop your personal skills: New research offers lessons for young people heading for university

New research on the importance of non-cognitive skills — such as conscientiousness, self-esteem and feeling in control of one's life — for graduates' earnings potential offers important lessons for young people receiving their A-level results.

7h

Exercise associated with benefit to patients with advanced colorectal cancer

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who engaged in moderate exercise while undergoing chemotherapy tended to have delayed progression of their disease and fewer severe side effects from treatment, according to the results of a new study.

7h

Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies

A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges.

7h

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge

Research conducted at the University of Hawaiʻi (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay, O'ahu revealed a unique feeding strategy, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge.

7h

Develop your personal skills: New research offers lessons for young people heading for university

New research on the importance of non-cognitive skills—such as conscientiousness, self-esteem and feeling in control of one's life—for graduates' earnings potential offers important lessons for young people receiving their A-level results.

7h

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge

Research conducted at the University of Hawaiʻi (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay, O'ahu revealed a unique feeding strategy, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge.

7h

Rewriting the periodic table at high pressure

The periodic table has been a vital foundational tool for material research since it was first created 150 years ago. Now, researchers add an entirely new dimension to the table, offering a new set of principles for material research.

7h

New Proof Settles How to Approximate Numbers Like Pi

The deep recesses of the number line are not as forbidding as they might seem. That’s one consequence of a major new proof about how complicated numbers yield to simple approximations. The proof resolves a nearly 80-year-old problem known as the Duffin-Schaeffer conjecture. In doing so, it provides a final answer to a question that has preoccupied mathematicians since ancient times: Under what ci

7h

Research bias may leave some primates at risk

Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University.

7h

Research bias may leave some primates at risk

Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University.

7h

Researchers develop improved method for studying tsunami risk to bridges, buildings, roads

Researchers at Oregon State University are paving the way toward greater safety for coastal residents and infrastructure by developing a better means of modeling the destructive force of tsunami waves.

7h

Cool roofs can help shield California's cities against heat waves

This summer alone, intense heat waves have been to blame for at least 11 deaths in Japan, a record-breaking 45.9-degree Celsius temperature in France, and a heat advisory affecting 147 million people on the U.S. East Coast. Conjectured as the "new normal," these extreme air temperatures can heat our bodies, causing sunstrokes or even organ damage.

7h

How Do You Film Water in Its Many Forms? Very, Very Carefully

The documentarian Victor Kossakovsky, his crew and others found themselves in perilous spots as they sought out roiling seas, frozen lakes, icebergs and more.

7h

One mother’s nail-biting journey from egg-freezing to parenthood

IVF is growing in popularity for women who don’t want babies until later in life. But as more are finding out, it isn’t a guarantee.

7h

Driverless Electric Trucks Are Coming, and They’ll Affect You More Than You Think

Self-driving and electric cars just don’t stop making headlines lately. Amazon invested in self-driving startup Aurora earlier this year. Waymo, Daimler, GM, along with startups like Zoox, have all launched or are planning to launch driverless taxis , many of them all-electric. People are even yanking driverless cars from their timeless natural habitat—roads—to try to teach them to navigate fores

7h

Working Scientist podcast: The school physics talk that proved more popular than Lady Gaga's boots

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02458-y Media interest in particle physics and the Large Hadron Collider boosted Jon Butterworth's interest in public engagement, reports Julie Gould.

7h

Views of Second World War’s toll vary by nation

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02445-3 People in every country generally think their homeland did the most in the war.

7h

Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics

An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, which could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper.

7h

Revolutionising the CRISPR method

Researchers at ETH Zurich have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. Now, for the very first time, it is possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously.

7h

Monster penguin find in Waipara, New Zealand

A new species of giant penguin — about 1.6 metres tall — has been identified from fossils found in Waipara, North Canterbury in New Zealand.

7h

Advanced data analysis enhances precision medicine application in clinics

Scientists have published a novel computational framework for highly accurate and targeted Non-Invasive Prenatal genetic Testing (NIPT) assay, which enables the application of cost-effective TAC-seq laboratory method in clinical practice. The developed computational workflow allows for the detection of frequent fetal trisomies and the parental origin of trisomic chromosomes from the mother's blood

7h

Fracking boom could explain the puzzling rise in global methane levels

The shale gas boom could be to blame for rising methane in the atmosphere. If the trend continues, it could put our climate goals in greater jeopardy

7h

Cannabis-based health products are going mainstream – do they work?

A component in cannabis called CBD is claimed to help everything from Alzheimer's to anxiety. Despite a boom in sales, there's little evidence supporting the claims

7h

The Atlantic: It’s Possible Dinosaurs Had a Whole Civilization

Megazord It’s technically possible that dinosaurs, in all of their gigantic glory, developed an advanced technological civilization that we’ll never know about. The idea, a thought experiment crafted by The Atlantic writer Peter Brannen , is meant to illustrate how all of the damage done to the world by humanity happened in the blink of an eye in terms of geological timescales — meaning that an a

7h

Red wine compound may have anti-stress effects

The plant compound resveratrol displays anti-stress effects by blocking the expression of an enzyme related to the control of stress in the brain, according to a new study with mice. The findings shed light onto how resveratrol affects neurological processes. “Resveratrol may be an effective alternative to drugs for treating patients suffering from depression and anxiety disorders,” says co-lead

7h

Nickel corrodes in a totally unexpected way

Nickel corrodes in a surprising way, new research finds. Nickel is one of the most abundant elements on earth. It is hard, yet malleable, magnetic at room temperature, and a relatively good conductor of electricity and heat. Most notably, nickel is highly corrosion-resistant, which is useful for industrial purposes. At the microscopic level, nickel is made of aggregates of small, tightly packed c

7h

Synchrotron reveals important information about famous sculpture by Paul Gauguin

Analysis carried out by Conservation Scientist Dr. Eric Henderson at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan allowed National Gallery of Canada's (NGC) Chief Conservator Doris Couture-Rigert to conclude a crucial aspect of her research on an important sculpture by Gauguin in the museum's collection.

8h

Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane, study suggests

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new research.

8h

Tech-oriented office company WeWork files to go public

Office sharing startup WeWork will be going public after its parent company filed papers Wednesday for a stock sale, despite losing money amid rapid expansion.

8h

New Chlamydia Vaccine Shows Promise In First Human Trial

Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the world, with doctors reporting 131 million new cases every year — but that number could drop dramatically thanks to a promising new chlamydia vaccine called CTH522 . CTH522 is the first chlamydia vaccine to ever reach a phase 1 clinical trial, the stage at which researchers test a medication or treatment in humans to ensure

8h

Rewriting the periodic table at high pressure

The periodic table has been a vital foundational tool for material research since it was first created 150 years ago. Now, researchers add an entirely new dimension to the table, offering a new set of principles for material research.

8h

Accurate detection of low-level somatic mutation in intractable epilepsy

Medical scientists have developed an advanced method for perfectly detecting low-level somatic mutation in patients with intractable epilepsy. Their study showed that deep sequencing replicates of major focal epilepsy genes accurately and efficiently identified low-level somatic mutations in intractable epilepsy. According to the study, their diagnostic method could increase the accuracy up to 100

8h

Cool roofs can help shield California's cities against heat waves

A new study shows that if every building in California sported 'cool' roofs by 2050, these roofs would help contribute to protecting urbanites from the consequences of dangerous heatwaves.

