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nyheder2019august23

Quantum gravity's tangled time

The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (U.S.) have combined t

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Brain finds order amidst chaos

How does the brain find order amidst a sea of noise and chaos? Researchers at the EPFL Blue Brain Project have found the answer by using advanced simulation techniques to investigate the way neurons talk to each other. In a paper published in Nature Communications, they found that by working as a team, cortical neurons can respond even to weak input against the backdrop of noise and chaos, allowin

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Omstridt insektgift skal nu væk fra danske frugt- og grøntafdelinger

Pesticidet chlorpyrifos, som er fundet på hver tredje citrusfrugt i Danmark, skal helt ud af vagten i Europa. Det mener EU-Kommissionen efter ny risikovurdering fra Efsa. Danske tilbagekaldelser er i gang.

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ALMA shows what's inside Jupiter's storms

New radio wave images made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) provide a unique view of Jupiter's atmosphere down to fifty kilometers below the planet's visible (ammonia) cloud deck.

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Here's Why Drugs That Work So Well in Mouse Brains Often Fail Miserably in Humans

Mice and humans have the same kinds of brain cells and wiring. But the similarities may stop there.

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The Amazon rainforest is burning, and humans are to blame

The Amazon blaze is so large, NASA satellites spotted it from space. Above, the agency captured several states within Brazil including Amazonas, Mato Grosso, and Rondônia. (NASA/) Dark skies over Sao Paulo this week were just a local hint of an unfolding global catastrophe centered in Brazil. This year, the Amazon rainforest is burning at an unprecedented rate, after historic deforestation in the

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Sponsored Interactive Crossword Puzzle

This puzzle is brought to you by RayBiotech

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Asteroid Ryugu has no dust on it and we don’t know why

The most detailed pictures yet from the asteroid Ryugu show it has no dust, which is very strange. There are at least three competing possible explanations

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Welding Ceramics With a Laser

Researchers developed a way to weld pieces of brittle ceramics together using a laser that fires a million times per second. laserceramics_1.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Technology Thursday, August 22, 2019 – 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Humans have been using cerami

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The Latest Photos From Hayabusa2's Mission to Asteroid Ryugu Are Here

The image shows the first image acquired by the DLR-developed MASCAM camera system during Hayabusa2's descent, shortly after separation from the landing module at a height of 41 meters. (Credit: Jaumann et al., Science (2019)) The solar system is a crowded place. Earth may be the only planet with humans on it, but many worlds are home to robots — rovers and landers and orbiters, gathering data for

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Audiobooks or Reading? To Our Brains, It Doesn't Matter

These color-coded maps of the brain show the semantic similarities during listening (top) and reading (bottom). (Credit: Fatma Deniz) If you don’t have time to sit and read a physical book, is listening to the audio version considered cheating? To some hardcore book nerds, it could be. But new evidence suggests that, to our brains, reading and hearing a story might not be so different. In a study

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Researchers discover how the sun damages our skin

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have discovered the mechanism through which ultraviolet radiation, given off by the sun, damages our skin.

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Scientists build a synthetic system to improve wound treatment, drug delivery for soldiers

For the first time, scientists built a synthetic biologic system with compartments like real cells. This Army project at the University of Massachusetts Amherst could lead to materials that provide new avenues to deliver medicine, treat wounds and purify water for Soldiers.

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Discovery of 'hidden' outbreak hints that Zika virus can spread silently

Just when international fears of contracting Zika began to fade in 2017, an undetected outbreak was peaking in Cuba — a mere 300 miles off the coast of Miami. A team of scientists at Scripps Research, working in concert with several other organizations, uncovered the hidden outbreak by overlaying air-travel patterns with genomic sequencing of virus samples from infected travelers. The discovery i

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Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR

a research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) demonstrates the use of CRISPR as a control element in a new type of stimuli-responsive "smart" materials.

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Smartphone app makes parents more attuned to their babies' needs, research shows

University of York researchers have designed and tested an app to help new parents become more 'tuned in' to what their babies are thinking and feeling. The app, called BabyMind, prompts the parent to think about things from their baby's perspective and to consider what is going on in their baby's mind at a specific point each day. It also provides parents with accurate information on babies' psyc

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The case for retreat in the battle against climate change

With sea level rise and extreme weather threatening coastal communities, it's no longer a question of whether they are going to retreat; it's where, when and how. In a new paper, researchers advocate for a managed and planned retreat, not a short-term spur of the moment reaction to a massive storm.

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Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems

In new research published in the journal Science, a team of biologists, including Colorado State University Assistant Professor of Biology Marc Nishimura, have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. Their discovery, revealing how plant resistance proteins trigger localized cell death, could lead to new strategies for engineering disease resistance in next-generation crops

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Heavy drinking and HIV don't mix

Heavy alcohol consumption (3 drinks or more/day for women and 4 drinks or more/day for men) is linked to alterations in immune function among people with HIV.

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Structure of protein nano turbine revealed

IST Austria scientists determine the first structure of a cell's rotary engine using state-of-art microscopy.

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Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research

The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behavior across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas, which gives the highest resolution view of malaria parasite gene expression to date and monitors how indi

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Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance

In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that inhabit different regions of the continent, including the genetic factors that confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. This sheds new light on the way that drug resistance is emerging in different locations and moving by various routes a

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Dietary zinc protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

Researchers have uncovered a crucial link between dietary zinc intake and protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the primary bacterial cause of pneumonia.Globally, it is estimated that nearly two billion people suffer from zinc deficiency, but why this increases susceptibility to bacterial infection has not been well understood — until now.

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Cell suicide could hold key for brain health and food security

Research into the self-destruction of cells in humans and plants could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative brain diseases and the development of disease-resistant plants.A study co-led by The University of Queensland's Professor Bostjan Kobe identified the role certain proteins play in cellular suicide.

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The case for managed retreat

Researchers at Stanford and other institutions present the case for managed retreat in the face of climate change and rising seas in a new Policy Forum article in the journal Science. Here the researchers detail why despite controversy over the topic of relocation, sea level rise adaptation must be approached strategically and communities should plan ahead.

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The case for strategic and managed retreat in the face of climate change

The best option for adaptation to a rapidly changing climate, at least for some, may be to flee — a process called 'managed retreat.'

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CRISPR-responsive hydrogel system offers programmable approach to smart biomaterials

Using CRISPR as the 'switcher,' hydrogels infused with DNA can be programmed to translate biological information into changes in the constituent gel material's properties, researchers say, triggering the gels to release compounds or nanoparticles, for example.

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'Malaria cell atlas' reveals gene clusters, possible drug targets

After performing single-cell RNA sequencing on thousands of malaria parasites — the genomes of which have historically encoded many uncharacterized genes — researchers report the first high-resolution atlas of malaria parasite gene expression across the entirety of these organisms' complex lifecycles.

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Images from the surface of asteroid Ryugu yield clues to its composition

New images taken by a lander on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu have yielded clues into the composition and origins of its rocks, which bear strong similarities to primitive meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites.

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Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required

Smartphones that don't scratch or shatter. Metal-free pacemakers. Electronics for space and other harsh environments. These could all be made possible thanks to a new ceramic welding technology developed by a team of engineers at UC San Diego and UC Riverside. The process works in ambient conditions and uses less than 50 watts of laser power, making it more practical than current ceramic welding m

24min

New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts

A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins — proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded two separate proteins. Somnath Tagore in the Frenkel-Morgenstern Lab at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and colleagues present ProtFus in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Genes tell the story of how the Asian tiger mosquito spread

Over the last 40 years, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has invaded every continent thanks to the transportation of its eggs via human trade and transportation. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now used the genomes of the mosquitos to track the history of the invasion and expansion of the species through Albania, Italy, and Greece.

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Some crypto-criminals think jumping across blockchains covers their tracks. Big mistake.

A popular cryptocurrency service that may appear to enhance anonymity actually doesn’t, according to new research.

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In Cuba, a ‘Hidden’ Zika Outbreak

The mosquito-borne virus spread through the island in 2017, but global health officials failed to sound the alarm.

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This Blood Test Seems to Predict if People Are Going to Die Soon

A simple blood test could one day reveal clues about your mortality. In a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications , a team of European researchers detail their hunt for biomarkers in human blood that would let them predict how much longer a person has to live. To pull it off, they embarked on an extraordinary data analysis saga: analyzing blood sample data from a total of 44,

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Seeing the embryo

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Manifold destiny

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The global soil community and its influence on biogeochemistry

Soil organisms represent the most biologically diverse community on land and govern the turnover of the largest organic matter pool in the terrestrial biosphere. The highly complex nature of these communities at local scales has traditionally obscured efforts to identify unifying patterns in global soil biodiversity and biogeochemistry. As a result, environmental covariates have generally been us

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News at a glance

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Paths out of darkness

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Geography of loss

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Warning signs

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Sharing data

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Seeing the embryo

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Manifold destiny

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A gut check

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Observation of a symmetry-protected topological phase of interacting bosons with Rydberg atoms

The concept of topological phases is a powerful framework for characterizing ground states of quantum many-body systems that goes beyond the paradigm of symmetry breaking. Topological phases can appear in condensed-matter systems naturally, whereas the implementation and study of such quantum many-body ground states in artificial matter require careful engineering. Here, we report the experimenta

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Programmable CRISPR-responsive smart materials

Stimuli-responsive materials activated by biological signals play an increasingly important role in biotechnology applications. We exploit the programmability of CRISPR-associated nucleases to actuate hydrogels containing DNA as a structural element or as an anchor for pendant groups. After activation by guide RNA–defined inputs, Cas12a cleaves DNA in the gels, thereby converting biological infor

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Exploring genetic interaction manifolds constructed from rich single-cell phenotypes

How cellular and organismal complexity emerges from combinatorial expression of genes is a central question in biology. High-content phenotyping approaches such as Perturb-seq (single-cell RNA-sequencing pooled CRISPR screens) present an opportunity for exploring such genetic interactions (GIs) at scale. Here, we present an analytical framework for interpreting high-dimensional landscapes of cell

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NAD+ cleavage activity by animal and plant TIR domains in cell death pathways

SARM1 (sterile alpha and TIR motif containing 1) is responsible for depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized form (NAD + ) during Wallerian degeneration associated with neuropathies. Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors recognize pathogen effector proteins and trigger localized cell death to restrict pathogen infection. Both processes depend on

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TIR domains of plant immune receptors are NAD+-cleaving enzymes that promote cell death

Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors activate cell death and confer disease resistance by unknown mechanisms. We demonstrate that plant Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of NLRs are enzymes capable of degrading nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized form (NAD + ). Both cell death induction and NAD + cleavage activity of plant TIR domains require k

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Ultrafast laser welding of ceramics

Welding of ceramics is a key missing component in modern manufacturing. Current methods cannot join ceramics in proximity to temperature-sensitive materials like polymers and electronic components. We introduce an ultrafast pulsed laser welding approach that relies on focusing light on interfaces to ensure an optical interaction volume in ceramics to stimulate nonlinear absorption processes, caus

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The slow earthquake spectrum in the Japan Trench illuminated by the S-net seafloor observatories

Investigating slow earthquake activity in subduction zones provides insight into the slip behavior of megathrusts, which can provide important clues about the rupture extent of future great earthquakes. Using the S-net ocean-bottom seismograph network along the Japan Trench, we mapped a detailed distribution of tectonic tremors, which coincided with very-low-frequency earthquakes and a slow slip

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Major subpopulations of Plasmodium falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa

Understanding genomic variation and population structure of Plasmodium falciparum across Africa is necessary to sustain progress toward malaria elimination. Genome clustering of 2263 P. falciparum isolates from 24 malaria-endemic settings in 15 African countries identified major western, central, and eastern ancestries, plus a highly divergent Ethiopian population. Ancestry aligned to these regio

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Images from the surface of asteroid Ryugu show rocks similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites

The near-Earth asteroid (162173) Ryugu is a 900-m-diameter dark object expected to contain primordial material from the solar nebula. The Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT) landed on Ryugu’s surface on 3 October 2018. We present images from the MASCOT camera (MASCam) taken during the descent and while on the surface. The surface is covered by decimeter- to meter-sized rocks, with no deposits

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Persistence of neuronal representations through time and damage in the hippocampus

How do neurons encode long-term memories? Bilateral imaging of neuronal activity in the mouse hippocampus reveals that, from one day to the next, ~40% of neurons change their responsiveness to cues, but thereafter only 1% of cells change per day. Despite these changes, neuronal responses are resilient to a lack of exposure to a previously completed task or to hippocampus lesions. Unlike individua

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Phospho-dependent phase separation of FMRP and CAPRIN1 recapitulates regulation of translation and deadenylation

Membraneless organelles involved in RNA processing are biomolecular condensates assembled by phase separation. Despite the important role of intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs), the specific interactions underlying IDR phase separation and its functional consequences remain elusive. To address these questions, we used minimal condensates formed from the C-terminal disordered regions o

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New Products

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The Malaria Cell Atlas: Single parasite transcriptomes across the complete Plasmodium life cycle

Malaria parasites adopt a remarkable variety of morphological life stages as they transition through multiple mammalian host and mosquito vector environments. We profiled the single-cell transcriptomes of thousands of individual parasites, deriving the first high-resolution transcriptional atlas of the entire Plasmodium berghei life cycle. We then used our atlas to precisely define developmental

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Response to Comment on "Legacy nitrogen may prevent achievement of water quality goals in the Gulf of Mexico"

Ballard et al . argue that our prediction of a 30-year or longer recovery time for Gulf of Mexico water quality is highly uncertain, and that much shorter time lags are equally likely. We demonstrate that their argument, based on the use of a two-component regression model, does not sufficiently consider fundamental watershed processes or multiple lines of evidence suggesting the existence of dec

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Comment on "Legacy nitrogen may prevent achievement of water quality goals in the Gulf of Mexico"

Van Meter et al . (Reports, 27 April 2018, p. 427) warn that achieving nitrogen reduction goals in the Gulf of Mexico will take decades as a result of legacy nitrogen effects. We discuss limitations of the modeling approach and demonstrate that legacy effects ranging from a few years to decades are equally consistent with observations. The presented time scales for system recovery are therefore h

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Structure and conformational plasticity of the intact Thermus thermophilus V/A-type ATPase

V (vacuolar)/A (archaeal)-type adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases), found in archaea and eubacteria, couple ATP hydrolysis or synthesis to proton translocation across the plasma membrane using the rotary-catalysis mechanism. They belong to the V-type ATPase family, which differs from the mitochondrial/chloroplast F-type ATP synthases in overall architecture. We solved cryo–electron microscopy str

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Workers at Big Government Lab Sue Over Exposure to a Toxic Chemical

Former technicians at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York say the were sickened by exposure to a toxic cleaning compound.

