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nyheder2019august24

Uber tries to reassure customers that it takes safety seriously, following NYTimes book exerpt

It’s hard at times not to feel sorry for CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, given all that he inherited when he became the ride-share giant’s top boss back in April 2017. Among his many to-do …

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What scientists and/or companies are focusing on Ray Kurzweil's GNR?

Meaning g enetics, n anotechnology, and r obotics. Three technologies that Kurzweil says will define our future. Are there any scientists, companies, (likely startups) and other organizations that are developing in these three fields at once? submitted by /u/dorash [link] [comments]

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New Glenn lifts less, can be used less times, and will have less flight data than BFR. So why would anyone choose it?

I am assuming BFR will be cheaper per pound (since it can lift more and aren't limited to 25 launches), and safer (since they will have more flight data) than New Glenn. If SpaceX lifts more, at a lower price, more safely why would anyone not use it (aside from government contracts)? submitted by /u/ommfg123456 [link] [comments]

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Spanish scientists created medicine that attacks cells that activate HIV

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Model developed to cut carbon emissions from buildings by 80 per cent

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Emotionally Extreme Experiences, Not Just "Positive" or "Negative" Experiences, Are More Meaningful in Life

Peak emotional experiences are the most meaningful ones in our lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Emotionally Extreme Experiences, Not Just "Positive" or "Negative" Experiences, Are More Meaningful in Life

Peak emotional experiences are the most meaningful ones in our lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How an old oven became a sink

A bathroom seems like a weird place for an oven. Unless that oven… is actually a sink. (Cari Shane/) When DIY inspiration strikes, you’ve got to go with it. For me, that meant impulsively salvaging a rusty, musty, 1940s electric oven with a vague plan to turn it into a vanity and sink. It also sometimes means bringing in some help, which is how an auto mechanic ended up using body shop techniqu

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Stjernestøv fra eksploderet kæmpestjerne fundet på Antarktis

Stjernestøvet er landet på Jorden indenfor de seneste 20 år.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #34

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Aug 18 through Sat, Aug 24, 2019 Editor's Pick How teen Greta Thunberg shifted world's gaze to climate change “Instead of worrying about how that future might turn out, I’m going to try to change that future while I still can,” the teen told NBC News. Greta Thunberg is the drivi

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Douglas Adams was right – knowledge without understanding is meaningless | John Naughton

Using supercomputers to explain life, the universe and everything takes us into territory previously only laughed at Fans of Douglas Adams’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy treasure the bit where a group of hyper-dimensional beings demand that a supercomputer tells them the secret to life, the universe and everything . The machine, which has been constructed specifically for this purpose, takes

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Genealogical Anxiety

Pondering the origins of your beliefs and yourself can be the first step toward making a better world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI Learns To Animate Your Face in VR

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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What will be left after humanity is gone from this planet?

Hello kind strangers. I have just discovered Reddit and this is my first post ever. As seeing so many topics about climate change, fires, wars, illnesses etc. I have been thinking – after all humanity is gone (extinct due to unbearable conditions, mushroom wars, or moving to another planet – but let's say it would happen in the near future – 100-500 years) what would the last artifact of our exis

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Gas Monkey's '33 Ford Pickup | Fast N' Loud

Richard shows off his 1933 Ford Pickup featuring a Ford flathead V8 engine! Stream Full Episodes of Fast N' Loud: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FastNLoudTV https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FastNLoudTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery We'

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The Amazon Fires Are More Dangerous Than WMDs

When Jair Bolosonaro won Brazil’s presidential election last year, having run on a platform of deforestation, David Wallace-Wells asked , “How much damage can one person do to the planet?” Bolsonaro didn’t pour lighter fluid to ignite the flames now ravishing the Amazon, but with his policies and rhetoric, he might as well have. The destruction he inspired—and allowed to rage with his days of stu

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Athletes have poor teeth despite brushing twice a day, study finds

Researchers found athletes regularly drink energy drinks, and use gels, all of which can damage teeth British Olympic and professional athletes could be damaging their teeth by regular using sports drinks, energy bars and gels, according to a study. Researchers from University College London surveyed 352 female and male athletes across 11 sports, including cycling, swimming, rugby, football, rowi

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Weekend reads: Self-citation farms; an editor refuses to retract; publishing enters politics

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a request: Our co-founder Ivan Oransky celebrated a birthday this past week, and he’d like nothing more than a gift to Retraction Watch to support our work. Here’s your chance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a massive correction for a paper used to support the ban on Caster … Continue reading

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New CRISPR Method Advances the Clock for Genetic Editing

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, illustration. Credit: Getty Images If genetic editing wasn’t crazy enough for your reality, a recent breakthrough in CRISPR technology has paved the way for editing entire gene networks in a single step. While this discovery will likely shorten the timeframes required for finding cures for deadly illnesses, it can also bring us closer to threats of bioterrori

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The Three Little Pigs and Climate Change

A fable for our time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why you might want to sign up for YouTube Premium

That little play button in the middle is part of the image. Don't click it. You're welcome. (Szabo Viktor via Unsplash/) Adding YouTube Premium to your growing list of digital subscriptions might have never crossed your mind. After all, YouTube already lets you watch millions of videos and upload as many videos as you want without paying a dime. Ever. So why buy the cow when you’re already gettin

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The science of addiction: a personal struggle to kick cocaine gives a neuroscientist unique insights

Having survived a decade of drink and drugs as a young woman, Professor Judith Grisel focused all her determination on writing a book about addiction When Professor Judith Grisel sat down to write her book Never Enough (a guide to the neuroscience of addiction that has been her life’s work), she didn’t expect to share so much of her own story. Nevertheless the resulting chapters are a collision o

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Russia sends humanoid robot to space, fails to dock with ISS

Russia launched a spacecraft carrying FEDOR, a humanoid robot. Its mission is to help astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Such androids can eventually help with dangerous missions likes spacewalks. None In a sign that the future you always imagined gets ever closer, Russia launched a humanoid robot into space on a 10-day mission to assist astronauts aboard the International Space S

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This Week’s Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through August 24)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE To Power AI, This Startup Built a Really, Really Big Chip Tom Simonite | Wired “The silicon monster is almost 22 centimeters—roughly 9 inches—on each side, making it likely the largest computer chip ever, and a monument to the tech industry’s hopes for artificial intelligence.” COMPUTING You Won’t See the Quantum Internet Coming Ryan F. Mandelbaum | Gizmodo “The quantum in

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Space Photos of the Week: Hubbub Over Hubble

You can’t beat space telescopes for an unencumbered view of the cosmos.

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Alleged 'Snake Oil' Crypto Firm Sues Over Boos at Black Hat

The paper being presented suggested that the two researchers had a method to quickly find large semiprime numbers and essentially break RSA-2048 and any other semiprime-based encryption.

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Oslo vil fjerne overløbsvand med skatepark

PLUS. Løsningen af oversvømmelser i den norske hovedstad er inspireret af en dansk skatebowl

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The Three Little Pigs and Climate Change

A fable for our time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Disney Plus will give you 4 simultaneous streams, 4K and HDR for no extra cost – CNET

Disney's original episodes will be released weekly instead of dropping entire seasons in one, bingeable bunch.

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Letters: The Medieval World of Incarceration

Thirty-Two Short Stories About Death in Prisons Following the death of Jeffrey Epstein, Ken White told 32 short stories about in-custody deaths or near deaths in U.S. prisons, and reflected on how the country treats incarcerated people. Before I spent six years in prison in North Carolina on drug charges, I spent 15 months in Columbus County jail. The jail conditions were unspeakable: 18 women in

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The chemistry behind how you make a record-breaking giant soap bubble

The art of creating giant bubbles is more mysterious than it seems, but researchers are at last teasing apart the chemistry of thin soapy films.

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Mutant sheep are being bred in lab to fight lethal child brain disease

Roslin Institute scientists create a flock to mimic human gene that causes Batten disorder Scientists have created a flock of sheep that carry the gene for a lethal inherited brain disorder in humans. The condition, Batten disease, usually starts in childhood and is invariably fatal, often within a few years of diagnosis. The project, which is designed to test treatments for the disease, is based

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Cryptocurrency Mining Employees Expose Nuclear Plant to Internet

Xbox eavesdropping, email scammers, and more of the week's top security news.

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Nobody’s Watching the Best Giant-Monster Movies

"Colossal," "A Monster Calls," and "I Kill Giants" are terrific sci-fi films with weird, big themes. They all failed to connect with audiences.

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Book publishers sue Audible to stop new speech-to-text feature

Publishers say Audible's new captions feature is illegal. Is it?

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this incredibly rich machinery – with Antonio Damasio

"Prior to nervous systems: no mind, no consciousness, no intention in the full sense of the term. After nervous systems, gradually we ascend to this possibility of having to this possibility of having minds, having consciousness, and having reasoning that allows us to arrive at some of these very interesting decisions." "We are fragile culturally and socially…but life is fragile to begin with. Al

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I Replaced My Oven With a Waffle Maker, and You Should Too

Dust off that waffle iron and enter a world of cooking that goes way beyond breakfast.

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Will China Overtake the U.S. in Artificial Intelligence Research?

The nation wants to make its AI industry dominant by 2030 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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So it looks like we're our own Great Filter

I think this is it boys and girls. The current state of world politics and burning of the Amazon have finally convinced me. We are our own Great Filter. Mobilize the troops! (whatever that means in this context), the time is now! submitted by /u/bot_bot_bot [link] [comments]

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Scientists built a working "quantum radar" device

submitted by /u/darkdeeds6 [link] [comments]

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What Was It Like to Be an Executioner in the Middle Ages?

The image of the hooded executioner is iconic, but it tells us only a small part of the story.

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Babies Can Be Raised Vegan With Proper Guidance, Experts Say

A judge in Australia said a couple had left their baby “severely malnourished” on a strict vegan diet. The case stirred debate about raising the very young solely on plant-based foods.

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Amazon Fires: Why the rainforest helps fight climate change

Fires in the Amazon rainforest have prompted concern around the world.

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Frederiksborggade Station bliver en vigtig del af Boulevardbanen

To cirkelrunde pavilloner med billetsalg, ventilation og ventesal var på gadeplan de eneste synlige tegn på Nørreport Station, som den kom til at hedde. Pavillonerne forsvandt dog ved en ombygning i 1932 forud for S-banens åbning.

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Honda's New Airbag Catches Your Head to Save Your Brain

The automaker’s got a brand new bag, and it could reduce the chances of brain injury in some crashes by 75 percent.

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REI Labor Day Sale: 26 Best Outdoor Deals for 2019

REI's annual Labor Day Sale has kicked off early, with deals on foldable kayaks, cargo bikes, headlamps, socks, and more.

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The Amazon Cannot Be Recovered Once It’s Gone

The Amazon is burning. There have been more than 74,000 fires across Brazil this year, and nearly 40,000 fires across the Amazon, according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research. That’s the fastest rate of burning since record-keeping began, in 2013. Toxic smoke from the fires is so intense that darkness now falls hours before the sun sets in São Paulo, Brazil’s financial capital and

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The Persistent Complexity of Tool

“To hear a Tool song for the first time,” said Henry James—last night, in my dream—“is an impossibility.” Phantasmal Master, I think I know what you mean. Tool music, with its long, magisterial patterns and ever-tightening curves, its helical risings and huge breakdowns, its floating grids of chug and its steppings-off into the sublime, its boring bits and its thrilling bits and its bits that sou

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Extinction: Last chance to save 'rhinos of the oceans'

Sharks and rays pushed towards extinction by the shark fin trade are hot on the agenda at key wildlife talks.

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Kenya northern white rhinos: Vets harvest eggs from last two females

It is hoped the unprecedented procedure will prevent the extinction of the northern white rhino.

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Climate change: Should you fly, drive or take the train?

How should you travel to reduce your carbon footprint?

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The Cold War spy technology which we all use

Radio-frequency identification, famously used to bug the US embassy in Moscow, is a cheap way to track objects and data.

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How to vastly improve your problem-solving workshops

Companies often jump right into workshopping solutions to a problem before they truly understand the underlying source and "pain points" of the issue. Deliberate Innovation CEO, Dan Seewald, advises companies to visualize and map out those unmet needs in order to discover a new path to a fresh solution. Only then should you move onto brainstorming and ideation techniques. These important steps al

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When Kids Are Straight Until Proven Otherwise

The 12-year-old drag star Desmond Napoles is one of a growing number of kids who have embraced an LGBTQ identity at an early age. He has already come out as gay. Recent postings on his Instagram feed, which has 181,000 followers, feature him posing in a purple wig with red lips pursed, or in a rainbow dress at Brooklyn Pride. He recently appeared in an ad for Converse’s 2019 Pride collection. “He

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Amazon fires: Brazil sends army to help tackle blazes

President Jair Bolsonaro orders soldiers to be sent to the region, after pressure from EU leaders.

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Nasa said to be investigating first allegation of a crime in space

The space agency is reportedly looking into an allegation against astronaut Anne McClain.

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Dig for victory: how archaeology can help veterans' mental health

Volunteers at Strata Florida Abbey in Wales find they enjoy the work and camaraderie Scrabbling around on hands and knees in a muddy trench surrounded by the misty mountains of mid Wales may not be everyone’s idea of a fun way to while away the last days of summer. But Julian Pitt, a former Royal Navy sailor still traumatised by his experiences in the Falklands and Gulf wars, was delighted to be

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Why 2020 Campaign Workers Are Suddenly Unionizing

A key part of the playbook for most successful Democratic presidential campaigns is courting the union vote. For candidates, that means touring union halls, trumpeting your solidarity with the labor movement, and making sure that the overpriced swag peddled by your campaign has an insignia certifying that it was made by American union workers. But what goes unmentioned on the campaign trail is th

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Will the Streaming Wars mark the end of TV?

The TV has ruled over 50 years, but its reign is about to end. Will the Streaming Wars mark the end of television as we know it? submitted by /u/Pavancurt [link] [comments]

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Rick Doblin (Founder of MAPS) On The Future Of The Psychedelic Renaissance

submitted by /u/feministerator [link] [comments]

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Faktatjek: Er IQ-tests vrøvl eller videnskab?

Kan IQ-tests sige noget generelt om din intelligens, eller fortæller de bare, om du er god til matematik?

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Ugens debat: ‘Kvalitetstillæg’ skaber ny debat om rejsekort

Når Københavns metro cityring åbner 29. september, bliver det både dyrere og mere besværligt at rejse med metroen. Metroselskabet venter selv, at det vil koste fire millioner passagerer – og på ing.dk brugte læserne ord som ‘komik’ og ‘Gøg og Gokke’.

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Facebook’s ad data may put millions of gay people at risk

Over four million people that live in countries where being gay is illegal have been labelled by Facebook as being interested in homosexuality

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What's Mars solar conjunction, and why does it matter?

The daily chatter between antennas here on Earth and those on NASA spacecraft at Mars is about to get much quieter for a few weeks.

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Worst drought in decades hits Chile capital and outskirts

Officials in Chile say the capital city and its outskirts are suffering from the worst drought in many years.

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A novel technology for genome-editing a broad range of mutations in live organisms

The ability to edit genes in living organisms offers the opportunity to treat a plethora of inherited diseases. However, many types of gene-editing tools are unable to target critical areas of DNA, and creating such a technology has been difficult as living tissue contains diverse types of cells.

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A novel technology for genome-editing a broad range of mutations in live organisms

The ability to edit genes in living organisms offers the opportunity to treat a plethora of inherited diseases. However, many types of gene-editing tools are unable to target critical areas of DNA, and creating such a technology has been difficult as living tissue contains diverse types of cells.