8h

Dementia care program improves mental health of patients, caregivers

A comprehensive dementia care program staffed by nurse practitioners working within a health system improves the mental and emotional health of patients and their caregivers.

8h

What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals

Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved.

8h

Researchers develop improved method for studying tsunami risk to bridges, buildings, roads

Researchers are paving the way toward greater safety for coastal residents and infrastructure by developing a better means of modeling the destructive force of tsunami waves.

8h

Cool roofs can help shield California's cities against heat waves

A new study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory shows that if every building in California sported 'cool' roofs by 2050, these roofs would help contribute to protecting urbanites from the consequences of dangerous heatwaves.

8h

Association between coeliac disease risk and gluten intake confirmed

An extensive study has confirmed that the risk of developing coeliac disease is connected to the amount of gluten children consume. The new study is observational and therefore does not prove causation; however, it is the most comprehensive of its kind to date. The results are presented in the prestigious journal JAMA.

8h

Moles on the body largely influenced by genetics, finds new study

A study published this week in the journal Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research has found that genes have a greater influence than previously thought not only on the number of moles you have but also where they are on your body.

8h

Accurate detection of low-level somatic mutation in intractable epilepsy

KAIST medical scientists have developed an advanced method for perfectly detecting low-level somatic mutation in patients with intractable epilepsy. Their study showed that deep sequencing replicates of major focal epilepsy genes accurately and efficiently identified low-level somatic mutations in intractable epilepsy. According to the study, their diagnostic method could increase the accuracy up

8h

Rewriting the periodic table at high pressure

The periodic table has been a vital foundational tool for material research since it was first created 150 years ago. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology presents a new article which adds an entirely new dimension to the table, offering a new set of principles for material research. The article is published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

8h

Metal-oxide semiconductor nanomembrane-based multifunctional electronics for wearable-human interfaces

Wearable electronic human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are an emerging class of devices to facilitate human and machine interactions. Advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs have offered pathways toward commercial wearable HMI devices. However, existing devices are uncomfortable since they restrict the human body's motion with slow response times and challenges to realize multiple f

8h

Is the UK ready for an election? Inside a system straining at the seams

Speculation has it that an early general election is around the corner for the UK.

8h

SpaceX “Starhopper” Will Attempt Longest Flight Yet This Weekend

One Big Leap SpaceX has scheduled the next test flight of its Starship prototype Starhopper for this weekend , according to SpaceNews senior writer Jeff Foust. Acording to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the test craft will attempt to reach an altitude of 650 feet . The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published a flight restrictions notice for the area starting on Friday and ending Monday morning. “J

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Unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge

Research revealed a unique feeding strategy of a marine sponge, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge.

8h

Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane, study suggests

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new research.

8h

Migraine diagnoses positively associated with all-cause dementia

Several studies have recently focused on the association between migraine headaches and other headaches and dementia and found a positive migraine-dementia relationship. However, most of these studies have failed to simultaneously adjust for several common comorbidities, thus potentially introducing bias into their findings.

8h

New insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity

Medical researchers have gained new insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity, including regulation, gene expression and metabolic pathways. This study used samples from a Phase 1 clinical trial for TAK-003, a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine. Though these discoveries occurred in the context of a dengue vaccine trial, they are applicable to the development of vaccine

8h

Reform the system: A minority of students achieve predicted A-level marks

With A-level results day come the countless pictures of jubilant students leaping in the air. But despite those jumping for joy, results day can also be a nerve-wracking time for those waiting to see if they got the grades needed to get into their first choice university.

8h

Smoke from Africa fertilizes the Amazon and tropical ocean regions with soluble phosphorous

A new study reveals that soluble phosphorus that fertilizes the Amazon, as well as the Tropical Atlantic and Southern oceans, is deposited through smoke from biomass fires in Africa.

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Livable cities rankings do citizens a disservice by trying to quantify urban life

At last count, there were over 500 rankings that pit cities around the world against each other: from the most intricately measured quality of life indices, to infographics of how often postal workers get attacked by dogs.

8h

Fejl i faldskærmene: Europæisk Mars-mission kan hænge i en tynd tråd

PLUS. Flere faldskærme til ExoMars-missionen er revnet under tests. Sker det igen, kan det blive svært at nå 2020-vinduet.

8h

Library of spider silk could hold secrets for new materials

With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope.

8h

Shard reveals how Cyprus' ancient kingdoms managed economy

The discovery of a small clay shard inscribed with a partial inventory of goods at a 2,500-year-old citadel suggests that Cyprus' ancient city states "more than likely" managed their economies using a homegrown system, not an imported one, an archaeologist said Wednesday.

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Electronic waste is mined for rare earth elements

Rare earth elements are the "secret sauce" of numerous advanced materials for energy, transportation, defense and communications applications. Their largest use for clean energy is in permanent magnets, which retain magnetic properties even in the absence of an inducing field or current.

8h

Dementia care program improves mental health of patients, caregivers

A comprehensive dementia care program staffed by nurse practitioners working within a health system improves the mental and emotional health of patients and their caregivers.

8h

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge

Research conducted at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay, Oahu revealed a unique feeding strategy, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge.

8h

Migraine diagnoses positively associated with all-cause dementia

Several studies have recently focused on the association between migraine headaches and other headaches and dementia and found a positive migraine-dementia relationship. However, most of these studies have failed to simultaneously adjust for several common comorbidities, thus potentially introducing bias into their findings.

8h

Findings shed new light on why Zika causes birth defects in some pregnancies

A new study shows that the risk of giving birth to a child with microcephaly might be related to how the immune system reacts against the Zika virus — specifically what kind of antibodies it produces.

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New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union.

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Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother's immune response

New research led by scientists at The Rockefeller University in New York may help explain why Zika virus infection causes birth defects in some children but not others. The study, which will be published August 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that the risk of developing an abnormally small head (microcephaly) depends on the types of antibody produced by pregnant mothers in res

8h

Behavioral scientists test biological principle on free-living Assamese macaques

"Birds of a feather flock together," or rather "opposites attract"? A recently published study on male macaques in Thailand speaks for the former: Behavioral biologists from the German Primate Centre—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research and psychologists from the University of Göttingen have observed that the more similar male Assamese macaques are in their personality, the closer they get and t

8h

App allows inspectors to find gas pump skimmers faster

A team of computer scientists at UC San Diego and the University of Illinois has developed an app that allows state and federal inspectors to detect devices that steal consumer credit and debit …

8h

Abnormal blood pressure in middle and late life influences dementia risk

In a study that spanned two and a half decades and looked at data from more than 4,700 participants, researchers have added to evidence that abnormal blood pressure in midlife persisting into late life increases the likelihood of developing dementia. Although not designed to show cause and effect, the study suggests that maintaining a healthy blood pressure throughout life may be one way to help d

8h

Sunscreens release metals and nutrients into seawater

Beachgoers are becoming increasingly aware of the potentially harmful effects UV filters from sunscreens can have on coral and other marine organisms when the protective lotions wash off their bodies into the ocean. Now, researchers have studied how sunscreens release different compounds — trace metals and inorganic nutrients — into Mediterranean seawater, with unknown effects on marine ecology.