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CRISPR cuts turn gels into biological watchdogs

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02542-3 Wunderkind gene-editing tool used to trigger smart materials that can deliver drugs and sense biological signals.

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The case for ‘managed retreat’ in the face of climate change

It needn’t be as drastic as it sounds, as Richard A Lovett reports.

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Weld done. A new way with ceramics

Clever use of lasers means no furnace required.

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New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts

A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins—proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded two separate proteins. Somnath Tagore in the Frenkel-Morgenstern Lab at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and colleagues present ProtFus in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research

The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behaviour across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas, which gives the highest resolution view of mala

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Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems

Plants, like humans and animals, have over millions of years evolved complex immune systems that fend off invading pathogens. But unlike many animals, plants lack adaptive immunity conferred by antibodies. This means each plant cell must defend itself against all potential pathogens—a daunting task.

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Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR

The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide position of the vast reaches of the genome. It is also being harnessed in ongoing diagnostic approaches for the detection of pathogens and disease-causing mutations in patie

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The case for retreat in the battle against climate change

When it comes to climate change, moving people and development away from at-risk areas can be viewed, not as a defeat, but as a smart strategy that allows communities to adapt and thrive.

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New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts

A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins—proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded two separate proteins. Somnath Tagore in the Frenkel-Morgenstern Lab at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and colleagues present ProtFus in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Structure of protein nanoturbine revealed

Cells rely on protein complexes known as ATP synthases or ATPases for their energy needs. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules power most of the processes sustaining life. Structural biologist Professor Leonid Sazanov and his research group from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) in Klosterneuburg, Austria have now determined the first atomic structure of the represent

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Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research

The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behaviour across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas, which gives the highest resolution view of mala

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Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems

Plants, like humans and animals, have over millions of years evolved complex immune systems that fend off invading pathogens. But unlike many animals, plants lack adaptive immunity conferred by antibodies. This means each plant cell must defend itself against all potential pathogens—a daunting task.

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Cell suicide could hold key for brain health and food security

Research into the self-destruction of cells in humans and plants could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative brain diseases and the development of disease-resistant plants.

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System finds 130 compounds that could save citrus

Scientists have developed a new way of finding potential treatments for citrus greening, and a short list of 130 compounds to explore further. Biologist Sharon Long has published over 150 papers on the symbiotic bacteria that help alfalfa grow. But when she realized her lab’s highly focused research could contribute to a solution for citrus greening—a disease that devastates citrus crops—she was

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Manta rays like hanging out with their mates

Understanding social connections could help conservation efforts. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Using DNA as a memory tape

Scientists turn living cells into computers and recording devices.

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Scorpion toxin targets the 'wasabi receptor'

And that may help solve mystery of chronic pain.

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It’s not quite Mars, but it will do

Atacama microbes may hold clues to life.

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Cell suicide could hold key for brain health and food security

Research into the self-destruction of cells in humans and plants could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative brain diseases and the development of disease-resistant plants.

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Magnetars Can Crack Themselves Open and Bombard Earth with Gamma-Ray Flares, New Theory Suggests

Three giant gamma-ray flares have been detected in the last 40 years. A new paper on magnetars cracking themselves open could explain why.

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Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil

A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world.

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There Are at Least Eight Ways to Hack a Nest Camera

Peering In Researchers from the security firm Cisco Talos identified eight separate vulnerabilities in the Nest Cam IQ, Google’s high-end home security camera system. By exploiting these flaws, the researchers were able to take over cameras, access video recordings, or even disable the Nest camera altogether, according to Motherboard . Google has promised a firmware update, but the surprising num

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Bose unveils portable WiFi/Bluetooth smart speaker ahead of Sonos launch – CNET

With Sonos rumored to have a new portable speaker arriving soon, Bose unveiled its Portable Home Speaker.

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How elite drivers train to endure the punishing conditions of pro racing

Nico Hulkenberg (GER) Renault Sport F1 Team trains to endure the rigors of the track. (XPB / James Moy Photography Ltd./) Steering a car while strapped tightly into a seat as may look more like relaxation than exertion. But piloting a race car is a draining effort that demands everything from the athletes of Formula 1, Indy Car, Nascar, and Le Mans sports cars. This is why increasing numbers of r

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Timing and Order of Molecular Events Recorded in Live Cells' DNA

Genetic engineers have co-opted base editing machinery to enable information storage and processing in the DNA of bacterial and mammalian cells.

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Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil

A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world.

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US environmental groups sue over wildlife protection rollbacks

US environmental groups have sued the administration of President Donald Trump over rollbacks that weaken the Endangered Species Act, a law credited with saving iconic species from the bald eagle to the grizzly bear.

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More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature

Agreement will make thousands of German-authored papers available free worldwide every year

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Tracing the evolution of vision in fruit flies

The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins (opsins) and this has ramifications for our understanding of several evolutionary pathways. Now, an international research team led by the University of Göttingen has shown there are other

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Storms on Jupiter are disturbing the planet's colorful belts

Storm clouds rooted deep in Jupiter's atmosphere are affecting the planet's white zones and colorful belts, creating disturbances in their flow and even changing their color.

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Adaptation to life in cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features

Research led by Kyushu University finds that E. coli from cattle share widespread genetic similarities with those that cause food poisoning in humans, indicating that the traits that are harmful to humans may emerge to improve survival in the bovine intestine.

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Storms on Jupiter are disturbing the planet's colorful belts

Coordinated observations of Jupiter in early 2017 by six ground-based telescopes and Hubble allowed astronomers to study the evolution of bright plumes and connect them with cloud movements deep in the planet. They show that these plumes originate 80 kilometers below the surface cloud deck and rise up quickly into the stratosphere, where supercooled ammonia freezes to form ammonia ice clouds. The

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Tracing the evolution of vision in fruit flies

The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins (opsins) and this has ramifications for our understanding of several evolutionary pathways. Now, an international research team led by the University of Göttingen has shown there are other

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100-year-old ship logs offer history of Arctic sea ice

Modern-day computer simulations and historic observations from 100-year old ship logbooks have extended estimates of Arctic sea ice volume all the way back to 1901, researchers report. The Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean and Modeling System, or PIOMAS , is a leading tool for gauging the thickness of sea ice coverage in the Arctic Ocean. Until now, that system has gone back only as far as 1979, when satellit

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Remembering Anthony Janetos

The eminent and influential climate scientist passed away in early August — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Remembering Anthony Janetos

The eminent and influential climate scientist passed away in early August — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Lack Of Diversity In Genetic Databases Hampers Research

Scientists around the world are working to correct a problem with genetic health information — too much of it is currently based on samples of Europeans. (Image credit: Yann Arthus-Bertrand/Getty Images)

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Storms on Jupiter are disturbing the planet's colorful belts

Coordinated observations of Jupiter in early 2017 by six ground-based telescopes and Hubble allowed UC Berkeley astronomers to study the evolution of bright plumes and connect them with cloud movements deep in the planet. They show that these plumes originate 80 kilometers below the surface cloud deck and rise up quickly into the stratosphere, where supercooled ammonia freezes to form ammonia ice

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Adaptation to life in cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features

Research led by Kyushu University finds that E. coli from cattle share widespread genetic similarities with those that cause food poisoning in humans, indicating that the traits that are harmful to humans may emerge to improve survival in the bovine intestine.

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Hormoner ved første blik? Sådan bliver din krop forelsket

Der er vidt forskellige mekanismer på spil, når du er nyforelsket eller i et fast forhold.

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Scratching the surface of how your brain senses an itch

Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument, as well as for detecting the touch of, say, biting insects. Researchers have discovered how neurons in the spinal cord help transmit such itch signals to the brain. The findings could help contribute to a better understanding of itch and could lead to new drugs to treat chronic itch, wh

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Tracing the evolution of vision

The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins (opsins) and this has ramifications for our understanding of several evolutionary pathways. Now, an international research team has shown there are other functions of opsin outside vision

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Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil

Researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world. Scientists have used bacteria found in the roots of salt-tolerant plants to successfully inoculate alfalfa plants against overly salty soil.

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This Steampunk Bionic Heart Uses Maglev Tech to Pump Blood

A team of engineers from private medical company Bivacor have been working hard since 2001 on building a bionic heart that can allow cardiac patients to stay alive, according to a recent IEEE Spectrum writeup by three of the company’s engineers. The steampunk apparatus works by harnessing the power of magnetic levitation to spin a disc at extremely fast speeds to pump blood to the body and return

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Moving Away from Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture

Bacteria-killing viruses could protect livestock without the risk of creating resistant microbes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches

Researchers found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think about species with naturally fragmented populations to understand their potential for extinction.

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Ginkgo biloba may aid in treating type 2 diabetes

Ginkgo Biloba, one of the oldest living trees species, may offer some clues in better treatments for Type 2 Diabetes, says one researcher.

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Scratching the surface of how your brain senses an itch

Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument, as well as for detecting the touch of, say, biting insects. Salk researchers have discovered how neurons in the spinal cord help transmit such itch signals to the brain. The findings could help contribute to a better understanding of itch and could lead to new drugs to treat chronic itc

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Adaptation to life inside cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features

A large-scale study of the genetic differences and similarities among E. coli bacteria from cattle and humans indicates that features causing food poisoning in humans may continuously be emerging in bacteria from cattle as a means to better adapt to their environment.

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Adaptation to life inside cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features

A large-scale study of the genetic differences and similarities among E. coli bacteria from cattle and humans indicates that features causing food poisoning in humans may continuously be emerging in bacteria from cattle as a means to better adapt to their environment.

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Universets første molekyle

PLUS. Heliumhydrid var med til at sætte skub i dannelsen af de første stjerner.

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Microsoft: We Stopped Listening to Your Xbox Convos “Months Ago”

Microsoft has admitted that it let human contractors review Xbox users’ private conversations — but says it halted the practice long before Vice published a story exposing it on Wednesday. “We stopped reviewing any voice content taken through Xbox for product improvement purposes a number of months ago, as we no longer felt it was necessary,” a Microsoft spokesperson told Vice in a statement, “an

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OtterBox Debuts Innovative OtterSpot Qi Wireless Charging Battery Puck System

We've seen wireless charging pads that plug directly into the wall to top off your device, and we've seen portable batteries that have Qi wireless charging pads built-in to them. Now OtterBox …

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Cuba’s untold Zika outbreak uncovered

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02510-x An unreported spike in cases from 2017 is revealed through international travellers, a technique that could help with early detection in other epidemics.

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Florida's oysters in Apalachicola, Cedar Key face climate threats to survival

Climate change isn't a primary suspect in the stunning extermination of Apalachicola Bay oysters, a calamity pegged to a variety of atrocities.

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Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil

A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world.Brigham Young University scientists have used bacteria found in the roots of salt-tolerant plants to successfully inoculate alfalfa plants against overly salty soil.

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Tracing the evolution of vision

The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins (opsins) and this has ramifications for our understanding of several evolutionary pathways. Now, an international research team led by the University of Göttingen has shown there are other

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Ginkgo biloba may aid in treating type 2 diabetes

Ginkgo Biloba, one of the oldest living trees species, may offer some clues in better treatments for Type 2 Diabetes, says one University Cincinnati researcher.

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If Trump Were an Airline Pilot

Through the 2016 campaign, I posted a series called “Trump Time Capsule” in this space. The idea was to record, in real time, what was known about Donald Trump’s fitness for office—and to do so not when people were looking back on our era but while the Republican Party was deciding whether to line up behind him and voters were preparing to make their choice. The series reached 152 installments by

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These Scientists Want to Launch Satellites From Steam Balloons

Balloon Ride Scientists are working on a new low-cost, efficient way to get satellites up into space. Instead of launching rockets from the ground, a team from the Finnish Meteorology Institute is investigating whether satellites could be lifted up into orbit through steam-filled balloons and launched from there, according to SciTech Europa . While they haven’t actually tested the idea yet, compu

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Giraffes given greater protection from unregulated trade as numbers fall

Numbers of the world's tallest mammal have fallen in Africa by 40% in the past three decades.

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These drugs land EDM partiers in the hospital

People who frequent electronic dance music parties often use multiple drugs simultaneously and experience adverse effects with some ending up in the emergency department, researchers report. Their study in the International Journal of Drug Policy is the first to survey adverse effects associated with the use of dozens of different drugs and could improve treatment for drug-related emergencies, sa

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A law just for Trump's presidency? California measure aims to protect state's environment

California is considering a far-reaching law that would lock current environmental protections into place and would only be in effect until the end of Donald Trump's presidency.

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Is evolution the missing link to understanding mental health?

The human brain has been shaped over hundreds of thousands of years, with evolution selecting for traits that helped our species survive and thrive. So why do we still have so many genes that make us struggle? Why did our remarkable cognitive capacity come with such a susceptibility to disorder?

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How investors can avoid the ‘infatuation effect’

New research explains why we put money into a specific investment just because it’s the most familiar or stands out. It also points to a solution for making better investing choices. “Everyday investors can often become overly attached to a particular stock or mutual fund, sometimes to their financial detriment,” says Steven Posavac, a professor of marketing at Vanderbilt University. “We wanted t

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An unreported Zika outbreak in 2017 detected through travel surveillance and genetics

By sequencing virus genomes from infected travelers, analyzing travel patterns and mosquito modeling, researchers unearthed a spike in Zika cases from travelers returning from Cuba during the summer of 2017 that was not captured by local reports.

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New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first time

Scientists report an entirely new approach to manipulation of carbon nanotubes that allows physical measurements to be made on carbon nanotubes that have previously only been possible by theoretical computation.

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Comparison of three similar frontline breast cancer drugs reveals important differences

First head-to-head comparison of CDK4/6 inhibitors in cell line and animal models of breast cancer reveals important differences, including one drug that exhibits unique, potentially advantageous therapeutic activity.

