Search Posts

nyheder2019august27

14d

14d

14d

How climate change affects your mental health | Britt Wray

"For all that's ever been said about climate change, we haven't heard nearly enough about the psychological impacts of living in a warming world," says science writer Britt Wray. In this quick talk, she explores how climate change is threatening our well-being — mental, social and spiritual — and offers a starting point for what we can do about it.

14d

Toxicity screening of cosmetics, sunscreens and pharmaceuticals is made easier with microfluidic devices

Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful.

14d

These albino lizards are the world's first gene-edited reptiles

Meet the world's first gene-edited reptiles: albino lizards roughly the size of your index finger. Researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to make the lizards, providing a technique for gene editing outside of major animal models. In their study, publishing August 27 in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers also show that the lizards can successfully pass gene-edited alleles for albinism to their offspri

14d

Atlas of retina genes could help prevent blindness

The world’s most detailed atlas of the genetic code of the human retina could help treat and prevent blindness, researchers report. Here, Raymond Wong, unit head of the cellular reprogramming unit at the Centre for Eye Research Australia and principal investigator in ophthalmology at the University of Melbourne, explains the research: Many different things can cause blindness. Often, it’s related

14d

These albino lizards are the world's first gene-edited reptiles

Meet the world's first gene-edited reptiles: albino lizards roughly the size of your index finger. Researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to make the lizards, providing a technique for gene editing outside of major animal models. In their study, publishing August 27 in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers also show that the lizards can successfully pass gene-edited alleles for albinism to their offspri

14d

Klar til jobsamtale: Lad være med at være dig selv

PLUS. Vil du score drømmejobbet, skal du udelukkende overbevise arbejdsgiveren om, at du er den bedst egnede. Erhvervspsykolog gør op med job-myterne.

14d

14d

Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes

In just three minutes, the laser printing approach can produce a 10×10 cm smart textile patch that's waterproof, stretchable and easily integrated with solar or other sources of power.

14d

Arms race between parasites and their victims

Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. However, only certain species of fish are suitable as hosts. A study now shows how the parasites succeed in preferably infecting these types.

14d

Ancient prescribed-burns could revitalize communities today

In collaboration with tribes in Northern California, researchers examined traditional fire management practices and found that these approaches, if expanded, could strengthen cultures and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern California.

14d

Retina-on-a-chip provides powerful tool for studying eye disease

The development of a retina-on-a-chip, which combines living human cells with an artificial tissue-like system, has been described.

14d

Fat pumps generate electrical power

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ('flips') lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical current may be important for a range of other cell mechanisms, and in this way also for human well-being and health.

14d

A molecular 'Trojan Horse'

The research group has achieved the synthesis of a potential immunosuppressive agent by modification of a naturally occurring compound. In this endeavor, the researchers have employed a masking trick to "hide" a reactive species inside the target molecule.

14d

Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms

When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. This harmful cocktail produces harmful algal blooms, and many of these are toxic to humans and wildlife.

14d

Novel target could halt glioblastoma recurrence in stubborn cells

Scientists have discovered a potential novel target for treating glioblastoma, the deadly brain cancer that took the life of Sen. John McCain and kills 15,000 Americans a year.

14d

Unusual 'quasiparticle' in common 2D material

Researchers have discovered a new quasiparticle named 'polaronic trion' which can enable significant tunability in the optoelectronic properties of prominent 2D material, molybdenum disulphide.

14d

The making of 'Fancy Mouse'

For the past few hundred years, the colorful hair and unique patterns of the so-called 'Fancy Mouse' have made them the stars of pet shows in Japan and beyond. Now, scientists have finally revealed the true cause of the genetic mutation responsible for the iconic black pigmentation in the popular East Asian pet.

14d

Researchers develop affordable, less intensive methane detection protocol

A new testing protocol that uses existing, affordable water chemistry tests can help scientists and regulators detect sites showing evidence of new methane gas leaks caused by oil and gas drilling, according to Penn State researchers.

14d

Kids from disadvantaged neighborhoods more likely to be obese as adults

Children who grow up in disadvantaged neighborhoods are nearly one-third more likely to experience obesity as adults, according to new research from Cornell University.

14d

Would a carbon tax help to innovate more-efficient energy use?

Taxing carbon emissions would drive innovation and lead to improved energy efficiency, according to a new paper published in Joule from Carnegie's Rong Wang (now at Fudan University), Harry Saunders, and Ken Caldeira, along with Juan Moreno-Cruz of the University of Waterloo.

14d

Machine learning increases resolution of eye imaging technology

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for increasing the resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) down to the single micrometer in all directions, even in a living patient. The new technique, called optical coherence refraction tomography (OCRT), could improve medical images obtained in the multibillion-dollar OCT industry affecting medical fields ranging from cardi

14d

Satellite-based estimates of reduced deforestation in protected areas needed

In the context of progressing towards new targets for a post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, the debate remains on whether the emphasis should be on protected area coverage or protected area effectiveness. 'It is worrying that we still know so little about how effective protected areas are, especially in relation to management inputs' says Dr. Eklund from the University of Helsinki.

14d

Cannabis may change autism-linked gene in sperm

A specific gene associated with autism appears to undergo changes in the sperm of men who use marijuana, according to a small study. The gene change occurs through a process called DNA methylation, and it could potentially be passed along to offspring. As reported in the journal Epigenetics , the researchers say the findings do not establish a definitive link between cannabis use and autism, but

14d

Mars Missions Stop in Their Tracks as Red Planet Drifts to the Far Side of Sun

Mars mission managers are dealing with the biggest source of electromagnetic interference in the solar system.

14d

How bees live with bacteria

More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists demand more research on the ecology of these insects.

14d

A new signaling pathway for mTor-dependent cell growth

A team led by the scientist has now discovered how inactivation of a certain lipid kinase promotes mTor complex 1 activity, and may therefore constitute a new point of attack for the treatment of diabetes and cancer.

14d

Biological risk potential of nanoparticles studied

Carbon nanoparticles are a promising tool for biomedical applications, for example for targeted transportation of biologically active compounds into cells. A team of researchers has now examined whether these particles are potentially dangerous for the organism and how cells cope with them once they have been incorporated.

14d

New biosensor provides insight into the stress behavior of plants

Researchers have developed a method with which they can further investigate an important messenger substance in plants — phosphatidic acid. Using a new biosensor, they are able to track the activity of phosphatidic acid spatially and temporally for the first time and thus, investigate plants that are exposed to stress such as salty soils.

14d

Energy-efficient power electronics: Gallium oxide power transistors with record values

Engineers have now achieved a breakthrough with transistors based on gallium oxide (beta-Ga2O3). The newly developed beta-Ga2O3-MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) provide a high breakdown voltage combined with high current conductivity. With a breakdown voltage of 1.8 kilovolts and a record power figure of merit of 155 megawatts per square centimeter, they achieve unique p

14d

Possible treatment on the horizon for severe dengue disease

New study reveals enzyme plays key role in potentially fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock; suggests clinically approved tryptase inhibitor could be key in future targeted treatment.

14d

Memo to Italy’s president: your researchers need you

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02560-1 The collapse of Italy’s coalition government has left researchers vulnerable. The president should use his moral authority with party leaders to make sure that promises of increased funding are kept.

14d

SpaceX Delays Starhopper’s Final Test Flight Once Again

Embarrassing With not even a single second left before takeoff, SpaceX scrubbed Monday’s final test flight of its 20 meters-tall Starship prototype called “Starhopper.” The plan had been to fly to an altitude of almost 500 feet. Shortly after the aborted attempt, Musk confirmed on Twitter that a “wiring/connector issue” may have caused the issue. “Igniters need to be inspected,” Musk added . “We

14d

The dark side of extrasolar planets share surprisingly similar temperatures

A new study by McGill University astronomers has found that the temperature on the nightsides of different hot Jupiters — planets that are similar size in to Jupiter, but orbit other stars — is surprisingly uniform, suggesting the dark sides of these massive gaseous planets have clouds made of minerals and rocks.

14d

Cancer cells' immune weak spot revealed

Scientists have found a vulnerability in cancer cells that could make them more susceptible to being destroyed by the immune system, according to a new report in eLife.

14d

Biological risk potential of nanoparticles studied

Carbon nanoparticles are a promising tool for biomedical applications, for example for targeted transportation of biologically active compounds into cells. A team of researchers has now examined whether these particles are potentially dangerous for the organism and how cells cope with them once they have been incorporated.

14d

Cilia: Cell's long-overlooked antenna that can drive cancer—or stop it in its tracks

You might know that our lungs are lined with hair-like projections called motile cilia. These are tiny microtubule structures that appear on the surface of some cells or tissues. They can be found lining your nose and respiratory tract too, and along the fallopian tubes and vas deferens in the female and male reproductive tracts. They move from side to side to sweep away any micro-organisms, fluid

14d

How worms snare their hosts

Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. However, only certain species of fish are suitable as hosts. A study by the University of Bonn now shows how the parasites succeed in preferably infecting these types. The results will be published in the journal Behaviour, but are already available online.

