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nyheder2019august16

UMN researcher decodes the brain to help patients with mental illnesses

Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the United States experience mental illness in a given year. Severe mental illnesses cause the brain to have trouble dealing with cognitively effortful states, like focusing attention over long periods of time, discriminating between two things that are difficult to tell apart, and responding quickly to information that is coming in fast.

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Ring-shaped multi-carbon compound cyclocarbon synthesized

A team of researchers from Oxford University and IBM Research has for the first time successfully synthesized the ring-shaped multi-carbon compound cyclocarbon. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the process they used and what they learned about the bonds that hold a cyclocarbon together.

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Sundhedsminister blåstempler kontroversiel beslutning fra foråret

Den nye sundhedsminister viderefører den politiske beslutning om, at en konkret sygdom er fysisk og ikke psykisk. Lægeformand kritiserer kraftigt.

6h

Suit up with a robot to walk and run more easily

A collaborative team reports that they now have developed the first portable exosuit that can assist the extension of the hip joint during both walking and running. The team successfully tested their wearable robot in uneven outdoor environments while wearers walked uphill, and walked and ran at different speeds.

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Should You Get a Scary UV Photo of Your Skin Damage?

A technology grows in popularity among dermatologists, sunscreen brands and artists.

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Bläckfiskars färgsinne

Bläckfiskar har förmåga att anpassa sitt utseende till omgivningen, och i förmågan ingår också att ändra färg efter omgivningens färg. Bläckfiskarna signalerar också till varandra med färgändringar. Därför kom det som en överraskning när man redan för länge sen kom underfund med att de, i motsats till oss, har bara en sorts ljuskänsliga celler i ögonen. Vi människor kan ju skilja på olika färger p

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Forskere: Amazonas træer kan ikke redde os fra klimakrisen – som vi ellers håbede

Klimamodeller går ud fra, at regnskov vil opsuge store mængder CO2 i fremtiden – men måske tager de fejl.

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Wearable sensors detect what's in your sweat

A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat. In a new paper, the team describes a sensor design that can be rapidly manufactured using a "roll-to-roll" processing technique that essentially prints the sensors onto a sheet of plastic like words on a newspaper. The sensors can provide real-time measurements

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Using Wall Street secrets to reduce the cost of cloud infrastructure

Inspired by Wall Street financial theories used to invest in the stock market, MIT and Microsoft researchers developed a 'risk-aware' model that improves the performance of cloud-computing infrastructure used across the globe.

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Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices

Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact.

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Microplastics Are Falling Along With Snow in the Arctic

Frigid terrain on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, where researchers recently documented microplastic pollution in falling snow. (Credit: Sejsejlija/Shutterstock) When it snows in the Arctic, there's another kind of flake drifting down alongside the ice crystals. Tiny bits of degraded plastic, commonly called microplastics, have been found swirling among the snow in otherwise pristine Arctic

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Why Do We Still Believe in 'Lunacy' During a Full Moon?

The full moon has been associated with aberrant behavior for centuries. (Credit: Aron Visuals/Unsplash) It’s sometimes called the "Transylvania effect.” In the dark sky, the clouds shift, revealing the full moon’s eerie silver gleam, and the people on Earth below go mad. It’s a story that gets repeated by doctors, teachers and police officers. The science, though, says something different. Blaming

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This Is the Most Brutal Supernova in Recorded History

Big Boom Scientists believe they witnessed the explosion of the most massive star to ever detonate into a supernova. The European Space Agency scientists spotted the stellar explosion, dubbed SN2016iet, back in 2016 — but it took three years of analysis and follow-up investigations for them to comprehend they had seen, CNN reports . That’s because SN2016iet totally contradicted scientists’ unders

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Solution-processed transparent ferroelectric nylon thin films

Ferroelectricity, a bistable ordering of electrical dipoles in a material, is widely used in sensors, actuators, nonlinear optics, and data storage. Traditional ferroelectrics are ceramic based. Ferroelectric polymers are inexpensive lead-free materials that offer unique features such as the freedom of design enabled by chemistry, the facile solution-based low-temperature processing, and mechanic

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Ferroicity-driven nonlinear photocurrent switching in time-reversal invariant ferroic materials

Nonlinear optical responses to external electromagnetic field, characterized by second- and higher-order susceptibilities, play crucial roles in nonlinear optics and optoelectronics. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to achieve ferroicity-driven nonlinear photocurrent switching in time-reversal invariant multiferroics. It is enabled by the second-order current response to electromagnetic field

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Erasable and recreatable two-dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface of SrTiO3 and a water-dissolvable overlayer

While benefiting greatly from electronics, our society also faces a major problem of electronic waste, which has already caused environmental pollution and adverse human health effects. Therefore, recyclability becomes a must-have feature in future electronics. Here, we demonstrate an erasable and recreatable two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), which can be easily created and patterned by deposi

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Highly stable hybrid perovskite light-emitting diodes based on Dion-Jacobson structure

Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites are emerging as promising materials for next-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the poor stability of these materials has been the main obstacle challenging their application. Here, we performed first-principles calculations, revealing that the molecule dissociation energy of Dion-Jacobson (DJ) structure using 1,4-bis(aminomethyl)benzene

25min

Surface states in bulk single crystal of topological semimetal Co3Sn2S2 toward water oxidation

The band inversion in topological phase matters bring exotic physical properties such as the topologically protected surface states (TSS). They strongly influence the surface electronic structures of the materials and could serve as a good platform to gain insight into the surface reactions. Here we synthesized high-quality bulk single crystals of Co 3 Sn 2 S 2 that naturally hosts the band struc

25min

Regional and correlative sweat analysis using high-throughput microfluidic sensing patches toward decoding sweat

Recent technological advancements in wearable sensors have made it easier to detect sweat components, but our limited understanding of sweat restricts its application. A critical bottleneck for temporal and regional sweat analysis is achieving uniform, high-throughput fabrication of sweat sensor components, including microfluidic chip and sensing electrodes. To overcome this challenge, we introdu

25min

Ultrahigh thermal isolation across heterogeneously layered two-dimensional materials

Heterogeneous integration of nanomaterials has enabled advanced electronics and photonics applications. However, similar progress has been challenging for thermal applications, in part due to shorter wavelengths of heat carriers (phonons) compared to electrons and photons. Here, we demonstrate unusually high thermal isolation across ultrathin heterostructures, achieved by layering atomically thin

25min

Long-range, selective, on-demand suspension interactions: Combining and triggering soluto-inertial beacons

Structures and particles that slowly release solute into solution can attract or repel other particles in suspension via diffusiophoresis, a process we termed "soluto-inertial (SI) interactions." These SI interactions involve "beacons" that establish and sustain nonequilibrium solute fluxes over long durations. Here, we demonstrate the versatility of the SI concept and introduce distinct strategi

25min

Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering reveals diffusive charge order dynamics in La2-xBaxCuO4

Charge order is universal among high- T c cuprates, but its relation to superconductivity is unclear. While static order competes with superconductivity, dynamic order may be favorable and even contribute to Cooper pairing. Using time-resolved resonant soft x-ray scattering at a free-electron laser, we show that the charge order in prototypical La 2– x Ba x CuO 4 exhibits transverse fluctuations

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Renewable Hydrogen Launches Sneak Attack On Natural Gas

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Reading Bostrom's "Superintelligence" — why does he take for granted that a Whole Brain Emulation would produce intelligence?

If one were to perfectly replicate the physical structure of a brain in digital form, it seems to me that the resultant software would not necessarily produce an intelligence. Couldn't such a software conceivably mirror the structure and physical movements of a brain without producing any intelligence or understanding ? In other words, the software would model all of the neurons, dendrites, and a

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Crypto Captcha: Five Anti-Bot Projects For Human Recognition

submitted by /u/rutho1p7 [link] [comments]

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Disney Is Finally Taking On Account Sharers

With help from the cable industry, Disney is trying to stop account sharing on Disney+, Hulu, and ESPN+.

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Study reveals how stress can curb the desire to eat in an animal model

Eating disorder researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have discovered a neurocircuit in mice that, when activated, increased their stress levels while decreasing their desire to eat. Findings appear in Nature Communications.

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Discovery of anti-opioid pathway offers new route to designing safer pain medications

'A study like this makes it clear that even though we may think we know everything there is to know about the opioid response, we're actually just scratching the surface.' — Kirill Martemyanov, PhD, Scripps Research Neuroscience Co-Chair

31min

Researchers build a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices

Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

31min

Chemist Richard Van Duyne Dies

The Northwestern University professor developed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, an invaluable technique for detecting and identifying individual molecules.

39min

Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health

We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush of embarrassment.

43min

Ebola is now largely curable, new clinical trials suggest

The Democratic Republic of Congo has been suffering a major Ebola outbreak since August 2018. In November 2018, a clinical trial began comparing the efficacy of four Ebola treatments. Two of those treatments — based on monoclonal antibodies — are nearly twice as effective as the standard treatment. None In August 2018, an Ebola outbreak struck a conflict zone in the Democratic Republic of Congo's

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Four Lessons From Israel’s Clash With Tlaib and Omar

On Thursday, Representative Rashida Tlaib requested and received permission to enter the state of Israel to visit her 90-year-old grandmother in the West Bank. “This could be my last opportunity to see her,” she wrote, on congressional letterhead. “I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my visit.” Today, Tlaib reversed herself. If she cannot promote he

55min

A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials

Researchers have discovered a cellular process that allows nanomaterial entry into cells.

1h

And Now, the Really Big Coal Plants Begin to Close

Old, small plants were the early retirees, but several of the biggest U.S. coal burners—and CO2 emitters-will be shuttered by year’s end — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Researchers show how probiotics benefit vaginal health

Researchers have shown that three genes from a probiotic Lactobacillus species, used in some commercial probiotic vaginal capsules, are almost certainly involved in mediating adhesion to the vaginal epithelium. This is likely critical to how this species benefits vaginal health.

1h

Cannabis-related poison control calls for Massachusetts kids doubled after medical pot legalized

After medical marijuana became legal in Massachusetts, cannabis-related poison control calls involving the commonwealth's children and teenagers doubled, according to a public health investigation.

1h

Researcher decodes the brain to help patients with mental illnesses

Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the United States experience mental illness in a given year. Severe mental illnesses cause the brain to have trouble dealing with cognitively effortful states, like focusing attention over long periods of time, discriminating between two things that are difficult to tell apart, and responding quickly to information that is coming in fast.

1h

Dating sim meets survival horror: the game that exposes pick-up artists

A dating sim with a difference, artist Angela Washko’s The Game: The Game exposes the manipulative horror of extreme seduction by getting the player to experience it from the woman’s point of view It’s Friday night, and it’s been a long day. You’re a young woman walking into a bar, looking for your friends, when a man you don’t know walks up to you, grabs you, and pulls you close. “SPIN,” he says

1h

Amino acid trio blocks Zika’s ability to replicate

A unique formulation of multiple amino acids inhibits the replication of Zika virus by up to 90% in human and non-human primate cells, according to a new study. The researchers tested a novel formulation of three free-form amino acids (FFAAP)—cystine, glycine, and glutamate, as well as a minute amount of selenium—that was previously known to increase biosynthesis (or production) of glutathione, a

1h

An Innovative Robotic Exosuit Boosts Both Walking and Running

The soft wearable could prove useful for military applications, emergencies and medical rehabilitation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials

Researchers have discovered a cellular process that allows nanomaterial entry into cells.