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Anxiety, depression linked to more opioid use after surgery

Surgeons wielding their life-saving scalpels, laparoscopic tools, or other implements to repair or remove what ails their patients understand all too well that pain is an unavoidable part of the healing process. Yet the current opioid crisis has made the standard prescribing practices for these highly effective analgesics fraught with risk. New research could help clinicians mitigate that risk by

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Climate change will alter waves along half the world's coast

New research finds that a warming planet will also alter ocean waves along more than 50% of the world's coastlines. This research has significant implications for coastal flooding and erosion.

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Switching electron properties on and off individually

Electrons have different properties – and they all can be used to create order in solid objects. This order determines the properties of the material. Experiments now show: It is possible to influence different characteristics of the electrons separately from each other. Closely interwoven quantum phenomena can thus be understood individually.

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The best dash cams for your car—and why you need one

Capture the view while you drive. (Bec Brown via Unsplash/) Even the safest drivers on the planet get into car accidents. They can even happen when you're parked at the gas station getting road trip Twizzlers. The odds of getting in an accident on a 1,000-mile trip are 1 in 366 , so it's no wonder why cameras designed to take footage of your crash have become more popular. Whether you’re an Uber

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Mexican marijuana traffickers are poisoning California forests with a banned pesticide, officials say

California law enforcement has learned that Mexican drug traffickers are using a dangerous pesticide banned in the United States to grow marijuana in remote areas of California's Sierra Nevada mountains, and are going after their operations.

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September's SLAS Discovery issue now available

September's SLAS Discovery cover article, "Using physicochemical measurements to influence better compound design,' now available for 30 days.

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Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think about species with naturally fragmented populations to understand their potential for extinction.

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Gun retailers could help prevent suicide

Firearm retailers may be willing to learn about suicide prevention and to train their employees in how to spot and act on suicide warning signs, a new study in Washington state finds. With firearms the commonly used and most lethal means of suicide nationwide, the findings from the survey of nearly 200 independent firearm retailers across Washington state demonstrate the potential for key communi

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If a Child Is Jailed and No One Is There to Hear Him Cry

For months at a time, the detention of migrant children seems to fall off the national radar, somehow fading to the background, behind the daily dramas of scandals big and small. And then suddenly, news will erupt: The children don’t have soap. They are freezing. The food is rotten. Where this information comes from is not primarily from journalists but monitors—lawyers and advocates who regularl

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Facebook Wants a Do-Over on News

One especially sharp aphorism about the internet’s attention economy likens webpages to car crashes. Explaining to The New York Times in 2017 how likes and shares drive users toward extremes, Evan Williams, the co-creator of Twitter, Medium, and Blogger , remarked that news-feed algorithms, trained to serve us the most attention-grabbing content, will do so ruthlessly. Using the web, Williams sai

2h

Early life on Earth limited by enzyme

A single enzyme found in early single-cell life forms could explain why oxygen levels in the atmosphere remained low for two billion years during the Proterozoic eon, preventing life colonizing land.

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Maximum mass of lightest neutrino revealed using astronomical big data

The mass of the lightest neutrino, an abundant 'ghost' particle found throughout the universe, has been calculated to be at least 6 million times lighter than the mass of an electron.

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Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells

Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach — intracellular compartmentalization. Now researchers tell how they take advantage of differences in electrical charge to create an 'all aqueous,' water-in-water construct that achieves compartmentalization in a sy

2h

Certain metabolites linked to stem cell function in the intestine

Researchers have found that high levels of ketone bodies, molecules produced by the breakdown of fat, help the intestine to maintain a functional stem cell pool, which are crucial for intestinal regeneration.

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Scorpion toxin that targets 'wasabi receptor' may help solve mystery of chronic pain

Researchers have discovered a scorpion toxin that targets the 'wasabi receptor,' a chemical-sensing protein found in nerve cells that's responsible for the sinus-jolting sting of wasabi. Because the toxin triggers a pain response, scientists think it can be used as a tool for studying chronic pain and inflammation, and may eventually lead to the development of new kinds of non-opioid pain reliever

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High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA

Researchers have created a technology called DOMINO to store complex 'memories' in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. This memory storage capacity can form the foundation of complex circuits that trigger a cellular event, such as producing a fluorescent protein, when a specific event or sequence of events occurs.

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‘Spaceteam’ Turns the Horrors of Deep Space Travel Into a Fun Card Game

Few of us realize it, but one of the best ways to bond with a group of strangers is shared peril. The peril, for example, of hurtling through space on a ship that is in dire need of repair . This sort of peril doesn’t come often, and probably isn’t worth risking just in the name of new friendships. But now you can simulate this horrifying scenario from the comfort of your own home thanks to this

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Faced with Data Deluge, Astronomers Turn to Automation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Asteroid Mining company to make Lunar Water free for all mankind.

submitted by /u/SpaceMining [link] [comments]

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Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells

Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach — intracellular compartmentalization. Now researchers tell how they take advantage of differences in electrical charge to create an 'all aqueous,' water-in-water construct that achieves compartmentalization in a sy

2h

Pencil cases to keep your writing tools organized

A place for your pens, pencils, and crayons. (Dan Dimmock via Unsplash/) Color-coded notes are more fun. Reading with a highlighter in hand makes the content easier to follow (even if what you choose to highlight is random). It’s easy to get carried away with writing utensils, metallic ink markers, sharpies, mechanical pencils, two-sided felt tip artist pens, and more. But if you don’t want them

2h

Ancient Skeletons with Alien-Like Heads Unearthed in Croatia

Archaeologists have unearthed three ancient skeletons in Croatia — and two of them had pointy, artificially deformed skulls.

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Ludwig study identifies an Achilles heel of many types of cancer

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a novel vulnerability in tumors that are driven by a common cancer gene known as MYC. Such cancers, it found, are highly dependent on the cell's machinery for making fats and other lipids.

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Moving Away from Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture

Bacteria-killing viruses could protect livestock without the risk of creating resistant microbes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first time

Swansea University scientists have reported a new approach to measuring the conductivity between identical carbon nanotubes which could be used to help improve the efficiency of electrical power cables in the future.

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Researchers get first microscopic look at a tiny phenomenon with big potential implications

Matter behaves differently when it's tiny. At the nanoscale, electric current cuts through mountains of particles, spinning them into vortexes that can be used intentionally in quantum computing. The particles arrange themselves into a topological map, but the lines blur as electrons merge into indistinguishable quasiparticles with shifting properties. The trick is learning how to control such cha

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Where are new stars born? NASA's Webb Telescope will investigate

When it comes to making new stars, the party is almost over in the present-day universe. In fact, it's been nearly over for billions of years. Our Milky Way continues to form the equivalent of one Sun every year. But in the past, that rate was up to 100 times greater. So if we really want to understand how stars like our Sun formed in the universe, we need to look billions of years into the past.

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Detecting hydrothermal vents in volcanic lakes

Geothermal manifestations at Earth's surface can be mapped and characterized by a variety of well-established exploration methods. However, mapping hydrothermal vents in aquatic environments is more challenging as conventional methods can no longer be applied. In fact, chemical composition of lake water may indicate inflow of fluids from a volcanic system, but it does not provide spatial informati

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Underwater Video Offers New Look at Titanic Wreck

The footage, captured by a team from Triton Submarines, showed the deterioration of the R.M.S. Titanic. The company said it was the first such visit in nearly 14 years.

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Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study

Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is the leading cause of greenhouse effects and global warming. Notably, rapid climate warming can, in turn, either increase or decrease land carbon uptake, leading to negative or positive carbon cycle-climate change feedback, respectively.

3h

Researchers find genetic links to child obesity across diverse ethnic groups

An international team of researchers who analyzed data across multiple ethnicities has produced the largest genetic study to date associated with common childhood obesity. The Early Growth Genetics Consortium discovered a robust new signal, fine-mapped previously reported genetic variants, and added to evidence that genetic influences on obesity operate across the lifespan.

3h

Comparison of three similar frontline breast cancer drugs reveals important differences

First head-to-head comparison of CDK4/6 inhibitors in cell line and animal models of breast cancer reveals important differences, including one drug that exhibits unique, potentially advantageous therapeutic activity.

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Svensk datatilsyn følger trop efter det danske: Afviser at behandle klage over Google

Datainspektionen i Sverige overgiver klage over Google til Irland efter råd fra det fælleseuropæiske tilsyn.

3h

A Rare Show That Explores the Nuances of Black Boyhood

The protagonist of David Makes Man walks among ghosts. The show’s first episode, which aired last week on Oprah’s OWN network, introduced viewers to David (played by Akili McDowell), a “gifted” 14-year-old attempting to balance his home life in a South Florida housing project called “The Ville” with the pressures of attending a far-away magnet school. David doesn’t travel alone: As he buses to sc

3h

Hundreds of Pyrenees livestock farmers protest predator bears

Hundreds of Spanish livestock farmers staged a protest Thursday in the Pyrenees town of Ainsa against the re-introduction of brown bears to the mountain region saying the predators are a menace to their flocks.

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Wildlife meeting backs more protection for giraffes

Wildlife-supporting countries on Thursday backed regulating international trade in giraffes in a bid to offer more protection to the gentle giants, feared to be facing a "silent extinction".

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Hundreds of Pyrenees livestock farmers protest predator bears

Hundreds of Spanish livestock farmers staged a protest Thursday in the Pyrenees town of Ainsa against the re-introduction of brown bears to the mountain region saying the predators are a menace to their flocks.

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Wildlife meeting backs more protection for giraffes

Wildlife-supporting countries on Thursday backed regulating international trade in giraffes in a bid to offer more protection to the gentle giants, feared to be facing a "silent extinction".

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Last of its kind rocket puts GPS satellite in orbit

A rocket that's the last of its kind delivered the newest, most powerful GPS satellite to orbit for the Air Force on Thursday.

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Bacteria fly into the Atacama Desert every afternoon on the wind

The Atacama Desert is one of the most hostile places on Earth, but new microbes arrive there every day on dust grains carried by the wind

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Gene editing turns cells into minicomputers that can record data

Gene editing can turn living cells into minicomputers that record data. The technology could track what happens inside the body over time

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New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first time

Swansea University scientists report an entirely new approach to manipulation of carbon nanotubes that allows physical measurements to be made on carbon nanotubes that have previously only been possible by theoretical computation.

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Software for diagnostics and fail-safe operation of robots developed at FEFU

A team of scientists from School of Engineering at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Automation and Control Processes, and Institute of Marine Technology Problems of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a software module to automatically diagnose defects in sensors and electric drives in various kinds of robots. The system is able to compensate

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Anxiety, depression linked to more opioid use after surgery

Surgeons wielding their life-saving scalpels, laparoscopic tools, or other implements to repair or remove what ails their patients understand all too well that pain is an unavoidable part of the healing process. Yet the current opioid crisis has made the standard prescribing practices for these highly effective analgesics fraught with risk. New research from Michigan Medicine could help clinicians

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Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses

The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. SIV's Nef protein forms a solid link between two primate proteins, tetherin and AP-2, forcing the destruction of tetherin, which normally prevents new SIV virions from budding off. A mutation in huma

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Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells

Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach — intracellular compartmentalization. Now a research team led by Thomas Russell at UMass Amherst tell how they take advantage of differences in electrical charge to create an 'all aqueous,' water-in-water construct

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High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA

MIT researchers have created a technology called DOMINO to store complex 'memories' in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. This memory storage capacity can form the foundation of complex circuits that trigger a cellular event, such as producing a fluorescent protein, when a specific event or sequence of events occurs.

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Shocking rate of plant extinctions in South Africa

Over the past 300 years, 79 plants have been confirmed extinct from three of the world's biodiversity hotspots located in South Africa — the Cape Floristic Region, the Succulent Karoo, and the Maputuland-Pondoland-Albany corridor.According to a study published in the journal Current Biology this week, this represents a shocking 45.4% of all known plant extinctions from 10 of the world's 36 biodiv

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Scorpion toxin that targets 'wasabi receptor' may help solve mystery of chronic pain

Researchers at UC San Francisco and the University of Queensland have discovered a scorpion toxin that targets the 'wasabi receptor,' a chemical-sensing protein found in nerve cells that's responsible for the sinus-jolting sting of wasabi. Because the toxin triggers a pain response, scientists think it can be used as a tool for studying chronic pain and inflammation, and may eventually lead to the

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Yale researchers detect unreported Zika outbreak

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH) have detected a large unreported Zika outbreak that occurred in Cuba during 2017, a year after Zika outbreaks peaked throughout the Americas.

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Study links certain metabolites to stem cell function in the intestine

MIT researchers have found that high levels of ketone bodies, molecules produced by the breakdown of fat, help the intestine to maintain a functional stem cell pool, which are crucial for intestinal regeneration.

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Researchers reveal plant defense toolkit and insights for fighting crop diseases

At an unprecedented scale, researchers have now catalogued the array of surveillance tools that plants use to detect disease-causing microbes across an entire species.

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Maximum mass of lightest neutrino revealed using astronomical big data

The mass of the lightest neutrino, an abundant 'ghost' particle found throughout the universe, has been calculated to be at least 6 million times lighter than the mass of an electron in a new UCL-led study.

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Early life on Earth limited by enzyme

A single enzyme found in early single-cell life forms could explain why oxygen levels in the atmosphere remained low for two billion years during the Proterozoic eon, preventing life colonizing land, suggests a UCL-led study.

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Gene linked to a rare neurological disorder regulates key enzyme in Alzheimer's

A gene that can become mutated and cause a rare balance disorder also regulates the behavior of an enzyme that increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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Preventing tumor metastasis

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute, together with colleagues from the pharmaceutical company F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, have taken an important step towards the development of an agent against the metastasis of certain cancers. Using the Swiss Light Source, they deciphered the structure of a receptor that plays a crucial role in the migration of cancer cells.

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Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets

Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. This may be because memory T cells, which are located throughout the body and required to maintain immune responses to infectious agents, according to scientists at NIAID. Their study in mice also found that animals undergoing dietary restri

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Microbiology: Atacama Desert microbes may hold clues to life on Mars

Microbial life on Mars may potentially be transported across the planet on dust particles carried by wind, according to a study conducted in the Atacama Desert in North Chile, a well-known Mars analogue. The findings are published in Scientific Reports.

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Revealing the molecular engine that drives pancreatic cancer provides ways to turn it off

Researchers have decoded a chain of molecules that are critical for the growth and survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma — the most common and also the most lethal form of pancreatic cancer.