14d

Fat pumps generate electrical power

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ("flips") lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical current may be important for a range of other cell mechanisms, and in this way also for human well-being and health.

14d

Färre dör i brustet kroppspulsåderbråck

– Vården av patienter med kroppspulsåderbråck i Sverige har revolutionerats de senaste årtiondena, med införsel av screening och skonsammare operationstekniker. Det är glädjande att se att detta har resulterat i en betydligt bättre överlevnad i denna livsfarliga sjukdom, säger professor Kevin Mani, huvudansvarig för studien vid Uppsala universitet. Brusten kroppspulsåder är en åkomma som är direk

14d

Cilia: Cell's long-overlooked antenna that can drive cancer—or stop it in its tracks

You might know that our lungs are lined with hair-like projections called motile cilia. These are tiny microtubule structures that appear on the surface of some cells or tissues. They can be found lining your nose and respiratory tract too, and along the fallopian tubes and vas deferens in the female and male reproductive tracts. They move from side to side to sweep away any micro-organisms, fluid

14d

How worms snare their hosts

Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. However, only certain species of fish are suitable as hosts. A study by the University of Bonn now shows how the parasites succeed in preferably infecting these types. The results will be published in the journal Behaviour, but are already available online.

14d

Fat pumps generate electrical power

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ("flips") lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical current may be important for a range of other cell mechanisms, and in this way also for human well-being and health.

14d

Denmark halts aquaculture development over environment concerns

Denmark said Monday it will stop development of its fish farming industry at sea, which has widely been criticised for its harmful impact on the environment.

14d

Highly-stable water electrolysis catalyst for the production of hydrogen and oxygen

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented noble catalysts for water electrolysis, capable of generating hydrogen and oxygen at the same time. According to the research team, among the catalysts reported so far, these are most stable, easy to make, affordable and have excellent performance.

14d

A molecular 'Trojan Horse'

The research group of Nuno Maulide from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has, in cooperation with the Research Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, achieved the synthesis of a potential immunosuppressive agent by modification of a naturally occurring compound. In this endeavour, the researchers have employed a masking trick to "hide" a react

14d

Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms

When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. This harmful cocktail produces harmful algal blooms, and many of these are toxic to humans and wildlife.

14d

A molecular 'Trojan Horse'

The research group of Nuno Maulide from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has, in cooperation with the Research Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, achieved the synthesis of a potential immunosuppressive agent by modification of a naturally occurring compound. In this endeavour, the researchers have employed a masking trick to "hide" a react

14d

Gene mutations coordinate to drive malignancy in lung cancer

Scientists have shown exactly how mutations in two different genes coordinate to drive the development of malignant lung tumors, according to a new report in the open-access journal eLife.

14d

Arctic permafrost melting will aggravate the greenhouse effect

Scientists from Russia and the United States studied the composition of the deep layers of permafrost in Eastern Siberia to better understand the hazards of permafrost thawing to our planet and its inhabitants. Their findings suggest that the release of organic matter from permafrost will intensify the greenhouse effect. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Geophysical Resea

14d

Greater left ventricular mass increases risk of heart failure

Elevated left ventricular mass, known as left-ventricular hypertrophy, is a stronger predictor of coronary artery disease-related death and heart failure than coronary artery calcium score, according to a new study.

14d

Ship emissions responsible for thousands of premature deaths in China's Pearl River Delta

Ship emissions caused more than 1,200 ozone-related and 2,500 particulate-related premature deaths in the Pearl River Delta region in 2015, according to new research in the AGU journal GeoHealth. The new study also predicts that implementing new coastal emission controls could reduce mortality due to fine particulates by 30 percent and ozone by 10 percent by 2030.

14d

Image: Amazon fires

The Amazon rainforest is burning.

14d

A New Type of Visual Prosthetic

The NIH’s director showcases a project to develop a brain implant that would restore sight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Walmart sagsøger Tesla efter syv solcelle-brande

Supermarkedskæden mener, at Tesla har udvist udstrakt, systematisk uagtsomhed.

14d

Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes

The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics will be laser printed and made in minutes. That's the future imagined by the researchers behind new e-textile technology.

14d

Nanoparticles could someday give humans built-in night vision

Movies featuring heroes with superpowers are all the rage. But while these popular characters are mere flights of fancy, scientists have used nanoparticles to confer a real superpower on ordinary mice: the ability to see near-infrared light. Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans.

14d

'MasSpec Pen' for accurate cancer detection during surgery

A major challenge for cancer surgeons is to determine where a tumor starts and where it ends. The 'MasSpec Pen,' a handheld device in development, could someday enable surgeons to distinguish between cancerous and healthy tissue with greater certainty in seconds, while in the operating room. Today, researchers report first results of its use in human surgeries.

14d

Peptide hydrogels could help heal traumatic brain injuries

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) — defined as a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function — sent 2.5 million people in the U.S. to the emergency room in 2014. Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival.

14d

Tweets show how different U.S. regions like to exercise

Social media data can reveal a lot about how much exercise different populations are getting, according to a new study. Researchers used machine learning to find and comb through exercise-related tweets from across the United States, unpacking regional and gender differences in exercise types and intensity levels. By analyzing the language of the tweets, this method was also able to show how diff

14d

An exoplanet within arm's reach: The Earth

Exobiology is an exciting discipline. It is based simultaneously on the latest data from astrophysics, planetary geology and the origins of life on Earth, all of which are evolving as we continue to study them. It could be said that exobiology is essentially Earth-oriented, as it's based primarily on knowledge learned here that we try to apply to other possible or observed situations.

14d

Microorganisms protect iron sheet piling against degradation

A natural biofilm of oxygen-free microorganisms protects iron sheet piling against corrosion by depositing minerals on the wall. That is what researchers at the Radboud University, the Dutch Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Deltares have published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

14d

En aminosyra avgörande för strömmingens anpassning till Östersjöns ljusmiljö

– Vi har kartlagt hela arvsmassan från många populationer av sill och strömming och kan visa att förändring av en enda aminosyra i proteinet rodopsin har spelat en viktig roll för strömmingens anpassning till Östersjön. Det är fenylalanin som har bytts ut mot tyrosin i position 261, säger Jason Hill, forskare vid Uppsala universitet. Studien publiceras i den vetenskapliga tidskriften PNAS. Upptäc

14d

När duplot får lämna rummet blir leken mer jämlik

– Egentligen är det ganska enkelt, men man måste ha vissa principer att gå efter. Det handlar bland annat om att inte skapa ett rum för en viss typ av lek, som bygghörnan eller köksavdelningen, rummet ska istället vara så flexibelt att barnen själva kan bestämma vad som ska hända där. Och de måste kunna blanda, säger Mia Heikkilä, docent i pedagogik vid Mälardalens högskola och en av forskarna ba

14d

Microorganisms protect iron sheet piling against degradation

A natural biofilm of oxygen-free microorganisms protects iron sheet piling against corrosion by depositing minerals on the wall. That is what researchers at the Radboud University, the Dutch Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Deltares have published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

14d

14d

The crisis of anti-Black racism in schools persists across generations

Recent reports of the schooling experiences of Black students in elementary, middle and high school in Toronto tell a story of negligence and disregard. This disregard includes a lack of access to appropriate reading materials and supportive relationships with teachers and administrators.

14d

Inside the Story of LightSail 2, a Solar Sail to the Stars

Right now, there’s a piece of reflective fabric about the size of a boxing ring orbiting the Earth. On the surface, it looks like an emergency blanket stretched tight by two tent poles. But underneath that unassuming facade, the fabric—LightSail 2—may be our pathway to the stars. Developed by the Planetary Society in collaboration with multiple universities, LightSail 2 is a solar sail. Rather th

14d

Researchers engineer antibodies that unlock body's regenerative potential

Our body makes antibodies to fight infections. But the synthetic versions of these molecules could hold the key to stimulating the body's ability to regenerate.

14d

Artificial intelligence could use EKG data to measure patient's overall health status

Researchers applying artificial intelligence to electrocardiogram data estimated the age group of a patient and predicted their gender. Artificial intelligence could more accurately track overall health status by determining 'physiologic age' — distinct from chronological age.

14d

Utah's red rock metronome

At about the same rate that your heart beats, a Utah rock formation called Castleton Tower gently vibrates, keeping time and keeping watch over the sandstone desert. Swaying like a skyscraper, the red rock tower taps into the deep vibrations in the earth — wind, waves and far-off earthquakes.

14d

Report: America Has a Social Credit System Much Like China’s

In China, a three-digit number between 350 and 950 can determine whether a person’s loan application is approved , whether they can travel outside the nation’s borders , and even whether they’re able to land a date for Friday night. That number is their social credit score, and they earn it through a system China began implementing in 2014. Under the social credit system, if a Chinese citizen doe

14d

Review: Biofeedback could help treat a number of conditions

A literature review by Veterans Affairs researchers highlights the usefulness of biofeedback for headache and incontinence treatment, and stroke recovery. There was less evidence for its role in other conditions.

