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nyheder2019august15

LIGO and Virgo probably spotted the first black hole swallowing up a neutron star

In a first, astronomers may just have detected gravitational waves from a black hole merging with a neutron star.

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A Rocket-Catchin' Copter, a Radioactive Russian Cloud, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Early species developed much faster than previously thought

When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species,

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Five CBD-infused products for Cannabidiol newbies

CBS products to check out (Kimzy Nanney via Unsplash/) Although most of them contain no THC—the hallucinogenic compound in marijuana that produces the “high”—CBD products have benefited enormously from the widespread acceptance and legalization of weed. More and more people are being introduced to the anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety benefits of Cannabidiol, and its versatility opens it up to a

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Canadian researchers find 'silent' strokes common after surgery

The study found that 'silent' covert strokes are actually more common than overt strokes in people aged 65 or older who have surgery.

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A great climate comes from happy soil. Could happy soil come from California?

Fava beans growing in between grape vines at Granton Vineyard in southern Tasmania (Stefano Lubiana/Flickr/) The way we're using our land isn't helping our chances of limiting global warming. As last week's IPCC report on land use and climate points out, agriculture, forestry, and other land uses are responsible for 22 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions. But it doesn't have to be like thi

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Logitech's latest gaming keyboards boast an 'impossibly thin' design

The devices, dubbed the G915 Lightspeed and G15 Lightsync, boast one major feature: an "impossibly thin" and "ground breaking" design, coming in at just 22mm. Logitech calls this a "feat of …

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Publisher Correction: Five-month-old infants detect affiliation in colaughter

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47826-w

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Climate change is less politicized in poor nations — they focus on natural impacts

A recent study compared how media in 45 countries cover climate change by analyzing more than 37,000 news articles. The results indicated that poor nations tend to frame climate change as an international relations issue, while rich nations tend to politicize the issue. The authors suggest that one reason climate change is politicized in richer nations is because of the prevalence of well-funded

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Jupiter May Have Been Hit by a Massive Proto-Planet Long Ago

A massive planet slamming into Jupiter in its infancy could create the fuzzy core that astronomers observe in the gas giant today. (Credit: K. Suda & Y. Akimoto/Mabuchi Design Office/Astrobiology Center, Japan) In 2016, NASA’s Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter with the goal of peering through Jupiter’s dense clouds to reveal the giant planet’s inner secrets. Along with the stunning pictures Juno

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Scientists Just Solved a Mystery of How Gallstones Form

A large gallstone. (Credit: eleonimages/Shutterstock) Up to 25 million Americans suffer from gallstones. The unwanted pebbles form in the gallbladder and can grow to be as large as a golf ball. They can block bile ducts and cause severe abdominal pain, infection and even death. For decades, doctors have known they appear when excess cholesterol and calcium salts accumulate in the bile — a yellowis

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ExoMars Fails Another Parachute Test, Threatening 2020 Mission

Most Mars landers or rovers use parachutes as part of their landing procedure, but Mars’ thin atmosphere makes even this low-tech approach a perilous one. (Credit: ESA/ATG medialab) ExoMars is a planned mission to Mars set to launch in the summer of 2020. But a recent series of parachute test failures may threaten that launch date. ExoMars is being built by a joint operation between the European a

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Norway’s New Electric Plane Crashes During Demo Flight

Mayday Norway unveiled its first battery-powered plane during a demo flight before a high-profile crowd on Wednesday. Unfortunately, for reasons that are not yet fully known, Reuters reports that the Alpha Electro G2 plane crash-landed in a lake. Though no one was hurt, the crash represents an inauspicious start for the country’s plan to electrify all domestic air travel within 20 years. Taking A

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Gone Hickenlooper

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, August 15. No Entry: Israel announced that it would ban Representatives Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan from visiting, shortly after President Donald Trump tweeted this morning that in do

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Instagram begins letting users report misinformation

Instagram on Thursday added a way for users to easily report deceptive posts at the photo and video-oriented social network owned by Facebook.

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Essential Gear for Surviving Freshman Year

Dorm living is a riot, but the close quarters can be stifling. Carve out some extra "me space" with these goods.

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How Facebook Catches Bugs in Its 100 Million Lines of Code

For the past four years, Facebook has quietly used a homegrown tool called Zoncolan to find bugs in its massive codebase.

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Flavonoids could curb cancer risk — even for smokers and drinkers

A recent study tracked the diet and health records of more than 53,000 Danes over 23 years. The results suggested that people who regularly consumed flavonoids were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease. Still, scientists have much to learn about flavonoids, and the new study didn't establish causality. None An apple a day might actually keep the doctor away — especially if you're a smoke

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'It is raining plastic': Microplastics found in Colorado rainwater

About 90 percent of rainwater samples collected from the Denver-Boulder area of Colorado contained microplastics. Researchers aren't exactly sure how the plastic ended up in the rainwater. Microplastics have invaded nearly every part of the environment, but scientists still aren't sure how these plastic bits might be affecting human health. None Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) w

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We’re closing down our comment section

Science News’ forthcoming website won’t feature comment sections on stories, but instead will invite e-mail feedback so readers can make their voices heard.

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New contrast agent could make MRIs safer

Researchers have taken a key step forward in developing a new, possibly safer contrast agent for use in MRI exams.

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New money-laundering rules change everything for cryptocurrency exchanges

Complying with regulators could mean the difference between going mainstream and remaining forever on the margins of the global financial system.

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Countries push to protect sharks, rays

Dozens of countries will push at a global meeting for regulations on trade in 18 types of shark and ray, with conservationists warning Thursday of looming extinction for many species.

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Countries push to protect sharks, rays

Dozens of countries will push at a global meeting for regulations on trade in 18 types of shark and ray, with conservationists warning Thursday of looming extinction for many species.

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Fracking has less impact on groundwater than traditional oil and gas production

The amount of water injected for conventional oil and gas production exceeds that from high-volume hydraulic fracturing and other unconventional oil and gas production by more than a factor of 10, according to a new report. Conventional methods of oil and gas production have been used since the late 1800s. An assessment of the environmental impacts of the petroleum industry should examine the conv

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‘National narcissism’ inflates beliefs about World War II victory

Across the board, people from countries on both sides of World War II ascribe an inflated weight to their country’s contribution to the war effort, according to new research There was another interesting finding. “Russians view World War II very differently than, basically, people from every other country in our study,” says lead author Henry Roediger, a professor in the psychological and brain s

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Tiny lensless endoscope captures 3-D images of objects smaller than a cell

Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3-D images of objects smaller than a single cell. Without a lens or any optical, electrical or mechanical components, the tip of the endoscope measures just 200 microns across, about the width of a few human hairs twisted together.

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N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database.

The city has 82,473 people in its database. Many of them have no idea their genetic information is there.

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Amazon: Those Bizarre Brand Ambassadors Are Real Employees

Important Update Amazon is insisting that those “Amazon FC Ambassador” accounts currently making waves on Twitter are real warehouse workers who actually work for the retail giant’s fulfillment centers. A PR Manager at Amazon confirmed that the ambassadors really work at fulfillment centers, where employees have been sprayed by bear repellent , forced to pee in bottles to meet unrealistic quotas,

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Genetic redundancy aids competition among bacteria in symbiosis with squid

The molecular mechanism used by many bacteria to kill neighboring cells has redundancy built into its genetic makeup, which could allow for the mechanism to be expressed in different environments. Some strains of luminescent bacteria that compete to colonize the light organs of the Hawaiian bobtail squid kill nearby cells of different bacterial strains using the "type VI secretion system (T6SS)."

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Genetic redundancy aids competition among bacteria in symbiosis with squid

The molecular mechanism used by many bacteria to kill neighboring cells has redundancy built into its genetic makeup, which could allow for the mechanism to be expressed in different environments. Some strains of luminescent bacteria that compete to colonize the light organs of the Hawaiian bobtail squid kill nearby cells of different bacterial strains using the "type VI secretion system (T6SS)."

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Political campaigns may influence acceptance of violence against women

During the 2016 Presidential Election, both major party candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, ran on polarizing platforms focusing on a few central issues: immigration, medicare, social issues (i.e., abortion, paid family leave), international trade, and sexism and violence against women.

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Early species developed much faster than previously thought, research shows

When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species,

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More fruits and veggies may ease fatigue for people with MS

Higher levels of blood high-density lipoprotein—good cholesterol—may improve fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients, according to a new study. The pilot study, which investigated the effects of fat levels in blood on fatigue caused by multiple sclerosis, shows lowering total cholesterol also reduces exhaustion. Fatigue is a frequent and debilitating symptom for people with multiple sclerosis that

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IDT launches oPools™ Oligo Pools – the longest, highest fidelity, and ready-to-use custom oligo pools on the market

Long, high-yield oligos with industry-beating low error rate enable researchers to skip amplification steps and start projects immediately

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These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry. (Image credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University)

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Trauma begets trauma: Bullying associated with increased suicide attempts among 12-to-15-year-olds

A new study reports that bullying victimization may increase the risk of suicide attempts among young adolescents by approximately 3-times worldwide.

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New contrast agent could make MRIs safer

Researchers have taken a key step forward in developing a new, possibly safer contrast agent for use in MRI exams.

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MDM2 counteracts resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors for melanoma therapy

A study has identified a possible second-line treatment for melanoma patients.

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Genetic redundancy aids competition among bacteria in symbiosis with squid

The molecular mechanism used by many bacteria to kill neighboring cells has redundancy built into its genetic makeup, which could allow for the mechanism to be expressed in different environments.

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MDM2 counteracts resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors for melanoma therapy

A study from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs led by Anna Vilgelm, MD, Ph.D., and Ann Richmond, Ph.D., has identified a possible second-line treatment for melanoma patients.

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GoPro's next-gen action cameras spied in leaked photos

GoPro’s next generation action camera has leaked ahead of an expected September launch, boasting an all-new look and support for optional add-on accessories.

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Microsoft’s latest Surface updates are causing CPU and Wi-Fi issues

Surfacebook 2 | Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Microsoft is working to fix CPU throttling on the company’s latest Surface devices, while owners complain of Wi-Fi issues, too. …

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Sighting a molecule’s sigh

Nature, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02456-0 A microscope observes a single molecule as it ‘relaxes’ after gaining an electron.

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Deadly Heat Waves Will Likely Get Worse

Heat is the number one cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S. Deadly Heat Waves Will Likely Get Worse Video of Deadly Heat Waves Will Likely Get Worse Earth Thursday, August 15, 2019 – 16:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — Heat is the top cause of weather-related deaths in the United States – more than hurricanes, tornadoes, floods or cold temperatures. And the proble

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Rapid Adoption of Carterra’s LSA™ Instrument Drives European Expansion

Carterra® Inc., the world leader in high-throughput antibody screening and characterization, announced today that they have opened a Customer Experience Center (CEC) and office in Munich, Germany.

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A New Species of Leech Is Discovered Near Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian researcher describes a previously unknown species of olive-green bloodsucker that has three jaws with up to 59 teeth

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These Robots Could One Day Explore Caves on Distant Planets

Cave Robots The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Subterranean Challenge is kicking off today, challenging robotics teams from across the nation to “rapidly map, navigate, and search dynamic underground environments.” While the challenge is aimed at finding robotics solutions for soldiers and first responders, NASA is hoping the same technology could lay the foundation for future explor

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Microfluidics with a pharma focus

Microfluidics has rapidly grown in popularity in recent years, and new applications for the technology continue to be reported.

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New contrast agent could make MRIs safer

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have taken a key step forward in developing a new, possibly safer contrast agent for use in MRI exams.

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Study: Non-invasive electrical stimulation alters blood flow in brain tumors

Led by Emiliano Santarnecchi, Ph.D., principal investigator at the Berenson-Allen Center For Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation at BIDMC, the scientists demonstrated that applying low-intensity electrical stimulation to the brains of patients with tumors resulted in decreased blood flow within tumors while leaving the rest of the brain unchanged. Although further study is needed, the findings suggest

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Trauma begets trauma: Bullying associated with increased suicide attempts among 12-to-15-year-olds

A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that bullying victimization may increase the risk of suicide attempts among young adolescents by approximately 3-times worldwide.

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Photos: The Statue of Liberty, Mother of Exiles

The 151-foot-tall Statue of Liberty, officially Liberty Enlightening the World , designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and Gustave Eiffel, was a gift to the United States from the people of France in 1886. With a tablet inscribed with the date of America’s independence, a broken chain beside one foot symbolizing the abolition of slavery, and a guiding light held up for the world to see, the stru

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Norway's first electric plane crash-lands on lake – Reuters

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The future is now.

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Machines Replace a Third of Workforce at Giant Copper Mine

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Can India Build the World’s First 100% Green-Energy Rail Network?

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U.S. wind energy prices are at historical lows, DOE report says

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NASA's Air Traffic Control System for Drones Nearing Completion

Increasing numbers of drones in urban areas means air traffic control is needed. (Credit: Volodymyr Goinyk/Shutterstock) Highways in the sky are one step closer to becoming reality as NASA conducts the final planned tests of its traffic management system for unmanned drones in Corpus Christi, Texas this week. The system would act like air traffic control for drones, tracking them to help avoid col

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Scientists Create a New Form of Carbon

Graphite, an allotrope of carbon. (Credit: Miriam Doerr Martin Frommherz/Shutterstock) Carbon is, all things considered, pretty great. Its position on the periodic table of elements — which symbolizes the amount of spare electrons it has, more or less — allows it to form an incredible variety of molecules. This includes allotropes, the different forms an element can take on its own based on its st

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Stellar telescopes for your space-loving kids

Eye opening telescopes for kids (Conner Baker via Unsplash/) With a telescope fit for an amateur astronomer, your kid is in for hours of out-of-this-world entertainment. Find below our three favorites. This is a perfect first telescope for your beginning galaxy gazer. (Amazon/) With a small tripod, carrying case, and viewfinder scope, this lightweight telescope simply constructed and easily assem

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Early species developed much faster than previously thought, OHIO research shows

When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species,

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Political campaigns may influence acceptance of violence against women

Nicole Johnson, assistant professor of counseling psychology at Lehigh University, set out to examine the influence, both positive and negative, of presidential campaigns, voting behavior, and candidate selection, on social views of rape culture.

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Tiny lensless endoscope captures 3D images of objects smaller than a cell

Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3D images of objects smaller than a single cell. Without a lens or any optical, electrical or mechanical components, the tip of the endoscope measures just 200 microns across, about the width of a few human hairs twisted together.

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Survey data suggests widespread bullying by superiors in medical residency training

Using questionnaire answers from thousands of internal medicine residents, primarily from US training programs, a research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine says it has added to the evidence that bullying of medical trainees is fairly widespread. Bullying affects about 14% of medical trainees overall, but is particularly more prevalent among foreign-born trainees.

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Deep learning speeds chemical test for food, blood, and more

Deep learning can speed up the analysis of gas chromatography data, researchers report. Because this type of analysis is used in a variety of ways, the new method will have a major impact on quality, efficiency, and cost when examining various data—blood tests, oil pollution testing, the fermentation of cheese, and much more, researchers say. Gas chromatography is a method of analysis that most p

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July Was the Hottest Month Ever Recorded on Earth

As climate change ramps into high gear, global temperature records are being smashed left and right.