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New method classifies brain cells based on electrical signals

A team of neuroscientists at the University of Tuebingen and MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory shows how to distinguish four classes of brain cells by their spike waveforms. The advance offers brain researchers the chance to better understand how different kinds of neurons are contributing to behavior, perception and memory, and how they are malfunctioning in cases of psychiatric or

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An unreported Zika outbreak in 2017 detected through travel surveillance and genetics

By sequencing virus genomes from infected travelers, analyzing travel patterns and mosquito modeling, researchers reporting Aug. 22, 2019 in the journal Cell unearthed a spike in Zika cases from travelers returning from Cuba during the summer of 2017 that was not captured by local reports.

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Living cells engineered to be computing and recording devices

Cells can be viewed as natural minicomputers that execute programs encoded in their DNA. In a paper appearing Aug. 22, 2019 in the journal Molecular Cell, MIT researchers describe a new technology that uses DNA for information processing and storage in living cells.

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A single gene determines whether a fly has a good sense of sight or a good sense of smell

Trade-offs in the sizes of visual and olfactory organs are a common feature of animal evolution, but the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms have not been clear. A study publishing Aug. 22, 2019 in the journal Developmental Cell reveals that a single DNA variant that affects the timing of sensory organ development in fruit flies could explain the size trade-off between eyes and antenna

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Mount Sinai researchers discover that fasting reduces inflammation and improves chronic inflammatory diseases

New research is showing the profound benefits — for longevity and fighting disease — of intermittent fasting.

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Abolishing the Filibuster Is Unavoidable for Democrats

Even if Democrats regain unified control of the White House and Congress in 2020, the fate of their ambitious legislative agenda will still likely hinge on a fundamental question: Do they try to end the Senate filibuster? If the party chooses to keep the filibuster, it faces a daunting prospect: Democrats elected primarily by voters in states at the forefront of the country’s demographic, cultura

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North Carolina Sheriffs Win a Round Against ICE

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper vetoed a bill yesterday that would have required the state’s sheriffs to cooperate with federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. “This legislation is simply about scoring partisan political points and using fear to divide North Carolina,” Cooper, a Democrat, said in a statement. “This bill, in addition to being unconstitutional, weakens law enforcement in N

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Positive steps for Asian elephants facing skinning threat

The Asian elephant is the forgotten elephant.

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Positive steps for Asian elephants facing skinning threat

The Asian elephant is the forgotten elephant.

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Daily briefing: Cryptographers fight a future without secrets

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02544-1 Preparing for the day quantum computers bring down public-key encryption, huge US study will offer genetic counselling and how consciousness arose from 3.8 billion years of trying to survive.

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Verizon enlists Boingo to help it bring 5G indoors

Sure, real 5G is up to three times faster than LTE, but there are a few caveats. As we discovered in Chicago, 5G doesn't always hold up when you're trying to use it indoors. …

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Researchers Quit MIT's Media Lab over Jeffrey Epstein Money

Two scholars resign after learning that their employer accepted donations and investments from the billionaire and alleged serial pedophile who recently died by suicide in jail.

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This Online Black Market Will Sell Your Entire Digital Identity

Digital Fingerprints An online marketplace called Richlogs is selling stolen digital fingerprints that include access to a person’s entire online presence or web activity. Since it emerged in April, Richlogs has been selling packages that include a victim’s IP address, time zone, device information, and other data that are logged into their browsers. Basically, it’s enough data to let a buyer tot

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Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02538-z Researchers established the limits by combining data from surveys of the cosmos and particle-physics experiments.

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Working Scientist podcast: Switching scientific disciplines

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02500-z Moving to a new branch of science is scary, but learning new skills and collaborating with different colleagues can be exhilarating, Julie Gould discovers.

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Expert discusses the truth about plastic

Plastic continues to make big news, especially in Connecticut where a single-use plastic bag fee took effect on August 1st. With estimates of 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of plastic finding its way to the world's oceans in a single year, the single-use plastic bag fee is aimed to reduce the amount of plastic used throughout the state. The measure has stirred up questions about plastics and their envir

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Rising summer heat could soon endanger travelers on annual Muslim pilgrimage

Over two million Muslim travelers just finished the annual religious pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, traveling during some of the country's hottest weather. New research finds pilgrims in future summers may have to endure heat and humidity extreme enough to endanger their health.

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Are we really protecting rivers from pollution? It's hard to say, and that's a problem

More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters – scientists found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have taken place, but their impact is mostly perceived; data is r

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Slow electrons to combat cancer

Slow electons can be used to destroy cancer cells – but how exactly this happens has not been well understood. Now scientists have been able to demonstrate that a previously little-observed effect actually plays a pivotal role: Due to a process called interatomic Coulombic decay, an ion can pass on additional energy to surrounding atoms. This frees a huge number of electrons, with precisely the ri

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E-cigs can trigger same lung changes seen in smokers, emphysema

Scientists found that the lungs of vapers — like the lungs of smokers — have elevated levels of protease enzymes, a condition known to cause emphysema in smokers. The researchers also found that the nicotine in vaping liquids is responsible for the increase in protease enzymes.

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Computer model could help test new sickle cell drugs

A new computer model that captures the dynamics of the red blood cell sickling process could help in evaluating drugs for treating sickle cell disease.

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Fatigue in Parkinson's disease is associated with lower diastolic blood pressure

Fatigue is a common debilitating symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). A novel research study has found that fatigue symptoms in PD are associated with small but persistent reductions in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) throughout the day.

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Temperatures of 800 billion degrees in the cosmic kitchen

It is among the most spectacular events in the universe: a merger of neutron stars. Astronomers have completed the first laboratory measurements of thermal electromagnetic radiation arising in such collisions. The resulting data enabled them to calculate the prevailing temperature when such stars merge.

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Australian men's life expectancy tops other men's

Australian men are now living longer than any other group of males in the world, according to new research.

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Extreme weather is making these spiders extra feisty

Anelosimus studiosus Anelosimus studiosus (Judy Gallagher/) Swirling wind moving at upwards of 100 miles per hour combined with pelting rains and crushing waves are going to disrupt an ecosystem at least a little . Tropical cyclones are, by their nature, devastating. So it makes sense that they'd force the ecosystems they pass through to change. Ecologists have long thought this idea was pretty i

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Infected travelers reveal Cuba’s ‘hidden’ Zika outbreak

New study suggests there were 5707 cases on the island, though only 187 were reported

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Shocking rate of plant extinctions in South Africa

Over the past 300 years, 79 plants have been confirmed extinct from three of the world's biodiversity hotspots located in South Africa—the Cape Floristic Region, the Succulent Karoo, and the Maputuland-Pondoland-Albany corridor.

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High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA

Using a technique that can precisely edit DNA bases, MIT researchers have created a way to store complex "memories" in the DNA of living cells, including human cells.

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A single gene determines whether a fly has a good sense of sight or a good sense of smell

Trade-offs in the sizes of visual and olfactory organs are a common feature of animal evolution, but the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms have not been clear. A study publishing August 22 in the journal Developmental Cell reveals that a single DNA variant that affects the timing of sensory organ development in fruit flies could explain the size trade-off between eyes and antennae, p

3h

Shocking rate of plant extinctions in South Africa

Over the past 300 years, 79 plants have been confirmed extinct from three of the world's biodiversity hotspots located in South Africa—the Cape Floristic Region, the Succulent Karoo, and the Maputuland-Pondoland-Albany corridor.

3h

Maximum mass of lightest neutrino revealed using astronomical big data

Neutrinos come in three flavours made up of a mix of three neutrino masses. While the differences between the masses are known, little information was available about the mass of the lightest species until now.

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High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA

Using a technique that can precisely edit DNA bases, MIT researchers have created a way to store complex "memories" in the DNA of living cells, including human cells.

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Atacama Desert microbes may hold clues to life on Mars

Microbial life on Mars may potentially be transported across the planet on dust particles carried by wind, according to a study conducted in the Atacama Desert in North Chile, a well-known Mars analogue. The findings are published in Scientific Reports.

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Early life on Earth limited by enzyme

The enzyme-nitrogenase-can be traced back to the universal common ancestor of all cells more than four billion years ago.

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A single gene determines whether a fly has a good sense of sight or a good sense of smell

Trade-offs in the sizes of visual and olfactory organs are a common feature of animal evolution, but the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms have not been clear. A study publishing August 22 in the journal Developmental Cell reveals that a single DNA variant that affects the timing of sensory organ development in fruit flies could explain the size trade-off between eyes and antennae, p

3h

Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells

Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach—intracellular compartmentalization. It refers to the way many different organelles, vesicles and other "water-in-water" soft structures in the cell, contain and isolate chemical reactions and processes. It also lets

3h

Researchers reveal plant defense toolkit and insights for fighting crop diseases

At an unprecedented scale, researchers have now cataloged the array of surveillance tools that plants use to detect disease-causing microbes across an entire species. Representing a major advance for plant biology, the findings have important implications for the management of dangerous crop diseases which represent significant threats to food security.

3h

Possible Links Between Warming and Tornadoes Are Still Murky

New research finds connections between ocean temperatures and tornado activity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Training teams for timely NICU evacuation

Fires, tornadoes and other natural disasters are outside of the control of care teams. But it is within our team's control to train neonatal intensive care unit staff to master emergency evacuations, a necessary skill, says Lisa Zell, BSN, a clinical educator at Children's National in Washington, D.C.

3h

New report finds 100% juice helps improve children's diet quality

A new report supports existing scientific data maintaining juice as part of a healthy diet, and reinforces that claims linking 100% juice to negative health outcomes are not supported by research.

3h

Researchers reveal plant defense toolkit and insights for fighting crop diseases

At an unprecedented scale, researchers have now cataloged the array of surveillance tools that plants use to detect disease-causing microbes across an entire species. Representing a major advance for plant biology, the findings have important implications for the management of dangerous crop diseases which represent significant threats to food security.

3h

The power to think ahead in a reckless age | Bina Venkataraman

In a forward-looking talk, author Bina Venkataraman answers a pivotal question of our time: How can we secure our future and do right by future generations? She parses the mistakes we make when imagining the future of our lives, businesses and communities, revealing how we can reclaim our innate foresight. What emerges is a surprising case for hope — and a path to becoming the "good ancestors" we

3h

Ethiopia's future is tied to water— a vital yet threatened resource in a changing climate

In July Ethiopians planted 350 million trees in a single day. This was part of the country's national green legacy initiative to counter environmental degradation and climate change. The initiative ultimately aims to grow 4 billion trees across the country.

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Immune "Webs" May Aid the Formation of Gallstones

Researchers find evidence of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), sticky clumps of DNA and protein extruded by neutrophils, holding gallstones together.

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Geologists get called 'dirty polluters', but we're needed to fight climate change

When people hear we are geologists, we are often asked if we have found any oil lately. Sadly—and wrongly—the most common view of geology as a profession is that its primary role is in the discovery and extraction of fossil fuels.

4h

New technology may help repel water, save lives through improved medical devices

Imagine a better windshield that easily repels water and requires less wiping. Now imagine if that same technology could allow doctors to better detect disease or abnormalities in patients.

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Moffitt researchers develop model to personalize radiation treatment

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to change this mindset for radiation treatment with the development of a genomically-based model that can optimize and personalize a radiation dose to match an individual patient's needs.

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Rising summer heat could soon endanger travelers on annual Muslim pilgrimage

Over two million Muslim travelers just finished the annual religious pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, traveling during some of the country's hottest weather. New research finds pilgrims in future summers may have to endure heat and humidity extreme enough to endanger their health. The results can help inform policies that would make the trip safer for the several million people who make the pilg

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Climate change will alter waves along half the world's coast

New research finds that a warming planet will also alter ocean waves along more than 50% of the world's coastlines. This research, published in Nature Climate Change, has significant implications for coastal flooding and erosion.

4h

Being an omnivore is actually quite odd

The first animal likely was a carnivore, new research finds. Humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed. What an animal eats is a fundamental aspect of its biology, but surprisingly, the evolution of diet had not been studied across the animal kingdom until now. The study is a deep dive into the evolutionary history of more than one million animal species going back 800 million ye

4h

Amerikanske missiler skal finde deres egne mål ved brug af kunstig intelligens

Et særligt missil skal være i stand til at finde sit eget mål og skelne mellem venner og fjender på egen hånd. Kritikere er bekymrede for, at det kan føre til upålidelige vurderinger af, hvad et missil skal ramme, og hvornår det får øje på en fjende.

4h

Slow electrons to combat cancer

Slow electons can be used to destroy cancer cells – but how exactly this happens has not been well understood. Now scientists have been able to demonstrate that a previously little-observed effect actually plays a pivotal role: Due to a process called interatomic Coulombic decay, an ion can pass on additional energy to surrounding atoms. This frees a huge number of electrons, with precisely the ri

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Signalämnen i hjärntumörer kan leda till nya cancerterapier

Varje år får drygt 1 300 personer i Sverige diagnosen hjärntumör. Glioblastom är en dödlig form av hjärntumör där den dåliga prognosen beror på att tumören är resistent mot behandling och har en förmåga att invadera den friska hjärnan. – Tumörens aggressiva beteende beror på så kallade cancerstamceller, det vill säga cancerceller som när de delar sig driver tumörens tillväxt och gör att cancern s

4h

Video Shows Thieves Hacking, Stealing a Tesla in Just 30 Seconds

Keyless Entry A smart doorbell home security video has surfaced that allegedly shows two UK thieves hacking into a Tesla and driving away in just 30 seconds. The footage shows one of the thieves walking up to the front door of the house with a backpack on his chest, holding up a wire with both arms. A second person stands near the car’s door, ready to open it and get inside. Hack Attack As Busine

4h

New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle

Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation.

4h

Explaining earthquakes we can't feel

Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores.

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First microscopic look at a tiny phenomenon with big potential implications

Matter behaves differently when it's tiny. At the nanoscale, electric current cuts through mountains of particles, spinning them into vortexes that can be used intentionally in quantum computing. The particles arrange themselves into a topological map, but the lines blur as electrons merge into indistinguishable quasiparticles with shifting properties. The trick is learning how to control such cha

4h

Quantum gravity's tangled time

The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, physicists have now combined the key elements of the two theories describing the flow of time and discovered that temporal order between events can exhibit genuine quantum features.