14d

New drug combination shows promising activity in non-small cell lung cancer patients

Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) now have more improved treatment options compared to standard of care with the addition of several new agents called immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). Despite these changes, many patients still develop progressive disease after ICI treatment. In a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers describe promising

14d

Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes

In just three minutes, the laser printing approach can produce a 10×10 cm smart textile patch that's waterproof, stretchable and easily integrated with solar or other sources of power.

14d

How worms snare their hosts

Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. However, only certain species of fish are suitable as hosts. A study by the University of Bonn now shows how the parasites succeed in preferably infecting these types. The results will be published in the journal Behaviour, but are already available online.

14d

Retina-on-a-chip provides powerful tool for studying eye disease

The development of a retina-on-a-chip, which combines living human cells with an artificial tissue-like system, has been described today in the open-access journal eLife.

14d

Fat pumps generate electrical power

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ('flips') lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical current may be important for a range of other cell mechanisms, and in this way also for human well-being and health. This is shown by a study from Aarhus University, Denmark.

14d

Optical neural network could lead to intelligent cameras

UCLA engineers have made major improvements on their design of an optical neural network — a device inspired by how the human brain works — that can identify objects or process information at the speed of light.

14d

Native approaches to fire management

In collaboration with tribes in Northern California, researchers examined traditional fire management practices and found that these approaches, if expanded, could strengthen cultures and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern California.

14d

For These Sword-Wielding Warriors, Medieval Battles Live On

To photograph an IRL *Game of Thrones*-style clash of armies, Alessandro D’Angelo avoided getting struck by swords, axes, and shields.

14d

Inside New York City's vanishing community of repair shops

It has become increasingly difficult to fix the things you own. Tinkering with your gear or taking it to an independent repair shop—assuming you can find one—often voids the warranty. But device rehab wasn’t always verboten. Communities of fixers still exist around the world, though their numbers are dwindling. In New York City, in particular, entire districts once dedicated to restoration have g

14d

What student teachers learn when putting theory into classroom practice

The preparation of student teachers is a critical aspect of their journey to being professional teachers. And teaching practice—real-world experiences that students acquire from actual classroom teaching before they are qualified teachers—is one important characteristic of this preparation process.

14d

How a rural community hopes to retain spiritual life undermined by western ways

Around the world, the introduction of western ways of life has changed indigenous communities. This has often happened by decreasing or by limiting their access to the resources they need. It's been deliberate as well as unintentional, often with negative results

14d

CITES agrees on near-total ban on sending wild elephants to zoos

The regulator of global wildlife trade will impose a near-total ban on sending African elephants captured from the wild to zoos after a final vote on the issue on Tuesday.

14d

14d

Near-total ban on sending wild elephants to zoos agreed

The regulator of global wildlife trade decided Tuesday to impose a near-total ban on sending African elephants captured from the wild to zoos, in a decision hailed by conservationists as "momentous".

14d

Berlin expects: Zoo's panda pregnant, birth expected soon

Berlin's zoo is hoping to hear the patter of tiny panda paws soon.

14d

Unraveling the history and science behind ancient decorative metal threads

When it comes to historical fashion, nothing stands out more than an item woven with shiny metal threads. But the historical record has limited insight into how these materials were made, and conservation efforts limit scientists' ability to obtain samples with destructive methods. Today, researchers report their progress toward a new, less damaging methodology for analyzing metal threads.

14d

Nanoparticles could someday give humans built-in night vision

Movies featuring heroes with superpowers are all the rage. But while these popular characters are mere flights of fancy, scientists have used nanoparticles to confer a real superpower on ordinary mice: the ability to see near-infrared light. Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans.

14d

Harnessing the power of solar panels

Researchers have developed a way to better harness the volume of energy collected by solar panels. In a new study, the researchers developed an algorithm that increases the efficiency of the solar photovoltaic (PV) system and reduces the volume of power currently being wasted due to a lack of effective controls.

14d

Berlin expects: Zoo's panda pregnant, birth expected soon

Berlin's zoo is hoping to hear the patter of tiny panda paws soon.

14d

Czech zoo hopes to spawn endangered South American frogs

A type of critically endangered frog that is the main ingredient in a smoothie-type health drink in Peru is being saved from extinction with help from a zoo in the Czech Republic.

14d

Native approaches to fire management could revitalize communities, researchers find

It costs more than a new iPhone XS, and it's made out of hazelnut shrub stems. Traditional baby baskets of Northern California's Yurok and Karuk tribes come at a premium not only because they are handcrafted by skilled weavers, but because the stems required to make them are found only in forest understory areas experiencing a type of controlled burn once practiced by the tribes but suppressed for

14d

Birds around airports may be deaf and more aggressive

Birds around airports are more aggressive and sing as if they have hearing loss. Collaboration between researchers of Manchester Metropolitan University and the Institute of Biology Leiden has led to surprising new findings about the impact of anthropogenic noise on birds around airports. Publication in Journal of Animal Ecology.

14d

Beer has a sexism problem and it goes much deeper than chauvinistic marketing

When CAMRA, the UK real ale campaign group, decided to ban beers with sexist names and labels from the Great British Beer Festival this summer, the responses were quite predictable. Liberal newspaper The Guardian celebrated the decision to call time on drinks that depict outdated, sexualized and derogatory images of women. Tabloid paper The Sun, by contrast, said that CAMRA lacks a "sense of humor

14d

How male 'porn superfans' really view women

In 2007, the pornography website Pornhub averaged 1 million visits per day. By 2018 this had increased to 92 million visits per day – or 33.5 billion views over the course of a year.

14d

Five weird and wonderful ways nature is being harnessed to build a sustainable fashion industry

One of the greatest challenges faced by the textiles and fashion industry is to make itself more sustainable, not just in terms of economic and labor force issues but in the face of ecological necessity. The production of textiles involves a long chain of complex processes to convert raw materials such as fibers or petroleum into finished fabrics or fashion products.

14d

Czech zoo hopes to spawn endangered South American frogs

A type of critically endangered frog that is the main ingredient in a smoothie-type health drink in Peru is being saved from extinction with help from a zoo in the Czech Republic.

14d

Native approaches to fire management could revitalize communities, researchers find

It costs more than a new iPhone XS, and it's made out of hazelnut shrub stems. Traditional baby baskets of Northern California's Yurok and Karuk tribes come at a premium not only because they are handcrafted by skilled weavers, but because the stems required to make them are found only in forest understory areas experiencing a type of controlled burn once practiced by the tribes but suppressed for

14d

Birds around airports may be deaf and more aggressive

Birds around airports are more aggressive and sing as if they have hearing loss. Collaboration between researchers of Manchester Metropolitan University and the Institute of Biology Leiden has led to surprising new findings about the impact of anthropogenic noise on birds around airports. Publication in Journal of Animal Ecology.

14d

Enhancing materials for hi-res patterning to advance microelectronics

To increase the processing speed and reduce the power consumption of electronic devices, the microelectronics industry continues to push for smaller and smaller feature sizes. Transistors in today's cell phones are typically 10 nanometers (nm) across—equivalent to about 50 silicon atoms wide—or smaller. Scaling transistors down below these dimensions with higher accuracy requires advanced material

14d

Orangutans hold the key to human speech

New research, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews and Indianapolis Zoo, shows that great apes can control their voice in a similar way to humans, giving a unique insight into the evolution of human language.

14d

Arctic permafrost melting will aggravate the greenhouse effect

Scientists from Russia and the United States studied the composition of the deep layers of permafrost in Eastern Siberia to better understand the hazards of the permafrost thawing to our planet and its inhabitants. Their findings suggest that the release of organic matter from the permafrost will intensify the greenhouse effect. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Geophysic

14d

Latinos lose out when it comes to Hollywood films

As the summer movie season winds to a close, and the conversation around immigration continues to simmer, one place where audiences won't find the Latino community is in popular films, according to a new study.

14d

Mitochondrial unfolded protein response signals imminent danger

Misfolded proteins must be promptly eliminated as they can form toxic aggregates in cells. LMU biologists have studied how this process is triggered in mitochondria and identified a general alarm signal that activates it.

14d

Can the patriarchy be matrilineal? An anthropologist calls for clarity

For over a century, anthropologists have attempted to describe human societies as "matrilineal" or "patrilineal"—emphasizing relatedness among women or men, respectively. A new paper by Laura Fortunato, an anthropologist at the University of Oxford and External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute, argues that it is time to confront the ambiguity at the heart of these terms.

14d

Why dogs really are a person's best friend

Researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College have highlighted the positive links between dog ownership and higher levels of physical activity in middle-aged and older adults.

14d

New genomics approaches to nomura's jellyfish sheds light on early evolution of active predation

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has analyzed the genetic map of Nomura's jellyfish, scientifically known as Nemopilema nomurai, for the first time.

14d

Study: New solvent-free, single lithium-ion conducting covalent organic framework

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has demonstrated new solvent-free, single lithium-ion conducting COF.