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An Innovative Robotic Exosuit Boosts Both Walking and Running

The soft wearable could prove useful for military applications, emergencies and medical rehabilitation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The insect that lost its homeland — and its sex life

Nature, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02465-z A pioneering group of stick insects that settled in the United Kingdom lost all of its males, leaving females that reproduce asexually.

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The F.D.A.’s New Cigarette Warnings Are Disturbing. See for Yourself.

Weakened by court battles with major tobacco companies, the F.D.A. has softened its depictions of smoking-related illnesses required for cigarette packs.

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Ebola treatment massively cuts death rate, but it’s no cure

In a recent clinical trial, a triple-antibody cocktail reduced the mortality rate for the deadly Ebola virus by stunning amounts—from 70% to as low as a reported 6% when given to patients early enough, researchers report. Robert Davey vividly remembers the first time he saw the power of the cocktail, called REGN-EB3, which the pharmaceutical company Regeneron makes. He was working at Texas Biomed

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Bluetooth flaw that lets hackers intercept data between devices affects iPhoneX, Pixel 2, and more

Researchers say the vulnerability allows hackers to shorten an encryption key between two Bluetooth devices. From there, hackers can easily brute-force there way into a person's device.

1h

How hospital pharmacists can cut antibiotic use

Research suggests a pharmacist-led approach can cut unneeded antibiotic use—especially at small community hospitals. The study, which included four community hospitals in North Carolina, demonstrated an approach that could expand to the nation’s wider network of small hospitals, where more than half of the US population receives care. “This is a matter of major consequence, because up to 50% of a

1h

Scientists Built Robo-Shorts to Make Walking Easier

Eat My Shorts It’s no P-5000 Powered Work Loader, but these robotic shorts sure look sleek. Even before the Alien franchise, exoskeletons have been conceptualized as a tool to aid humanity. Some researchers believe wearable robotics are poised to appear everywhere from battlefields to Ford’s factory floors — and even your Thanksgiving dinner table . But researchers from Harvard’s Wyss Institute a

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Stacey Abrams Is Playing the Long Game

Stacey Abrams was catapulted into the national spotlight in 2018, when the former state representative came within 54,000 votes of winning the Georgia governor’s race, in an election marred by extensive reports of voter suppression. But despite the wave of calls urging her to parlay that political stardom into a presidential (or Senate) bid, Abrams will instead focus on fighting voter suppression

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Takis: his eye-popping and eerily beautiful magnetic marvels defined an era

Effortlessly bridging the gap between the two cultures, the Greek sculptor – who has died aged 93 – played with invisible forces and put the truths of the cosmos on canvas The Greek sculptor Takis, who has died at 93 during the run of an acclaimed Tate retrospective of his ingenious creations, was half artist and half mad scientist. His works of art look like experiments – because that’s what the

2h

Musikfestivaler laboratorium för en hållbarare livsstil

Nyligen deltog hon och tre kollegor i sociologi på två musikfestivaler i England. Men inte som vilka deltagare som helst. På plats intervjuade de 60 festivaldeltagare lät 250 personer svara på enkäter. – Alla som varit på en festival vet att det hör till att vara lite småskitig i några dagar. Men våra resultat visar något djupare, nämligen hur fort deltagare anpassade sig efter den nya normen, äv

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3D-skrivaren som ska printa en månbas av månstoft

Ross Friel, universitetslektor vid Högskolan i Halmstad, leder en grupp forskare som jobbar med autonom additiv tillverkning (även kallad 3D-printing) som kan användas på månen. – Jordens resurser är begränsade, så vår fortsatta existens kräver att vi blickar bortom vår planet. I rymden finns oändligt med resurser. För att kunna utforska inom, men även utanför, vårt solsystem, behövs en månbas so

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Elon Musk Really, Really Wants to Nuke Mars

Pre-Emptive Strike Elon Musk wants to nuke Mars. Seriously: he really, really wants to drop a big ol’ nuclear bomb on the Red Planet, and he took to Twitter to share his enthusiasm for the idea on Thursday night. Though he never clarified why he wants to run the risk of sending a nuclear warhead to space and detonating it on a planet that scientists are actively investigating for signs of ancient

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Maths and tech specialists need Hippocratic oath, says academic

Exclusive: Hannah Fry says ethical pledge needed in tech fields that will shape future Mathematicians, computer engineers and scientists in related fields should take a Hippocratic oath to protect the public from powerful new technologies under development in laboratories and tech firms, a leading researcher has said. The ethical pledge would commit scientists to think deeply about the possible a

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The Books Briefing: What Happens When You Lose the Place You Come From

In our latest cover story, Vann R. Newkirk II details how 1 million black families were forced off their farmland , a loss that translates to about $3.7 billion to $6.6 billion in today’s dollars. Such stories of displacement—the loss of property, or the loss of a home—are compelling subjects for many authors, who delve into the histories of real and fictional people to reflect on what it means t

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Carbon Pricing Is Not a Fix for Climate Change

The problem: developing countries can't afford to go along — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This newly discovered leech lurked in plain sight for decades

Macrobdella mimicus Macrobdella mimicus was hiding in plain sight. (Ian Cook/) Recoil or rejoice: Scientists discovered a new medicinal leech in North America. The about three-inch-long species, Macrobdella mimicus , had lurked in freshwater bodies and natural history collections for decades—until scientists gave it a closer examination. They described the species for the first time Thursday in t

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Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials

University of Minnesota researchers discovered a cellular process that allows nanomaterial entry into cells.

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Stem Cells for In Vitro Modeling of Neurological Disease

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to examine the potential of stem cells for in vitro modeling of neurological disease.

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Carbon Pricing Is Not a Fix for Climate Change

The problem: developing countries can't afford to go along — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Virgin Galactic Unveils Luxurious Spaceport Lounge

Spaceport Lounge Virgin Galactic revealed on Thursday what its spaceport at its new New Mexico home looks like — and it’s a beautiful vision of the airport lounge’s cosmic successor. The company moved to the Spaceport America facility in May, which it calls “the world’s first purpose built commercial spaceport.” It’s purpose, according to the company, is to “provide a fitting welcome to those new

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Toothless Druid Woman's Face Comes Alive in Wax, Wrinkles and All

A toothless skull was all that researchers had of one of Scotland's oldest known Druids, but now they have something more: a wax re-creation of her face.

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FCC hands out more than $600,000 in penalties over misuse of emergency alert tones

The Federal Communications Commission’s Enforcement Bureau has collectively issued more than $600,000 in fines to a TV broadcaster, cable TV networks and a radio broadcaster for misusing Emergency …

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Twitter to test a new filter for spam and abuse in the Direct Message inbox

Twitter is testing a new way to filter unwanted messages from your Direct Message inbox. Today, Twitter allows users to set their Direct Message inbox as being open to receiving messages from …

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Nya fynd förklarar indirekt reglering av blodsockret

Resultaten som publiceras i tidskriften Nature Communications förklarar något som länge varit en gåta för forskarna. Den hormonfrisättande delen av bukspottkörteln, de Langerhanska öarna, har en unik arkitektur vilken medger en funktionell interaktion mellan olika celltyper. Hormonet somatostatin frisätts från deltacellen och fungerar som en effektiv hämmare av insulinfrisättande betaceller och g

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Satellite view of tropical storm Krosa transition in sea of Japan

Tropical Storm Krosa continued to erode after it moved into the Sea of Japan and satellite data showed it as a ragged and shapeless storm on August 16, 2019.

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Unmet family expectations linked to increased mortality among older Chinese Americans

New Rutgers-led study explores the link between mortality and the discrepancy between older Chinese Americans' expectations versus receipt of filial piety.

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Increase Your NAD+ Levels Naturally With the Basis NAD+ Boosting Supplement

If living a longer healthier life is something that appeals to you, you’re not alone. According to data released by the World Health Organization’s World Report on Ageing and Health , even though people are living longer lives, they’re not necessarily living very well. It turns out, the unfortunate part of living longer is that people are living more sedentary, less robust lives. If making it to

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A Tissue Sample From 1966 Held Traces of Early HIV

In 1966, a 38-year-old man visited a hospital in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. His name, his symptoms, and everything about him beyond his age and gender have been lost to history. But a piece of one of his lymph nodes was collected and preserved. By analyzing it, a team of researchers led by Michael Worobey from the University of Arizona have shown that the man was infected by HI

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Instagram Wants to Fact-Check Your Memes

Zooming Out Facebook wants to expand its fact-checking initiative to Instagram, claiming that it will investigate memes and posts that spread misinformation. But it probably won’t work out as well as the company claims, Wired reports , as the Facebook fact-checking program was already spread too thin. And trying to validate the accuracy and intentions of Instagram posts requires more context and

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Alzheimer’s targets brain cells that help people stay awake

Nerve cells in the brain that are tied to wakefulness are destroyed in people with Alzheimer’s, a finding that may refocus dementia research.

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Does the judicial system give justice to assaulted EMS first responders?

Violence toward first responders is widespread and can face a felony charge in Pennsylvania, yet new research shows that victims often feel they do not receive legal justice. Now a study of victim cases and interviews with district attorneys in Philadelphia offers three solutions to help educate first responders and legal professionals to participate constructively in the legal system intended to

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University of Utah studies safe gun storage practices in military homes

Active-duty US military personnel who have had thoughts of suicide or self-harm are less likely to keep a firearm at home, but also less likely to store a firearm safely.

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Cannabis-related poison control calls for Massachusetts kids doubled after medical pot legalized

After medical marijuana became legal in Massachusetts, cannabis-related poison control calls involving the commonwealth's children and teenagers doubled, according to a public health investigation led by University of Massachusetts Amherst injury prevention researcher Jennifer Whitehill.

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Feasibility of antimicrobial stewardship interventions in community hospitals

This study evaluated whether implementing two antimicrobial stewardship interventions (pharmacist approval to continue antibiotic use after the first dose and pharmacist engagement with the prescriber about antibiotic appropriateness after 72 hours of treatment) were feasible in community hospitals.

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Differences in end-of-life interventions between men, women with advanced dementia

In a study of 27,000 nursing home residents in Canada with advanced dementia who died, researchers describe differences between men and women in receiving burdensome interventions in the last 30 days of life (including invasive procedures and physical restraints) and antibiotic therapy.

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Firearm storage practices among military personnel with suicidal thoughts

This observational study analyzed survey data from 1,652 active-duty military personnel to examine associations between firearm ownership and storage practices with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. More than one-third (35.7%) of military personnel reported having a firearm in or around their homes, with 32.2% indicating their firearms were safely stored unloaded and locked up.

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Doctors help parents talk with their teens about sex, alcohol

Parents and teens find it difficult to talk about sex and alcohol, and this study finds that doctors can help. This randomized clinical trial evaluated whether interventions targeted at parents in primary care pediatric settings might improve communications between parents and their teens about sexual health and alcohol use.

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Cannabis-related poison control cases in kids, teens in Massachusetts around medical marijuana legal

Rates of marijuana exposure cases in children and teens reported to a poison control center increased after Massachusetts legalized medical marijuana in 2012. From 2009 to 2016, there were 218 cannabis-related calls (a small portion of the calls to the poison center) about exposure in children and teens to age 19, with most of the calls coming from health care facilities. Teens ages 15 to 19 were

3h

Facebook is Opening Privacy Check-Up Cafes, for Some Reason

Privacy Cafe In an attempt to convince its two billion users that it truly cares about their privacy — pinky swear — Facebook has decided to open a number of pop-up cafes across the UK to give people a privacy check-up. Because nothing says privacy like a public cafe in the middle of London. Of course, the reason almost nobody knows how to check up on their privacy in the first place is at least

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Something Weird Is Happening to the Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way

Astronomers have been watching the black hole at the center of our galaxy for 20 years, and in May, they saw something they'd never seen before.