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Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave

Researchers have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. The advancement was demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies and fluttering tree leaves on a kinetic art piece.

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Memory research: Fruit flies learn their body size once for an entire lifetime

Drosophila melanogaster develops stable long-term memory for its body size and reach through motion parallax while walking.

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Asteroid That's Nearly the Height of the World's Tallest Building Is Flying by Earth Soon

This asteroid nearly rivals the height of the world's tallest building.

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NASA sees a lopsided Atlantic Tropical Storm Chantal form

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a view of newly formed Tropical Storm Chantal in the North Atlantic Ocean. The image revealed that the storm formed despite being battered by outside winds.

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Satellite sees Eastern Pacific Depression 10E form

Tropical Depression 10E has formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the GOES-West satellite caught its formation far from the Baja Peninsula.

4h

Video: Five things you might not want to mix with birth control

Many forms of birth control are hormone-based, but not everything mixes well with those hormones.

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39% of straight couples now meet online

More heterosexual couples today meet online, research finds. In fact, matchmaking is now the primary job of online algorithms. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , sociologist Michael Rosenfeld reports that heterosexual couples are more likely to meet a romantic partner online than through personal contacts and connections. Since 1940, traditional ways of meeting partners—thro

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Victim-survivors of rape don't feel justice has been met, even if the accused goes to prison

The Scottish criminal justice process leaves those who have reported a rape or serious sexual assault feeling marginalized and with little control regardless of their case's outcome, a new study has found.

4h

How to become a great impostor

Unlike other icons who have appeared on the front of Life magazine, Ferdinand Waldo Demara was not famed as an astronaut, actor, hero or politician. In fact, his 23-year career was rather varied. He was, among other things, a doctor, professor, prison governor and monk. Demara was not some kind of genius either—he actually left school without any qualifications. Rather, he was "The Great Impostor,

4h

NASA finds Tropical Depression Bailu forms east of Philippines

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Depression Bailu, east of the Philippines.

4h

Slow electrons to combat cancer

Ion beams are often used today in cancer treatment: this involves electrically charged atoms being fired at the tumour to destroy cancer cells. Although, it's not actually the ions themselves that cause the decisive damage. When ions penetrate through solid material, they can share part of their energy with many individual electrons, which then continue to move at relatively low speed—and it is pr

4h

Enzyme that helps protect us from stress linked to liver cancer growth

An enzyme induced by stress to help reduce production of damaging free radicals is also used by liver cancer to regulate two major cell proliferation pathways that enable the cancer to thrive, scientists report.

4h

Underground links between quakes and eruptions of Japan's biggest active volcano

To better understand subsurface processes associated with earthquakes and eruptions of Mount Aso, researchers investigated a very long period (VLP) seismicity dataset collected over two years. A new technique was developed to locate VLP events, and two clusters of such events were detected. Changes in the locations of VLP events were closely associated with earthquake and eruption occurrences. Thi

4h

Report: Apple will unveil overhauled MacBook Pro, “Pro” iPhones this fall

The iPad Pro, iPad, HomePod, AirPods, and Apple Watch will also see updates soon.

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Spotify matches Apple Music’s 3-month trial

Spotify’s battle with Apple Music is continuing to heat up. On Monday, the company introduced upgrades to its Premium Family plan which now offers parental controls and other exclusive …

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New tools could map out complex weather data to help firefighters predict where forest fires are likely to break out

Weather and fuel—two leading wildfire culprits—are now in the crosshairs of a University of Alberta researcher hoping to use machine learning against them.

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Ethnic minority members who don't feel British are less likely to progress in their career, research shows

Members of ethnic minorities who don't feel British are less likely to move up the career ladder, new research says.

4h

Increasing numbers of Americans support gun background checks

In the aftermath of the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, public debate once again turned to what Congress should do to reduce gun violence.

4h

Next generation synthetic covalent 2-D materials unveiled

A team of researchers at the National Graphene Institute at The University of Manchester have developed a new method to synthesize 2-D materials that are thought to be impossible or, at least, unobtainable by current technologies.

4h

Uranium 'breaks the rules again'

Work led by the research group of Professor Steve Liddle and published in the prestigious journal Nature Chemistry has reported a uranium dinitrogen molecule that, according to basic chemical theory, should not exist. The rule-breaking molecule could have implications for the activation of dinitrogen, which is an essential molecule for producing fertilisers.

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Five things you might not want to mix with birth control (video)

Many forms of birth control are hormone-based–but not everything mixes well with those hormones. This week on Reactions, learn about some common products that could make your birth control less effective or cause dangerous side effects.

4h

New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle

Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation.

4h

Temperatures of 800 billion degrees in the cosmic kitchen

It is among the most spectacular events in the universe: a merger of neutron stars. An international team of researchers with strong representation from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first laboratory measurements of thermal electromagnetic radiation arising in such collisions. The resulting data enabled them to calculate the prevailing temperature when such stars merge

4h

Fatigue in Parkinson's disease is associated with lower diastolic blood pressure

Amsterdam, NL, August 22, 2019 – Fatigue is a common debilitating symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). A novel research study has found that fatigue symptoms in PD are associated with small but persistent reductions in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) throughout the day, report scientists in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

4h

Scientists use skin's microbiome to develop health index for children with eczema

Microbiomes aren't just for understanding and modulating gut health — skin, our largest organ, hosts a vibrant and complex microbiome that can provide health insights. An international research team has developed an index to better understand skin health across human populations.

4h

NASA sees a lopsided Atlantic Tropical Storm Chantal form

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a view of newly formed Tropical Storm Chantal in the North Atlantic Ocean. The image revealed that the storm formed despite being battered by outside winds.

4h

Satellite sees Eastern Pacific Depression 10E form

Tropical Depression 10E has formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the GOES-West satellite caught its formation far from the Baja Peninsula.

4h

Are we really protecting rivers from pollution? It's hard to say, and that's a problem

More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters – scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have ta

4h

Study: Climate change could pose danger for Muslim pilgrimage

According to a new study by researchers at MIT and in California, because of climate change there is an increasing risk that in coming years, conditions of heat and humidity in the areas of Saudi Arabia where the Hajj takes place could worsen, to the point that people face 'extreme danger' from harmful health effects.

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Denmark Learns What It’s Like to Be at the Center of Trump’s Attention

COPENHAGEN —At first there was disbelief, then anger, and then, following a script now familiar to a growing number of nations, Denmark turned, in its attempt to explain the inexplicable, to speculation. After waking yesterday morning to the news that the president of the United States had canceled a state visit that he himself had requested, Danes found themselves moving through the stages of Do

4h

What's the best way to teach children a second language? New research produces surprising results

People often assume that children learn new languages easily and without effort, regardless of the situation they find themselves in. But is it really true that children soak up language like sponges?

4h

Jupiter mission takes first images of destination from Earth

As part of preparations for the launch of ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer, its navigation camera has been given a unique test: imaging its destination from Earth.

4h

DeepMind Co-Founder Mustafa Suleyman Placed on Leave

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are transforming the technology industry, which is why Google dropped $650 million on UK-based DeepMind in 2014. DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman has been at the heart of the company’s research and industry outreach efforts, but now he’s mysteriously been placed on leave from the company he started with current CEO Demis Hassabis. DeepMind has been

4h

Fake news is 'reinforced by false memories'

Research during Ireland's abortion referendum highlights risks for social networks.

4h

Bacterial sex drives evolution of microbes to conquer and colonize the gut

. This discovery constitutes a paradigm shift and opens the possibility to design phage-targeted therapies capable of dealing with the aftermath of infection and antibiotic usage, as well as antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

4h

Bacterial sex drives evolution of microbes to conquer and colonize the gut

. This discovery constitutes a paradigm shift and opens the possibility to design phage-targeted therapies capable of dealing with the aftermath of infection and antibiotic usage, as well as antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

4h

Astronomers investigate radio burst emission from the magnetar XTE J1810−197

Using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), astronomers have observed the magnetar XTE J1810−197 after its recent radio outburst to investigate its emission. Results of the study, presented in a paper published August 12, offer more insights into the nature of this magnetar.

4h

Educational mobility: Students from working class background half as likely to attend top universities

Students from a working class background are around half as likely to move to a 'golden triangle' university to study for a masters' degree than those with wealthier parents, even if they match them academically.

4h

Washing laundry may be an underappreciated source of microplastic pollution

Concerns over plastic in the ocean are growing in recent years. About 2.41 million tons of plastic waste enter the oceans every year, including approximately 15,000 plastic bags per day. However, most of the plastic waste (94 percent) is made up of microplastics—pieces of plastic measuring less than five millimeters across. This summer, three interns at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth O

4h

Fifty percent chance you've reacted to junk news at least once

A new article, published by researchers from the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science and the Leiden University Centre of Linguistics in the journal PLoS ONE, shows that 50% of Dutch Facebook users are exposed to junk news at least once. In addition, junk news causes more user engagement than mainstream news.

4h

Queering Comics and Cosplay at Flame Con

Justin J Wee’s portraits highlight what it means to be queer and seen in the comics community.

4h

Hey Teachers, Get to Know Your Students' Preconceptions

People in an intro to physics class may make some basic errors, but that doesn't mean their ideas are bad. Effective teachers know to look deeper.

4h

There are way more species of horseshoe bats than scientists thought

Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. There are about a hundred different species of horseshoe bats — and that number is only going to grow. By studying the DNA of horseshoe bat specimens in museum collections, scientists have discovered that there are probably a dozen new species of horseshoe bat

4h

Switching on the Atlantic Ocean heat pump

34 million years ago the warm 'greenhouse climate' of the dinosaur age ended and the colder 'icehouse climate' of today commenced. Antarctica glaciated first and geological data imply that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the global ocean conveyor belt of heat and nutrients that today helps keep Europe warm, also started at this time. Why exactly, has remained a mystery.

4h

Visualizing strong magnetic fields with neutrons

Researchers have developed a new method with which strong magnetic fields can be precisely measured. They use neutrons obtained from the SINQ spallation source. In the future, it will therefore be possible to measure the fields of magnets that are already installed in devices and thus are inaccessible by other probing techniques.

4h

Brain finds order amidst chaos

How does the brain find order amidst a sea of noise and chaos? Researchers have found the answer by using advanced simulation techniques to investigate the way neurons talk to each other. They found that by working as a team, cortical neurons can respond even to weak input against the backdrop of noise and chaos, allowing the brain to find order.

4h

High-intensity step training boosts stroke survivors' walking skills

High-intensity step training that mimics real world conditions may better improve walking ability in stroke survivors compared to traditional, low-impact training.

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Så slogs Nordatlantens värmepump på

– Vi har hittat det som kan förklara hur cirkulationssystemet i Atlanten uppstod under övergången från växthusklimat till istidsklimat. Under den varma perioden flödade det bräckta havsvattnet ut från Arktis och blandades ut med Atlantens havsvatten vilket störde den process som hjälper till att driva de varma strömmarna. I den här studien upptäckte vi att detta flöde stängdes av genom tektoniska

4h

Detecting hydrothermal vents in volcanic lakes

Changes in the behaviour of hydrothermal vents may be indicative of changes in the volcanic system underneath, thus being a useful precursor for the next generation of early warning systems. New exploration approaches will help improving site-specific risk assessment and monitoring concepts by taking a closer look at hydrothermal vents.

4h

Computer model could help test new sickle cell drugs

A new computer model that captures the dynamics of the red blood cell sickling process could help in evaluating drugs for treating sickle cell disease.

4h

NASA finds Tropical Depression Bailu forms east of Philippines

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Depression Bailu, east of the Philippines.

4h

E-cigs can trigger same lung changes seen in smokers, emphysema

In a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the UNC scientists found that the lungs of vapers — like the lungs of smokers — have elevated levels of protease enzymes, a condition known to cause emphysema in smokers. The researchers also found that the nicotine in vaping liquids is responsible for the increase in protease enzymes.

4h

Bacterial sex drives evolution of microbes to conquer and colonize the gut

Healthy mice study real-time gut colonization and discovered a pivotal role for bacterial sex in the evolution of the mammalian microbiome. This discovery constitutes a paradigm shift and opens the possibility to design new therapies.

4h

Research: Awareness of effort to tackle air pollution can reduce people's mental wellbeing

Efforts by governments to tackle air pollution can reduce people's mental wellbeing by not meeting citizens' expectations, new research says.

4h

Climate change could pose danger for Muslim pilgrimage: study

For the world's estimated 1.8 billion Muslims—roughly one-quarter of the world population—making a pilgrimage to Mecca is considered a religious duty that must be performed at least once in a lifetime, if health and finances permit. The ritual, known as the Hajj, includes about five days of activities, of which 20 to 30 hours involve being outside in the open air.

4h

Tech Is Fueling the Hong Kong Movement. An Insider Told Us How, and Why It’s a Huge Step for Freedom

Over the past two months, Hong Kong has roared into global headlines. Its seven million citizens have increasingly taken to the streets (and the capital building, and the airport) to protest China’s move to decrease the city-state’s autonomy, set off by a proposed bill that would allow criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China. Pro-democracy activist and singer Denise Ho ,

4h

A Crater Lake and Pumice Raft in the Pacific right now

The new crater lake at Kīlauea's summit, spotted on August 15, 2019. M. Patrick, USGS-HVO Over the last few weeks, we've had two newsworthy events that involve volcanoes and water. This is a common combination on our planet and can have dramatically different results. One is a very small feature that's new to one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. The other is now a large feature spreading acr

4h

Ann Nelson Took On the Biggest Problems in Physics

The Standard Model of particle physics enumerates all the particles we’ve ever seen and captures most of how they relate to each other. This set of equations is considered a major triumph, but problems remain. For example, the Standard Model predicts that the neutron will develop properties it has never been observed to have. One possible solution to this problem, known in the community as the st

4h

Why People Keep Falling for Viral Hoaxes

It's not because they're stupid.

4h

Vikings arrived in Ireland when the population was in serious decline

New research has found that the population of Ireland was in decline for almost 200 years before the Vikings settled.

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Young Eastern Europeans in UK: Experiencing more racism, xenophobia since Brexit vote

Young Eastern Europeans living in England and Scotland have experienced more racism and xenophobia since the Brexit vote, with some saying that teachers were failing to protect them, research says.

4h

Switching electron properties on and off individually

Properties of complex materials are often determined by the interplay of several electron properties. TU Wien (Vienna) has now succeeded in disentangling this mess.