14d

Excess body fat increases the risk of depression

Carrying ten kilograms of excess body fat increases the risk of depression by seventeen per cent. The more fat, the greater the probability of developing depression. This is the main conclusion of a new study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

14d

A molecular 'Trojan Horse'

The research group of Nuno Maulide from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has achieved the synthesis of a potential immunosuppressive agent by modification of a naturally occurring compound. In this endeavour, the researchers have employed a masking trick to "hide" a reactive species inside the target molecule. The results were recently published in the renowned "Journal of the

14d

Energy-efficient power electronics — Gallium oxide power transistors with record values

The Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH) has now achieved a breakthrough with transistors based on gallium oxide (beta-Ga2O3). The newly developed beta-Ga2O3-MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) provide a high breakdown voltage combined with high current conductivity. With a breakdown voltage of 1.8 kilovolts and a record power figure of merit of 155 megawatts per square centimete

14d

Possible treatment on the horizon for severe dengue disease

New study reveals enzyme plays key role in potentially fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock; suggests clinically approved tryptase inhibitor could be key in future targeted treatment.

14d

Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms

When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. This harmful cocktail produces harmful algal blooms, and many of these are toxic to humans and wildlife.

14d

Sociala medier har skapat ny nyhetslogik – och sociala journalister

När sociala medier blivit en viktig del i journalistiken har svenska journalister blivit mer sociala. Men sociala nätverksmedier har också blivit en viktig plattform där journalister bygger sina egna varumärken. Men skyll inte varumärkesbyggandet endast på de sociala medierna: – Det kan lika gärna ses som en konsekvens av en allt hårdnande mediemarknad. För vissa journalister tycks ett högt antal

14d

Orangutans hold the key to human speech

New research, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews and Indianapolis Zoo, shows that great apes can control their voice in a similar way to humans, giving a unique insight into the evolution of human language.

14d

Mitochondrial unfolded protein response signals imminent danger

Misfolded proteins must be promptly eliminated as they can form toxic aggregates in cells. LMU biologists have studied how this process is triggered in mitochondria and identified a general alarm signal that activates it.

14d

Why dogs really are a person's best friend

Researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College have highlighted the positive links between dog ownership and higher levels of physical activity in middle-aged and older adults.

14d

New genomics approaches to nomura's jellyfish sheds light on early evolution of active predation

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has analyzed the genetic map of Nomura's jellyfish, scientifically known as Nemopilema nomurai, for the first time.

14d

The One Source of Perfect Crystals

Unless you’re really into graphene (or other two-dimensional advanced materials) you’ve probably never heard of these guys . Takashi Tanaguchi and Kenji Watanabe at Tsukuba’s National Institute of Materials Science are basically the only source in the world for high-quality crystals of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and that is apparently the idea substrate for studying all sorts of other two-dim

14d

Climate change is altering winter precipitation across the Northern Hemisphere

A team of scientists has successfully teased out the influence of human-caused climate change on wintertime precipitation over much of the last century, showing that the warming climate is significantly altering wintertime rainfall and snowfall across the Northern Hemisphere.

14d

Prediction: Hydride compound should be superconductive at high temperature and pressure

A team of researchers at Jilin University has calculated that a certain hydride compound should be superconductive at high temperature and under very high pressure. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the work they did that led to their theory.

14d

Acid oceans are shrinking plankton, fueling faster climate change

Increasingly acidic oceans are putting algae at risk, threatening the foundation of the entire marine food web.

14d

Research team finds that population density is key to evolution

A multiuniversity research team including a Florida State scientist has found that a lack of predators creates an environment that is key to evolutionary changes found in guppies.

14d

How bees live with bacteria

More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects.

14d

Studying downward terrestrial gamma-ray flashes during a winter thunderstorm

Lightning is a unique and fascinating phenomenon that has been studied for centuries. Although we now have a better understanding of this naturally occurring spectacle, many of its secrets are yet to be uncovered.

14d

Researchers discover unusual 'quasiparticle' in common 2-D material

The discovery of a new quasiparticle is analogous to the discovery of a new molecule, except molecules contain different elements, while quasiparticles are made from fundamental particles and interactions. As each molecule has its own unique properties, so do quasiparticles, and the discovery of a new one brings a range of possible technological applications.

14d

New Ransomware Steals Crypto From Fortnite Players

NOTAVIRUS.exe A new ransomware attack making the rounds specifically targets Fortnite players, threating to delete files on their computers until they pay the hijackers in cryptocurrency. The ransomware, Syrk, comes disguised as software to cheat at Fortnite, according to CoinDesk , an admittedly clever way to explain away why it can’t be found on legitimate app stores. Though easily countered, t

14d

Skin creams aren't what we thought they were

Anyone who has gone through the stress and discomfort of raw, irritated skin knows the relief that comes with slathering on a creamy lotion. Creams generally contain a few standard ingredients, but little is known about how these components interact. Now, researchers report the first direct glimpse of how a cream or lotion is molecularly structured, and it's not quite what they expected.

14d

'MasSpec Pen' for accurate cancer detection during surgery

A major challenge for cancer surgeons is to determine where a tumor starts and where it ends. The 'MasSpec Pen,' a handheld device in development, could someday enable surgeons to distinguish between cancerous and healthy tissue with greater certainty in seconds, while in the operating room. Today, researchers report first results of its use in human surgeries.

14d

Peptide hydrogels could help heal traumatic brain injuries

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) — defined as a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function — sent 2.5 million people in the U.S. to the emergency room in 2014. Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival.

14d

Chipping away at how ice forms could keep windshields, power lines ice-free

How does ice form? Surprisingly, science hasn't fully answered that question. But researchers today will explain their finding that the arrangements that surface atoms impose on water molecules are the key. Their work has implications for preventing ice formation on windshields, ships and power lines, and for improving weather prediction.

14d

Essential knots: how to tie the 20 knots you need to know

A good knot can save lives when you're dealing with a survival situation, performing first aid, and when working over heights or water. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally published by Outdoor Life . Knot tying has always been one of those key outdoor skills that the inexperienced take for granted. The experienced outdoorsman, however, has had enough success and failure to know that there a

14d

Research team finds that population density is key to evolution

A multiuniversity research team including a Florida State scientist has found that a lack of predators creates an environment that is key to evolutionary changes found in guppies.

14d

Can You Change Your Habits? An Interview with Gretchen Rubin

Best-selling author Gretchen Rubin answers your questions about what it takes to change your habits and habit-forming tendencies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

G7 reacts to Amazon fires crisis, but fails to respond to the root of global climate and nature emergencies

As leaders at the G7 Summit in Biarritz today announced an aid package for the Amazon, currently dealing with the impacts of unprecedented deforestation, WWF underlines the importance of leaders tackling the root causes of the planet's nature and climate emergencies through concrete, long-term measures rather than stop-gap responses.

14d

New technique converts eggshells into bulky nanoporous graphene and pure hydrogen

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has unveiled a new way to turn discarded eggshells into hydrogen, an innovative and alternative energy for the future. The new method, which is used as a catalyst for the conversion of alcohols to hydrogen, is used for the synthesis of graphene on the shell after the reaction. This technique of producing value‐added graphene and pure hydrogen, while recycling

14d

Can You Change Your Habits? An Interview with Gretchen Rubin

Best-selling author Gretchen Rubin answers your questions about what it takes to change your habits and habit-forming tendencies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

How bees live with bacteria

More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects.

14d

New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants

Researchers have developed a method with which they can further investigate an important messenger substance in plants — phosphatidic acid. Using a new biosensor, they are able to track the activity of phosphatidic acid spatially and temporally for the first time and thus, investigate plants that are exposed to stress such as salty soils.

14d

NUS researchers discover unusual 'quasiparticle' in common 2D material

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have discovered a new quasiparticle named 'polaronic trion' which can enable significant tunability in the optoelectronic properties of prominent 2D material, molybdenum disulphide.

14d

The making of 'Fancy Mouse'

For the past few hundred years, the colorful hair and unique patterns of the so-called 'Fancy Mouse' have made them the stars of pet shows in Japan and beyond. Now, scientists have finally revealed the true cause of the genetic mutation responsible for the iconic black pigmentation in the popular East Asian pet. The findings were published on August 2, 2019, in Communications Biology.

14d

How bees live with bacteria

More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects.

14d

High fat diet during pregnancy slows learning in offspring, rat study suggests

In a bid to further explore how a mother-to-be's diet might affect her offspring's brain health, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that pregnant and nursing rats fed high fat diets have offspring that grow up to be slower than expected learners and that have persistently abnormal levels of the components needed for healthy brain development and metabolism.

14d

Researchers take aim at circadian clock in deadly brain cancer

Scientists at USC and UC San Diego have discovered a potential novel target for treating glioblastoma, the deadly brain cancer that took the life of Sen. John McCain and kills 15,000 Americans a year.

14d

Lenovo Cranks Out L13 Yoga, L13, And T490 Laptops With Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake

Lenovo has tossed several new notebook computers onto the market, and the new ThinkPad T490 is among them. This machine can be fitted with up to 10th gen Intel Core i7 processors. The T490 …

14d

Personalize Yelp Based on Your Dietary, Lifestyle Needs

This is what your search results might look like if you're a vegan/vegetarian who loves to hike (via Yelp) Whether you’re a gluten-free pet owner …

14d

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02517-4 How Nature reported a toxicological study of alcohol in 1919, and the potential benefits of computer graphics for medical geography in 1969.

