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nyheder2019august26

Sea snail compound reduces cancer risk

The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. Researchers at Flinders University, Southern Cross University and Monash University in Australia have isolated one compound in the gland secretions from the Australian white rock sea snail (Dicathasi

9h

Solvarmekapaciteten i den danske fjernvarmeforsyning overstiger 1 GW

Danmark fører på verdensplan i udbredelsen af solvarmeanlæg, og kapaciteten ligger nu på over 1 GW.

7h

Søg blot en overlægestilling

Der er ikke nogen femårsregel for speciallæger, når det gælder anciennitet i forhold til at søge en overlægestilling. Hvis en ansøger besidder de rette kvalifikationer, så skal arbejdsgiveren indsende en dispensationsansøgning til regionen.

11h

Watch a Noxious Cloud of Carbon Monoxide Pollution Spill Out of the Burning Amazon

The Amazon is burning, and it's leaking a huge plume of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere. Hopefully, the cloud will disappear within a month.

2min

America’s Allies Seem to Be Moving On Without Trump

The most striking photograph to emerge from the G7 summit meeting in Biarritz, France, was one of an empty chair. It’s the seat that President Donald Trump was supposed to occupy during a meeting Monday where world leaders talked about climate trends that could render parts of the planet uninhabitable if left unchecked. Trump skipped it. The White House put out a statement that Trump was busy tal

7min

Optimistic People Live Longer, a New Study Finds

(Credit: Elnur/Shutterstock) Want to live forever? Or at least well into old age? Results from a new study suggest optimism might be part of the equation. A large-scale study indicates those with a bright outlook on life lived as much as 10 percent longer, and stood a better chance of making it past 85. "This study … suggests that optimism is one such psychosocial asset that has the potential to

11min

Vast 'pumice raft' found drifting through Pacific Ocean

The mass of pumice, the size of Manhattan, is believed to come from an underwater volcano near Tonga.

19min

FAA: Weaponized Drones Are Illegal

The cost of consumer drones has come down considerably in the past few years, and some owners have fancied the idea of outfitting their unmanned vehicles with weapons. Some recent videos have surfaced showing people doing just that. Well, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is here to remind everyone that, no, you can’t equip a drone with weapons . It’s highly illegal, and the FAA is author

20min

Eight toilet upgrades that could very well change your life

Bidets for days. (Edgardo Lagmay via Unsplash/) Some people (who lurk on Reddit) believe that Japanese toilets should be a basic human right. In Japan, 81 percent of households have bidets—commonly called washlets—which means that most of the population has extremely strong anal hygiene game. Upgrade your toilet with this range of bidets, from budget options to baller status. If you opt to spring

36min

DEA Again Promises to Improve Access to Marijuana for Research

After years of stalling, the agency says it plans to provide notice on pending applications from growers—but only after it establishes new regulations for suppliers.

46min

KFC and Beyond Meat to test meatless 'chicken' nuggets

KFC will give out free samples of its new meatless "chicken" nuggets and boneless wings at one Atlanta restaurant on Tuesday. KFC has already tested a meatless "chicken" sandwich in the U.K., where it sold out of the product in four days. The alternative meats industry is booming. One recent report predicts that by 2040 about 60% of the "meat" people consume will come from plants. None In 2018, W

50min

Desk lamps to improve your home office

Light up your workspace. (Tatiana Lapina via Unsplash/) A desk lamp is essential for any office space, whether you work from home full-time or on occasion. Proper lighting will help you focus and reduce eye-strain from staring at a screen all day. Below, some of the best deals to start your search. A flexible and adjustable lamp. (Amazon/) This best-selling LED desk lamp is adjustable in just abo

57min

New evidence that optimists live longer

After decades of research, a new study links optimism and prolonged life. Researchers have found that individuals with greater optimism are more likely to live longer and to achieve 'exceptional longevity,' that is, living to age 85 or older.

59min

Honeybee brain development may enhance waggle dance communication

Changes in a vibration-sensitive neuron may equip forager honeybees for waggle dance communication, according to new research.

59min

Do you need more patio furniture, or do you need one of these inflatable pools?

You don't need to break ground to get a personal pool. (Brandon Morgan via Unsplash/) The inflatable pool is a staple—an iconic vessel of entertainment and necessary source of relief. Heat and humidity during the dog days of summer make it harder for your body to cool off on its own , and that can get dangerous. In terms of personal pools, the inflatable version is about the best you can do. No n

1h

Disappearing Plastics Stay Strong in the Shadows and Melt Away in the Sun

The material could form self-destructing drones or sensors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Alberta researchers find elusive key to stopping neglected tropical diseases

Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America.

1h

Disappearing Plastics Stay Strong in the Shadows and Melt Away in the Sun

The material could form self-destructing drones or sensors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Heat Deaths Jump in Southwest United States, Puzzling Officials

The number of heat-related deaths has more than tripled in Arizona and Nevada since 2014, new data show, raising concern about the limits of adaptation.

1h

The secret of fireworm is out: molecular basis of its light emission

A collaborative effort by an international team of scientists led to to the discovery of new luciferin from fireworm. The characterization of three key low-molecular-weight components of its bioluminescence system, presented in an article published in the PNAS journal, further enabled the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of bioluminescence of this organism.

1h

Apple shelves tech that would have let you text off the grid

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Apple has reportedly put a technology for iPhones on hold that would have let people send text messages to other iPhones over a 900MHz radio …

1h

Kentucky Fried Chicken goes beyond chicken in partnership with Beyond Meat

Kentucky Fried Chicken is going beyond chicken with its latest partnership. As other chicken chains vie for chicken sandwich dominance, KFC is doing its bit for the planet and taking its first …

1h

4K projectors for an incredible home theater

Home projectors for crisp, larger-than-life picture. (Jeremy Yap via Unsplash/) For some, home theater begins and ends with a large television. But there are others who want to project movies onto giant screens. The one drawback, historically, is a reduction in picture quality. That's nothing to worry about with these 4K projectors. One thing to know going in is that pixels required to display at

1h

Why Was Johnson & Johnson the Only Opioid Maker on Trial in Oklahoma?

Other states are suing a range of drug makers, distributors and retailers. Here are three reasons Johnson & Johnson was the only company on trial in Oklahoma.

1h

People Used Fiverr to Spy on Their Spouses

$5 Spy Job Fiverr, the freelancer’s job board known for quick, cheap gigs and terrible subway ads , had a bit of a stalker problem. People have been using the site to offer and commission spies, covert surveillance setups, and even unlicensed private investigators, Motherboard reports — suggesting that the internet’s content moderation problem is increasingly growing beyond YouTube and Facebook,

1h

Learn How to Fall With Climber Alex Honnold

What to wear, what to eat, how to fall during bouldering, and more from the subject of the Oscar-winning documentary *Free Solo*.

1h

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Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil

In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil.

1h

Johnson & Johnson Ordered to Pay $572 Million in Landmark Opioid Trial

The first case against a drug manufacturer for the national public health disaster may indicate what lies ahead in 2,000 more lawsuits.

1h

New rider data shows how public transit reduces greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions

Public transit has long been an answer for people looking to leave their car at home and reduce their air pollution emissions. But now, with better rider tracking tools, the University of Utah and the Utah Transit Authority can better answer the question: How much does public transit reduce pollution emissions?

2h

Ann Nelson, Expert on Particle Physics, Is Dead at 61

Dr. Nelson was celebrated for helping to address flaws in the Standard Model, the longtime basis for explaining how particles interact.

2h

KFC to Begin Selling Meatless Fried “Chicken”

Faux Chicken On Monday, Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) announced plans to begin selling nuggets and boneless wings made from Beyond Meat’s plant-based protein — making it the first national fast-food restaurant to take a chance on faux chicken. “KFC Beyond Fried Chicken is so delicious, our customers will find it difficult to tell that it’s plant-based,” KFC U.S. President Kevin Hochman said in a p

2h

We aren’t terrified enough about losing the Amazon

Scientists aren’t sure if there’s a tipping point, or how close we are to it – but it would be “absolutely catastrophic” if we cross it.

2h

Researchers use AI to plot green route to nylon

The chemical and allied industries face such challenges as ready access to reliable energy supplies, waste reduction, water conservation, and energy efficiency. Organic electrosynthesis—an electricity-driven, energy-efficient process that can easily integrate with renewable energy sources—could help solve them.

2h

Strawberries: The tasty fruit with a tainted environmental legacy and an uncertain future

Are the glory days of California's strawberry industry gone for good?

2h

NASA Astronaut Accused of World’s First ‘Space Crime’ Denies Allegations

Decorated US astronaut Anne McClain had been accused of committing the first crimes in space. McClain is going through an acrimonious divorce and her spouse, Summer Worden, has alleged that McClain committed financial improprieties by accessing financial records while serving aboard the ISS (International Space Station) and has filed a complaint with the FTC and NASA’s Office of Inspector General

2h

Strawberries: The tasty fruit with a tainted environmental legacy and an uncertain future

Are the glory days of California's strawberry industry gone for good?

2h

Venezuela Is Seriously Pushing Its State-Run Cryptocurrency

Care Package The Venezuelan government just announced a new state-run cryptocurrency platform called Patria Remesa, according to a Monday press release — and it wants its citizens who are working abroad to use it to send funds back home. In the release, the government argues that sending remittances through the government’s oil-backed crypto is safer and more cost-effective than existing means, s

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AT&T’s CEO of Communications, John Donovan, to retire in October

John Donovan, CEO of AT&T Communications, announced today his plans to retire effective October 1, 2019. Donovan has for the past two years led AT&T’s largest business unit, which …

2h

Donald Lindberg, Former NLM Director, Dies

He led the National Library of Medicine for 31 years and oversaw the implementation of PubMed, MedlinePlus, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

2h

Mindfulness for middle school students

Two new studies suggest that mindfulness — the practice of focusing one's awareness on the present moment — can enhance academic performance and mental health in middle-schoolers.

2h

To stop mosquito-transmitted illnesses, pay attention to how humans behave

Targeting the mosquito population within a defined area is the primary way scientists and public health officials mitigate the spread of diseases caused by viruses like Zika, dengue fever, and West Nile. But researchers have discovered that evaluating how humans commute to and from an affected area, as well as their living habits, is key for successful mitigation planning.

2h

Technique combats widespread passion fruit disease

Experiments performed in Brazil show that systematic eradication of plants contaminated by cowpea aphid-borne virus (CABMV) can keep orchards producing for at least 25 months and avoid annual replanting.

2h

Celebrate National Dog Day with 14 of the best doggone stories we've got

Some light reading. (Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash/) Every dog must have its day, and that day happens to be August 26. On the off chance you actually need an excuse to devour some fascinating content about doggos, here are 14 of PopSci's best puppy tales in honor of National Dog Day. What makes dogs special? Dogs aren't stupid, but they're also not the smartest animals on the block. Recent r

2h

New ‘medicine’ could vaccinate plants against devastating viruses

RNA-targeting method could speed the design of crop vaccines

2h

Macron claims deal to end digital service tax fight with the US

Trump shows no sign of ending feud over 3% tax on digital services.

2h

Rates of colonoscopies boosted by text reminders, instructions

Having simple text conversations with patients one week before they are scheduled for a colonoscopy dramatically decreased the 'no-show' rates.

2h

Two studies reveal benefits of mindfulness for middle school students

Two new studies from MIT suggest that mindfulness — the practice of focusing one's awareness on the present moment — can enhance academic performance and mental health in middle-schoolers.

2h

Runaway mitochondria cause telomere damage in cells

Targeted damage to mitochondria produces a 'Chernobyl effect' inside cells, pelting the nucleus with harmful reactive oxygen species and causing chromosomal damage.

2h

Graphene shield shows promise in blocking mosquito bites

An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitos, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The research, conducted by the Brown University Superfund Research Center, Providence, Rhode Island, is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

2h

How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea

An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, reports that a single amino acid change in the light-sensing rhodopsin protein played a critical role when herring adapted to the red-shifted light environment in the Baltic Sea. Remarkably about one third of all fish living in brackish or freshwater carry the same change. The study is published today

2h

Mosquito incognito: Could graphene-lined clothing help prevent mosquito bites?

A new study shows that graphene sheets can block the signals mosquitoes use to identify a blood meal, potentially enabling a new chemical-free approach to mosquito bite prevention.

2h

Stanford chemists discover water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide

Despite its abundance, water retains a great many secrets. Among them, Stanford chemists have discovered, is that water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide.

2h

Spontaneous brain fluctuations influence risk-taking

Minute-to-minute fluctuations in human brain activity, linked to changing levels of dopamine, impact whether we make risky decisions, finds a new UCL study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

2h

CRISPR gene editing may halt progression of triple-negative breast cancer

A tumor-targeted CRISPR gene editing system, encapsulated in a nanogel and injected into the body, could effectively and safely halt the growth of triple-negative breast cancer, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. Their proof-of-principle study, conducted in human tumor cells and in mice, suggests a potential genetic treatment for triple-negative breast cancer, which has the highest

2h

Quest for new cancer treatment crosses milestone

A cancer therapy invented at Rice University has crossed a milestone in clinical trials, a major development in a decadeslong quest to develop a treatment that destroys tumors without the debilitating side effects of chemotherapy, invasive surgery and radiation.

2h

New evidence that optimists live longer

After decades of research, a new study links optimism and prolonged life. Researchers have found that individuals with greater optimism are more likely to live longer and to achieve 'exceptional longevity,' that is, living to age 85 or older.

2h

Scientists advance search for memory's molecular roots

The mechanism of a large, multidomain protein perfectly suited to help store long-term memories in neurons is detailed for the first time by researchers at Rice University, the University of Houston and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

2h

Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances

Researchers used tree pollen data for 120 sites across Japan to observe pollen synchronicity at regional and national levels. Greater synchronicity was found among eastern regions than western regions. There was intermittent synchronization nationwide, with yearly changes such as perfect synchronization (2009-2010), perfect desynchronization (2015-2016), and mixed states. These findings can be use

3h

New coating brings lithium metal battery closer to reality

A research team invented a new coating that could finally make lightweight lithium metal batteries safe and long lasting, which could usher in the next generation of electric vehicles.

3h

New insights into retina's genetic code

Scientists have developed the world's most detailed gene map of the human retina, providing new insights which will help future research to prevent and treat blindness.

3h

Mechanism accelerates polycystic kidney disease

Researchers uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism that may accelerate polycystic kidney disease.

3h

We Need a Better Way to Measure Hurricanes

The Saffir-Simpson scale relies on wind to categorize a hurricane, but it doesn't account for storm surge or flooding. We Need a Better Way to Measure Hurricanes Video of We Need a Better Way to Measure Hurricanes Earth Monday, August 26, 2019 – 15:00 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) — Meteorologists rank hurricanes from category 1 to 5 based on wind speed. It’s called the Saffir-Simps

3h

Want to Live Longer? The Right Attitude May Help.

Think life is great and expect that to continue? You may have high odds of living to a ripe old age, a new study suggests.

3h

Optimism may hold secret to longer life, study suggests

Research claims people who ‘look on the bright side’ stand better chance of reaching 85 Seeing the glass as half full may mean a longer life, according to research suggesting that optimists not only live longer in general, but have a better chance of reaching 85 or older. It is not the first time optimism has been linked to health benefits. People of an upbeat disposition have previously been fou

3h

Biochemistry in a conflict zone

Nature, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02565-w Eqbal Dauqan shares how she managed to conduct scientific research amid a national conflict.

3h

Cheer up! Optimists live longer

Large study finds association between positive attitude and extended life span

3h

Mosquito incognito: Could graphene-lined clothing help prevent mosquito bites?

The nanomaterial graphene has received significant attention for its potential uses in everything from solar cells to tennis rackets. But a new study by Brown University researchers finds a surprising new use for the material: preventing mosquito bites.

3h

How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea

The evolutionary process that occurs when a species colonizes a new environment provides an opportunity to explore the mechanisms underlying genetic adaptation, which is essential knowledge for understanding evolution and the maintenance of biodiversity. An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, reports that a single amino acid change in the

3h

Chemists discover water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide

Water is everywhere on Earth, but maybe that just gives it more space to hide its secrets. Its latest surprise, Stanford researchers report Aug. 26 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is that microscopic droplets of water spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide.

3h

Scientists advance search for memory's molecular roots

A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something.