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The next trick for CRISPR is gene-editing pain away

A family of street performers could walk on coals. Here’s how the secret of why they felt no pain could benefit others.

4h

We could use bees' honey to track environmental lead pollution

Honey is a surprisingly effective tool for monitoring the levels of lead in the environment. It could be used in places where sampling is hard to organise

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Research shows it's easier for Britons to get culture than for people in any other European country

Forget the opera houses of Italy or the concert halls of Vienna—it's easier for people in Britain than in any other European country to get culture, new research shows.

5h

Exploring the interaction of polystyrene nanoplastics and blood plasma proteins

Collaborative research at ANSTO led by Mr Shinji Kihara and A/Prof. Duncan McGillivray of The MacDiarmid Institute, New Zealand with ANSTO's Dr. Jitendra Mata, scientists from the University of Auckland and A/Prof Ingo Köper from Flinders University, SA , is contributing to a better understanding of how nanoplastics interact with blood plasma proteins and other biological molecules within the body

5h

Slow electrons to combat cancer

Slow electons can be used to destroy cancer cells – but how exactly this happens has not been well understood. Now scientists at TU Wien have been able to demonstrate that a previously little-observed effect actually plays a pivotal role: Due to a process called interatomic Coulombic decay, an ion can pass on additional energy to surrounding atoms. This frees a huge number of electrons, with preci

5h

Switching electron properties on and off individually

Electrons have different properties – and they all can be used to create order in solid objects. This order determines the properties of the material.Experiments at the TU Vienna show: It is possible to influence different characteristics of the electrons separately from each other. Closely interwoven quantum phenomena can thus be understood individually.

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Lower levels of dietary vitamins and antioxidants are linked to frailty in older adults

Researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin have shown in the largest study to-date that lower levels of specific dietary vitamins and antioxidants are associated with frailty. The study examined the association of vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D, lutein and zeaxanthin levels with frailty.

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Dyslexia could affect pass rates in UK GP clinical skills exam

Trainee doctors who have dyslexia, and who declare this prior to taking the clinical skills component of the licensing exam for general practice, are less likely to pass than their counterparts, new research has shown.

5h

New insights: Improving function, independence and quality of life of individuals with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common movement disorders in children. A growing number of caregivers worldwide are caring for children, adolescents and adults with child-onset CP. In this collection of articles in the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, experts from different disciplines share their experience and summarize new research directed at maintaining and improving funct

5h

Quantum gravity's tangled time

The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA) have combined th

5h

The origins and evolution of life: Re-examining the evidence of early life traces

Even though Earth has been habitable (has had surface liquid water and some crust) for 4.3 billion years, and the oldest putative traces of life suggested go back up to 4.1 billion years, the presence of a microbial biosphere is solidly demonstrated only since 3.4 billion years ago.

5h

Global warming could make El Niño events less predictable

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests that as the planet continues to heat up due to the emission of greenhouse gases, it will become increasingly difficult to forecast El Niño events. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes computer simulations that show the impact of global warming on El Niño and La Niña events.

5h

An Ice Age savannah corridor let large mammals spread across Southeast Asia

New research from the University of Tübingen indicates that the Thai-Malay Peninsula—where parts of Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand are located—was at least partly an open savannah during the Ice Age, when the peninsula was part of a much larger land now known as the Sunda Shelf. It is likely to have provided a corridor for large mammals from mainland Asia to reach today's islands of Sumatra, Borne

5h

Visualizing strong magnetic fields with neutrons

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method with which strong magnetic fields can be precisely measured. They use neutrons obtained from the SINQ spallation source. In the future, it will therefore be possible to measure the fields of magnets that are already installed in devices and thus are inaccessible by other probing techniques. The researchers have now publishe

5h

Switching on the Atlantic heat pump

34 million years ago, the warm greenhouse climate of the dinosaur age ended, and the colder icehouse climate of today commenced. Antarctica glaciated first, and geological data imply that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the global ocean conveyor belt of heat and nutrients warm Europe, also started at this time. Why, exactly, has remained a mystery.

5h

Generation of light in a photon-number quantum superposition

Physicists at C2N have demonstrated for the first time the direct generation of light in a state that is simultaneously a single photon, two photons, and no photon at all. They showed that the same kind of light emitter used for decades is also able to generate these quantum states, and expect that this holds true for any kind of atomic system.

5h

STEM: Efforts to inspire more children could be entrenching educational inequalities

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is a priority for governments around the world. For example, the UK's current commitment to increasing investment in research and development to 2.4% of GDP by 2027 means that we need to train 260,000 more researchers to carry out this work.

5h

Human Brains and Mouse Brains: So Similar, So Different

Well, it’s inadvertently been sort of a Neuroscience Week here. This latest paper is a very interesting addition to the field indeed, just out from a very large team centered at the Allen Institute, where some rather large-scale work in the field has been done in the past. This one continues their tradition: it’s a look at single-cell-nucleus RNA sequencing in one brain region (the middle tempora

5h

Identified: Molecular structure that breaks down an important component of smog

Nitrogen oxides, also known as NOx, form when fossil fuels burn at high temperatures. When emitted from industrial sources such as coal power plants, these pollutants react with other compounds to produce harmful smog. To mitigate these NOx emissions, engineers developed a process called selective catalytic reduction (SCR) where NOx passes through a converter, or air scrubber, that transforms the

5h

The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat

In what is likely the first study to look at how dietary preferences evolved across the animal kingdom, UA researchers looked at more than a million species, going back 800 million years. The team reports several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a carnivore and that humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed.

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The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat

In what is likely the first study to look at how dietary preferences evolved across the animal kingdom, UA researchers looked at more than a million species, going back 800 million years. The team reports several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a carnivore and that humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed.

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Identified: Molecular structure that breaks down an important component of smog

Nitrogen oxides, also known as NOx, form when fossil fuels burn at high temperatures. When emitted from industrial sources such as coal power plants, these pollutants react with other compounds to produce harmful smog. To mitigate these NOx emissions, engineers developed a process called selective catalytic reduction (SCR) where NOx passes through a converter, or air scrubber, that transforms the

5h

Correlating entangled photons by radial position and momenta

A team of researchers from Xiamen University, the University of Ottawa and the University of Rochester has shown that it is possible to entangle photons with correlations between their radial and momentum states. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with entangled photons and what they learned.

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Ultrahigh thermal isolation across heterogeneously layered two-dimensional materials

Heterogeneous nanomaterials can now facilitate advanced electronics and photonics applications, but such progress is challenging for thermal applications due to the comparatively shorter wavelengths of heat carriers (known as phonons). In a new study, now published on Science Advances, Sam Vaziri and co-workers at Theiss Research and the departments of Electrical Engineering, Materials Science and

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Indigenous hunters are protecting animals, land and waterways

Canada aims to conserve 17 percent of its land and fresh water by the end of 2020. This noble objective will help protect water, air, food and biodiversity and improve the health of humans.

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Build the ultimate natural disaster survival kit

Because wouldn't you prefer to be ready when this happens? (John Middelkoop on Unsplash/) This story was originally published by Outdoor Life . Natural disasters can feel totally out of our control. But there's something that you can control to insulate your family from flooding, earthquakes, and hurricanes: You can get prepared. In this article, we’ll talk about the things to stock in your home

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Indigenous hunters are protecting animals, land and waterways

Canada aims to conserve 17 percent of its land and fresh water by the end of 2020. This noble objective will help protect water, air, food and biodiversity and improve the health of humans.

5h

A Chunk of Trinitite Reminds Us of the Sheer, Devastating Power of the Atomic Bomb

Within the Smithsonian's collections exists a telltale trace of the weapon that would change the world forever

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A 42,000-Year-Old Man Finally Goes Home

At long last, the remains of Mungo Man are at rest after an agonizing clash between modern science and an ancient spirituality

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Microbiome Testing Startup uBiome Based Tests on Infant, Pet Data

uBiome, the medical testing company offering consumer-friendly kits that analyze people’s gut health, likely based its products on some particularly shoddy science. More specifically, the data that the company used to develop its poop-testing kit included analyses of infant and pet stool, according to Business Insider . When faced with the choice to exclude the muddy data from their tests, which

5h

Overflødigt kropsfedt øger risikoen for depression

Jo mere fedt, du har på kroppen, desto større er din risiko for at udvikle depression, fastslår nyt studie. Resultatet skal hjælpe med at komme fedmeepidemien til livs, siger forsker bag studiet.

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Emmanuel Macron Expounds as the World Burns

It was a perfect late-summer evening when President Emmanuel Macron—tanned and super-energized in a dark-blue suit and crisp white shirt—held forth before the Elysée press corps on matters of international import. Posh Paris was largely out of town. Nearby, boulangeries, shops, and the French National Assembly were still closed for the August holiday. Tumbleweeds practically blew down the Bouleva

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A Hippocratic Oath for data science? We'll settle for a little more data literacy

"I swear by Hypatia, by Lovelace, by Turing, by Fisher (and/or Bayes), and by all the statisticians and data scientists, making them my witnesses, that I will carry out, according to my ability and judgment, this oath and this indenture."

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Health care workers unprepared for magnitude of climate change

An epidemic of chronic kidney disease that has killed tens of thousands of agricultural workers worldwide, is just one of many ailments poised to strike as a result of climate change, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

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Researchers get first microscopic look at a tiny phenomenon with big potential implications

Matter behaves differently when it's tiny. At the nanoscale, electric current cuts through mountains of particles, spinning them into vortexes that can be used intentionally in quantum computing. The particles arrange themselves into a topological map, but the lines blur as electrons merge into indistinguishable quasiparticles with shifting properties. The trick is learning how to control such cha

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Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study

A research group led by Dr. NIU Shuli from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that water availability in soil determines the direction of carbon-climate feedback.

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Yet another way dogs help the military; aeromedical patient evacuations

Animal-assisted therapy has many benefits in health care. Yet, its biological and psychosocial effects in the military are unknown, especially for injured, airlifted patients. Researchers teamed up with a non-profit animal organization that trains therapy dogs to see if an animal-assisted intervention could reduce stress in this setting. Results showed that levels of the stress biomarkers cortisol

5h

More frequent wildfires in the boreal forest threaten previously protected soil carbon

University of Saskatchewan researchers have found that as major wildfires increase in Canada's North, boreal forests that have acted as carbon sinks for millennia are becoming sources of atmospheric carbon, potentially contributing to the greenhouse effect. The results were published Aug. 21 in the prestigious journal Nature.

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Stanford researchers explain earthquakes we can't feel

Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores.

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Australian men on top when it comes to life expectancy

Australian men are now living longer than any other group of males in the world, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

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Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave

Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. The advancement, recently reported in the journal Science Robotics, was demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies and fluttering tree leaves on a kinetic art piece.

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Truckies more obese than most: QUT study

More than 200,000 people are employed as truck drivers in Australia and while their role in transporting goods across its wide brown land is critical, they are among the nation's most unhealthy. Dr Marguerite Sendall from QUT's School of Public Health and Social Work says driving a truck and being healthy is possible but drivers need a little help from the workplace to find the time and motivation

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Klimaministeren står foran kæmpe-udfordring: Hvad vil du spørge ham om?

Hvad er de mest kritiske punkter, som den nye regering skal tage med i sine planer for at reducere udslippet af klimagasser med 70 pct.? Det forsøger vi nu at få skriftlige svar på efter flere aflyste interviewaftaler med den ansvarlige minister.

5h

Boo! Google Stops Serving Desserts, Goes With Android 10 For Next Mobile OS Build

You can forget about the next version of Android being called queijadinha, qurabiya, queen of puddings, or any other dessert that begins the letter "Q." As part of a more inclusive rebranding …

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Physical activity at any intensity linked to lower risk of early death

Clear evidence that higher levels of physical activity — regardless of intensity — are associated with a lower risk of early death in middle aged and older people.

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Omega-3 fats have little or no effect on type 2 diabetes

Increasing omega-3 fats in the diet has little or no effect on risk of type 2 diabetes.

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China's two-child policy has led to 5.4 million extra births

The introduction of China's universal two-child policy, that permits all couples to have two children, has led to an extra 5.4 million births, finds a new study.

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New technique could streamline design of intricate fusion device

Stellarators, twisty machines that house fusion reactions, rely on complex magnetic coils that are challenging to design and build. Now, a physicist has developed a mathematical technique to help simplify the design of the coils.

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Air pollution linked to risk of premature death

A new international study has found that air pollution is linked to increased cardiovascular and respiratory death rates. The study is the largest of its kind to investigate the short-term impacts of air pollution on death, conducted over a 30-year period. The study analyzed data on air pollution and mortality in 24 countries and regions.

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Google Gives up Sweets: New OS Is Just Called Android 10

Bucking tradition, the next version of Google's mobile operating system will not be named after a dessert. Google is also changing the logo from green to black.

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The Android 10 Privacy and Security Upgrades You Should Know About

Google's next big Android release will make you safer—especially in ways you can't see.

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Shh! No Hacking the Census in the Library

Opinion: Millions of folks filling out the 2020 Census on public library computers also are putting themselves at risk.

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Modal time theory: Understanding human existence through time travel and music

Time is a fundamental dimension of human existence and comes in many forms. Using a comparative approach, philosopher and physicist Norman Sieroka looks at what distinguishes them, using time travel and music.

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The Search for Social Identity Leads to "Us" versus "Them"

Uncertainty in the world threatens our sense of self. To cope, people embrace populism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Greenhouse uses predatory insects for pest control

The William & Mary greenhouse has started a new program to limit the use of chemicals by relying on predatory insects for pest control. It's the biological equivalent of fighting fire with fire ⁠— and so far it's working.

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Greenhouse uses predatory insects for pest control

The William & Mary greenhouse has started a new program to limit the use of chemicals by relying on predatory insects for pest control. It's the biological equivalent of fighting fire with fire ⁠— and so far it's working.

5h

How our genes and environment influence BMI and height

Environmental conditions influence our body mass index (BMI) by increasing or decreasing the effect of inherited genetic variations, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

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Memory research: Fruit flies learn their body size once for an entire lifetime

Drosophila melanogaster develops stable long-term memory for its body size and reach through motion parallax while walking.