8h

Optimal vitamin D levels may vary for different ethnic and racial groups

When recommending vitamin D supplements, doctors should look at each individual patient as having different requirements and not rely on 'one-size-fits-all' guidelines, according to a new study.

8h

Type 2 diabetes and sleep problems in midlife women

Hormone changes are known to alter insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, as well as interfere with women's sleep patterns. But little was known about the association between diabetes and sleep disturbances during the menopause transition until now, as a new study concludes that women with diabetes are at greater risk for sleep disturbances.

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Emotional journey of a digital detox while traveling

New research reveals the emotional journey that tourists go on when they disconnect from technology and social media while travelling. The study investigated how engaging in digital-free tourism impacted travelers' holiday experiences. It involved losing access to technologies such as mobile phones, laptops, tablets, the Internet, social media and navigation tools.

8h

Hard-working termites crucial to forest, wetland ecosystems

Soil bedding increases microbial and termite decomposition activity.

8h

Sodium Hydride in Aprotic Solvents: Look Out

Here’s a safety warning for my fellow synthetic organic chemists. It’s a reagent combination whose hazards have been noted before, but a lot of people don’t seem to know about it: sodium hydride in DMSO or other polar aprotic solvents. And yeah, I’ve used that exact combination, too, many times. But I did those reactions (for the most part) before I was aware of the possible hazards, and they hav

8h

Behavioral scientists test biological principle on free-living Assamese macaques

"Birds of a feather flock together," or rather "opposites attract"? A recently published study on male macaques in Thailand speaks for the former: Behavioral biologists from the German Primate Centre—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research and psychologists from the University of Göttingen have observed that the more similar male Assamese macaques are in their personality, the closer they get and t

8h

Plan B for cholesterol transport

Cholesterol is a vital cell building block in humans and animals, and an integral part of the so-called cell membrane. This boundary layer separates the interior of the cell from the neighboring cells and the surrounding environment. By means of certain proteins, it ensures that various chemical messengers can enter or exit the cell. In addition, cholesterol is the precursor of various hormones an

8h

Three benefits of Indonesia's permanent ban on forest clearance

Five years ago, Indonesia was considered one of the world's worst forest destroyers. But a permanent moratorium on new clearance of primary forest and peatland, recently announced by Presiden Joko "Jokowi" Widodo's administration, may turn that around.

8h

Study shows women benefit from multiple marriages while men do not

A pair of researchers, one with the University of California, the other with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, has found that women in an East African community benefit from multiple marriages while the men seem to suffer. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Monique Mulder and Cody Ross describe their study of people living in Pimbwe, a community i

8h

Milky Way's black hole just flared, growing 75 times as bright for a few hours

Even though the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is a monster, it's still rather quiet. Called Sagittarius A*, it's about 4.6 million times more massive than the sun. Usually, it's a brooding behemoth. But scientists observing Sgr. A* with the Keck Telescope just observed its brightness blooming to over 75 times normal for a few hours.

8h

Plan B for cholesterol transport

Cholesterol is a vital cell building block in humans and animals, and an integral part of the so-called cell membrane. This boundary layer separates the interior of the cell from the neighboring cells and the surrounding environment. By means of certain proteins, it ensures that various chemical messengers can enter or exit the cell. In addition, cholesterol is the precursor of various hormones an

8h

Human-sized penguin fossil discovered in New Zealand

New species said to have been four times heavier than emperor penguin A giant penguin that stood as tall as a person has been identified from fossil leg bones discovered by an amateur palaeontologist on New Zealand’s South Island. At 1.6 metres and 80kg (12st), the new species, Crossvallia waiparensis , was four times as heavy and 40cm taller than the emperor penguin, the largest living penguin.

8h

Centerchef fra Sundhedsstyrelsen er ny vicedirektør på sjællandsk hospital

Henrik Stig Jørgensen er ny vicedirektør på Næstved, Slagelse og Ringsted sygehuse.

8h

Dell XPS 13 (2019) Review: A Great Compact Laptop

With that dreaded nose cam fixed, the Dell latest XPS 13 is an ultraportable delight to use. Read our full laptop review.

8h

DeepMind's Losses and the Future of Artificial Intelligence

Alphabet’s DeepMind unit, conqueror of Go and other games, is losing lots of money. Continued deficits could imperil investments in AI.

8h

New insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity

A team led by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research has gained new insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity, including regulation, gene expression and metabolic pathways. This study, published in Nature Communications, used samples from a Phase 1 clinical trial for TAK-003, a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine. Though these discoveries occurred in the context of

8h

Research bias may leave some primates at risk

Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University.

8h

Air pollution speeds up emphysema

Air pollution—especially ozone air pollution—accelerates the progression of emphysema of the lung, according to a new study. While previous studies have shown a clear connection between air pollutants and some heart and lung diseases, new research in JAMA demonstrates an association between long-term exposure to all major air pollutants—especially ozone—with an increase in emphysema seen on lung

9h

Study shows birdsong loses complexity as population numbers decline

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in Hawaii and one in Spain has found that as a type of songbird in Hawaii drops in population, the songs they sing lose complexity. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of three species of honeycreeper birds and what they found.

9h

Study shows birdsong loses complexity as population numbers decline

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in Hawaii and one in Spain has found that as a type of songbird in Hawaii drops in population, the songs they sing lose complexity. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of three species of honeycreeper birds and what they found.

9h

Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics

An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, which could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper.

9h

What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals

Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved.

9h

What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals

Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved.

9h

The surprising psychological reasons you’re procrastinating — and how to fight it

There are many reasons why people procrastinate . Among the most common excuses are poor time management, or being easily distracted , and while these explanations may be true in some circumstances, our tendency to put things off is often a more psychological matter. As Nic Voge, the senior associate director of Princeton University's McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, explains in his TEDxP

9h

Rare antelopes and black cats

Tanzania is home to an elusive antelope species that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. According to the Red List, it can be classified as endangered. The first photograph of one of these antelopes was taken by researchers as recently as the year 2003. So far, the distribution of this species on Mt. Kilimanjaro has not been documented. Its scientific name: Abbott's duiker (Cephalophus spa

9h

Rare antelopes and black cats

Tanzania is home to an elusive antelope species that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. According to the Red List, it can be classified as endangered. The first photograph of one of these antelopes was taken by researchers as recently as the year 2003. So far, the distribution of this species on Mt. Kilimanjaro has not been documented. Its scientific name: Abbott's duiker (Cephalophus spa

9h

Shedding light on black holes

"Black holes" is one of the most highly searched terms about our universe. There's a fascination with the idea of a region of space having a gravitational pull so strong, nothing can escape its deadly grasp, not even a sliver of light. Well, not quite. In fact, much of what we think we know about black holes turn out to be myths.

9h

Two teams build invisibility cloaks for water applications

Two teams of researchers, one in Korea, the other China, have devised two different types of invisibility cloaks for water applications. Both teams have published papers describing their work in the journal Physical Review Letters.