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New graphic FDA warnings aim to scare smokers with the consequences of their habit

Some early images of what the new FDA packaging might look like (FDA/) An image of bloody urine isn’t exactly cool. It’s not the kind of thing you’d want to see on your smoke break, right when you’re supposed to be doing something you enjoy. And that’s exactly why the Food and Drug Administration wants to put pictures of it—along with images of heart surgery scars and kids emaciated by secondhand

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Världens yngsta patient avslöjade orsak till ALS-symptom

– Proteinet SOD1 finns i normala fall i alla celler i kroppen, men barnet har nästan enbart symtom från motoriska nervsystemet och särskilt från de delar som finns i hjärnbarken. Detta skulle kunna betyda att motoriska nervsystemet är mer känsligt än övriga nervsystemet och mycket mer känsligt än andra organsystem, säger professor och överläkare Peter M Andersen vid Umeå universitet och Norrlands

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Richard Linklater’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette Is a Gripping Mess

It’s not that hard to figure out where Bernadette went. If you’re walking into Richard Linklater’s new film, Where’d You Go, Bernadette , expecting a Carmen Sandiego–style womanhunt, you might be disappointed. This is no globe-trotting mystery thriller, and Bernadette Fox (played by Cate Blanchett) would not make for a particularly elusive super-thief, despite her penchant for big sunglasses. No,

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Do C-section babies need mum’s microbes? Trials tackle controversial idea

Nature, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02348-3 Swabbing infants with mothers’ vaginal bacteria could affect the children’s health, but critics warn of sparse data and high risk.

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Each cell is a small world: the microbiome of ciliates has been studied

Microbiologists investigated the microbiome of a sessile free-living ciliate Stentor coeruleus. This is one of the first studies addressing prokaryotic communities associated with unicellular eukaryotes through metagenomic analysis.

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Guidelines for managing severe traumatic brain injury continue to evolve

New evidence continues to drive the evolution of guideline recommendations for the medical management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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Researchers demonstrate three-dimensional quantum hall effect for the first time

The quantum Hall effect (QHE), which was previously known for two-dimensional (2D) systems, was predicted to be possible for three-dimensional (3D) systems by Bertrand Halperin in 1987: Now it has been demonstrated.

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Organic dye in zinc oxide interlayer stabilizes and boosts the performance of organic solar cells

Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified organic dye boost

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'Invisible ink' on antique Nile papyrus revealed by multiple methods

Researchers studied a small piece of papyrus that was excavated on the island of Elephantine on the River Nile a little over 100 years ago. The team used serval methods including non-destructive techniques at BESSY II.

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Mikroplaster faller som snö i Arktis

Trots att Arktis är en av få platser på jorden som människan inte exploaterat i särskilt stor grad faller plast från himlen enligt en ny studie.

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IDT launches oPools™ Oligo Pools – the longest, highest fidelity, and ready-to-use custom oligo pools on the market

Long, high-yield oligos with industry-beating low error rate enable researchers to skip amplification steps and start projects immediately

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Researchers demonstrate three-dimensional quantum hall effect for the first time

The quantum Hall effect (QHE), which was previously known for two-dimensional (2D) systems, was predicted to be possible for three-dimensional (3D) systems by Bertrand Halperin in 1987: Now it has been demonstrated.

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Tiny GPS backpacks uncover the secret life of desert bats

A new study using miniaturized satellite-based tags revealed that during drier periods desert bats must fly further and longer to fulfill their nightly needs. According to researchers this signals their struggle in facing dry periods.

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How E. coli knows how to cause the worst possible infection

The discovery could one day let doctors prevent the infection by allowing E. coli to pass harmlessly through the body.

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Organic dye in zinc oxide interlayer stabilizes and boosts the performance of organic solar cells

Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified organic dye boost

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Best of both worlds: Asteroids and massive mergers

Researchers are using the Catalina Sky Survey's near-Earth object telescopes to locate the optical counterparts to gravitational waves triggered by massive mergers.

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Wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

Engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It's all part of a system called BodyNet.

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Numbers count in the genetics of moles and melanomas

Scientists have identified a way to help dermatologists determine a patient's risk of developing melanoma.

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Team finds the ‘signature’ of guts that don’t get C. diff

Researchers have found the molecular signature of a healthy gut microbiome—the kind of bacterial community that keeps Clostridium difficile in check even in the aftermath of antibiotic treatment. Antibiotics can upset the balance of bacteria in the intestinal tract. In some cases, antibiotics can cause the bacterium C. difficile to overgrow wildly, causing diarrhea and, in severe cases, life-thre

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AI Is in Danger of Becoming Too Male—New Research

Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are becoming smarter every day, beating world champions in games like Go , identifying tumors in medical scans better than human radiologists, and increasing the efficiency of electricity-hungry data centers. Some economists are comparing the transformative potential of AI with other “general purpose technologies” such as the steam engine, electricity, or the

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Wild boar genes recreated domestic pigs

Pigs have the genetic makeup of European wild boars, and have mostly lost the original identity they had roughly 10,000 years ago, according to a new study. When researchers sequenced DNA from hundreds of pigs collected from the Middle East and Europe, they found that the first pigs to arrive in Europe and live alongside farmers 8,000 to 10,000 years ago had a definite Middle Eastern genetic hist

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Apple Puts the AR in 'Art' (and in 'Transparent Sky-Being')

The company’s newly launched augmented-reality walks may only be available in five cities, but [AR]T Walk creates wildly ambitious deployments of public art.

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Tiny ‘glass’ bottles deliver drugs at right temp and place

Nanoscale silica bottles filled with medicine and a temperature-sensitive material could one day deliver drugs to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a new study. Researchers devised a way to create silica-based hollow spheres around 200 nanometers in size, each with one small hole in the surface that could allow them to encapsulate a wide range of payloads they c

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Mosquito misery: can environmental changes reduce mosquito-transmitted disease?

In autumn, as the heat becomes a bit more bearable and football season approaches, people begin to spend more time outdoors where they are sure to be plagued by that quintessential Louisiana nuisance—mosquitoes. And, mosquitoes are more than just an annual annoyance. Mosquitoes are common pests and vectors for diseases. But, what if more mosquitoes were actually the solution?

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Tjejer med självskadebeteende påverkas starkare av sociala medier

Irene Perini har tidigare studerat vad som händer i tonåringars hjärnor när de använder sociala medier. Hon fann, med hjälp av bilder tagna i magnetkamera, att en förväntan på bekräftelse sätter igång processer i hjärnan. Framför allt aktiveras de delar av hjärnan som riktar vår uppmärksamhet mot det som är mest relevant för oss, kallat salience network. – När vi lägger ut en bild eller ett inläg

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Space samples link NASA's Apollo 11 and Mars 2020

On July 24, 1969, Apollo 11 command module Columbia splashed down in the Pacific, fulfilling President Kennedy's goal to land a man on the Moon and return him safely to Earth. Among the mission's many firsts was the acquisition and return of the first samples from another celestial body. Findings based on the 47 pounds (21.5 kilograms) of lunar rock and soil rewrote the textbooks on both the Moon

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Scientists Discover Star Dust in Antarctic Snow

Researchers in Antarctica turned up a large amount of a form of iron likely forged in nearby supernova explosions. Antarctica-Snow.jpg Scientists melted down more than 1,000 pounds of snow from Antarctica and found evidence that the leftover pieces of iron that they found were forged outside of our solar system. Image credits: Wayne Morris/ shutterstock Earth Friday, August 16, 2019 – 09:30 Rami

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Even Physics Textbooks Tend to Get Friction Slightly Wrong

No matter what that Intro to Physics book says, you can't calculate the "work done by friction." Nope. Doesn't work. Don't even try it.

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The Smart Prison Initiative Pairing Inmates With Rescue Dogs

Since 2016, Pawsitive Change has transformed the lives of hundreds of violent offenders and helped pets find permanent homes.

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The Friends Who All Cosplay the Same Character

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with three women who cosplay as Natasha Romanova, a.k.a. Black Widow, a Russian spy turned superhero and a member of the Avengers, played by Scarlett Johansson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The fr

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Mississippi river diversions: driving land gain or land loss?

River diversions have not created or maintained land, but resulted in more land loss, according to a new paper in the peer-reviewed science journal Restoration Ecology. LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner and his LSU co-authors Erick Swenson and Michael Layne, and Dr. Yu Mo, University of Maryland, used satellite imagery to study the differences between the percent land before and after a river di

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What you might have missed

From superdeep diamonds and the world’s biggest penguin to an old-meets-new way to measure Arctic ice – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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The Value of Owning Your Businesses Values

Nikolay Storonsky, CEO of the UK’s hottest fintech startup Revolut, has been extremely vocal about his company’s values. “Ninety-five per cent of founders, they will bullshit you,” he told the Financial Times . “I’m not going to do it.” Storonsky says, “I can’t see how work-life balance will help you to build a startup. You are competing with bigger players, with better funded startups; you’re co

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Cannibalism is common in the animal kingdom, but for humans it's the ultimate taboo

Vulnerable spadefoot tadpoles eat their smaller competitors to speed towards toadhood as quickly as possible. Gulls and pelicans are among bird species that eat hatchlings for food or to prevent the spread of disease. In insect species such as the praying mantis or the Australian redback spider, males offer their bodies as a final gift to females after mating.

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Cannibalism is common in the animal kingdom, but for humans it's the ultimate taboo

Vulnerable spadefoot tadpoles eat their smaller competitors to speed towards toadhood as quickly as possible. Gulls and pelicans are among bird species that eat hatchlings for food or to prevent the spread of disease. In insect species such as the praying mantis or the Australian redback spider, males offer their bodies as a final gift to females after mating.

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Arctic sea ice loaded with microplastics

At first glance, it looks like hard candy laced with flecks of fake fruit, or a third grader's art project confected from recycled debris.

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What’s the most polluted city? It’s impossible to really know

Poor on-the-ground monitoring makes it impossible to know which city is the world’s most polluted, according to new research. “I often see rankings of the most polluted city in the world,'” says Randall Martin, professor in the energy, environmental, and chemical engineering department in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. “These rankings are misleading,” he

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Doped photovoltaics

Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A Chinese-German team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified or

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Revealed: How E. coli knows how to cause the worst possible infection

The discovery could one day let doctors prevent the infection by allowing E. coli to pass harmlessly through the body.

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Tiny GPS backpacks uncover the secret life of desert bats

A new study from the University of Helsinki using miniaturized satellite-based tags revealed that during drier periods desert bats must fly further and longer to fulfil their nightly needs. According to researchers this signals their struggle in facing dry periods.

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Accelerating Protein Purification by Using Thermal Unfolding as a Guiding Tool

NanoTemper Technologies invites you to join them for this educational webinar.

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Deinse Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking it. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson / TED)

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Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?

In 2018, an orca made headlines when she carried her dead calf on her back for weeks. Barbara King says this was a display of animal grief and explains how this changes our relationship with animals. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED)

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When human expertise improves the work of machines

Machine learning algorithms can sometimes do a better job with a little help from human expertise, at least in the field of materials science.

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Best of both worlds: Asteroids and massive mergers

The race is on. Since the construction of technology able to detect the ripples in space and time triggered by collisions from massive objects in the universe, astronomers around the world have been searching for the bursts of light that could accompany such collisions, which are thought to be the sources of rare heavy elements.