14d

Greek temple ruins suggest lifting machines in use 1.5 centuries earlier than previously believed

As modern Greeks undertake to reconstruct the Parthenon, largely using stone material from the site's ruins, a question naturally arises: How did ancient Greeks construct massive temples and other buildings—lifting and placing one heavy block at a time, and up multiple rows in a wall—without modern advanced machinery?

14d

Deforestation could worsen Amazon rainforest fires every year

It's a giant air filter nearly as vast as the contiguous U.S. And it's been burning for weeks.

14d

14d

Därför behövs grönområden på förskolan

Förskolegården är en av de utomhusplatser där barn regelbundet leker. Allt mer forskning visar att naturen kan ge oss värdefulla så kallade ekosystemtjänster, det vill säga mycket mer än bara rena naturresurser som frukt, grönsaker och virke. Till exempel rening av luft, bullerdämpning, pollinering – och en mängd hälsofördelar. En rad vetenskapliga studier har visat att gröna omgivningar kan gynn

14d

High-fat diet in utero protects against Alzheimer's later

A high-fat diet can carry health risks, but for mothers-to-be, it may make all the difference when it comes to Alzheimer's disease prevention for their children. Reports show for the first time in animals that high maternal fat consumption during gestation protects offspring against changes in the brain that are characteristic of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

14d

Using a smartphone to detect norovirus

University of Arizona researchers have developed a simple, portable and inexpensive way to detect minute amounts of norovirus.

14d

Scientists identify potential cause of statin-related muscle pain

An international team of researchers may have discovered why some people experience muscle pain after taking statins and have shown that moderate exercise may be a good way for people taking statins to avoid these symptoms.

14d

Individualized approach to identify 'fertile windows' could benefit many women

Menstrual cycles are considerably varied with only 13% of women having cycles that last 28 days, according to a new study.

14d

Runaway mitochondria cause telomere damage in cells

Targeted damage to mitochondria produces a 'Chernobyl effect' inside cells, pelting the nucleus with harmful reactive oxygen species and causing chromosomal damage.

14d

Spontaneous brain fluctuations influence risk-taking

Minute-to-minute fluctuations in human brain activity, linked to changing levels of dopamine, impact whether we make risky decisions, finds a new study.

14d

The Neuroscience of Reality

Reality is constructed by the brain, and no two brains are exactly alike — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Yelp Is Overhauling Its App to Emphasize Personalization

Users can customize the app to reflect their stated preferences and lifestyles.

14d

You're Racing Toward a Wall. Should You Brake Hard—or Swerve?

Say you’re driving and come upon an obstacle. Is it best to slam on the brakes, turn, or start weaving? Here’s how to crunch the numbers.

14d

Silicon Valley's Secret Philosophers Should Share Their Work

Opinion: Tech giants must stop hiring philosophers as pawns, and allow them to make sense of the world tech is molding.

14d

A Novelist Takes Self-Driving to Its Illogical Conclusion

In John Marrs' sixth novel, *The Passengers*, a hacker traps eight people in self-driving cars—with results as revealing as they are ridiculous.

14d

Brazil Angrily Rejects Millions in Amazon Aid Pledged at G7, Then Accepts British Aid

President Jair Bolsonaro suggested he would reconsider accepting aid from the Group of 7 if France’s president withdrew “insults made to my person.” Then, Brazil accepted $12 million in British aid.

14d

Her er gigantmotoren, som giver Boeing flere problemer

PLUS. Flere GE9X-motorer fragtes tilbage til fabrikken med An-124.

14d

WISE J0720−0846 hosts a massive T dwarf, observations confirm

By combining high-precision astrometry and adaptive optics-resolved imaging, astronomers have found that the binary system WISE J0720−0846, better known as Scholz's star, hosts a T dwarf, confirming previous assumptions. The finding is reported in a paper published August 19 on arXiv.org.

14d

Biological risk potential of nanoparticles studied

Carbon nanoparticles are a promising tool for biomedical applications, for example for targeted transportation of biologically active compounds into cells. A team of researchers from the Physics, Medicine and Chemistry departments at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now examined whether these particles are potentially dangerous for the organism and how cells cope with them once they

14d

A new signaling pathway for mTor-dependent cell growth

A team led by the scientist Volker Haucke (Leibniz – Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie and Freie Universität Berlin) has now discovered how inactivation of a certain lipid kinase promotes mTor complex 1 activity, and may therefore constitute a new point of attack for the treatment of diabetes and cancer.

14d

Women are beautiful, men rational

Men are typically described by words that refer to behavior, while adjectives ascribed to women tend to be associated with physical appearance. This, according to a group of computer scientists from the University of Copenhagen and other universities that deployed machine learning to analyze 3.5 million books.

14d

The Neuroscience of Reality

Reality is constructed by the brain, and no two brains are exactly alike — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Scientists harness bacteria to create 'living' liquid crystals

Liquid crystals are widely used in technologies such as displays, which manipulate their orientation to display colors across the spectrum.

14d

How private will an ancestry website keep my DNA?

Where else does your DNA go when you submit it to an ancestry website? This video explains. There needs to be a much more rigorous regime of privacy protections around genetic material, says law professor Erin Murphy of New York University. After all, she says in the video, “This is a kind of very unregulated space and a little bit of a wild, wild west space.” In addition, she cautions, “…these a

14d

Eco-friendly supplies for a low-waste lunch

Eco-friendly vessels for your meals. (Ello/) Going out to lunch can be stressful: you have to find a place (decision paralysis) and then, inevitably, end up throwing out a lot of waste like plastic or styrofoam. It’s hard on planet earth and hard on your wallet. The responsible, adult move is to pack your own lunch, which means you’ll be saving money and eating healthier. Upgrade your lunch a ste

14d

U of T researchers engineer antibodies that unlock body's regenerative potential

Our body makes antibodies to fight infections. But the synthetic versions of these molecules could hold the key to stimulating the body's ability to regenerate. The findings come from a decade-long collaboration between the teams of Sachdev Sidhu, a professor in the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, and Stephane Angers, Associate Dean of Research in the Leslie Dan Faculty of

14d

Microsoft offering some customers an extra year of free Windows 7 updates

As reported by The Register, the Windows 7 and Office 2010 end of support FAQ reveals that companies running Windows 10 Enterprise E5, Microsoft 365 E5, Microsoft 365 E5 Security, and Government …

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

A Successful Artificial Memory Has Been Created

The growing science of memory manipulation raises social and ethical questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Acupuncture Points Don’t Exist

Acupuncture is defined as an intervention involving placing thin needles into specified acupuncture points in order to relieve symptoms or promote healing. What is special about the acupoints? They are supposed to be locations where the flow of life force (chi) can be manipulated. There are a few problems with the claims made for acupuncture. First, there is no place for vitalism – belief in a li

14d

Image of the Day: Last Loa Water Frogs

Scientists hope to breed the species in captivity because their habitat has nearly disappeared.

14d

A Successful Artificial Memory Has Been Created

The growing science of memory manipulation raises social and ethical questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Booking websites edged out travel agents, and that's a bad thing, tourism study says

The traditional travel agent is a thing of the past. Nowadays, the burden of planning a vacation falls on the consumer.

14d

Laser scarecrows successful at keeping birds from eating sweetcorn

Farmers have had long-running battles trying to keep birds of many varieties from eating their sweetcorn. They've used propane cannons, visual deterrents and even shotguns, but none succeed for very long.

14d

What's the best way to cut vehicle greenhouse-gas emissions?

Policies to encourage reductions in greenhouse gas emissions tend to stress the need to switch as many vehicles as possible to electric power. But a new study by MIT and the Ford Motor Company finds that depending on the location, in some cases an equivalent or even bigger reduction in emissions could be achieved by switching to lightweight conventional (gas-powered) vehicles instead—at least in t

14d

NASA activates Deep Space Atomic Clock

An atomic clock that could pave the way for autonomous deep space travel was successfully activated last week and is ready to begin its year-long tech demo, the mission team confirmed on Friday, Aug. 23, 2019. Launched in June, NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock is a critical step toward enabling spacecraft to safely navigate themselves in deep space rather than rely on the time-consuming process of r

14d

Laser scarecrows successful at keeping birds from eating sweetcorn

Farmers have had long-running battles trying to keep birds of many varieties from eating their sweetcorn. They've used propane cannons, visual deterrents and even shotguns, but none succeed for very long.

14d

Finding new ways to beef up cattle

Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere continue to increase and while that stimulates plant growth, it also means plants have less nitrogen, which is a key nutrient.

14d

Fires ravage the Amazon

Thousands of fires have broken out in the Amazon rainforest. Satellite data show that there are almost four times as many fires this year compared to the same period last year. Apart from Brazil, parts of Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina have also been affected.

14d

Halt the use of facial-recognition technology until it is regulated

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02514-7 Until appropriate safeguards are in place, we need a moratorium on biometric technology that identifies individuals, says Kate Crawford.