9h

Rewriting the periodic table at high pressure

The periodic table has been a vital foundational tool for material research since it was first created 150 years ago. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology presents a new article which adds an entirely new dimension to the table, offering a new set of principles for material research. The article is published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

9h

Det specialiserede sundhedsvæsen kræver lægelige brobyggere

Specialiseringen i sundhedsvæsenet giver patienterne bedre behandling, men prisen er en masse siloer, som ikke taler lige godt sammen. Det kræver lægelige ledere som brobyggere, skriver Inger Brødsgaard, ledende overlæge psykiatrien Aalborg Universitetshospital.

9h

Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand

Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis has revealed.

9h

Aerobic exercise programs may improve endurance, walking after stroke

Stroke survivors who completed a group-based aerobic exercise program, like cardiac rehabilitation, significantly improved their endurance and walking capacity regardless of time since stroke. Mixed forms of aerobic activity and walking had the most benefit for stroke survivors.

9h

Researcher seeks to make trees more resilient amid a changing climate

Katharina Braeutigam, a plant epigeneticist at the University of Toronto, wants to grow trees fit for a future climate.

9h

How the catalytic converters in cars go bad and why it matters

Modern cars rely on catalytic converters to remove carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and other harmful chemicals from exhaust emissions.

9h

Researcher seeks to make trees more resilient amid a changing climate

Katharina Braeutigam, a plant epigeneticist at the University of Toronto, wants to grow trees fit for a future climate.

9h

Toxic blue-green algae warning for dog owners and swimmers

People urged to check for the bloom which can cause swimmers rashes and fever and prove fatal to dogs.

9h

Abnormal blood pressure in middle and late life influences dementia risk

In a study that spanned two and a half decades and looked at data from more than 4,700 participants, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that abnormal blood pressure in midlife persisting into late life increases the likelihood of developing dementia. Although not designed to show cause and effect, the study suggests that maintaining a healthy blood pressure throughout life may be one

9h

Sunscreens release metals and nutrients into seawater

Beachgoers are becoming increasingly aware of the potentially harmful effects UV filters from sunscreens can have on coral and other marine organisms when the protective lotions wash off their bodies into the ocean. Now, researchers have studied how sunscreens release different compounds — trace metals and inorganic nutrients — into Mediterranean seawater, with unknown effects on marine ecology.

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Scandlines-færge skal sejle med rotorsejl

Færgen mellem Gedser og Rostock får rotorsejl, der udnytter Magnus-effekten til at skabe fremdrift og reducerer CO2-udledningen.

9h

The demand for luxury shellfish is polluting the ocean with plastic

The federal government has taken action recently to reduce the amount of plastic waste found on land and in oceans, rivers and lakes.

9h

The demand for luxury shellfish is polluting the ocean with plastic

The federal government has taken action recently to reduce the amount of plastic waste found on land and in oceans, rivers and lakes.

9h

Sugary Western Diets Fuel Newly Evolving Superbug

A diarrhea-causing bacterium is evolving into a new species that thrives on sugar-rich Western diets and readily spreads in hospitals.

9h

Samband mellan glutenmängd och risk för celiaki

En stor studie bekräftar att mängden gluten sannolikt inverkar på risken att utveckla celiaki. I den nya långtidsstudien från Lunds universitet ingår barn från flera länder.

9h

Fewer health troubles for older workers with the right job

Staying in the wrong job can be bad for the health of older people and push them into early retirement, research suggests. The researchers found that when older workers’ reasoning abilities matched well with their job demands, they reported fewer chronic health problems than when they couldn’t keep up. And when workers couldn’t keep up with the reasoning demands of their jobs, the odds that they

9h

Removing old structures from rivers could restore vital water flow

Rivers in Europe are so congested with concrete obstructions like weirs, bridges and other man-made barriers that they no longer flow freely, which harms the wider environment. Removing these blockages could restore these vital aquatic ecosystems to their former glory.

9h

CRISPR enters its first human clinical trials

The gene editor will be used in lab dishes in cancer and blood disorder trials, and to directly edit a gene in human eyes in a blindness therapy test.

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Journals retract more than a dozen studies from China that may have used executed prisoners’ organs

In the past month, PLOS ONE and Transplantation have retracted fifteen studies by authors in China because of suspicions that the authors may have used organs from executed prisoners. All of the original studies — seven in Transplantation, and eight in PLOS ONE — were published between 2008 and 2014. Two involved kidney transplants, and … Continue reading

9h

Image of the Day: Seizure Proteins

The sei ion channel in fruit flies keeps their neuronal excitability in check.

9h

3 Animals Hurt By the New Endangered Species Act

These three creatures illustrate the harm that could come from the loss of protections, which the Trump administration announced Monday.

9h

Gentester kan ge skräddarsydd behandling

De senaste tio åren har kartläggningen av en persons arvsmassa förenklats avsevärt genom en ny generation av tekniker för så kallad DNA-sekvensering. En persons hela arvsmassa, genom, kan nu läsas av – sekvenseras – på några dagar. Den tidigare Sanger-tekniken krävde över tio år för att uppnå samma sak. Snabbheten gör att sjukvården nu kan börja använda kartläggning av arvsmassan för att förbättr

9h

Lyme Disease Is Baffling, Even to Experts

In the fall of 1997, after I graduated from college, I began experiencing what I called “electric shocks”—tiny stabbing sensations that flickered over my legs and arms every morning. They were so extreme that as I walked to work from my East Village basement apartment, I often had to stop on Ninth Street and rub my legs against a parking meter, or else my muscles would begin twitching and spasmin

9h

I am not the hive mind of Transetti Prime

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02420-y A difficult decision.

9h

Ebola success, Moon bears and gene-therapy delay

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02416-8 The week in science: 9–15 August 2019.

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China may be on track to meet its carbon emissions goals early

China, the world's largest carbon emitter today, may be on track to meet its emission goals up to a decade early, according to a recent study on the cover of Nature Sustainability led by researchers from Nanjing University in Nanjing, China, and Harvard University.

9h

How recycling is actually sorted, and why Australia is quite bad at it

Recycling in Australia used to be fairly simple. Our older readers may remember bottle drives, paper and cardboard collections, and the trip to the scrap metal merchant to sell metals.

9h

Sunscreens release metals and nutrients into seawater

Beachgoers are becoming increasingly aware of the potentially harmful effects UV filters from sunscreens can have on coral and other marine organisms when the protective lotions wash off their bodies into the ocean. Now, researchers have studied how sunscreens release different compounds—trace metals and inorganic nutrients—into Mediterranean seawater, with unknown effects on marine ecology. They

9h

When Will All the Ice in the Arctic Be Gone?

A climatologist and ice researcher examines the latest trends and data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Scientists poke a hole in the age of trees

Some of Britain's most majestic ancient trees are probably not as ancient as we previously thought, one of the country's leading tree-ageing experts has suggested.

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The history of the Universe in the blink of an eye

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02459-x How astronomers are using ancient radio waves to study the ancient Universe

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Survey reveals a third of NZ gun owners distrust gun lobby

The terrorist attacks on the Christchurch Muslim community on 15 March this year resulted in a political response that was decidedly different from what usually follows mass shootings in the United States.

10h

Eat green to save the environment, says IPCC: How to tell if that means you

In its new special report on climate change and land, the IPCC calls for more effective and sustainable land management, and more sustainable food consumption. But who is the onus on to go vegetarian, or look after land better? You, me, the "global elite"? The world's poorest people, or perhaps the many millions of newly-wealthy Chinese or Indians? Or maybe our governments?