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The best affordable used motorcycles any beginner can buy

Suzuki's SV650 represents one of the best "bang for your buck" values on today's used motorcycle market. (Motorcyclist/) This story originally published on Motorcyclist . So you've passed your motorcycle training course, you've got your license and some new riding kit; now it's time to find the perfect ride. It's a bike you'll always remember, so better make it a good one. While there are plenty

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Research asks if 'Poldark effect' threatens sense of Cornish identity

A researcher is examining how Cornish people are affected by the rewriting of history and identity in TV programmes like Poldark—and the influx of visitors drawn to the county's scenic filming locations.

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Devastating Banana Fungus Arrives In Colombia, Threatening The Fruit's Future

A fungus that has destroyed banana plantations in Asia is now in Latin America. The disease moves slowly, but there's no cure, and it could mean calamity for the continent's banana industry. (Image credit: Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images)

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These Robots Could One Day Explore Caves on Distant Planets

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The transhumanists who want to live forever

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How far will digital video go?

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How buildings can cut 80% of their carbon emissions by 2050

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U.S. Army discloses ground-launched hypersonic weapon development

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Megastructure Maintenance & Space Janitors

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24 Questions That Show Nukes Are NOT The Answer

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US Installs 736 Megawatts Of New Wind As Pipeline Grows

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Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops

Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. They discovered that producing more of a protein that controls the rate in which electrons flow during photosynthesis, accelerates the whole process.

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Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?

Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research. The study found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and improving harvests.

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New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle

New research used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

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Nytt smärtorgan upptäckt i huden

Smärta orsakar lidande och leder till stora kostnader för samhället. Nästan var femte person har pågående smärta och det finns ett stort behov av att hitta nya smärtstillande läkemedel. Men smärtkänslighet är också nödvändigt för överlevnad och har en skyddande funktion. Det leder till reflexreaktioner som förhindrar vävnadsskada, som exempelvis när man drar undan handen då man känner ett stick f

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Kaspersky Products Leak Everything You Do Online, Straight Through Incognito Mode

Kaspersky Labs has been leaking data from any machine that runs its antivirus products. It broadcasts a unique identifier straight through incognito mode. …

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Treatment for Extreme Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Wins U.S. Government Approval

The three-drug regimen cures 90 percent of people who have the deadliest form of the disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Decoding the scent of a plant

A recent study led by Dr. Radhika Venkatesan has identified that herbivores are capable of decoding the scent of a plant and using these cues to brace up their immunity.

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A laser for penetrating waves

The 'Landau-level laser' is an exciting concept for an unusual radiation source. It has the potential to efficiently generate terahertz waves, which can be used to penetrate materials as well as for future data transmission. So far, however, nearly all attempts to make such a laser have failed. An international team has now taken an important step in the right direction: In the journal Nature Phot

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Researchers demonstrate three-dimensional quantum hall effect for the first time

The quantum Hall effect (QHE), which was previously known for two-dimensional (2D) systems, was predicted to be possible for three-dimensional (3D) systems by Bertrand Halperin in 1987, but the theory was not proven until recently by researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and their research collaborators from around the globe.

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When human expertise improves the work of machines

Machine learning algorithms can sometimes do a better job with a little help from human expertise, at least in the field of materials science.

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Which city is most polluted? No one knows

On any given day, a news story might list a city in India as "most polluted." In another story, a city in China may have held the distinction. Then again, maybe Iran hosts the most polluted city in the world, as a recent news report indicated.

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Toxic pond algae is killing dogs—how to protect your pooch

Your dog bounds heedlessly into a local lake or pond, playfully splashing in the water.

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Toxic pond algae is killing dogs—how to protect your pooch

Your dog bounds heedlessly into a local lake or pond, playfully splashing in the water.

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Lizards from cold climates may face rapid extinctions in next 60 years, study shows

Lizards that produce live young are significantly more likely to be driven to extinction through climate change than those that lay eggs, new research suggests.

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Seismic lines helped butterflies survive Fort McMurray wildfire, study shows

Even as Alberta's fierce wildfire raged in and around Fort McMurray in 2016, plants and butterflies were surviving in narrow strips of forest that remained green and undamaged.

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Lizards from cold climates may face rapid extinctions in next 60 years, study shows

Lizards that produce live young are significantly more likely to be driven to extinction through climate change than those that lay eggs, new research suggests.

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Enhanced tree trimming reduces storm-related power outages, study finds

Enhanced tree trimming reduces the number of power outages during storms by 16 to 48 percent, according to a study from UConn researchers recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Electric Power Systems Research.

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Seismic lines helped butterflies survive Fort McMurray wildfire, study shows

Even as Alberta's fierce wildfire raged in and around Fort McMurray in 2016, plants and butterflies were surviving in narrow strips of forest that remained green and undamaged.

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The Reason Antarctica Is Melting: Shifting Winds, Driven by Global Warming

A new study helps solve the puzzle of why the continent’s western glaciers are melting so fast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hidden 'Jurassic World' of Volcanoes Uncovered in Australia

About 100 volcanoes dating to the Jurassic era were recently discovered buried under the basins of central Australia.

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Sometimes Winning Gets Old

MANCHESTER, N.H.—During a rally in the nation’s first primary state last night, President Donald Trump delivered two hours’ worth of musings on his favorite topics, including, in the order mused: the 2016 election, “fake polls,” the “fake news media,” crowd size, “fake witch hunts,” the success of “Make America Great Again” as a slogan, China tariffs, farmers, “Sleepy Joe” Biden, “Pocahontas,” pe

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South Sudan: Latest images reveal a global hotspot for biodiversity

In 1979 the government of the Democratic Republic of Sudan and the government of Italy began working together to survey the incredible wildlife in the forests of Sudan's Southern National Park in preparation for drawing up what they called a "Master Plan" for protecting the park.

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Lobster fertility under the microscope in Scotland

Marine scientists in Scotland have successfully trialled a new method for investigating the fertility of the European lobster, one of the country's most valuable catches.

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Genetic study suggests humans, not Ice Age, killed off European cave bears

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions across Europe has found evidence that suggests humans were responsible for the extinction of cave bears thousands of years ago, not the climate effects of the last Ice Age. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their mitochondrial DNA study of cave bear remains and what they learned from it.

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South Sudan: Latest images reveal a global hotspot for biodiversity

In 1979 the government of the Democratic Republic of Sudan and the government of Italy began working together to survey the incredible wildlife in the forests of Sudan's Southern National Park in preparation for drawing up what they called a "Master Plan" for protecting the park.

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Image: Hubble's portrait of star's gaseous glow

Although it looks more like an entity seen through a microscope than a telescope, this rounded object, named NGC 2022, is certainly not algae or tiny, blobby jellyfish. Instead, it is a vast orb of gas in space, cast off by an aging star. The star is visible in the orb's center, shining through the gases it formerly held onto for most of its stellar life.

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Student reveals the face of Iron Age female druid

A University of Dundee student has revealed the face of one of Scotland's oldest druids, believed to have been more than 60 years old when she died during the Iron Age.

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Lobster fertility under the microscope in Scotland

Marine scientists in Scotland have successfully trialled a new method for investigating the fertility of the European lobster, one of the country's most valuable catches.

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Studying the excitation spectrum of a trapped dipolar supersolid

Supersolids, solid materials with superfluid properties (i.e., in which a substance can flow with zero viscosity), have recently become the focus of numerous physics studies. Supersolids are paradoxical phases of matter in which two distinct and somewhat antithetical orders coexist, resulting in a material being both crystal and superfluid.

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Genetic study suggests humans, not Ice Age, killed off European cave bears

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions across Europe has found evidence that suggests humans were responsible for the extinction of cave bears thousands of years ago, not the climate effects of the last Ice Age. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their mitochondrial DNA study of cave bear remains and what they learned from it.

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The Reason Antarctica Is Melting: Shifting Winds, Driven by Global Warming

A new study helps solve the puzzle of why the continent’s western glaciers are melting so fast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study describes the Trans-Saharan Seaway in Mali, Africa, 50 to 100 million years ago

Leif Tapanila, Idaho State University geosciences professor and director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History, is a co-author on a scientific paper published this summer in the Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History that describes the Trans-Saharan Seaway in Mali, Africa, and the strange creatures that existed there 50 to 100 million years ago.

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Nuisance neighbors, dangerous dogs: Anti-social behaviors impact quality of life

Nuisance neighbors and problems with out of control/dangerous dogs are the anti-social behaviors which have the largest impact on quality of life, according to new research led by Nottingham Trent University.

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Study describes the Trans-Saharan Seaway in Mali, Africa, 50 to 100 million years ago

Leif Tapanila, Idaho State University geosciences professor and director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History, is a co-author on a scientific paper published this summer in the Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History that describes the Trans-Saharan Seaway in Mali, Africa, and the strange creatures that existed there 50 to 100 million years ago.

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Archaeology at BESSY II

Researchers from the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, Berlin universities and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin studied a small piece of papyrus that was excavated on the island of Elephantine on the River Nile a little over 100 years ago. The team used serval methods including non-destructive techniques at BESSY II. The researchers' work, reported in the Journal of Cultural Heritage, blazes a trail

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Researchers identify protein governing platinum resistant ovarian cancer

Researchers at the GW Cancer Center have identified the protein ERK as an important mechanism behind platinum-resistance in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. The study is published in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Identification of genes responsible for sex-related differences in cancer aggressiveness

An understanding of the molecular basis of differences in the incidence and survival of cancer between men and women may allow the discovery of specific and more effective treatments. The study, published in Science Advances, compares the brain tumours of male and female flies at the molecular level and identifies proteins responsible for the different degree of aggressiveness.

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Numbers count in the genetics of moles and melanomas

University of Queensland scientists have identified a way to help dermatologists determine a patient's risk of developing melanoma.

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Stanford develops wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

Stanford engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It's all part of a system called BodyNet.

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Best of both worlds: Asteroids and massive mergers

University of Arizona researchers are using the Catalina Sky Survey's near-Earth object telescopes to locate the optical counterparts to gravitational waves triggered by massive mergers.

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Improving mental health for older victims of crime

Psychiatric researchers at UCL are working with the Metropolitan Police and local branches of mental health charity Mind, to trial a new intervention aimed at reducing the distressing psychological outcomes, known to be prevalent among older victims of crime.

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For superconductors, discovery comes from disorder

Discovered more than 100 years ago, superconductivity continues to captivate scientists who seek to develop components for highly efficient energy transmission, ultrafast electronics or quantum bits for next-generation computation. However, determining what causes substances to become—or stop being—superconductors remains a central question in finding new candidates for this special class of mater

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Care of horses: Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotters

Damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80% of trotters examined after a race. However, such damage is easily overlooked due to being out of sight.

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Gene regulation behind the choice of the correct receptor for olfaction

Scientists have uncovered the genetics behind two distinct types of olfactory sensory neurons; the so called 'class I olfactory neurons' that has persisted from aquatic to terrestrial animals and the 'class II olfactory neurons' that only terrestrial animals possess.

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Oil and water: better monitoring needed to secure vital groundwater supplies, researchers say

When it comes to groundwater quality, fracking receives much of the public attention but misses most of the picture, according to a new study by hydrogeologists.

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Minimal proteinfabrik upptäckt hos parasit

– För 150 år sedan hotades europeisk silkesindustri av en okänd epidemi som tog död på silkesmaskarna. Louis Pasteur identifierade smittkällan och föreslog åtgärder, vilket räddade silkesproduktionen denna gång. I dag vet man att det var en så kallad mikrosporidieparasit som orsakade epidemin. Varje år orsakar silkesmasksjukdomar inkomstbortfall i kinesisk silkesindustri på mer än 100 miljoner do

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Fungus fights oxygen-sucking water weed

In parts of the South, there are stories about an invasive floating weed, which forms such a dense mass that it enables small animals to walk across water.