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Migrating mule deer don't need directions: study

How do big-game animals know where to migrate across hundreds of miles of vast Wyoming landscapes year after year?

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Migrating mule deer don't need directions: study

How do big-game animals know where to migrate across hundreds of miles of vast Wyoming landscapes year after year?

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Komiker kæmpede for at finde sin plads: 'Humoren blev min vej gennem folkeskolen'

Selvom Nikolaj Stokholm havde det svært i skolen, er han klogere end de fleste. Sjove mennesker er nemlig mere intelligente, viser forskning.

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Arab Women Are Tired of Talking About Just ‘Women’s Issues’

The striking image of a tall woman dressed in white, lightly veiled, wearing large gold earrings, and raising a finger as she led several hundred men and women in chants of protest against Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir went viral in April. Described as a Nubian queen, 22-year old Alaa Salah quickly became an icon of the movement to bring down Bashir—and of the widespread participation of wome

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Deducing the scale of tsunamis from the 'roundness' of deposited gravel

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Ritsumeikan University have found a link between the 'roundness' distribution of tsunami deposits and how far tsunamis reach inland. They sampled the 'roundness' of gravel from different tsunamis in Koyadori, Japan, and found a common, abrupt change in composition approximately 40% of the 'inundation distance' from the shoreline, regardless of tsun

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Luftskeppens comeback – som klimaträddare

Modern teknik, mer precisa väderprognoser och ett stort behov av att minska utsläppen av växthusgaser har åter igen gjort ”luftens ubåtar” aktuella. Spela klippet ovan för att höra forskarnas bästa argument för luftskepp.

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Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds

submitted by /u/chicompj [link] [comments]

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Inflammation in type 2 diabetes: Study overturns previous notions

New research challenges the prevalent belief that it is glucose that drives chronic inflammation in obesity and obesity-related type 2 diabetes.

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Amazon is selling thousands of banned, unsafe, and mislabelled products, report shows

The report found more than 4,000 listings for products deemed to be unsafe, banned or mislabelled. These products included mislabelled pain relievers, dangerous children's toys, and helmets that had failed federal safety tests. There are some steps you can take to avoid buying unsafe or counterfeit products from Amazon. None You order a product on Amazon. It's eligible for Amazon Prime. It ships

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Effects of grazing livestock on grassland functioning may depend more on grazing intensity than livestock diversity [Letters (Online Only)]

Disentangling the effects of livestock diversity on ecosystem functioning and underlying mechanisms in managed ecosystems is important for distilling an integrated biodiversity−ecosystem functioning relationship theory (BEF) across multitrophic cascades in ecology, biodiversity conservation, and ecosystem management. In PNAS, Wang et al. (1) present fascinating results with a 5-y manipulated mixed

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Reply to Hu et al.: Whether grazer diversity or grazing intensity really accounts for grassland functioning [Letters (Online Only)]

Hu et al. (1) question the robustness that livestock diversity is that causally influential in shaping biodiversity and ecosystem multifunctionality (EMF), in our recent published paper (2) entitled “Diversifying livestock promotes multidiversity and multifunctionality in managed grasslands,” on the basis that maintaining all of the plots at an anticipated same…

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Molecular organization of mammalian meiotic chromosome axis revealed by expansion STORM microscopy [Cell Biology]

During prophase I of meiosis, chromosomes become organized as loop arrays around the proteinaceous chromosome axis. As homologous chromosomes physically pair and recombine, the chromosome axis is integrated into the tripartite synaptonemal complex (SC) as this structure’s lateral elements (LEs). While the components of the mammalian chromosome axis/LE—including meiosis-specific cohesin…

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The hybrid AAVP tool gets an upgrade [Commentaries]

Gene therapy is the use of nucleic acids as therapeutic agents, with the purpose of restoring the expression of a missing/nonfunctional gene, silencing the expression of a mutant allele that has become toxic, or expressing cytotoxic genes to induce apoptosis and kill rogue cells. The last of the three is…

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Time to look forward to adapt to ocean warming [Commentaries]

There is growing evidence indicating that variability and extremes in conditions in the marine environment are as (or more) important as changes in the mean for determining threats to biodiversity, impacts on ecosystem services, and consequences for human systems (1–4). With respect to ocean temperature, long-term persistent warming has been…

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Pore-modulating toxins exploit inherent slow inactivation to block K+ channels [Physiology]

Voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kvs) gate in response to changes in electrical membrane potential by coupling a voltage-sensing module with a K+-selective pore. Animal toxins targeting Kvs are classified as pore blockers, which physically plug the ion conduction pathway, or as gating modifiers, which disrupt voltage sensor movements. A third group…

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SOBIR1/EVR prevents precocious initiation of fiber differentiation during wood development through a mechanism involving BP and ERECTA [Plant Biology]

In plants, secondary growth results in radial expansion of stems and roots, generating large amounts of biomass in the form of wood. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS)-guided reverse genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana, we discovered SOBIR1/EVR, previously known to control plant immunoresponses and abscission, as a regulator of secondary growth. We…

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Iridescence in nematics: Photonic liquid crystals of nanoplates in absence of long-range periodicity [Physics]

Photonic materials with positionally ordered structure can interact strongly with light to produce brilliant structural colors. Here, we found that the nonperiodic nematic liquid crystals of nanoplates can also display structural color with only significant orientational order. Owing to the loose stacking of the nematic nanodiscs, such colloidal dispersion is…

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Lazy electrons in graphene [Physics]

Within a tight-binding approximation, we numerically determine the time evolution of graphene electronic states in the presence of classically vibrating nuclei. There is no reliance on the Born–Oppenheimer approximation within the p-orbital tight-binding basis, although our approximation is “atomically adiabatic”: the basis p-orbitals are taken to follow nuclear positions. Our…

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Light-matter interaction without interference

Quantum dots might constitute the foundation of quantum communication. They are an efficient interface between matter and light, with photons emitted by the quantum dots transporting information across large distances. However, structures form by default during the manufacture of quantum dots that interfere with communication. Researchers have now successfully eliminated these interferences.

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How gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics

As public health officials worry about the emergence of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, researchers are tracing how antibiotics bind to a gonococcal protein, information that can help lead to new antimicrobials.

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New approaches to heal injured nerves

Researchers have deciphered new mechanisms that enable the regeneration of nerve fibers. This could open up new treatment approaches for the brain, optic nerve, and spinal cord injuries.

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Self-rolling sensors take heart cell readings in 3D

A new organ-on-an-electronic-chip platform uses self-rolling biosensor arrays to coil up and measure the electrophysiology of heart cells in 3D.

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Self-rolling sensors take heart cell readings in 3D

A new organ-on-an-electronic-chip platform uses self-rolling biosensor arrays to coil up and measure the electrophysiology of heart cells in 3D.

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Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae

Researchers have derived analytically how corkscrew-shaped nano-antennas interact with light.

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How microbes generate and use their energy to grow

Researchers have shed light on how bacteria and baker's yeast generate and use their energy to grow. Knowing about cells' energy use is essential for industrial biotech processes.

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Successful egg harvest breaks new ground in saving the northern white rhinoceros

There are only two northern white rhinos left worldwide, both of them female. Saving this representative of megafauna from extinction seems impossible under these circumstances, yet an international consortium of scientists and conservationists just completed a procedure that could enable assisted reproduction techniques to do just that.

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Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species

Mapping the evolution of complex uranium oxide species has practical applications from Mars exploration to nuclear proliferation detection.

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Brain's astrocytes play starring role in long-term memory

Researchers have discovered that star-shaped cells called astrocytes help the brain establish long-lasting memories. The work could inform therapies for disorders in which long-term memory is impaired, such as traumatic brain injury or dementia.

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How memories form and fade

Researchers have identified the neural processes that make some memories fade rapidly while other memories persist over time.

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Can't get thinner than this: Synthesis of atomically flat boron sheets

Scientists have found a simple method for producing atomically thin layers of oxidized borophene, a promising 2D boron-based nanomaterial that could serve in a variety of fields.

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The real nuclear option.

submitted by /u/cdopson3 [link] [comments]

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Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species

Mapping the evolution of complex uranium oxide species has practical applications from Mars exploration to nuclear proliferation detection.

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Evolution designed by parasites

A new paper explores an overlooked aspect of the relationship between parasites and their hosts by systematically discussing the ways in which parasitic behavior manipulation may encourage the evolution of mechanisms in the host's nervous and endocrine systems.

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A novel technology for genome-editing a broad range of mutations in live organisms

Researchers have developed a new tool — dubbed SATI — to edit the mouse genome, enabling the team to target a broad range of mutations and cell types. The new genome-editing technology could be expanded for use in a broad range of gene mutation conditions such as Huntington's disease and the rare premature aging syndrome, progeria.

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Migrating mule deer don't need directions, study finds

Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges, according to a new study.

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Tech time not to blame for teens' mental health problems

A new study suggests that the time adolescents are spending on their phones and online is not that bad. The study tracked young adolescents on their smartphones to test whether more time spent using digital technology was linked to worse mental health outcomes.

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Children of incarcerated parents have more substance abuse, anxiety

Children of incarcerated parents are six times more likely to develop a substance use disorder in adulthood and nearly twice as likely to have diagnosable anxiety compared to children whose parents were not incarcerated, according to new research.

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Heart attack patients with mild cognitive impairment get fewer treatments

New research finds people with mild cognitive impairment don't always receive the same, established medical treatment that patients with normal cognitive functioning get when they have a heart attack.

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A Prehistoric Plant Could Reproduce in The UK For The First Time in Human History

Climate change is reviving plants not seen in the area for 60 million years.

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The Shape Of Your Mouth Affects How You Talk and Gets Amplified Across Generations

(Credit: eveleen/shutterstock) Around the world, humans communicate with each other using nearly 7,000 distinct languages. But despite how different languages like English and Chinese are for example, we all use the same basic anatomy to talk. Our lips, tongues and the bones inside our mouths allow humans to make the noises of language. Now researchers have found that differences in the shape of t

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Some Exoplanets Could Have Greater Biodiversity Than Earth

When you stack up the most promising recent exoplanet finds, as illustrated here, it becomes clear none is Earth’s true twin. But even more habitable worlds may be out there waiting to be found. (Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech) Earth is the only place in the universe where we know life exists. But with billions of other star systems out there, it might not be the best place for life. In a new study

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These Coastal Mud Bacteria Make a Chemical That Cools Our Climate and Smells Like the Ocean

Scientists recently dug into salt marshes and discovered abundant amounts of a"good guy gas" that helps cool Earth's climate. (Credit: JuneJ/shutterstock) The tangy smell of the sea may seem like nothing more than salt in the air, but in fact it comes courtesy of a specific chemical. And dimethyl sulfide, or simply DMS, not only defines that airy aroma, but it also helps cool the climate. In a stu

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How a Bitter Divorce Battle on Earth Led to Claims of a Crime in Space

NASA is examining a claim that an astronaut improperly accessed the bank account of her estranged spouse from the Space Station.

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Netflix is testing human-curated 'Collections'

On the one hand, machine learning is a fantastic way to simplify many tedious processes, such as data entry. On the other hand, though, it can seem a bit creepy: algorithm-driven recommendations …

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What we learned about Star Wars, Pixar, and the MCU from D23’s Disney+ panel

Disney The biennial D23 conference in Anaheim, California was full of exciting news for fans of Star Wars and the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In a panel dedicated to the upcoming …

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The environmental impact of watching a movie might surprise you

Energy spent watching your favorite movies. (infographic by Sara Chodosh/) Nostalgic about browsing at Blockbuster? Don't be. Of all the ways to view a film at home, driving to a store to rent a copy consumes by far the most energy. It's not exactly a Shyamalan twist to learn that gas-­guzzling vehicles are bad for the environment. But what if we told you that streaming uses as much juice as gett

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Tariffraff

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, August 23. ‣ China said it plans to slap retaliatory tariffs on $75 billion worth of American products, and restart tariffs on U.S. cars and parts. President Donald Trump escalated Friday evening: ‣ David Koch,

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Vaping May Have Killed Someone, Health Officials Say

An investigation into respiratory illnesses connected to e-cigs by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention turned up the first known death this week.

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Scientists say sustainable forestry organizations should lift ban on biotech trees

Prohibition by the Forest Stewardship Council and others has hampered research

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Study: Sending emojis is linked to scoring more dates, sex

A new study shows that people who frequently used emojis in text messages with potential dates engaged in more sexual activity and had more contact with those dates. However, the study only shows an association; it didn't establish causality. The authors suggest that emojis might help to convey nuanced emotional information that's lacking in strictly text-based messaging. None Want to boost your

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Ruth Bader Ginsberg Just Completed Another Cancer Treatment, and She's Good to Go.

This isn't the first time the "Notorious RBG" has bounced back from health scares.

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Amazon removes hundreds of toxic and unsafe products after news report

Wall Street Journal found that more than 4,000 items for sale on Amazon have been declared unsafe by federal agenciesAmazon has removed hundreds of toxic and unsafe products from its site after …

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Last week in tech: The supreme smartphone, Apple's credit card, and Android 10

You can almost smell the cotton candy vape when looking at this photo. (Supreme/) Choosing a cellphone used to be a lot more fun. Before the dawn of the smartphone, aesthetics played a much bigger part of the decision-making process. Did you want a shiny, pink Sanyo Katana flip phone? Or maybe a translucent blue Kyocera candy bar? Now we labor over important-but-boring stats like screen resolutio

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New study: Migrating mule deer don't need directions

Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges.

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A novel technology for genome-editing a broad range of mutations in live organisms

Salk Institute researchers have developed a new tool — dubbed SATI — to edit the mouse genome, enabling the team to target a broad range of mutations and cell types. The new genome-editing technology could be expanded for use in a broad range of gene mutation conditions such as Huntington's disease and the rare premature aging syndrome, progeria.

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Alien Oceans Could Hold Way More Life Than Earth’s Waters Ever Did, New Research Suggests

Alien worlds that favor strong ocean currents could be overflowing with life.

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There Are Now Nearly 200 Cases of Severe Lung Illnesses Tied to Vaping

One patient has reportedly died from a severe lung illness linked to vaping.

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Why the Amazon’s On Fire, a Robocall Fight, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Dawn of the Stegosaurs

Bones found in Morocco underscore that many more dinosaurs await discovery. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon Fires and the Horrifying Science of Deforestation

At the core of Brazil's out-of-control fires in the Amazon is deforestation. Here's how human meddling fundamentally transforms a rainforest.

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Why this activist is calling for the mass ingestion of psychedelics

During a conference, Gail Bradbrook, the co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, an environmentalist social movement, called for people to take psychedelics en masse as an act of civil disobedience. Bradbrook argues that "The causes of the crisis are political, economic, legal and cultural systemic issues but underneath that are issues of human trauma, powerlessness, scarcity and separation," and tha

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Essential travel kits for active pets

Ultimate walkies. (Emerson Peters via Unsplash/) One of the biggest joys of having an animal companion is exploring the world together. Contemplating the vast landscape from a mountain peak, spending the day in a new city, or simply visiting friends are grand adventures with a pet by your side. Just like us, making sure basic needs are met and preparing for challenges are key to making the most f

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Three power adapters for every world traveler's suitcase

Power tripping. (Frederick Tubiermont via Unsplash/) Electrical outlets vary in shape and voltage from country to country, so any savvy globetrotter knows to pack the appropriate adapter. With a power converter, you can ensure your blowdryer, phone charger, and electric toothbrush work just like they do in the States. Always be sure to check the voltage range for the country you’re in—you don’t w

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How the Last Dragons Survived Extinction

Komodo dragons outlived their giant reptile peers through isolation and some lucky breaks, although cannibalism and virgin births may have helped. KomodoandDeer.jpg Image credits: Ruchira Somaweera Rights information: This image may be republished with this Inside Science story. Creature Friday, August 23, 2019 – 16:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — Extinction wiped out their clos

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The causes and risks of the Amazon fires

Fires have been breaking out at an unusual pace in Brazil this year, causing global alarm over deforestation in the Amazon region. The world's largest rainforest is often called the "lungs of the earth." Here's a look at what's happening:

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First Death in a Spate of Vaping Sicknesses Reported by Health Officials

An Illinois patient has died following a respiratory illness linked to vaping. Health officials offered few details about the circumstances.