10h

The US Army is developing AI missiles that find their own targets

The US Army wants to build smart missiles that will use AI to select their targets, raising concerns that the technology will be a form of lethal autonomous weapon

10h

FDA Warns About Miracle Mineral Solution

Jim Humble is still selling his industrial bleach as a fake cure, and the FDA gives another toothless warning.

10h

Study finds the metronome running rodent brains

A study of mouse neurons may have found a long-sought timing mechanism. If the finding carries over into humans, it may help explain the language of neurons. Each area of the brain may have its own metronome neurons, quietly ticking away. None That neurons communicate with each other in the human brain through the transmission of electrical signals from one to another seems clear, but there are s

10h

Of CNN, Hydropower, and Albania’s Valbona Valley

In early 2018, an Albanian hydropower giant, Gener2, entered into a media partnership with CNN. In May, a human rights organization detailed allegations of a pattern of threats, intimidation, and harassment from the company — a trend that is becoming increasingly common as hydropower grows in the Balkans.

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How to save trees: It's all about conflict resolution

The Madre de Dios rainforest in southeastern Peru is one of the biodiversity capitals of the world, with more species of plants and animals than almost anywhere else on the planet. This giant patch of Amazon rainforest is also home to some of the last uncontacted indigenous tribes on earth. But its rich heritage has made it a center of escalating conflict.

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A novel forecasting tool helps experts prepare for extreme weather

There is mounting evidence that climate change is increasing the risk and severity of extreme weather events around the world. As floods, heatwaves, droughts and storms become fiercer and more frequent, it's increasingly imperative to find tools that will help us adapt to the changes happening to the Earth's climate.

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New evidence highlights growing urban water crisis

New research has found that in 15 major cities in the global south, almost half of all households lack access to piped utility water, affecting more than 50 million people. Access is lowest in the cities of sub-Saharan Africa, where only 22% of households receive piped water.

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Super Proton Synchrotron to receive a new beam dump

By the end of the second long shutdown (LS2) of CERN's accelerator complex, a nine-metre-long object with several hundred tonnes of shielding will be installed around the beam line of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). But this object, the longest single component of the SPS, is no ordinary one. It contains the new beam dump of the SPS, designed to absorb beams of particles whose flight through t

10h

App allows inspectors to find gas pump skimmers faster

A team of computer scientists at UC San Diego and the University of Illinois has developed an app that allows state and federal inspectors to detect devices that steal consumer credit and debit card data at gas pumps. The devices, known as skimmers, use Bluetooth to transmit the data they steal.

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A Scientist Must Go Where the Evidence Leads

When our cherished ideas are contradicted by the facts, we must avoid the human tendency to double down on those ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

One Giant Leap for Maggotkind

After placing a dozen maggots in a petri dish, Michael Wise was surprised to see that only two were still there. The rest had made a break for it, and were jumping all over his lab. Wise, a botanist at Roanoke College, had been studying gall midges—flies that lay their eggs inside silverrod and goldenrod plants. Once the eggs hatch, the developing larvae create abnormal swellings called galls. Wi

10h

NASA selects proposals to further study the fundamental nature of space

NASA has selected two proposals for concept studies that could help us better understand the fundamental nature of space and how it changes in response to planetary atmospheres, radiation from the Sun, and interstellar particles. The proposals will advance NASA's heliophysics program and could lead to better protection for both technology and humans as we travel farther from home.

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Living commodities, fraud in the lab, and a history of nautical navigation: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02419-5 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

10h

A Tax Credit Fueled the Solar Energy Boom. Now It's in Limbo

A federal subsidy that helped launch the US solar industry is about to expire. The industry is likely to stumble without some replacement.

10h

No More Screen Time! The Navy Reverts to Physical Throttles

The Navy will eliminate touchscreen controls in destroyers after reports found that many sailors did not know how to work them, contributing to accidents.

10h

WIRED Takes a Good Hard Look at Dick Pics

The dick pic—so commonplace, so controversial—has undeniable cultural importance, but media coverage of it tends to strike a single chord: “Ew, bad.”

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Forest carbon still plentiful post-wildfire after century of fire exclusion

Forests in Yosemite National Park hold more carbon today than they did 120 years ago despite burning in a severe wildfire in 2013, according to a Penn State-led team of researchers.

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A Scientist Must Go Where the Evidence Leads

When our cherished ideas are contradicted by the facts, we must avoid the human tendency to double down on those ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sugary Western Diets Fuel Newly Evolving Superbug

A diarrhea-causing bacterium is evolving into a new species that thrives on sugar-rich Western diets and readily spreads in hospitals.

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Scientists Figure Out Why There Are Black Squirrels All Over the United States

A team of biologists from the United Kingdom thinks that they've decoded the mystery of all the gray squirrels running around the United States with black fur.

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Astronomers Uncover 39 Ancient Galaxies — Moving So Fast That Even Hubble Can't See Them

There are ancient, massive galaxies haunting the dusty reaches of our universe, invisible to the Hubble Space Telescope. But now astronomers sifting through infrared data have discovered 39 of them.

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'Interplanetary Shock' Seen for 1st Time

A team of four NASA spacecraft finally caught sight of a phenomenon scientists have been hunting for years: an interplanetary shock.

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OnePlus reveals the name of its upcoming TV: the OnePlus TV

Soon after Lau announced plans for the TV, OnePlus launched a competition asking members of the public to choose a name for its product—“something better than the OnePlus TV,” I suggested at …

11h

Earth Could Be a Lens for a Revolutionary Space Telescope

Stationed beyond the moon, the proposed “terrascope” would use our planet’s atmosphere to magnify light from distant objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Earth Could Be a Lens for a Revolutionary Space Telescope

Stationed beyond the moon, the proposed “terrascope” would use our planet’s atmosphere to magnify light from distant objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Nu forklarer Google, hvorfor søgemaskinen tabte op mod 4 pct. af websites i april

Det skulle tage mere end tre uger, før alle følgefejlene var rettet op, da Google oplevede problemer i april. I mellemtiden mistede et stort antal websites søgemaskinetrafik.

11h

High hopes that Berlin zoo's panda is expecting

Experts say they're pretty sure Berlin zoo's 6-year-old panda Meng Meng is pregnant.

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High hopes that Berlin zoo's panda is expecting

Experts say they're pretty sure Berlin zoo's 6-year-old panda Meng Meng is pregnant.

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New nanotechnology could aid stem cell transplantation research

Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries.

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New technology could aid stem cell transplantation research

Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries.

11h

Apple is reportedly in talks to let Siri play Spotify tracks

You wouldn't think that Apple and Spotify's relationship would be thawing out anytime soon, given that Spotify has lodged an antitrust complaint against its streaming rival …

11h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad er formålet med det gule trafiklys før det grønne?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor trafiklyset ikke bare bliver grønt efter rødt ligesom ved fodgængerfelterne. Det svarer projektleder fra Aarhus Kommune på.

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As the Forest Moves Back in, Pollen Is on the Rise in Detroit

As the forest creeps back into Detroit’s myriad vacant lots, plants are pumping pollen into the air — and into Detroiters’ airways. Now, for the first time, researchers are starting to pinpoint where pollen levels are the highest in the hopes of helping vulnerable residents protect themselves.