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Fungus fights oxygen-sucking water weed

In parts of the South, there are stories about an invasive floating weed, which forms such a dense mass that it enables small animals to walk across water.

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Organic dye in zinc oxide interlayer stabilizes and boosts the performance of organic solar cells

Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A Chinese-German team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified or

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Data confirms growing dead zone in Chesapeake Bay

Maryland scientists have been warning of a growing "dead zone" in the Chesapeake Bay. Now the numbers are in, confirming their dire warnings were correct.

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How the glowing bacteria in squid fight it out

New research with Hawaiian bobtail squid provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of competition among bacteria in a microbiome. Some strains of luminescent bacteria that compete to colonize the light organs of the Hawaiian bobtail squid kill nearby cells of different bacterial strains using the “type VI secretion system (T6SS).” The new research, published in the Journal of Bacteriology ,

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The moon rock that turned out to be from Earth

All is not what it seems in the world of lunar samples.

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Plex Announces New Desktop App, Leaves HTPCs Behind

The media managing and streaming service Plex has rolled out a new app today, and it might mean some painful adjustments for long-time users. Starting today, there’s a new Plex desktop app for both Windows and macOS — this will replace the existing Plex Media Player client. That marks the end of old-fashioned HTPC support for Plex. For the uninitiated, Plex is a media player platform that organiz

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A New Form of Carbon

Here’s today’s weird molecule, for sure. A collaboration between IBM-Zürich and Oxford has reported a new allotrope of carbon, this one an 18-membered ring of alternating triple and single bonds (!) People have been speculating about such structures for years, but they appear to be too reactive to spot easily in the wild. There’s some evidence in the gas phase, but not enough to settle arguments

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Anxiously Seeking the Perfect Anti-Anxiety App

Soon I may be swiping my screen, looking for a newer, better, flashier app, like Tinder for fixing mental anguish. But what if the magic stops working?

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Nintendo Is Taking Down YouTube Archives of Its Music

Though the company has the right to do that, this is a huge bummer for gamers who want to hear their favorite tunes.

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Domino's and the Web are Failing the Disabled

Opinion: A potential Supreme Court case over ordering pizza could exclude 49 million Americans from the 21st century.

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Instagram Now Fact-Checks, but Who Will Do the Checking?

Facebook said it will expand its fact-checking program to Instagram. But the system is already overwhelmed, and may not be able to handle more information.

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Gene regulation behind the choice of the correct receptor for olfaction

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have uncovered the genetics behind two distinct types of olfactory sensory neurons; the so called 'class I olfactory neurons' that has persisted from aquatic to terrestrial animals and the 'class II olfactory neurons' that only terrestrial animals possess.

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Scientists assess reliability of multiple precipitable water vapor datasets in Central Asia

Scientists evaluated multiple satellite and reanalysis precipitable water vapor (PWV) datasets against radiosonde observations in Central Asia. They further constructed a skill-weighted ensemble mean of the reanalysis datasets, based on the different performances of individual datasets.

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Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotters

In a Finnish study, damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80% of trotters examined after a race. However, such damage is easily overlooked due to being out of sight.

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Tiny fluorescent carbon dots could make cancer treatment safer and more effective

A pioneering new technique that could make light-based cancer treatment more effective and safer for patients, while reducing its cost, has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield.

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Simpel teknik åbner for metode til at undgå pigebørn

Japanske forskere har opdaget, at et bestemt stof brugt til herpesbehandling, kan give sædceller med y-kromosomer en fordel under svømmeturen mod ægget.

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The fascinating history of boredom

"I'm bored" is a statement many parents dread hearing during the summer holidays.

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Motorola Moto One Action Brings Welcome Death Knell To Vertical Smartphone Videos

Motorola has a history of delivering Android smartphones that are packed with features, but don't break the bank. The latest entry from the company is the Moto One Action, which reserves its …

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It'll be hard, but we can feed the world with plant protein

A U.N. report released last week found a quarter of the world's carbon emissions come from the food chain, particularly meat farming. This has prompted calls to sharply reduce emissions from agriculture and to feed the world on plant protein.

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Making dragons: a speculative scientific adventure

Nature, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02468-w Helen Pilcher enjoys a father–daughter study speculating how a scaly fire-breather might be bioengineered.

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The ‘net’ that leads to excruciating stones in the belly

Nature, Published online: 15 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02449-z Immune cell extrudes a webbing that can encourage the growth of gallstones, a common and painful malady.

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Ebola Outbreak Spreads to 3rd Province in Eastern Congo

Two new cases were confirmed in South Kivu, according to the Health Ministry.

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A Solar Road Update

Remember the “Solar Freakin’ Roadways?” The idea was to pave roads with solar cells that would produce electricity for the grid. The power could also be used for LEDs that could serve as traffic lights and warning signals, and the power could melt snow and ice to boot. I wrote about this in 2014 and at the time I was not impressed with the arguments that were being made. As many people pointed ou

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Could A.I. detect mass shooters before they strike?

President Donald Trump wants social media companies to develop A.I. that can flag potential mass shooters. Experts agree that artificial intelligence is not advanced enough, nor are current moderating systems up to the task. A majority of Americans support stricter gun laws, but such policies have yet to make headway. None On August 3, a man in El Paso, Texas, shot and killed 22 people and injure

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Was Deadly Explosion Off the Arctic Coast the Result of a Nuclear-Powered Russian Weapon?

An explosion off Russia's Arctic coast has led to speculation that the incident resulted from a failed test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile. Do the details add up?

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Forensics Friday: Is this paper worth reading?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the thirteenth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue re

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Josh Hawley Says Tech Enables 'Some of the Worst of America'

From social media addiction to antitrust regulation, the freshman senator from Missouri wants to take on Big Tech in big ways.

6h

Adobe Fresco for iPad: Price, First Look, Release Date

We dabbled with Adobe’s new drawing app, which aims to be a one-stop shop for aspiring and professional digital artists.

6h

Reality TV Meets Crowdsourced Medicine in Netflix's Diagnosis

The seven-episode show falls somewhere between Dateline-ish daytime television and a nerdy online social experiment.

6h

Gadget Lab Podcast: The Dirty Wars Inside Google

WIRED senior writer Nitasha Tiku dives deep into her September cover story about internal turmoil at Google, the so-called happiest company in tech.

6h

Surprise! Uber and Lyft Do Not Like NYC’s New Ride-Hail Rules

The regulations are particularly less than ideal for the companies because New York is among their largest urban markets.

6h

He Fought for Migrant Kids. Then He Got Rich.

Growing up in Brownsville, Texas, the southernmost city along the U.S.-Mexico border, Juan Sanchez was always immersed in migrant life. He went on to build a career as an advocate, founding what is now the nation’s largest provider of shelter for migrant youth. “Our goal was always to keep families together,” Sanchez says in a new documentary from The Atlantic . But he would stray far from that v

6h

Trump Is Thinking of Buying a Giant Socialist Island

President Donald Trump is interested in buying Greenland, The Wall Street Journal reports . “In meetings, at dinners and in passing conversations, Mr. Trump has asked advisers whether the U.S. can acquire Greenland,” the paper says. And while one source speculated to the Journal that the president might be making a kind of joke—“Since Mr. Trump hadn’t floated the idea at a campaign rally yet, he

6h

How Family Separations Brought Down a Migrant Mogul

AUSTIN, Texas—Juan Sanchez, the founder of America’s largest network of shelters for detained migrant children, greeted his employees at the company’s Thanksgiving potluck last November. “How you doing, brother?” he asked. “ Como estás, mija? ” The employees seemed preoccupied. Their company, Southwest Key, had been in the national spotlight for months. Since the Trump administration began separa

6h

Games Boys Play

I came out to my dad while we were playing Spider-Man 3 on PlayStation 2. People ask me if it was hard—he’s a political conservative and a Christian, and they wonder if I was afraid he would condemn me. I wasn’t. My father is an artist from a family of New York intellectuals. On social issues, he takes a laissez-faire stance: Live and let live, just don’t hurt anyone. I was pretty sure he’d react

6h

Image of the Day: ButterflyNet

Scientists used machine learning to analyze the coevolution of physical traits in butterflies.

6h

‘Mystery’ volcano that cooled the ancient world traced to El Salvador

The 539 C.E. eruption triggered crop failure, famine, and disease

6h

A glimpse into the future: Accelerated computing for accelerated particles

Every proton collision at the Large Hadron Collider is different, but only a few are special. The special collisions generate particles in unusual patterns—possible manifestations of new, rule-breaking physics—or help fill in our incomplete picture of the universe.

6h

Indigenous knowledge offers new approach to help forests adapt to new conditions

When Jaime Yazzie began planning her research for her forestry thesis, her adviser asked her what species of trees she wanted to save. They would use a computer simulation to measure the effects of a warming, drying environment, and she needed to select which trees to preserve.

6h

Indigenous knowledge offers new approach to help forests adapt to new conditions

When Jaime Yazzie began planning her research for her forestry thesis, her adviser asked her what species of trees she wanted to save. They would use a computer simulation to measure the effects of a warming, drying environment, and she needed to select which trees to preserve.

6h

Risk assessment at nanoscale level: A closer look at the mimotope variation analysis

Since January 2018 the EU project PANBioRA is developing a modular system for a comprehensive risk assessment of biomaterials. The instrument will be able to compare different biomaterials and help doctors to choose the best suited material for a patient before implantation. Another function of the system is the risk assessment of new biomaterials (synthesized or obtained by modification of known

6h

Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotting horses

In a Finnish study, damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80 percent of trotters examined after a race. However, such damage is easily overlooked due to being out of sight.

6h

How plants can tell time even without a brain

Anyone who has traveled across multiple time zones and suffered jet lag will understand just how powerful our biological clocks are. In fact, every cell in the human body has its own molecular clock, which is capable of generating a daily rise and fall in the number of many proteins the body produces over a 24-hour cycle. The brain contains a master clock that keeps the rest of the body in sync, u

6h

Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotting horses

In a Finnish study, damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80 percent of trotters examined after a race. However, such damage is easily overlooked due to being out of sight.

6h

How plants can tell time even without a brain

Anyone who has traveled across multiple time zones and suffered jet lag will understand just how powerful our biological clocks are. In fact, every cell in the human body has its own molecular clock, which is capable of generating a daily rise and fall in the number of many proteins the body produces over a 24-hour cycle. The brain contains a master clock that keeps the rest of the body in sync, u

6h

E. coli's secret weapon for causing the worst possible infection

A pair of University of Virginia School of Medicine scientists have revealed how E. coli seeks out the most oxygen-free crevices of your colon to cause the worst infection possible.

6h

Why do different cultures see such similar meanings in the constellations?

Almost every person throughout the existence of humankind has looked up at the night sky and seen more than just a random scattering of light. Constellations of stars have helped us shape our own ongoing narratives and cultures—creating meaning in the sky above that guides us in our life on the ground below.

6h

E. coli's secret weapon for causing the worst possible infection

A pair of University of Virginia School of Medicine scientists have revealed how E. coli seeks out the most oxygen-free crevices of your colon to cause the worst infection possible.

6h

The transhumanists who want to live forever

For a core of longevity true believers, the time to intervene is now.

6h

Racing toward Absolute Zero

A lab at the University of Cambridge is looking for materials that have weird quantum properties at the coldest temperatures possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Busting the myth of the 'white working class'

New research led by University of Leeds academics and UK's leading race equality think tank has highlighted growing racial and ethnic diversity in Northern towns and cities.