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Trump’s Foreign-Policy Crisis Arrives

For two and a half years, the world has wondered how President Donald Trump would cope with a real international crisis. That crisis may have finally arrived in Hong Kong, as Beijing appears poised to execute a massive, violent crackdown against protesters. And how it’s resolved will matter not just for Trump’s political fortunes—it will determine whether the United States and China can find a ba

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Old Dinosaur Turns Into Something New

A fossil uncovered in the 1970s turns out to be a previously-unknown dinosaur species. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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If You Were Worried DJs Were Working Too Hard, This Idiotic AI Literally Picks Songs for Them

DJ Roomba Finally, a new AI assistant can take all of the stressful guesswork out of DJing a set . Called “DJUCED,” the AI algorithm can automatically select songs to put together a fun, dance-oriented playlist for DJs who have too much stage fright to, you know, pick songs. The algorithm, built by software company Hercules, seems like the perfect example of AI assistants being developed for ever

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Extinct Caribbean bird yields DNA after 2,500 years in watery grave

Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island.

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Suit up with a robot to walk and run more easily

A collaborative team reports that they now have developed the first portable exosuit that can assist the extension of the hip joint during both walking and running. The team successfully tested their wearable robot in uneven outdoor environments while wearers walked uphill, and walked and ran at different speeds.

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Study finds lack of racial diversity in cancer drug clinical trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs.

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Water crisis grips US city after lead contamination

A growing water crisis gripped a US city Thursday after environmental officials discovered high lead levels in tap water, sparking worry and highlighting creaking infrastructure in a major urban centre.

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Top NASA official gets look at next moon rocket

NASA's top official says the rocket expected to power the next mission to the moon is about 90 percent complete.

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Depth of Field: Where Is Jay-Z Taking the NFL?

The rapper-entrepreneur and pro football have a new partnership. But it might be built on illusion.

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Earth Stopped Getting Greener 20 Years Ago

Declining plant growth is linked toward decreasing air moisture tied to global warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Young women’s reasons for sexting aren’t clear cut

The motivations for young people’s “sexting” aren’t as straightforward as some people might think, especially when it comes to young women, researchers report. In an online survey, Morgan Johnstonbaugh, a doctoral student in sociology at the University of Arizona, asked more than 1,000 college students—20 years old on average—from 7 US universities to describe the last time they sent a nude or se

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Exercise Changes Our Gut Microbes, But How Isn’t Yet Clear

Physical activity, independent of diet, shifts the composition of bacteria in the intestines, spurring researchers to search for species that might provide benefits akin to working out.

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Chemists have created and imaged a new form of carbon

A new molecule takes its place among buckyballs, carbon nanotubes and other odd forms of carbon.

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Extinct Caribbean bird yields DNA after 2,500 years in watery grave

Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island.

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Extinct Caribbean bird yields DNA after 2,500 years in watery grave

Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island.

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Chemists make first-ever ring of pure carbon

Nature, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02473-z Elusive 18-atom ‘cyclocarbon’ could be a step towards molecule-scale transistors.

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Drug interaction research: Evolution clues

A new article has shown that a key biological component in the communication system of the nematode C. Elegans can be repurposed to take on a different job,. This critical finding about the workings of evolution could one day affect research into drug interactions, agricultural bio-engineering, and a better understanding of genetic inheritance through multiple generations.

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Expression of M gene segment of influenza A virus determines host range

The host range of the influenza A virus (IAV) is restricted by dysregulated expression of the M viral gene segment, according to a new study.

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Health research funding lags for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

Clinical research funding continues to lag for the US population of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, even though the nation's largest biomedical funding agency has pledged to prioritize research on diverse populations.

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Addiction intervention in hospital is a 'reachable moment'

Patients who meet an addiction medicine consult team while they're in the hospital are twice as likely to participate in treatment for substance use disorder after they go home, according to new research. The study measures a key outcome for patients who participated in a first-of-its-kind addiction intervention program.

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Gene linked to physical and intellectual disabilities identified

Modern science and data sharing converged to underpin a study that identified a gene associated with a rare condition that results in physical and intellectual disabilities of children. The results suggest that rare variants in the gene DDX6 are associated with a significant disruption in the development of the central nervous system, governing such basic skills as the ability to walk and talk.

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Studying diseases like gout and kidney stones finds new drug targets

A new fruit fly model that mimics diseases associated with high uric acid levels, such as gout and kidney stones, has revealed new targets for developing treatments for these diseases.

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Adults with mild cognitive impairment can learn and benefit from mindfulness meditation

A pilot study shows promising evidence that adults with MCI can learn to practice mindfulness meditation, and by doing so may boost their cognitive reserve.

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New pain organ discovered in the skin

Researchers have discovered a new sensory organ that is able to detect painful mechanical damage, such as pricks and impacts.

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Vegetable-rich diet lowers fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients by raising good cholesterol

Higher levels of blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — or good cholesterol — may improve fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients, according to a new study.

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Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals

Researchers have discovered that the numbers of plant species recorded by botanists have increased in locations where the climate has changed most rapidly, and especially in relatively cold parts of the world.

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Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development — the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship,

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Bloodsucker discovered: First North American medicinal leech described in over 40 years

Freshwater wetlands from Georgia to New York are home to a previously unrecognized species of medicinal leech, according to scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of National History. The new species, named Macrobdella mimicus, was first identified from specimens collected in southern Maryland, prompting a search through marshes and museum collections that ultimately revealed that the lee

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Bloodsucker discovered: First North American medicinal leech described in over 40 years

Freshwater wetlands from Georgia to New York are home to a previously unrecognized species of medicinal leech, according to scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of National History. The new species, named Macrobdella mimicus, was first identified from specimens collected in southern Maryland, prompting a search through marshes and museum collections that ultimately revealed that the lee

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NASA pinpointed tropical storm Krosa's strength before Japan landfall

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information for Tropical Storm Krosa as it was making landfall in southern Japan.

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WPI biologist's discovery gives evolution clues and may affect drug interaction research

A Nature Communications paper by Worcester Polytechnic Institute biologist Jagan Srinivasan has shown that a key biological component in the communication system of the nematode C. Elegans can be repurposed to take on a different job,. This critical finding about the workings of evolution could one day affect research into drug interactions, agricultural bio-engineering, and a better understanding

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Extinct Caribbean bird yields DNA after 2,500 years in watery grave

Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island.

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TGen team links gene to children with physical and intellectual disabilities

Modern science and data sharing converged to underpin a study led by TGen that identified a gene associated with a rare condition that results in physical and intellectual disabilities of children. The results, published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics, suggest that rare variants in the gene DDX6 are associated with a significant disruption in the development of the central nervous

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NOAA Data Confirms July Was Hottest Month Ever Recorded

Data from federal researchers confirmed that July was the hottest month on record, edging out the previous record-holder, July 2016.

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Kary B. Mullis, 74, Dies; Found a Way to Analyze DNA and Won Nobel

His discovery created a new world of possibilities in diagnosing disease, unearthing the past and assisting in criminal cases, including O.J. Simpson’s murder trial.

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The Hazards of Writing While Female

Why has the literary world gone crazy for Sally Rooney? Is it her age—28? Is it her two acclaimed novels, Conversations With Friends and Normal People ? Or is it her “sensuous lips”? According to the Swiss critic Martin Ebel, it is all three. In a recent article praising Rooney’s work, he wrote that the hype around her was helped by “promising” photographs where she “looks like a startled deer wi

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Immune cells drive gallstone formation

Sticky meshworks of DNA and proteins extruded by white blood cells called neutrophils act as the glue that binds together calcium and cholesterol crystals during gallstone formation, researchers report. Both genetic and pharmacological approaches that inhibited the formation of these so-called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) reduced the formation and growth of gallstones in mice.

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Bloodsucker discovered: First North American medicinal leech described in over 40 years

Freshwater wetlands from Georgia to New York are home to a previously unrecognized species of medicinal leech, according to scientists. The new species was first identified from specimens collected in southern Maryland less than 50 miles from Washington, D.C., prompting a search through marshes and museum collections that revealed that the leech has long occupied a range that stretches throughout

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Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development — the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship,

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Robotic exosuit developed to help wearers run and walk

Researchers plan to commercialise technology for device worn like a pair of shorts

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There Are Thousands of Tardigrades on the Moon. Now What?

What might it mean for the moon to have thousands of tardigrades as new inhabitants?

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Research suggests glyphosate lowers pH of dicamba spray mixtures below acceptable levels

A study found that mixing glyphosate with formulations of dicamba consistently lowered the pH of the spray solution below 5.0 — a critical value according to the latest dicamba application labels.

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Winning coaches' locker room secret

Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was at half-time and how well the team played in the second half: The more negativity, the more the team outscored the opposition.

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Screening for cervical spine risk factors could reduce CT scans by half

Study finds identifiable risk factors ED staff can use for evaluation, avoiding over 100,000 unnecessary scans annually.

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In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes

In new product design, connecting with an end user's heart, rather than their head, can lead to more original and creative outcomes, says an expert in product development and marketing.

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When the cardiology patient ends up in the oncology care ward

If you end up needing to go to the hospital, often times you're hoping to get a bed without having to wait hours, but a new study shows you may want to wait a little longer, so that you are placed in the best ward for your needs. New research shows that among patients admitted to the hospital, 19.6% are placed in beds in a ward outside the area of care they require.

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Warmer winters are changing the makeup of water in Black Sea

Warmer winters are starting to alter the structure of the Black Sea, which could foreshadow how ocean compositions might shift from future climate change, according to new research.

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Are Siri and Alexa making us ruder?

Is the way we bark out orders to digital assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant making us less polite? Prompted by growing concerns, two information systems researchers decided to find out.

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Winning coaches' locker room secret

Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was at half-time and how well the team played in the second half: The more negativity, the more the team outscored the opposition.

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Addiction intervention in hospital is a 'reachable moment'

Patients who meet an addiction medicine consult team while they're in the hospital are twice as likely to participate in treatment for substance use disorder after they go home, according to new research. The study measures a key outcome for patients who participated in a first-of-its-kind addiction intervention program started by Oregon Health & Science University in 2015.

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Regenstrief, IU scientists to present cutting-edge HIT expertise at world congress

Research scientists representing Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine and IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI are joining — and in some cases leading — the global health conversation at the 17th World Congress of Medical and Health Informatics (MedInfo).

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Health research funding lags for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

Clinical research funding continues to lag for the US population of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, even though the nation's largest biomedical funding agency has pledged to prioritize research on diverse populations.

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Expression of M gene segment of influenza A virus determines host range

The host range of the influenza A virus (IAV) is restricted by dysregulated expression of the M viral gene segment, according to a study published August 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Anice Lowen and John Steel of Emory University School of Medicine, and colleagues.

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Adults with mild cognitive impairment can learn and benefit from mindfulness meditation

Pilot study shows promising evidence that adults with MCI can learn to practice mindfulness meditation, and by doing so may boost their cognitive reserve.

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System for studying diseases like gout and kidney stones finds new drug targets

A new fruit fly model that mimics diseases associated with high uric acid levels, such as gout and kidney stones, has revealed new targets for developing treatments for these diseases. Pankaj Kapahi of Buck Institute and colleagues report these findings in a new study published August 15, 2019 in PLOS Genetics.

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Relaxing of regulations for regenerative medicines has cascading effect internationally

Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines, like stem cell 'treatments', could be causing a downward spiral in international standards.

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Firework memories

Recently Weizmann Institute scientists succeeded in recording these rapid bursts of activity — called 'hippocampal ripples' — in the human brain, and they were able to demonstrate their importance as a neuronal mechanism underlying the engraving of new memories and their subsequent recall.

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New pain organ discovered in the skin

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new sensory organ that is able to detect painful mechanical damage, such as pricks and impacts. The discovery is being published in Science.

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Suit up with a robot to walk and run more easily

A collaborative team at the Wyss Institute, Harvard SEAS, and the University of Nebraska Omaha reports in Science that they now have developed the first portable exosuit that can assist the extension of the hip joint during both walking and running. The team successfully tested their wearable robot in uneven outdoor environments while wearers walked uphill, and walked and ran at different speeds.

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In worms, researchers uncover protein that may one day make opioid use safer

Studying mutant worms has led to the discovery of a receptor that reduces sensitivity to opioid side effects in these organisms.

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Deep-earth diamonds reveal primordial rock source in Earth's mantle

An analysis of helium isotopes locked inside 'super-deep' diamonds hundreds of kilometers below Earth’s surface suggests that vast reservoirs of molten primordial source rock, perhaps nearly as old as the Earth, are present.

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Gene variant in maize ancestor could increase yields in today's densely planted fields

From within the genetic diversity of wild teosinte — the evolutionary ancestor of modern maize — valuable traits lay hidden.

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A step forward in wearable robotics: Exosuit assists with both walking and running

A soft robotic exosuit — worn like a pair of shorts — can make both walking and running easier for the wearer, a new study reports.

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Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development — the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship,

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Superdeep diamonds confirm ancient reservoir deep under Earth's surface

Analyses show that gases found in microscopic inclusions in diamonds come from a stable subterranean reservoir at least as old as the Moon, hidden more than 410 km below sea level in the Earth's mantle.

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Bloodsucker discovered: First North American medicinal leech described in over 40 years

Freshwater wetlands from Georgia to New York are home to a previously unrecognized species of medicinal leech, according to scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of National History. The new species was first identified from specimens collected in southern Maryland less than 50 miles from Washington, D.C., prompting a search through marshes and museum collections that revealed that the l

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The Aging Spacecraft of Deep Space

Beyond Earth and its bubble of satellites; past Mars, where rovers explore; past Jupiter and its circling orbiter—outside the solar system entirely—two spacecraft are gliding across interstellar space. They have crossed over the invisible boundary that separates our solar system from everything else, into territory untouched by the influence of the sun. People have seen much deeper into the unive

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New Leech Found in D.C.-Area Swamps

The large, colorful parasite has apparently been lurking there for years. new-leech.jpg Macrobdella mimicus, a newly discovered species of leech that lives in the U.S. and will readily feed on humans. Image credits: Ian Cook Creature Thursday, August 15, 2019 – 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — America has a new leech — new to science, that is. In fact, the big orange-bellied

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News at a glance

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Francis's way

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Berry blues

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Choosing wisely

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Benefits of diversity

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Class (II) warfare

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An E-Z resolution

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Teosinte ligule allele narrows plant architecture and enhances high-density maize yields

Increased planting densities have boosted maize yields. Upright plant architecture facilitates dense planting. Here, we cloned UPA1 ( Upright Plant Architecture1 ) and UPA2 , two quantitative trait loci conferring upright plant architecture. UPA2 is controlled by a two-base sequence polymorphism regulating the expression of a B3-domain transcription factor ( ZmRAVL1 ) located 9.5 kilobases downst

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Relativistic redshift of the star S0-2 orbiting the Galactic Center supermassive black hole

The general theory of relativity predicts that a star passing close to a supermassive black hole should exhibit a relativistic redshift. In this study, we used observations of the Galactic Center star S0-2 to test this prediction. We combined existing spectroscopic and astrometric measurements from 1995–2017, which cover S0-2’s 16-year orbit, with measurements from March to September 2018, which

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Reducing the metabolic rate of walking and running with a versatile, portable exosuit

Walking and running have fundamentally different biomechanics, which makes developing devices that assist both gaits challenging. We show that a portable exosuit that assists hip extension can reduce the metabolic rate of treadmill walking at 1.5 meters per second by 9.3% and that of running at 2.5 meters per second by 4.0% compared with locomotion without the exosuit. These reduction magnitudes

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Sub-single-exciton lasing using charged quantum dots coupled to a distributed feedback cavity

Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive materials for realizing highly flexible, solution-processable optical gain media, but they are difficult to use in lasing because of complications associated with extremely short optical-gain lifetimes limited by nonradiative Auger recombination. By combining compositional grading of the QD’s interior for hindering Auger decay with postsyn

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Quantum-state-selective electron recombination studies suggest enhanced abundance of primordial HeH+

The epoch of first star formation in the early Universe was dominated by simple atomic and molecular species consisting mainly of two elements: hydrogen and helium. Gaining insight into this constitutive era requires a thorough understanding of molecular reactivity under primordial conditions. We used a cryogenic ion storage ring combined with a merged electron beam to measure state-specific rate

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Thermal unequilibrium of strained black CsPbI3 thin films

The high-temperature, all-inorganic CsPbI 3 perovskite black phase is metastable relative to its yellow, nonperovskite phase at room temperature. Because only the black phase is optically active, this represents an impediment for the use of CsPbI 3 in optoelectronic devices. We report the use of substrate clamping and biaxial strain to render black-phase CsPbI 3 thin films stable at room temperat

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Nearly ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductivity

Spin-triplet superconductors potentially host topological excitations that are of interest for quantum information processing. We report the discovery of spin-triplet superconductivity in UTe 2 , featuring a transition temperature of 1.6 kelvin and a very large and anisotropic upper critical field exceeding 40 teslas. This superconducting phase stability suggests that UTe 2 is related to ferromag

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Stabilizing heterostructures of soft perovskite semiconductors

Here we report a solution-processing strategy to stabilize the perovskite-based heterostructure. Strong Pb–Cl and Pb–O bonds formed between a [CH(NH 2 ) 2 ] x [CH 3 NH 3 ] 1– x Pb 1+ y I 3 film with a Pb-rich surface and a chlorinated graphene oxide layer. The constructed heterostructure can selectively extract photogenerated charge carriers and impede the loss of decomposed components from soft

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Primordial and recycled helium isotope signatures in the mantle transition zone

Isotope compositions of basalts provide information about the chemical reservoirs in Earth’s interior and play a critical role in defining models of Earth’s structure. However, the helium isotope signature of the mantle below depths of a few hundred kilometers has been difficult to measure directly. This information is a vital baseline for understanding helium isotopes in erupted basalts. We meas

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Specialized cutaneous Schwann cells initiate pain sensation

An essential prerequisite for the survival of an organism is the ability to detect and respond to aversive stimuli. Current belief is that noxious stimuli directly activate nociceptive sensory nerve endings in the skin. We discovered a specialized cutaneous glial cell type with extensive processes forming a mesh-like network in the subepidermal border of the skin that conveys noxious thermal and

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Bright and photostable chemigenetic indicators for extended in vivo voltage imaging

Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) enable monitoring of neuronal activity at high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the utility of existing GEVIs has been limited by the brightness and photostability of fluorescent proteins and rhodopsins. We engineered a GEVI, called Voltron, that uses bright and photostable synthetic dyes instead of protein-based fluorophores, thereby extend

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Active cell migration is critical for steady-state epithelial turnover in the gut

Steady-state turnover is a hallmark of epithelial tissues throughout adult life. Intestinal epithelial turnover is marked by continuous cell migration, which is assumed to be driven by mitotic pressure from the crypts. However, the balance of forces in renewal remains ill-defined. Combining biophysical modeling and quantitative three-dimensional tissue imaging with genetic and physical manipulati

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New Products

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Nuclear hnRNPA2B1 initiates and amplifies the innate immune response to DNA viruses

DNA viruses typically eject genomic DNA into the nuclei of host cells after entry. It is unclear, however, how nuclear pathogen–derived DNA triggers innate immune responses. We report that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2B1 (hnRNPA2B1) recognizes pathogenic DNA and amplifies interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production. Upon DNA virus infection, nuclear-localized hnRNPA2B1 senses viral DNA, homo

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Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples linked to visual episodic recollection in humans

Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs) constitute one of the most synchronized activation events in the brain and play a critical role in offline memory consolidation. Yet their cognitive content and function during awake, conscious behavior remains unclear. We directly examined this question using intracranial recordings in human patients engaged in episodic free recall of previously viewed photo

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Comment on "Impacts of historical warming on marine fisheries production"

Free et al . (Reports, 1 March 2019, p. 979) linked sea surface temperature (SST) to surplus production and estimated a 4% decline in maximum sustainable yield (MSY) since 1930. Changes in MSY are expected when fitting production models to age-structured data, so attributing observed changes to SST is problematic. Analyses of recruitment (a metric of productivity in the same database) showed incr

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Response to Comment on "Impacts of historical warming on marine fisheries production"

Szuwalski argues that varying age structure can affect surplus production and that recruitment is a better metric of productivity. We explain how our null model controlled for age structure and other processes as explanations for the temperature-production relationship. Surplus production includes growth, recruitment, and other processes and provides a more complete description of food production

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Mitochondria–Striking a balance between host and endosymbiont

Mitochondria are organelles with their own genome that arose from α-proteobacteria living within single-celled Archaea more than a billion years ago. This step of endosymbiosis offered tremendous opportunities for energy production and metabolism and allowed the evolution of fungi, plants, and animals. However, less appreciated are the downsides of this endosymbiosis. Coordinating gene expression

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Israel’s Massive Self-Own

You don’t expect logic and reason to rule the day when it comes to the Middle East. But every now and then, in a limited way, you get lucky. In July, an overwhelming bipartisan majority of the House of Representatives voted to affirm the traditional tenets of U.S. policy toward Israel: opposing attacks on Israel’s legitimacy, as articulated by the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement, and

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Super-deep diamonds contain traces of a pristine chunk of early Earth

Diamonds that formed twice as deep as normal contain evidence of a pristine hunk of original Earth rock hiding deep underground

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Robotic shorts could help you run and walk more efficiently

A robotic exosuit cuts the energy required to walk and run, and could be used by firefighters or others who spend long periods of time on their feet

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Scientists discover new pain-sensing organ

Octopus-like Schwann cells that engulf nerves in skin can sense pain, experiments show A new organ involved in the sensation of pain has been discovered by scientists, raising hopes that it could lead to the development of new painkilling drugs. Researchers say they have discovered that the special cells that surround the pain-sensing nerve cells that extend into the outer layer of skin appear to

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Superdeep diamonds have a story to tell

Brazilian rocks may be older than anything on the Earth’s surface. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Need help walking and running? Consider robo-wear

Harvard-led project leverages variable biomechanics but tests fashion sense. Barry Keily reports.

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A Banana-Killing Fungus Has Reached Latin America. Does This Spell the End for Bananas?

A banana-killing fungus has finally reached Latin America, as scientists long feared it would.

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Fluid in superdeep diamonds may be from some of Earth's oldest unchanged material

Primordial rock deep in the mantle and dating to just after Earth’s formation could yield insights about the planet’s formation and evolution

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Carbon atoms marry to form first-ever ring

Cyclocarbon could lead to new materials for electronics and nanodevices

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Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

A potentially useful material for building quantum computers has been unearthed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), whose scientists have found a superconductor that could sidestep one of the primary obstacles standing in the way of effective quantum logic circuits.

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Superdeep diamonds confirm ancient reservoir deep under Earth's surface

Analyses show that gases found in microscopic inclusions in diamonds come from a stable subterranean reservoir at least as old as the Moon, hidden more than 410 km below sea level in the Earth's mantle.

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Catch a Buzz With Two New Books About Bugs

In “The Mosquito,” Timothy Winegard examines the history of man’s “deadliest predator.” In “Buzz, Sting, Bite,” Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson looks at how insects have shaped human civilization.

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Astronomers Closer to Cracking Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts

Canadian telescope finds eight more repeating blasts—energetic events from deep in the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fish flashing below

Bioluminescent bacteria under the eyes allows them to school at night.

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Humans pushed cave bears towards extinction

Numbers were declining before the onset of the ice age. Dyani Lewis reports.

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How many genes in the human microbiome?

Spoiler alert: it’s a lot, according to an early study.

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A CRISPR ‘revolution’

Swiss team says its process can modify 25 sites at once.

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What is herd immunity?

Hassan Vally from Australia's La Trobe University looks at an important issue affecting vaccination uptake.

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Does opioid maintenance treatment during pregnancy harm newborns?

A new study found no harm to newborns from opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) during pregnancy compared with no treatment.

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Discovery could pave the way for disease-resistant rice crops

Researchers have uncovered an unusual protein activity in rice that can be exploited to give crops an edge in the evolutionary arms race against rice blast disease, a major threat to rice production around the world.

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Scientists Seek Better Guidelines for Editing Genes in Human Embryos

In the first of two meetings, an international commission discussed the criteria required before such experiments should be conducted—if ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Seek Better Guidelines for Editing Genes in Human Embryos

In the first of two meetings, an international commission discussed the criteria required before such experiments should be conducted—if ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Report: The World’s First Solar Road is an Absolute Disaster

Sorry State In 2016 France turned a one-kilometer stretch of roadway into the world’s first solar road . And three years later, the trial project has turned out to be an absolute disaster, French newspaper Le Monde reports . The photovoltaic panels that made up the 2,800 square meter (just over 30,000 square feet) of road surface have deteriorated beyond recognition, according to the paper. The p

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Those Obviously-Fake Amazon Warehouse Workers Are Still Tweeting

PR Push Those bizarre “Amazon FC Ambassador” accounts on Twitter, which were ridiculed last year for seemingly posing as happy Amazon warehouse workers, are having a bit of a moment. It’s unclear whether these bizarre Twitter accounts are humans that actually work at Amazon fulfillment centers — they tend to insist that they are — or if they’re artificially-cheery sock puppets. But what is clear

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Vegetable-rich diet lowers fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients by raising good cholesterol

Higher levels of blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — or good cholesterol — may improve fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study.

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NASA pinpointed tropical storm Krosa's strength before Japan landfall

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information for Tropical Storm Krosa as it was making landfall in southern Japan.

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The relationship between mean platelet volume and in-hospital mortality in geriatric patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 135-141; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0015, the authors consider the relationship between mean platelet volume and in-hospital mortality in geriatric patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

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Ultrasound: The potential power for cardiovascular disease therapy

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 125-134; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0013, the authors summarize the biomedical effects of acoustic intervention in experimental and clinical studies, current challenges, and the potential of ultrasound for cardiovascular disease therapy.

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Cardiac rehabilitation: Preliminary results

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 121-23; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0069, C. Richard Conti, Jamie. B Conti, and Jeff Plasschaert from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, USA consider the impact of cardiac rehabilitation programs.

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American higher education is in crisis. Here’s a plan to revolutionize it.

Half of all students who begin their higher education journey drop out, 68 percent of Americans never attain a higher education degree, and 73 percent of Americans go into fields unrelated to their higher education degree. Clearly, something is wrong with how we approach higher education. In turn, this approach contributes to societal ills, like unrealized contributions to humanity, unrealized po

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July 2019 was hottest month on record for the planet

Much of the planet sweltered in unprecedented heat in July, as temperatures soared to new heights in the hottest month ever recorded. The record warmth also shrank Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.

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An Atmospheric Drought Is Slowing Plant Growth Worldwide, Study Says

Less moisture in the atmosphere means plants grow more slowly. (Credit: OhEngine/Shutterstock) Water shortage troubles are common in the arid West and South Africa. But they’re not the only places enduring dry spells. In a new study today, scientists say the atmosphere itself is suffering from a major drought. The lack of moisture in the air is sucking water from dirt and plants, leading to reduce

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The best ways to wind down using tech

Desperately need to relax? Technology can help. The sand and water are optional. (Simon Rae via Unsplash/) Whether it's endlessly scrolling through Twitter or binge-watching Netflix, technology is often to blame for keeping us up way too late. But our gadgets don't have to be the culprits behind a bad night’s sleep—they can also help us wind down and rest as if we were sleepy toddlers all over ag

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Program offers pathway to medical school for students of color

Fourteen high school graduates streamed into a large lecture room at Hofstra University, each carrying a sign with the name of the college they will attend: Stony Brook University, The New York Institute of Technology, Columbia University.

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Predictive value of resting pd/pa for fractional flow reserve assessed with monorail pressure microcatheter in real-world practice

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 113-120; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0078, the authors consider predictive value of resting Pd/Pa for fractional flow reserve assessed with monorail pressure microcatheter in real-world practice.

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Epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia

What to Do with Epicardial Coronary Artery Abnormalities That do not Result in Myocardial Ischemia? In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 109-111 ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0067 C. Richard Conti from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, USA considers epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result

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Selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 85-98 ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0060, Jayasheel O. Eshcol and Adnan K. Chhatriwalla from Saint Luke's Hospital Mid America Heart Institute, and University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA consider selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest.

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In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes

Developing original and innovative products is critical to a company's long-term success and competitive advantage. Thus, gaining a better idea of what factors impact how designers cultivate product originality can have important—and potentially profitable—consequences for businesses.

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Melting ice probably isn’t causing extreme winter weather, but there is a connection

For decades, experts have observed that melting ice in the Arctic (caused by climate change) coincides with unusually bitter winters at lower latitudes. (Flickr/) Climate change skeptics often point to recent, record-breaking winters as evidence against global warming. But in reality, greenhouse gases may be just as responsible for extreme winters as they are for heat waves. For decades, experts

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Trump Has Enabled Israel’s Antidemocratic Tendencies at Every Turn

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET on Thursday, August 15, 2019. The trip was always going to be bad PR for Israel. Representatives Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota planned to lead a visit to Israel and the Palestinian territories, meeting with “people in the refugee camps,” “people at checkpoints,” and “people who lost their lands and had their homes demolished,” as James Zogby, the he

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Mutations linked to familial pancreatic cancer

A new study finds genetic mutations associated with hereditary forms of pancreatic cancer and mechanism by which these mutations may contribute to the development of tumors.

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Moon glows brighter than sun in images from NASA's Fermi

If our eyes could see gamma rays, the Moon would appear brighter than the Sun! That's how NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has seen our neighbor in space for the past decade.

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The NSA Won’t Say Anything About Its Slack Account

Big Brother It turns out that the National Security Agency (NSA), the government intelligence agency responsible for domestic mass surveillance, seems to use Slack, the same messaging app common in offices, newsrooms, and other not-as-top-secret workplaces. That’s according to Motherboard , which attempted to discover the name of the NSA’s slack channels though a Freedom of Information Act reques

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Research suggests glyphosate lowers pH of dicamba spray mixtures below acceptable levels

A University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture study published in the Journal of Weed Technology found that mixing glyphosate with formulations of dicamba consistently lowered the pH of the spray solution below 5.0—a critical value according to the latest dicamba application labels. These labels recommend maintaining a spray solution pH above 5.0 to reduce potential for dicamba volatility.

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Research suggests glyphosate lowers pH of dicamba spray mixtures below acceptable levels

A University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture study published in the Journal of Weed Technology found that mixing glyphosate with formulations of dicamba consistently lowered the pH of the spray solution below 5.0—a critical value according to the latest dicamba application labels. These labels recommend maintaining a spray solution pH above 5.0 to reduce potential for dicamba volatility.

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July 2019 hottest month on record for planet: NOAA

July 2019 temperatures were the hottest ever recorded globally, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Thursday, while satellite data showed polar ice shrank to its lowest levels.