14d

A few small goofs nearly threw the world into nuclear war

How we learned to start worrying about the bomb. (National Museum of the U.S. Navy/) The following is an excerpt adapted from End Times: A Brief Guide To The End Of The World by Bryan Walsh. If there's an important post in America's national defense establishment, chances are that William Perry has held it. He worked as a civilian expert in electronic intelligence in the 1960s, served as undersec

14d

Finding new ways to beef up cattle

Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere continue to increase and while that stimulates plant growth, it also means plants have less nitrogen, which is a key nutrient.

14d

Scientists zero in on cancer treatments using CRISPR

Chemotherapy works off of a basic premise: kill all rapidly-growing cells in an effort to wipe out tumor cells. The tactic, while generally effective, has quite a few off-target casualties, including cells that produce hair and cells that line the stomach.

14d

Scientists zero in on cancer treatments using CRISPR

Chemotherapy works off of a basic premise: kill all rapidly-growing cells in an effort to wipe out tumor cells. The tactic, while generally effective, has quite a few off-target casualties, including cells that produce hair and cells that line the stomach.

14d

A Raft of Floating Rock Stuns Sailors. But Can It Save the Reef?

Researchers are curious about whether marine life, hitching a ride on a raft of floating volcanic rock, could replenish the dying reef.

14d

The dark sides of extrasolar planets share surprisingly similar temperatures

A new study by McGill University astronomers has found that the temperature on the nightsides of different hot Jupiters is surprisingly uniform, suggesting the dark side of these massive gaseous planets have clouds made of minerals and rocks.

14d

Sticker makes nanoscale light manipulation easier to manufacture

Human pathogens, such as HIV and viruses causing respiratory tract infection, have molecular fingerprints that are difficult to distinguish. To better detect these pathogens, sensors in diagnostic tools need to manipulate light on a nanoscale.

14d

A new signaling pathway for mTor-dependent cell growth

The activation of mTor complex 1 in the cell is central to many vital processes in the body such as cell growth and metabolism. Overactivity of this signaling pathway can result in diseases such as in diabetic insulin resistance and cancer. A team led by the scientist Volker Haucke (Leibniz—Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie and Freie Universität Berlin) has now discovered how inactiv

14d

A new species of Canadian gall mite challenges current classification of a major lineage

A new species of gall mites (Setoptus tsugivagus) associated with the Western hemlock (a common coniferous tree at the west coast of North America) has been described by a group of scientists from Russia, Serbia and the U.S. The researchers believe that the current classification of the Setoptus mites and other groups should be reconsidered, because species that were previously considered as close

14d

Researchers describe a new fireworm bioluminescence system

A collaborative effort by an international team of scientists has led to to the discovery of a new luciferin from fireworm. The characterization of three key low-molecular-weight components of its bioluminescence system, presented in an article published in PNAS, further enables the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of bioluminescence of this organism.

14d

A new signaling pathway for mTor-dependent cell growth

The activation of mTor complex 1 in the cell is central to many vital processes in the body such as cell growth and metabolism. Overactivity of this signaling pathway can result in diseases such as in diabetic insulin resistance and cancer. A team led by the scientist Volker Haucke (Leibniz—Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie and Freie Universität Berlin) has now discovered how inactiv

14d

A new species of Canadian gall mite challenges current classification of a major lineage

A new species of gall mites (Setoptus tsugivagus) associated with the Western hemlock (a common coniferous tree at the west coast of North America) has been described by a group of scientists from Russia, Serbia and the U.S. The researchers believe that the current classification of the Setoptus mites and other groups should be reconsidered, because species that were previously considered as close

14d

Researchers describe a new fireworm bioluminescence system

A collaborative effort by an international team of scientists has led to to the discovery of a new luciferin from fireworm. The characterization of three key low-molecular-weight components of its bioluminescence system, presented in an article published in PNAS, further enables the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of bioluminescence of this organism.

14d

X-37B Military Space Plane Breaks Record on Latest Mystery Mission

The robotic X-37B has been circling Earth for nearly 719 days on its latest mystery mission, which is known as Orbital Test Vehicle 5 (OTV-5).

14d

Amazon Wildfires Are Horrifying, But They're Not Destroying Earth's Oxygen Supply

Even if the entire Amazon rainforest burned down, we'd be okay.

14d

Physicists Just Released Step-by-Step Instructions for Building a Wormhole

All you need are a couple of black holes and some cosmic strings. No biggie.

14d

Hackers Could Kill More People Than a Nuclear Weapon

Digital attacks can hit many targets at once.

14d

Trump’s Unprecedented Fight to Withhold Information

President Donald Trump’s administration has declared war on congressional oversight, and the House of Representatives is fighting back—by suing in federal court to enforce its subpoenas. I served for more than 20 years in the House’s Office of General Counsel, from 1995 to 2016. During that period, House committees issued hundreds of subpoenas to executive-branch officials. In the majority of tho

14d

Fighting Wildfires with Computer Models

Prescribed burns can remove excess fuel from the forest floor, and algorithms can help fire crews know where to set them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Jeffrey Epstein and the Power of Networks

The billionaire child rapist bought his way into an elite crowd of intellectuals that defined the last three decades of science, tech, and culture.

14d

Insect-based food 'better for pets than top steak'

The body representing UK vets says pet food diets based on insects are a 'fantastic opportunity'.

14d

Seal sculpture made from Essex beach plastic rubbish

The plastic waste collected from one beach is "the tip of the iceberg", the artist says.

14d

Fighting Wildfires with Computer Models

Prescribed burns can remove excess fuel from the forest floor, and algorithms can help fire crews know where to set them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

The Gift-Card Budget

Brenda Mayrack never intended to become an unclaimed-property czar. Even among legal specialties, the field is particularly obscure: During law school at the University of Wisconsin, she remembers hearing only a 10-minute lecture introducing the topic at the end of her trusts-and-estates class. But as the director of Delaware’s unclaimed-property office, Mayrack now oversees a fund of $540 millio

14d

Hospitalerne har brugt 70 mio. kr. på kunst

Landets hospitaler har de seneste fem år brugt knap 70 mio. kr. på at udsmykke sine lokaler med kunst. Sundhedsordfører Liselott Blixt (DF) kritiserer brugen af penge, mens regionsrådsformand Anders Kühnau (S) kalder det hyklerisk.

14d

New Insights into Self-Insight: More May Not Be Better

An innovative study technique yields surprising results that counter the popular idea that knowing yourself is good for you — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Video: The latest look at 'first light' from Chandra

NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has captured many spectacular images of cosmic phenomena over its two decades of operations, but perhaps its most iconic is the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

14d

Technique combats widespread passion fruit disease

Passion fruit woodiness caused by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the disease that most affects passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) grown in Brazil, can be treated with a relatively simple technique, according to a study published in the journal Plant Pathology. It shows that systematic eradication of plants with symptoms of the disease preserves the crop as a whole and keeps plants produci

14d

Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances

Complaints of allergic rhinitis (hayfever) are common worldwide, affecting around 17 percent of the Japanese population in spring and summer (around 20 million people). In Japan, the main tree species causing hayfever are Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress, with a combined land area of over 7 million hectares. Their pollen is dispersed between February and May and causes a range of symptoms from

14d

New Insights into Self-Insight: More May Not Be Better

An innovative study technique yields surprising results that counter the popular idea that knowing yourself is good for you — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Technique combats widespread passion fruit disease

Passion fruit woodiness caused by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the disease that most affects passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) grown in Brazil, can be treated with a relatively simple technique, according to a study published in the journal Plant Pathology. It shows that systematic eradication of plants with symptoms of the disease preserves the crop as a whole and keeps plants produci

14d

Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances

Complaints of allergic rhinitis (hayfever) are common worldwide, affecting around 17 percent of the Japanese population in spring and summer (around 20 million people). In Japan, the main tree species causing hayfever are Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress, with a combined land area of over 7 million hectares. Their pollen is dispersed between February and May and causes a range of symptoms from

14d

New Insights into Self-Insight: More May Not Be Better

An innovative study technique yields surprising results that counter the popular idea that knowing yourself is good for you — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Ridhästar kan ha en naturlig rörelseasymmetri – utan att ha ont

Tidigare studier har visat att ett stort antal ridhästar som av ryttaren upplevs som friska och är i full träning rör sig lika asymmetriskt som hästar som utreds och behandlas för låggradiga hältor. Idag saknar vi kunskap att avgöra om dessa hästar med rörelseasymmetrier har ont på grund av ett ortopediskt problem eller om hästar kan ha ett naturligt asymmetriskt rörelsemönster som inte är orsaka

14d

Kineserne vil have planter til at vokse hurtigere med elektrisk felt

Kinesiske forskere har taget en over 100 år gammel idé og brugt den til at øge planters vækst. Men forskere rundt om i verden er skeptiske – også danske.

14d

Misstänkt mikroskopisk urmoder odlad i lab

Under livets första två miljarder år fanns bara ensamma celler utan cellkärna. Ett olöst mysterium är hur en cell plötsligt blev mer komplex, och i förlängningen kunde bli till så avancerade saker som träd och människor. Bakterier har sparsamt inredda celler medan högre liv som växter, djur och svampar bland annat har en cellkärna med arvsmassa och en mitokondrie som förser cellen med energi. Vi s

14d

IBM går med i Linux-samarbejde om troværdig AI

Den brede offentlighed skal kunne stole på kunstig intelligens, lyder det fra it-kæmpen.