3h

How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea

The evolutionary process that occurs when a species colonizes a new environment provides an opportunity to explore the mechanisms underlying genetic adaptation, which is essential knowledge for understanding evolution and the maintenance of biodiversity. An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, reports that a single amino acid change in the

3h

How to Stop Worrying

Worrying doesn’t prevent things from happening, it just means you suffer twice if they do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Temp suggests rocky clouds on hot Jupiter ‘nightsides’

The temperature on the nightsides of some hot Jupiters is surprisingly uniform, which suggests the dark sides have clouds made of minerals and rocks. Hot Jupiters are massive gaseous planets similar in size to Jupiter, but orbiting other stars. Hot Jupiters have daysides that always face their host stars and nightsides that always face the darkness of space. Using data from the Spitzer Space and

3h

How to Stop Worrying

Worrying doesn’t prevent things from happening, it just means you suffer twice if they do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Scientists advance search for memory's molecular roots

A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something.

3h

These Caterpillars Can ‘See’ Colors With Their Skin

Peppered-moth caterpillars can change their hue to match their surroundings without looking, a study has found. But how they do it remains a mystery.

3h

Oncologists echo findings that suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence

A modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high risk, HER-2 negative breast cancer.

3h

Researchers use AI to plot green route to nylon

A team reported that in its search to develop an innovative, environmentally friendly process to make adiponitrile (ADN) — the main precursor to nylon 6, 6 — it found a way to greatly improve the efficiency of organic electrosynthesis. The researchers credited their success in part to what they believe is the first use of artificial intelligence to optimize an electrochemical process.

3h

New rider data shows how public transit reduces greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions

Researchers used tap-on tap-off rider data to quantify the emissions saved by buses and commuter rail lines, and also project how much additional emissions could be saved by upgrading the bus and rail fleet.

3h

Properties of cells that affect how tissue structures form

Knowing how cell structure and tissue can be disrupted mechanically may provide clues into defective wound healing and the development and progression of disease.

3h

Saving sage-grouse by relocation

A team of scientists successfully moved sage-grouse, a threatened bird species in Washington state, from one area of their range to another to increase their numbers and diversify their gene pool. A new study on the project shows relocating the birds is a viable and productive step towards helping their population recover in the state.

3h

Regulating the activity of RNA molecules

Messenger RNA molecules contain genetic information and thus control the synthesis of proteins in living cells. Biochemists have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. In principle, it is thus possible to switch RNA-controlled protein synth

3h

Removing cancer's protective barrier could boost immunotherapy treatments

Scientists may have found a way to pull down the protective wall that surrounds tumors, potentially re-exposing them to the killing power of the immune system and immunotherapy treatments.

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Crack in Pacific seafloor caused volcanic chain to go dormant

Geologists have discovered that 50 million years ago a chain of volcanoes between Northeast Asia and Russia were forced into a period of dormancy that lasted for 10 million years.

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Promising approach to reducing plaque in arteries

In a new study, investigators have revealed previously unknown factors that contribute to the hardening of arteries and plaque growth, which cause heart disease. Their insight is the basis for a promising therapeutic approach to halt and potentially reverse plaque buildup and the progression of disease, the researchers said.

3h

Obesity tied to weakened response to taste

Obesity is connected with a reduced response to taste, according to a new study.

3h

Scientist Argues Cyborgs Will Eventually Replace Humans As Rulers Of The World

How long will human beings be the dominant species on the planet? One scientist argues that the reign of humans is coming to an end. Dr. James Lovelock recently contended that humans will be …

3h

The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Just as we have seen an increase in the number of microbreweries making specialty beers, the market for chocolate has also developed, so there are more high-end chocolate manufacturers who are …

3h

To stop mosquito-transmitted illnesses, pay attention to how humans behave: study

Targeting the mosquito population within a defined area is the primary way scientists and public health officials mitigate the spread of diseases caused by viruses like Zika, dengue fever, and West Nile. But researchers have discovered that evaluating how humans commute to and from an affected area, as well as their living habits, is key for successful mitigation planning.

3h

Researchers use AI to plot green route to nylon

A team reported that in its search to develop an innovative, environmentally friendly process to make adiponitrile (ADN) — the main precursor to nylon 6, 6 — it found a way to greatly improve the efficiency of organic electrosynthesis. The researchers credited their success in part to what they believe is the first use of artificial intelligence to optimize an electrochemical process.

3h

The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Can you manipulate the taste of noble cocoas in different directions to create exciting new flavors for the world's chocolate fans? Some researchers and cocoa professionals asked that question and the research shows that you actually can. The results are of particular importance for high-end producers, but with time they could also be valuable for larger chocolate manufacturers.

3h

A new way to make valuable chemicals

A new discovery has advanced the field of carbon capture and utilization. Researchers have formed carbon-nitrogen bonds in an electrochemical carbon monoxide reduction reaction, which led to the production of high-value chemicals called amides, that are useful in a variety of industries, including pharmaceuticals.

3h

Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers

New research investigates the causes of seafaring injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers.

3h

Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers

Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded information in quantum computers.

3h

Report: Trump Has Repeatedly Suggested Nuking Hurricanes

Nuking Hurricanes President Donald Trump has repeatedly floated a bizarre idea for preventing hurricanes from reaching American shores, several sources told Axios in a newly published story . “I got it. I got it. Why don’t we nuke them?” one of the anonymous sources paraphrased the President as saying during a hurricane briefing. “They start forming off the coast of Africa, as they’re moving acro

3h

In a Strange Twist, This AI Tries to Teach Empathy to Humans

Gentle Nudge Humana Pharmacy has deployed an artificial intelligence system in its call centers that gives the human employees speaking on the phone gentle nudges to be friendlier and more empathetic with customers. The algorithm, built by the AI development firm Cogito, reminds people when they’ve stayed silent for too long or start speaking too quickly, according to USA Today . Given that it’s

3h

The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Can you manipulate the taste of noble cocoas in different directions to create exciting new flavors for the world's chocolate fans? Some researchers and cocoa professionals asked that question and the research shows that you actually can. The results are of particular importance for high-end producers, but with time they could also be valuable for larger chocolate manufacturers.

3h

From cradle to grave: Postnatal overnutrition linked to aging

Researchers have found a new answer to an old question: how can overnutrition during infancy lead to long-lasting health problems such as diabetes?

3h

A new way to make valuable chemicals

A new discovery has advanced the field of carbon capture and utilization. Researchers have formed carbon-nitrogen bonds in an electrochemical carbon monoxide reduction reaction, which led to the production of high-value chemicals called amides, that are useful in a variety of industries, including pharmaceuticals.

3h

New technique isolates placental cells for non-invasive genetic testing

A new technique for isolating cells carrying the full fetal genome from cervical swabs could enable doctors to diagnose genetic disorders without using needles to harvest cells from the placenta.

3h

Most of California's Big Earthquakes Are Preceded by Ghostly 'Foreshocks' Weeks in Advance

Foreshocks — the tiny, sometimes imperceptible tremors that precede massive earthquakes — are way more common than we thought.

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Newark Water Crisis: Racing to Replace Lead Pipes in Under 3 Years

A new $120 million financing plan will allow the city to replace its 18,000 buried lead service lines more quickly.

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Head start programs alleviate supply gap of center-based childcare in NJ

The availability of Head Start and Early Head Start in New Jersey, federal programs designed to serve low-income families' childcare needs, reduces the likelihood that a community will experience a severe childcare supply gap, a Rutgers-led study found.

3h

New rider data shows how public transit reduces greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions

In a paper published in Environmental Research Communications, University of Utah researchers Daniel Mendoza, Martin Buchert and John Lin used tap-on tap-off rider data to quantify the emissions saved by buses and commuter rail lines, and also project how much additional emissions could be saved by upgrading the bus and rail fleet. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Utah Transit Autho

3h

Physicists mash quantum and gravity and find time, but not as we know it

Researchers say they have discovered "a new kind of quantum time order". The discovery arose from an experiment the team designed to bring together elements of the two big – but contradictory – physics theories developed in the past century.

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Depression, anxiety linked to opioid use and reduced survival in women with breast cancer

The findings should encourage doctors to better manage mental health in patients with breast cancer and spur care providers to consider alternative pain management such as physical therapy, massage and acupuncture, the researchers say.

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Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers

New research investigates the causes of seafaring injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers.

3h

Wildfires could permanently alter Alaska's forest composition

A team of researchers projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees of Alaska to get pushed out in favor of broadleaf deciduous trees, which shed their leaves seasonally.

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Big increase in ocean carbon dioxide absorption along West Antarctic Peninsula

Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a new study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run.

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Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women

Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by psychologists reveal that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women.

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Missy Elliott Is Reclaiming Her Legacy

Who else has as strong a claim to the title of coolest person in the world? What other superstar is so associated with the idea of the future ? Missy Elliott hee-howed new phrases into the lexicon. She brought breakdance to bhangra . She pioneered the music video as a freaky channel-surf of unlikely gyration and unlikelier clothes before anyone else so whacked the world . “Just make sure you ahea

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What you need to know about email trackers and how to stop them

They'll know if you've left them on read. (Matt Wildbore via Unsplash/) Your inbox is watching you. Yeah, most of us know we're being tracked online , but you might be surprised at the number of incoming emails that can tell when, where, and how often they've been opened. Sure, you can unsubscribe from newsletters and delete accounts with companies you feel are sending you too many digital missiv

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This Is How Earth Would Look to Alien Astronomers

It has been less than 30 years since the discovery of the first exoplanets , and we’re still in the dark when it comes to the possibility of life on any of them. Our techniques for finding other planets isn’t particularly sensitive, and we’re not even certain what signals we need to prioritize. A new study could shed light on that question by using the only habitable planet known to exist : Earth

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There's a Troubling Rise in Colorectal Cancer Among Young Adults

Some experts blame our modern, sugary diet, while others think that gut microbiome changes and sedentary lifestyles may play a role. Altogether, the causes are far from clear.

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The legal crusader fighting cyber stalkers, trolls, and revenge porn

Attorney Carrie Goldberg is on a mission to eradicate the law that gave rise to the modern internet—and which enables stalking, revenge porn, and more.

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Photos: The Burning Amazon Rainforest

For weeks now, forest fires have been burning across Brazil’s Amazon rainforest—generally a normal situation in the dry season, but the fires are much worse than normal this year. Brazil’s official numbers now tally more than 79,500 fires this year—more than half of those in the Amazon, making this the “ most active fire year in that region since 2010 .” The majority of these fires are intentiona

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The Anthropologist of Artificial Intelligence

How do new scientific disciplines get started? For Iyad Rahwan , a computational social scientist with self-described “maverick” tendencies, it happened on a sunny afternoon in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in October 2017. Rahwan and Manuel Cebrian , a colleague from the MIT Media Lab, were sitting in Harvard Yard discussing how to best describe their preferred brand of multidisciplinary research. T

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Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers

Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded information in quantum computers.

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How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake

Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. A sensory network assures that the plant strikes the right balance.

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Breaching the brain's defense causes epilepsy

Epileptic seizures can happen to anyone. But how do they occur and what initiates such a rapid response? An international team of scientists has discovered that failure of the so-called glial cells in the brain triggers the epileptic seizures.

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Diverse immune cell profiles and roles found in breast cancer resistance to immunotherapy

Researchers show that heterogeneity of both breast cancer cells themselves and immune composition of the tumor microenvironment are important considerations for therapy.

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Even scientists have gender stereotypes … which can hamper the career of women researchers

However convinced we may be that science is not just for men, the concept of science remains much more strongly associated with masculinity than with femininity in people's minds. This automatic bias, already identified among the general public, also exists in the minds of most scientists, who are not necessarily aware of it. In certain conditions, it may lead to otherwise careful scientific evalu

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Flame retardants — from plants

Flame retardants are present in thousands of everyday items, from clothing to furniture to electronics. Although these substances can help prevent fire-related injuries and deaths, they could have harmful effects on human health and the environment. Today, scientists report potentially less toxic, biodegradable flame retardants from an unlikely source: plants.

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New way to bump off ticks: Dry up their saliva

Saliva from a tick's bite can transmit pathogens that cause serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease, and significant agricultural losses. Scientists have been seeking new ways to prevent these pesky arachnids from spreading pathogens. Now, researchers report that compounds they previously identified can dry up ticks' saliva by upsetting the balance of ions in the tick salivary gland.

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This Centuries-Old Geoduck Shell May Rewrite the Rules About Who Can Harvest the Fancy Clam

A remnant from a meal long gone, the find in British Columbia could give the region's indigenous communities an important legal claim

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Climate Migrants within the U.S. Will Need a Strong Health System

We must ensure continuity of care for Americans who will be displaced from agricultural regions and coastal cities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers use AI to plot green route to nylon

A team at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering reported that in its search to develop an innovative, environmentally friendly process to make adiponitrile (ADN) — the main precursor to nylon 6, 6 — it found a way to greatly improve the efficiency of organic electrosynthesis. The researchers credited their success in part to what they believe is the first use of artificial intelligence to optimiz

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Oncologists echo findings that suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence

Oncologists at VCU Massey Cancer Center were invited to co-author an editorial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology providing expert commentary on findings from a large study conducted by German investigators that a modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high risk, HER-2 negative breast cancer.

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The Robot Ship Set to Cross the Atlantic and Change the World

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Beyond Meat heading to KFC to test Beyond Fried Chicken

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These Engineers Want to 3D Print an Entire Rocket in 60 Days

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Better data would ease gaps in rural public health

A new effort to compile better data on rural public health could help address the startling health gaps between people in rural and urban areas. In Washington, for instance, rural residents are one-third more likely to die from intentional self-harm or 13% more likely to die from heart disease. While statistics like these help guide public health policy and spending, they can hide even greater he

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Climate Migrants within the U.S. Will Need a Strong Health System

We must ensure continuity of care for Americans who will be displaced from agricultural regions and coastal cities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA Astronaut Accused of First Space Crime

Space Crime NASA astronaut Anne McClain is at the center of what may be the first-ever crime committed in space. On Friday, The New York Times reported that McClain’s estranged wife, Summer Worden, discovered that someone had accessed her bank account while McClain was on board the International Space Station — and the computer network that person used was registered to NASA. Two Sides According

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Thanks to These High-Tech Kinetic Pants, You Can Say Goodbye to Ironing Forever

With the growing popularity of lifestyle overhauls provided by concepts like the KonMari Method, Americans are discovering the joys of minimalism. Instead of owning a variety of things you don’t actually want, need, or like, you focus on the items that spark joy in your life. This breaks down our ability to be overwhelmed by the things we own, so they don’t end up owning us. Conceptually, when yo

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Nuking a Hurricane Would Probably Just Create a Slightly Bigger, Radioactive Hurricane

Has Trump been reading old Live Science articles about nuking hurricanes? And if not, should he be?

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Kids Are Becoming Emotionally Attached to Robots

I? Robot? Today’s toddlers and preschoolers are growing up surrounded by friendly-looking, sometimes humanlike robotic devices and educational tools — a phenomenon that scientists warn could be confusing. While young children tend to understand that the robotic helpers all around them aren’t truly alive, The Wall Street Journal reports that toddlers tend to think that the robots’ artificial intel

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GlobalFoundries sues TSMC in the US and Germany for patent infringement

The US-based semiconductor foundry is taking the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company to court on two continents. Globalfoundries announced the lawsuits earlier today, and alleges that …

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Employees of Big Tech are speaking out like never before

When Liz O'Sullivan was hired at the New York City-based artificial intelligence company Clarifai in 2017, she felt lucky to find work at the intersection of two of her main interests: technology …

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Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers used tree pollen data for 120 sites across Japan to observe pollen synchronicity at regional and national levels. Greater synchronicity was found among eastern regions than western regions. There was intermittent synchronization nationwide, with yearly changes such as perfect synchronization (2009-2010), perfect desynchronization (2

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Honeybee brain development may enhance waggle dance communication

Changes in a vibration-sensitive neuron may equip forager honeybees for waggle dance communication, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

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Social, executive brain functions crucial for communication

Impairments in social and executive brain functions hinder effective communication, according to research in patients with dementia recently published in eNeuro.