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Alaska Still Hasn’t Saved Its Universities

Standing before a room full of reporters on Tuesday, Governor Mike Dunleavy of Alaska let go of the podium he’d been gripping, spreading his hands wide as he announced the agreement he had reached with the state’s university system. He said the two sides of the negotiation had started “a little bit apart,” but they had worked toward the middle. The middle they’d arrived at was a $70 million budge

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‘MacGyver’ robot builds tools with what’s on hand

Researchers have successfully trained an intelligent agent to create basic tools by combining objects. The work, which uses a new capability to reason about shape, function, and attachment of unrelated parts, is a significant step toward enabling intelligent agents to devise more advanced tools that could prove useful in hazardous—and potentially life-threatening—environments. The concept may sou

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Winning coaches' locker room secret

Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was at half-time and how well the team played in the second half: The more negativity, the more the team outscored the opposition.

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Research suggests glyphosate lowers pH of dicamba spray mixtures below acceptable levels

A University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture study published in the Journal of Weed Technology found that mixing glyphosate with formulations of dicamba consistently lowered the pH of the spray solution below 5.0 — a critical value according to the latest dicamba application labels.

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En pris der deler vandene

PLUS. Giver det mening at belønne fysikere med en stor pris for en teori, som har vist sig ikke at have noget med virkeligheden at gøre?

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How cells override genetic changes

A new discovery could lead researchers to a more effective way to treat pancreatic cancer.

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This Boston Dynamics-Esque Bot Has Horrifying, Human-Like Eyes

Low-Budget Black Mirror “Astro” the robodog promises many things, but its face is the stuff of nightmares. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University (FAU) set out to build a robodog that combined all the best parts of Siri, 3D-printing, and nimble, next-gen robots like Boston Dynamics’ SpotMini. Unfortunately, Astro’s engineers added an extra component to the bot: horrible, human-like eyes. As

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UPS Has Been Delivering Cargo in Self-Driving Trucks for Months And No One Knew

The self-driving freight truck startup TuSimple has been carrying mail across the state of Arizona for several weeks.Read more…

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Bring More Tech (and Amazon Boxes) Into the Garage With a Smarter Opener

Most every premium garage door brand these days has a Wi-Fi remote that lets you check the status of your garage door from your smartphone and open or close the door remotely. Increasingly, Wi-Fi remotes tie into home control services including Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant and let you monitor who comes in and when. They all beat the old clip-on open-close remotes that attach to your car’s su

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Study identifies mutations linked to familial pancreatic cancer

Study finds genetic mutations associated with hereditary forms of pancreatic cancer and mechanism by which these mutations may contribute to the development of tumors.

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Nanoscale 'glass' bottles could enable targeted drug delivery

Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a new study.

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New study shows how autism can be measured through a non-verbal marker

Researchers have identified a non-verbal, neural marker of autism. This marker shows that individuals with autism are slower to dampen neural activity in response to visual signals in the brain. This first-of-its kind marker was found to be independent of intelligence and offers an objective way to potentially diagnose autism in the future.

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To Make Two Black Holes Collide, Try Three

The spiraling dance of a pair of colliding black holes should last for billions of years. Yet we’ve caught about 10 black hole collisions since 2016 — far more than we would expect. Some process must be at work to accelerate the collision process, to make black holes come together more quickly than anticipated. The trouble starts before black holes form in the first place. Black holes are essenti

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Data assimilation method offers improved hurricane forecasting

Operational models for severe weather forecasting predicted Hurricane Harvey would become a Category 1 hurricane in 2017, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Instead, it became a massive Category 4 just before it made landfall, tying Hurricane Katrina for the costliest hurricane on record.

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New industrial revolution sparked by technology gives power to service, retail, wholesale industries

The United States is experiencing a new type of industrial revolution, one in which businesses outside of manufacturing are harnessing the power of the internet to scale up production and increase profits.

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Young Jupiter was smacked head-on by massive newborn planet

A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a still-forming planet in the early solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago, could explain surprising readings from NASA's Juno spacecraft, according to a new study.

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Predictability of parent interaction positively influences child's development

Scientists have investigated the impact of the predictability of parent interaction on a child's development. The study showed that a higher predictability of the parent's interaction signals in infancy was associated with the child's ability to better control and regulate their own actions and emotions.

6h

Tweaked CRISPR in neurons gives scientists new power to probe brain diseases

Researchers describe a technique that uses a special version of CRISPR to systematically alter the activity of genes in human neurons generated from stem cells, the first successful merger of stem cell-derived cell types and CRISPR screening technologies.

6h

Age-related illness risk for people living with HIV

The first large-scale review into the health outcomes of people living with HIV has found that this group has an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with aging.

6h

Nest Enrages Users By Removing Option to Disable Camera Status LEDs

The company just made good on one of the promises it made at I/O — it's removing the option to disable camera status LEDs. Nest customers have responded …

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Feds: Capital One suspect may have hacked 30-plus companies

Federal prosecutors say a woman charged in a massive data breach at Capital One may have hacked more than 30 other organizations.

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YouTube discriminates against LGBT content by unfairly culling it, suit alleges

The Google-owned site’s software targets gay and lesbian videos for takedowns, some creators say.

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Why Some Doctors Purposely Misdiagnose Patients

The headaches started when Mariah Martinez was 10 years old. It was 2003, and she was living in Dearborn, Michigan, with her mother and two sisters. Whenever a headache struck, she would want to put her head down, stay in the dark, and be alone. Martinez saw her primary-care physician, who referred her to Yasser Awaad, a pediatric neurologist at a hospital that was then known as Oakwood Healthcar

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In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes

In new product design, connecting with an end user's heart, rather than their head, can lead to more original and creative outcomes, says published research co-written by Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois and an expert in product development and marketing.

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Discovery of how cells override genetic changes

A discovery by scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) could lead researchers to a more effective way to treat pancreatic cancer. Their findings were published today in Developmental Cell.

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National narcissism rears its head in study of WWII

In a survey of adults from the countries that comprised the World War II alliances known as the Allies and the Axis, respondents overestimate the importance of their country to the war effort. A new Arts & Sciences study shows how.

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New tools help detect digital domestic abuse

A new clinical model developed by Cornell Tech researchers aims to respond systematically and effectively to the growing array of digital threats against victims of intimate partner violence. Working with the New York City Mayor's Office to End Domestic and Gender-Based Violence, the researchers created and piloted a questionnaire, a spyware scanning tool and a diagram for assessing clients' digit

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Screening for cervical spine risk factors could reduce CT scans by half

Study finds identifiable risk factors ED staff can use for evaluation, avoiding over 100,000 unnecessary scans annually.

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Does opioid maintenance treatment during pregnancy harm newborns?

A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study found no harm to newborns from opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) during pregnancy compared with no treatment.

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The inside scoop on Charmin’s fake poop (and how it helps keep your butt clean)

I've always been a big fan of poop, and not just because I get plenty of fiber. As a science journalist, I've long felt that stories about stools are some of the most fascinating to tell . Everybody poops, after all, and too many of us go through life without stopping to think of all the wild and crazy research going on to better understand the stuff. So when Proctor & Gamble offered PopSci an ex

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Enriched environment in aquaculture enhances the survival of fish from bacterial disease

A cooperative study conducted by University of Jyväskylä and Natural Resources institute Finland (Luke), revealed that enriched rearing of juvenile fish significantly enhances the survival of fish from bacterial infection commonly seen in rearing conditions. That may also improve the post release survival of the fish after stocking into the wild. The study has been published in Journal of Applied

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Warmer winters are changing the makeup of water in Black Sea

Warmer winters are starting to alter the structure of the Black Sea, which could foreshadow how ocean compositions might shift from future climate change, according to new research.

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New research could provide better food and faster analysis of blood tests

Gas chromatography is a method of analysis that most people have experienced at one time or another without necessarily knowing it. For example, gas chromatography can be used to reveal food fraud, find out where a particular batch of cocaine was produced or monitor the fermentation of cheese.

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Enriched environment in aquaculture enhances the survival of fish from bacterial disease

A cooperative study conducted by University of Jyväskylä and Natural Resources institute Finland (Luke), revealed that enriched rearing of juvenile fish significantly enhances the survival of fish from bacterial infection commonly seen in rearing conditions. That may also improve the post release survival of the fish after stocking into the wild. The study has been published in Journal of Applied

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A Swiss Army Knife for Your Mind

If you practice what you read in this article, your life will improve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Moon glows brighter than sun in images from NASA's Fermi

If our eyes could see high-energy radiation called gamma rays, the Moon would appear brighter than the Sun! That's how NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has seen our neighbor in space for the past decade.

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Watch This Hacked-Together Tesla “Pickup” Do Wicked Donuts

The Teslamino To carry their dirt bikes into the desert, the people behind an electric car conversion company chopped off the back of an already-damaged Tesla Model S to turn it into a “Teslamino” — a nod towards the open back truck variant of the Chevrolet El Camino. And it can burn some rubber doing gnarly donuts as well. Owner Eddy Borysewicz worked with California-based electric car parts com

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Better food and faster analysis of blood tests

Researchers have figured out how to use deep learning to speed up the analysis of gas chromatographic data. Because this type of analysis is used in many parts of society, the new method will have a major impact on quality, efficiency and cost when examining various data — from blood tests, to the fermentation of cheese.

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Enriched environment in aquaculture enhances the survival of fish from bacterial disease

A new study has revealed that enriched rearing of juvenile fish significantly enhances the survival of fish from bacterial infection commonly seen in rearing conditions. That may also improve the post release survival of the fish after stocking into the wild.

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Data assimilation method offers improved hurricane forecasting

Operational models for severe weather forecasting predicted Hurricane Harvey would become a Category 1 hurricane in 2017. Instead, it became a massive Category 4 just before it made landfall, tying Hurricane Katrina for the costliest hurricane on record.

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How buildings can cut 80 percent of their carbon emissions by 2050

Energy use in buildings — from heating and cooling your home to keeping the lights on in the office — is responsible for over one-third of all carbon dioxide emissions in the United States. Slashing building carbon dioxide emissions 80 percent by 2050 would therefore contribute significantly to combating climate change.

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Ian Urbina Joins The Atlantic as Contributing Writer

Editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today that Ian Urbina , a longtime reporter for The New York Times and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize, is becoming a contributing writer for The Atlantic. Urbina’s first piece for The Atlantic, “ A Visit to the World’s Tiniest Nation ,” published this morning, is an exploration of what the remarkable (and bizarre) story of Sealand—a “micro-nation” on an

7h

JHU Researchers Harmed Dogs, Animal Rights Group Argues

Stop Animal Exploitation Now issues a federal complaint against Johns Hopkins scientists, saying they messed up surgeries on nine animals.

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No, Siri and Alexa are not making us ruder

Is the way we bark out orders to digital assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant making us less polite? Prompted by growing concerns, two Brigham Young University information systems researchers decided to find out.

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Warmer winters are changing the makeup of water in Black Sea

Warmer winters are starting to alter the structure of the Black Sea, which could foreshadow how ocean compositions might shift from future climate change, according to new research.

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When the cardiology patient ends up in the oncology care ward

If you end up needing to go to the hospital, often times you're hoping to get a bed without having to wait hours, but a new study shows you may want to wait a little longer, so that you are placed in the best ward for your needs. New research in the upcoming INFORMS journal Management Science shows that among patients admitted to the hospital, 19.6% are placed in beds in a ward outside the area of

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Nanoscale 'glass' bottles could enable targeted drug delivery

Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

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A Swiss Army Knife for Your Mind

If you practice what you read in this article, your life will improve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Discovery could pave the way for disease-resistant rice crops

Researchers have uncovered an unusual protein activity in rice that can be exploited to give crops an edge in the evolutionary arms race against rice blast disease, a major threat to rice production around the world.

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Discovery could pave the way for disease-resistant rice crops

Researchers have uncovered an unusual protein activity in rice that can be exploited to give crops an edge in the evolutionary arms race against rice blast disease, a major threat to rice production around the world.

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An ecologist with an eye toward forecasting the future

Michael Dietze is helping stand up the Ecological Forecasting Initiative

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Invasive pests kill enough trees to hamper carbon storage

In addition to the ecological impact, the devastation invasive pests wreak on trees reduces carbon storage equivalent to the amount of carbon emitted by 5 million vehicles each year. Invasive insects and pathogens have wreaked havoc on ash, elm, chestnut, and other trees, wiping some almost completely from American forests. The trees the 15 most invasive pests kill each year contain 5.53 teragram

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Moon glows brighter than sun in images from NASA's Fermi

If our eyes could see gamma rays, the Moon would appear brighter than the Sun! That's how NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has seen our neighbor in space for the past decade.

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New research could provide better food and faster analysis of blood tests

A group of researchers from UCPH FOOD have figured out how to use deep learning to speed up the analysis of gas chromatographic data. Because this type of analysis is used in many parts of society, the new method will have a major impact on quality, efficiency and cost when examining various data — from blood tests, to the fermentation of cheese.

7h

Enriched environment in aquaculture enhances the survival of fish from bacterial disease

Cooperative study conducted by University of Jyväskylä and Natural Resources institute Finland (Luke), revealed that enriched rearing of juvenile fish significantly enhances the survival of fish from bacterial infection commonly seen in rearing conditions. That may also improve the post release survival of the fish after stocking into the wild. The study has been published in Journal of Applied Ec

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Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) vol 4, issue 2 publishes

The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a new issue, Volume 4 Issue 2. This issue is a general issue with a wide variety of papers by authors from the US, Asia and Europe. This is also the first issue with new Editor in Chief Jianzeng Dong who will be working as joint Editor in Chief with C Richard Conti.

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Discovery could pave the way for disease-resistant rice crops

Researchers have uncovered an unusual protein activity in rice that can be exploited to give crops an edge in the evolutionary arms race against rice blast disease, a major threat to rice production around the world.

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Conceptual design ready for PLATO telescope simulator

SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research designs and builds a space simulator to test and calibrate eight out of twenty-six cameras for ESA's next exoplanet hunter telescope, PLATO. The conceptual design is now complete. PLATO will be able to spot smaller planets in larger orbits than its predecessors. This could lead to the discovery of Earth-sized planets within the habitable zone. The tele

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Total annihilation for supermassive stars

A renegade star exploding in a distant galaxy has forced astronomers to set aside decades of research and focus on a new breed of supernova that can utterly annihilate its parent star—leaving no remnant behind. The signature event, something astronomers had never witnessed before, may represent the way in which the most massive stars in the Universe, including the first stars, die.

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UPS Has Been Quietly Shipping Packages on Self-Driving Trucks

Self-Delivering Cargo UPS has been quietly using autonomous trucks to deliver cargo between Phoenix, Tucson, and Arizona since May. The delivery company announced that it took a minority stake today in TuSimple, a Chinese San Dieog-based autonomous long-haul trucking startup — and that it’s been testing the company’s trucks with its own cargo. For now, though, a driver will remain behind the whee

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Composition of fossil insect eyes surprises researchers

Eumelanin — a natural pigment found for instance in human eyes — has, for the first time, been identified in the fossilized compound eyes of 54-million-year-old crane-flies. It was previously assumed that melanic screening pigments did not exist in arthropods.

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Dinosaur brains from baby to adult

New research sheds light on how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and what this reveals about its posture.

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Guidelines for treatment of migraine in children and teens

For children and teens with migraine, the pain and symptoms that accompany migraine attacks can be debilitating, resulting in missed school days, absence from social or sporting events, and affected home activities. Now the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Headache Society have developed two guidelines that include recommendations for preventing and treating migraine in childre

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NASA scientists fly over Greenland to track melting ice

The fields of rippling ice 500 feet below the NASA plane give way to the blue-green of water dotted with irregular chunks of bleached-white ice, some the size of battleships, some as tall as 15-story buildings.