14d

14d

14d

14d

Fairphone 3 Gives Us the Smartphone Repair Options That Big Tech Won't

Say what you will about modular smartphones—and there’s certainly plenty to say—they do have one very clear benefit over the phones folks most commonly carry around in their pockets: reducing …

14d

Prosecutors Need to Take the Lead in Reforming Prisons

More than a decade into my career as an assistant district attorney in Manhattan, I investigated a murder on upper Broadway, in which two masked men opened fire in a busy street, shooting four people nonfatally and point-blank murdering a fifth. Over the course of an 18-month investigation and a six-week jury trial, I spent countless hours with the heartbroken mother of the murdered young man to

14d

The Idea That Whites Can’t Refer to the N-Word

Laurie Sheck is a professor of creative writing at the New School in New York, a decades-long veteran of the classroom, a widely published novelist and essayist, and a Pulitzer nominee. She’s also spent the summer in trouble with her bosses for possibly being a racist. Her offense? You may not have known that despite the resonance of the title of the renowned 2016 documentary on James Baldwin, I

14d

Regeringen vil stoppe flere havbrug

Miljøminister Lea Wermelin vil stoppe lovgivning, der ville have muliggjort flere og større havbrug. I stedet vil hun udvide fiskeproduktionen fra dambrug.

14d

Feral Hogs Are a Serious Threat to North American Biodiversity

After monitoring 36 forest patches in Mississippi, researchers found that forest patches with feral pigs had 26 percent less-diverse mammal and bird communities than similar forest patches without them. This is concerning since feral pig populations across the continent are rapidly expanding.

14d

The top 4 crises facing the world today

According to historian Jared Diamond, we currently have four global crises to address: the ongoing threat of nuclear attacks, climate change, running out of resources, and socioeconomic inequality. Diamond believes there's hope for the future, though, because these problems are human caused, and must have human solutions — they are not looming doomsdays like an asteroid poised to strike Earth (of

14d

Cancer researcher up to five retractions

A researcher in India is up to five retractions, by our count, for problematic data and image issues. The latest retractions involve articles published in 2008 and 2013 in the journal Life Sciences. The last author on the papers is Yogeshwer Shukla, of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, about whom we have previously … Continue reading

14d

A Newer, Faster Way To Detect Norovirus In Water Supplies

Norovirus sickens tens of millions of people each year. They get the disease from contaminated food or water. Engineers have developed a rapid, inexpensive test to detect the virus in water supplies.

14d

Termiske kameraer og spyd slukkede sejlivet grønlandsk brand

Den arktiske naturbrand, som har hærget i over en måned, var vanskelig at slukke, fordi den ulmede i tørvelagene, hvor den i værste fald kan overvintre.

14d

Are psychiatrists really ready for the AI revolution?

Machine learning can help manage a wide range of mental health disorders. But the psychiatric profession is worryingly unprepared for this change, according to a global survey.

14d

Using a smartphone to detect norovirus

University of Arizona researchers have developed a simple, portable and inexpensive way to detect minute amounts of norovirus.

14d

Artificial intelligence could use EKG data to measure patient's overall health status

Researchers applying artificial intelligence to electrocardiogram data estimated the age group of a patient and predicted their gender.Artificial intelligence could more accurately track overall health status by determining 'physiologic age' — distinct from chronological age.

14d

Peptide hydrogels could help heal traumatic brain injuries

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) — defined as a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function — sent 2.5 million people in the U.S. to the emergency room in 2014. Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival. The researchers will present their results at th

14d

Chipping away at how ice forms could keep windshields, power lines ice-free

How does ice form? Surprisingly, science hasn't fully answered that question. But researchers today will explain their finding that the arrangements that surface atoms impose on water molecules are the key. Their work has implications for preventing ice formation on windshields, ships and power lines, and for improving weather prediction. The researchers will present their results today at the Ame

14d

'MasSpec Pen' for accurate cancer detection during surgery

A major challenge for cancer surgeons is to determine where a tumor starts and where it ends. The 'MasSpec Pen,' a handheld device in development, could someday enable surgeons to distinguish between cancerous and healthy tissue with greater certainty in seconds, while in the operating room. Today, researchers report first results of its use in human surgeries. They will present findings results a

14d

Skin creams aren't what we thought they were

Anyone who has gone through the stress and discomfort of raw, irritated skin knows the relief that comes with slathering on a creamy lotion. Creams generally contain a few standard ingredients, but little is known about how these components interact. Now, researchers report the first direct glimpse of how a cream or lotion is molecularly structured, and it's not quite what they expected. The resea

14d

Nanoparticles could someday give humans built-in night vision

Movies featuring heroes with superpowers are all the rage. But while these popular characters are mere flights of fancy, scientists have used nanoparticles to confer a real superpower on ordinary mice: the ability to see near-infrared light. Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. The researchers will pres

14d

Smartphone-based device for detecting norovirus, the 'cruise ship' microbe

Made infamous by outbreaks on cruise ships, norovirus can really ruin a vacation, causing vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. But the highly infectious virus can also strike closer to home, with outbreaks occurring in municipal water systems, schools and restaurants. Today, researchers report a new device that can detect a handful of norovirus particles in water. The researchers will present thei

14d

Unraveling the history and science behind ancient decorative metal threads

When it comes to historical fashion, nothing stands out more than an item woven with shiny metal threads. But the historical record has limited insight into how these materials were made, and conservation efforts limit scientists' ability to obtain samples with destructive methods. Today, researchers report their progress toward a new, less damaging methodology for analyzing metal threads. The res

14d

Stop using mouse swim test as proxy for depression

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02548-x

14d

Testing the environmental impacts of sea-bed mining

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02550-3

14d

India keeps a close eye on its tigers

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02546-z

14d

Ello Guvna!

The BBC—which is more and more evidently becoming a tech company—is developing a voice assistant to offer consumers of its content a “whole new way to interact with BBC programmes and services,” …

14d

A smartphone app can detect tiny amounts of norovirus in water

A device consisting of a smartphone and an attachable microscope can detect minuscule amounts of norovirus, which may help identify its spread earlier

14d

Engineering of Magnetic Softness and Domain Wall Dynamics of Fe-rich Amorphous Microwires by Stress- induced Magnetic Anisotropy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48755-4

14d

Long-range vortex transfer in superconducting nanowires

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48887-7

14d

Vimentin regulates Notch signaling strength and arterial remodeling in response to hemodynamic stress

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48218-w

14d

Revisiting the genetic diversity of emerging hantaviruses circulating in Europe using a pan-viral resequencing microarray

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47508-7

14d

Acute Physical Exercise Can Influence the Accuracy of Metacognitive Judgments

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48861-3

14d

Deformed wing virus type A, a major honey bee pathogen, is vectored by the mite Varroa destructor in a non-propagative manner

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47447-3

14d

Antibody response against koala retrovirus (KoRV) in koalas harboring KoRV-A in the presence or absence of KoRV-B

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48880-0

14d

14d

San Antonio researchers seek to prevent aerospace failures and oil spills disasters

In 2014, Kazakhstan's newest and largest oil field was slated to become a major contributor to the global supply. But within a month of operation, a total shutdown occurred. Without warning, large cracks appeared in its pipelines. For the next two years, the field remained idle due to costly repairs. The cause: embrittlement of the pipelines.

14d

Should You Take Your Shoes Off at Home?

It isn’t even a question in many homes, but here’s what the science has to say.

14d

Is It Time to Upend the Periodic Table?

The iconic chart of elements has served chemistry well for 150 years. But it’s not the only option out there, and scientists are pushing its limits.