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Scientists explore outback as testbed for Mars

This week, scientists from NASA's upcoming Mars 2020 mission joined their counterparts from the joint European-Russian ExoMars mission in an expedition to the Australian Outback, one of the most remote, arid regions on the planet. Both teams came to hone their research techniques before their missions launch to the Red Planet next summer in search of signs of past life on Mars.

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Developing cancer drugs from African plants

Nature, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02564-x Mansurah Abdulazeez discusses how her visionary plant research could help in the fight against cancer.

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Is life after 75 worth living? This UPenn scholar doubts it.

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel revisits his essay on wanting to die at 75 years old. The doctor believes that an old life filled with disability and lessened activity isn't worth living. Activists believe his argument stinks of ageism, while advances in biohacking could render his point moot. A few years ago oncologist and bioethicist Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel wrote a provocative essay in The Atlantic titled "Why

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Sun’s solar wind recreated in lab with aid of Big Red Ball

submitted by /u/Captain-Blitzed [link] [comments]

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The Robots Are Coming…To Free You

submitted by /u/2noame [link] [comments]

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This is cool as hell

submitted by /u/KingCole210 [link] [comments]

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Designers Want To Build Iceberg-Making Submarines To Counter Melting Ice Sheets

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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This Geothermal Energy System Could Be Built in a Backyard

Going Geothermal In June, a U.S. government report noted the “enormous untapped potential” of geothermal energy, the heat naturally produced beneath Earth’s surface, for the generation of electricity. Now, Canadian company Eavor Technologies is building a first-of-its-kind geothermal system in Alberta — and it could help the world finally tap into that potential. “You can put it almost anywhere,”

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10 most powerful animal bites on the planet

This article was originally published on Field & Stream . Wild animals bring many awe-inspiring physical traits to their battle for survival, including the ability to use their teeth and jaws for self-defense and feeding. Not surprisingly, nature’s strongest jaws often belong to apex predators who sit comfortably atop the food chain, and collecting hard data on the force of their bites can be a d

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Air mattresses that don't hate your back

Air mattresses that'll give you a solid eight hours of sleep. (HOP DESIGN via Unsplash/) There's no longer any excuse for making your guests sleep on the couch or the floor. Affordable air mattresses are now actually comfortable. Plus, a decent air mattress is a game-changers for anyone who lives life on the go. If you take an air mattress on a road trip, all you need is a roof over your head for

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Pepe the Frog Means Something Different in Hong Kong—Right?

Pepe is popping up all over Hong Kong—on walls, in forums, in sticker packs for apps—as a symbol of resistance against an authoritarian state.

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Backers for Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency May Jump Ship

Crypto Bubble Things aren’t looking great for Libra, Facebook’s foray into the world of cryptocurrency. Multiple high-profile backers that invested in the project are having second thoughts, according to CoinDesk , and some are considering backing out of the project altogether. Faced with increasing scrutiny and pressure from regulatory bodies in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere, CoinDesk

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Scientists Built a Working “Quantum Radar” Device

Photon Spotting A new “quantum radar” device uses entangled microwaves to overcome some of the limitations of traditional radar systems. The device, built by a team from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, is capable of spotting objects at lower temperatures and with less background noise than existing radar, according to MIT Technology Review . Though still in early stages, research

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Evolution designed by parasites

In 'Invisible Designers: Brain Evolution Through the Lens of Parasite Manipulation,' published in the September 2019 issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology, Marco Del Giudice explores an overlooked aspect of the relationship between parasites and their hosts by systematically discussing the ways in which parasitic behavior manipulation may encourage the evolution of mechanisms in the host's nerv

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Project DEAL in Germany Reaches Agreement with Springer Nature

Elsevier is now the only big scientific publisher that hasn't struck a bargain with the German consortium of libraries and research institutions.

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The way roaches run could teach robots a thing or two

A cleverly simple method to assess and improve locomotion in robots gets its inspiration from the superb scurrying skills of cockroaches. Normally, understanding how insects’ or robots’ moving parts coordinate smoothly to take them places requires tedious modeling of mechanics, electronics, and information science. But in a new study, biomechanics researchers boiled down the sprints of cockroache

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UCSD Eye Doctor Resigns After Investigation into Ties with China

The FDA and the university have audited Kang Zhang for breaches in bioethics and a failure to follow research protocols.

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Børn får højere karakterer, når de ved, de kan træne deres intelligens

Forskere ændrer elevers opfattelse af, hvordan deres intelligens fungerer.

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Twitter Trust and Safety Advisers Say They’re Being Ignored

Members of Twitter’s safety council say the company is keeping them in the dark and want to talk to CEO Jack Dorsey, in a letter obtained by WIRED.

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CuriosityStream Is a Science-Focused Streaming Service for People Who Love to Learn

Remember when you used to be able to find educational and entertaining shows on networks like The Discovery Channel, The Learning Channel, or The History Channel? Most of these networks have succumbed to modern trends in reality shows, but there is a corner of the streaming universe that caters to those of us who still have a zest for learning. It’s called CuriosityStream, and right now you can t

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Designers Want to Give 3D Printers Legs, Let Them Wander the Earth

On the Move The Break the Grid initiative has a plan for repairing the environment: give 3D printers the ability to autonomously navigate the world around them. To that end, the three Danish companies behind the initiative — GXN Innovation, The Danish AM Hub, and Map Architects — teamed up to imagine what mobile 3D printers might look like, transforming the devices into bizarre-looking robots tha

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Alarming surge in Amazon fires prompts global outcry

Nature, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02537-0 French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel called for discussion of the situation in Brazil at the upcoming G7 summit.

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Google tells workers to avoid arguing politics in house

Google on Friday told employees to focus on work instead of heated debates about politics with colleagues at the internet company, which has long been known for encouraging people to speak their …

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Giraffes Get New Protections, but Will It Be Enough?

International trade of giraffes will now be regulated, but habitat loss and bush meat poaching remain the predominant threats to the species.

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This new Salmonella ‘superbug’ is probably no scarier than the flu

Salmonella Salmonella invading an immune cell (NIH/) Superbugs sound scary now more than ever because they're increasingly real. Our widespread use of antibiotics is actively breeding hardier bacteria that can evade our best weapons against them. This week, yet another new strain of deadly bacteria headlined the news. But if you're concerned about this 'super' strain of Salmonella enterica , here

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Western states oppose plan to charge for US reservoir water

Attorneys general from a dozen western states want the Trump administration to halt a proposal by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that they say usurps states' authority over their own water.

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This Cheap “Polypill” Could Reduce Your Risk of a Heart Attack

In 2001, health experts floated the idea of a low-cost “polypill” to prevent cardiovascular disease. Such a pill would contain multiple medicines known to reduce a person’s risk of heart attacks and strokes , including aspirin. The idea was that “the use of a single pill could well encourage patients to adhere to treatment as well as seriously reduce the cost of the drugs,” experts wrote in a Wor

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Scientists Warn Of “Cascading System Collapse” in Amazon Rainforest

Hell World As the Amazon Rainforest continues to burn as a result of cut-and-burn deforestation practices, we steadily approach the point of no return. Over the last 50 years, about 20 percent of the rainforest has been burned or cut away, according to The Intercept . As the current fires rage on and the policies that led to them continue to exist, another 20 percent — that’s 300,000 square miles

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Researchers advance organ-on-chip technology to advance drug development

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have developed an organ-on-an-electronic-chip platform, which uses bioelectrical sensors to measure the electrophysiology of the heart cells in three dimensions. These 3D, self-rolling biosensor arrays coil up over heart cell spheroid tissues to form an 'organ-on-e-chip,' thus enabling the researchers to st

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Kids' Brains Remarkably Plastic After Stroke

A small study reports that, among children who had left-hemisphere damage as newborns, the complementary region of the right hemisphere appears to compensate and protect language development.

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US charges 80 in internet fraud and money laundering scheme

US authorities on Thursday announced charges against 80 people, most of them Nigerians, in a wide-ranging fraud and money laundering operation that netted millions of dollars from victims of …

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Rational synthesis of an atomically precise carboncone under mild conditions

Carboncones, a special family of all-carbon allotropes, are predicted to have unique properties that distinguish them from fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphenes. Owing to the absence of methods to synthesize atomically well-defined carboncones, however, experimental insight into the nature of pure carboncones has been inaccessible. Herein, we describe a facile synthesis of an atomically wel

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Metal-insulator transition in a semiconductor nanocrystal network

Many envisioned applications of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), such as thermoelectric generators and transparent conductors, require metallic (nonactivated) charge transport across an NC network. Although encouraging signs of metallic or near-metallic transport have been reported, a thorough demonstration of nonzero conductivity, , in the 0 K limit has been elusive. Here, we examine the temper

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Bulk ultrafine grained/nanocrystalline metals via slow cooling

Cooling, nucleation, and phase growth are ubiquitous processes in nature. Effective control of nucleation and phase growth is of significance to yield refined microstructures with enhanced performance for materials. Recent studies reveal that ultrafine grained (UFG)/nanocrystalline metals exhibit extraordinary properties. However, conventional microstructure refinement methods, such as fast cooli

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Ultrafast extreme rejuvenation of metallic glasses by shock compression

Structural rejuvenation of glasses not only provides fundamental insights into their complicated dynamics but also extends their practical applications. However, it is formidably challenging to rejuvenate a glass on very short time scales. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that a specially designed shock compression technique can rapidly rejuvenate metallic glasses to extremely hig

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Near-UV to mid-IR reflectance imaging spectroscopy of paintings on the macroscale

Broad spectral range reflectance imaging spectroscopy (BR-RIS) from the near UV through the mid–infrared (IR) (350 to 25,000 nm or 28,571 to 400 cm –1 ) was investigated as an imaging modality to provide maps of organic and inorganic artists’ materials in paintings. While visible–to–near-IR (NIR) reflectance and elemental x-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging spectroscopies have been used for in situ

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Current-driven magnetization switching in a van der Waals ferromagnet Fe3GeTe2

The recent discovery of ferromagnetism in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) materials holds promises for spintronic devices with exceptional properties. However, to use 2D vdW magnets for building spintronic nanodevices such as magnetic memories, key challenges remain in terms of effectively switching the magnetization from one state to the other electrically. Here, we devise a bilayer str

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Ionic liquid-based click-ionogels

Gels that are freeze-resistant and heat-resistant and have high ultimate tensile strength are desirable in practical applications owing to their potential in designing flexible energy storage devices, actuators, and sensors. Here, a simple method for fabricating ionic liquid (IL)–based click-ionogels using thiol-ene click chemistry under mild condition is reported. These click-ionogels continue t

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Organ-on-e-chip: Three-dimensional self-rolled biosensor array for electrical interrogations of human electrogenic spheroids

Cell-cell communication plays a pivotal role in coordination and function of biological systems. Three-dimensional (3D) spheroids provide venues to explore cellular communication for tissue development and drug discovery, as their 3D architecture mimics native in vivo microenvironments. Cellular electrophysiology is a prevalent signaling paradigm for studying electroactive cells. Currently, elect

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Exploiting mammalian low-complexity domains for liquid-liquid phase separation-driven underwater adhesive coatings

Many biological materials form via liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), followed by maturation into a solid-like state. Here, using a biologically inspired assembly mechanism designed to recapitulate these sequential assemblies, we develop ultrastrong underwater adhesives made from engineered proteins containing mammalian low-complexity (LC) domains. We show that LC domain–mediated LLPS and mat

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Document reveals how Facebook downplayed early Cambridge Analytica concerns

Internal correspondence provides new insight into how Facebook staff reacted to concerns about use of user data by political campaign consultantsInternal Facebook correspondence from September …

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Zero-power radiative cooling system sends heat into space

A new system can help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, researchers report. The system consists of a special material—an inexpensive polymer/aluminum film—that’s installed inside a box at the bottom of a specially designed solar “shelter.” The film helps to keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air inside the box and transmitting that ener

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Think declining mental sharpness 'just comes with age'? Think again, say experts

Declining mental sharpness 'just comes with age,' right? Not so fast, say geriatrics researchers and clinicians gathered at a prestigious 2018 conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) with support from the National Institute on Aging (NIA).

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Inexpensive chef knives that will change the way you cook

Sharp chef's knives for your kitchen. (Amazon/) Chef Masaharu Morimoto says “a kitchen without a knife is not a kitchen.” Something as essential as a proper chef’s knife should be top-quality, but it’s pretty easy to spend a few hundred dollars on getting a fancy one hand-made by artisans in a faraway land. Not everybody has that kind of dough to spend. Our favorite chef’s knives are comfortable

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Can color-changing road signs make night driving safer?

A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could lead to road signs that shine brightly and change color at night. The technology could help call attention to important traffic information when it’s dark, with potential benefits for both drivers and pedestrians, the researchers say. The film consists of polymer microspheres laid down on the sticky side of a transparent tape. The material’

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Does Hyundai's rooftop solar panel change the fuel-economy equation?

The hybrid Sonata with a solar panel on its roof. (Hyundai/) The new hybrid Hyundai Sonata isn't available yet in the United States, but it offers something compelling enough to make headlines here—a solar panel on its roof. While the panel can't produce nearly enough juice to give the car's battery all it needs for regular travel, it does occupy what the company calls a "supporting role" for the

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Terraform Mars? How about Earth?

Pioneers of the Greater Holocene plan to strike back against concrete. Seed packets and plant nutrients are the weapons of choice for standing up to humanity's destructive impact. Hopeless? Maybe. Poignant? Absolutely. None We're seeing a lot of references to Earth entering a new epoch characterized by all the changes — okay, damage — we've wrought upon the planet. That epoch, of course, is refer

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Young teen phone use doesn’t damage mental health

The time adolescents spend on their phones isn’t that bad for their mental health, according to a new study. The study tracked young adolescents on their smartphones to test whether more time using digital technology was linked to worse mental health outcomes. The researchers found little evidence of longitudinal or daily linkages between digital technology use and adolescent mental health. “It m

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Can't get thinner than this: synthesis of atomically flat boron sheets

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) find a simple method for producing atomically thin layers of oxidized borophene, a promising 2D boron-based nanomaterial that could serve in a variety of fields.

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Taylor Swift Finds Her Faith on Lover

When an artist’s work becomes synonymous with the term diaristic , it’s easy to feel that there’s little left unknown about her life. Taylor Swift has been not-so-subtly addressing her nonfictional exes and besties and rivals and romances in lyrics for years. One song on her new album, Lover , reveals the very block on which she first shacked up with one of her beaus. But it’s still surprising to

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FAA warns you not to put a flamethrower on that drone – CNET

Guns, bombs, fireworks and other dangerous items also aren't allowed.