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Catching vision issues early could mean more healthy years

Detecting and managing hearing and vision impairments early could prolong healthy living for older adults, according to a new study. Older adults aged 60 years and above with these conditions may have fewer years of life as well as healthy life compared to those with no impairments. Out of the five physical senses, impairment in vision and hearing, especially simultaneously, may have the greatest

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Data assimilation method offers improved hurricane forecasting

Operational models for severe weather forecasting predicted Hurricane Harvey would become a Category 1 hurricane in 2017, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Instead, it became a massive Category 4 just before it made landfall, tying Hurricane Katrina for the costliest hurricane on record.

7h

Age-related illness risk for people living with HIV

The first large-scale review into the health outcomes of people living with HIV has found that this group has an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with ageing.

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Modified lactides promise new implementations in pharmacology and catalysis

The project concerning modification of oligo- and polylactic acids with thiacalix[4]arene derivatives was launched at Kazan Federal University three years ago. The main idea of the study was to improve physical and chemical properties of polymers by introducing macrocyclic rigid structures which determine spatial arrangement of linear chains of lactides in their microenvironment.

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Tweaked CRISPR in neurons gives scientists new power to probe brain diseases

In a paper published August 15 in the journal Neuron, the researchers describe a technique that uses a special version of CRISPR developed at UCSF to systematically alter the activity of genes in human neurons generated from stem cells, the first successful merger of stem cell-derived cell types and CRISPR screening technologies.

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Analysis of sex disparities in ophthalmic research

Sex disparities in ophthalmic research were analyzed in this study that evaluated the representation of female authorships in ophthalmologic journals from 2008 to 2018, with sex assigned according to first name.

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How common is nearsightedness among schoolchildren in Japan?

This study of 1,400 elementary and junior high school students in Tokyo estimated the rate of nearsightedness.

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Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals

Researchers have discovered that the numbers of plant species recorded by botanists have increased in locations where the climate has changed most rapidly, and especially in relatively cold parts of the world.

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New study shows how autism can be measured through a non-verbal marker

A Dartmouth-led research team has identified a non-verbal, neural marker of autism. This marker shows that individuals with autism are slower to dampen neural activity in response to visual signals in the brain. This first-of-its kind marker was found to be independent of intelligence and offers an objective way to potentially diagnose autism in the future. The results are published in Current Bio

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How buildings can cut 80% of their carbon emissions by 2050

Energy use in buildings — from heating and cooling your home to keeping the lights on in the office — is responsible for over one-third of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the United States. Slashing building CO2 emissions 80% by 2050 would therefore contribute significantly to combatting climate change. A new model developed by researchers at two US national laboratories appears Aug. 15 in

7h

Immune cells drive gallstone formation

Sticky meshworks of DNA and proteins extruded by white blood cells called neutrophils act as the glue that binds together calcium and cholesterol crystals during gallstone formation, researchers in Germany report Aug. 15, 2019 in the journal Immunity. Both genetic and pharmacological approaches that inhibited the formation of these so-called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) reduced the format

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Undress, the doctors will see you now

Two old gynaecology professors in Milan decided to racially profile, then rate their misinformed young patients for sexual attractiveness. Their even published this as an evo-psych study in a respected society journal.

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Kids With Autism Might Get Anxiety Because They Can't Predict the Future

(Credit: Dean Drobot/Shutterstock) Children with autism have a hard time interacting with others. Although they may find people fascinating, they struggle with talking and relating to others. Many autistic kids have trouble adapting when routines change and struggle with anxiety. Now researchers find an inability to predict the future may be the source of anxiety in children with autism. The resul

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New Date For 'Late Heavy Bombardment' May Change Life's Timeline on Earth

Asteroids may have stopped pummeling Earth some 600 million years earlier than scientists thought, giving life that much more time to evolve. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) The solar system once experienced a meteor shower of epic proportions: Asteroids whizzed around the inner planets, crashing down in a rain of fire that left their surfaces scarred for billions of years. Astronomers typically call t

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Sticky nets of DNA from immune cells may be to blame for gallstones

Immune cells may help painful gallstones grow by ejecting sticky nets of DNA around the crystals that form in bile – a finding that could lead to new treatments

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Summer briefing: The best of the Briefing

Nature, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02436-4 Readers chose the stories that informed, delighted and moved them most this year, from the first-ever image of a black hole to the ultimate limit of human endurance.

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Methane emissions spike: Is there one main culprit?

The level of methane in the atmosphere has risen dramatically in the last decade—and climate scientists are worried. Although there's still roughly 60 times less of it floating around than carbon dioxide, the gas heats the planet 86 times more intensely than CO₂ over a 20-year period, meaning that it accounts for about a quarter of human-caused global heating we're experiencing today. And because

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Scientist: Merging Your Brain With AI Would Basically Be Suicide

Join The Borg Famed technologist Elon Musk hopes his startup Neuralink will soon help heal people with neurological disorders — and even eventually compete with superintelligent artificial general intelligence , But that’s not such a good idea, says cognitive psychologist Susan Schneider. In fact, she wrote this week in an op-ed for the Financial Times that the project could amount to “suicide fo

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Leopard seals share their suppers

Bad news if you are a penguin

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As face-recognition technology spreads, so do ideas for subverting it

They work because machine vision and human vision are different

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The F.D.A.’s New Cigarette Warnings Are Disturbing. See for Yourself.

Weakened by court battles with major tobacco companies, the F.D.A. has softened its depictions of smoking-related illnesses required for cigarette packs.

7h

Altered behavior and brain activity among people wearing bike helmets

A bike helmet suggests safety — even if the wearer is not sitting on a bike and the helmet cannot fulfill its function.

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Monkey malaria breakthrough offers possible cure for relapsing malaria

A breakthrough in monkey malaria research could help scientists diagnose and treat a relapsing form of human malaria.

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Wiggling it beats a path for a better performance at school

Early childhood researchers have developed a fun rhythm and movement program to support young children's brains.

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More cancer cases among women with sleep apnea

Women with severe sleep apnea appear to be at an elevated risk of getting cancer, a study shows. No causal relationship is demonstrated, but the link between nocturnal hypoxia in women and higher cancer risk is still clear.

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Green chemists find a way to turn cashew nut shells into sunscreen

Team of 'green chemists' are working on techniques to produce useful compounds from wood and other fast growing non-edible plant waste, through a chemical process named xylochemistry.

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Pregnant trans men need better health care

A lack of knowledge among health care providers puts pregnant transgender men at increased risk of depression and difficulty getting medical care, research finds. The study, published in the journal Maturitas , examines health care research on transgender men who become pregnant at or after age 35 to determine their medical and mental health needs. “Despite the increased visibility of transgender

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Young Jupiter was smacked head-on by massive newborn planet

A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a still-forming planet in the early solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago, could explain surprising readings from NASA's Juno spacecraft, according to a study this week in the journal Nature.

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Predictability of parent interaction positively influences child's development

A joint project of the University of Turku's FinnBrain study and the University of California-Irvine (US) investigated the impact of the predictability of parent interaction on a child's development. The study showed that a higher predictability of the parent's interaction signals in infancy was associated with the child's ability to better control and regulate their own actions and emotions.

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Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals

Faster rates of climate change could be increasing the diversity of plant species in many places, according to research from the University of York.

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Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals

Faster rates of climate change could be increasing the diversity of plant species in many places, according to research from the University of York.

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How astronomers chase new worlds in TESS data

As pink liquid oozed around her shoes, astronomer Johanna Teske started to feel sick. She had been looking for new planets with the Planet Finder Spectrograph, an astronomical instrument resembling an industrial-sized refrigerator mounted to the Magellan II telescope. One night in October 2018, a hose leading to the instrument burst, causing pink coolant to spill onto sensitive parts of the instru

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Star Jelly Found in Remote Jungle | Contact

Sarah and Nick head to Mexico to investigate reports of UFO sightings and "star jelly" in a remote jungle. Stream Full Episodes of Contact on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/contact/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Follow us on Instagram: https://www

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Astronomer: Earth’s Atmosphere Could Become the Lens of a Massive Telescope

The conventional wisdom is that if you want to look at more distant objects in the universe, you need a bigger telescope. What if you didn’t have to build one, though? A new analysis claims it may be possible to use the Earth’s atmosphere as a giant lens to observe far-away stars and galaxies on the cheap. The process may even work in reverse to send signals to distant locales. Earth’s atmosphere

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Jupiter’s Core May Have Been Shattered By a Massive Protoplanet Impact

Jupiter high-resolution: Hubble’s WFC3 allows scientists to snap photos of distant objects with unprecedented detail, but things in our own backyard look nicer, too. This full-disc image of Jupiter was captured in 2014, showing the Great Red Spot. Jupiter may have been struck by a huge protoplanet long ago, spreading the heavy material inside the planet’s core across a much wider area inside the

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Study that claims white police no more likely to shoot minorities draws fire

Even with new crowdsourced databases, measuring racial bias remains difficult

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Resolving Cultivation Bottlenecks

Learn more about bioprocessing challenges, how bioreactors and fermentors alleviate those challenges, the basic components of a bioreactor, and how bioreactors monitor and control cell growth.

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Now endangered: The very act that protects wildlife

The Trump administration recently announced a proposal that would gut the Endangered Species Act. The news follows in the wake of a report from the United Nations earlier this year that more than 1 million plants and animals around the world face extinction, some within decades, owing to human development, climate change and other threats. Mark Urban, director of UConn's Center of Biological Risk,

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Attempts to ban swearing are a waste of time: Wherever there is language, people cuss

Attempts to ban swearing in public places, in the workplace and even in the home appear to be on the rise.

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Now endangered: The very act that protects wildlife

The Trump administration recently announced a proposal that would gut the Endangered Species Act. The news follows in the wake of a report from the United Nations earlier this year that more than 1 million plants and animals around the world face extinction, some within decades, owing to human development, climate change and other threats. Mark Urban, director of UConn's Center of Biological Risk,

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Wet winter doesn't end climate change risk to Colorado River

Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading.

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Companies May Limit Lifesaving Climate Data to Clients That Can Pay

Multi-billion dollar “climate services” firms are trying to cash in on the financial fear and insecurity prompted by changing weather — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WiFi-Enabled Smart Ovens Are Preheating Themselves at Night

Self-Baking Ovens Remember Juicero, the $400 juicer that attracted more than a hundred million dollars in venture capital? If so, you probably remember the near-universal ridicule when it came out that you could squeeze the startup’s Keurig-like fruit bags by hand. Eventually, the company had to shut down in disgrace . Now, The Verge is reporting that internet-connected ovens made by the company

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Why are so many languages spoken in some places and so few in others?

People across the world describe their thoughts and emotions, share experiences and spread ideas through the use of thousands of distinct languages. These languages form a fundamental part of our humanity. They determine whom we communicate with and how we express ourselves.

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'Finding Dory' did not increase demand for pet fish, despite viral media stories

If a piece of information is repeated often enough, it will eventually be believed, even if there is no evidence for it. One example of this features the friendly clownfish Nemo and his side-kick Dory, a blue tang fish, who you may know from the animated blockbusters Finding Nemo and Finding Dory.

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'Finding Dory' did not increase demand for pet fish, despite viral media stories

If a piece of information is repeated often enough, it will eventually be believed, even if there is no evidence for it. One example of this features the friendly clownfish Nemo and his side-kick Dory, a blue tang fish, who you may know from the animated blockbusters Finding Nemo and Finding Dory.

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A Movie About Falling in Love With Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen, poet laureate of the American worker , musical essayist of that ineffable feeling of being caught between a rock and a hard place, is very much a heart-on-sleeve artist. To say as much is not to diminish his music, but to explain why he fits so well in the oeuvre of a director like Gurinder Chadha. The British Indian filmmaker behind such cheerful comedies as Bend It Like Beckh

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ATLAS Experiment releases new search for strong supersymmetry

New particles sensitive to the strong interaction might be produced in abundance in the proton-proton collisions generated by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) – provided that they aren't too heavy. These particles could be the partners of gluons and quarks predicted by supersymmetry (SUSY), a proposed extension of the Standard Model of particle physics that would expand its predictive power to incl

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Offshore oil and gas rigs leak more greenhouse gas than expected

A survey of offshore installations extracting oil and natural gas in the North Sea revealed far more leakage of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, than currently estimated by the British government, according to a research team led by scientists from Princeton University.

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Women close the gender gap in television coverage of Olympics

Women in the United States may still have to contend with a shortfall in their lifetime earnings and a glass ceiling in the boardroom, but they've closed the gender gap in at least one arena—the television coverage they receive as Olympic athletes.

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Scientists find a way to create long-life, fast-charging batteries

A group of researchers led by Skoltech Professor Pavel Troshin studied coordination polymers, a class of compounds with scarcely explored applications in metal-ion batteries, and demonstrated their possible future use in energy storage devices with a high charging/discharging rate and stability. The results of their study were published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

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Rapid metabolism change helped mammals to thrive in colder climate

Hedgehogs, rabbits, primates and even giraffe have all benefited in the evolutionary race due to their ability to adapt their metabolism to cope with a changing climate, according to new research.

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Ammonia for fuel cells

Fuel cells are pollution-free power sources that convert chemical energy to electricity with high efficiency and zero emissions. Fuel cell cars, trucks, and buses would allow people to travel long distances with convenient refueling and less of a carbon footprint.

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Rapid metabolism change helped mammals to thrive in colder climate

Hedgehogs, rabbits, primates and even giraffe have all benefited in the evolutionary race due to their ability to adapt their metabolism to cope with a changing climate, according to new research.

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Gamification can give dental and medical education a boost

Introducing gamification to medical and dental education can boost student motivation and lead to better learning outcomes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Using their own mobile devices, students on a histology course took trivia quizzes on the course topics focusing on human cells and tissues. According to students, this promoted interaction and created a positive learn

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Scientists discover new state of matter

A team of physicists has uncovered a new state of matter—a breakthrough that offers promise for increasing storage capabilities in electronic devices and enhancing quantum computing.

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The Professional Triumph of the Firstborns

When corporate boards pick out new CEOs, they scrutinize candidates’ qualifications, studying their performance in previous jobs and vetting their academic credentials. But a recent study suggests they might want to look even further back in the histories of corporate hopefuls: CEOs’ experiences in childhood seem to shape what kind of leaders they grow up to be. The study—co-authored by the Unive

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The Limits of Trump’s White Identity Politics

President Donald Trump and his defenders in the conservative media have identified the real group endangered by rising racial tensions during his presidency. It’s not undocumented immigrants or people of color targeted by his harsh and sometimes openly racist rhetoric. It’s the president and his supporters themselves who are being unfairly accused of racism by critics recoiling from his words. De

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Grøn klimatilpasning kan give flere sygdomme

PLUS. At holde en del af de øgede regnmængder på overfladen vil som regel gavne både folkesundhed og kommunekasse. Men udført forkert kan det virke lige omvendt.

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Why captive breeding will not save the wild tiger

Let's be clear—tigers are perilously close to extinction.

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Dinosaur brains from baby to adult

New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture.

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Green chemists find a way to turn cashew nut shells into sunscreen

A team of international scientists has found an environmentally friendly way of producing potential sunscreens by using cashew nut shells, a waste material.

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Why captive breeding will not save the wild tiger

Let's be clear—tigers are perilously close to extinction.