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Sifting Through the Pterosaur Menu

Fossil poop reveals that some Jurassic pterosaurs were filter feeders. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the Last Dragons Survived Extinction

Creature Komodo dragons outlived their giant reptile peers through isolation and some lucky breaks, although cannibalism and virgin births may have helped. 08/23/2019 Joshua Learn, Contributor To read more…

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This Stealthy Glider Self-Destructs When Exposed to Sunlight

Mission: Impossible A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology say they’ve invented a glider, made from a special polymer, that self-destructs when it hits a certain temperature. The idea is to build a spy drone that leaves no trace after dropping surveillance tools over enemy territory. “This started off with building small sensors for the government — microphones, cameras, thi

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Trump Wants to Nuke His Way Out of Big Problems

During President Donald Trump’s first year in office, he had a question for staffers who were briefing him on hurricanes. Why not just bomb them?, he asked, according to Axios . That seems far-fetched, even for Trump, but the reporters on the item, Jonathan Swan and Margaret Talev, both have a long record of accurate stories on the White House beat, and they also reviewed a National Security Coun

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Blue light for RNA control

Messenger RNA molecules contain genetic information and thus control the synthesis of proteins in living cells. Biochemists at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. In principle, i

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Tiny device shows how asthmatic spasms happen

A microdevice that mimics the behavior of the human airways has revealed how muscle contractions, or bronchospasm, in the airway occur, researchers report. The study could lead to new treatment strategies for respiratory diseases, says coauthor Reynold Panettieri, director of the Rutgers University Institute for Translational Medicine and Science. Bronchospasm can occur in both healthy people and

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NASA's Terra Satellite finds some power in Tropical Depression 13W

Infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed Tropical Depression 13W contained some powerful thunderstorms pushing high into the troposphere as it was moving west in the Philippine Sea toward the Philippines.

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Blue light for RNA control

Messenger RNA molecules contain genetic information and thus control the synthesis of proteins in living cells. Biochemists at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. In principle, i

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Biased Evaluation Committees Promote Fewer Women

If members don’t explicitly believe gender discrimination exists, they allow implicit stereotypes to sway their decision-making, according to a new analysis of real-world hiring decisions.

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Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

Thanks to the advent of super-resolution microscopes some 30 years ago, scientists can observe subcellular structures, proteins and living tissue with unprecedented precision. These microscopes operate by measuring the fluorescent light that some compounds emit naturally or the light emitted by artificial fluorophores, and by exploiting various quantum properties of the fluorophore, can deliver a

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Deep transformations needed to achieve sustainable development goals

The Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change call for deep transformations that require complementary actions by governments, civil society, science, and business. IIASA contributed to a new study outlining six major transformations that will be required to achieve these ambitious goals.

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New 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Footage Shows Rey Breaking Bad

Sure, you could dissect the new ‘Star Wars’ trailer frame by frame. But look at that double-lightsaber!

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University of Kentucky to Fire Professors for Research Misconduct

The institution completed an internal investigation into two professors and a staff researcher for duplicating images and fudging data.

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Saving sage-grouse by relocation

Moving can be tough, but eventually most of us acclimate to new surroundings.

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Researchers identify fundamental properties of cells that affect how tissue structures form

Researchers have found that changing the mechanical properties of individual cells disrupts their ability to remain stable, profoundly affecting their health and the health of the tissue that comprises them.

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New coating brings lithium metal battery closer to reality

Hope has been restored for the rechargeable lithium metal battery—a potential battery powerhouse relegated for decades to the laboratory by its short life expectancy and occasional fiery demise while its rechargeable sibling, the lithium-ion battery, now rakes in more than $30 billion a year.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds heavy rainmaking ability in tropical storm Dorian

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dorian as it triggered warnings and watches for the islands of the Eastern Caribbean Sea.

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NASA's Terra Satellite finds some power in Tropical Depression 13W

Infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed Tropical Depression 13W contained some powerful thunderstorms pushing high into the troposphere as it was moving west in the Philippine Sea toward the Philippines.

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Saving sage-grouse by relocation

Moving can be tough, but eventually most of us acclimate to new surroundings.

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Researchers identify fundamental properties of cells that affect how tissue structures form

Researchers have found that changing the mechanical properties of individual cells disrupts their ability to remain stable, profoundly affecting their health and the health of the tissue that comprises them.

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How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake

When water is scarce, plants can close their pores to prevent losing too much water. This allows them to survive even longer periods of drought, but with the majority of pores closed, carbon dioxide uptake is also limited, which impairs photosynthetic performance and thus plant growth and yield.

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Lizards Prefer to Poop on the Largest Rock They Can Find

Conspicuous toilet spots may help Dalmatian wall lizards communicate. wall-lizard.jpg Image credits: Annelies Jacobs Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Monday, August 26, 2019 – 12:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Simon Baeckens knows when he's in a good spot for catching lizards. It's when he sees the largest, most pr

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White parents' racial bias awareness associated with greater willingness to discuss race

A new Northwestern University study found that white parents' racial bias awareness was associated with greater willingness to discuss race with their children, along with increased color consciousness and decreased color blindness.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds heavy rainmaking ability in tropical storm Dorian

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dorian as it triggered warnings and watches for the islands of the Eastern Caribbean Sea.

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Saving sage-grouse by relocation

A team of scientists successfully moved sage-grouse, a threatened bird species in Washington state, from one area of their range to another to increase their numbers and diversify their gene pool. A WSU study on the project in The Journal of Wildlife Management shows relocating the birds is a viable and productive step towards helping their population recover in the state.

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Coating developed by Stanford researchers brings lithium metal battery closer to reality

A Stanford-led research team invented a new coating that could finally make lightweight lithium metal batteries safe and long lasting, which could usher in the next generation of electric vehicles.

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Survey reveals skyrocketing interest in marijuana and cannabinoids for pain

Millennials lead the escalating interest in marijuana and cannabinoid compounds for managing pain — with older generations not far behind — yet most are unaware of potential risks. 75% of Americans who expressed interest in using marijuana or cannabinoids to address pain are under the impression they are safer or have fewer side effects than opioids or other medications, according to a nationwid

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Researchers identify properties of cells that affect how tissue structures form

Knowing how cell structure and tissue can be disrupted mechanically may provide clues into defective wound healing and the development and progression of disease.

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How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake

When water is scarce, plants can close their pores to prevent losing too much water. This allows them to survive even longer periods of drought, but with the majority of pores closed, carbon dioxide uptake is also limited, which impairs photosynthetic performance and thus plant growth and yield.

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Dangerous wild grass will be used in batteries

Hogweed, which grows over vast areas of Russia, can be useful as a material for batteries. Scientists from NUST MISIS have investigated the possibilities of fibrous substances in the plant stems. They have turned them into electrodes—elements of devices capable of storing energy. It was experimentally proven that the treated dangerous plant can successfully replace traditional sources of energy wi

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White parents' racial bias awareness associated with greater willingness to discuss race

A new Northwestern University study found that white parents' racial bias awareness was associated with greater willingness to discuss race with their children, along with increased color consciousness and decreased color blindness.

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Singapore Is Giving its Citizens Free Fitbits

Opt-Out The government of Singapore just partnered with the fitness tracker company Fitbit to provide hundreds of thousands of citizens with free fitness-tracking smartwatches. Of course, there’s a catch. In exchange for the free $100 smartwatch, people who sign up for the new “Live Healthy SG” program will need to cough up a $10 monthly subscription to Fitbit, and agree to share all the health d

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Disability categories in education were redefined to exclude minorities, study shows

Organizations inescapably categorize people, and those in the most desirable categories may do whatever it takes to stay there and to exclude others until a more desirable category emerges. However, dominant groups also can rerank existing favorable and unfavorable categories when weaker groups gain greater access to the traditionally favorable categories. Two University of Kansas professors have

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Crack in Pacific seafloor caused volcanic chain to go dormant

From his geology lab at the University of Houston, Jonny Wu has discovered that a chain of volcanoes stretching between Northeast Asia and Russia began a period of silence 50 million years ago, which lasted for 10 million years. In the journal Geology, Wu, assistant professor of structural geology, tectonics and mantle structure, is reporting that one of the most significant plate tectonic shifts

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Officials Announce First Death From Vaping-Related Illness

A mysterious vaping-related lung sickness, now sweeping the United States, has claimed its first life. On Friday, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) revealed that an adult hospitalized with severe respiratory illness after vaping died in August . The department did not provide any additional details on the patient or the exact circumstances of their death. According the IDPH, 22 Illi

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Why American towns are more selective than ever about what they recycle

The seeming success of worldwide recycling depended on China's now abandoned role. Municipalities are starting to limit the materials they'll recycle, and landfills are growing. The real solution to our waste problem may lie in our past. None The "father of recycling" is a man from Woodbury, New Jersey, named Donald Sanderson. In the 1970s, his local landfill was nearing capacity and costing loca

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The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Just as we have seen an increase in the number of microbreweries making specialty beers, the market for chocolate has also developed, so there are more high-end chocolate manufacturers who are trying to stand out by fine tuning the taste and making several different varietals. Therefore, there is a need to know how you can address this during the processing of the noble cocoa.

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The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Just as we have seen an increase in the number of microbreweries making specialty beers, the market for chocolate has also developed, so there are more high-end chocolate manufacturers who are trying to stand out by fine tuning the taste and making several different varietals. Therefore, there is a need to know how you can address this during the processing of the noble cocoa.

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Anthropologist chronicles a nation's deportation campaign

In June, President Trump promised that his administration would work to deport "millions of illegal aliens" from the U.S. via increased Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids and a ramping up of Border Patrol agents.

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Philippine airborne campaign targets weather, climate science

NASA's P-3B science aircraft soared into the skies over the Philippines on Aug. 25 to begin a nearly two-month-long investigation on the impact that smoke from fires and pollution have on clouds, a key factor in improving weather and climate forecasts. The Cloud, Aerosol, and Monsoon Processes Philippines Experiment (CAMP2Ex) is the most comprehensive field campaign to date in Maritime Southeast A

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Stability of Earth's climate depends on Amazonia

The Amazon basin cradles the largest rainforest in the world, and plays an essential role in regulating regional and even global climates.

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Memory loss, dementia an understudied yet widespread phenomenon among Chinese Americans

The US Chinese population is growing — and graying — rapidly! From 2000 to 2010, the Chinese American population aged 65 and over grew at a rate four times higher than the overall US older adult population. As this population ages, they are increasingly susceptible to memory loss and lacking the necessary supports for healthy aging, according to new Rutgers studies published in the Journal of th

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Utah's red rock metronome

At about the same rate that your heart beats, a Utah rock formation called Castleton Tower gently vibrates, keeping time and keeping watch over the sandstone desert. Swaying like a skyscraper, the red rock tower taps into the deep vibrations in the earth — wind, waves and far-off earthquakes.

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Playing Offense and Defense on Climate at the Same Time

We need to focus on responses to climate change that both reduce emissions and help people cope with an altered environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds

Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests.

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G7 pledges millions to help fight Amazon fires

The G7 has agreed to spend $20 million (18 million euros) on the Amazon, mainly to send fire-fighting aircraft to tackle huge blazes engulfing parts of the world's biggest rainforest, the presidents of France and Chile said Monday.

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What Andrew Luck’s Retirement Says About the NFL

Saturday evening, during a slate of otherwise forgettable NFL preseason games, word began circulating that Andrew Luck, the Pro Bowl quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts, was retiring, just two weeks ahead of the 2019 regular season. The news came as a shock. Luck had a history of injuries : Most recently, he missed the 2017 campaign following complications from shoulder surgery, and after retu

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Colleges Would Rather Freshmen Not Choose Their Roommates

Lee Balterman / The Life Picture Collection / Getty In 1926, the University of Wisconsin published a brochure advertising its new men’s dormitories. “Here … the man from the well-to-do home and the man who tends furnaces to buy his text-books will learn respect for each other across a common table,” the booklet read , “and the son of banker and farmer will find mutual understanding, of a winter’s

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Did you solve it? Drive your car (and brain) round the block

The solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you this puzzle : You are in a big city where all the streets go in one of two perpendicular directions. You take your car from its parking place and drive on a tour of the city such that you do not pass through the same intersection twice and return back to where you started. If you made 100 left turns, how many right turns did you make? Continu

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Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers

Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded information in quantum computers.

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Utah's red rock metronome: Seismic readings reveal Castleton Tower's unseen vibrations

At about the same rate that your heart beats, a Utah rock formation called Castleton Tower gently vibrates, keeping time and keeping watch over the sandstone desert. Swaying like a skyscraper, the red rock tower taps into the deep vibrations in the earth—wind, waves and far-off earthquakes.

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Strike three

Researchers uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism that may accelerate polycystic kidney disease.

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New technique isolates placental cells for non-invasive genetic testing

A new technique for isolating cells carrying the full fetal genome from cervical swabs could enable doctors to diagnose genetic disorders without using needles to harvest cells from the placenta.

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A new way to make valuable chemicals

A new discovery has advanced the field of carbon capture and utilization. Researchers have formed carbon-nitrogen bonds in an electrochemical carbon monoxide reduction reaction, which led to the production of high-value chemicals called amides, that are useful in a variety of industries, including pharmaceuticals.

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Concussions linked to erectile dysfunction in former NFL players

Former NFL players reporting concussion symptoms following head injury more likely to report erectile dysfunction and low testosterone levels. Clinicians treating patients with head trauma should inquire proactively about symptoms of ED and low testosterone.

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Genetically manipulating protein level in colon cancer cells can improve chemotherapy

Colorectal cancer outcomes may improve by genetically altering an immune-regulatory protein in cancer cells, making the cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy. That's according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings, published this month in Oncogene, indicate that increasing the expression of the PD-L1 protein in colorectal cancer cells can improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

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Playing Offense and Defense on Climate at the Same Time

We need to focus on responses to climate change that both reduce emissions and help people cope with an altered environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds

Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests.

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Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds

Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests.

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How moral obligation drives protest

Researchers have long studied the motives that inspire people to join in collective action. Three factors have received particular attention: anger caused by apparent social injustice; belief in the efficacy of collective action; and politicised identity. In 2008, these factors informed a predictive model of collective action—SIMCA, or a Social Identity Model of Collective Action. New studies have

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A History of Plans to Nuke Hurricanes (and Other Stuff Too)

If you think dropping a nuclear bomb into the eye of a hurricane is a bad idea, wait'll you see what they had in mind for the polar ice caps.

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Speeding up hydrogen production by the magic topological surface states

The hydrogen economy is considered to be one of the best options for providing renewable energy and, thereby, contributing to mitigating today's environmental challenges. The energy density of hydrogen is between 120-142 MJ/kg, which is much greater than that of chemical, fossil, and biofuels. More importantly, water is the only byproduct when hydrogen is used to produce electricity.

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Medicare patients with multiple sclerosis bear the burden of rising drug prices

In a decade, Medicare recipients saw a sevenfold increase in out of pocket costs for multiple sclerosis drugs. Spending on these drugs by Medicare itself increased by tenfold.

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College students with diabetes at risk for complications, depression, low quality of life

The study surveyed 173 people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), who worked at or attended a university. High levels of diabetes distress were reported by 27% of those with T1DM and 30% of those with T2DM. Participants who reported high diabetes distress also indicated a lower diabetes quality of life. Researchers found 19% of those with T1DM and 17% of those

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Obesity tied to weakened response to taste

Obesity is connected with a reduced response to taste, according to a new study featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State of University of New York.

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How moral obligation drives protest

New studies have recently prompted a team of scholars that includes a HSE University researcher to incorporate 2 additional factors — ideology and moral obligation — in the Social Identity Model of Collective Action. A survey of protesters in Spain was used to test the impact of these two new factors. The results of the study were published in PlOS ONE.

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One-third of pre-approved prescription drugs have not completed the FDA approval process

The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Accelerated Approval Program was created in 1992 to significantly accelerate the ability to bring certain new drugs to market. New research published in the INFORMS journal Manufacturing & Service Operations Management reveals a large number of drug manufacturers are failing to complete the approval process, meaning a significant number of drugs on the mark

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New paper creates omega-3 calculator for researchers to specify EPA+DHA doses in studies

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition will make it possible for researchers to calculate how much omega-3 EPA and DHA they need to use in their studies in order for subjects to reach a healthy Omega-3 Index.