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How one UTI makes another more likely

New research may explain how an initial urinary tract infection can lead to subsequent infections. More than 60% of women will experience urinary tract infections (UTI) at some point in their lives, and about a quarter will get a second such infection within six months, for reasons that have been unclear to health experts. In mouse studies, the researchers found that a transient infection trigger

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Studie: Rör dig mer, sitt mindre och lev längre

All fysisk aktivitet, oavsett hur intensiv den är, är förknippad med en väsentligt minskad risk för tidig död. Det är resultatet från en ny metaanalys som publicerats i medicintidskriften BMJ.

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How memories form and fade

Caltech researchers identify the neural processes that make some memories fade rapidly while other memories persist over time.

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Trump Longs to Command the Economy

Fate sometimes has an acute sense of irony. This morning, the political donor and philanthropist David Koch died. Koch’s father was an early, prominent supporter of the limited-government, red-baiting John Birch Society. Koch ran for vice president as a Libertarian in 1980, but he and his brother Charles eventually shifted their focus to pushing the Republican Party in an aggressively small-gover

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Expert: Governments Must Step in to Prevent Evil, Superpowered AI

Race To The Bottom As tech corporations like Facebook and Google, as well as government research firms like the Pentagon’s DARPA or Russia’s Advanced Research Foundation try to create super-powered artificial general intelligence, precautions must be taken to prevent that super-intelligent AI from crushing humanity . That’s the crux of a new essay in The Conversation penned by Wim Naudé, a profes

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Tech time not to blame for teens' mental health problems

A new study, published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, suggests that the time adolescents are spending on their phones and online is not that bad. The study tracked young adolescents on their smartphones to test whether more time spent using digital technology was linked to worse mental health outcomes.

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Children of incarcerated parents have more substance abuse, anxiety

Children of incarcerated parents are six times more likely to develop a substance use disorder in adulthood and nearly twice as likely to have diagnosable anxiety compared to children whose parents were not incarcerated, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University.

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Sillgrisslor speglar konflikten mellan Östersjöns miljömål

Den främsta faktorn för sillgrisslors överlevnad i Östersjön är mängden skarpsill, visar en ny studie ledd av forskare vid Naturhistoriska riksmuseet. Skarpsill är sillgrisslans viktigaste födokälla i Östersjön. Skarpsillen är huvudföda även för torsken, vilket gör att skarpsillsbeståndet påverkas av fisketrycket på torsk. – Dynamiken mellan olika arter i födoväven leder till att förvaltningsbesl

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This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act

Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally moving to weaken the federal Endangered Species Act.

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This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act

Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally moving to weaken the federal Endangered Species Act.

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Chinese Firm Wants to Give Cloned Pets the Original’s “Memories”

Garlic is a fluffy feline furball with a pink nose and tiny gray ears — just like the cat he was cloned from. “My cat died of urinary tract disease,” Garlic’s owner Huang Yu told the Global Times . “I decided to clone him because he was so special and unforgettable.” But while Garlic is biologically identical to his predecessor, he’s not the same cat — he has his own personality and is forming hi

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Daily briefing: How to communicate your science to the people in charge

Nature, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02558-9 Six simple strategies for informing policymakers, researchers speak about life in a troubled ancient-DNA lab and the ‘CRISPR age’ spawns smart materials.

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The West is trading water for cash. The water is running out

When it comes to global warming's one-two punch of inundation and drought, the presence of too much water has had the most impact on U.S. agriculture this year, with farmers across the Midwest swamped by flooding throughout the Mississippi Basin.

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Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds

Tissue engineers create artificial organs and tissues that can be used to develop and test new drugs, repair damaged tissue and even replace entire organs in the human body. However, current fabrication methods limit their ability to produce free-form shapes and achieve high cell viability.

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We Need an International Center for Climate Modeling

The science community must join forces to provide the most accurate long-term predictions and make their results publicly accessible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Geography of loss—a global look at the uneven toll of suicide

As rates fall in many countries, those in the United States climb

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Top US university investigates donations from Jeffrey Epstein

Nature, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01805-3 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology announcement comes after two researchers said they would leave the university because of its links to the sex offender.

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We Need an International Center for Climate Modeling

The science community must join forces to provide the most accurate long-term predictions and make their results publicly accessible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue

Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from a Zimbabwe National Park that trampled a tourist or the Sumatran tiger that killed a keeper who entered his zoo enclosure in Birmingham. There are numerous examples of attacks by wild pets on their owners, often whom they have known for years.

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Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy

How do cells generate and use energy? This question might seem simple, but the answer is far from simple. Furthermore, knowing how microbial cell factories consume energy and how proteins are allocated to do so is crucial when working with industrial fermentations.

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Earth Might Not Be the Most Hospitable Planet out There

Distant Neighbors It goes without saying that the emergence of life on Earth was an extraordinary event — so seemingly rare that many scientists suspect that it to be unique in the cosmos. But new computer models suggest that there could be exoplanets even better suited for life than Earth, according to ScienceAlert . While there’s no guarantee that those exoplanets exist or that their hospitable

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Wild polio has been eradicated in Nigeria but infections will continue

Nigeria has officially wiped out wild polio, but there have already been 15 cases of infection this year, caused by the live virus used in some vaccines

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Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue

Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from a Zimbabwe National Park that trampled a tourist or the Sumatran tiger that killed a keeper who entered his zoo enclosure in Birmingham. There are numerous examples of attacks by wild pets on their owners, often whom they have known for years.

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Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy

How do cells generate and use energy? This question might seem simple, but the answer is far from simple. Furthermore, knowing how microbial cell factories consume energy and how proteins are allocated to do so is crucial when working with industrial fermentations.

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Scientists use a new method to track pollution from cooking

Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is one of the most important primary sources of pollution in urban environments. There is growing evidence that exposure to cooking oil fumes is linked to lung cancer. Currently, the most effective method to identify and quantify COA is through positive matrix factorization of OA mass spectra from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements. However, for the widely used lo

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Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species

When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can test on a microscale in a safe laboratory environment what could previously be tested only in larger, more dangerous experiments with bombs.

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Trump Orders ‘a Lot’ of Ketamine for Depressed Veterans

President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that the government will purchase “a lot” of the drug esketamine, a derivative of ketamine. Though ketamine is known as a recreational hallucinogen, Trump asserted that a new nasal-spray derivative would be of great benefit to veterans with depression. As he left the White House for a veterans’ conference in Kentucky, he told reporters that he had instruct

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These Scientists Want to Bring Back Zeppelins in a Big Way

Here’s an explosive situation: An Austrian team of scientists are proposing an airship, otherwise known as a zeppelin, that’s ten times the size of the Hindenburg — the 800-foot German passenger airship that infamously caught fire in 1937, ending in a disaster, while landing in New Jersey. Despite their inherent dangers, zeppelins could revolutionize cargo transportation in the 21st century, the

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Dansk landbrug kan (måske) redde Amazonas, inden det er for sent

Regnskoven kan komme sig. Løsningen er moderne landbrug, så bønderne ikke behøver brænde skoven.

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Parents: Ask your college-bound teen these 8 health questions

Here are eight key health questions that parents should ask their college-bound teen. Although preparing for unforeseeable health circumstances may feel like a daunting task, it’s crucial, explains Preeti Malani, professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. Malani, chief health officer of the universit

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Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae

The nanostructures from Katja Höflich's HZB team are shaped like corkscrews and made of silver. Mathematically, such a nano antenna can be regarded as an one-dimensional line that forms a helix, characterized by parameters such as diameter, length, number of turns per unit length, and handedness.

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Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species

When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can test on a microscale what could previously be tested only in larger, more dangerous experiments. In a recent experiment, scientists used a laser to ablate atomic uranium while recording chemical reactions a

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Biophysicists discovered how 'Australian' mutation leads to Alzheimer's disease

A team of scientists from MIPT and IBCh RAS studied one hereditary genetic mutation to discover general molecular mechanisms that may lead both to early onset of Alzheimer's disease and to the form of the disease caused by age-related changes in human body. Understanding these mechanisms is necessary for developing new targeted treatments for this neurodegenerative disease that is becoming ever mo

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Caregivers of people with dementia are losing sleep

Caregivers of people with dementia lose between 2.5 to 3.5 hours of sleep weekly due to difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep — a negative for themselves and potentially for those in their care, according to Baylor University research published in JAMA Network Open.

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Suicide and self-harm risk nearly triple in people with restless leg syndrome

Restless legs syndrome was associated with a nearly tripled risk of suicide and self-harm in a new study led by Penn State researchers.

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It Was Easier to Be Skinny in the ’80s

More than a third of adults in the United States are obese. This statistic is often attributed to a confluence of unhealthy dietary practices, sedentary lifestyles, and genetics. But we may be missing the bigger picture. A 2015 study revealed that people today are 10 percent heavier than they were in the 1980s—even with the same diets and exercise regimens. A new episode of The Idea File investig

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The Books Briefing: Reassessing the Back-to-School Reading List

Whether you’re a parent or a child, a student or a teacher (and even if you don’t currently identify with any of those categories), the dog days of summer can often bring to mind that back-to-school feeling —including the urgency of trying to cram in a stack of summer reading before classes resume. Over the years, exactly which books belong in that stack has been a fraught topic, as seemingly eve

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Frying oil consumption worsened colon cancer and colitis in mice, study shows

Food scientists have shown that feeding frying oil to mice exaggerated colonic inflammation, enhanced tumor growth and worsened gut leakage, spreading bacteria or toxic bacterial products into the bloodstream.

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A new method for quantifying crystal semiconductor efficiency

Scientists have found a new way to successfully detect the efficiency of crystal semiconductors.

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Scurrying roaches help researchers steady staggering robots

To walk or run with finesse, roaches and robots coordinate leg movements via signals sent through centralized systems. Though their moving parts are utterly divergent, researchers have devised handy principles and equations to assess how both beasts and bots locomote and to improve robotic gait.

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Google Photos Now Lets You Search For Text In Photos

Have you ever taken a photo and it contains text and you wanted to search for that text within it? We’re not sure how many of you would have need for such a feature, but the good news …

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To improve weather forecasts, AI finds the tricky spots

Artificial intelligence that pinpoints swift-changing weather areas could result in more accurate weather forecasts. The weather changes much faster and more violently in some geographic areas than others, which can mean that current weather prediction models may be slow and inefficient. In a new study, the researchers used an AI model based on natural selection to find areas of the continental U

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Scientists Create Artificial ‘Chameleon Skin’ That Can Change Colour

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Så svarar svenska växter på klimatförändringar

Under 1900-talet steg medeltemperaturen med ungefär 1,5 grader och nederbörden har ökat med ungefär tio procent. Hur har det påverkat vilka växter vi hittar på en plats? För att ta reda på det har SLU-forskaren Alistair Auffret och hans kollega Chris Thomas utgått från 3 000 växtarter och vilket klimat som passar dem bäst. De har sedan jämfört vilka växter som fanns i ett landskap historiskt och

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Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics

Steadily and relentlessly, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea has slipped past medicine's defenses, acquiring resistance to once-reliable drugs, including penicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. These former stalwarts are no longer used to treat the sexually transmitted disease.

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Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics

Steadily and relentlessly, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea has slipped past medicine's defenses, acquiring resistance to once-reliable drugs, including penicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. These former stalwarts are no longer used to treat the sexually transmitted disease.

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Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds

Researchers have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. Their groundbreaking technique stands to change the field of tissue engineering.

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Study models new method to accelerate nanoparticles

Researchers have modeled a method to manipulate nanoparticles as an alternative mode of propulsion for tiny spacecraft that require very small levels of thrust. The team simulated a system that uses light to generate an electromagnetic field to move the particles from a reservoir, funneled through an injector, then shot out of an accelerator to produce thrust.

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Can researchers engage safely with the food industry?

Researchers are exploring ways to help scientists better protect their work from the influence of the food industry.

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Menstrual cups were invented in 1867. What took them so long to gain popularity?

Menstrual cups were one of the first technologies proposed as a solution to dealing with monthly periods. So why are they only catching on now? (Wikimedia Commons/) Are you a Dutchess, a Diva, or a Pixie? Do you Blossom like a flower, or are you more of a Saalt of the earth kind of gal? Perhaps ‘Lunette’ better captures your dreamy, moonlike bodily fluctuations. Today, people with periods can cho

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Gene Editing Transforms Gel into Shape-Shifting Smart Material

The CRISPR technique can trigger the new material to release drugs or pick up biological signals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain's astrocytes play starring role in long-term memory

Salk researchers discover that star-shaped cells called astrocytes help the brain establish long-lasting memories. The work could inform therapies for disorders in which long-term memory is impaired, such as traumatic brain injury or dementia.

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Successful egg harvest breaks new ground in saving the northern white rhinoceros

There are only two northern white rhinos left worldwide, both of them female. Saving this representative of megafauna from extinction seems impossible under these circumstances, yet an international consortium of scientists and conservationists just completed a procedure that could enable assisted reproduction techniques to do just that. On August 22, 2019, a team of veterinarians successfully har

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Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics

As public health officials worry about the emergence of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, an MUSC researcher is tracing how antibiotics bind to a gonococcal protein, information that can help lead to new antimicrobials.

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In Defense of Sea Gulls: They’re Smart, and They Co-Parent, 50/50 All the Way

Besides, if people weren’t such slobs, gulls would never have learned about French fries.

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Scientists use a new method to track pollution from cooking

Scientists find that black carbon is a good tracer to separate cooking organic aerosol from traffic-related organic aerosol.

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New approaches to heal injured nerves

Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. A team from the Department of Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum led by Professor Dietmar Fischer has deciphered new mechanisms that enable the regeneration of such fibers. This could open up new treatment approaches for the brain, optic ner

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Gene Editing Transforms Gel into Shape-Shifting Smart Material

The CRISPR technique can trigger the new material to release drugs or pick up biological signals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ping-pong and the riddle of victory | Pico Iyer

Growing up in England, Pico Iyer was taught that the point of a game was to win. Now, some 50 years later, he's realized that competition can be "more like an act of love." In this charming, subtly profound talk, he explores what regular games of ping-pong in his neighborhood in Japan have revealed about the riddle of winning — and shows why not knowing who's won can feel like the ultimate victor

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'I will give my last drop of blood for this forest'

Members of Brazil's Mura tribe vow to defend their land, as wildfires rage in the Amazon rainforest.

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Weak handgrip may warn of cognitive impairment

Poor handgrip may be a sign of impaired cognition and memory among older adults, research suggests. Researchers followed nearly 14,000 participants from the 2006 Health and Retirement Study, age 50 and older, for eight years. They found that every 5-kilogram (11-pound) reduction in handgrip strength was associated with 10% greater odds for any cognitive impairment and 18% greater odds for severe

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Novel paradigm in drug development

Targeted protein degradation (TPD) is a new paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to the development of new medicines to treat diseases such as cancer more effectively. A recent study by researchers at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences reveals global and drug-specific cellular effectors needed for TPD. The results have now been published in the sc

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Osteoarthritis: A chip 'mimics' the disease to devise effective drugs

A sophisticated chip the size of a coin in which cartilage can be cultivated and which can later be subjected to mechanical stress such that it generates the effects of Osteoarthrosis (OA).

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Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae

For the first time, an HZB team has derived analytically how corkscrew-shaped nano-antennas interact with light. The mathematical tool can be used to calculate the geometry that a nano-antenna must have for specific applications in sensor technology or information technology.

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Who you see matters: Stroke patients benefit more from observing their own hand movements during therapy

Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have found that for stroke patients, observing their own hand movements in a video-assisted therapy — as opposed to someone else's hand — could enhance brain activity and speed up rehabilitation.