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Scientists hail promise of first effective Ebola treatments

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Vaccin mot klamydia ger lovande resultat

Varje år får drygt 30 000 svenskar klamydia. För hela världen är siffran över 130 miljoner. Antibiotika hjälper, men flertalet får inga symtom och riskerar att sprida smittan vidare. På lång sikt kan infektionen göra både kvinnor och män sterila. För kvinnor ökar även risken för utomkvedshavandeskap som kan vara livshotande.

8h

One in five awaiting new hip suffering extreme pain, study shows

Almost 20 per cent of people awaiting hip replacements are experiencing extreme pain or discomfort, a study shows.

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The composition of fossil insect eyes surprises researchers

Eumelanin — a natural pigment found for instance in human eyes – has, for the first time, been identified in the fossilized compound eyes of 54-million-year-old crane-flies. It was previously assumed that melanic screening pigments did not exist in arthropods.

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Care less with helmet

A bike helmet suggests safety — even if the wearer is not sitting on a bike and the helmet cannot fulfil its function. These are the findings of psychologists from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany in cooperation with the Canadian University of Victoria.

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To monitor air quality, scientists chase methane plumes in dead of night

As days turn to nights in Broomfield, Colorado, residents may spot a white Chevrolet Tahoe with a pole jutting out its top slowly moving through neighborhoods and down city streets.

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Research: Previously unknown aspect of cell internalization during embryonic development

A team of researchers from Aix Marseille Université and CNRS, the Turing Centre for Living Systems, the University of Chicago and Collège de France has found a previously unknown aspect of cell internalization that occurs during embryonic development in the fruit fly. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster

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New report reveals stark gender disparity in the visual arts

"Representation of Female Artists in Britain During 2018" by Dr. Kate McMillan seeks to identify how the role of gender affects the career of artists.

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Research: Previously unknown aspect of cell internalization during embryonic development

A team of researchers from Aix Marseille Université and CNRS, the Turing Centre for Living Systems, the University of Chicago and Collège de France has found a previously unknown aspect of cell internalization that occurs during embryonic development in the fruit fly. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster

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An autonomous vehicle coupled with a robotic laboratory proves its worth

Every drop of seawater contains thousands of cells that can reveal the diversity of life in our ocean. Using a self-contained robotic laboratory and an autonomous underwater vehicle, MBARI scientists and engineers are developing advanced collection techniques that may one day simplify the jobs of biologists and resource managers.

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Can’t Stop the Nitro Groups

OK, since I’m a medicinal chemist, I have an excellent excuse to avoid the nitro functional group. It’s metabolic trouble, and although there are indeed drugs with nitros on them, they’re exceptions. Some of them, in fact, are antibacterials that rely on that metabolic activation to work, in the same way that there are nitrate esters that rely on hydrolysis of that group to exert their vasodilati

8h

Fiddler crabs produce more carbon dioxide than their marshy homes can handle

Dense burrows release carbon dioxide from the salt marsh soil

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Massive newbie planet smacked young Jupiter head-on

A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a massive newborn planet about 4.5 billion years ago could explain surprising readings from NASA’s Juno spacecraft, according to a new study. Researchers say the new impact scenario can explain Juno’s previously confusing gravitational readings which suggest that Jupiter’s core is less dense and more extended that expected. “This is puzzling,” say

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A hotter planet will make solar power less efficient

Photovoltaic cells are notoriously sensitive to temperature. Now a new study reveals how global warming will reduce output across the globe by 2100.

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These AI Author Avatars Will Read Their Books to You

Author Avatars Audiobooks are a growing market in China, and just like in the U.S., listeners love to hear authors narrate their own books. That can sometimes require a writer to dedicate up to a month to the recording process. But now, Chinese search engine Sogou is using artificial intelligence tech to replicate not only an author’s voice — making it sound like they’re the person narrating an a

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This CAR-T Tag-Team Could Wipe Out HIV for Good

CAR-T may have made its name as the cancer breakthrough of this century, but its roots dig far back to one of humanity’s other terrifying medical nemeses: HIV. This week, Lengtigen, a biotech company based in Gaithersburg, MD, teamed up with researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York to dust off a blue-sky idea inspired by people who naturally fight off HIV. What if there’

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Quantum system virtually cooled to half of its actual temperature

Physicists have developed a quantum simulation method that can "virtually cool" an experimental quantum system to a fraction of its actual temperature. The method could potentially allow access to extremely low-temperature phenomena, such as unusual forms of superconductivity, that have never been observed before. The simulation involves preparing multiple copies of the system's quantum state, int

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Gamification can give dental and medical education a boost

Introducing gamification to medical and dental education can boost student motivation and lead to better learning outcomes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Using their own mobile devices, students on a histology course took trivia quizzes on the course topics focusing on human cells and tissues. According to students, this promoted interaction and created a positive learn

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Green chemists find a way to turn cashew nut shells into sunscreen

Team of 'green chemists' are working on techniques to produce useful compounds from wood and other fast growing non-edible plant waste, through a chemical process named xylochemistry.

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Dinosaur brains from baby to adult

New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture.

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More cancer cases among women with sleep apnea

Women with severe sleep apnea appear to be at an elevated risk of getting cancer, a study shows. No causal relationship is demonstrated, but the link between nocturnal hypoxia in women and higher cancer risk is still clear.

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Forsker i chok: Mikroplast sviner Jordens uberørte steder

Små fragmenter fra gummidæk, maling og lak er dukket op på Svalbard.

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Flying Down East

We were flying away from Washington D.C. again , leaving the Sturm und Drang of our hometown in early August for a point nearly as far east on the U.S. map as one can get. It is “Down East,” in the vernacular of Maine, and the town of Eastport, where residents say the sun first rises over the United States, as does the moon, which gets far too little attention. James Fallows, banking the Steel Ed

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Finnish discovery brings new insight on the functioning of the eye and retinal diseases

Finnish researchers have found cellular components in the epithelial tissue of the eye, which have previously been thought to only be present in electrically active tissues, such as those in nerves and the heart. A study at Tampere University found that these components, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, are involved in the renewal of sensory cells in the adjacent neural tissue, the retina.

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Wiggling it beats a path for a better performance at school

QUT early childhood researchers develop fun rhythm and movement program to support young children's brains.

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Monkey malaria breakthrough offers cure for relapsing malaria

A breakthrough in monkey malaria research by two University of Otago scientists could help scientists diagnose and treat a relapsing form of human malaria.

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Sensory impairment and health expectancy in older adults

Older adults aged 60 years and above with vision and hearing impairments may enjoy fewer years of life as well as healthy life compared to those with no impairments. Detecting and managing these conditions early could prolong the duration of life lived in good health by older adults, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at Duke-NU

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Study reports high-harmonic generation in an epsilon-near-zero material

High-harmonic generation (HHG) is a nonlinear optical phenomenon through which high harmonics of an intense laser beam are generated in a target material, typically a gas. Physicists have been studying HHG in atomic gases for decades, but more recently a team of researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has started investigating this process in solids.

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Europe’s extinct cave bears went into decline just as humans arrived

The population of cave bears in Europe held steady for tens of thousands of years, then crashed after humans showed up – suggesting we helped wipe them out

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Biologists have a problem with homosexuality – they should get over it

Studies that reduce human sexuality to two neat categories – gay and straight – are bad science and stoke societal prejudice, says neuroethologist Andrew Barron

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Sensory impairment and health expectancy in older adults

Older adults aged 60 years and above with vision and hearing impairments may enjoy fewer years of life as well as healthy life compared to those with no impairments. Detecting and managing these conditions early could prolong the duration of life lived in good health by older adults, a new study suggests.

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Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, finds researchers investigating hypoglycemia

For people with diabetes, taking medications and monitoring their blood sugar is part of the rhythm of their daily lives. However, according to new research, more than 20% of adult patients in the US are likely treated too intensively. This has caused thousands of potentially preventable emergency department visits and hospitalizations for hypoglycemia (high blood sugar).

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For a decade, Francis Collins has shielded NIH—while making waves of his own

Collins has led the National Institutes of Health with a firm hand

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More obesity among black men who attend church often

Black men who attend church almost daily are nearly three times more likely to have obesity than those who never (or very rarely) attend, a new study shows. Moreover, the study found health differences across denominations: Among black Americans, Catholics and Presbyterians had lower odds of diabetes than Baptists. The obesity epidemic, like many deleterious outcomes in America, has disproportion

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Controlled hydraulic fracturing sculpts mammalian embryos into shape

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a process most often associated with shale gas extraction, but a team of researchers from Institut Curie at the Sorbonne, and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology at the College de France have concluded that self-fracking is the mechanism that moves an embryo (here, a mouse) from a radially symmetric accumulation of cells to a bilaterally symme

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Controlled hydraulic fracturing sculpts mammalian embryos into shape

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a process most often associated with shale gas extraction, but a team of researchers from Institut Curie at the Sorbonne, and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology at the College de France have concluded that self-fracking is the mechanism that moves an embryo (here, a mouse) from a radially symmetric accumulation of cells to a bilaterally symme

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Study tests resilience of the Salish Sea to climate change impacts

What will the ecology of the Salish Sea look like in the year 2095?

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A new way to hoard resources in nano-sized factories targeted for biotech

The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. This research could someday lead to new medical, industrial or bioenergy applications.

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Uric acid pathologies shorten fly lifespan, highlighting need for screening in humans

Few people get their level of uric acid, a breakdown product of metabolism, measured in their blood. Based on research published in PLOS Genetics, it might be time to rethink that, given that 20 percent of the population have elevated levels of the almost insoluble compound, increasing their risk for gout, kidney stones, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes and early death. While dietary changes

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Drug accelerates blood system's recovery after chemotherapy, radiation

A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem cells after exposure to radiation. If the results can be replicated in humans, the compound could help people recover quicker from chemotherapy, radiation and bone marrow transplants.

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Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, finds researchers investigating hypoglycemia

For people with diabetes, taking medications and monitoring their blood sugar is part of the rhythm of their daily lives. However, according to new research from Mayo Clinic, more than 20% of adult patients in the US are likely treated too intensively. This has caused thousands of potentially preventable emergency department visits and hospitalizations for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

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Minister i samråd om kloakoverløb

En række interessenter kritiserer, at ingen ved, hvor store mængder kloakoverløb der havner i naturen efter kraftige regnskyl. Overløbene har i årevis været et overset miljøproblem, men der er løsninger.

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Ghana wants to grow more cashews. But what about unintended consequences?

Over at least the last decade, one of Ghana's most vital breadbaskets has been converted into cashew nut production to feed export markets. Bono East, Bono and the Ahafo regions—previously known as the Brong Ahafo region—are being transformed by cashew production. This growth has positioned Ghana as one of the largest producers of raw cashew nuts in Africa.

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Ghana wants to grow more cashews. But what about unintended consequences?

Over at least the last decade, one of Ghana's most vital breadbaskets has been converted into cashew nut production to feed export markets. Bono East, Bono and the Ahafo regions—previously known as the Brong Ahafo region—are being transformed by cashew production. This growth has positioned Ghana as one of the largest producers of raw cashew nuts in Africa.

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A brief astronomical history of Saturn's amazing rings

Many dream of what they would do had they a time machine. Some would travel 100 million years back in time, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Not many, though, would think of taking a telescope with them, and if, having done so, observe Saturn and its rings.

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Stressed plants must have iron under control

When land plants' nutrient availability dwindles, they have to respond to this stress. Plant researchers have used available data to examine which genes plants activate in the event of stress and what these mean.

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Router guest networks lack adequate security, experts say

While many organizations and home networks use a host and guest network on the same router hardware to increase security, a new study indicates that routers from well-known manufacturers are vulnerable to cross-router data leaks through a malicious attack on one of the two separated networks.

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Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle

The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate.

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The Psychological Key to Creating the Best Version of You

People struggle to define their real selves, but they don’t have to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI Algorithms Need FDA-Style Drug Trials

Opinion: Algorithms cause permanent side effects on society. They need clinical tests.

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Catch Rockets With a Helicopter? Yep, That's the Plan

SpaceX was the first to bring a booster back from space and use it again. Other companies are now following in its footsteps—kind of.

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Is scruffing the best way to handle an upset cat?

Many of us were taught that "scruffing" a cat—or grabbing the animal by the loose skin at the back of the neck—is not only an effective mode of restraint, but also causes cats to relax. The thought behind this is that kittens relax when their mom carries them by the scruff.

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Is scruffing the best way to handle an upset cat?

Many of us were taught that "scruffing" a cat—or grabbing the animal by the loose skin at the back of the neck—is not only an effective mode of restraint, but also causes cats to relax. The thought behind this is that kittens relax when their mom carries them by the scruff.

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Three new Beta Cephei stars detected

Using NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, astronomers have identified three new Beta Cephei stars. The newly found trio is an important addition to the still short list of known stars of this type. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 7 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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Skoltech scientists found a way to create long-life fast-charging batteries

A group of researchers led by Skoltech Professor Pavel Troshin studied coordination polymers, a class of compounds with scarcely explored applications in metal-ion batteries, and demonstrated their possible future use in energy storage devices with a high charging/discharging rate and stability. The results of their study were published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

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The Psychological Key to Creating the Best Version of You

People struggle to define their real selves, but they don’t have to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What goes up must come down—landing locusts crash on their heads

For many grasshoppers and other insects jumping is a fast and effective way to escape from their predators. In particular desert locusts are known for their powerful jumps. To avoid catapulting into the wrong direction, locusts are able to precisely control the movement of their prominent hind legs. However, what happens when the locusts want to land? Are they also able to precisely control their

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Strong winds fan fierce wildfire in southern France

More than 500 firefighters battled Thursday to contain a fire sweeping through a pine forest in southern France, with officials warning that strong winds could hinder efforts to bring the blaze under control.

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What goes up must come down—landing locusts crash on their heads

For many grasshoppers and other insects jumping is a fast and effective way to escape from their predators. In particular desert locusts are known for their powerful jumps. To avoid catapulting into the wrong direction, locusts are able to precisely control the movement of their prominent hind legs. However, what happens when the locusts want to land? Are they also able to precisely control their

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New 3D interconnection technology for future wearable bioelectronics

Scientists developed stretchable metal composites and 3D printed them on soft substrates at room temperature. By enabling ever-slimmer 3D interconnects, this study can help to revolutionize the physical appearance of smart gadgets, in addition to reinforcing their technical functions.

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Tydlig lukt av mes

Fåglars luktsinne har ansetts som obetydligt men tidigare i år visade en svensk studie att kråkfåglar och trastar kan lukta sig fram till maten. Nu har amerikanska forskare visat att små mesar beaktar doften av en eventuell partner. Två snarlika arter fick känna kroppslukter från olika individer, utan att se eller höra varandra. Fåglarna skiljde ut och föredrog sina artfränder, enligt en studie so

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How synthetic biology can help the environment

Most environmental science is focused on how to turn back the clock, not push it forward, says Ben Bostick, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. "We think about how we can roll back our footprint, and not so much about how can we make our footprint bigger in a positive way," he said. "But there are many examples of synthetic biology that I think actually have a lot of potential in the

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How ancient seafarers and their dogs helped a humble louse conquer the world

This is the story of how a parasitic, skin-chewing insect came to conquer the world.

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How ancient seafarers and their dogs helped a humble louse conquer the world

This is the story of how a parasitic, skin-chewing insect came to conquer the world.

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Biosensor can detect a small presence of salmonella in food in just hours

When food is recalled due to contamination from bacteria such as salmonella, one may wonder how a tainted product ended up on store shelves. New technology being developed at the University of Missouri could give retailers and regulators an earlier warning on dangers in food, improving public health and giving consumers peace of mind.