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The Search for Social Identity Leads to "Us" versus "Them"

Uncertainty in the world threatens our sense of self. To cope, people embrace populism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Handbook of Assays for Developing Targeting Therapeutics

Download this handbook from LI-COR Biosciences to learn about key assays used to answer vital questions related to therapeutics research, including Western blotting, protein profiling, tissue section microscopy, and in vivo and ex vivo imaging!

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My experiment in studying science has reinforced my belief in exams

In his final report, our writer says he discovered that learning is rewarding at any age — and great fun

5h

Viking migration left a lasting legacy on Ireland's population

The early medieval period in Ireland (400-1200AD) was a time of key importance. It was a turning point in European history and the origin of much contemporary Irish culture and identity. Ireland, the early medieval "land of saints and scholars," had much cultural and economic growth during the 5th and 6th centuries. Elsewhere in Europe there were unstable populations in the wake of the fall of Rom

5h

Brown fat may clear obesity-linked amino acids from blood

New research clarifies how brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue, may help protect against obesity and diabetes. The study in the journal Nature adds to our knowledge about brown fat’s role in human health and could lead to new medications for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. Scientists consider brown fat a heat organ. People have a few grams of it in areas including the neck, collar

6h

Earth is an exoplanet to aliens: This is what they'd see

The study of exoplanets has matured considerably in the last 10 years. During this time, the majority of the over 4000 exoplanets currently known were discovered. It was also during this time that the process has started to shift from the discovery to characterization. What's more, next-generation instruments will allow for studies that will reveal a great deal about the surfaces and atmospheres o

6h

Quantum computers to become portable

Together with the University of Innsbruck, the ETH Zurich and Interactive Fully Electrical Vehicles SRL, Infineon Austria is researching specific questions on the commercial use of quantum computers. With new innovations in design and manufacturing, the partners from universities and industry want to develop affordable components for quantum computers.

6h

Researchers developing natural pesticide alternative to target pests without harming honeybees

A natural, sustainable alternative to pesticides that targets specific pests, without harming beneficial pollinators such as honeybees, is being developed with the help of researchers from the Institute for Sustainable Food at the University of Sheffield.

6h

Research team reveals molecular program that controls cells' capacity for division

Cells in the body proliferate at different rates. Some divide constantly and throughout life, like the ones that line the gut. Others divide only rarely, sometimes resting for several years in a non-dividing state. Now, a study led by scientists at MIT's Whitehead Institute sheds light on the molecular mechanisms that help control this cellular hibernation, termed quiescence, revealing how cells c

6h

Researchers developing natural pesticide alternative to target pests without harming honeybees

A natural, sustainable alternative to pesticides that targets specific pests, without harming beneficial pollinators such as honeybees, is being developed with the help of researchers from the Institute for Sustainable Food at the University of Sheffield.

6h

Cleaner living through public housing: Access to land is a barrier to simpler, sustainable living

Many of us do not need to hear any more warnings from the IPCC, David Attenborough or climate activists like Greta Thunberg. We have seen enough to be convinced that limitless economic growth and the globalization of high-consumption lifestyles have brought our planet's life-support systems to the brink of collapse.

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Research team reveals molecular program that controls cells' capacity for division

Cells in the body proliferate at different rates. Some divide constantly and throughout life, like the ones that line the gut. Others divide only rarely, sometimes resting for several years in a non-dividing state. Now, a study led by scientists at MIT's Whitehead Institute sheds light on the molecular mechanisms that help control this cellular hibernation, termed quiescence, revealing how cells c

6h

Physicists create world's smallest engine

The research explains how random fluctuations affect the operation of microscopic machines like this tiny motor. In the future, such devices could be incorporated into other technologies to recycle waste heat and thus improve energy efficiency.

6h

India has it right: nations either aim for the moon or get left behind in the space economy

India's Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has settled into lunar orbit, ahead of its scheduled moon landing on September 7. If it succeeds India will join a very select club, now comprising the former Soviet Union, the United States and China.

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Green transition: The whole world can learn from a small town in Iceland

Nowadays cities are quite unsustainable places. They consume a lot of the world's resources and account for more than half of the world's emissions of greenhouse gases, contributing substantially to the ongoing climate crisis.

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Russia launches life-sized robot into space

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India's Chandrayaan 2, Enters the moon's Orbit.

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Amazon, Microsoft, 'putting world at risk of killer AI': study

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Læring af fejl skal ikke foregå i Byretten

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skal evalueres inden for det næste halve år, og der skal ske en ændring, for styrelsen arbejder stadig meget kontrollerende og straffende, skriver Henrik Ullum, formand for LVS.

6h

Genom-supercomputer bliver forsinket igen

Forsinkelsen påvirker ikke Nationalt Genom Center, oplyser centerdirektør.

6h

Google Delays Hangouts Shutdown Until June 2020

Google announced major changes to its popular Hangouts messaging platform in 2017, but Hangouts is still chugging along more than two years later. Now, Google …

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This Way Up Is a Bountiful Binge Watch

The more shows like This Way Up emerge, the more the current TV business model of paying squillions of dollars to questionably credentialed hit-makers seems lamentable. For every overstuffed, ego-swaddling vanity project clogging up the airwaves, you could have 20 series like this one from the Irish comedian and writer Aisling Bea: small in scope, infinitely charming, and intermittently devastati

6h

AI and Scaffolding Networks

A recent commentary in Nature Communications echoes, I think, a key understanding of animal intelligence, and therefore provides an important lesson for artificial intelligence (AI). The author, Anthony Zador, extends what has been an important paradigm shift in our approach to AI. Early concepts of AI, as reflected in science fiction at least (which I know does not necessarily track with actual

6h

Ny app upptäcker risk för att utveckla Alzheimer

Det finns mycket att vinna på att skjuta upp de allvarliga symptomen för demens, Alzheimer och andra kognitiva nedsättningar. Forskning visar att om sjukdomarnas debut skjuts upp i fem år besparar det den genomsnittliga patienten hälften av lidandet sjukdomarna medför. Samtidigt halveras samhällets kostnader. – Med appen Dementia Risk Tool kan vem som helst testa om de befinner sig i riskzonen, s

6h

Pence says U.S. rocket companies will put astronauts in space this year. U.S. rocket companies aren’t so sure.

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft brings astronauts to the ISS. ETA TBD. (NASA/) With all the glory of the Apollo lunar landings, it can be easy to forget that the Soviet Union beat the U.S. to most other milestones during the space race. Sputnik 1 was the first satellite. Laika, the first animal (dog) in orbit. Yuri Gagarin, the first person. For the last eight years, the Russia’s Roscosmos has rega

6h

Three suicide prevention strategies show real promise. How can they reach more people?

Crisis hotlines, standardizing mental health care, and restricting lethal means are all saving lives

6h

Have humans developed natural defenses against suicide?

A provocative idea suggests big brains can have tragic consequences—but may also help keep us safe

6h

The Beautiful Potential of Never-Ending Bachelor Parties

More than a third of millennials slip ’n’ slide into debt to attend bachelor/ette parties. Thanks to group texts, the party never stops.

6h

8 Best Laptops and Tablets for Students (2019 Back to School)

Whether you plan to crush that term paper or immerse yourself in research, these college-ready computers will help you excel.

6h

Verdens i særklasse største chip skal bruges til kunstig intelligens

Calfornisk virksomhed har lanceret ny chip, der både i fysisk størrelse og antal transistorer overtrumfer alt, vi tidligere har set.

6h

Gravitational waves could settle mystery of the universe's expansion

Supernovae and the big bang's afterglow give us conflicting numbers on how fast the universe is expanding. Gravitational waves could help settle things

6h

Image of the Day: Baked with Ancient Yeast

Scientists extracted 4,500-year-old yeast from Egyptian pottery to use in breadmaking.

6h

Färre unga går till doktorn när det kostar pengar

– Det är intressant att trots att det är en relativt låg avgift, så finner vi en minskning i antalet läkarbesök, konstaterar Naimi Johansson, doktorand i hälsoekonomi och förstaförfattare till studien, publicerad i The European Journal of Health Economics. I den aktuella forskningsstudien undersöks hur primärvårdsläkarbesök i Västra Götaland påverkas när unga vuxna går från avgiftsfri vård, till

7h

Eight species of fungus cause root rot in South Dakota corn

An invisible enemy is attacking South Dakota corn.

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Eight species of fungus cause root rot in South Dakota corn

An invisible enemy is attacking South Dakota corn.

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Is Tribalism a Natural Malfunction? – Issue 75: Story

From an office at Carnegie Mellon, my colleague John Miller and I had evolved a computer program with a taste for genocide. This was certainly not our intent. We were not scholars of race, or war. We were interested in the emergence of primitive cooperation. So we built machines that lived in an imaginary society, and made them play a game with each other—one known to engender complex social beha

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Survival of the Friendliest – Issue 75: Story

Violence has been the sire of all the world’s values,” wrote poet Robinson Jeffers in 1940. “What but the wolf’s tooth whittled so fine the fleet limbs of the antelope? What but fear winged the birds, and hunger jeweled with such eyes the great goshawk’s head?” We’ve taken these metaphors for evolution to heart, reading them to mean that life is a race to kill or be killed. “Darwinian” stands in

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Humans Are Wired for Goodness – Issue 75: Story

Nicholas Christakis and I are on the same page: We would definitely sacrifice our lives to save a billion strangers, perhaps even several hundred million, plucked at random from Earth’s population. But, for sure, not a thousand strangers, or a million. Those numbers seem, somehow, too insignificant. Christakis, the director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, shared this thought experimen

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Salt deposits on Mars hold clues to sources of ancient water

For centuries, miners have burrowed into the earth in search of salt—laid down in thick layers from ancient oceans long since evaporated. When scientists saw huge deposits of salt on Mars, they immediately wondered whether it meant Mars too once had giant oceans. Yet it's remained unclear what those deposits meant about the Red Planet's climate.

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Online dating is the most popular way couples meet

Algorithms, and not friends and family, are now the go-to matchmaker for people looking for love, Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld has found.

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Magnets are being used to extract algal molecules for the beauty, bioplastics industries

Entrepreneurs in the aquaculture sector face a problem—extracting all the valuable molecules from seaweed and algal cells is still really difficult. But marine enzymes and magnets are now making it easier to remove precious molecules and can even turn microalgae into magnetically-guided 'vehicles' for targeted drug delivery.

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An Ingenious Microscope Could Change How Quickly Disease Is Detected

In the rural parts of Uganda, lab technicians spend hours each day on thankless and seemingly unceasing work. The most common tests they run are for malaria. A technician smears a blood sample on a slide, treats it with dye, and then slowly scans it for cells that contain malaria parasites. She then uses a handheld clicker to record how many parasites she sees. A typical test might take from 30 m

7h

Ready or Not Is a Clever Horror Comedy About Entitled Rich People

The trope of entitled aristocrats hunting humans has rattled around in pop culture for decades. Beginning with Richard Connell’s 1924 short story “ The Most Dangerous Game ,” this cautionary tale of wealth spiraling into murderous madness has been remade by Hollywood numerous times, from the Fay Wray–starring 1932 version to the 1993 Jean-Claude Van Damme action thriller Hard Target . But the rec

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Researchers explain slow-moving earthquakes known as 'slow slip events'

The Earth's subsurface is an extremely active place, where the movements and friction of plates deep underground shape our landscape and govern the intensity of hazards above. While the Earth's movements during earthquakes and volcanic eruptions have been recorded by delicate instruments, analyzed by researchers and constrained by mathematical equations, they don't tell the whole story of the shif

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New evidence on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle

Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation.

7h

The False Promise of Fish Oil Supplements

After decades of promises that they “may work” to reduce cardiovascular disease, the lack of a demonstrated benefit leads me to conclude that consumers are wasting their money [ED: Please… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Conflicting consequences of climate change for Arctic nesting geese

Life over the last half-century has been pretty good for populations of Svalbard barnacle geese. A hunting ban implemented in the 1950s in their overwintering area in Scotland has led to explosive population growth, from roughly 2800 birds in 1960 to more than 40,000 birds today.

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Breakthroughs seen in artificial eye and muscle technology

Inspired by the human eye, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens that is essentially a flat, electronically controlled artificial eye. The adaptive metalens simultaneously controls for three of the major contributors to blurry images: focus, astigmatism, and image shift.

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Underground links between quakes and eruptions of Japan's biggest active volcano

The threat of explosive volcanic eruptions looms over many cities around the world. Earthquakes, another major geological hazard, are known to have some relationships with the occurrence of volcanic eruptions. Although they often precede volcanic events, the mechanisms of these relationships are not yet well understood.

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Studying quantum phenomena in magnetic systems to understand exotic states of matter

Besides solids, liquids and gases, more exotic states of matter can be generated in specific materials under special conditions. Such states are of great interest to physicists because they provide a deeper understanding of quantum phenomena.

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Conflicting consequences of climate change for Arctic nesting geese

Life over the last half-century has been pretty good for populations of Svalbard barnacle geese. A hunting ban implemented in the 1950s in their overwintering area in Scotland has led to explosive population growth, from roughly 2800 birds in 1960 to more than 40,000 birds today.

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Matsvinnsvåg kan minska avfallet på turisthotell

Att producera mat kräver mycket resurser och matsvinnet i alla delar av livsmedelskedjan är ett stort miljöproblem. Extra problematiskt blir det när mat kastas nära slutkund eftersom alla insatser för matproduktionen då har varit förgäves, såsom transport, förpackning, förvaring och tillagning av maten. Därför finns det stor potential att minska miljöbelastningen från livsmedelskedjan genom att k

7h

Män behöver engagera sig mer i omsorg av barn

– Genom att använda sig av de sociala miljöer som finns för föräldralediga pappor kan män skapa vardagsrutiner och hantera huvudansvar för barn, tillsammans med andra pappor. Detta bidrar till att pappornas omsorgsansvar konkretiseras och normaliseras, förklarar genusvetaren Tobias Axelsson vid Örebro universitet. Tobias Axelsson har i sin doktorsavhandling tittat närmare på öppna förskolans papp

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Biblical War Revealed on 2,800-Year-Old Stone Altar

The altar reveals new details about a rebellion against the Kingdom of Israel.

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Astronomers Create 8 Million Baby Universes Inside a Computer and Watch Them Grow. Here's What They Learned.

"UniverseMachine" churns out millions of unique universes to study dark matter and the evolution of galaxies.