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A380-motoreksplosion: Flydel på den grønlandske indlandsis har ført til gennembrud

I juni lykkedes det en Geus-ekspedition at finde ‘fan hubben’ fra en Airbus-motor, der eksploderede i luften. Den har revner, som nu kan føre til hasteeftersyn af adskillige fly

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Study models new method to accelerate nanoparticles

In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois and the Missouri University of Science and Technology modeled a method to manipulate nanoparticles as an alternative mode of propulsion for tiny spacecraft that require very small levels of thrust.

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Sphero acquires modular electronics maker littleBits to tackle educational toy segment

Consumer robotics and toy company Sphero on Friday announced it is acquiring New York City-based modular electronics maker littleBits for an undisclosed sum.

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An Existential Reading List for Middle-Aged Men

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with four men, all active in the evangelical Church of the Nazarene, who assign themselves reading and then have an annual retreat where they discuss faith, death, and how to live well. In this interv

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The Promise of Direct Air Capture: Making Stuff Out of Thin Air

Imagine making fuel, plastics, and concrete out of “thin air.” That’s the promise of direct air capture (DAC), a technology that fundamentally disrupts our contemporary oil economy. Mimicking what already occurs in nature, DAC essentially involves industrial photosynthesis, harnessing the power of the sun to draw carbon directly out of the atmosphere. This captured carbon can then be turned into

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What you might have missed

Air pollution linked to psychiatric illness, a fossilised primate skull and the issue of fracking – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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Head of NASA: Nuclear Propulsion Could Be “Game-Changer”

Future Rockets America, China, and Russia are all working to develop rockets powered by thermal nuclear propulsion, a technology that NASA chief Jim Bridenstine says could be a “game-changer” for the space agency. Bridenstine gave a presentation on the importance of developing nuclear propulsion tech during a meeting of the National Space Council on Tuesday, Space.com reports . If NASA cracks the

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Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy

Now, researchers have shown that it is possible to evoke a shift in the metabolism from fermentation to respiration of E. coli and baker's yeast by optimizing fermentation conditions. This shift means that the cells can be pushed into producing more internal energy (ATP).

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Helping NASA spacecraft travel faster and farther with math

By combining cutting-edge machine learning with 19th-century mathematics, a mathematician is working to make NASA spacecraft lighter and more damage tolerant by developing methods to detect imperfections in carbon nanomaterials used to make composite rocket fuel tanks and other spacecraft structures.

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In a quantum future, which starship destroys the other?

Quantum mechanics boasts all sorts of strange features, one being quantum superposition — the peculiar circumstance in which particles seem to be in two or more places or states at once. Now, an international group of physicists flip that description on its head, showing that particles are not the only objects that can exist in a state of superposition — so can time itself.

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Cell suicide could hold key for brain health and food security

Research into the self-destruction of cells in humans and plants could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative brain diseases and the development of disease-resistant plants. A study has identified the role certain proteins play in cellular suicide.

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Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance

In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that inhabit different regions of the continent, including the genetic factors that confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. This sheds new light on the way that drug resistance is emerging in different locations and moving by various routes a

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Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research

The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behavior across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas, which gives the highest resolution view of malaria parasite gene expression to date and monitors how indi

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Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems

Biologists have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. Their discovery, revealing how plant resistance proteins trigger localized cell death, could lead to new strategies for engineering disease resistance in next-generation crops.

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The case for retreat in the battle against climate change

With sea level rise and extreme weather threatening coastal communities, it's no longer a question of whether they are going to retreat; it's where, when and how. In a new paper, researchers advocate for a managed and planned retreat, not a short-term spur of the moment reaction to a massive storm.

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Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR

The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide position of the vast reaches of the genome. It is also being harnessed in ongoing diagnostic approaches for the detection of pathogens and disease-causing mutations in patie

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We Have the Touch

OK, let’s get reductionist, and let’s see why getting reductionist often works so well. How do you know when your finger has touched something? You feel it – but how do you feel it? Your nerves have sent an impulse to your brain, which interprets it as something having physically come into contact with your finger tip, but what sets off that impulse? Trace the sensory neurons all the way back and

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Se de unika närbilderna på asteroiden

För ett år sedan anlände den japanska satelliten Hayabusa 2 till asteroiden Ryugu. Nu visar närbilder av asteroiden att den är uppbyggd av samma ursprungliga material som solsystemet bildades ur för nästan 4,6 miljarder år sen. Se de unika närbilderna på Ryugu i klippet ovan.

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Malaria Treatments Are Not Working Well

Experts worry that deaths and illness will rise in the U.S. and worldwide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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University of Kentucky moves to fire researchers after misconduct finding

The University of Kentucky has started termination proceedings against a pair of scientists found guilty of “significant departures from accepted practices of research,” according to the institution. The scientists, Xianglin Shi, who up until now had held the William A. Marquard Chair in Cancer Research and served as associate dean for research integration in the … Continue reading

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Gloucestershire man walks tortoise to the pub every day

Nancy Drew the tortoise has become famous around Tewkesbury, with people loving to stop and say hello.

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Planned Parenthood Withdraws From Federal Funding Program Over Abortion Restrictions

Planned Parenthood announced this week that it would withdraw from a federal family planning program rather than comply with restrictions that would limit its providers’ ability to counsel women on abortion. The withdrawal will result in a loss of $60 million per year for the organization.

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Researchers find a way to stop lung damage due to the body's immune response

Researchers have discovered a new way to stop harmful inflammation in the lungs due to sepsis and injury. They found a molecule, present during inflammation that binds to white blood cells allowing them to pass from the blood stream into the tissue and cause severe damage.

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Do single people suffer more?

Researchers have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support – even without verbal or physical contact.

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The technology behind Bitcoin may improve the medications of the future

Researchers have developed a prototype of an app that may potentially prescribe the optimal dose of medicine for the individual patient, as well as prevent counterfeit products.

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Addressing causes of mortality in Zambia

Despite the fact that people in sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer than they did two decades ago, their average life expectancy remains below that of the rest of the world population. A new study looked into the importance of various causes of death in Zambia and how eliminating the most prominent of these would impact life expectancy in the country.

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Your heart's best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health

Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to a new analysis. The study examines the association of pet ownership — specifically dog ownership — with cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular health.

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Study suggests weight loss regardless of psychiatric medication use

A new study suggests that individuals who take anti-depressants and/or anti-psychotics and participate in a weight management program can lose weight whether or not they take psychiatric medications, according to a new report. The study is the first to examine weight loss outcomes in individuals taking anti-depressants or anti-psychotics alone, in combination or not at all.

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The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat

In what likely is the first study on the evolution of dietary preferences across the animal kingdom, researchers report several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a carnivore and that humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed.

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How red-eared invaders are hurting California's native turtles

Western pond turtles got fatter and healthier after scientists removed nearly 200 invasive red-eared slider turtles from the UC Davis Arboretum, reports a new study. The study is the first to quantify competition between these two species in the wild.

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What's killing sea otters? Parasite strain from cats

Many wild southern sea otters in California are infected with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, yet the infection is fatal for only a fraction of sea otters, which has long puzzled the scientific community. A new study identifies the parasite's specific strains that are killing southern sea otters, tracing them back to a bobcat and feral domestic cats from nearby watersheds.

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Dosering af medicin rykker ned på din smartphone

Forskere på Københavns Universitet har udviklet en prototype på en app, der på sigt kan optimere dosering af lægemidler til den enkelte patient samt sikre imod falske produkter. Alt sammen med QR-koder på firkantede tabletter og blockchain.

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Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds

Researchers from EPFL and the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. Their groundbreaking technique stands to change the field of tissue engineering.

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Study models new method to accelerate nanoparticles

In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois and the Missouri University of Science and Technology modeled a method to manipulate nanoparticles as an alternative mode of propulsion for tiny spacecraft that require very small levels of thrust. The team simulated a system that uses light to generate an electromagnetic field to move the particles from a reservoir, funneled through an inj

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Can researchers engage safely with the food industry?

Researchers from The University of Queensland and University of Cambridge are exploring ways to help scientists better protect their work from the influence of the food industry.

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Researchers use machine learning to teach robots how to trek through unknown terrains

A team of Australian researchers has designed a reliable strategy for testing physical abilities of humanoid robots. Using a blend of machine learning methods and algorithms, the research team succeeded in enabling test robots to effectively react to unknown changes in the simulated environment, improving their odds of functioning in the real world. The findings have promising implications in the

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Exciting new vaccine targets killer disease TB

Australian medical researchers from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney have successfully developed and tested a new type of vaccine targeting tuberculosis (TB), the world's top infectious disease killer. Reported in the 'Journal of Medicinal Chemistry', the early-stage vaccine was shown to provide substantial protection against TB in a pre-clinical laboratory setting.

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A new method for quantifying crystal semiconductor efficiency

Japanese scientists have found a new way to successfully detect the efficiency of crystal semiconductors. For the first time ever, the team used a specific kind of photoluminescence spectroscopy, a way to detect light, to characterize the semiconductors. The emitted light energy was used as an indicator of the crystal's quality. This method potentially culminates in more efficient light-emitting d

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Study shows frying oil consumption worsened colon cancer and colitis in mice

In their paper published Aug. 23, 2019 in Cancer Prevention Research, University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists showed that feeding frying oil to mice exaggerated colonic inflammation, enhanced tumor growth and worsened gut leakage, spreading bacteria or toxic bacterial products into the bloodstream.

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You can stop bots and spammers from calling you so freaking much

Oh god, is that another one? (Fezbot2000 via Unsplash/) Your smartphone is a lot of things—a way to communicate with your loved ones, a tool to share your world, an occasional gaming console—but a vessel for ads and marketing campaigns should not be one of them. Unfortunately, robocalls and spam calls are now a serious problem for many of us, meaning we waste precious minutes fending off incoming

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Astronauts Add Docking Bay For Private Spaceships to Space Station

A New Port Astronauts Nick Hague and Andrew Morgan spent six and a half hours outside the International Space Station (ISS) yesterday installing a new docking port for commercial crew spacecraft. The new port, called IDA-3, will allow private spacecraft such as Boeing’s Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon to dock with the space station in the near future. It will be the second docking port of its

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Closing the attainment gap: Children need a place to excel and thrive

Recent statistics from The Education Policy Institute suggest it will take another 100 years to bridge the academic attainment gap between rich and poorer students in the UK. And according to the Sutton Trust, eight elite schools sent as many pupils to Oxbridge between 2015 and 2018 as three-quarters of all the state schools in the country.

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Opinion: Develop Organoids, Not Chimeras, for Transplantation

Scientists are devising human-animal hybrids for harvesting human organs, but lab-derived mini-organs are a less ethically fraught solution to meeting the need for transplantation.

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Artificial trees capture new bird species on candid camera

An experiment from The Australian National University (ANU) using artificial trees has attracted birds and other wildlife never before seen in a damaged Canberra landscape—catching them on camera at the same time.

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Artificial trees capture new bird species on candid camera

An experiment from The Australian National University (ANU) using artificial trees has attracted birds and other wildlife never before seen in a damaged Canberra landscape—catching them on camera at the same time.

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Algorithm would warn warehouse workers about risky motions

A new system uses machine learning to monitor factory and warehouse workers and tell them how risky their behaviors are in real time, researchers report. In 2017 there were nearly 350,000 incidents of workers taking sick leave due to injuries affecting muscles, nerves, ligaments, or tendons—like carpal tunnel syndrome—according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Among the workers with the high

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Dealers Are Using Snapchat to Sell Illegal Guns

Snap Decision The illegal weapon trade, unfortunately, is nothing new . But what is new is how dealers are connecting with their customers: through Snapchat and other social media platforms. A new Guardian story recounts several examples of federal authorities catching weapons dealers advertising illegal guns via social media — and then using those platforms to bring the dealers to justice. Hired

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Detraction-free light-matter interaction

Certain semiconductor structures, so-called quantum dots, might constitute the foundation of quantum communication. They are an efficient interface between matter and light, with photons (light particles) emitted by the quantum dots transporting information across large distances. However, structures form by default during the manufacture of quantum dots that interfere with communication.

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Addressing causes of mortality in Zambia

Despite the fact that people in sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer than they did two decades ago, their average life expectancy remains below that of the rest of the world population. A new study looked into the importance of various causes of death in Zambia and how eliminating the most prominent of these would impact life expectancy in the country.

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The technology behind Bitcoin may improve the medications of the future

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a prototype of an app that may potentially prescribe the optimal dose of medicine for the individual patient, as well as prevent counterfeit products.

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Do single people suffer more?

Researchers at the University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall, Austria) and the University of the Balearic Islands (Palma de Mallorca, Spain) have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support – even without verbal or physical contact.

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Wildfire health hazards extend hundreds of miles

Fire emissions from wildfires can contribute to cardiovascular disease hundreds of miles from the flames, according to new research. The researchers say the risks are greater and more widespread than most predictive models show. Spyros Pandis, a professor of chemical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, warns that people downwind of a fire are not fully anticipating its possible effects on

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Sony Buys Studio Behind Its Awesome *Spider-Man* Game

The move furthers a trend of hardware manufacturers consolidating their brands by adding studios to their stable of first-party creators.

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The Consumer Bureau's Reckless Plan for Debt Collection

Opinion: A CFPB proposal would create a quandary for consumers. Click and risk a computer virus, or don't click and miss a debt payment.

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How to make influence from people in our networks a force for good

As the social and economic divides between groups grow ever wider, and social mobility declines, the bonds that tie people together, within families or communities, have weakened over time.

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Starting out in smaller communities may be better for refugees in short term

Syrian refugees are more satisfied with settlement services and their community when they spend their first year of settlement in a smaller city, according to a new University of Alberta study.

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250,000 Melbourne residents losing water due to logging

Logging in Melbourne's largest water catchment has led to a loss of water equivalent to the amount used by 250,000 people each year, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.

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Nano-thermometer takes temperature inside cells

Scientists have developed a nano-thermometer able to take temperatures inside cells. The technique takes advantage of the fluorescent properties of a modified molecular rotor and the viscosity of the cell.

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Increasing flood risk

Researchers have developed new maps that predict coastal flooding for every county on the Eastern and Gulf Coasts and find 100-year floods could become annual occurrences in New England; and happen every one to 30 years along the southeast Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico shorelines.

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Birds balance sexiness and predator avoidance by changing color

Most birds remain the same color year-round, replacing their feathers only once a year.

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Birds balance sexiness and predator avoidance by changing color

Most birds remain the same color year-round, replacing their feathers only once a year.

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The Amazon is on fire: Here are 5 things you need to know

Record fires are raging in Brazil's Amazon rainforest, with more than 2,500 fires currently burning. They are collectively emitting huge amounts of carbon, with smoke plumes visible thousands of kilometers away.

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Image: Amazonian fires continue shrouding South America in smoke

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite collected this natural-color image using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument on August 21, 2019. Smoke from the fires raging in in the Amazon basin has created a shroud that is clearly visible across much of the center of South America.

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Scientists have found longevity biomarkers

An international group of scientists studied the effects of 17 different lifespan-extending interventions on gene activity in mice and discovered genetic biomarkers of longevity. The results of their study were published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

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UCalgary researchers find a way to stop lung damage due to the body's immune response

University of Calgary researchers at the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) led by Dr. Donna Senger, PhD, Dr. Paul Kubes, PhD, and Dr. Stephen Robbins, PhD have discovered a new way to stop harmful inflammation in the lungs due to sepsis and injury. They found a molecule, present during inflammation that binds to white blood cells allowing them to pass from the blood stream into the tissue and cause

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Heart attack patients with mild cognitive impairment get fewer treatments

University of Michigan research finds people with mild cognitive impairment don't always receive the same, established medical treatment that patients with normal cognitive functioning get when they have a heart attack.