7h

Forest study shows how plants adapt to rising carbon dioxide

Studies of the world's tropical forests have pinpointed how much water plants put back into the atmosphere compared to how much carbon they take up, with lower rainfall linked to increased efficiency.

7h

Danskernes yndlingsbanan i fare: Svampeangreb truer Colombias plantager

Panamasygen risikerer at lægge de colombianske bananplantager øde.

7h

Ny forskning kan skaffe bedre fødevarer og hurtigere analyse af fx blodprøver

Forskere fra Institut for Fødevarevidenskab på Københavns Universitet har fundet ud af,…

7h

App allows citizen scientists to contribute to monarch butterfly research

When spotting a butterfly, a common reaction may be to whip out a phone and snap a photo. A team of University of Maine researchers is hoping another response could be to use the phone to log details about areas where butterflies are likely to be found.

7h

App allows citizen scientists to contribute to monarch butterfly research

When spotting a butterfly, a common reaction may be to whip out a phone and snap a photo. A team of University of Maine researchers is hoping another response could be to use the phone to log details about areas where butterflies are likely to be found.

7h

Nya kvinnoideal skapas av kvinnliga influencers

För att ha en karriär som framgångsrik bloggare och influencer behöver du också dela personliga erfarenheter. Kvinnorna har varit tvungna att berätta om sådant som de tidigare tyckt var för privat. I den rörelsen görs personliga trauman till triumfer när de delas och sprids exponentiellt i sociala medier. Magdalena Petersson Mc Intyre har gjort intervjuer med kvinnliga influencers och bloggare. D

7h

Gender roles shape public attitudes about transgender military service, study finds

Attitudes toward transgender people have become increasingly scrutinized during the last few years. But those attitudes intersect with actual policy most visibly in the military.

7h

Expanded ion beams light new way for next-generation electronic devices, energy storage, smart homes

A new type of lens is lighting the way for expanded uses of large ions and building blocks for new materials. The lens may also address one of the fundamental bottlenecks for generating bright ion beams.

7h

How weapons fuel America's mass shootings

Mental illness. Video games. The Internet. These are excuses offered by the U.S. President and his supporters for a scourge of mass killings. But five decades of empirical research by preeminent criminal law expert Professor Franklin Zimring tell a different story: The core of our country's deadly violence is access to weaponry.

7h

Second Life Is Plagued by Security Flaws, Ex-Employee Says

A former infosec director at Linden Lab alleges the company mishandled user data and turned a blind eye to simulated sex acts involving children.

7h

The Bonkers Tech That Detects Lightning 6,000 Miles Away

If lightning strikes near the North Pole, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Yes, because a global sensor network is always listening.

7h

Discovery provides path to pathogen-targeted antibiotics

"Take with food" is a common warning for people using antibiotics, but a discovery announced this week in the scientific journal Nature may create a path to more targeted drugs.

7h

Discovery provides path to pathogen-targeted antibiotics

"Take with food" is a common warning for people using antibiotics, but a discovery announced this week in the scientific journal Nature may create a path to more targeted drugs.

7h

Racing toward Absolute Zero

A lab at the University of Cambridge is looking for materials that have weird quantum properties at the coldest temperatures possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Smart chip kan styra medicin

Forskare vid det tekniska universitetet EPFL i Schweiz har utvecklat en liten elektrisk krets för att kontrollera utsöndringen av medicin som placerats inne i kroppen, till exempel ett smärtstillande preparat efter en operation.

7h

NASA selects proposals to demonstrate smallSat technologies to study interplanetary space

NASA has selected two proposals to demonstrate small satellite technologies to improve science observations in deep space, which could help NASA develop better models to predict space weather events that can affect astronauts and spacecraft.

7h

Catalytic transformation of ethylene

National University of Singapore chemists have developed a catalytic method using visible light for the difunctionalization of ethylene for potential use in the production of fine chemicals.

7h

Robotic toolkit added to NASA's Mars 2020 rover

The bit carousel—a mechanism that will play a key role in the acquisition, containment and eventual return to Earth of humanity's first samples from another planet—has been incorporated into NASA's Mars 2020 rover.

7h

Your Employer May Be Spying on You–and Wasting Its Time

New technologies help companies monitor their workers’ every move. But do those data tell them anything useful? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Your Employer May Be Spying on You–and Wasting Its Time

New technologies help companies monitor their workers’ every move. But do those data tell them anything useful? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

15 studies retracted due to fears they used Chinese prisoners' organs

15 organ transplantation studies by researchers in China have been retracted due to concerns the work may have used organs from executed prisoners

7h

The Mysterious Fate of the World’s Largest Butterfly

Butterflies are rapidly disappearing. Among the rarest is the world's largest butterfly, the Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing of Papua New Guinea, which boasts a wingspan of 14 inches. Yet despite its majesty, virtually nothing is known about its fate, as well as that of many other tropical butterfly populations.

7h

Memory-guided microsaccades

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11711-x Microsaccades are small-amplitude, fixational eye movements that are largely thought to be involuntary. Here, the authors demonstrate that monkeys (and humans) can be easily trained to respond to a remembered target location with a volitional microsaccade, and that a population of superior colliculus neurons i

8h

3D sub-diffraction imaging in a conventional confocal configuration by exploiting super-linear emitters

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11603-0 Super-resolution microscopy is a valuable tool in bioimaging, but often requires complex systems or post-processing. Here, the authors present super-linear excitation-emission (SEE) microscopy, which overcomes these limitations by taking advantage of markers with super-linear dependence between emission and ex

8h

Chemical compass behaviour at microtesla magnetic fields strengthens the radical pair hypothesis of avian magnetoreception

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11655-2 Many animals use the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation, yet the underlying principles are poorly understood. The authors show that a molecular triad acts as a chemical compass in magnetic fields of similar magnitude to that of the Earth, supporting the hypothesis that photo-initiated quantum processes und

8h

Expression of CD20 after viral reactivation renders HIV-reservoir cells susceptible to Rituximab

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11556-4 Here, the authors identify B lymphocyte antigen CD20 as a marker for HIV-infected T cells and provide evidence for the potential use of anti-CD20 antibodies in combination with latency reversing agents for depletion of viral reactivated CD4 T cells in patients on antiretroviral therapy.

8h

Generation of amine dehydrogenases with increased catalytic performance and substrate scope from ε-deaminating L-Lysine dehydrogenase

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11509-x Amine dehydrogenases (AmDHs) catalyse the conversion of ketones into amines. Here, the authors created AmDH variants, the best of which showing a substrate-dependent stereo-switchable selectivity, affording either S- or R-configured amine products with up to >99.9% enantiomeric excess.

8h

On demand delivery and analysis of single molecules on a programmable nanopore-optofluidic device

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11723-7 Nanopore based detection has numerous high impact applications outside of next-generation sequencing. Here the authors use an optofluidic chip to detect individual individual 70S ribosomes in a sample mixed with DNA.

8h

Heterogeneity in respiratory electron transfer and adaptive iron utilization in a bacterial biofilm

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11681-0 Biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis requires high levels of ferric iron. Here, Qin et al. show that iron accumulation requires production of dihydroxybenzoate (a precursor in siderophore biosynthesis), and matrix-associated iron may be acting as extracellular electron acceptor during respiratory electron tr

8h

Single cell transcriptome analysis of developing arcuate nucleus neurons uncovers their key developmental regulators

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11667-y Despite the crucial physiological processes governed by neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), the developmental pathways and regulators for ARC neurons remain understudied. In this study the authors use single cell RNA-seq analyses of mouse embryonic ARC to identify cell type-specific markers for

8h

Resolving Cultivation Bottlenecks: The Bioprocessing Journey

Learn more about bioprocessing challenges, how bioreactors and fermentors alleviate those challenges, the basic components of a bioreactor, and how bioreactors monitor and control cell growth.

8h

A new FDA-approved drug takes aim at a deadly form of tuberculosis

The antibiotic could help tackle extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, which kills tens of thousands each year.

8h

Forsyningsselskaber om kloakrenovering: Vi løser ét problem, men skaber et andet

PLUS. Tætning af kloakker kan give husejere problemer, fordi grundvandet i stedet trænger ind i deres kældre. Lovgivningen forhindrer en effektiv løsning.

8h

99.99% of species go extinct. What is humanity’s future?

The great science fiction writer Isaac Asimov put a terrifying question on humanity's radar: Where will we be 50,000 years from now? Humanity is close to exhausting the known laws of physics; it's the unknown – the unified theory of everything – that could dominate our destiny in the coming millennia. And that destiny is almost certainly tied to space travel. Why? "Extinction is the norm," says M

8h

Amid Biodiversity Crisis, Trump Administration Weakens Endangered Species Act

Under the changes, it will be easier for regulators to delist and “down-list” the some 1,650 species currently protected by the act, it will be harder to take climate change's effects into account, and economic factors will be considered alongside ecological criteria in the categorizing of a species.

8h

I Tried to Tell the World About the MCC. No One Wanted to Listen.

“URGENT,” the emails were marked. Since Jeffrey Epstein’s death at the Metropolitan Correctional Center, at least 20 reporters and shows from a broad cross section of the nation’s major news outlets have reached out for context and comment about the federal penitentiary. I spent a decade trying to get media outlets to pay attention to the MCC, in Lower Manhattan, pleading with journalists for hou

8h

Why It’s Immigrants Who Pack Your Meat

The immigration raid last week at seven poultry plants in rural Mississippi was a perfect symbol of the Trump administration’s racism, lies, hypocrisy, and contempt for the poor. It was also a case study in how an industry with a long history of defying the law has managed to shift the blame and punishment onto workers. Planned for more than a year, the raid involved at least 600 agents from U.S.

8h

Sleater-Kinney Lost Its Chaos Before It Lost Its Drummer

There’s a clear case to be made that the best way to hear music is, simply, to listen. Discard expectations; consume the sound coming from the speaker; note how you feel. The end. Another way is to place it in its context: Learn about its creators, its genre, its lineage, what it’s attempting, what it’s implying. The divide between those two ways of hearing may seem stark—after all, isn’t it pure

8h

Autocratic Leaders Are Filling the Vacuum Left by Trump

Over the past few nightmarish hurricane seasons, climate scientists have sought to draw a fine distinction : No particular hurricane is the result of climate change, they say, but climate change is making storms worse and more frequent. Global warming, it turns out, can serve as a useful metaphor for global affairs. The past week has offered a range of examples of authoritarian nationalism on the

8h

Trump’s Hate Makes the ‘Squad’ Stronger

Who better to personify the opposition party than its official congressional leaders? Tom Daschle. Harry Reid. Chuck Schumer. Nancy Pelosi. Those Democrats have all been targeted by the GOP over the years, much as the Republicans Newt Gingrich, Trent Lott, Paul Ryan, and Mitch McConnell were targeted by Democrats. The “squad” is different. The four Democrats referred to by that nickname—first-ter

8h

Sikkerhedshul i Bluetooth lader hackere følge med i dataoverførsler

Organisationen bag Bluetooth har udsendt en sikkerhedsadvarsel om sagen.

8h

Robotshorts gör löpturen lättare

Shortsen hjälper till att föra benen bakåt vid varje steg och minskar därmed ansträngningen med drygt 9 procent vid gång och 4 procent när man springer enligt forskarnas beräkningar som presenteras i tidskriften Science. Batteriet och motorerna bärs runt midjan och hela paketet väger cirka 5 kilo.

8h

Dansk Energi: DTU-studie af elnettet er ikke repræsentativt

DTU's studie konkluderer, at elnettet uden større investeringer godt kan klare en million elbiler. Men Dansk Energi mener ikke, at studiet kan gælde hele landet.