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The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans

Can you manipulate the taste of noble cocoas in different directions to create exciting new flavours for the world's chocolate fans? Some researchers and cocoa professionals asked that question and the research shows that you actually can. The results from the Department of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark are of particular importance for high-end producers, but with time th

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Yale-led study offers promising approach to reducing plaque in arteries

In a new Yale-led study, investigators have revealed previously unknown factors that contribute to the hardening of arteries and plaque growth, which cause heart disease. Their insight is the basis for a promising therapeutic approach to halt and potentially reverse plaque buildup and the progression of disease, the researchers said.

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Philippine airborne campaign targets weather, climate science

NASA's P-3B science aircraft soared into the skies over the Philippines on Aug. 25 to begin a nearly two-month-long investigation on the impact that smoke from fires and pollution have on clouds, a key factor in improving weather and climate forecasts. The Cloud, Aerosol, and Monsoon Processes Philippines Experiment (CAMP2Ex) is the most comprehensive field campaign to date in Maritime Southeast A

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Historical gathering: International meeting of the discoverers of chemical elements

As part of the International Year of the Periodic Table 2019, the Conference on the Chemistry and Physics of Heavy Elements (TAN) taking place in Wilhelmshaven, Germany from the 25th to the 30th of August, brought together the discoverers of new chemical elements in a unique historical gathering. Researchers from Germany, Russia and Japan, who have added new elements to the periodic table in recen

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From cradle to grave: postnatal overnutrition linked to aging

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have found a new answer to an old question: how can overnutrition during infancy lead to long-lasting health problems such as diabetes?

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Canadian children's diet quality during school hours improves over 11-year period

Surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13% improvement in the quality of foods consumed by Canadian children during school hours. The study looked at the nutritional profile of foods consumed during school hours (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.), and during the entire school day, using a holistic measure of dietary quality known as the Canadian Healthy Eating Index (C-HEI). This index assigns a score based on 11 ke

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This Smithsonian Scientist is on a Mission to Make Leeches Less Scary

Curator Anna Phillips is on a quest to make leeches less repulsive to the public

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Upward mobility requires education. Here’s how America falls short.

One credible way to help children born into poverty get out of it is by providing them with a great education. Indeed, the best, high-paying jobs are going to go to the nations with the best-education people. On top of helping solve socio-economic inequality, a quality education also promotes a civically-minded, knowledgable citizenry. Education has become a partisan issue — it should be the oppo

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Kina vil have flere børn: Men ny politik gav kun fem mio. ekstra

Riget i Midten øgede kun antallet af fødsler med lige knap danmarks befolkning de første 18 mdr. efter landet droppede et-barns-politikken. Men regeringen vil have mange flere børn.

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Exercise is good for the aging brain

Researchers have found that a single bout of exercise benefits some older people's brains. In experiments in which participants aged 60 to 80 exercised once and multiple times, the researchers found some individuals showed improved cognitive functions and working memory.

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Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive

Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests.

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First direct evidence for mantle plume origin of Jurassic flood basalts in southern Africa

A group of geochemists suggests they have found the smoking gun in the Karoo magma province. Their new article reports the discovery of primitive picrite lavas that may provide the first direct sample of a hot mantle plume underneath southern Africa in the Jurassic period.

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Spikes in handgun purchases after high-profile events linked to more firearm injuries

A recent study assessed the sharp rise in handgun purchasing in 2012 after Sandy Hook and the re-election of President Obama, across 499 Californian cities. It estimated whether the excess handgun purchases increased fatal and non-fatal injuries. It found that these spikes in handgun purchases have been linked to a 4 percent increase in firearm injury in California.

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Depression, anxiety linked to opioid use and reduced survival in women with breast cancer

The findings should encourage doctors to better manage mental health in patients with breast cancer and spur care providers to consider alternative pain management such as physical therapy, massage and acupuncture, the researchers say.

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Diverse immune cell profiles and roles found in breast cancer resistance to immunotherapy

Researchers show that heterogeneity of both breast cancer cells themselves and immune composition of the tumor microenvironment are important considerations for therapy.

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How common is cannabis use among young adult cancer patients?

Cannabis can help alleviate some of the symptoms of cancer and its treatment, and a new study examines the prevalence of its use among young adult cancer patients now that medical cannabis is becoming increasingly available.

6h

Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers

A new article published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigates the causes of these injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers.

6h

Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers

Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded information in quantum computers.

6h

Breaching the brain's defense causes epilepsy

Epileptic seizures can happen to anyone. But how do they occur and what initiates such a rapid response? An international team of scientists led by Prof. Dr. Emre Yaksi at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway and includes researchers from Dr. Caghan Kizil's group at the Center for Regenerative Therapies at TU Dresden (CRTD), has discovered that failure of the so-called

6h

Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

EPFL scientists have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models.

6h

Deep transformations needed to achieve the SDGs

The Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change call for deep transformations that require complementary actions by governments, civil society, science, and business. IIASA contributed to a new study outlining 6 major transformations that will be required to achieve these ambitious goals.

6h

Blue light for RNA control

Messenger RNA molecules contain genetic information and thus control the synthesis of proteins in living cells. Biochemists at the Universities of Bayreuth and Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. In principle, it is thus possib

6h

How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake

Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. A sensory network assures that the plant strikes the right balance.

6h

New research predicts stability of mosquito-borne disease prevention

To reduce transmission of dengue to humans, scientists have introduced Wolbachia bacteria to A. aegypti mosquitoes. Now a team of international researchers has found that Wolbachia's ability to block virus transmission may be maintained by natural selection, alleviating concern that this benefit could diminish over time.

6h

Study finds big increase in ocean carbon dioxide absorption along West Antarctic Peninsula

Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a Rutgers-led study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run. The study, led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, is published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

6h

Multiple-birth infants have higher risk of medical mixups in NICU

Multiple-birth infants had a significantly higher risk of wrong-patient order errors compared with singletons in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. The higher error rate was due to misidentification between siblings within sets of twins, triplets, or quad

6h

Even scientists have gender stereotypes … which can hamper the career of women researchers

However convinced we may be that science is not just for men, the concept of science remains much more strongly associated with masculinity than with femininity in people's minds. This automatic bias, already identified among the general public, also exists in the minds of most scientists, who are not necessarily aware of it. In certain conditions, it may lead to otherwise careful scientific evalu

6h

New threat from ocean acidification emerges in the Southern Ocean

Scientists investigating the effect of ocean acidification on diatoms, a key group of microscopic marine organisms, phytoplankton, say they have identified a new threat from climate change — ocean acidification is negatively impacting the extent to which diatoms in Southern Ocean waters incorporate silica into their cell walls. The findings are important in the context of global climate change be

6h

Wildfires could permanently alter Alaska's forest composition

A team of researchers led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees of Alaska to get pushed out in favor of broadleaf deciduous trees, which shed their leaves seasonally.

6h

Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women

Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by a UBC psychologist and researchers in France reveals that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women.

6h

Medicare patients with multiple sclerosis bear the burden of rising drug prices

In a decade, Medicare recipients saw a sevenfold increase in out of pocket costs for multiple sclerosis drugs. Spending on these drugs by Medicare itself increased by tenfold.

6h

Many kidneys discarded in the United States would be transplanted in France

French organ transplant centers are far more likely to accept 'lower-rated' kidneys, like those from older organ donors, than centers in the United States, according to an analysis published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. French transplant centers would have transplanted more than 60% — about 17,500 kidneys — of the nearly 28,000 deceased-donor kidneys discarded in the United States between 20

6h

Astrophysicists link brightening of pulsar wind nebula to pulsar spin-down rate transition

Astrophysicists have discovered that the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) surrounding the famous pulsar B0540-69 brightened gradually after the pulsar experienced a sudden spin-down rate transition (SRT). This discovery, made by a group of astrophysicists led by GE Mingyu and LU Fangjun at the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, provides important clues to the spin-down me

6h

Elderly have poor prognosis after recovery in long-term acute care hospitals

While long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are designed to help patients recover and regain independence, fewer than one in five older adults who were transferred to such facilities were alive five years later, leaving them with a worse prognosis than terminal illnesses such as advanced cancer, according to research at UC San Francisco and The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

6h

Upward mobility requires education. Here’s how America falls short.

One credible way to help children born into poverty get out of it is by providing them with a great education. Indeed, the best, high-paying jobs are going to go to the nations with the best-education people. On top of helping solve socio-economic inequality, education also promotes a civically-minded, knowledgable citizenry. Education has become a partisan issue, when it should be the opposite H

6h

This Bluetooth security flaw affects tons of devices

The perks of Bluebooth technology come with security risks, say researchers. David Starobinski and Johannes Becker, researchers from Boston University, uncovered that popular Bluetooth devices including iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches, and FitBits—and workplace essentials including MacBooks and Microsoft tablets and laptops—have a flaw that exposes device users to the risk of being tracked by unwan

6h

Can we be immortal digitally?

David Evans Bailey from New Zealand’s Auckland University of Technology explores the idea of ‘Virternity’.

6h

The beginnings of trade in northwestern Europe during the Bronze Age

People in England were using balance weights and scales to measure the value of materials as early as the late second and early first millennia BC. This is what Professor Lorenz Rahmstorf, scientist …

6h

Tech that monitors your water use, air quality, and more

Inspector Gadgets (Josh Dickinson/) Your monthly utility bills give a big-picture look at the resources your home drinks up. They won’t tell you, though, that a leaky toilet is hemorrhaging water or your “sleeping” cable box is still sucking up electricity. Obsessive monitoring types can install app-connected smart devices to check on precisely how their homes are doing in real time. 1. Water Aft

7h

A 2 nm sized nanomachine able to spin and transfer its rotational energy

A collaboration of researchers in France, Japan and the United States have developed a new nanosized propeller which can act as gears. This propeller, when bound to a gold surface, can be activated through thermal, electrical or mechanical energy to spin unidirectionally either clockwise or counterclockwise. Its compatibility with solid state surfaces planar technology suggests this propeller can

7h

Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis

Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts.

7h

Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized

After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. This was achieved through ICSI (Intra Cytoplasm Sperm Injection) with frozen sperm fr

7h

An innovative new diagnostic for Lyme disease

Researchers describe an early detection method for pinpointing molecular signatures of the disease with high accuracy.

7h

Stable home lives improve prospects for preemies

Researchers have found that as premature babies grow, their mental health may be related less to the medical challenges they face after birth than to the environment the babies enter once they leave the neonatal intensive care unit.

7h

Insights into high quality fabrication of nanocomposites

Researchers now provide a much-needed analysis and review of the emerging research on particle reinforced metal matrix nanocomposites with selective laser melting, charting out possibilities for engineering applications.

7h

The beginnings of trade in northwestern Europe during the Bronze Age

People in England were using balance weights and scales to measure the value of materials as early as the late second and early first millennia BC. This showed that there was already expertise in using standard weights and measures in many regions of Europe at that time.

7h

Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution

Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. A new study indicates nitrate pollution of coastal waters stimulates the decomposition of organic matter in salt marsh sediments that normally would have remained stable, and can alter the capacity of salt marshes to sequester carbon over the long term.

7h

A 2 nm sized nanomachine able to spin and transfer its rotational energy

A collaboration of researchers in France, Japan and the United States have developed a new nanosized propeller which can act as gears. This propeller, when bound to a gold surface, can be activated through thermal, electrical or mechanical energy to spin unidirectionally either clockwise or counterclockwise. Its compatibility with solid state surfaces planar technology suggests this propeller can

7h

Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores — without the 'achoo!'

In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. Even better, these treated particles don't trigger allergies.

7h

SpaceX Starhopper Will Fly for the Last Time Tonight

Hop Matrix SpaceX is gearing up for the last flight test of its Starhopper test vehicle at its Boca Chica test site in Texas. The plan is to “hop” to an altitude of 150 meters or 492 feet — and, in the process, lay the groundwork for its upcoming Starship spacecraft. The test vehicle’s first untethered flight in July was a success. Two separate videos , uploaded by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, showed th

7h

New threat from ocean acidification emerges in the Southern Ocean

The oceans act as a carbon sink and have already absorbed more than 40% of anthropogenic carbon emissions. The majority of this CO2 has been taken up by the Southern Ocean making these waters hotspots of ocean acidification (OA).

7h

Study finds big increase in ocean carbon dioxide absorption along West Antarctic Peninsula

Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a Rutgers-led study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run.

7h

Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women

Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by a UBC psychologist and researchers in France reveals that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women.

7h

More fires flare up in Amazon as Brazil warplanes fight blazes

Hundreds of new fires have flared up in the Amazon in Brazil, data showed Monday, even as military aircraft dumped water over hard-hit areas and G7 nations pledged to help combat the blazes.

7h

New research predicts stability of mosquito-borne disease prevention

To reduce transmission of dengue to humans, scientists have introduced Wolbachia bacteria to A. aegypti mosquitoes. Now a team of international researchers has found that Wolbachia's ability to block virus transmission may be maintained by natural selection, alleviating concern that this benefit could diminish over time.

7h

Wildfires could permanently alter Alaska's forest composition

This summer, Alaska has experienced record high temperatures and devastating wildfires. If such events become more frequent, how might that impact our northernmost forests? A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees

7h

Astrophysicists link brightening of pulsar wind nebula to pulsar spin-down rate transition

Astrophysicists have discovered that the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) surrounding the famous pulsar B0540-69 brightened gradually after the pulsar experienced a sudden spin-down rate transition (SRT). This discovery, made by a group of astrophysicists led by GE Mingyu and LU Fangjun at the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, provides important clues to the spin-down me

7h

Ny metod gör det lättare att hitta rätt biomarkör

Exosomer frisätts från alla kroppens celler. De är membranklädda strukturer som kan transportera proteiner och nukleinsyror mellan cellerna. De är också lovande som cirkulerande biomarkörer för till exempel tumörprogression och metastasering och för tidig upptäckt av neurodegenerativa sjukdomar. För att praktiskt utnyttja exosomer för diagnostik är det viktigt att kunna skilja mellan exosomer frå

7h

Ekonomiska mål försämrar livsvillkoren för funktionshindrade

Lagen om stöd och service till vissa funktionshindrade, LSS, infördes 1994. Dess syfte är att särskilt behövande personer med funktionsnedsättning ska få det stöd i det dagliga livet som krävs för att de ska kunna uppleva samma människovärde som andra. Besparingsåtgärder inom den sociala välfärden riskerar dock att ta över fokus från de socialpolitiska målen, visar en ny forskningsstudie. – Den p

7h

Bacteria v mossies. Bacteria holding their own

Study suggests they have long-term viability in blocking spread of infection. Natalie Parletta reports.

7h

How memories form and fade

They may last longer if more neurons work together, research suggests.

7h

Fires and climate change may alter Alaska's forests

Modelling suggests deciduous species will prosper at the expense of evergreens.

7h

Crows probably shouldn’t have fries with that

Human food boosts their cholesterol, research shows.

7h

Can we be immortal digitally?

David Evans Bailey from New Zealand’s Auckland University of Technology explores the idea of ‘Virternity’.

7h

7h

Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds

Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests.

7h

Dangerous wild grass will be used in batteries

Hogweed, which has grown over vast territories of Russia, can be useful as a material for batteries. Scientists from NUST MISIS have investigated the possibilities of fibrous substances in the plant stems. They have turned them into electrodes — elements of devices capable of storing energy. It was experimentally proven that the treated dangerous plant can successfully replace traditional sources

7h

Disability categories in education were redefined to exclude minorities, study shows

A study by two University of Kansas professors shows how a large school district redefined disability categories to keep minorities out of most supported special ed categories, when forced to integrate. The study also defines practice of 'categorical manipulation.'

7h

Crack in Pacific seafloor caused volcanic chain to go dormant

University of Houston geologists have discovered that 50 million years ago a chain of volcanoes between Northeast Asia and Russia were forced into a period of dormancy that lasted for 10 million years.

7h

New study suggests exercise is good for the aging brain

University of Iowa researchers have found that a single bout of exercise benefits some older people's brains. In experiments in which participants aged 60 to 80 exercised once and multiple times, the researchers found some individuals showed improved cognitive functions and working memory.

7h

A new model of heat transfer in crystals was developed by Russian scientists

The understanding of atomic level processes opens a wide range of prospects in nanoelectronics and material engineering. One of such studies is a model suggested by a team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU). The model describes the distribution of heat in ultrapure crystals at the atomic level.