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Plants are going extinct up to 350 times faster than the historical norm

Earth is seeing an unprecedented loss of species, which some ecologists are calling a sixth mass extinction. In May, a United Nations report warned that 1 million species are threatened by extinction. More recently, 571 plant species were declared extinct.

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Habitable type planets found around nearby small mass star

A team of researchers from several European countries and one from Chile has found evidence of three possibly habitable exoplanets circling the star GJ1061. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, and soon to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the group describes their study of the star system and what they found.

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Why cursive handwriting needs to make a schoolcomeback

Teaching connected-style handwriting, otherwise known as cursive handwriting, has fallen out of fashion on many school curricula. Older generations have sometimes been shocked that some younger people today can't sign their names on official documents or even read a handwritten note.

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Plants are going extinct up to 350 times faster than the historical norm

Earth is seeing an unprecedented loss of species, which some ecologists are calling a sixth mass extinction. In May, a United Nations report warned that 1 million species are threatened by extinction. More recently, 571 plant species were declared extinct.

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Scientists Use ‘UniverseMachine’ to Simulate 8 Million Universes

The universe is a big place. The Hubble Space Telescope's views burrow deep into space and time, but cover an area a fraction the angular size of the full Moon. The challenge is that these "core samples" of the sky may not fully represent the universe at large. This dilemma for cosmologists is called cosmic variance. By expanding the survey area, such uncertainties in the structure of the univers

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Researchers observe spontaneous occurrence of skyrmions in atomically thin cobalt films

Since their experimental discovery, magnetic skyrmions—tiny magnetic knots—have moved into the focus of research. Scientists from Hamburg and Kiel have now been able to show that individual magnetic skyrmions with a diameter of only a few nanometers can be stabilized in magnetic metal films even without an external magnetic field. They report on their discovery in the journal Nature Communications

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The Gamma-Ray Moon

A reminder that there is more going on in the universe than we ordinarily perceive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pollution and winter linked with rise in heart attack treatment

Heavily polluted areas have a higher rate of angioplasty procedures to treat blocked arteries than areas with clean air, according to new research. Procedures are even more common in winter, the most polluted time of year.

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Elite athletes have poor oral health despite brushing twice daily

Elite athletes have high rates of oral disease despite brushing their teeth more frequently than most people, finds a new study.

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Key areas of measles virus polymerase to target for antiviral drug development

Targeting specific areas of the measles virus polymerase, a protein complex that copies the viral genome, can effectively fight the measles virus and be used as an approach to developing new antiviral drugs to treat the serious infectious disease, according to a new study.

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Psychiatric illnesses are common in adults and children with kidney failure

Between 1996 and 2013, approximately 27% of adults, 21% of elderly adults, and 16% of children with kidney failure in the United States were hospitalized with a psychiatric diagnosis in the first year of kidney failure. The prevalence of hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses increased over time across age groups, mostly due to secondary diagnoses.

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Research details impact of energy development on deer habitat use

Mule deer avoid areas close to such human disturbance, even when there's quality forage in those areas.

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International team discovers unique pathway for treating deadly children's brain cancer

An international team of researchers has discovered a new pathway that may improve success against an incurable type of children's brain cancer. The study results suggest that scientists have identified a unique way to disrupt the cellular process that contributes to Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas (DIPG).

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How the sun damages our skin

Researchers have discovered the mechanism through which ultraviolet radiation, given off by the sun, damages our skin.

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Cracking a decades-old test, researchers bolster case for quantum mechanics

Researchers have developed creative tactics to get rid of loopholes that have long confounded tests of quantum mechanics. With their innovative method, the researchers were able to demonstrate quantum interactions between two particles spaced more than 180 meters (590 feet) apart while eliminating the possibility that shared events during the past 11 years affected their interaction.

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Videos of chemical synthesis at atomic resolution achieved

For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes. They have shown there are significant discrete stages to these processes which build on our knowledge of chemical synthesis. These details could aid in the development of methods to synthesize chemicals with greater control and precision than ever before. Methods such as these could

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Cracking a decades-old test, researchers bolster case for quantum mechanics

Researchers have developed creative tactics to get rid of loopholes that have long confounded tests of quantum mechanics. With their innovative method, the researchers were able to demonstrate quantum interactions between two particles spaced more than 180 meters (590 feet) apart while eliminating the possibility that shared events during the past 11 years affected their interaction.

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Nano-thermometer takes temperature inside cells

Scientists have developed a nano-thermometer able to take temperatures inside cells. The technique takes advantage of the fluorescent properties of a modified molecular rotor and the viscosity of the cell.

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Evidence found of low slip earthquakes impeding progression of large destructive quakes

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found evidence of slow slip earthquakes impeding the progression of large destructive quakes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of both types of earthquakes and the events surrounding the large Tohoku-Oki quake in 2011, and what they found. Heidi Houston, with the University of So

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Italy’s Leaders Are Divided on Policy, United in Fear of One Man

In the days since the Italian government fell, finding an alternative governing coalition has been less politics and more physics. Italy’s various political forces—right and left, north and south—are divided into 1 million pieces, but are revolving around one center of gravity: Matteo Salvini. Before withdrawing from the coalition this month, triggering the crisis, Salvini—Italy’s interior minist

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Creating textiles and cosmetics of the future with nanotechnology

By using nanocapsules, scientists and industrial partners are developing innovative garments and skin products that provide thermal comfort, and anti-aging and antimicrobial properties.

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Geoengineering: 'Plan B' for the planet

Dismissed a decade ago as far-fetched and dangerous, schemes to tame global warming by engineering the climate have migrated from the margins of policy debates towards centre stage.

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Nano-thermometer can take a single cell’s temperature

It’s now possible to take the temperature inside a cell with a fluorescent nano-thermometer, researchers report. Researchers used the light-emitting properties of particular molecules to create the nano-thermometer, modifying a biocompatible molecular rotor known as boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY, for short) to reveal temperatures inside single cells. Light-up molecule The molecule is ideally suite

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Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Doesn’t Get What Makes Stories Scary

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark , the new film adaptation of the collection of children’s books by the same name, wants you to know that stories have power. At both the beginning and the end of the movie, a voice-over reminds the audience: “Stories hurt, stories heal. If we repeat them often enough, they become real. They have that power.” In the movie, that power is magical, sinister, and chan

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Caffeine does not influence stingless bees

The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) that has a sting for use in defense is common in Western Europe. Stingless bees, on the other hand, are mainly at home in the tropics and subtropics. They are a very social group and live in colonies. They construct hives where they store honey for their colony. While the western honey bee reacts to the presence of caffeine in nectar and pollen and becomes mo

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Caffeine does not influence stingless bees

The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) that has a sting for use in defense is common in Western Europe. Stingless bees, on the other hand, are mainly at home in the tropics and subtropics. They are a very social group and live in colonies. They construct hives where they store honey for their colony. While the western honey bee reacts to the presence of caffeine in nectar and pollen and becomes mo

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The nuclear mutant is still evolving

A nuclear weapon test on Bikini Atoll (US Department of Energy/) In the early morning of April 26, 1986, reactor number 4 in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. In the middle of a safety test, energy levels plunged, so the operators withdrew the majority of the control rods to force the reactor back into production. It began to overheat. Hoping to neutralize the system, the scientists pus

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Scientists find longevity biomarkers

An international group of scientists studied the effects of 17 lifespan-extending interventions on gene activity in mice and discovered genetic biomarkers of longevity. The results of their study were published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

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Industry guidance touts untested tech as climate fix

Draft guidelines for how industry fights climate change promote the widespread use of untested technologies that experts fear could undermine efforts to slash planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, AFP can reveal.

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Scientists find longevity biomarkers

An international group of scientists studied the effects of 17 lifespan-extending interventions on gene activity in mice and discovered genetic biomarkers of longevity. The results of their study were published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

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Child labor protections are lacking in many countries, study finds

Despite international commitments made by nearly all of the 193 United Nations (UN) member states, dozens of countries lack important legal protections against children doing work that could be harmful or interfere with their education, a study by the WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has found.

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A new method for quantifying crystal semiconductor efficiency

Japanese scientists have found a new way to detect the efficiency of crystal semiconductors. For the first time ever, the team used a specific kind of photoluminescence spectroscopy, a way to detect light, to characterize the semiconductors. The emitted light energy was used as an indicator of the crystal's quality. This method potentially culminates in more efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs)

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To ban or not to ban genetically modified crops? That's not the question

The South Australian government recently announced its intention to lift the long-standing statewide moratorium on genetically modified (GM) crops, following a statutory six-week consultation period.

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The fat of the land: Estimating the ecological costs of overeating

Researchers have proposed a way to measure the ecological impact of global food wastage due to excessive consumption. The results suggest that direct food waste — thrown away or lost from field to fork — is a mere hors-d'œuvre.

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Junk food intake in children reduced by health education that addresses emotional issues

Teacher training followed by classroom education with information, activities, and emotional support improves lifestyles in teachers and students, according to new research. The study suggests that knowledge alone is insufficient to change behavior.

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Big brains or big guts: Choose one

A global study comparing 2,062 birds finds that, in highly variable environments, birds tend to have either larger or smaller brains relative to their body size. Birds with smaller brains tend to use ecological strategies that are not available to big-brained counterparts.

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Videos of chemical synthesis at atomic resolution achieved

For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes. They have shown there are significant discrete stages to these processes which build on our knowledge of chemical synthesis. These details could aid in the development of methods to synthesize chemicals with greater control and precision than ever before. Methods such as these could

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To ban or not to ban genetically modified crops? That's not the question

The South Australian government recently announced its intention to lift the long-standing statewide moratorium on genetically modified (GM) crops, following a statutory six-week consultation period.

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Häng med Apollo 11 till månen

Den 20 juli i år var det 50 år sedan de första människorna steg ut på månens yta. Neil Armstrong yttrade sina berömda ord om ett litet steg för en människa och ett jättesprång för mänskligheten. Buzz Aldrin såg sig omkring och kommenterade den magnifika ödsligheten. Michael Collins väntade i omloppsbana på att de skulle lyckas återvända.

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Best Travel Gear for Babies and Kids (Flights, Car Rides)

Traveling with babies, toddlers, or young kids is no picnic—even if food is involved. These accessories should help.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: You’ve Got Microplastics

WIRED’s Matt Simon joins the show to talk about microplastics—what they are, why they’re a nightmare, and whether you should fret about eating them.

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Image of the Day: Skeleton Lake

Human remains around Roopkund Lake in India bear South Asian, East Asian, and Mediterranean ancestry.

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Can a New Lyme Disease Vaccine Overcome a History of Distrust and Failure?

Two new vaccines are in development, but it has taken researchers two decades to get this close — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers analyze use of social media to influence politics during uprising

When the people of Puerto Rico took to the streets after a series of government corruption scandals this past July, a group of researchers took the opportunity to determine the role of social media in the organization and dissemination of the protests, marches and other activities that occurred.

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Københavns Kommune foreslår enorm udvidelse af Lynetteholm

By & Havn foreslår at den kunstige ø Lynetteholm, skal være 282 – og ikke ‘kun’ 190 hektar stor.

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Forensics Friday: You’re the reviewer. How do you react to this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the fourteenth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue re

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Detraction-free light-matter interaction

An efficient light-matter interface might constitute the foundation of quantum communication. However, certain structures that are formed during the growth process interfere with the signal.

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Using CRISPR to program gels with new functions

The CRISPR genome-editing system is best-known for its potential to correct disease-causing mutations and add new genes into living cells. Now, a team from MIT and Harvard University has deployed CRISPR for a completely different purpose: creating novel materials, such as gels, that can change their properties when they encounter specific DNA sequences.

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After using tools, crows behave more optimistically, study suggests

It's no secret crows are smart. They're notorious for frustrating attempts to keep them from tearing into garbage cans; more telling, however, is that they are one of the few animals known to make tools.

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Using CRISPR to program gels with new functions

The CRISPR genome-editing system is best-known for its potential to correct disease-causing mutations and add new genes into living cells. Now, a team from MIT and Harvard University has deployed CRISPR for a completely different purpose: creating novel materials, such as gels, that can change their properties when they encounter specific DNA sequences.

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After using tools, crows behave more optimistically, study suggests

It's no secret crows are smart. They're notorious for frustrating attempts to keep them from tearing into garbage cans; more telling, however, is that they are one of the few animals known to make tools.

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Q&A: Scientist models exoplanet's atmosphere

In the search for life beyond our galaxy, many scientists have their eyes turned toward orbs like Earth: rocky planets. So after the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) detected a rocky planet slightly larger than Earth last fall, a team of researchers launched a campaign to take additional images with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the only telescope currently in space that can directly de

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Researchers produce first-ever videos of chemical synthesis at atomic resolution

For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes. They have shown there are significant discrete stages to these processes that build on existing knowledge of chemical synthesis. These details could aid in the development of methods to synthesize chemicals with greater control and precision than ever before. Methods such as these co

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Manta rays form social bonds with each other

Manta rays form social relationships and actively choose their social partners, a new study has revealed. Research published today by scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation, Macquarie University and the University of Papua is the first to describe the structure of social relationships in manta rays.

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Ferrara protects Rector Zauli from “prejudiced” media and unqualified public

University of Ferrara rejected a journalist's FOI request about the investigation of its own Rector. The arguments: the media is biased and drives a slander campaign against Giorgio Zauli, and in any case, his research can only be evaluated in a "Science Court" by peer review.

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Manta rays form social bonds with each other

Manta rays form social relationships and actively choose their social partners, a new study has revealed. Research published today by scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation, Macquarie University and the University of Papua is the first to describe the structure of social relationships in manta rays.

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High diversity of harvestmen in Atlantic Rainforest and ancient geological events

In the southern Atlantic Rainforest remnants between Rio de Janeiro State in Southeast Brazil and Santa Catarina State in South Brazil, there are some 600 species of harvestmen (Opiliones), arachnids that live in caves and humid forests. The number of species is considered high even for this well-known biodiversity hotspot, and most of these species are endemic.

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30 years ago: Voyager 2's historic Neptune flyby

Thirty years ago, on Aug. 25, 1989, NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft made a close flyby of Neptune, giving humanity its first close-up of our solar system's eighth planet. Marking the end of the Voyager mission's Grand Tour of the solar system's four giant planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune—that first was also a last: No other spacecraft has visited Neptune since.

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Mapping nucleation kinetics with nanometer resolution

Nucleation is the formation of a new condensed phase from a fluid phase via self-assembly. This process is critical to many natural systems and technical applications including the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and advanced materials, the formation of clouds, mineral formation in the Earth's crust, and the stability of proteins. While scientists have studied nucleation for over a century, it re

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High diversity of harvestmen in Atlantic Rainforest and ancient geological events

In the southern Atlantic Rainforest remnants between Rio de Janeiro State in Southeast Brazil and Santa Catarina State in South Brazil, there are some 600 species of harvestmen (Opiliones), arachnids that live in caves and humid forests. The number of species is considered high even for this well-known biodiversity hotspot, and most of these species are endemic.