8h

SVAR PÅ DEBAT: Region Nordjylland sikrer – og ikke skader – lægedækningen

Debatindlægget af Nikolaj Jonstrup indeholder nogle heftige beskyldninger mod regionen, som er ukorrekte, skriver Anne Bukh, koncerndirektør i Region Nordjylland, som efterlyser dokumentation for påstandene.

8h

Amazon’s ‘Marvelous’ Gas Station Discount Causes Chaos in California

Rachel Brosnahan is the marvelous Mrs. Maisel (via Amazon Prime Video) There is nothing wrong with acknowledging success: Amazon Original TV show The …

8h

Podcast: Stigende grundvand og et mystisk manuskript

I podcasten dykker vi ned i en af verdens mærkeligste bøger, Voynich-manuskriptet, hvis kode en britisk forsker mener at have knækket. Du kan også høre om husejeres problemer med stigende grundvand og om de ubetydelige bøder, virksomheder får for at ødelægge naturen.

8h

Tiny magnets could help rid the ocean of harmful microplastics

Tiny magnetic coils can turn microplastics into carbon dioxide and water. The reaction could catch plastic in wastewater streams and stop it entering the ocean

9h

Efter 50 års ventetid har vi nu det første ringformede kulstofmolekyle

C18 er fremstillet og analyseret med en metode, der også kan anvendes til at skabe andre kulstofrige molekyler.

9h

For ‘Diagnosis’ Show, Dr. Lisa Sanders Lets Times Readers Around the World Join in the Detective Work

A Times Magazine columnist credits Sherlock Holmes and global crowdsourcing with helping her solve patients’ mysterious ailments.

9h

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment

Standard optical microscopes can image cells and bacteria but not their nanoscale features which are blurred by a physical effect called diffraction. Now, Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) report in Nature Communications a simple way to bypass diffraction limitations using standard optical imaging tools.

9h

Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops

Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. They discovered that producing more of a protein that controls the rate in which electrons flow during photosynthesis, accelerates the whole process.

9h

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?

Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and impr

9h

Research offers new insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

9h

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis

A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis.

9h

Plex Announces New Desktop App, Leaves HTPCs Behind

Starting today, there's a new Plex desktop app for both Windows and macOS — this will replace the existing Plex Media Player client. That marks the end of …

9h

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9h

Analytical study on ignition time of PMMA exposed to time-decreasing thermal radiation using critical mass flux

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48411-x

9h

Bounded Asymmetry in Road Networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48463-z

9h

Oral Administration of Clinically Relevant Antimalarial Drugs Does Not Modify the Murine Gut Microbiota

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48454-0

9h

Modelling of the tsunami from the December 22, 2018 lateral collapse of Anak Krakatau volcano in the Sunda Straits, Indonesia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48327-6

9h

9h

A Secret Opioid Memo That Could Have Slowed an Epidemic

A new TV Show from The New York Times on FX and Hulu.

9h

Donald Klein, Who Expanded the Psychiatric Toolbox, Dies at 90

His studies of the use of drugs to treat disorders led many to consider him “the father of psychopharmacology.”

9h

9h

BBC expands shortwave radio news coverage in Kashmir

submitted by /u/FarrahKhan123 [link] [comments]

9h

July was Earth's hottest month on record

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

9h

AI Algorithms Need FDA-Style Drug Trials

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

9h

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?

Dr. Antony Dodd, Senior Lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences and senior author of the paper, said: "This proof of concept research suggests that, in future, we might be able to refine the use of some chemicals that are used in agriculture by taking advantage of the biological clock in plants. Approaches of this type, combining biotechnology with precision agriculture, can provide economic

9h

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment

The ability to observe how life works at a nanoscale level is a grand challenge of our time.

9h

Research offers new insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

9h

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis

A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis.

9h

Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops

Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. They discovered that producing more of a protein that controls the rate in which electrons flow during photosynthesis, accelerates the whole process.

9h

The world’s top deepfake artist is wrestling with the monster he created

Hao Li has spent his career perfecting digital trickery. Now he’s working to confront the problem of increasingly seamless off-the-shelf deception.

9h

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?

Dr. Antony Dodd, Senior Lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences and senior author of the paper, said: "This proof of concept research suggests that, in future, we might be able to refine the use of some chemicals that are used in agriculture by taking advantage of the biological clock in plants. Approaches of this type, combining biotechnology with precision agriculture, can provide economic

9h

Research offers new insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

9h

Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops

Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. They discovered that producing more of a protein that controls the rate in which electrons flow during photosynthesis, accelerates the whole process.

9h

Welsh bees threatened by deadly disease American Foulbrood

One keeper says he spotted the signs and had to burn an entire hive to protect others.

9h

Early fish tapeworms found at 'Britain's Pompeii' Must Farm

Prehistoric inhabitants were infected with intestinal worms from eating raw fish, experts say.

9h

Hopp för jordens korallrev

Av drygt 2 500 korallrev i 44 länder klassades 17 procent som fungerande ekosystem. Samtliga ligger i kalla punkter som inte drabbats av det extra varma vatten som väderfenomenet El Niño skapade 2014 -2017.

10h

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10h

Forsvarets Hercules-fly skal undersøges for revner ved vingerne

I USA har 123 af de militære transportfly haft flyveforbud, imens de blev undersøgt for sprækkedannelse, som i værste fald kan medføre, at flyene taber vingerne.

10h

Hver gang jeg møder en ny kollega, skal jeg overveje, om jeg har lyst til at springe ud

Vi er nået langt, men bag regnbueflagets farver gemmer sig en hverdag som læge i klinikken, hvor vi stadig kan stille spørgsmål ved graden af tolerance, skriver en homoseksuel læge.

10h

»Psykiske sygdomme er det mest komplekse, der findes«

Jimmi Nielsen, der i forsommeren blev udnævnt til professor i psykofarmakologi og kompliceret skizofreni ved Københavns Universitet, valgte psykiatrien som karrierevej, fordi det var det mest komplekse område, han overhovedet kunne finde.

10h

Ny kirurgisk metod förbättrar behandlingen av livmodercancer

Med dagens sätt att behandla livmodercancer kan det vara svårt att identifiera patienter som löper större eller mindre risk att ha tumörspridning till lymfkörtlarna. Ibland opereras alla lymfkörtlar bort på patienten, vilket inte alltid är nödvändigt, och kan medföra att patienten drabbas av lymfödem. Men en ny metod kan minska riskerna.

11h

Tilltryckta atomer ger ny kemi

– En häftig sak är att det periodiska systemets struktur ändras vid extrema tryck. De flesta alkalimetaller förvandlas till exempel till övergångsmetaller, säger Martin Rahm, forskare på Chalmers som har arbetat med att ta fram den nya modellen.Det periodiska systemet fyller 150 år i år, och utvecklas alltså fortfarande.

11h

Sygehuschef: Vi har gjort, hvad vi kunne for, at ‘Christina-sagen’ ikke gentager sig

Nye retningslinjer og bedre arbejdsgange har set dagens lys på Nykøbing Falster Sygehus, efter at en sygeplejerske misbrugte huller i systemet. Men sygehuset vil aldrig kunne helgardere sig mod kriminelle handlinger, siger sygehuschef.

11h

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First New Tuberculosis Drug Approved in 50 Years

The US Food and Drug Administration green lights a therapy for an extreme form of multidrug resistant TB.

11h

Fracking has less impact on groundwater than traditional oil and gas production

Conventional oil and gas production methods can affect groundwater much more than fracking, according to hydrogeologists Jennifer McIntosh from the University of Arizona and Grant Ferguson from the University of Saskatchewan.

11h

Global meet to mull trade rules to protect endangered species

Specialists will meet in Geneva from Saturday to try to tighten rules on trade in elephant ivory, rhino horns and other endangered animal and plant species amid growing alarm over accelerating extinctions.

11h

Trans-Brazil trail raises hopes for future of Atlantic Forest

Luiz Pedreira walks with other hikers beneath the Atlantic Forest's thick canopy in Brazil, where an 8,000-kilometre (5,000-mile) trail stretching the full length of the country is being opened up.

11h

Global meet to mull trade rules to protect endangered species

Specialists will meet in Geneva from Saturday to try to tighten rules on trade in elephant ivory, rhino horns and other endangered animal and plant species amid growing alarm over accelerating extinctions.

11h

Critics: Oregon courts disaster with new tsunami-zone law

With sunlight sparkling off surrounding Yaquina Bay, workers are putting up an ocean-studies building, smack in the middle of an area expected to one day be hit by a tsunami.

11h

Gentle giraffes threatened with 'silent extinction'

For most of his life as a Samburu warrior, Lesaiton Lengoloni thought nothing of hunting giraffes, the graceful giants so common a feature of the Kenyan plains where he roamed.

11h

11h

Gay penguins adopt egg after trying to hatch stone

A pair of gay penguins in Germany who tried earnestly to hatch a stone now have the chance to become real parents.

11h

Gentle giraffes threatened with 'silent extinction'

For most of his life as a Samburu warrior, Lesaiton Lengoloni thought nothing of hunting giraffes, the graceful giants so common a feature of the Kenyan plains where he roamed.

11h

Gay penguins adopt egg after trying to hatch stone

A pair of gay penguins in Germany who tried earnestly to hatch a stone now have the chance to become real parents.

11h

12h

Wildlife summit to consider global ban on saiga antelope trade

Protections for saiga antelope, mako sharks and even woolly mammoths will be considered at a conference of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

12h

Systemets sejr – patientens tab

Kirurgien er i frit fald på Aarhus Universitetshospital i Skejby takket være et paradigmeskift i organisation og ledelse. Konsekvensen er længere ventelister, hyppige aflysninger af operationer, risiko for nedsat kvalitet af de kirurgiske indgreb og et uigennemskueligt, diffust ledelsessystem.

12h

DIIS til Forsvaret: Udvis større ansvar – vær mere åben omkring militære cyberangreb

Danmark er for passiv i forhold til at udvise ansvarlig cyberadfærd. Større åbenhed om militære cyberangreb og en anvendelse af cyberredskaber, også til politiske formål, ville øge vores modenhed, anfører DIIS-forsker.

12h

12h

Astro robo-dog packs an AI-enabled "brain" in its 3D-printed head

submitted by /u/ILOVEASIANCUNTS [link] [comments]

12h

The World's Looming Water Crisis

submitted by /u/RoughTourist [link] [comments]

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13h

This Country Is Setting the Bar for Handling Migrants

BOGOTÁ, Colombia—This country is already overwhelmed by the Venezuelan migration. Its schools and hospitals are crowded. Its public spaces are overrun. Yet its right-wing government continues, against mild public opposition, to keep Colombia open as more and more people arrive from across the border, fleeing the collapse of their economy. Most recently, Colombian President Iván Duque extended cit

13h

Oceans of Noise: Episode Two – Science Weekly podcast

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson presents the second instalment of a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019 Contrary to popular belief, and the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life under the ocea

13h

Bronze age meals in the marshes – seasoned with parasitic worms

Human faeces from 900BC Must Farm reveal widespread intestinal worm infection The clutch of homes that stood on stilts in the wetland fens of East Anglia were the envy of the local peasantry 3,000 years ago. But amid the remains of the grand wooden huts and the belongings of the well-to-do residents lurked evidence that all was not well at Must Farm , Britain’s premier bronze age settlement. Firm

13h

Oceans of Noise: Episode Two – Science Weekly podcast

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson presents the second instalment of a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

13h

13h

Dyr kureret for kræft med gen-redigering: Næste skridt er mennesket

Med teknologien crispr har forskere blandt andet kureret dyr for blindhed, muskelsvind og kræft.