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The quest to unlock the secrets of the baby Universe

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02417-7 Radioastronomers look to hydrogen for insights into the Universe’s first billion years.

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Yngre Læger: Evaluering af hoveduddannelsen skal anonymiseres bedre

Det er et stort problem, at anonymiteten fortsat halter i evalueringen af hoveduddannelsen. Det mener Yngre Læger, som foreslår at udgive evalueringerne blot én gang årligt for at maskere afsenderen bedre.

11h

Region Nordjylland vil skade lægedækningen

Fire konkrete eksempler på, hvordan Region Nordjylland med regionsklinikker gør skade på lægedækningen, skriver driftschef i privat lægeklinik

11h

DMI forkaster alle sommerens temperaturmålinger på toppen af indlandsisen

Indtil forholdende omkring målestationen ved Summit er bragt i orden, viderebringer DMI ikke oplysninger om dens målinger.

11h

Don’t Ban Assault Weapons—Tax Them

The nation is debating what to do about assault-style weapons, what gun-rights advocates like to call modern sporting rifles. Gun-rights champions argue that these weapons are in common use, and hence protected by the Second Amendment. Gun-control supporters respond that these weapons have no place on our streets and ought to be banned. But there’s a better solution, and one that avoids the const

11h

The NCAA Doesn’t Speak for College Athletes

Nicole Lynn is an attorney and a former Wall Street analyst. She is also an agent for Young Money APAA Sports, which is owned by the rapper Lil Wayne. In this year’s NFL draft, Lynn became the first black woman to represent a top-three pick. In January, she is scheduled to take the National Basketball Players Association’s certification exam for agents. On her Twitter feed in June , Lynn posted a

11h

Engraved bones reveal that symbolism had ancient roots in East Asia

Denisovans might have etched line patterns on two animal bone fragments more than 100,000 years ago in what’s now northern China.

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Now that's a penguin

Prehistoric giant had a close Antarctic relative.

12h

Challenging the point neuron dogma: FS basket cells as 2-stage nonlinear integrators

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11537-7 Recent experimental work has revealed non-linear dendritic integration in interneurons. Here, the authors show, through detailed biophysical modeling, that fast spiking interneurons are better described with a 2-stage artificial neural network model calling into question the use of point neuron models.

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Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of single and multi-layer graphene

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11165-1 Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) accesses the vibrational properties of a material via nonlinear four-wave mixing (FWM); CARS in graphene has not been observed to date despite its high nonlinear third-order susceptibility. Here, the authors devised a FWM scheme to perform stimulated Raman spectrosc

12h

Harmonious genetic combinations rewire regulatory networks and flip gene essentiality

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11523-z Studying how genetic variants in different genes interact and their combinatorial output is experimentally and analytically challenging. Here, the authors quantify the effects of more than 5000 mutation pairs in the yeast GAL regulatory system, finding that many combinations can be predicted with statistical m

12h

PTPσ inhibitors promote hematopoietic stem cell regeneration

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11490-5 Protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPσ) deficient haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) demonstrate increased engraftment following transplantation. Here the authors identify a small molecule inhibitor of PTPσ that promotes murine and human haematopoietic stem cell regeneration via induction of the RAC pathway an

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Rainfall drives variation in rates of change in intrinsic water use efficiency of tropical forests

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11679-8 How the water use efficiency of trees changes with atmospheric CO2 variations has mostly been studied on short time scales. Here, a newly compiled data set covering 1915 to 1995 shows how rates of change in water use efficiency vary with location and rainfall over the global tropics on a decadal scale.

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Dissecting the heterogeneity of DENV vaccine-elicited cellular immunity using single-cell RNA sequencing and metabolic profiling

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11634-7 Using a combination of single-cell RNA sequencing and TCR clonotype analysis on longitudinal samples from dengue vaccinated individuals, Waickman et al. here define a transcriptional signature in acutely-activated T cells that is associated with durable CD8+ T cell memory.

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Author Correction: A split fluorescent reporter with rapid and reversible complementation

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11689-6

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The complex of ferric-enterobactin with its transporter from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggests a two-site model

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11508-y Bacteria produce small iron-binding molecules called siderophores, which are recognised by outer-membrane transporters. Here, the authors show that a Pseudomonas transporter recognises the siderophore enterobactin using extracellular loops distant from the pore, and propose that there is a second binding site

12h

Sundhedsplatformen laver koks i medicin igen: Bytter rundt på to lægemidler

Fejl i det udskældte it-system Sundhedsplatformen medførte forkert ordination af medicin til patienter med lavt stofskifte.

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Kjellberg om sundhedsaftaler: De kan virke luftige

Sundhedsaftalerne mellem kommuner, regioner og de praktiserende læger er nu vedtaget i hele landet. De er et afgørende værktøj, men problemet er, at de kan virke luftige, fordi det kan være svært at fuldføre visionerne i praksis, siger professor Jakob Kjellberg.

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Region Sjælland satser på mental sundhed i ny sundhedsaftale

I Region Sjælland er sundhedsaftalen blevet skarpere, mener Pernille Beckmann (V), næstformand i Sundhedskoordinationsudvalget og borgmester i Greve Kommune. Men der har været konflikter mellem praksislæger, regioner og kommuner.

12h

Military-grade jet fuel made cheaply from plant waste instead of coal

An expensive superfuel normally reserved for missiles and hypersonic jets can now be made from crop waste instead of fossil fuels – and more cheaply to boot

12h

Potential för cykelturism i Svemester-sverige

– Det behövs utvecklas mätinstrument för att statistiskt kunna följa upp de åtgärder som görs. Dessutom behöver cykelturisternas behov och önskemål förstås ytterligare för att kunna utveckla framgångsrika destinationer, säger Christina Stave, en av forskarna bakom den litteratursammanställning och omvärldsanalys som nu gjorts. Studien visar att det redan gjorts många utredningar på området, och u

12h

Periodiska systemet skrivs om när atomer utsätts för högt tryck

Det periodiska systemet har varit ett centralt verktyg för materialforskning sedan det först skapades för 150 år sedan. Nu visar Chalmersforskaren Martin Rahm i en studie hur grundämnenas elektronegativitet och elektronkonfiguration förändras under tryck. Resultaten ger forskare en helt ny verktygslåda att utgå ifrån. Framför allt innebär resultaten att det blir möjligt att göra snabba förutsägel

12h

Overraskede forskere: Det regner med plastic i Rocky Mountains

Regnvandet i dele af den nordamerikanske bjergkæde er fyldt med mikroplast i alle farver og former, konkluderer amerikanske forskere.

12h

In the shadow of the dinosaurs

Research published this Wednesday in Scientific Reports describes Clevosaurus hadroprodon, a new reptile species from Rio Grande do Sul state in southern Brazil.

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Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand

Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis from the University of Sussex and Aarhus University has revealed.

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Aerobic exercise programs may improve endurance, walking after stroke

Stroke survivors who completed a group-based aerobic exercise program, like cardiac rehabilitation, significantly improved their endurance and walking capacity regardless of time since stroke.Mixed forms of aerobic activity and walking had the most benefit for stroke survivors.

12h

Hög förskrivning av opioider vid artros

Var fjärde artrospatient i Skåne fick receptförskrivna opioider någon gång mellan november 2014 och oktober 2015. I resten av befolkningen i samma region var siffrorna betydligt lägre, där fick var tionde person opioider förskrivet under samma period. Resultaten är alarmerande.