7h

A 2 nm sized nanomachine able to spin and transfer its rotational energy

A collaboration of researchers in France, Japan and the United States have developed a new nanosized propeller which can act as gears. This propeller, when bound to a gold surface, can be activated through thermal, electrical or mechanical energy to spin unidirectionally either clockwise or counterclockwise. Its compatibility with solid state surfaces planar technology suggests this propeller can

7h

How the West can adapt to a rising Asia | Kishore Mahbubani

As Asian economies and governments continue to gain power, the West needs to find ways to adapt to the new global order, says author and diplomat Kishore Mahbubani. In an insightful look at international politics, Mahbubani shares a three-part strategy that Western governments can use to recover power and improve relations with the rest of the world.

7h

The beginnings of trade in northwestern Europe during the Bronze Age

People in England were using balance weights and scales to measure the value of materials as early as the late second and early first millennia BC. This is what Professor Lorenz Rahmstorf, scientist at the University of Göttingen and project manager of the ERC "Weight and Value" project, has discovered. He compared Middle and Late Bronze Age gold objects from the British Isles and Northern France

7h

New research predicts stability of mosquito-borne disease prevention

To reduce transmission of dengue to humans, scientists have introduced Wolbachia bacteria to A. aegypti mosquitoes. Now a team of international researchers has found that Wolbachia's ability to block virus transmission may be maintained by natural selection, alleviating concern that this benefit could diminish over time.

7h

Going to Mars? See Australia first

Scientists hone their research skills on ancient fossils.

7h

Control Review: From the makers of Max Payne and Alan Wake

Control is the latest game from the makers of Max Payne, Alan Wake, and Quantum Break. It's all the standard elements of a regular third-person shooter, but its exhaustive world building and …

7h

Sharks feel the love as nations push protection of marine species

Sharks appear to be getting an image makeover as countries move to restrict trade in several species of the oceans' top predator in a push to extend more protections to marine species.

7h

Researchers' review paper reveal insights into high quality fabrication of nanocomposites

Metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) are increasingly used in industries such as automotive, aerospace and military due to their excellent combination of high strength, thermal stability, ductility and isotropy. However, despite MMNCs' superior properties and growing interest, the complex processing and inadequate economic efficiency have limited the applications of MMNCs. High energy consumption i

7h

A Tale of Two Tennis G.O.A.T.s

Serena Williams and Roger Federer are two of the greatest tennis players of all time. That idea has been reiterated so often by journalists and commentators, by current and former players, that it’s assumed an almost self-evident quality. Williams has broken records and wowed fans for years on the women’s tour; Federer has done the same on the men’s. Federer is 38 years old, while Williams will t

7h

Can consumers save the planet by just buying green?

Buying green is getting more and more popular, but is it enough to solve the sustainability problem? Lewis Akenji from the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Finland …

7h

Sharks feel the love as nations push protection of marine species

Sharks appear to be getting an image makeover as countries move to restrict trade in several species of the oceans' top predator in a push to extend more protections to marine species.

7h

Baidu unseats Google for second place in global smart speaker race

Market analyst firm Canalys said Baidu shipped 4.5 million smart speakers during the three-month period, besting the 4.3 million units that Google moved. Amazon with its Echo line of smart speakers …

7h

Urban living leads to high cholesterol…in crows

Animals that do well in urban areas tend to be the ones that learn to make use of resources such as the food humans throw away. But is our food actually good for them? A new study suggests that a diet of human foods such as discarded cheeseburgers might be giving American crows living in urban areas higher blood cholesterol levels than their rural cousins.

7h

Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay

A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay — it's likely to expand its territory. A new study supports the theory that the new tumbleweed grows more vigorously than its progenitors because it is a hybrid with doubled pairs of its parents' chromosomes.

7h

Simple blood test unmasks concussions absent on CT scans

Many patients with concussion have normal CT scans and are discharged from the hospital without follow-up. But a blood test that is currently under development and costs a fraction of the price of a brain scan may flag concussion in these CT-negative patients, enabling them to be evaluated for long-term complications.

7h

Childhood cancer survivors at elevated risk of heart disease

Survivors of childhood cancer have higher risk of developing various types of heart disease due to cancer therapy, compared to peers who are cancer-free. Most studies of this survivor group have focused only on heart failure as a result of cancer therapy.

7h

Blood test detects concussion and subconcussive injuries in children and adults

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers are making new progress in finding ways to detect a traumatic yet sinister brain injury — and getting closer to preventing further damage.

7h

Tiny tweaks for big wins in solar cells

Changes in composition are shown to affect light-harvesting layer crystallization and perovskite solar cell efficiency.

7h

Effectiveness of a new bladder cancer demonstrated

Demonstrated the effectiveness of a drug for treating metastatic bladder cancer in patients who did not respond to the usual treatment. The preliminary results of an ongoing clinical trial show that TAK-228, a mTORC1/2 protein inhibitor, can stop the progression of the disease.

7h

Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis

Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts at the University of Stirling.

7h

Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized

After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. This was achieved through ICSI (Intra Cytoplasm Sperm Injection) with frozen sperm fr

7h

First direct evidence for mantle plume origin of Jurassic flood basalts in southern Africa

A group of geochemists from Finland and Mozambique suggests they have found the smoking gun in the Karoo magma province. Their new article reports the discovery of primitive picrite lavas that may provide the first direct sample of a hot mantle plume underneath southern Africa in the Jurassic period.

7h

The beginnings of trade in northwestern Europe during the Bronze Age

People in England were using balance weights and scales to measure the value of materials as early as the late second and early first millennia BC. This is what Professor Lorenz Rahmstorf, scientist at the University of Göttingen and project manager of the ERC 'Weight and Value' project, has discovered. This showed that there was already expertise in using standard weights and measures in many reg

7h

Producing protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns. By using synthetic polypeptides and other polymers, researchers have taken the first steps toward constructing electrodes for such power so

7h

Augmented reality glasses may help people with low vision better navigate their environment

In a new study of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease that results in poor vision, researchers found that adapted augmented reality glasses can improve patients' mobility by 50% and grasp performance by 70%.

7h

Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution

Deep in the waterlogged peat of salt marshes, carbon is stored at much greater rates than in land ecosystems, serving as an offset to climate change due to carbon dioxide (CO2) build-up in the atmosphere.

7h

This Giant AI Chip Is the Size of an iPad and Holds 1.2 Trillion Transistors

People say size doesn’t matter, but when it comes to AI the makers of the largest computer chip ever beg to differ. There are plenty of question marks about the gargantuan processor, but its unconventional design could herald an innovative new era in silicon design. Computer chips specialized to run deep learning algorithms are a booming area of research as hardware limitations begin to slow prog

7h

Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores — without the 'achoo!'

In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. Even better, these treated particles don't trigger allergies.

7h

Making polyurethane degradable gives its components a second life

Polyurethane waste is piling up, but scientists have a possible solution: They have developed a method to make polyurethane degradable. Once the original product's useful life is over, the polymer can easily be dissolved into ingredients to make new products such as superglue.

7h

Physicians slow to use effective new antibiotics against superbugs

New, more effective antibiotics are being prescribed in only about a quarter of infections by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of the world's most intractable drug-resistant bacteria, according to an analysis by scientists. This sluggish uptake of such high-priority antibiotics prompted the researchers to call for an examination of clinical and pharmaceutical stewardship pra

7h

Tiny RNA provides big protection after a heart attack

Heart muscle can continue to die even after restoring blood following a heart attack, and scientists have new evidence that one way to help it live is by boosting levels of a tiny RNA that helped the heart form.

7h

A lack of background knowledge can hinder reading comprehension

The purpose of going to school is to learn, but students may find certain topics difficult to understand if they don't have the necessary background knowledge.

7h

One Number Shows Something Is Fundamentally Wrong with Our Conception of the Universe

Here's what's going on with the discrepancies in cosmic expansion measurements.

7h

Huntington’s and Other Repeat Disorders: DNA, Not Protein?

As many will know, there is a whole set of what are termed “ polyglutamine repeat disorders “, which themselves are a large part of a bigger set of trinucleotide repeat disorders. Huntington’s disease is a well-known one: the gene (HTT) for the huntingtin protein ends up with a series of CAG nucleotide repeats, which after translation to protein gives it a long set of glutamine residues. It’s bee

7h

Researchers' review paper reveal insights into high quality fabrication of nanocomposites

SUTD together with research collaborators provide much needed analysis and review of the emerging research on particle reinforced metal matrix nanocomposites with selective laser melting, charting out possibilities for engineering applications.

7h

An innovative new diagnostic for Lyme disease

In new research, Joshua LaBaer, executive director of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an early detection method for pinpointing molecular signatures of the disease with high accuracy.

7h

Speeding up the hydrogen production by the magic topological surface states

The hydrogen economy is considered to be one of the best options for providing renewable energy and, thereby, contributing to mitigating today's environmental challenges. The energy density of hydrogen is between 120-142 MJ/kg, which is much greater than that of chemical, fossil, and biofuels. More importantly, water is the only byproduct when hydrogen is used to produce electricity.

7h

Stable home lives improve prospects for preemies

Researchers at at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that as premature babies grow, their mental health may be related less to the medical challenges they face after birth than to the environment the babies enter once they leave the neonatal intensive care unit.

7h

Extra testosterone may attune us to moral norms

Testosterone supplements made people more sensitive to moral norms in a recent study. The findings suggest that testosterone’s influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought. Some studies have linked high levels of the hormone to immoral behavior. Previous research has investigated moral judgment on the basis of behavioral responses and brain activity, but the current study goe

8h

Producing protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns. By using synthetic polypeptides and other polymers, researchers have taken the first steps toward constructing electrodes for such power so

8h

Remodeling unhealthful gut microbiomes to fight disease

You are what you eat — right down to the microbiome living in your gut. Today, scientists will report the development of molecules that can change, or remodel, unhealthful gut microbiomes in mice into more healthful ones. The research could also someday be applied to other conditions related to diet.

8h

Disappearing act: Device vanishes on command after military missions

A polymer that self-destructs? Once a fictional idea, polymers now exist that are rugged enough to ferry packages or sensors into hostile territory and vaporize immediately upon a military mission's completion. The material has been made into a rigid-winged glider and a nylon-like parachute fabric. It could also be used someday in building materials or environmental sensors.

8h

Pacific 'pumice raft' left 'no water visible'

Two sailors recall their encounter with a vast sea of floating volcanic rocks in the Pacific Ocean.

8h

FAA Reminder: Don’t Fly a Drone With a Weapon Attached to It

Weaponized Drones Don’t fly a drone with a weapon attached to it, stupid! That’s the latest warning by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, which it made in a notice released publicly last week. Safety Alert: The #FAA warns against attaching weapons to #drones . Operating a drone with a weapon attached is not only dangerous, it is illegal and violators could face significant civil penalties

8h

‘Good gene’ may offer new way to fight glioblastoma

A newly discovered pathway may help suppress the development of glioblastoma tumors, one of the deadliest forms of cancer, according to new research. The work focuses on the AH receptor, which controls expression of a diverse set of genes, essentially contradicts what was previously understood in glioblastoma research. “We found the AH receptor—which was previously reported in the literature to b

8h

Toolkit makes shared augmented reality more secure

A new toolkit called ShareAR lets app developers build collaborative and interactive features for augmented reality without sacrificing their users’ privacy and security, researchers report. A few summers ago throngs of people began using the Pokemon Go app, the first mass-market augmented reality game, to collect virtual creatures hiding in the physical world. For now, AR remains mostly a solo a

8h

Flygödlor åt samma föda som dagens flamingor

Pterosaurier, eller flygödlor, var en mångfaldig grupp reptiler som härskade i skyarna under dinosauriernas tid. Fossiliserade skelett antyder att de, precis som dagens fåglar, var anpassade till en rad olika levnadsmiljöer och födostrategier. Dessvärre är direkta födobevis såsom tarminnehåll ovanligt och endast kända från några få arter. Koproliter, det vill säga fossilt bajs, är förvånansvärt v

8h

How Much Is AI Really Moving the Needle on Health?

When it comes to health and wellness, most people have a similar goal: we want to live a healthier, longer , and happier life. Thanks to antibiotics, vaccines, medical imaging, and other technological breakthroughs, we’ve already made major strides. So it’s perhaps no surprise that all eyes are now on the transformative innovation of this century: AI. The promise of AI to solve our health and wel

8h

Early disease detection: Individual exosomes identified

There is a growing demand for diagnostic markers for early disease detection and prognosis. Exosomes are potential biomarkers for cancer progression and neurodegenerative disease but it can be difficult to identify what tissue a specific exosome comes from. Researchers have solved this problem by developing a method that maps surface protein complements on large numbers of individual exosomes.

8h

Augmented reality glasses may help people with low vision better navigate their environment

In a new study of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease that results in poor vision, researchers found that adapted augmented reality glasses can improve patients' mobility by 50% and grasp performance by 70%.

8h

Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic

Modern flamingos employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. Very similar contents have been found in more than 150-million-year-old pterosaur droppings. This represents the first direct evidence of filter-feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs and demonstrates that their diet and feeding environment were similar to those of modern fl

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Sea snail compound reduces cancer risk

The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. Researchers have isolated one compound in the gland secretions from the Australian white rock sea snail (Dicathasis orbita) which has not only antibacterial and anti-inflammatory qualities, but impor

8h

Will disposable colonoscopy devices replace reusables?

As a disposable version of the instrument used in one of the most common medical procedures in the United States inches closer to widespread availability, a team of data researchers is studying the economic and safety implications associated with the devices used to perform colonoscopies.

8h

Chocolate muddles cannabis potency testing

Since the first states legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, several others have joined them, and cannabis-infused edibles, including gummy bears, cookies and chocolates, have flooded the market. But these sweet treats have created confusing results for scientists trying to analyze their potency and purity. Now researchers report that components in chocolate might be interfering with cannabis

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Skin patch could painlessly deliver vaccines, cancer medications in one minute

Nearly 100,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed annually, and 20 Americans die every day from it. Now, researchers have developed a skin patch that efficiently delivers medication within one minute to attack melanoma cells. The device, tested in mice and human skin samples, also could be adapted to deliver other vaccines.

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Australian researchers reveal new insights into retina's genetic code

Australian scientists have led the development of the world's most detailed gene map of the human retina, providing new insights which will help future research to prevent and treat blindness.

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Physicists mash quantum and gravity and find time, but not as we know it

A University of Queensland-led international team of researchers say they have discovered "a new kind of quantum time order".UQ physicist Dr Magdalena Zych said the discovery arose from an experiment the team designed to bring together elements of the two big – but contradictory – physics theories developed in the past century.

8h

Ilhan Omar’s Opportunity

In July, at the Washington, D.C., conference of the Muslim Collective for Equitable Democracy, Representative Ilhan Omar gave a heated answer to a question posed by a member of the audience. The woman had asked if Omar and Representative Rashida Tlaib would be willing to make public statements condemning female genital mutilation. She said that given a recent court decision in Detroit that had fo

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Identification of all types of germ cells tumors

Germ cell tumors were considered very heterogeneous and diverse, until recently. Researchers from the Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and the Princess Máxima Center for pediatric oncology have added structure by suggesting a subdivision in seven types of germ cell tumors. This division is relevant for basic and clinical research and contributes to optimal diagnostics and healthcare in the

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Scientists closer to solving mystery of why lean people get fatty liver disease

Researchers from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) have discovered how fatty liver disease develops in lean people, aiding the development of potential treatments for these patients.

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Parasitic worms infect dogs, humans

A human infective nematode found in remote northern areas of Australia has been identified in canine carriers for the first time. Flinders University environmental health researchers, with experts in the USA, have found a form of the soil-borne Strongyloides worm in faeces collected from dogs. Strongyloidiasis, carried by several kinds of Strongyloides spp., is estimated to infect up to 370 millio

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Researchers propose method to balance user experience and cloud cost

For an online gamer, lag is the worst. The gamer watches, telling the avatar to move to avoid another player's attack, but the avatar does nothing. Then, suddenly, the avatar does all of the commands, rapid fire. It was listening, it just took too long for the commands to process. Researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology have now developed a method to help avoid this aggravating issue

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Did parasite manipulation influence human neurological evolution?