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A Defining Moment for Trump’s Foreign Policy

It seems about as black-and-white a situation as an American president can face in this messy world of ours: hundreds of thousands of largely peaceful protesters— at points as much as a quarter of Hong Kong’s entire population—spilling into the streets of the former British colony to demand greater democracy and resist China’s creeping control over the semiautonomous region. All the more so for t

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A Cosmic Rarity Found in Antarctic Snow

The snow arrived at the laboratory in Munich inside Styrofoam boxes. It came from a German research station in Antarctica, where summer made the snow, whisked around in the wind like sand on a beach, easy to lift. A pair of scientists had shoveled in thousands of pounds of the stuff. The boxes, kept under freezing conditions, traveled by plane to the ice shelf and then by ship to South Africa and

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Elite athletes have poor oral health despite brushing twice daily

Elite athletes have high rates of oral disease despite brushing their teeth more frequently than most people, finds a new UCL study published in the British Dental Journal.

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How Aging Shapes Narrative Identity – Facts So Romantic

It’s not just our flesh and bones that change as we get older. Photograph by dirkmvp41 / Flickr In 2010, Dan McAdams wrote a biography about George W. Bush analyzing the former American president using the tools of personality psychology. It was, in his own words, a flop. “I probably had three readers,” McAdams laughs. But an editor from The Atlantic happened to read it, and asked McAdams to writ

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A Rail Gun the Size of Manhattan Could Reveal the Secrets of the Higgs Boson

A giant linear collider the size of Manhattan could finally help us find new physics, scientists argue.

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Sending Even a Tiny Message Through a Black Hole Would Make It Evaporate

Sending a carrier pigeon across the cosmos would probably be a more reliable way to send a message.

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Physicists Finally Narrowed Down the Mass of the Tiniest 'Ghost Particle' in the Universe

A new paper uses data about the structure of the entire universe to measure the mass of one of its smallest, hardest-to-study components.

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In Support of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory

The House of Representatives has taken the first step toward honoring a pioneering woman in astronomy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stormansgrav funnen i Uppsala

Graven hittades för tre år sedan inför anläggningen av området Östra Fyrislund, men grävfirman Arkeologikonsult har legat lågt om de spektakulära fynden medan de konserverats och analyserats. Brandgraven dateras till folkvandringstid-vendeltid, cirka år 550-600 – samma tid som kungshögarna anläggs i Gamla Uppsala.

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What Is Cyberwar? The Complete WIRED Guide

The threat of cyberwar looms over the future: a new dimension of conflict capable of leapfrogging borders and teleporting the chaos of war to civilians thousands of miles beyond its front.

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You Are Already Having Sex With Robots

Sex robots are here, and their AI-enabled pseudosexuality isn’t long behind.

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Surprise: Bees Need Meat

Microbes in flowers are crucial to bee diets, and microbiome changes could be starving the insects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science-Based Satire: Children of Anti-Vaccine Parents More Likely to Refuse Cootie Shot

Are the children of anti-vaccine parents refusing their cootie shots? Are we at risk of seeing outbreaks in our schools? They do say that the organic, non-GMO apples don't fall far from the tree. No, this is satire. Everyone knows that the cootie virus can only be found in government research laboratories.

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In Support of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory

The House of Representatives has taken the first step toward honoring a pioneering woman in astronomy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient plants reproduce in the UK as global warming increases

“It’s not something that’s happened with a short-term mild spell. It’s a longer-term warming which is making these things happen.”

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Record Amazon rainforest fires spark row between Brazil and France

The Brazilian space agency, INPE, this week reported more than 75,000 fires across the Brazilian part of the world’s greatest rainforest, up 84 per cent on last year

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Surprise: Bees Need Meat

Microbes in flowers are crucial to bee diets, and microbiome changes could be starving the insects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Surprise: Bees Need Meat

Microbes in flowers are crucial to bee diets, and microbiome changes could be starving the insects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tydligt samband mellan glutenmängd och risk för celiaki

Studien är av observationstyp och påvisar därför inte orsakssamband, men den är den hittills mest omfattande i sitt slag. Sammanlagt har drygt 6 600 barn med förhöjd risk att utveckla celiaki följts från födseln fram till femårsdagen. Barnen kommer från Sverige, Finland, Tyskland samt USA och deltar i forskningsprojektet TEDDY. – Det finns i studien en tydlig koppling mellan mängden gluten som ba

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From Flying Spiders to Global Warming, a Hymn for a Windswept Planet

In the newly reissued "Heaven's Breath," the South African explorer and polymath Lyall Watson blends science, folklore, history, and anecdote to explore the many wonders of wind, a primal force that he credits for everything from the growth of civilization and globalization to evolution and life itself.

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The Proud Boys’ Real Target

I haven’t seen Justice Hans Linde in more than a decade, but I thought of him last Saturday, when I found myself locked in a science museum with frightened parents and children while neofascist thugs marched by. Hans was a child in Weimar Germany; I suspect he would have known how I was feeling. The museum was the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry , in Portland. The occasion was a rally organ

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The Lasting Lesson of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact

Thirty years ago this week, on August 23, 1989, more than 2 million citizens of the Baltic republics of the U.S.S.R. engineered one of the most dramatic and successful mass protests in Soviet history. Men, women, and children linked hands in a continuous human chain more than 400 miles long that they called the “Baltic Way,” connecting the Estonian capital of Tallinn in the north with the Latvian

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The Cops Who Abused Photoshop

U.S. District Court of Oregon Last week, The Oregonian newspaper exposed what ought to be a headline-grabbing scandal in the course of reporting on an otherwise obscure criminal trial. The dicey behavior began when Portland cops investigating a series of bank robberies felt they knew the perpetrator’s identity: Tyrone Lamont Allen, a 50-year-old whose face is covered by several prominent tattoos.

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Bureaucrats Put the Squeeze on College Newspapers

In September 2017, Rebecca Liebson broke the biggest story of her college career and put her school’s administration on its heels. In a faculty senate meeting that month , Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley announced a series of impending budget cuts, department closures, and layoffs that would eliminate the jobs of more than 20 professors . Liebson, a reporter for the student new

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Vi trækker ikke nok fosfor ud af spildevandet

Lovgivning, slamkvalitet og pris. Det er hovedårsagerne til, at Danmark endnu ikke fuldt har nået målet for genanvendelse af fosfor fra spildevandsslam.

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Kvinnorna mest gynnade av sextimmarsdag

Forskare vid Mittuniversitetet har följt Östersundshems försöksprojekt med sex timmars arbetsdag med bibehållen lön. − Det som främst lyfts fram som positivt med projektet är möjligheten att själv styra sitt arbete vilket har medfört att medarbetarna känt ett förtroende att själva bedöma när arbetet är klart för dagen. I intervjumaterialet, liksom i de öppna svaren i enkäten, betonar man att foku

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How Pete Holmes creates comedic flow: Try micro-visualization

Setting an intention doesn't have to be complicated, and it can make a great difference when you're hoping for a specific outcome. When comedian Pete Holmes is preparing to record an episode of his podcast, "You Made it Weird with Pete Holmes," he takes 15 seconds to check in with himself. This way, he's primed with his own material and can help guests feel safe and comfortable to share theirs, a

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From rejection to renewal: the future of organ transplants

For transplant patients, the body’s own defences can be fatal. Breakthrough research offers new hope

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PODCAST: Hvordan udvikler man en ny forbrændingsmotor til biler?

Schweiziske forskere mener, at de har skabt fremtidens forbrændingsmotor uden knastaksel. Barkbillen lægger kæmpe tyske skovområder øde. Kun 31 pct. af det plastaffald, som københavnerne sorterer for Vestforbrænding, bliver genbrugt.

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Complex quantum teleportation achieved for the first time

Austrian and Chinese scientists have succeeded in teleporting three-dimensional quantum states for the first time. High-dimensional teleportation could play an important role in future quantum computers.

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Kritisk fejl fundet i Moskvas blockchain-baserede afstemningssystem en måned før valg

En fransk sikkerhedsforsker har fundet en kritisk fejl i det blockchain-baserede afstemningssystem, som skal bruges til det regionale parlamentsvalg i Moskva i næste måned.

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Hacker afslører tredje gabende hul i Steam på en måned

Spilplatformen er gennemhullet. Samtidig understreger nyt privilegie-eskaleringsangreb, at Steams bug bounty-program har massive problemer.

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Pioneer and nonpioneer factor cooperation drives lineage specific chromatin opening

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11791-9 Pioneer transcription factor Pax7 specifies melanotrope cells, which then allows for the binding of Tpit transcription factor. Here, authors find that while binding of heterochromatin targeting by Pax7 is independent of Tpit, Pax7-dependent chromatin opening requires Tpit.

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Development of a SFTSV DNA vaccine that confers complete protection against lethal infection in ferrets

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11815-4 Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne virus with no specific treatment or vaccine available. Here, the authors develop a DNA vaccine for SFTSV that is protective against lethal challenge in ferrets and show that anti-envelope antibodies are important for protection

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Rebalancing of actomyosin contractility enables mammary tumor formation upon loss of E-cadherin

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11716-6 E-cadherin is a well-known tumor suppressor albeit loss of E-cadherin alone is insufficient to induce mammary tumorigenesis. Here the authors report that epithelial cells that have lost E-cadherin can survive by extruding to the basal lamina but require rebalancing of actomyosin contractility to drive tumor de

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Equivalence and its invalidation between non-Markovian and Markovian spreading dynamics on complex networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11763-z When modelling epidemic spreading on complex networks, one useful simplification is to assume that the dynamics are Markovian, i.e. memoryless. Here the authors present a more general non-Markovian approach which is able to accurately reproduce the transient and stationary regime on different substrates.

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Diversity-triggered deterministic bacterial assembly constrains community functions

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11787-5 The role of microbial β-diversity in soil ecosystem function is not well-studied. Here, the authors use genetic data to show that microbial α-diversity levels may have impacts on stochastic/deterministic assembly processes and functions of soil microbiome.

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Photocatalytic enantioselective α-aminoalkylation of acyclic imine derivatives by a chiral copper catalyst

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11688-7 Copper-based asymmetric photocatalysis has great synthetic potential, however it has been rarely exploited due to challenges inherent to such systems. Here, a chiral bisoxazoline copper catalyst is involved in a SET process, photoredox catalysis, Lewis acid activation and asymmetric induction to construct chir

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Integrative transcriptome imputation reveals tissue-specific and shared biological mechanisms mediating susceptibility to complex traits

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11874-7 PrediXcan is a widely used gene expression imputation method that links genetic variants to gene expression. Here, the authors develop EpiXcan which leverages epigenetic annotations to inform transcriptomic imputation and further use the obtained gene-trait associations for computational drug repurposing.

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TriQuinoline

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11818-1 In this paper, the authors introduce a structurally elegant 2D triquinoline molecule as a discrete model for graphitic materials with atom-sized voids. The compound has unusual chemical properties, including high proton affinity and rich supramolecular behavior, forming complexes via both π-π and CH-π contact

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The SpaceX 'Starhopper' is ready to make its biggest leap

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Harsh UK Energy Regs Claims 13th Victim

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Are there alternatives to air conditioning?

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The Americans Left Behind in Iran

Nizar Zakka never believed he was getting out. He had been held in an Iranian prison for nearly four years, and every so often, the prison guards would tell him he was about to be released, only to return him to his cell. In a recent interview after he was finally freed, he said he understood why ISIS captives looked so calm in beheading videos: They went through a similar process of conditioning

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Climate change turns Arctic into strategic, economic hotspot

From a helicopter, Greenland's brilliant white ice and dark mountains make the desolation seem to go on forever. And the few people who live here—its whole population wouldn't fill a football stadium—are poor, with a high rate of substance abuse and suicide.

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Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinction

Veterinarians have successfully harvested eggs from the last two surviving northern white rhinos, taking them one step closer to bringing the species back from the brink of extinction, scientists said in Kenya on Friday.

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Harnessing the tissue and plasma lncRNA-peptidome to discover peptide-based cancer biomarkers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48774-1

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Hepsin-mediated Processing of Uromodulin is Crucial for Salt-sensitivity and Thick Ascending Limb Homeostasis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48300-3

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Automated real-time monitoring of human pluripotent stem cell aggregation in stirred tank reactors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48814-w

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Anticipatory postural adjustments during joint action coordination

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48758-1

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Structural features in the glycine-binding sites of the GluN1 and GluN3A subunits regulate the surface delivery of NMDA receptors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48845-3

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Geographical differences in osteoporosis, obesity, and sarcopenia related traits in white American cohorts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48734-9

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Big brains or big guts: Choose one

A global study comparing 2,062 birds finds that, in highly variable environments, birds tend to have either larger or smaller brains relative to their body size. Birds with smaller brains tend to use ecological strategies that are not available to big-brained counterparts. The new research from biologists at Washington University in St. Louis appears Aug. 23, 2019 in the journal Nature Communicati

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Chemistry in motion

For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes. They have shown there are significant discrete stages to these processes which build on our knowledge of chemical synthesis. These details could aid in the development of methods to synthesize chemicals with greater control and precision than ever before. Methods such as these could

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Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinction

Veterinarians have successfully harvested eggs from the last two surviving northern white rhinos, taking them one step closer to bringing the species back from the brink of extinction, scientists said in Kenya on Friday.

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Life-Changing Drugs Almost Nobody Can Afford

A New TV Show from The New York Times on FX and Hulu

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Big brains or big guts: Choose one

Big brains can help an animal mount quick, flexible behavioral responses to frequent or unexpected environmental changes. But some birds just don't need 'em.

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Big brains or big guts: Choose one

Big brains can help an animal mount quick, flexible behavioral responses to frequent or unexpected environmental changes. But some birds just don't need 'em.

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DC-3 fylder 75: Flyet, der gjorde luftfarten voksen

PLUS. ‘Den danske DC-3’er’ er blevet en ældre dame, men luftdueligheden fejler ikke noget. Ingeniøren fløj med i anledning af jubilæet og ny bog.

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The Amazon in Brazil is on fire – how bad is it?

Thousands of fires are ravaging the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. How bad are they?

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Sværme af barkbiller gnasker Europas skove i stykker

PLUS. Stigende temperaturer har siden 1980’erne fået en behåret barkbille til at ødelægge stadigt flere træer over hele Europa. Situationen er alarmerende i flere lande.

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Quantum radar has been demonstrated for the first time

A radar device that relies on entangled photons works at such low power that it can hide behind background noise, making it useful for biomedical and security applications.

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Fodbold er effektiv medicin for kvinder med prædiabetes

Nyt studie fra SDU viser, at fodbold er en effektiv træningsform for 55-70-årige kvinder med prædiabetes. På 16 uger opnår de fremgang i kondital, blodtryk, fedtprocent og kolesterol.

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Alle undersøgelser samme dag er vejen frem for diabetespatienter

Patienterne er glade for at få samlet deres mange undersøgelser på samme dag, viser rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen. Formand for endokrinologerne håber, at merværdien for patienter ved sammedagsforløb på sigt kan stå mål med de ekstra ressourcer.

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Microbial Life Discovered 2.4 Km Deep in Canadian Mine

Scientists cultivate sulfate-reducing microbes from some of the oldest-known water on Earth.

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ANALYSE: Stikker teledataskandalen langt dybere end vi lige ser?

I lyset af skandalen med teledata bør dommere og forsvarsadvokater fremover spørge mere ind til nye bevistyper, anfører redaktionschef Henning Mølsted.