12h

Neolithic remains help sniff out the earliest human use of dung

It is used as a fertiliser to help crops grow, burned as a fuel for heat, and is even used as a building material. But exactly when and how humans began using dung is a mystery that is now starting to be unravelled by researchers.

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Teenage activists and an IPCC triumph

Nature, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02425-7 The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is a well-timed blueprint for action. Decision makers must now pay attention — a nascent youth movement is showing them how.

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Ecological disaster on Greek island as fire burns on

Firefighters on the Greek island of Evia were still battling Wednesday to contain a fire that has caused massive damage to a pristine mountain wildlife habitat after threatening four communities.

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Drop-in røntgen spares væk på Gentofte Hospital

Praktiserende læger i Region Hovedstaden har ikke længere mulighed for at henvise patienter uden forudgående aftale til enkle røntgenundersøgelser på Gentofte Hospital. Hospitalsafdelingen skal spare.

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A new sphenodontian from Brazil is the oldest record of the group in Gondwana

Research published this Wednesday (August 14th) in Scientific Reports describes Clevosaurus hadroprodon, a new reptile species from Rio Grande do Sul state in southern Brazil. Its fossils remains—jaws and associated skull bones—were collected from Triassic rocks (c. 237-228 million-years old) making it the oldest known fossil of its kind in Gondwana, the southern supercontinent that would eventual

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'Human-sized penguin' lived in New Zealand

The animal, dubbed "monster penguin" by Canterbury Museum, stood around 1.6m (5ft 3in) tall.

14h

Greta Thunberg: the world's youthful climate conscience

Swedish climate activist and global star Greta Thunberg understood climate change at an early age and has rallied youths around the world and parents to her cause, sparking criticism along the way.

14h

NASA descends on Icelandic lava field to prepare for Mars

To prepare for the next mission to Mars in 2020, NASA has taken to the lava fields of Iceland to get its new robotic space explorer ready for the job.

14h

Songbirds silenced as Colombia fights wildlife trafficking

The metal doors of a shoebox-sized cage open up and a bird tagged #811 launches into a giant aviary. The palm-sized finch performs a midair pirouette, lands on a willow branch and curiously twitches its saffron-colored head sideways, as if surprised by its good fortune.

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Giant penguin fossil found in New Zealand

The fossilised remains of a huge penguin almost the size of an adult human have been found in New Zealand's South Island, scientists announced Wednesday.

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Songbirds silenced as Colombia fights wildlife trafficking

The metal doors of a shoebox-sized cage open up and a bird tagged #811 launches into a giant aviary. The palm-sized finch performs a midair pirouette, lands on a willow branch and curiously twitches its saffron-colored head sideways, as if surprised by its good fortune.

14h

Hard-working termites crucial to forest, wetland ecosystems

Termites are unwelcome in your home. They can cause structural damage to the wood in frames, floors and other materials. It's nothing personal, though. They are really just looking for food sources.

14h

Nyheter i väntrummet ger större intresse för medicinsk forskning

– Intresset var enkelt uttryckt 30 procent högre i gruppen som fått ta del av nyheterna, och detta var utan tvekan statistiskt signifikant, säger Ronny Gunnarsson, adjungerad professor i allmänmedicin vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, och studiens förstaförfattare. Syftet med studien, publicerad i BMJ Open, var att bedöma intresset för hälsorelaterad forskning, att förstå i vilken

14h

Hard-working termites crucial to forest, wetland ecosystems

Termites are unwelcome in your home. They can cause structural damage to the wood in frames, floors and other materials. It's nothing personal, though. They are really just looking for food sources.

14h

'The Nemo effect' is untrue: Animal movies promote awareness, not harm, say researchers

Contrary to what was widely communicated in media by high-profile figures, the movie 'Finding Dory' had no impact on increasing demand for blue tang fish, the species of the main protagonist. There was, however, an increase in online searches for that species, showing that blockbusters can drive information-seeking behavior about nature.

15h

#MeToo media coverage sympathetic to but not necessarily empowering for women

The #MeToo movement has encouraged women to share their personal stories of sexual harassment. While the movement amplifies previously unheard voices, a Carnegie Mellon University analysis of #MeToo media coverage shows accusers are often portrayed as sympathetic, but with less power and agency than their alleged perpetrators.

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'The Nemo effect' is untrue: Animal movies promote awareness, not harm, say researchers

Contrary to what was widely communicated in media by high-profile figures, the movie 'Finding Dory' had no impact on increasing demand for blue tang fish, the species of the main protagonist. There was, however, an increase in online searches for that species, showing that blockbusters can drive information-seeking behavior about nature.

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James Webb Space Telescope could begin learning about TRAPPIST-1 atmospheres in a single year, study indicates

New research from astronomers at the University of Washington uses the intriguing TRAPPIST-1 planetary system as a kind of laboratory to model not the planets themselves, but how the coming James Webb Space Telescope might detect and study their atmospheres, on the path toward looking for life beyond Earth.

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Probably an oldie, but really smart on combating desertification

submitted by /u/Rapierian [link] [comments]

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Quantum Gravity and the Hardest Problem in Physics | Space Time

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

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US scientists find how brain cells regulate memories in mice study

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Alzheimer's Appears to Attack The Neurons That Keep Us Awake

Could excessive sleepiness be an early sign?

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The glaciers of Iceland seemed eternal. Now a country mourns their loss | Andri Snær Magnason

My grandparents mapped these giants of the landscape. A plaque will mark the spot where the first was lost to the climate crisis How do you write a eulogy for a glacier? Think about it. How would you go about that, having grown up with glaciers as a geological given, a symbol of eternity? How do you say goodbye? Related: Icelandic memorial warns future: ‘Only you know if we saved glaciers’ Contin

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'The Nemo effect' is untrue: Animal movies promote awareness, not harm, say researchers

Contrary to what was widely communicated in media by high-profile figures, the movie 'Finding Dory' had no impact on increasing demand for blue tang fish, the species of the main protagonist. There was, however, an increase in online searches for that species, showing that blockbusters can drive information-seeking behavior about nature.

16h

Country diary: collared doves cosy up for a summer fling

Sandy, Bedfordshire: After three mornings, the male’s song changed and the birds began billing instead of cooing At the songless end of summer, a bird was playing trumpet down my chimney. A clatter of claws on the tiles, a count to three, then “ cu coo-cu ” came echoing out of the fireplace. The next morning, and every morning thereafter, collared doves were back on the rooftops, trading coos wit

17h

#MeToo media coverage sympathetic to but not necessarily empowering for women

The #MeToo movement has encouraged women to share their personal stories of sexual harassment. While the movement amplifies previously unheard voices, a Carnegie Mellon University analysis of #MeToo media coverage shows accusers are often portrayed as sympathetic, but with less power and agency than their alleged perpetrators.

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Optimal vitamin D levels may vary for different ethnic and racial groups

When recommending vitamin D supplements, doctors should look at each individual patient as having different requirements and not rely on 'one-size-fits-all' guidelines, according to a study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of California, San Francisco.

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Rare antelopes and black cats

Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by a research group of Würzburg University. The protected areas of the mountain are of tremendous importance for the biodiversity of this animal group.