It seems so obvious that someone should have thought of it decades ago: Since parasites have plagued eukaryotic life for millions of years, their prevalence likely affected evolution. Psychologist Marco Del Giudice of the University of New Mexico is not the first researcher to suggest that the evolution of the human brain could have been influenced by parasites that manipulate host behavior. But t

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Studerar uran i bentonit för slutförvaring av kärnavfall

– Forskningen behövs för att bättre kunna förstå och förutsäga hur uran kommer att bete sig om avfallet kommer i kontakt med bentonitlera, som Sverige och många andra länder planerar att använda som buffertmaterial mellan kärnavfallskapslarna och berggrunden. Eftersom utbränt kärnbränsle består av cirka 95 procent urandioxid i fast form kommer eventuellt läckage av uran och andra radioaktiva ämne

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Techathlon podcast: Phone scams, tech trivia, and the crucible of keyboard shortcuts

Listen to the latest episode in the player below or wherever you find your favorites. (Techathlon/) We’re rapidly approaching fall. Before you know it, the pumpkin spice leviathan will begin its annual rampage across the land, knocking the leaves off of trees and forcing children back to school in its festive, autumnal wake. But, for now, there’s still one more week of summer, which means you sho

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Did parasite manipulation influence human neurological evolution?

It seems so obvious that someone should have thought of it decades ago: Since parasites have plagued eukaryotic life for millions of years, their prevalence likely affected evolution. Psychologist Marco Del Giudice of the University of New Mexico is not the first researcher to suggest that the evolution of the human brain could have been influenced by parasites that manipulate host behavior. But t

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Sea snail compound reduces cancer risk

The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical.

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Indonesia picks Borneo island for new capital

Indonesia will move its capital to the eastern edge of jungle-clad Borneo island, President Joko Widodo said Monday, as the country shifts its political heart away from congested and sinking megalopolis Jakarta.

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How high schools can foster 'deeper learning'

Jal Mehta, professor of education at the Graduate School of Education (GSE), and Sarah Fine, Ed.M. '13, Ed.D. '17, visited 30 innovative public high schools across the country to examine where students were experiencing what the two call deeper learning. What they found was surprising: Even in the most celebrated schools, the learning that allows students to grow as thinkers and critical and creat

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New theory draws connections between Planckian metals and black holes

Two researchers at Harvard University, Aavishkar A. Patel and Subir Sachdev, have recently presented a new theory of a Planckian metal that could shed light on previously unknown aspects of quantum physics. Their paper, published in Physical Review Letters, introduces a lattice model of fermions that describes a Planckian metal at low temperatures (Tà0).

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Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis

Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts at the University of Stirling.

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Will disposable colonoscopy devices replace reusables?

As a disposable version of the instrument used in one of the most common medical procedures in the United States inches closer to widespread availability, a team of Johns Hopkins data researchers is studying the economic and safety implications associated with the devices used to perform colonoscopies.

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Simple blood test unmasks concussions absent on CT scans

Many patients with concussion have normal CT scans and are discharged from the hospital without follow-up. But a blood test that is currently under development and costs a fraction of the price of a brain scan may flag concussion in these CT-negative patients, enabling them to be evaluated for long-term complications.

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Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution

Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. A new study from the MBL Ecosystems Center indicates nitrate pollution of coastal waters stimulates the decomposition of organic matter in salt marsh sediments that normally would have remained stable, and can alter the capacity of salt marshes to sequester carbon over the long term.

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Sea snail compound reduces cancer risk

The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical.

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Russian scientists develop a smart sorbent for water purification

Scientists of the South Ural State University are engaged in the creation of a multifunctional carbon sorbent. The material will be able to absorb both several types of harmful substances produced in industrial production and selectively sorb individual organic substances. The original sorbent can be targeted at the most hazardous pollutants, the absorption of which will be a priority for it. On t

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Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis

Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts at the University of Stirling.

8h

Amazonas brænder: Er Jordens lunge kollapset?

Regnskoven i Brasilien har snart brændt i flere uger. Ender vi nu med iltmangel og et uoverskueligt CO2-overskud? Det har vi vendt med danske eksperter i biogeokemi og biodiversitet.

8h

100 000 bebisar screenade för hög risk för typ 1-diabetes

Sammanlagt 100 000 nyfödda barn har nu screenats för typ 1-diabetes inom ramen för GPPAD (The Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes), en stor europeisk satsning för att finna barn med hög ärftlig risk att utveckla sjukdomen.

9h

Researchers find elusive protein that could be key to eliminating neglected tropical diseases

Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America.

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Researchers find elusive protein that could be key to eliminating neglected tropical diseases

Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America.

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Mrk 1498 hosts a young and obscured AGN, study finds

An international team of astronomers has found that the giant radio galaxy (GRG) Mrk 1498 has a more complex nuclear structure than previously thought. By analyzing multi-wavelength observations of Mrk 1498, a young and obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) has been identified in the center of this galaxy. The study is detailed in a paper published August 16 on arXiv.org.

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Peru's ancient water systems can help protect communities from shortages caused by climate change

Water is essential for human life, but in many parts of the world water supplies are under threat from more extreme, less predictable weather conditions due to climate change. Nowhere is this clearer than in the Peruvian Andes, where rising temperatures and receding glaciers forewarn of imminent water scarcity for the communities that live there.

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3-D printed salt template for bioresorbable bone implants

With the help of a 3-D printed salt template, ETH researchers have succeeded in producing magnesium scaffolds with structured porosity that are suitable for bioresorbable bone implants.

9h

First direct evidence for a mantle plume origin of Jurassic flood basalts in southern Africa

The origin of gigantic magma eruptions that led to global climatic crises and extinctions of species has remained controversial. Two competing paradigms explain these cataclysms, either by the splitting of tectonic plates at the Earth's surface or by the impacts of hot currents, called mantle plumes, from the planetary interior. A group of geochemists from Finland and Mozambique suggests they have

9h

Risk factors that predict a dog's fear at the vet

A new study led by researchers from the University of Adelaide has found up to 40 percent of owners report their pet dogs are scared while being examined by a vet while, globally, up to one in seven dogs to show severe or extreme fear during an examination.

9h

Review: Rad Power Bikes RadRunner Is a Comfy, Utility-Minded E-Bike

Rad Power’s latest ride is a heavy, affordable electric cruiser.

9h

After Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, Everything Changes

The release of Episode IX not only signals the end of the Skywalker saga but also spurs a whole new notion of just what Star Wars is.

9h

See How LA Belches Emissions, Block by Block

Researchers quantify the emissions of every road and building in the nearly 5,000 square miles of the Los Angeles metro area. Your city could be next.

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The Search for Truth in Physics

How close can physics bring us to a truly fundamental understanding of the world? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Risk factors that predict a dog's fear at the vet

A new study led by researchers from the University of Adelaide has found up to 40 percent of owners report their pet dogs are scared while being examined by a vet while, globally, up to one in seven dogs to show severe or extreme fear during an examination.

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Øjenvidner: Sådan skød vi med kanon på Ostenfeld og Kampsax

I begyndelsen af 1970'erne knaldede de studerende livligt på kollegierne i Lyngby

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Deducing the scale of tsunamis from the 'roundness' of deposited gravel

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Ritsumeikan University have found a link between the "roundness" distribution of tsunami deposits and how far tsunamis reach inland. They sampled the "roundness" of gravel from different tsunamis in Koyadori, Japan, and found a common, abrupt change in composition approximately 40 percent of the "inundation distance" from the shoreline, regardless

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Scientists analyze 3-D model of proteins from disease-causing bacteria

Millions of people are affected by the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacterium, which can cause sinus infections, middle ear infections and more serious life-threatening diseases, like pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Up to forty percent of the population are carriers of this bacterium.

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Appearance of male and female cycad on Isle of Wight an indicator of global warming

Several representatives of the Ventnor Botanic Garden (VBG) have spoken with the press recently about the unusual appearance of male and female cycad (Cycas revoluta) in an outdoor setting in the U.K. The primitive palm-like tree is found in many locations around the world, but tends only to produce male and female cones in warm climates. Representatives with the VBG also noted that a male of the

9h

Scientists analyze 3-D model of proteins from disease-causing bacteria

Millions of people are affected by the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacterium, which can cause sinus infections, middle ear infections and more serious life-threatening diseases, like pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Up to forty percent of the population are carriers of this bacterium.

9h

Invasive mosquitoes use ‘time-capsule’ eggs to move north

Asian tiger mosquitoes at the northern limit of their current range are using time-capsule-like eggs to survive cold conditions than those of their native territory, researchers report. When the Asian tiger mosquito ( Aedes albopictus ) arrived in the United States in the 1980s, it took the invasive blood-sucker only one year to spread from Houston to St. Louis. The northern mosquitoes have adapt

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Appearance of male and female cycad on Isle of Wight an indicator of global warming

Several representatives of the Ventnor Botanic Garden (VBG) have spoken with the press recently about the unusual appearance of male and female cycad (Cycas revoluta) in an outdoor setting in the U.K. The primitive palm-like tree is found in many locations around the world, but tends only to produce male and female cones in warm climates. Representatives with the VBG also noted that a male of the

9h

Can't get thinner than this: synthesis of atomically flat boron sheets

Since its rediscovery and characterization in 2004, graphene has been the focus of countless research efforts across multiple fields. It is a versatile material consisting of a two-dimensional (2-D) carbon network, a thin sheet of carbon that has a thickness of one atom. Graphene is not only stronger than the strongest steels, but also has a myriad of interesting chemical, electronic, and mechanic

9h

Development for all: a better solution for Papua

Racial abuse of Papuan students in Surabaya, East Java, has sparked massive protests across the country and riots in Manokwari and Sorong, two big cities in the country's easternmost part, Papua.

9h

Researchers develop practical method for measuring quantum entanglement

Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have helped develop a new technique for quantifying entanglement that has major implications for developing the next generation of technology in computing, simulation, secure communication and other fields. The researchers outlined their new method for measuring entanglement in a recent Nature Communications article.

9h

Don’t cherry pick your experts

The appeal to authority fallacy is one of the most common logical fallacies in internet debates. It is a favorite tactic among climate change deniers, anti-vaccers, young earth creationists, and pretty much anyone else who rejects “mainstream” science. I previously … Continue reading →

9h

Trump’s Trade War Isn’t Just a US–China Problem

As companies explore manufacturing options outside China, the countries that stand to gain most from new business might still lose in the end.

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India Develops the World's First Iron-ion Battery

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Gene editing tool could treat many diseases created by mutations

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Scientists isolate genes affecting the quality of wheat grains

A team of scientists from the Institute of Biology of Tyumen State University and universities of Kazakhstan and Australia studied the factors that affect the quality of wheat grains. Two groups of genes that control the synthesis of gluten proteins turn out to have a considerable affect the quality of wheat dough. The work will help make wheat more eco-friendly and healthy. The article was publis

9h

Scientists isolate genes affecting the quality of wheat grains

A team of scientists from the Institute of Biology of Tyumen State University and universities of Kazakhstan and Australia studied the factors that affect the quality of wheat grains. Two groups of genes that control the synthesis of gluten proteins turn out to have a considerable affect the quality of wheat dough. The work will help make wheat more eco-friendly and healthy. The article was publis

9h

Without microglia, mouse brains don’t form Alzheimer’s plaques

A new way to forestall Alzheimer’s disease in a laboratory setting could one day help in devising targeted drugs that prevent it. Researchers found that when they removed brain immune cells known as microglia from rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid plaques—the hallmark pathology of Alzheimer’s—never formed. Previous research has shown most Alzheimer’s risk genes are turned on in t

9h

NASA's BITSE solar scope is ready for balloon flight over New Mexico

NASA and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, or KASI, are getting ready to test a new way to see the Sun, high over the New Mexico desert.

9h

Small skulls point to human migration highway to Australia

Human remains discovered on Alor island in Indonesia offer new insight into human migration through Southeast Asia thousands of years ago, say researchers from The Australian National University (ANU).

9h

New process advances the field of carbon utilization

In an effort to develop sustainable solutions to humanity's energy needs, many scientists are studying carbon capture and utilization—the practice of using excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere or from point sources, instead of fossil fuels, to synthesize chemicals used to make everyday products, from plastics to fuels to pharmaceuticals.

9h

Image: Hubble captures dynamic dying star

This atmospheric image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows a dark, gloomy scene in the constellation of Gemini (the Twins). The subject of this image confused astronomers when it was first studied—rather than being classified as a single object, it was instead recorded as two objects, owing to its symmetrical lobed structure (known as NGC 2371 and NGC 2372, though sometimes referr

9h

Image: X-raying a galaxy's stellar remnants

This colourful spread of light specks is in fact a record of extremely powerful phenomena taking place in a galaxy known as Messier 83, or M83. Located some 15 million light-years away, M83 is a barred spiral galaxy, not dissimilar in shape from our own Milky Way, and currently undergoing a spur of star formation, with a handful of new stars being born every year.

9h

Scientists shed new light on mystery origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray hotspot

Among many particles arriving from outer space, there are ones with the extremely high energy that travel at nearly the speed of light, which is equivalent of a baseball thrown at a speed of 100 meters per second. New hypothesis for origin of those ultra-high-energy particles has been proposed, thus drawing particular attention from all over the world.

9h

Matematisk modell förutsäger moralisk utveckling

G år det att skapa vetenskapliga modeller som förutsäger moralisk normförändring i framtiden? – Absolut, det är en sådan modell vi just har skapat, säger Pontus Strimling, forskningsledare på Institutet för framtidsstudier. Vår studie visar att det helt avgörande för vilka åsikter som vinner mark är sambandet mellan en viss moraluppfattning och vilken typ av argument som anförs till dess försvar.

10h

Iceland grieving a dead glacier could help us better face the climate crisis

People gather to commemorate the loss of 700 year old glacier Okjokull. (STR/EPA/) Death certificates and commemorative plaques aren't something you'd normally associate with a glacier. But that is exactly how Iceland recently mourned the loss of 700-year-old Okjökull, the first of its major glaciers to die . This is just one early example of events we will encounter more and more often as the ho

10h

Image of the Day: Spider Sex

Funnel-web spiders change the timing of their distinct courtship behavior depending on what microbes they're carrying.

10h

Internationale studerende kløjes i gruppearbejde og mundtlige eksaminer

Sproget er ikke den eneste udfordring for udenlandske studerende, der følger engelsksprogede kurser…

10h

Apple Contractors Reportedly Listened To Over 1,000 Siri Recordings Per Shift

The vast majority of Siri users had no idea that some of their recordings were being listened to by contractors in what Apple said was an attempt to make its digital assistant services better. …

10h

Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic

Modern flamingoes employ filter feeding and their feces is, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically small aquatic prey. Very similar contents are described from more than 150-million-year-old …

10h

New scientific model can predict moral and political development

How come today's conservatives are more liberal than yesterday's liberals? Why has public opinion in large parts of the world shifted so rapidly in favour of gay and lesbian rights, but been …

10h

Amazon fires explained: what are they, why are they so damaging, and how can we stop them?

Imagine a rainforest at dawn—the tall canopy laden with dripping ferns and orchids, tree trunks covered in spongy mosses and lichens, and the morning mist only slowly burning away as the sun rises. While there is fuel everywhere, it seems unimaginable that such humid ecosystems could ever catch fire.

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How we can keep our planet cool even as A/C use rises

On June 28, 2019, record temperatures were recorded in the French department of le Gard, rising above the 45°C (113°F) mark for the first time in France. Less than a month later a second heat wave hit, pushing temperatures in Paris and other cities to highs never seen before.

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False Memories and Fake News

Here’s yet another reminder that our memories are reconstructed fabrications our brains use to reinforce existing narratives. A new study of 3,140 participants finds that exposing people to fake news created false memories of the depicted events in about half of subjects. What the researchers did specifically was show people in Ireland prior to the 2018 referendum on abortion, six news stories, t

10h

Stealth glider made out of special polymer self-destructs in sunlight

A polymer that breaks down in sunlight has been used to create a glider that can transport objects behind enemy lines at night, then disappear without a trace

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It's not just Brazil's Amazon rainforest that's ablaze – Bolivian fires are threatening people and wildlife

Up to 800,000 hectares of the unique Chiquitano forest were burned to the ground in Bolivia between August 18 and August 23. That's more forest than is usually destroyed across the country in two years. Experts say that it will take at least two centuries to repair the ecological damage done by the fires, while at least 500 species are said to be at risk from the flames.