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Teknologien bag bitcoin kan forbedre fremtidens medicin

Forskere på Københavns Universitet har udviklet en prototype på en app, der potentielt…

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Amazon will no longer use drivers' tips to cover their base pay

Amazon has pledged to be more transparent and to tell its its Flex delivery drivers how much they actually earn, according to an email sent to contractors as seen by the LA Times. Perhaps …

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‘You Cannot Forbid Love’: A Kremlin Critic’s Struggle

MOSCOW—Shortly before midnight one recent evening, five beefy security officers lifted a small leather couch from an election-commission office here and gently carried it down a flight of stairs, through a beeping metal detector, and finally out into the dark summer night. On it sat Lyubov Sobol, an opposition activist who had been barred from running in September’s elections for Moscow’s city co

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Kirurg bypassede kommandovejen og afleverede protestbrev direkte til regionsformanden

Ordet bypass blev brugt i en anden betydning, da thoraxkirurg Per Hostrup Nielsen besluttede sig at aflevere et kritisk brev fra 59 kirurger på Aarhus Universitetshospital direkte til regionens politiske chef, regionsrådsformand Anders Kühnau (A).

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Study suggests weight loss regardless of psychiatric medication use

A new Canadian study suggests that individuals who take anti-depressants and/or anti-psychotics and participate in a weight management program can lose weight whether or not they take psychiatric medications, according to a report published online today in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. The study is the first to examine weight loss outcomes in individuals taking anti-depress

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The physics professor who says online extremists act like curdled milk

Hate may be less like a cancer and more like bubbles, says Neil Johnson, who applies physics theory to human behavior Lone wolves. Terrorist cells. Bad apples. Viral infections. The language we use to discuss violent extremism is rife with metaphors from the natural world. As we seek to understand why some humans behave so utterly inhumanely, we rely on comparisons to biology, ecology and medicin

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US government issues final Utah monument plan

The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around a Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized doesn't include many new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal issued last year.

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Rolling Stones get a little piece of Mars to call their own

There is now a "Rolling Stones Rock" on Mars, and it's giving Mick and the boys some serious satisfaction.

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The fat of the land: Estimating the ecological costs of overeating

With every unfinished meal since Band Aid, you've heard it: "people are starving in Africa, y'know". True, the UN estimates that rich countries throw away nearly as much food as the entire net production of sub-Saharan Africa—about 230 million tonnes per year. But is it any less a waste to eat the excess food?

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Research details impact of energy development on deer habitat use

For every acre of mule deer habitat taken by roads, well pads and other oil and gas development infrastructure in Wyoming's Green River Basin, an average of 4.6 other acres of available forage is lost, according to new research by University of Wyoming scientists.

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Research details impact of energy development on deer habitat use

For every acre of mule deer habitat taken by roads, well pads and other oil and gas development infrastructure in Wyoming's Green River Basin, an average of 4.6 other acres of available forage is lost, according to new research by University of Wyoming scientists.

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'100-year' floods will happen every 1 to 30 years, according to new flood maps

A 100-year flood is supposed to be just that: a flood that occurs once every 100 years, or a flood that has a one-percent chance of happening every year.

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Kirurgien i Aarhus er under pres

Mangel på plejepersonale, dårlig udnyttelse af operationslejerne og ny organisation har ført til 5000 aflyste operationer i år og protester fra 59 kirurger på Aarhus Universitetshospital. Hospitalsdirektør erkender, at kapaciteten endnu ikke er tilfredsstillende, og at det er svært at sætte dato på, hvornår den vil blive det.

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DARPA Subterranean Challenge Tunnel Circuit Wrap-Up

submitted by /u/Synesthesia108 [link] [comments]

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Is nuking Mars a good idea? (No)

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

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Oceans of Noise: Episode Three – Science Weekly

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson concludes this three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019 As wildlife recordist Chris Watson looks for solutions to ocean noise pollution, he hears from Tim Gordon

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Oceans of Noise: Episode Three – Science Weekly

During our summer break, we’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson concludes this three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution First released: 03/05/2019. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Bagmænd bag falsk sexafpresning tjener millioner

Falsk sexafpresning stammer formentlig fra organiserede it-kriminelle, viser nye undersøgelser.

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Pollution and winter linked with rise in heart attack treatment

Heavily polluted areas have a higher rate of angioplasty procedures to treat blocked arteries than areas with clean air, according to research to be presented at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. Procedures are even more common in winter, the most polluted time of year.

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Junk food intake in children reduced by health education that addresses emotional issues

Teacher training followed by classroom education with information, activities, and emotional support improves lifestyles in teachers and students, according to research to be presented at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. The study suggests that knowledge alone is insufficient to change behavior.

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The fat of the land: Estimating the ecological costs of overeating

Researchers have proposed a way to measure the ecological impact of global food wastage due to excessive consumption. Published in Frontiers in Nutrition, the results suggest that direct food waste — thrown away or lost from field to fork — is a mere hors-d'œuvre.

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Your heart's best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health

Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to the first analysis of data from the Kardiozive Brno 2030 study. The study examines the association of pet ownership — specifically dog ownership — with cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular health. The results are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Child death rate linked to hospital preparedness for pediatric emergencies

Critically ill children brought to hospital emergency departments that are ill-prepared to care for pediatric emergencies have more than three times the odds of dying compared to those brought to hospitals well-equipped to care for them. The findings, published today in the journal Pediatrics, are the first to provide evidence from multiple states linking the readiness of hospital emergency depart

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ANALYSE: Stikker teledataskandalen langt dybere end vi lige ser?

I lyset af skandalen med teledata bør dommere og forsvarsadvokater fremover spørge mere ind til nye bevistyper, anfører redaktionschef Henning Mølsted.

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Photo exhibition celebrates Moon landing

The photos show it's not all about the event, but also the technology that got us there.

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Life is short, time goes too quickly, things get better: what I learned from reading my old journals | Brigid Delaney

Reviewing more than 20 years of my inner world was often painful but some universal lessons emerged from the pages Recently I came across a dusty box in the garage that was full of old journals that held all my secrets from 1996. Rereading them was excruciating, painful even, like hearing a recording of your own voice. Do I (did I) really sound like that ? I reread the diaries out of sequence (19

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Radio Atlantic: Recession Politics

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) This week showed increasing signs that a recession could be on the horizon. Manufacturing is shrinking . Job growth is slowing . The markets are spooked—and now so is the president . But what exactly is happening? Annie Lowrey joins Edward-Isaac Dovere to make sense of the recession news. (What exactly is the yiel

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Potential upside of high initial visual acuity? [Letters (Online Only)]

Vogelsang et al. (1) argue that high initial visual acuity in children, who underwent late treatment of congenital blindness, may be responsible for subsequent impairments in configural face analysis. This hypothesis offers an exciting alternative to the standard explanation of a critical period for the ensuing impairment, which could have…

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Response to Katzhendler and Weinshall: Initial visual degradation during development may be adaptive [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Katzhendler and Weinshall for their thought-provoking comment (1) on our paper (2). They argue that the computational simulations are insufficient to suggest that initially poor acuity may be an adaptive feature of visual development. The logic of their argument is this: Our evaluation of DNN performance is based…

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An in situ high-throughput screen identifies inhibitors of intracellular Burkholderia pseudomallei with therapeutic efficacy [Microbiology]

Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and Burkholderia mallei (Bm) are Tier-1 Select Agents that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These are highly lethal human infections with limited therapeutic options. Intercellular spread is a hallmark of Burkholderia pathogenesis, and its prominent ties to virulence make it an attractive therapeutic target. We developed a…

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Time crystal minimizes its energy by performing Sisyphus motion [Commentaries]

We all know about ordinary space crystals, which are often beautiful objects and also useful in various practical applications. Briefly speaking, they consist of atoms which due to mutual interactions are able to self-organize their distribution in a regular way in space if certain conditions are fulfilled—ideally they form in…

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Molecular evolution of the switch for progesterone and spironolactone from mineralocorticoid receptor agonist to antagonist [Medical Sciences]

The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is highly conserved across vertebrate evolution. In terrestrial vertebrates, the MR mediates sodium homeostasis by aldosterone and also acts as a receptor for cortisol. Although the MR is present in fish, they lack aldosterone. The MR binds progesterone and spironolactone as antagonists in human MR but…

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Regulation of PRMT5-MDM4 axis is critical in the response to CDK4/6 inhibitors in melanoma [Medical Sciences]

Cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitors are an established treatment in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and are currently in clinical development in melanoma, a tumor that exhibits high rates of CDK4 activation. We analyzed melanoma cells with acquired resistance to the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and demonstrate that the activity of PRMT5,…

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Noncanonical mitochondrial unfolded protein response impairs placental oxidative phosphorylation in early-onset preeclampsia [Physiology]

Preeclampsia (PE) is a dangerous complication of pregnancy, especially when it presents at <34 wk of gestation (PE < 34 wk). It is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality and also increases the risk of cardiometabolic diseases in later life for both mother and offspring. Placental…

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Insights into TLC{Phi} lysogeny: A twist in the mechanism of IMEX integration [Commentaries]

Many organisms have established symbiotic relationships with acquired mobile genetic elements (MGEs) integrated in their genomes (1). MGEs spread among genomes within and across microbial species through horizontal gene transfer and, once integrated into host chromosome, are disseminated vertically to the progeny, causing rapid evolution of drug resistance, pathogenicity, and…

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Histone deacetylase 1 suppresses Kruppel homolog 1 gene expression and influences ȷuvenile hormone action in Tribolium castaneum [Agricultural Sciences]

Posttranslational modifications, including acetylation and deacetylation of histones and other proteins, modulate hormone action. In Tribolium castaneum TcA cells, Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, mimics juvenile hormone (JH) in inducing JH response genes (e.g., Kr-h1), suggesting that HDACs may be involved in JH action. To test this hypothesis,…

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China launches advanced unmanned warship

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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China's satellite tests pulsar navigation for future deep space exploration

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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'Malaria will not be eradicated in near future', warns WHO

Three-year review says new vaccines for eradicating disease are only 40% effective Malaria will not be eradicated in the foreseeable future even though it is achievable and would save millions of lives, according to World Health Organization (WHO) experts following a three-year review. The WHO remains committed to the “disappearance of every single malaria parasite from the face of the planet”, a

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‘Paralysed by anxiety’: researchers speak about life in troubled ancient-DNA lab

Nature, Published online: 23 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02540-5 Colleagues of Alan Cooper, who has been suspended as leader of the prestigious Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, describe a toxic work environment.

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Bagsiden: Da de skød på Ostenfeld og Kampsax

Kanongod historie – now it can be told:

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Systemic failures in public health system led to deaths in elderly patients

The deaths of 17 elderly people earlier this summer were the result of systemic failures in the public health system in England, according to a leading public health expert.

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Pigs' emotions could be read by new farming technology

New technology has been developed to detect how happy the animals are.

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Cat ladies aren't 'depressed, anxious or alone,' say UCLA researchers

A study at UCLA found that cat and dog owners are just as likely to be crazy as non-pet owners. Misunderstanding cats often results from expecting them to act like dogs. Learning the natural behavior of your pet is essential for developing a strong bond with them. None The fact that this study was even conducted should bring a smile to your face. Here goes: cat ladies are not crazy. That's the co

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Our Microbiomes Might Shape Our Social Lives

(Credit: Sara López Gilabert/SAPIENS) It is early morning on a wide plain in Amboseli National Park in southern Kenya. With a small Dixie cup and a wooden tongue depressor, Susan Alberts picks up a fecal sample left by a female baboon named Yoruba. Alberts is an eminent primatologist. She is both the chair of the department of evolutionary anthropology and a member of the biology department at Duk

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Why the NFL's Field Goal Record Is Waiting to Be Smashed

Players, coaches, and scientists alike say that the current record of 64 yards is well shy of what humans are capable of kicking.

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Single polypill reduces risk of heart attacks and strokes, study finds

Large trial held in Iran of inexpensive medication combining four common drugs A cheap, single pill taken once a day that combines four common drugs is safe and reduces the risk of events such as heart attacks, strokes and sudden death in people over the age of 50, research has found. The study, the first large-scale trial to date, looked at the effectiveness of a so-called polypill – a four-in-o

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A Crackdown on the Use of Face Recognition Tech Is Brewing in the EU: Report

European citizens may soon have protections most Americans lack: control over the use of their face recognition data.Read more…

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The Fight Against Robocalls Gets Powerful New Allies

All the state attorneys general, along with 12 major companies, promise to finally make serious moves against robocalls.

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Why elephant hunting has a 'drastic' impact on our global climate

Elephants help keep the central African forests they live in healthy. Without elephants, the forests see a striking reduction in their carbon dioxide-storage capacity. Study calls elephants "natural forest managers." None As long as there's profit in it — and as long as there are those who simply enjoy killing animals — we're likely to continue losing elephants, and it's a disturbing loss. To see

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This Daily Pill Cut Heart Attacks by Half. Why Isn’t Everyone Getting It?

“Polypills” of generic drugs may dramatically reduce heart attacks and strokes in poor countries, a new study suggests. Some experts still aren’t enthusiastic.

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Daily ‘polypill’ cuts risk of heart disease

Iranian trial shows clinical benefits of combining four cheap medicines

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Heavy drinking and HIV don't mix, study finds

A new study finds that heavy alcohol consumption (three drinks or more/day for women and four drinks or more/day for men) is linked to alterations in immune function among people with HIV.

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Detecting hydrothermal vents in volcanic lakes

Changes in the behaviour of hydrothermal vents may be indicative of changes in the volcanic system underneath, thus being a useful precursor for the next generation of early warning systems. New exploration approaches will help improving site-specific risk assessment and monitoring concepts by taking a closer look at hydrothermal vents.

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Smartphone app makes parents more attuned to their babies' needs, research shows

A new app has been designed to help new parents become more 'tuned in' to what their babies are thinking and feeling.

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Study shows some exoplanets may have greater variety of life than exists on Earth

A new study indicates that some exoplanets may have better conditions for life to thrive than Earth itself has. 'This is a surprising conclusion', said lead researcher Dr. Stephanie Olson, 'it shows us that conditions on some exoplanets with favorable ocean circulation patterns could be better suited to support life that is more abundant or more active than life on Earth.'

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Soap, Detergent and Even Laxatives Could Turbocharge a Battery Alternative

Researchers are trying to develop options to lithium-ion and other batteries in a quest for quick bursts of power and extended energy storage.

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News Corp to launch a news aggregation service called 'Knewz'

Rupert Murdoch-owned News Corp is reportedly launching a news aggregation website called "Knewz.com". According to The Wall Street Journal (which is owned by News Corp), this site (and associated …

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A Tugboat in Space, Microplastics In Your Water, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Study shows some exoplanets may have greater variety of life than exists on Earth

A new study indicates that some exoplanets may have better conditions for life to thrive than Earth itself has. "This is a surprising conclusion," said lead researcher Dr. Stephanie Olson, "it shows us that conditions on some exoplanets with favourable ocean circulation patterns could be better suited to support life that is more abundant or more active than life on Earth."

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Border detention centers won't give vaccines, despite flu deaths and potential U.S. outbreaks

Not offering vaccinations to migrants detained at border facilities could lead to more outbreaks and flu deaths. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jonathan Koob/) Customs and Border Patrol will not provide flu vaccinations to migrants detained in facilities at the border, according to an official statement sent to CNBC this week . That decision came even though at least three children have d

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Greenhouse Pass

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, August 22. Here’s what we’re watching. Out of Sight: The changes the Trump administration is seeking to make to a 22-year-old agreement known as the Flores settlement could do more than just allow the governme

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Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses

The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. SIV's Nef protein forms a solid link between two primate proteins, tetherin and AP-2, forcing the destruction of tetherin, which normally prevents new SIV virions from budding off. A mutation in huma

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Health care workers unprepared for magnitude of climate change

An epidemic of chronic kidney disease that has killed tens of thousands of agricultural workers worldwide, is just one of many ailments poised to strike as a result of climate change, according to researchers.

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