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Scientists Are Building a Real-Life Version of the Starship Enterprise's Life Scanner

A novel method relying on biochemistry could provide an unambiguous signal of life on other worlds.

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Swatting Is a Deadly Problem—Here's the Solution

Seattle has a no-brainer solution: If you're afraid of being swatted, list your address in a registry that police can check.

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For Young Female Coders, Internship Interviews Can Be Toxic

In a survey conducted by Girls Who Code, teen female engineers report that even their very first encounters with tech companies raised red flags.

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Here Come the Space Tugs, Ready to Tidy Up Earth's Orbits

SpaceX is teaming up with the maker of a space tugboat, which would nudge satellites around, clean up space junk, and do other orbital housekeeping.

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The False Promise of Fish Oil Supplements

After decades of promises that they “may work” to reduce cardiovascular the lack of demonstrated benefit leads me to conclude that consumers are wasting their money [ED: Please provide… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The floor is yours

What topics would you like to see covered at Science-Based Medicine? Open thread today for your suggestions and comments.

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Here’s how social-media firms should tackle online hate, according to physics

Policing online hate groups is like a never-ending game of whack-a-mole, and it’s not working. Here are some ideas that might.

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Maybe don’t keep your Apple Card in a leather wallet, Apple warns

The card strives to be compatible with the way we shop, not the way we dress.

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YouTube has become such a garbage fire it is time to dump it for good

To make the internet a better place we could start by switching off the world’s biggest video sharing site amid claims its algorithms magnify fringe views, says Annalee Newitz

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The Solar System's Loneliest Planets, Revisited

Thirty years after a probe visited Neptune, many scientists say now is the time to finally return to that world and Uranus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Solar System's Loneliest Planets, Revisited

Thirty years after a probe visited Neptune, many scientists say now is the time to finally return to that world and Uranus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Den danske vognpark vokser hurtigere end vores nabolandes

PLUS. Vognparken er vokset hurtigt i de senere år. Personbiltætheden i Danmark er nu oppe på 447 biler pr. 1.000 indbyggere, og garagerne fyldes hurtigere end i vores nabolande.

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Bernie Sanders’s ‘Green New Deal’: A $16 Trillion Climate Plan

Mr. Sanders’s climate change proposal calls for the United States to eliminate fossil fuel use by 2050. “We must be extraordinarily aggressive,” he said in an interview.

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Ljudkonst på jakt efter osynliga ljud

– Med hjälp av sensorer, hydrofoner och en aeolisk gitarr skapade vind, gitarr och den omgivande ljudmiljön en enhet som gemensamt navigerade i de förutsättningar som platsen hade i ögonblicket, säger Stefan Östersjö, professor i musikalisk gestaltning vid Luleå tekniska universitet och medverkande i Ljudkonstprojektet Invisible Sounds. Det var hösten 2018, som Stefan Östersjö tillsammans med Jan

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French mayor due in court after banning pesticide use near homes

A mayor in northwest France is to appear in court on Thursday after banning the use of pesticides near homes in his village in a case that is seen as emblematic of rising opposition to chemical pollution in rural areas.

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French mayor due in court after banning pesticide use near homes

A mayor in northwest France is to appear in court on Thursday after banning the use of pesticides near homes in his village in a case that is seen as emblematic of rising opposition to chemical pollution in rural areas.

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Hepatitis expert up to five retractions and one expression of concern denies reusing images

A microbiology journal has issued an expression of concern over image reuse in a 2010 paper whose senior author has already racked up five retractions for duplicating figures. The article, “Activation of transcription factor Nrf2 by hepatitis C virus induces the cell-survival pathway,” appeared in the Journal of General Virology, a publication of the Microbiology … Continue reading

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Ny centerchef på Psykiatrisk Center Glostrup

Mette Bertelsen Fredsgaard overtager stillingen som øverste chef ved Psykiatrisk Center Glostrup. Den nye chef glæder sig til at komme tilbage til patienterne, siger hun.

8h

Politiets nye it-center har fået over 12.000 anmeldelser om økonomisk kriminalitet

Politiet åbnede i december 2018 et nyt center for it-relateret økonomisk kriminalitet. På et halvt år har centret modtaget 12.162 henvendelser fra danske borgere og virksomheder.

8h

Milton Friedman Was Wrong

On Monday, the Business Roundtable, a group that represents CEOs of big corporations, declared that it had changed its mind about the “purpose of a corporation.” That purpose is no longer to maximize profits for shareholders, but to benefit other “stakeholders” as well, including employees, customers, and citizens. While the statement is a welcome repudiation of a highly influential but spurious

8h

Don’t Use These Free Speech Arguments Ever Again

America is awash in ugly, hateful speech. White nationalists march defiantly , and their slogans are echoed in murderous rampages . Government officials revel in disparaging the very people they patrol . Many people—and I’m one of them—argue that the president’s rhetoric encourages this grotesque and shameful state of affairs even as he nominally condemns it. This has all led to more discussion a

8h

Would You Rather a Recession, or Trump?

With tumbling United States stocks, a queasy eurozone market, and decelerating Chinese growth, warnings signs are flashing that the U.S. economy, for all its strengths , may be slipping into a downturn. But some of the president’s opponents are greeting economic jitters with a surprising response: Bring on the recession! Their thinking goes like this: Trump’s presidency poses a unique threat to t

8h

To Solve Hospital Overcrowding, Think Like a Mathematician

Hospitals have often struggled to allocate resources to handle the ebb and flow of patient demand. But studies suggest that patients show up in fairly predictable patterns. The problem is that hospitals try to meet that naturally varying demand with guesswork and intuition instead of statistics.

8h

Hashtag politics: 4 key ways digital activism is inegalitarian

Protesting in person is costly in terms of money and resources; some people have children to take care of, jobs that can't be away from, or may not have time to attend a planning event. The internet was supposed to be a way to sidestep this barrier to political activism. But this doesn't consider the other barriers preventing poor and working-class folks from participating in digital activism. In

8h

WHO: Foreløbig ingen tegn på, at mikroplast i drikkevand er usundt

Vi ved endnu ikke nok til at kunne afgøre, om mikroplast i drikkevand udgør en sundhedsfare. Verdenssundhedsorganisationen råder til at filtrere vandet og forske mere.

8h

News Brief: Federal Deficit, New Immigration Policy, DNA Experiment

The Congressional Budget Office revises its federal deficit estimate. New policy would allow the government to indefinitely detain children with their families. And, the results of a DNA experiment.

8h

The Future On Four Wheels — Change In The Automotive Business

The future of the automotive trade is open. As new technology enters the market, like sensing element technology, mixed reality, and 3D printing, contenders from all manner of industries square measure transportation completely different thinking to the room additionally because of the R&D department. Ride-sharing schemes, electrical vehicles, and autonomous vehicles is also grabbing the headline

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The difference between predictive analysis and machine learning

submitted by /u/inkedlj [link] [comments]

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Evolutionary modification of AGS protein contributes to formation of micromeres in sea urchins

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11560-8 Micromeres in a sea urchin embryo are formed by asymetric cleavage but what molecular mechanisms regulate their formation is unclear. Here, the authors show that sea urchins modify an evolutionarily conserved AGS-dependent mechanism to induce asymmetric cell divisions in the early embryo.

9h

Isolating contiguous Pt atoms and forming Pt-Zn intermetallic nanoparticles to regulate selectivity in 4-nitrophenylacetylene hydrogenation

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11794-6 Noble metals play a momentous role in heterogeneous catalysis but still face a huge challenge in selectivity control. Herein, the authors demonstrate that isolating contiguous Pt atoms and forming Pt-Zn intermetallic nanoparticles is an effective strategy to optimize the selectivity of Pt catalysts.

9h

Octahedral gold-silver nanoframes with rich crystalline defects for efficient methanol oxidation manifesting a CO-promoting effect

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11766-w Direct methanol fuel cells are promising for clean, sustainable energy, but catalysts should be optimized. Here the authors construct ultrathin nanoframes with rich crystalline defects to increase electrocatalytic activity of gold for methanol oxidation, which is surprisingly promoted by carbon monoxide.

9h

Nucleosome and ubiquitin position Set2 to methylate H3K36

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11726-4 Set2 methyltransferase catalyzes the lysine 36 methylation of histone H3 (H3K36me) and the enzyme is mutated in many cancers. The authors provide mechanistic insights into how Set2 methylates nucleosomes by determining the 3.8 Å cryo-EM structure of Set2 bound to a H2B ubiquitinated nucleosome core particle.

9h

Quantifying the nonclassicality of pure dephasing

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11502-4 The presence of processes that cannot be simulated classically in open quantum system dynamics is acknowledged, but an exact quantifier for this non-classical character is still missing. Here, the authors provide a quantitative measure of non-classicality for purely dephasing evolutions.

9h

Cognitive control of complex motor behavior in marmoset monkeys

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11714-8 Whether marmosets can exhibit complex motor tasks in controlled experimental designs has not yet been demonstrated. Here, the authors show that marmoset monkeys can be trained to call on command in controlled operant conditioning tasks.

9h

Switchable magnetic bulk photovoltaic effect in the two-dimensional magnet CrI3

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11832-3 Two dimensional (2D) material with intriguing physical properties promises advanced electronic and spintronic technologies. Here the authors predict a magnetic photo-galvanic effect (MPGE) in bilayer 2D CrI3 due to the magnetism-induced asymmetry of the carrier velocity in the band-structure topology.

9h

Crystal structure and substrate-induced activation of ADAMTS13

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11474-5 The plasma metalloprotease ADAMTS13 regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in a shear-dependent manner. Here the authors present the ADAMTS13 crystal structure of the 70kDa N-terminal metalloprotease to spacer domains, and using kinetic measurements they identify a substrate b

9h

A high-efficiency L-band coaxial three-period relativistic Cherenkov oscillator

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47496-8

9h

Complete chloroplast genome sequences of four Allium species: comparative and phylogenetic analyses

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48708-x

9h

Non-Invasive Imaging Through Scattering Medium by Using a Reverse Response Wavefront Shaping Technique

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48788-9

9h

Epitope Mapping by NMR of a Novel Anti-Aβ Antibody (STAB-MAb)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47626-2

9h

Highly-efficient laser ablation of copper by bursts of ultrashort tuneable (fs-ps) pulses

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48779-w

9h

Immunoevolution of mouse pancreatic organoid isografts from preinvasive to metastatic disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48663-7

9h

Quantum Engineering of Atomically Smooth Single-Crystalline Silver Films

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48508-3

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Systemically Administered Plant Recombinant Holo-Intrinsic Factor Targets the Liver and is not Affected by Endogenous B12 levels

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48555-w

9h

Økonomiforhandlinger skal give løft af sundhedsvæsenet

Jeg vil ikke tegne et dystert billede af sundhedsvæsenet, men væsenet er altså presset og behøver langt flere penge end den årlige ene procent. Så, vil danskerne kunne mærke, at der er kommet en ny regering?

9h

Midtjysk enighed om tre fokuspunkter i sundhedsaftale

Det er et tålmodighedsarbejde at få sundhedsaftalen på plads, mener Ib Lauritsen (V), borgmester i Ikast-Brande Kommune og næstformand for Sundhedskoordinationsudvalget. Men han er tilfreds med, at Midtjylland vil fokusere på psykiatri, rygning og akutte indlæggelser.

9h

Trump’s Riskiest Bet

It’s the nightmare scenario that President Donald Trump’s camp dreads most: an economic downturn that steadily intensifies as the 2020 election nears. What would it mean for Trump if, by the fall of 2020, the jobless rate had doubled, economic growth was hovering at an anemic 1 percent, and, with no end in sight for the trade war with China, the stock market was plunging? A president whose argume

9h

Visualizing strong magnetic fields with neutrons

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method with which strong magnetic fields can be precisely measured. They use neutrons obtained from the SINQ spallation source. In the future, it will therefore be possible to measure the fields of magnets that are already installed in devices and thus are inaccessible by other probing techniques.

9h

Switching on the Atlantic heat pump

34 million years ago the warm 'greenhouse climate' of the dinosaur age ended and the colder 'icehouse climate' of today commenced. Antarctica glaciated first and geological data imply that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the global ocean conveyor belt of heat and nutrients that today helps keep Europe warm, also started at this time. Why exactly, has remained a mystery.

9h

High-intensity step training boosts stroke survivors' walking skills

High-intensity step training that mimics real world conditions may better improve walking ability in stroke survivors compared to traditional, low-impact training.

9h

The sourdough loaves that led two scientists to fame on The Great British Bake Off

Nature, Published online: 22 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02533-4 The UK television competition, which has spawned spin-offs in 30 other countries, is back for a tenth series, starting on 27 August. The 2018 winner Rahul Mandal and 2017 contestant Chuen-Yan Tsou (‘Yan’) talk cake, failed bakes, imposter syndrome and why science is an advantage in the Bake Off tent.

9h

EU brygger på regler mod masseovervågning med ansigtsgenkendelse

Efter flere sager om ansigtsgenkendelsessoftware i virksomheder og myndigheder er EU-Kommissionen nu gået i gang med at planlægge ny regulering mod teknologien.

9h

Russia launches life-sized robot into space

The robot, named Fedor, will perform daily tasks during its 10 days on the International Space Station.

10h

Conflicting consequences of climate change for Arctic nesting geese

Climate change is the big wild card when it comes to the survival of many Arctic species. A new study shows that climate change will be both good and bad for Svalbard barnacle goose populations — although the balance may tip depending upon the severity of future temperature increases, and how other species react.

10h

Forsyningernes vand-sensorer var fulde af fejl: Ph.d.-studerende er klar med løsningen

Forkerte indstillinger af tid eller af minimumsforbrug var blandt de grelle fejl, en ph.d.-studerende fra DTU fandt i sensorer fra tre større danske forsyninger. Han har nu udviklet et værktøj til at teste data fra vandmålinger.

10h

French Guiana grapples with Asian craving for fish bladder

For years, Asian demand for a dried fish bladder prized as a culinary delicacy—and purported aphrodisiac—has been a boon to French Guiana's fishing industry, but officials are racing to rein in the market over fears the species will soon be endangered.

11h

French Guiana grapples with Asian craving for fish bladder

For years, Asian demand for a dried fish bladder prized as a culinary delicacy—and purported aphrodisiac—has been a boon to French Guiana's fishing industry, but officials are racing to rein in the market over fears the species will soon be endangered.

11h

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