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Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic

Modern flamingos employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. Very similar contents are described from more than 150-million-year-old pterosaur droppings in a recent paper in PeerJ. This represents the first direct evidence of filter-feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs and demonstrates that their diet and feeding environment were si

10h

New scientific model can predict moral and political development

How come today's conservatives are more liberal than yesterday's liberals? Why has public opinion in large parts of the world shifted so rapidly in favour of gay and lesbian rights, but been virtually unchanged on other contested issues such as abortion rights? A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critica

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How we discovered UK shale gas reserves are at least 80% smaller than thought

Over the past decade, the UK has tentatively begun to exploit its reserves of shale gas through a process best known as "fracking". But according to our new research, UK shale gas reserves are substantially lower than previously thought—in fact, the amount of shale gas available may be just one sixth of the current official estimate.

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From crystals to glasses: a new unified theory for heat transport

Theoretical physicists from SISSA and the University of California at Davis have developed a new approach to heat transport in materials, which finally allows crystals, polycrystalline solids, alloys and glasses to be treated on the same solid footing. It opens the way to the numerical simulation of the thermal properties of a vast class of materials in important fields such as energy saving, conv

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Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic

Modern flamingoes employ filter feeding and their feces is, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically small aquatic prey. Very similar contents are described from more than 150-million-year-old pterosaur droppings, according to a recent paper in PeerJ. This represents the first direct evidence of filter-feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs and demonstrates that their diet and feeding environm

10h

A toxic truth: lead exposure problems linger in soil, air

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan—which began in 2014 but to this day has not been completely resolved—brought the public health and economic costs of lead exposure into sharp focus. The crisis sparked conversations about environmental justice and raised awareness about the impacts of lead in water in particular.

11h

Woman Gives Birth to Twins — 11 Weeks Apart

The chances of the pregnancy were 1 in 50 million.

11h

Many Teens Are Using Ultra-Potent 'Marijuana Concentrates'

Sometimes known as "butane hash oil," "dab," "wax," or "shatter," marijuana concentrates typically contain three times more THC than the dried marijuana flower.

11h

One Number Shows Something Is Fundamentally Wrong with Our Conception of the Universe

Here's what's going on with the discrepancies in cosmic expansion measurements.

11h

What Sci-Fi Can Teach Computer Science About Ethics

Schools are adding ethics classes to their computer-science curricula. The reading assignments: science fiction.

11h

Ask the Know-It-Alls: How Do Machines Learn?

Don’t get swept away by the hype: Machine learning doesn’t make computers anything like people. No matter how "smart" they get, they still need us.

11h

OpenAI Said Its Code Was Risky. Two Grads Re-Created It Anyway

The artificial intelligence lab cofounded by Elon Musk said its software could too easily be adapted to crank out fake news.

11h

Lambda School's For-Profit Plan to Solve Student Debt

The online institution offers a coding education in exchange for a share of post-graduation income. Does this tuition model benefit students—or investors?

11h

This 8-Minute Galactic Primer Is the Future of AR Education

Can augmented reality help children with reading skills? Boring math lessons? Chris Milk and the team at Within believes it can.

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I Tried to Become a Musician Using Apps and a Light-Up Piano

This musically challenged guinea pig is going to become an artist—or at least record one (sort of) song.

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I Gooped Myself

I t was a Tuesday afternoon in early summer when I realized that I was the person in the office who stank. Not “smelled a little ripe,” not “could use a shower,” but stank . An aroma was emanating from deep within my body. As the afternoon sun strained the building’s air-conditioning and my odor situation deteriorated, I furtively sniffed at myself and began running through a list of things that

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Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend’s Son Is Impossible

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am 38 years old and have been dating my boyfriend for a year and a half, during which time he has gone through a divorce and begun co-parenting with his ex. We have lived together for a year in my home. He h

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Can consumers save the planet by just buying green?

Buying green is getting more and more popular, but is it enough to solve the sustainability problem? Lewis Akenji from the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Finland puts it bluntly:

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The hidden costs of food waste

We've all been there before. We rummage around our fridge to find those long-forgotten strawberries we bought days ago. Our intentions were good. We really did intend to eat them, but now they've been colonized by an unappetizing mold. Alas, the time has come to bid farewell to the snack that should have been but never was. With a final glance, we toss them in the trash for good.

11h

The Hidden Figure in Climate Science

John Tyndall is credited with the link between carbon dioxide and climate—but Eunice Newton Foote got there first — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sjöar blir mindre bruna om lövskog får ersätta barrskog

Att sjöar, bäckar, åar och älvar färgas bruna beror på att järn och organiskt material läcker från den omgivande marken ut i vattnet. Det är en naturlig process och ingenting som är unikt för Sverige; bruna vatten är vanliga på hela norra halvklotet. Men de senaste årtiondena har färgen ökat kraftigt och allt fler sjöar och vattendrag har blivit märkbart bruna. Om ingenting görs kommer vattnet sa

11h

The menopause: why so little research on the middle-aged ovary?

Even the way a woman’s decline in oestrogen relates to her symptoms is a mystery, scientists say When Elena Sanchez-Heras realised the menopause was upon her, she did what she always does when faced with a biological unknown. “I’m a scientist,” she said. “I’ve been trained when you encounter a problem and want to figure it out, you go and seek out original sources.” Sanchez-Heras, now 56, is a ce

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The Hidden Figure in Climate Science

John Tyndall is credited with the link between carbon dioxide and climate—but Eunice Newton Foote got there first — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Opinion: Treat U.S. gun violence as a disease

As a pediatrician who works in an emergency department, I am reminded daily of how firearm violence impacts my patients and our communities. In many of the hospitals where I and my fellow physicians work, firearm violence is as ingrained as the scrubs we wear and the stretchers that wheel into our emergency departments every day.

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Mysterious Neutrinos Get New Mass Estimate

Cosmic calculations suggest how massive nature’s lightest matter particle could be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China’s Playbook in Hong Kong Is Also Working in the Asia-Pacific

The ongoing protests in Hong Kong have captivated the world, prompting speculation of another brutal Tiananmen-like government crackdown. Rather than viewing Hong Kong merely through the lens of a China problem, however, it may make more sense to see it in the context of the broader Asia-Pacific region. The “one country, two systems” arrangement, under which Hong Kong has been administered by Bei

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NASA's AIRS maps carbon monoxide from Brazil fires

New data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, aboard the Aqua satellite, shows the movement high in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide associated with fires in the Amazon region of Brazil.

11h

Mysterious Neutrinos Get New Mass Estimate

Cosmic calculations suggest how massive nature’s lightest matter particle could be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Researchers use DNA in seawater to monitor scallop reproduction

Researchers from the University of Maine and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences have developed a method for studying the timing of scallop spawning by analyzing the environmental DNA found in water samples.

11h

Why we need to get back to Venus

Just next door, cosmologically speaking, is a planet almost exactly like Earth. It's about the same size, is made of about the same stuff and formed around the same star.

11h

Wildfires west of the Cascades: Rare, but large and severe

Most of us think of wildfire in Washington state as something that happens east of the mountains. There's a reason for that: more than 99 percent of wildfires in the last 40 years have been east of the Cascade Crest.

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Researchers use DNA in seawater to monitor scallop reproduction

Researchers from the University of Maine and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences have developed a method for studying the timing of scallop spawning by analyzing the environmental DNA found in water samples.

11h

The Problem With MRIs for Low Back Pain

Over two decades, the use of magnetic resonance imaging and other high-tech scans for low back pain increased by 50 percent in developed countries. Medical societies have launched campaigns to convince physicians and patients to forgo the unnecessary images, to little avail. Why is imaging so common?

11h

Winning team pockets $15 mn in final of eSports spectacular

More than 600,000 people watched captivated online and thousands packed a downtown Shanghai arena to see team OG take home a life-changing chunk of an eSports-record $34.3 million prize pool …

11h

»Jeg er blevet den ingeniør, jeg gerne vil være«

PLUS. Under sit ingeniørstudium opdagede Peter Ladegaard Larsen, at han manglede det praktiske håndelag, hvis han skulle arbejde med produktudvikling. Så gik han i lære som finmekaniker.

12h

Kunder hos Mastercard fik lagt personlige oplysninger på nettet

Personlig information på Mastercards såkaldte Priceless Specials-kunder i Belgien og Tyskland blev fredag lagt på nettet efter læk.

12h

Klinefelter syndrome: many men have an extra X chromosome – but it is rarely diagnosed

The genetic condition is one of the most common in the UK and may be a leading cause of infertility in men. Why does it so often go untreated? Three years ago, Paul (not his real name), now 31, went to the doctor with stomach pains. His blood test came back with low testosterone levels. “We went to see a urologist and he said bluntly that we wouldn’t have any options to have kids with my sperm – w

12h

Former NCI postdoc faked data from nearly 60 experiments

A former postdoc at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) made up data for 59 experiments that never happened, according to new findings by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity. The ORI found that Rahul Agrawal “knowingly, intentionally, and/or recklessly falsified and/or fabricated:” qRT-PCR data in fifty-nine (59) Excel files by: — conceiving Cycle Threshold … Continue reading

12h

Elizabeth Warren’s Radical Idea

Elizabeth Warren could well win the Democratic presidential nomination. An Iowa Starting Line poll from mid-August showed the Massachusetts senator with a commanding lead over the other candidates in the first caucus state. Her poll numbers are strong in New Hampshire, too. At the Iowa State Fair this month, she spoke to a crowd of thousands, and she has built one of the best organizing structure

12h

The Next Recession Will Destroy Millennials

The trade war is dragging on. The yield curve is inverting. Investors are fleeing to safety. Global growth is slowing. The stock market is dipping. The Millennials are screwed. Recessions are never good for anyone. A sputtering economy means miserable financial, emotional, and physical-health consequences for everyone from infants to retirees. But the next one—if it happens, when it starts happen

12h

GeoBits: The Astounding Volcanism of Other Worlds

The volcanoes on other worlds make our wildest fire mountains look positively tame — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Brazil's Plans for Gene-Edited Cows Got Scrapped—Here's Why

The country was going to breed a herd of genetically dehorned cows. Then errors in the cows' DNA cropped up.

12h

Techtopia #120: Højttalere som lytter men ikke aflytter

Smarte højttalere fra Google, Apple og Amazon nøjes ikke med at lytte til dig, de aflytter dig også.

12h

Scientists in Italy fertilize 7 northern white rhino eggs

Silvia Colleoni's hand holding a syringe was trembling as she injected liquid into a micro pipette to facilitate the aspiration of sperm that had been removed and later frozen from one of the last then-living male northern white rhinos on Earth.

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Scientists in Italy fertilize 7 northern white rhino eggs

Eggs removed from the last two female northern white rhinos have been fertilized with sperm from the now-dead last male, but it will be about 10 days before it's known whether the eggs have become embryos, an Italian assisted-breeding company said Monday.

12h

International Space Station crew relocates Soyuz capsule

The crew of the International Space Station has successfully relocated a Soyuz space capsule to another docking port to facilitate the rendezvous with another spacecraft.

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Få meters præcision: Nye GPS-satellitter sendt i kredsløb

PLUS. Den anden af i alt ti nye GPS-satellitter er netop sat sendt i kredsløb om Jorden. Den næste generation af GPS-satelliter gør det globale positioneringsystem mere nøjagtigt og sværere at snyde.

12h

From crystals to glasses: a new unified theory for heat transport

Theoretical physicists from SISSA and the UCDavis lay brand new foundations to heat transport in materials, which finally allow crystals, polycrystalline solids, alloys, and glasses to be treated on the same solid footing. This feat opens the way to numerical simulation of thermal properties of a vast class of materials that are key in important technologies and even in the planetary sciences. The

12h

Novel method identifies the right individual exosomes

There is a growing demand for diagnostic markers for early disease detection and prognosis. Exosomes are potential biomarkers for cancer progression and neurodegenerative disease but it can be difficult to identify what tissue a specific exosome comes from. Researchers at Uppsala University and spin-off company Vesicode AB have solved this problem by developing a method that maps surface protein c

12h

Childhood cancer survivors at elevated risk of heart disease

Survivors of childhood cancer have higher risk of developing various types of heart disease due to cancer therapy, compared to peers who are cancer-free. Most studies of this survivor group have focused only on heart failure as a result of cancer therapy.

12h

New technique gives polyurethane waste a second life

Polyurethane is used in a wide range of materials, including paints, foam mattresses, seat cushions and insulation. These diverse applications generate large amounts of waste. A team at the University of Illinois has developed a method to break down polyurethane waste and turn it into other useful products.

12h

Disappearing act: Device vanishes on command after military missions (video)

A polymer that self-destructs? Once a fictional idea, polymers now exist that are rugged enough to ferry packages or sensors into hostile territory and vaporize immediately upon a military mission's completion. The material has been made into a rigid-winged glider and a nylon-like parachute fabric. It could also be used someday in building materials or environmental sensors. The researchers will p

12h

Remodeling unhealthful gut microbiomes to fight disease

You are what you eat — right down to the microbiome living in your gut. Today, scientists will report the development of molecules that can change, or remodel, unhealthful gut microbiomes in mice into more healthful ones. The research could also someday be applied to other conditions related to diet. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Me

12h

Producing protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns. By using synthetic polypeptides and other polymers, researchers have taken the first steps toward constructing electrodes for such power so

12h

Making polyurethane degradable gives its components a second life

Polyurethane waste is piling up, but scientists have a possible solution: They have developed a method to make polyurethane degradable. Once the original product's useful life is over, the polymer can easily be dissolved into ingredients to make new products such as superglue. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

12h

Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores — without the 'achoo!' (video)

In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. Even better, these treated particles don't trigger allergies. The researchers wi

12h

New way to bump off ticks: Dry up their saliva (video)

Saliva from a tick's bite can transmit pathogens that cause serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease, and significant agricultural losses. Scientists have been seeking new ways to prevent these pesky arachnids from spreading pathogens. Now, researchers report that compounds they previously identified can dry up ticks' saliva by upsetting the balance of ions in the tick salivary gland. The researche

12h

Flame retardants — from plants

Flame retardants are present in thousands of everyday items, from clothing to furniture to electronics. Although these substances can help prevent fire-related injuries and deaths, they could have harmful effects on human health and the environment. Today, scientists report potentially less toxic, biodegradable flame retardants from an unlikely source: plants. The researchers will present their re

12h

Inhibitory protein puts a lid on an epigenetic marker

Nature, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02521-8 Two reports examine how a protein complex that adds transcription-repressing marks to histone proteins is potently inhibited by the protein EZHIP during the maturation of sperm and egg cells and in a type of brain cancer.

12h

Lithium: the gripping history of a psychiatric success story

Nature, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02480-0 The treatment for bipolar disorder was discovered through an unlikely route. Douwe Draaisma praises an account of it.

12h

Quantum localization and delocalization of charge carriers in organic semiconducting crystals

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11775-9 Existing transport models for organic semiconductors are limited in their ability to accurately describe the transport mechanisms in these materials. Here, the authors report the fragment-orbital based surface hopping method for predicting charge transport in crystalline organic semiconductors.

12h

Engineered CRISPRa enables programmable eukaryote-like gene activation in bacteria

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11479-0 CRISPR activation strategies in bacteria are limited due to the reliance on σ70 promoters. Here the authors demonstrate eukaryote-like gene activation with high dynamic ranges using σ54- dependent promoters.

12h

Author Correction: The role of energy storage in deep decarbonization of electricity production

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11778-6

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Profiling surface proteins on individual exosomes using a proximity barcoding assay

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11486-1 The use of antibodies to capture and profile exosomes limits the number of target proteins that can be detected. Here the authors develop a proximity-dependent barcoding assay that allows profiling of 38 surface proteins on individual exosomes from heterogeneous samples such as serum and seminal fluid.

12h

Carbon dioxide electroreduction to C2 products over copper-cuprous oxide derived from electrosynthesized copper complex

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11599-7 Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide is attractive for obtaining multicarbon products, but conversion efficiency is low. Here the authors use copper complex materials for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to ethanol and acetic acid with high efficiencies and activities.