13h

Photos of the Week: Sky Glider, Ice Swimmer, Cave Basketball

A “Grand Tattoo” in Berlin, a trapped raccoon in Florida, pole vaulting in Peru, scuffles in Hong Kong, a baby hippo in Taipei, mutton bustin' in Iowa, a Diplodocus in Germany, Eid Al-Adha in Mauritania, a baptism in Mexico, wildfires in Greece, spear fishing in Maine, stars over Wadi Rum, Oktoberfest prep in Berlin, and much more.

13h

14h

Transgender college students four times as likely to experience mental health problems

In the largest mental health survey of gender minority college students, BU researchers Sarah Lipson and Julia Raifman find that transgender, gender-nonconforming, genderqueer, and nonbinary college students face enormous mental health disparities. Their national study across 71 US colleges and universities reinforces the urgent call for schools to improve mental health resources and implement gen

14h

14h

Ny professor vil rydde op i brugen af psykofarmaka

Psykiater Jimmi Nielsen udfordrer psykiateres gængse måde at behandle skizofreni på med antipsykotisk medicin. For langtfra alle har efter hans bedste overbevisning gavn af den. Som ny professor i psykofarmakologi og kompliceret skizofreni ved Københavns Universitet vil han undersøge, om det kan lade sig gøre at identificere og nedtrappe dem i dosis.

14h

Lægen, der startede­ ‘Christina-sagen’, ­efterlyser handling

Overvågning af medicinrum og blodprøver af alle dødsfald på hospitalerne kan være løsninger, som kan være med til at sikre, at vi ikke får en ny ‘Christina-sag’, hvor en sygeplejerske fik 12 års fængsel for fire drabsforsøg på patienter. Det mener tidligere overlæge på sygehuset i Nykøbing Falster, Niels Lundén.

14h

Styrelse: Øget overvågning vil mistænkeliggøre alle ansatte

Øget overvågning af personale er ikke en løsning, når sygehuse skal sikre, at den såkaldte ‘Christina-sag’ ikke gentager sig. Det vil mistænkeliggøre alle sundhedsfaglige, mener sektionsleder i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.

14h

“Neurorights” and Why You Need Them

Most of us, especially those with an interest in technology, are fascinated by all that AI (Artificial Intelligence) and neurotechnologies are achieving. We use it on a daily basis, more than we even realize. For instance, I use Google’s AI-powered predictions pretty much every day to figure out how I can get to work in […]

14h

Lovgivning bremser effektiv indsats mod stigende grundvand

PLUS. Flere steder medfører et stigende grundvandsspejl, at vand trænger ind i ellers tørre kældre og omdanner haver og marker til sump. Byen Sunds tester nye, men ulovlige, løsninger.

15h

Last month was Earth's warmest July on record — and by most measures the hottest month, period.

Most of our planet baked in July — earning the title for hottest month on record, according to two analyses, and in a tie in a third. (Source: NASA GISTEMP) Two analyses out today show that in July, Earth endured its hottest month on record. A third analysis shows last month in a tie with August 2016 for the dubious title of Earth's hottest month in records dating back to the 1880s. Also out today

16h

Early fish tapeworms found at 'Britain's Pompeii' Must Farm

Prehistoric inhabitants were infected with intestinal worms from eating raw fish, experts say.

16h

Your annual checkup could soon include screening for illicit drug use

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which develops guidelines for health screening tests, is recommending that physicians also screen for illicit drug use in patients over the age of 18. (Pixabay/) Somewhere in the flurry of tests and questions at an annual primary care visit, doctors typically ask about a patient’s alcohol and cigarette use—answers to those questions help inform ph

16h

16h

Rejuvenating brain stem cells may hold key to future MS treatments

Scientists have found a way to rejuvenate brain stem cells in rats. The finding offers clues on how to restore lost brain function in diseases such as MS.

16h

'Silent' strokes common after surgery, linked to cognitive decline

The study found that 'silent' covert strokes are actually more common than overt strokes in people aged 65 or older who have surgery.

16h

Genetic redundancy aids competition among bacteria in symbiosis with squid

The molecular mechanism used by many bacteria to kill neighboring cells has redundancy built into its genetic makeup, which could allow for the mechanism to be expressed in different environments.

16h

Non-invasive electrical stimulation alters blood flow in brain tumors

Scientists demonstrated that applying low-intensity electrical stimulation to the brains of patients with tumors resulted in decreased blood flow within tumors while leaving the rest of the brain unchanged. Although further study is needed, the findings suggest that a series of such treatments could modify tumor growth and progression.

16h

The FDA Is Literally Warning People Not to Drink Bleach Now

If a cure sounds too good to be true, it is.

16h

Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites

'Coprolites' from the Must Farm archaeological excavation in East Anglia, UK, shows the prehistoric inhabitants were infected by parasitic worms that can be spread by eating raw fish, frogs and shellfish.

16h

Tiny lensless endoscope captures 3D images of objects smaller than a cell

Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3D images of objects smaller than a single cell. Without a lens or any optical, electrical or mechanical components, the tip of the endoscope measures just 200 microns across, about the width of a few human hairs twisted together.

16h

Renewable energy can generate billions of dollars in health benefits

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

16h

University of Findlay researchers discover new drug to treat brain cancer

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16h

16h

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16h

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16h

Death of internal combustion: 1000 kilometers EV range

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

16h

Scientists who leave research to pursue other careers in science are still scientists [Letters (Online Only)]

In their study, Milojević et al. (1) set out to examine the relationships between number of publications by (primarily academic) research scientists, whether those scientists were lead or supporting authors, and how long they remained in their research career. The authors found trends between how productive (measured by number of…

17h

Reply to Hanlon: Transitions in science careers [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Hanlon for his comments on our paper and appreciate his summary of our findings (1). We recognize the concerns raised regarding both research and non-research roles in science. For example, the National Science Foundation reports various estimates of the science labor force: about 6 million in “science and…

17h

Short-chain diamines are the physiological substrates of PACE family efflux pumps [Microbiology]

Acinetobacter baumannii has rapidly emerged as a major cause of gram-negative hospital infections worldwide. A. baumannii encodes for the transport protein AceI, which confers resistance to chlorhexidine, a widely used antiseptic. AceI is also the prototype for the recently discovered proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins that…

17h

Neural networks-based variationally enhanced sampling [Chemistry]

Sampling complex free-energy surfaces is one of the main challenges of modern atomistic simulation methods. The presence of kinetic bottlenecks in such surfaces often renders a direct approach useless. A popular strategy is to identify a small number of key collective variables and to introduce a bias potential that is…

17h

Histone H4 induces platelet ballooning and microparticle release during trauma hemorrhage [Medical Sciences]

Trauma hemorrhage is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Platelets are fundamental to primary hemostasis, but become profoundly dysfunctional in critically injured patients by an unknown mechanism, contributing to an acute coagulopathy which exacerbates bleeding and increases mortality. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism…

17h

Addressing cellular heterogeneity in tumor and circulation for refined prognostication [Medical Sciences]

Despite pronounced genomic and transcriptomic heterogeneity in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) not only between tumors, but also within a tumor, validation of clinically relevant gene signatures for prognostication has relied upon single-tissue samples, including 2 commercially available multigene tests (MGTs). Here we report an unanticipated impact of intratumor heterogeneity (ITH)…

17h

CPEB3 inhibits translation of mRNA targets by localizing them to P bodies [Neuroscience]

Protein synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of long-term memory-related synaptic plasticity. The cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 3 (CPEB3) regulates the translation of several mRNAs important for long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. In previous studies, we found that the oligomerization and activity of CPEB3 are controlled by small ubiquitin-like…

17h

Nucleosome positions alone can be used to predict domains in yeast chromosomes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We use molecular dynamics simulations based on publicly available micrococcal nuclease sequencing data for nucleosome positions to predict the 3D structure of chromatin in the yeast genome. Our main aim is to shed light on the mechanism underlying the formation of chromosomal interaction domains, chromosome regions of around 0.5 to…

17h

Structure and dynamics of G protein-coupled receptor-bound ghrelin reveal the critical role of the octanoyl chain [Pharmacology]

Ghrelin plays a central role in controlling major biological processes. As for other G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) peptide agonists, the structure and dynamics of ghrelin bound to its receptor remain obscure. Using a combination of solution-state NMR and molecular modeling, we demonstrate that binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor…

17h

Cell phenotypic plasticity requires autophagic flux driven by YAP/TAZ mechanotransduction [Cell Biology]

Autophagy, besides ensuring energy metabolism and organelle renewal, is crucial for the biology of adult normal and cancer stem cells. However, it remains incompletely understood how autophagy connects to stemness factors and the nature of the microenvironmental signals that pattern autophagy in different cell types. Here we advance in these…

17h

Cute pool floats that make every day a party

Float in style. (William Rouse via Unsplash/) Very few things combine practicality, entertainment, and self-expression quite like a pool float. Stripped to their essence, they’re a distant cousin of the foam life preserver that used to adorn the side of ships. You don’t need a giant flamingo to keep you from drowning, but at its core, that’s what it’s here to do. As a byproduct of keeping your he

17h

18h

Unusual Parasites Plagued Bronze Age Fen Folk And Their Dogs

Parasites aplenty riddled humans and their dogs at a swampy site in Bronze Age England. From left: Microscopic eggs of a fish tapeworm, giant kidney worm and Echinostoma worm found in ancient feces from the Must Farm site. (Black scale bar represents 20 micrometers.) (Credit: M. Ledger, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University) Around 3,000 years ago, people were going about their business

18h

These Robotic Shorts Make Everyday Strolls Feel Like a Moving Airport Walkway

(Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University) If you have two functioning legs and a reliable nervous system, walking and running are generally thoughtless tasks. But if you’re a soldier hauling massive amounts of gear on your back for an extended period of time, putting one foot in front of the other can get exhausting. That’s where the idea for a soft, futuristic "exosuit" came about in 2011 –

18h

Bagsiden: Er det alligevel en spiddrejer?

Vi følger op på et af forsommerens mysterier.

18h

Bagsiden: Skød M’erne med kanon på Kampsax-kollegiet i Lyngby?

Ugens vandrehistorie – sand eller falsk?

18h

The plight of a US dairy farm

It's a family business which has been around since 1942 – but now the last remaining cows are being sold off.

18h

NASCAR may be the fastest road to learning about physics

The laws of physics are on display at the Daytona International Speedway. (Action Sports Photography/Shutterstock.com/) There's just something thrilling about traveling at high speeds . Throughout history people have always pushed themselves to go faster , whether on foot , on horseback, on a boat, or on a bicycle . Nearly every weekend, today’s speed lovers can live vicariously by watching their

19h

Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites

'Coprolites' from the Must Farm archaeological excavation in East Anglia, UK, shows the prehistoric inhabitants were infected by parasitic worms that can be spread by eating raw fish, frogs and shellfish.

19h

Genetic study suggests humans, not Ice Age, killed off European cave bears

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions across Europe has found evidence that suggests humans were responsible for the extinction of cave bears thousands of years ago, not …

19h

Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites

New research published today in the journal Parasitology shows how the prehistoric inhabitants of a settlement in the freshwater marshes of eastern England were infected by intestinal worms caught from foraging for food in the lakes and waterways around their homes.

19h

Extinction: Humans played big role in demise of the cave bear

The arrival of human ancestors in Europe spelled the downfall of the cave bear some 40,000 years ago.

19h

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