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Research: Link between increased atmospheric vapor deficit and worldwide loss of vegetation

A large international team of researchers has found evidence of a connection between an increase in the atmospheric vapor deficit and worldwide vegetation loss. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their analysis of climate datasets and the correlation of an increase in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) to loss of vegetation around the world over the past half-c

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Why Jay-Z’s Roc Nation–NFL Deal Is So Puzzling

On Tuesday, the National Football League announced a splashy new venture: a partnership with Roc Nation, the label run by Jay-Z (a.k.a. Shawn Carter). In his new post, The Wall Street Journal reported , Jay-Z will help to directly shape the NFL’s social-justice program and oversee much of the league’s entertainment programming, including the halftime show. (Jay-Z will not be required to perform,

10h

EU:s nya jordbrukspolitik inte hållbar för framtiden

I höst börjar den sista förhandlingsrundan om den jordbrukspolitik som ska gälla i EU efter 2020. Inför överläggningarna har en internationell forskargrupp granskat det förslag som EU-kommissionen lagt fram. Tre frågor har varit i fokus: Är reformförslaget förenligt med FN:s globala hållbarhetsmål, återspeglar det medborgarnas önskemål om ett hållbart jordbruk och erbjuder det en tydlig förbättri

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Researchers move forward in explaining atomic causes of high temperature superconductivity

During the last five years, few scientists have successfully employed very high pressures in order to produce metal hydrides, rich in hydrogen, which become superconductive around -20 degrees Celsius. This so-called transition temperature of metal hydrides is therefore considerably higher than that of other materials, which become superconductive only at -200 degrees Celsius.

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Newly discovered mussels may help refocus conservation efforts in Texas

A team of researchers recently discovered two new freshwater mussel species in Texas, which will likely impact current conservation efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

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Researchers build cannon to test seals in coal mines

Mining and explosives engineering researchers at Missouri S&T began testing concrete seals used to close coal mine tunnels this month by loading a cannon with projectiles, shooting them at the seals and testing their impact. The research could help to improve the design of seals and keep miners safe.

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Newly discovered mussels may help refocus conservation efforts in Texas

A team of researchers recently discovered two new freshwater mussel species in Texas, which will likely impact current conservation efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

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Financial abuse of older adults by family members more common than scams by strangers

A new analysis of resource line calls identifies financial abuse of older adults by family members as more common than scams by strangers.

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Moderate to heavy drinking during pregnancy alters genes in newborns, mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies' DNA, according to a new study.

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Premature mortality is partly predicted by city neighborhood

A new in-depth study called 'The influence of environmental and health indicators on premature mortality: An empirical analysis of the City of Toronto's 140 neighborhoods' assesses the impact of several environmental, health, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics on lifespan. Authors determined that premature mortality in Toronto neighborhoods was predicted by a combination of unhealthy en

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New 3D interconnection technology for future wearable bioelectronics

Scientists developed stretchable metal composites and 3D printed them on soft substrates at room temperature. By enabling ever-slimmer 3D interconnects, this study can help to revolutionize the physical appearance of smart gadgets, in addition to reinforcing their technical functions.

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Families continue to enjoy TV together — but potentially ruin it for each other

TV companies battling to preserve the shared experience of scheduled TV viewing in an era of 24/7 streaming and personalized viewing need more than binge-watching contracts and no-sleeping agreements to keep customers.

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There’s a link between dementia risk and blood pressure

Researchers have discovered a link between better control of high blood pressure than current standards and lower risks of dementia and cognitive impairment. Specifically, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of 449 adults shows that those with high blood pressure who achieved systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg—known as “intensive” blood pressure control—had a small but signific

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New BioIVT research examines potential link between HIV integrase inhibitor drugs and neural tube defects during pregnancy

BioIVT announced that researchers in its Transporter Sciences Group have co-authored a peer-reviewed paper, which investigates the inhibitory effects of a class of HIV drugs known as integrase inhibitors on folate transporter pathways. Previously published studies had appeared to show a correlation between exposure to dolutegravir, and other HIV integrase inhibitor drugs, at conception and an incr

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Drought spells changes for soil microbes

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Kansas State University found that soil drying significantly affected the structure and function of soil microbial communities.

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Researchers dish up digital avocado

It's an ancient fruit, but the avocado has been brought into the new millennium with the publication of its draft genome, which may be the key to improvements in future crops.

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Scientists discover abundance of plastic built up in sea ice collected in the Arctic's Northwest Passage

A research team, led by the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, recently returning from a groundbreaking, 18-day expedition aboard the Swedish Icebreaker Oden has made a discovery related to plastics in the Arctic Ocean. The team, traveling as part of the National Science Foundation funded Northwest Passage Project (NPP) to investigate the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, disco

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Drought spells changes for soil microbes

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Kansas State University found that soil drying significantly affected the structure and function of soil microbial communities.

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Researchers dish up digital avocado

It's an ancient fruit, but the avocado has been brought into the new millennium with the publication of its draft genome, which may be the key to improvements in future crops.

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The Myth of the ‘Underage Woman’

O n Monday, the New York Times columnist James B. Stewart published a remarkable article : a summary of an interview he had conducted last August with Jeffrey Epstein. The two were ostensibly talking together about matters of business—about rumors that Epstein had been doing advisory work for the electric-car company Tesla. But Epstein, in Stewart’s telling, kept guiding the conversation toward t

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Släktingar till våra äldsta förfäder?

Kunskaperna om evolutionen av människosläktet (Homo) har visserligen gjort stora framsteg på sistone, men nu ska vi inte gå ett par miljoner, utan ett par miljarder år tillbaks i tiden, till bildningen av de första cellerna med membranavgränsad cellkärna. Man har länge misstänkt att de uppkommit ur s.k. asgårdarkéer, en slags organismer som fått namn efter de fornnordiska gudarnas hemvist. En unde

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Nanoscale 'glass' bottles could enable targeted drug delivery

Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Shift to renewable electricity a win-win at statewide level

Amid rollbacks of the Clean Power Plan and other environmental regulations at the federal level, several U.S. states, cities, and towns have resolved to take matters into their own hands and implement policies to promote renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. One popular approach, now in effect in 29 states and the District of Columbia, is to set renewable portfolio standards (RPS),

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Average people can discern the beauty of math

Average Americans can assess mathematical arguments for beauty just as they can pieces of art or music, research finds. The beauty they discerned about the math was not one-dimensional: Using nine criteria for beauty—such as elegance, intricacy, universality, etc.—300 people had better-than-chance agreement about the specific ways that four different mathematical proofs were beautiful. This inqui

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Ny dieselbil fra Mercedes er lige så ren for lokalmiljøet som en elbil

Mercedes C220d får i test samme karakter som elbilen Nissan Leaf, når det gælder udledningen af miljøskadelige stoffer til lokalmiljøet.

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Hidden Painting Under da Vinci Masterpiece Revealed with New Imaging

Researchers have uncovered new details of a hidden image buried within Leonardo da Vinci's painting "The Virgin of the Rocks."

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First DJ in space

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano made space (and music) history on 13 August when he broadcast the first DJ music set from orbit, performing to an audience of over 3000 people as part of the BigCityBeats WORLD CLUB DOME Cruise Edition.

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54 million year-old fossil flies yield new insight into the evolution of sight

Fossilised flies that lived 54 million years ago have revealed a surprising twist to the tale of how insects' eyes evolved. These craneflies, unveiled in Nature today, show that insect eyes trap light the same way as human eyes, using the pigment melanin—yet another example of evolution finding similar solutions to similar problems.

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Researchers explore how Antarctic ice sheets will respond to climate change and global sea level rise

A new model, developed by a Victoria University of Wellington Ph.D. student, could help to more accurately predict how Antarctica's ice sheets will respond to a warming world and impact global sea level rise.

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Neutron star ‘glitch’ offers surprising look inside

A neutron star “glitch” is providing astronomers a peak at what happens within the mysterious objects. The “glitch” happens when parts of the neutron star interior start to move outwards and the star begins to spin faster. Researchers studied a neutron star known as the Vela Pulsar. Located in the southern sky, and approximately 1,000 light years from Earth, the Vela Pulsar is known to glitch abo

10h

Kampen om næste års pengekasse på sundhedsområdet starter næste uge

Økonomiforhandlingerne mellem Danske Regioner og regeringen begynder onsdag i næste uge, oplyser Danske Regioner.

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New cloaking devices could hide objects from water waves and currents

Specially designed materials could help prevent boats from rocking too violently in harbors, researchers say.

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Truckers Gain More Freedom, Thanks to Tech’s Watchful Eye

Proposed federal rules would give truckers more leeway in taking breaks—because regulators already know when drivers are driving and not driving.

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Grain-Free Dog Food

This is a great example of the unintended consequences that can result from making decisions based on scientific conjecture and preliminary hypotheses. In this case, the hypothesis was never a good one. If you are a pet owner, you may have noticed the recent trend toward grain-free dog or cat food . The justification for this trend is the notion that since dogs are essentially wolves, and wolves

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Can We Rely on Our Intuition?

As the world becomes more complex, making decisions becomes harder. Is it best to depend on careful analysis or to trust your gut? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Season 3, GLOW Embraces Discomfort

This story contains spoilers for the entire third season of GLOW . GLOW is a feel-good series about feeling bad. Netflix’s dazzling comedy, which follows a women’s wrestling show, has the sheen of an uplifting story about “finding your people”—one in which outcasts forge a makeshift family as they come together to create something new. But GLOW ’s bright spandex shell is wrapped around a bruising

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Secrets and Lies in the School Cafeteria

Late on a fall afternoon, a skeleton crew staffed the cafeteria at New Canaan High School, in Connecticut. Custodial workers cleaned up the day’s remains while one of the cooks prepped for the evening’s athletic banquet. To hear more feature stories, see our full list or get the Audm iPhone app. A woman entered quietly through the back door, the one designated for deliveries and employees. She wo

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America's Largest Asteroid Impact Left a Trail of Destruction Across the Eastern United States

America's largest impact crater wreaked havoc on the land and water. Scientists are just beginning to understand it.

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Can We Rely on Our Intuition?

As the world becomes more complex, making decisions becomes harder. Is it best to depend on careful analysis or to trust your gut? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Cooperative Sponges

Mycale grandis teams up with microbes housed inside it to gather nutrients.

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Can We Rely on Our Intuition?

As the world becomes more complex, making decisions becomes harder. Is it best to depend on careful analysis or to trust your gut? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Retraction Watch readers, we still need your help to be able to continue our work

Dear Retraction Watch readers: Maybe you’re a researcher who likes keeping up with developments in scientific integrity. Maybe you’re a reporter who has found a story idea on the blog. Maybe you’re an ethics instructor who uses the site to find case studies. Or a publisher who uses our blog to screen authors who submit … Continue reading

11h

Valgkampen sluttede og så blev der stille…

Det er utroligt, at den socialdemokratiske regering har holdt ferie i stedet for at følge op på de mange valgløfter, den har givet, skriver tidligere sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).

11h

To Fix the Climate, Tell Better Stories – Issue 75: Story

Here are two sets of statements from far-distant opposites in the climate change debate. The first is from Naomi Klein, who in her book This Changes Everything paints a bleak picture of a global socioeconomic system gone wrong: “There is a direct and compelling relationship between the dominance of the values that are intimately tied to triumphant capitalism and the presence of anti-environment v

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The Great Silence – Issue 75: Story

The humans use Arecibo to look for extraterrestrial intelligence. Their desire to make a connection is so strong that they’ve created an ear capable of hearing across the universe. But I and my fellow parrots are right here. Why aren’t they interested in listening to our voices? We’re a nonhuman species capable of communicating with them. Aren’t we exactly what humans are looking for? The univers

11h

A Novelist Teaches Herself Physics – Issue 75: Story

Helen Clapp, a professor of theoretical physics at MIT, recounted the biggest news of 21st century physics, the detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), an international collaboration of scientists, resulting from the collision of two black holes more than a billion years ago. Einstein posited the existence of gravitational waves in 1915,

11h

Why Did Witch Hunts Go Viral? – Facts So Romantic

If it is in fact accurate to think of witch trial beliefs as viruses, maybe it would be helpful to study their spread the way scientists study the spread of viruses: using an epidemiological model. “The Witch, No. 1” (1892) by Joseph E. Baker / Wikicommons It’s hard to make sense of witch hunts. Many people of early modern Europe and colonial America seemed to have genuinely believed that witches

11h

People Are Starting to Realize How Voice Assistants Actually Work

Clapping to turn on the lights. Paying for food by staring into space . Talking aloud to an empty room. Technology, and especially voice technology, has normalized some bizarre behaviors. It can be hard to remember that summoning Alexa or Siri by speaking to a watch, a blank screen, or a speaker two rooms away was eerie in the beginning, like almost any exercise that requires communicating with t

11h

Do we need to worry about banana blight?

A fungal banana disease that experts describe as a serious threat to production has reached Colombia.

11h

Thousands of Tarantulas Are About to Set Off on Their Annual Migration in Colorado

In southeastern Colorado, male Oklahoma brown tarantulas will soon begin their annual migration to reach the prairies where female spiders live.

11h

Bridging a Binary Universe

Modern physicists continue to enshrine the split between the heavens and the earth perceived by our ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Greta Thunberg: Caroline Lucas reports Arron Banks to Twitter

Brexit campaigner Arron Banks says his tweet about "freak yachting accidents" was a joke.

11h

Fordobling i brug af antiepileptisk medicin bekymrer

Forbruget af antiepileptisk medicin er fordoblet blandt gravide kvinder og kvinder i den fødedygtige alder i løbet af de sidste 15 år, viser nyt studie. Dette sker trods en sparsom viden om nyere epilepsimedicins risikoprofiler. Samtidig er brugen af lægemidlet valproat til fertile kvinder ikke faldet som forventet trods midlets sammenhæng med misdannelser og psykiatriske lidelser hos børnene i t

11h

Lægestafetten: De andre speciallæger tror ikke, vi ved noget om noget som helst

I en ny portrætserie af læger i Danmark møder vi praktiserende læge i Præstø Christian Jensen. Han fortæller, at det, han elsker ved sit speciale, er det tætte forhold mellem læge og patient. Skulle han vælge et andet arbejde, ville det være præst – hvis han altså kunne blive fri for »det ceremonielle halløj«.

11h

Bliver forventningens glæde størst?

Torben Mogensen, dr. med. tror, at den nye regering vil foretage et kasseeftersyn, hvor den finder et stort hul, som den ikke havde forudset, men som desværre betyder, at man ikke har penge til valgløfterne.

11h

Stellar evolution in real time detected in the old star T Ursae Minoris

An international team of astronomers succeeded in detecting signs of aging in the red supergiant star T UMi. The star in the Little Bear constellation is currently going through its last nuclear "hiccups," and will soon end its 1.2 billion year-long life.

11h

Actually, Gender-Neutral Pronouns Can Change a Culture

In 2012 a non-gendered pronoun dropped into Swedish discourse. Today it's widely used—and it's nudging people to see the world a little differently.

11h

At Twitter, It Seems No One Can Hear the Screams

Twitter’s brass at an event this week struggled to balance the platform’s reputation for viral rage with the conversational mecca it wants to become.