17h

Hard-working termites crucial to forest, wetland ecosystems

Soil bedding increases microbial and termite decomposition activity

17h

Is diabetes keeping you up at night?

Hormone changes are known to alter insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, as well as interfere with women's sleep patterns. But little was known about the association between diabetes and sleep disturbances during the menopause transition until now, as a new study concludes that women with diabetes are at greater risk for sleep disturbances. Study results are published online today in Menopau

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Kræft er ikke altid en 'krig': Kamp-ord kan skade vores syn på sygdom

Vi kan miste troen på at forebygge kræft, når vi møder krigsretorik.

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Kvinnor mer framstående under vikingatiden än man trott

Sedan det framkom att den främsta krigargraven på Birka tillhörde en kvinna har forskare börjat omvärdera kvinnans roll i det vikingatida samhället. Tillsammans med andra fynd verkar det som att de överlag var mer framstående än man tidigare trott.

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Astronaut Luca Parmitano plays DJ set from International Space Station

Luca Parmitano played from the International Space Station to a cruise ship in the Mediterranean Sea.

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Professor om klageafvisning: Datatilsynet venter til Google dummer sig »big time«

Datatilsynet har afvist at bruge kræfter på en borgers klage mod Google. To eksperter peger på, at beslutningen godt kan forsvares, mens en tredje mener, at tilsynet har ledt efter en kattelem for ikke at påtage sig en stor sagsbehandlingsopgave.

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Nyt studie: Almindelige hovedpinetabletter kan sprede antibiotikaresistens

Studie fra Australien viser, at en række almindelige håndkøbspræparater giver bakterier øget mulighed for at sprede deres resistente gener.

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Net carbon emissions from African biosphere dominate pan-tropical atmospheric CO2 signal

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11097-w Tropical land ecosystems contain vast carbon reservoirs, but their influence on atmospheric CO2 is poorly understood. Here the authors use new carbon-observing satellites to reveal a large emission source over northern tropical Africa, where there are large soil carbon stores and substantial land use changes.

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The Atlantic Grows Newsroom Leadership Team

The Atlantic is creating senior leadership roles for three of its journalists: Ross Andersen becomes a deputy editor of The Atlantic, after four years as the top editor for Science, Technology, and Health; Caitlin Frazier will oversee strategy for audience and engagement; and Yoni Appelbaum will lead a major expansion of the Ideas section that he helped launch last year. These moves were announce

18h

FAA tells airlines MacBook Pros with defective batteries can’t fly

MacBook Pros subject to Apple's June recall are banned from US flights.

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Farmers jailed in Australia for smuggling Danish pig semen in shampoo bottles

Two men from GD Pork pleaded guilty in WA to breaching biosecurity laws to gain ‘unfair’ breeding advantage Two pig farmers in Western Australia will be jailed after being convicted of illegally importing Danish pig semen concealed in shampoo bottles. Torben Soerensen has been sentenced to three years in prison, while Henning Laue faces a two-year sentence after pleading guilty to breaching quara

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Twitter is adding a search tool for DMs, alongside live photos and topic suggestions

In its immediate pipeline, Twitter said it will roll out the ability to search direct messages, making it easier to located specific conversations in your inbox, and will also begin supporting …

19h

Pancreatic cancer cells spread by 'educating' the tumor environment

Why does pancreatic cancer spread? The answer may lie in a previously unknown set of molecules that help cancer cells shape the environment around tumors.

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Ebola hasn't been cured yet, but two experimental drugs are showing significant progress

Two experimental drugs are showing significant progress in treating Ebola. If patients received either of two new drugs early in their disease progression, risk of death dropped to around 10 percent. (WHO/S. Hawkey/) Two experimental treatments significantly improve survival rates from Ebola, according to preliminary data reported this week from a clinical trial testing the drug in the Democratic

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This photographer transformed a shipping container into a working camera

This story was originally published by Popular Photography . Large-format photographer Brendan Barry makes functional cameras out of everyday objects , but his latest project is also his largest. The shipping container camera, as the name implies, is a giant camera that is housed in a room-sized vessel meant for transporting goods on overseas treks. "It's basically the world's biggest, slowest, a

20h

How a 'NULL' License Plate Landed One Hacker in Ticket Hell

Security researcher Joseph Tartaro thought NULL would make a fun license plate. He's never been more wrong.

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App developer ad choices can leave users at risk

A developer’s choice of ad network can leave users vulnerable to questionable ads and data privacy concerns, research finds. In a study involving both a survey of 49 mostly independent app developers and in-depth interviews with 10, researchers found that app developers believe that entering agreements with groups like Facebook ads, AdMob, ONE by AOL, and Unity Ads are the only way to make money

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Scientists are developing a pill to cure loneliness

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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We could put enough wind turbines on European land to power the world

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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A flashing mystery is unfolding at the center of the Milky Way

Most galaxies appear to contain a supermassive black hole, and ours is acting up. (Pixabay/) Something weird is going on at the center of the Milky Way , and astronomers are scrambling for answers. At the heart of our pinwheeling galaxy lies a black hole with some four million times the mass of the sun stuffed into an area roughly the size of Earth’s orbit. Known as Sagittarius A* (which is prono

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RTS,S vaccine could favor the acquisition of natural immunity against malaria

The RTS,S malaria vaccine could enhance the production of protective antibodies upon subsequent parasite infection, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results, published in BMC Medicine, identify the antigens (or protein fragments) that could be included in future, more effective multivalent vaccines.

21h

Pinpointing the molecular mechanisms of aging

Although each and every one of us goes through it, aging is a poorly understood process. Researchers have used a biomarker called the epigenetic clock to identify a gene that is closely linked to aging in humans. This study shows that the epigenetic clock could be a good tool for improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind aging.

21h

21h

Pinpointing the molecular mechanisms of ageing

Although each and every one of us goes through it, ageing is a poorly understood process. Researchers have used a biomarker called the epigenetic clock to identify a gene that is closely linked to ageing in humans. The study, published in Genome Biology, shows that the epigenetic clock could be a good tool for improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind ageing.

21h

Pinpointing the molecular mechanisms of ageing

Although each and every one of us goes through it, ageing is a poorly understood process. Researchers have used a biomarker called the epigenetic clock to identify a gene that is closely linked to ageing in humans. The study, published in Genome Biology, shows that the epigenetic clock could be a good tool for improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind ageing.

21h

Vodka for your post-apocalypse wingding

33 years later, parts of the exclusion zone may be ready to be reclaimed. The beverage similar to Ukrainian vodka will soon be available. Raise a glass to the renewable Earth. None This just-announced grain spirit is called "ATOMIK," an excellent name given its source. It's made from water and rye from the Chernobyl exclusion zone in the Ukraine. This is an area surrounding the ill-fated nuclear

21h

4 ways to inject more creativity into your craft (and life)

Creativity is not a magical force, but a discipline that's hard-won through patience and fortitude. Breaking free from your comfort zone is often required to live a more creative life. These four suggestions from psychologists and neuroscientists provide insights into injecting more creativity into your craft. None Creativity requires a high degree of patience and the emotional willingness to fai

22h

Deforestation: What’s wrong with planting new forests?

Planting trees can sometimes actually do more harm than good to the environment. Here's why.

22h