12h

Uncovering the biosynthetic potential of rare metagenomic DNA using co-occurrence network analysis of targeted sequences

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11658-z Soil microorganisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules. Here, the authors present a targeted sequencing workflow that reconstructs the clustered organization of biosynthetic domains in metagenomic libraries from amplicon data, thus guiding the discovery of novel metabolites from rare members of the soil

12h

A conserved regulatory program initiates lateral plate mesoderm emergence across chordates

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11561-7 Numerous tissues are derived from the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) but how this is specified is unclear. Here, the authors identify a pan-LPM reporter activity found in the zebrafish draculin (drl) gene that also shows transgenic activity in LPM-corresponding territories of several chordates, including chicken

12h

Fermi level-tuned optics of graphene for attocoulomb-scale quantification of electron transfer at single gold nanoparticles

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11816-3 Measurement of single-molecule level electron transfer is restricted by detection limits in nanoampere to picoampere ranges. Here the authors develop graphene-based electrochemical microscopy to attain an attoampere-level detection limit for faraday current at single nanoparticles.

12h

How to defeat the disease that killed half the people who ever lived

Malaria is humanity's greatest scourge. But genetic technologies that threaten to send mosquitoes extinct are problematic, and no substitute for practical action now

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fMRI indicates cortical activation through TRPV1 modulation during acute gouty attacks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48656-6

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Prevalence and diversity of Bartonella species in small rodents from coastal and continental areas

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48715-y

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Effect of Protease Inhibitors in Healing of the Vaginal Wall

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48527-0

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Nuclear weapons and hurricanes don't mix, NOAA advises

President Donald Trump reportedly suggested bombing hurricanes before they made landfall.

13h

Deformed Skulls Mark a Historic Migration Into Europe

Human remains found in Croatia with signs of artificial cranial deformation provide the earliest genetic evidence of the presence of people from East Asia in Europe.

13h

Why Doctors Still Offer Treatments That May Not Help

Evidence-based medicine has made progress since doctors’ infamous bloodletting of George Washington, but less than you might think.

13h

Do Plants Have Something to Say?

One scientist is definitely listening.

13h

There’s no doubt that Brazil’s fires are caused by deforestation, scientists say

Number of blazes has almost doubled compared with last year, satellite data show

13h

Elizabeth Warren Manages to Woo the Democratic Establishment

SAN FRANCISCO—Joe Biden is ostensibly the candidate of the Democratic establishment. But it was Elizabeth Warren—who’s built her career on trying to challenge the status quo—who spent the weekend wowing party insiders. At this point in Warren’s campaign, it’s not a surprise anymore when she spends hours working a “selfie line” after a major event, as she did following two massive rallies she’s he

13h

China’s Spies Are on the Offensive

In early 2017, Kevin Mallory was struggling financially. After years of drawing a government salary as a member of the military and as a CIA and Defense Intelligence Agency officer, he was behind on his mortgage and $230,000 in debt . Though he had, like many veteran intelligence officials, ventured into the private sector, where the pay can be considerably better, things still weren’t going well

13h

Study Questions Mainstay Treatment For Mild Asthma

Many of the 26 million Americans with asthma use a low-dose steroid inhaler daily to prevent symptoms. But a recent study raises questions about this strategy for people with mild, persistent asthma. (Image credit: hsyncoban/Getty Images)

13h

New way to bump off ticks: Dry up their saliva

Saliva from a tick's bite can transmit pathogens that cause serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease, and significant agricultural losses. Current insecticides have drawbacks, so scientists have been seeking new ways to prevent these pesky arachnids from spreading pathogens. Now, researchers report that compounds they previously identified can dry up ticks' saliva by upsetting the balance of ions i

13h

Flame retardants—from plants

Flame retardants are present in thousands of everyday items, from clothing to furniture to electronics. Although these substances can help prevent fire-related injuries and deaths, they could have harmful effects on human health and the environment. Of particular concern are those known as organohalogens, which are derived from petroleum. Today, scientists report potentially less toxic, biodegrada

13h

Making polyurethane degradable gives its components a second life

Polyurethane waste is piling up in landfills, but scientists have a possible solution: They have developed a method to make polyurethane degradable. Once the original product's useful life is over, the polymer can easily be dissolved into ingredients to make new products such as superglue. These polyurethanes could also be used in microscopic capsules that break open to release cargo such as bioci

13h

Disappearing act: Device vanishes on command after military missions

A polymer that self-destructs? While once a fictional idea, new polymers now exist that are rugged enough to ferry packages or sensors into hostile territory and vaporize immediately upon a military mission's completion. The material has been made into a rigid-winged glider and a nylon-like parachute fabric for airborne delivery across distances of a hundred miles or more. It could also be used so

13h

Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores—without the 'achoo!'

In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can grab on to pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. Even better, these treated particles don't trigger allergies.

13h

New way to bump off ticks: Dry up their saliva

Saliva from a tick's bite can transmit pathogens that cause serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease, and significant agricultural losses. Current insecticides have drawbacks, so scientists have been seeking new ways to prevent these pesky arachnids from spreading pathogens. Now, researchers report that compounds they previously identified can dry up ticks' saliva by upsetting the balance of ions i

13h

Producing protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns. By using synthetic polypeptides—which make up proteins —- and other polymers, researchers have taken the first steps toward constructing el

13h

New technique gives polyurethane waste a second life

Polyurethane is used in a wide range of materials, including paints, foam mattresses, seat cushions and insulation. These diverse applications generate large amounts of waste. A team at the University of Illinois has developed a method to break down polyurethane waste and turn it into other useful products.

13h

Første patentansøgning fra kunstig intelligens

Britiske forskere har brugt en kunstig intelligens til at udvikle to nye produkter og søgt om patenter på vegne af den kunstige intelligens.

13h

Facial recognition specialist Megvii plans share sale

The creator of the Face++ system has filed papers to prepare for a Hong Kong flotation.

13h

Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay

A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay—it's likely to expand its territory.

13h

Topledelse i sundhedsvæsenet: Flere kvinder bør på banen

Når antallet af kvinder i topledelsen er så begrænset, hvorfor ændrer beslutningstagerne så ikke blot blandingsforholdet. Forklaringen skal søges i fravær af neutralitet i vores bedømmelser af mænd og kvinder samt i en tilsyneladende grundfæstet manglende vilje til at ændre på balancerne, skriver Lars Muusmann m.fl.

13h

Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay

A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay—it's likely to expand its territory.

13h

Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay

A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay—it's likely to expand its territory.

13h

Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay

A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay — it's likely to expand its territory. A new study from UC Riverside supports the theory that the new tumbleweed grows more vigorously than its progenitors because it is a hybrid with doubled pairs of its parents' chromosomes.

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One reason mouse studies often don’t translate to humans very well

Mouse models are often used as preclinical models of human disease, but the number of drugs that succeed in mice but go on to be approved as a drug for humans is only about one in ten. A new study comparing gene expression in the cells of human brains with those of mouse brains provides new insight into why.

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Augmented reality glasses may help people with low vision better navigate their environment

Nearly one in 30 Americans over the age of 40 experience low vision—significant visual impairment that can't be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, medication or surgery.

14h

A lack of background knowledge can hinder reading comprehension

The purpose of going to school is to learn, but students may find certain topics difficult to understand if they don't have the necessary background knowledge. This is one of the conclusions …

14h

CITES votes to ban trade in two endangered otter species

A trade ban is looming for two endangered otter species after some 100 countries voted to increase protections following a social-media fuelled craze for acquiring the silky mammals as pets.

15h

Thick smoke chokes Brazil's north as Amazon fires rage

Blackened tree trunks lay smoldering on the charred ground as thick smoke chokes the Amazon rainforest in Brazil, a scene of devastation that is being repeated across the "lungs of the planet."

15h

CITES votes to ban trade in endangered otters

Over 100 countries voted Sunday to ban the trade in the smooth-coated otter and placed it on the CITES most endangered list.

15h

A lack of background knowledge can hinder reading comprehension

The purpose of going to school is to learn, but students may find certain topics difficult to understand if they don't have the necessary background knowledge. This is one of the conclusions of a research article published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

15h

Urban living leads to high cholesterol… in crows

Animals that do well in urban areas tend to be the ones that learn to make use of resources such as the food humans throw away. But is our food actually good for them? A new study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that a diet of human foods such as discarded cheeseburgers might be giving American Crows living in urban areas higher blood cholesterol levels than their rur

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Urban living leads to high cholesterol… in crows

Animals that do well in urban areas tend to be the ones that learn to make use of resources such as the food humans throw away. But is our food actually good for them? A new study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that a diet of human foods such as discarded cheeseburgers might be giving American Crows living in urban areas higher blood cholesterol levels than their rur

15h

Can you solve it? Drive your car (and brain) round the block

A streetwise puzzle UPDATE: For the solution please click here. Today’s puzzle is a trip. You are in a big city where all the streets go in one of two perpendicular directions. You take your car from its parking place and drive on a tour of the city such that you do not pass through the same intersection twice and return back to where you started. If you made 100 left turns, how many right turns

15h

What is the menopause and when does it strike?

It’s a natural part of the female life cycle – so why don’t we talk more about the menopause, its debilitating effects and possible mitigation? The menopause is when a woman’s fertile period comes to a halt. This is generally a gradual process over months or even years, but technically the menopause is defined as when a woman has gone 12 months without a period. In the UK, the average age for thi

15h

Banana industry on alert after disease arrives in Colombia

It might not be obvious at the supermarket, but the banana industry is fighting to protect the most popular variety of the fruit from a destructive fungus.

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Banana industry on alert after disease arrives in Colombia

It might not be obvious at the supermarket, but the banana industry is fighting to protect the most popular variety of the fruit from a destructive fungus.

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Wildfires Are Turning Important Northern Carbon Sinks Into Major Emitters

The trees aren't really the issue, it's the soil.

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High above Greenland glaciers, NASA looks into melting ocean ice

Skimming low over the gleaming white glaciers on Greenland's coast in a modified 1940s plane, three NASA scientists, led by an Elvis-impersonating oceanographer, waited to drop a probe into the water beneath them.

16h

Whoops! California’s carbon offsets program could extend the life of coal mines.

A new study highlighting the risks of perverse incentives offers the latest evidence that carbon offsets are a deeply flawed way of combating climate change.

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Is there a futurology subreddit that talks about things other than climate change and co2?

If anyone can advise thank you. It's time for me to pull the plug on this place. I don't know if it due to no moderators, moderators complicit in activism over futurology or just plain incompetence. If you can advise of a place that actually talks about FUTUROLOGY tech and science I would appreciate any links. Cheers. submitted by /u/fasting_to_slow_down [link] [comments]

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Forskere vil redde indfangede chimpanser: ’Mange ender som middagsmad’

DNA-landkort skal hjælpe med at bringe chimpanser tilbage til deres hjem i naturen.

17h

City crows may have high cholesterol because they eat fast food

Crows living in urban areas have higher cholesterol than those in rural areas, which may be partly due to fast food they scavenge in cities

17h

Physicists' study demonstrates silicon's energy-harvesting power

A University of Texas at Dallas physicist has teamed with Texas Instruments to design a better way for electronics to convert waste heat into reusable energy. Silicon in the form of nanoblades can harvest thermoelectric energy at a greatly increased rate while remaining mass-producible when combined with integrated circuits.

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A lack of background knowledge can hinder reading comprehension

The purpose of going to school is to learn, but students may find certain topics difficult to understand if they don't have the necessary background knowledge. This is one of the conclusions of a research article published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Physicians slow to use effective new antibiotics against superbugs

New, more effective antibiotics are being prescribed in only about a quarter of infections by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of the world's most intractable drug-resistant bacteria, according to an analysis by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. This sluggish uptake of such high-priority antibiotics prompted the researchers to call for an examina

17h

Tiny RNA provides big protection after a heart attack

Heart muscle can continue to die even after restoring blood following a heart attack, and scientists have new evidence that one way to help it live is by boosting levels of a tiny RNA that helped the heart form.

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Augmented reality glasses may help people with low vision better navigate their environment

In a new study of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease that results in poor vision, Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers found that adapted augmented reality glasses can improve patients' mobility by 50% and grasp performance by 70%.

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New scientific model can predict moral and political development

A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critical questions on how public opinion changes on moral issues. They have created a scientific model that can predict public opinion changes on moral issues.

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Study finds that teens are using a highly potent form of marijuana

Nearly one in four Arizona teens have used a highly potent form of marijuana known as marijuana concentrate, according to a new study by Arizona State University researchers. Among nearly 50,000 eighth, 10th, and 12th graders from the 2018 Arizona Youth Survey, a biennial survey of Arizona secondary school students, one-third (33%) had tried some form of marijuana, and nearly a quarter (24%) had t

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Study: Blood test detects concussion and subconcussive injuries in children and adults

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers at Orlando Health are making new progress in finding ways to detect a traumatic yet sinister brain injury — and getting closer to preventing further damage.

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Are physicians helping cancer survivors live healthy lives?

Study finds that some physicians do not counsel cancer survivors on adopting a healthy lifestyle.

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Shingles vaccination of older adults cost-effective in Canada

Vaccinating older adults against shingles in Canada is likely cost-effective, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), and the Shingrix vaccine appears to provide better protection than the Zostavax vaccine.

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Urban living leads to high cholesterol…in crows

Animals that do well in urban areas tend to be the ones that learn to make use of resources such as the food humans throw away. But is our food actually good for them? A new study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that a diet of human foods such as discarded cheeseburgers might be giving American crows living in urban areas higher blood cholesterol levels than their rur

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Sådan bestemmer du teknisk gæld i dine systemer

Kodeanalyse rangerer vedligeholdelsesbyrden for et system og hjælper blandt andet med beslutninger om modernisering kontra nyudvikling.

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Flystriber skader klimaet mere end flyenes CO2 – og det bliver kun værre

PLUS. Jo koldere udstødning og jo flere sodpartikler, desto oftere dannes der flystriber og cirrusskyer. Og i modsætning til lavereliggende skyer holder de mere varme inde, end de reflekterer ud i rummet.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #34

Story of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… G7 can’t turn a blind eye to ecocide in the Amazon Leaders must ask themselves if Jair Bolsonaro’s destructive attitude to the forest and its peoples should be considered a crime The fires in the world’s largest rainforest have triggered a glo

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The $6 Million Drug Claim

New treatments for rare diseases are changing the lives of patients, but the price can reach millions of dollars for a single person.

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Designing a blood test that can predict lifespan

A recent paper outlines researchers' efforts to design a blood test that can more accurately predict how long an individual has to live.

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Australia plans to block sites hosting extremist content during attacks

The March Christchurch attack increased worries about extremist content online.

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Succession Bores Into the Power of Fear

This post contains major spoilers for Season 2, Episode 3 of Succession . The most recent episode of HBO’s Succession , “Hunting,” will be most remembered for one phrase: “boar on the floor.” That’s the catchy name of the “game” that the Waystar Royco mogul Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox) inflicts on his potentially traitorous underlings, forcing some of them to oink like piggies and scuffle for

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The risks of amoral A.I.

submitted by /u/halfbakedlikeacake [link] [comments]

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Tesla Full Self Driving & The Infamous 80/20 Rule

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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New model shows how buildings could slash their carbon emissions by 80% by 2050

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Musk’s satellite internet could save Americans $30B a year

submitted by /u/KenshiroTheKid [link] [comments]

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Spikes in handgun purchases after high-profile events linked to more firearm injuries

A UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program (VPRP) study, which will publish Aug. 25 in Injury Epidemiology, assessed the sharp rise in handgun purchasing in 2012 after Sandy Hook and the re-election of President Obama, across 499 Californian cities. It estimated whether the excess handgun purchases increased fatal and non-fatal injuries. It found that these spikes in handgun purchases have be

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Author Correction: Distinct modes of mitochondrial metabolism uncouple T cell differentiation and function

Nature, Published online: 26 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1490-y

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Removing cancer's protective barrier could boost immunotherapy treatments

Scientists may have found a way to pull down the protective wall that surrounds tumors, potentially re-exposing them to the killing power of the immune system and immunotherapy treatments, according to a study part funded by Cancer Research UK and published in EBioMedicine today.

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Water scarcity: Five ways to avert a water crisis

In the coming decade, billions could face a critical shortage of water. Here's what we can do about it.

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How diabetes can increase cancer risk: DNA damaged by high blood sugar

For years, scientists have been trying to solve a medical mystery: Why do people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing some forms of cancer? Today, researchers report a possible explanation for this double whammy. They found that DNA sustains more damage and gets fixed less often when blood sugar levels are high, thereby increasing cancer risk.

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