11h

The End of the Dan Coats Era

President Donald Trump’s feud with his intelligence agencies has flared ever since he took office already chafing about their conclusion on Russian electoral interference. The latest casualty: Dan Coats, who today leaves his post as director of national intelligence, with his deputy, Sue Gordon, reluctantly following him out the door. Joe Maguire now steps in as acting director, and whoever takes

12h

Who won the war? We did, says everyone

Ask any of the few remaining World War II veterans what they did during the war and you're likely to get a humble answer. But ask the person on the street how important their country's contribution to the war effort was and you'll probably hear something far less modest. A new study suggests people from Germany, Russia, the UK and the US on average all think their own country shouldered more than

12h

Man's X-Ray Reveals His Penis Is Turning to Bone

A man was diagnosed with penile ossification, a rare condition in which bone forms inside the penis.

12h

Alzheimer's Directly Kills Brain Cells That Keep You Awake

Napping could be considered an early symptom of Alzheimer's disease.

12h

Bridging a Binary Universe

Modern physicists continue to enshrine the split between the heavens and the earth perceived by our ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Stressed plants must have iron under control

When land plants' nutrient availability dwindles, they have to respond to this stress. Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have used available data to examine which genes plants activate in the event of stress and what they mean. They published their findings in the journal iScience.

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Kameror leder till ökad trygghet

Södra Sofielund i Malmö är enligt polisen ett särskilt utsatt område. Vid Svedplan har öppen narkotikahandel varit ett stort problem under flera år. Sedan 2015 har polisen därför upp övervakningskameror i området. Kamerorna är ständigt i gång och polisen kan när som helst gå in och se vad som händer på platsen. Anna-Karin Ivert, docent i kriminologi vid Malmö högskola, har tillsammans med doktoran

12h

Antisense Drugs for Huntington's, ALS and Prion Diseases Could Meet the Dire Need for Brain Treatments

A genetic therapy that increases or lowers levels of a protein raises hopes for a treatment for neurological disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Stressed plants must have iron under control

When land plants' nutrient availability dwindles, they have to respond to this stress. Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have used available data to examine which genes plants activate in the event of stress and what they mean. They published their findings in the journal iScience.

12h

Antisense Drugs for Huntington's, ALS and Prion Diseases Could Meet the Dire Need for Brain Treatments

A genetic therapy that increases or lowers levels of a protein raises hopes for a treatment for neurological disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Norsk elfly nødlander i sø få timer efter demo-flyvning med minister

En højtstående embedsmand var eneste passager i Alpha Electro G2-flyet, som blev fløjet af direktøren for Avinor, der driver de norske lufthavne. Begge er uskadte.

12h

Antisense Drugs for Huntington's, ALS and Prion Diseases Could Meet the Dire Need for Brain Treatments

A genetic therapy that increases or lowers levels of a protein raises hopes for a treatment for neurological disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The Worst Thing That Could Happen to Local News—And the Best

From 20 feet away, one designer used to tell me, all newspapers look the same: vertical rectangles with black ink on them. But the announcement earlier this month that the country’s two largest newspaper companies have agreed to merge is a reminder that there are actually two very different ways to look at them. To some, local newspapers are simply cash machines, from which investors can make wit

12h

Kommunal rehabilitering gavner brystkræftramte kvinder

Brystkræftopererede kvinder har positiv effekt af kommunal rehabilitering, viser nyt studie i Københavns Kommune, som ønsker, at forløbene bredes ud til resten af landet. Men der mangler solid evidens på området, siger cheflæge i Kræftens Bekæmpelse.

12h

Sintef-direktør: Drop målet om mere gods på jernbanen

PLUS. Et regeringsudpeget udvalg i Norge vil lade jernbanen konkurrere på lige fod med vejtransport, som står over for en elektrificering og automatisering.

12h

Financial abuse of older adults by family members more common than scams by strangers

Keck School of Medicine of USC analysis of resource line calls identifies financial abuse of older adults by family members as more common than scams by strangers

12h

Moderate to heavy drinking during pregnancy alters genes in newborns, mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies' DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.

12h

Protocells, Bombardment, Martian Erosion and Biofluorescence

What do these things have in common? They’re all important for astrobiology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Google Assistant Can Now Set Timed Reminders For Your Family And Friends

Not all feature updates have to be groundbreaking or big in scope. I'm reminded of this today with Google announcing a nifty new capability coming to Google Assistant. In short order, Google …

12h

Amazon improves face analysis tech, adds fear

Amazon's image recognition software is now able to detect fear. Amazon Web Services announced this as part of an update note about its facial recognition software, Rekognition.

12h

Stronger graphene oxide 'paper' made with weaker units

Want to make a super strong material from nano-scale building blocks? Start with the highest quality building blocks, right?

12h

The first chlamydia vaccine has passed a major test

A clinical trial for a vaccine against the sexually transmitted disease found that the product provoked an immune response.

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Cambridge scientists reverse ageing process in rat brain stem cells

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Surgical Robots are Surging in Popularity. So Will Their Data.

The most popular surgical robot in use today, the da Vinci, is equipped to record all of the movements a surgeon makes during an operation. On its face, that could be a valuable training tool, allowing apprentices to access detailed feedback about their performance. But how much data is too much?

12h

Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle

The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate.

12h

American higher education is in crisis. Here’s a plan to revolutionize it.

Half of all students who begin their higher education journey drop out, 68 percent of Americans never attain a higher education degree, and 73 percent of Americans go into fields unrelated to their higher education degree. Clearly, something is wrong with how we approach higher education. In turn, this approach contributes to societal ills, like unrealized contributions to humanity, unrealized po

12h

Genome-wide association study identifies 14 previously unreported susceptibility loci for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in Japanese

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11596-w Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common pediatric disease leading to spinal deformities. Here, the authors report GWAS followed by genome-wide meta-analysis in up to 79,211 Japanese individuals, identifying 20 genetic loci for AIS, 14 of which were previously unreported, and perform in vitro validati

12h

The structure of a polygamous repressor reveals how phage-inducible chromosomal islands spread in nature

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11504-2 Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) encode the master repressor Stl and after bacteriophage infection Stl interacts with specific phage proteins leading to a derepression of SaPIs. Here the authors provide structural insights into this family of repressors by determining the crystal structures

12h

Separate lanes for adding and reading in the white matter highways of the human brain

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11424-1 Math and reading have shared cognitive components; here authors examined what are shared and dissociated neural substrates of these tasks. They find that dissociated regions and white matter sub-bundles within fascicles support adding and reading, suggesting parallel processing in the brain.

12h

Diversity of oligomerization in Drosophila semaphorins suggests a mechanism of functional fine-tuning

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11683-y Semaphorin-plexin interactions regulate various developmental processes in Drosophila but the structural basis of these signaling events is unclear. Here, the authors present crystal structures of all Drosophila class 1 and 2 semaphorins, and elucidate determinants for their plexin binding specificities.

12h

Cancer-associated mutations in DICER1 RNase IIIa and IIIb domains exert similar effects on miRNA biogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11610-1 DICER is involved in the processing of miRNAs, where the RNase IIIa and IIIb domains are thought to cut the 3p and 5p hairpin arms, respectively. Here, in endometrial cancer, the authors identify an RNase IIIa mutation, which phenocopies mutations in the RNase IIIb domain.

12h

Copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative γ-C(sp3)-H amination of saturated ketones for synthesis of polysubstituted anilines

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11624-9 Functionalising ketones at the γ-position is not a trivial synthetic task. Here, the authors developed a copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative γ-amination of saturated ketones, which can then participate in a 3-component coupling reaction to construct polysubstituted anilines.

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Alternate subunit assembly diversifies the function of a bacterial toxin

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11592-0 Salmonella Typhi produces the typhoid toxin. Here, Fowler et al. show that S. Typhi produces two forms of typhoid toxin that are differentially regulated and display different trafficking properties and different effects when administered to laboratory animals.

12h

The Pint-Size Nation off the English Coast

On Christmas Eve of 1966, Paddy Roy Bates, a retired British army major, drove a small boat with an outboard motor seven miles off the coast of England into the North Sea. He had sneaked out of his house in the middle of the night, inspired with a nutty idea for a perfect gift for his wife, Joan. Using a grappling hook and rope, he clambered onto an abandoned anti-aircraft platform and declared i

12h

Candidates Don’t Need Airtime, They Need Attention

Last week, Senator Bernie Sanders appeared on The Joe Rogan Experience , on which the eponymous host frequently converses with guests for longer than three hours. So it was no surprise when Rogan asked the presidential candidate, “Do you get frustrated by the time constraints of the debates?” “You shouldn’t even call them a debate,” Sanders answered. “What they are is a reality-TV show in which y

12h

Jay-Z Helped the NFL Banish Colin Kaepernick

Yesterday the hip-hop mogul Jay-Z and National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell held a joint media session at the Roc Nation offices in New York to seal a once-implausible partnership that isn’t being received as positively as both parties probably hoped. I assume neither Goodell nor Jay-Z expected to be on the defensive once the NFL announced that it would give Roc Nation, the music mo

12h

Google Assistant Now Lets You Send Reminders to Other People

Hey Google, is this the future of passive-aggressive exchanges at home?

12h

A Strange Radioactive Cloud Likely Came From Russia

In 2017 a plume of radioactive gas wafted across Europe. A study now shows it probably stemmed from a nuclear accident in southern Russia.

12h

Stronger graphene oxide 'paper' made with weaker units

Jiaxing Huang's counterintuitive discovery will help engineers make stronger materials.

13h

Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle

The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate.

13h

How One Billionaire Could Keep Three Countries Hooked on Coal for Decades

The story of a mining project in Australia helps to explain why the world keeps burning coal despite the profound risk it poses to the future.

13h

Morphological and Molecular Changes in Juvenile Normal Human Fibroblasts Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48378-9

13h

A Network of SLC and ABC Transporter and DME Genes Involved in Remote Sensing and Signaling in the Gut-Liver-Kidney Axis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47798-x

13h

Short-term influences of radiation on musculofascial healing in a laparotomy rat model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48201-5

13h

Enhancing the Thermal Stability of Carbon Nanomaterials with DNA

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48449-x

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Comparing the Lifestyle Interventions for Prediabetes: An Integrated Microsimulation and Population Simulation Model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48312-z

13h

Assessing the role of surface glycans of extracellular vesicles on cellular uptake

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48499-1

13h

Amazon launches a new program to donate unsold products from third-party sellers to charity

Amazon will make it easier and more affordable for its third-party sellers to donate of their unwanted excess inventory and returns, rather than having the items sent back or destroyed. The …

13h

LED-lys på vekselstrøm: Nyt halvleder-materiale kan presse LED-prisen ned

Amerikanske forskere har fremstillet LED-dioder med halvledermaterialet galiumnitrid, som ikke behøver at konvertere strømmen fra vekselstrøm til jævnstrøm med en separat silicium-chip. Det kan reducere omkostningerne til både produktion og vedligehold af udendørs LED-belysning.

13h

Fler cancerfall bland kvinnor med svår sömnapné

– Det är rimligt att anta att sömnapné är en riskfaktor för cancer, eller att båda sjukdomarna har gemensamma riskfaktorer som exempelvis övervikt. Däremot är det mindre sannolikt att cancer leder till sömnapné, konstaterar Ludger Grote, professor och överläkare inom sömnmedicin, en av författarna till studien. Forskningen, publicerad i European Respiratory Journal , bygger på analyser av registe

13h

Supraledande tvådimensionellt material upptäckt

Supraledning innebär att elektroner som normalt sätt stöter bort varandra formar så kallade Cooper-par som rör sig utan resistans genom materialet. Teorin av Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) ger en grundläggande förklaring av supraledning men kan inte förutsäga om ett material blir supraledande eller vid vilken övergångstemperatur detta i så fall sker. Eliashberg formulerade senare en precis matem

13h

Author Correction: TGF-β induces miR-100 and miR-125b but blocks let-7a through LIN28B controlling PDAC progression

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11752-2

13h

Climate change or just crazy weather? How improving tools make it easier to tell.

Scientists linked late July’s heat wave in Western Europe to climate change in a matter of days.

13h

Teen video app TikTok is the latest battlefield in the Kashmir conflict

Hindu nationalists are flooding TikTok with videos declaring they plan to go to Kashmir, get married, and ostensibly make the majority-Muslim contested region Hindu.

13h

The Pull of Andrew Yang’s Pessimism

CLEAR LAKE, Iowa—The Best Western Holiday Lodge off Route 18 in northern Iowa feels like the right place to talk about how maybe it’s too late. Accept it, deal with it, Andrew Yang tells me, but try to make the best of it, and maybe we’ll even get somewhere decent along the way. But there’s no “patching the dam,” as he put it. “The world has changed; the world is changing. We can’t put the genie

14h

Author Correction: Overcoming NADPH product inhibition improves D-sorbitol conversion to L-sorbose

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48082-8

14h

Samband hjärt-kärlsjukdom och artros

Forskare vid Lunds universitet har i en epidemiologisk studie undersökt sambanden mellan artros och mortalitet. Det visade sig att risken att dö i hjärt-kärlsjukdom var högre för personer med artros, än för resten av befolkningen.

14h

Drönare och satelliter – den nya tidens drängar

Henrik Stadig sitter vid köksbordet på gården utanför Skara. På bordet framför sig har han slagit upp sin bärbara dator. Han klickar fram en karta över ett område som är täckt av små fyrkanter i olika gröna och gula nyanser. – Det är fältet här utanför, säger han och pekar ut genom fönstret. Ju grönare färg på kartan, desto bättre växer det.

14h

Få koll på vattenläget

För första gången finns nu en samlad och aktuell presentation av miljösituationen i Sveriges sjöar, vattendrag, grundvatten och hav.

14h

Möt Darwin på nätet

På Darwin online finns en stor samling av Charles Darwins skrifter. Det rör sig inte om digital text utan om skannade originalutgåvor, vars bruna sidor är märkta av ålder. Kolla in exempelvis En naturforskares resa omkring jorden, i svensk utgåva från 1872.

14h

Skrämmande teknik – nyckeln till klimatet

Det finns en teknik som kan vara avgörande för att rädda klimatet. Sverige har använt den för att få ner koldioxidutsläppen från elproduktionen till nära noll, likaså Frankrike, och den kanadensiska provinsen Ontario. Förutom att vara i stort sett koldioxidfri smutsar den inte ner luften, och jämfört med kolkraft är mängden avfall minimalt.

14h

Slarvig journalistik hamnar i soptunnan

Sverker Olofsson blev något av en legend under sina 23 år som programledare för konsumentmagasinet Plus i SVT. Med stort patos granskade han massor av produkter. Allt som var trams och lurendrejeri hamnade i hans röda soptunna.

14h

Läsvärt om migration

Migrationspolitiken har i många länder varit föga förankrad i befolkningen om man går till de opinionsmätningar som gjorts, och den rankas samtidigt som den viktigaste frågan inom EU. Detta är bara några av lärdomarna av Joakim Ruists nya bok Global migration. Han är nationalekonom vid Göteborgs universitet, och han gick förra året till tv-historien genom sin långa tystnad vid en Aktuellt-intervju

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En bok för alla som vill skriva begripligt

Under en termin var Magnus Linton husförfattare vid institutionen för idé- och lärdomshistoria vid Uppsala universitet. Hans uppdrag var att hjälpa forskare att skriva friare. Nu har han samlat sina råd och analyser i boken Text & stil. Om konsten att berätta med vetenskap (Natur & Kultur) 1 | Vem riktar sig boken till?

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Så funkar blodgivningen

Klicka för att ladda ner grafiken som pdf.

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