14d

Financing open-access publication after 2024

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02547-y

14d

Accredit scientific software for sustainability

Nature, Published online: 27 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02549-w

14d

Skin creams aren't what we thought they were

Anyone who has gone through the stress and discomfort of raw, irritated skin knows the relief that comes with slathering on a creamy lotion. Topical creams generally contain a few standard ingredients, but manufacturers know little about how these components interact to influence the performance of the product. Now, researchers report the first direct glimpse of how a cream or lotion is structured

14d

Nanoparticles could someday give humans built-in night vision

Movies featuring heroes with superpowers, such as flight, X-ray vision or extraordinary strength, are all the rage. But while these popular characters are mere flights of fancy, scientists have used nanoparticles to confer a real superpower on ordinary mice: the ability to see near-infrared light. Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give b

14d

Chipping away at how ice forms could keep windshields, power lines ice-free

How does ice form? Surprisingly, science hasn't fully answered that question. Differences in ice formation on various surfaces still aren't well understood, but researchers today will explain their finding that the arrangements that surface atoms impose on water molecules are the key. The work has implications for preventing ice formation where it isn't wanted (windshields, power lines) and for pr

14d

Unraveling the history and science behind ancient decorative metal threads

When it comes to historical fashion, nothing stands out more than an item woven with shiny metal threads. These threads have been woven into textiles since ancient times and have been used by cultures around the world. However, the historical record has limited insight into how these materials were made, and conservation efforts limit scientists' ability to obtain samples because many methods are

14d

Smartphone-based device for detecting norovirus, the 'cruise ship' microbe

Made infamous by outbreaks on cruise ships, norovirus can really ruin a vacation, causing severe vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. But the highly infectious virus can also strike closer to home, with water- and foodborne outbreaks occurring in municipal water systems, schools and restaurants. Today, researchers report a sensitive, portable device that can detect as few as a handful of norovirus

14d

Peptide hydrogels could help heal traumatic brain injuries

Traumatic brain injury (TBI)—defined as a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function—sent 2.5 million people in the U.S. to the emergency room in 2014, according to statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regr

14d

'MasSpec Pen' for accurate cancer detection during surgery

A major challenge for cancer surgeons is to determine exactly where a tumor starts and where it ends. Removing too much tissue can impair normal functions, but not taking enough can mean the disease could recur. The "MasSpec Pen," a handheld device in development, could someday enable surgeons to distinguish between cancerous and healthy tissue with greater certainty in seconds, while in the opera

14d

New coating brings lithium metal battery closer to reality

Hope has been restored for the rechargeable lithium metal battery—a potential battery powerhouse relegated for decades to the laboratory by its short life expectancy and occasional fiery demise …

14d

Nasa astronauts train in underwater space station

Nasa astronauts have been sampling the spacecraft experience at the Johnson Space Centre in Texas.

14d

Vi kender kuren mod tvang i psykiatrien

Vi kan undgå en stor del af tvangen i psykiatrien med den viden vi har i dag, men det kræver investeringer i både den regionale og kommunale psykiatri, skriver ledende overlæge på psykiatrisk afdeling.

14d

5G: Rural areas could see bigger and taller masts

A balance has to be struck between the landscape and better connectivity, the digital secretary says.

14d

Could serenading mosquitoes help stop the spread of malaria?

That annoying buzz we all recognise from summer evenings is actually a love song for a mosquito.

14d

Mario Kart Tour arrives on iOS and Android on September 25

Nintendo’s next mobile game, Mario Kart Tour, will be available on iOS and Android devices starting on September 25. The official Twitter account for the game revealed the launch date, …

14d

'Rosalind Franklin' Mars rover assembly completed

Engineers in Stevenage, UK, finish building a robot that will search for life on the Red Planet.

14d

14d

14d

14d

Kvinder er smukke, mænd er rationelle

Mænd beskrives typisk med ord, der siger noget om deres opførsel, mens kvinder bliver påhæftet…

14d

Tropical Storm Dorian gains steam, heads for Caribbean

Tropical Storm Dorian intensified Monday as it approached the Caribbean on a track that will take it near Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic by midweek, possibly at hurricane strength, US forecasters said.

14d

Scientists reproduce coral in lab, offering hope for reefs

A team of scientists in the US have managed to reproduce coral in a lab setting for the first time ever, an encouraging step in the race to save "America's Great Barrier Reef" off the coast of Florida.

14d

Brazilian firefighters toil in Amazon region hazy with smoke

Equipped with hoses connected to rubber backpacks, Brazilian firefighters in the Amazon on Monday raced in a truck along dirt roads toward plumes of smoke after a spotter in a military helicopter directed them to a fast-spreading fire.

14d

Lovers of Tuscany's 'paradise' beach have factory to thank

Holidaymakers splash in the turquoise waters of the Rosignano Solvay beach in Tuscany and laze on its pristine white sands—most of them fully aware that the picture-perfect swimming spot owes its allure to a nearby factory.

14d

Angering China Can Now Get You Fired

Not too long ago, China “taking your job” meant its wages were far lower than Western alternatives, thus allowing it to “steal” blue-jean and iPhone factories. But what if it meant getting you fired for what you believe? That’s apparently what happened last week to Rebecca Sy, a long-serving flight attendant at a subsidiary of the Hong Kong–based airline Cathay Pacific. Her crime: supporting the

14d

Spacecraft carrying Russian humanoid robot docks at ISS

An unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit successfully docked at the International Space Station on Tuesday, following a failed attempt over the weekend, Moscow's space agency said.

14d

Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil

In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered at least one species is being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil.

14d

Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil

In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered at least one species is being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil.

14d

Do Acupuncture Points Exist? Can Acupuncturists Find Them?

Acupuncturists do a systematic review and reveal they can't reliably locate acupoints. No wonder: they don't exist.

14d

14d

The robo racing cars accelerating driverless tech

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

14d

A new coating could be the key to lighter lithium metal batteries.

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

14d

A cashless vending machine in china that uses facial recognition

submitted by /u/cinemassacress [link] [comments]

14d

Mysterious cloud 'absorbers' seen to drive Venusian albedo, climate

As planets in our solar system go, Venus is one for the textbooks.

14d

14d

14d

Tre ud af fire 11- til 15-årige bevæger sig for lidt

Mange børn lever ikke op til Sundhedsstyrelsens anbefalinger om fysisk aktivitet, viser rapport.

14d

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #34, 2019

44 items this week, with 9 available as open access. Articles: Humans dealing with global warming Future Heat Stress During Muslim Pilgrimage (Hajj) Projected to Exceed “Extreme Danger” Levels Impact of Water Level Rise on Urban Infrastructures: Washington, DC, and Shanghai as Case Studies Not all carbon dioxide emission scenarios are equally likely: a subjective expert assessment Decarbonization

14d

Brexit Got a Lot More Complicated for EU Citizens

For the past three years, the more than 3 million European Union citizens living in Britain have been in a state of limbo . At first, it was unclear whether they and their families would be able to continue living and working in the country with the same rights they have now after Britain leaves the EU. Even once the British government unveiled plans last year to impose a new legal status for EU

14d

Glem Jorden: Liv trives måske bedre på fremmede planeter

Planeter med særlige oceaner kan rumme ekstremt meget liv, viser ny forskning.

14d

Researchers develop a better way to harness the power of solar panels

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a way to better harness the volume of energy collected by solar panels. In a new study, the researchers developed an algorithm that increases the efficiency of the solar photovoltaic (PV) system and reduces the volume of power currently being wasted due to a lack of effective controls.

14d

Early improvements in preschoolers' skills help explain long-term benefits of intervention

Current research findings are mixed as to whether preschool programs can improve individuals' outcomes in the long term, with some studies pointing to benefits years later and others showing a fadeout of cognitive gains as early as elementary school. A new longitudinal study explored the long-term impacts of a preschool quality improvement program for low-income children on their self-regulation a

14d

Adolescents' fun seeking predicts both risk taking and prosocial behavior

Research shows that risk-taking behaviors, such as binge drinking, may increase throughout adolescence. At the same time, so can prosocial behaviors (behaviors that involve doing good to benefit others). A new longitudinal study from the Netherlands sought to determine if these behaviors are related and whether certain brain regions can predict them. The study found that the two behaviors may be r

14d

Vaccines ‘most powerful tool against infectious diseases’

Cepi’s Richard Hatchett outlines the economic case for investing in vaccines

14d

Debate over vaccination strategies dogs Ebola efforts in Congo

New vaccine from J&J could supplement current shot from Merck

14d

Community health workers’ focus on prevention brings dividends

Primary care practices best placed to monitor immunisation and disease

14d

Japan’s GHIT ramps up fight against neglected diseases

The non-profit pairs Japanese pharma with global organisations to tackle disease in low-income countries

14d

Biotechs fight fears of ‘antibiotic apocalypse’

Market failure gives little incentive to develop new drugs as antimicrobial resistance grows

14d

Japanese clinical trials can help check western domination

New system will also help country fight threat of disease at home

14d

US health leaders play the anti-vaxxers at their own game

Experts counter vaccine fears with tragic tales of people who suffered from preventable diseases

14d

FT Health: Communicable Diseases

The year-old outbreak of Ebola in DRC underlines the urgent need for new approaches to the threat of epidemic disease. FT writers examine the latest thinking from industry and public health authorities

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

We already have 'shadow banning', I predict 'shadow editing' comes next.

I imagine big tech now have enough data on every individual to create a profile of their personal views. The next level of tech social activism imo will be 'shadow editing'. The basics of how I see this working: UserA posts something outside of an accepted activist narrative. Similar to shadow banning, UserA will see their own 'wrong think' post. For the sake of argument, we'll use this as an exa

14d

Automatisering droppet: Rejsekort-passagerer må selv opdage overbetaling ved forsinkelser

Passagerer i den offentlige transport, der rejser med rejsekort, risikerer at skulle betale for ekstra zoner, hvis bussen er forsinket.

14d

14d

Rusland: Spor af strontium, barium og lanthan efter radioaktiv ulykke

Flere lokale russiske målestationer er gået offline – de ligger, hvor en radioaktiv sky ville have spredt sig. Samtidig melder nordmænd om en hidtil ukendt anden eksplosion.

14d

Blocking key protein could treat chronic pain

New research in mice sheds light on the development of chronic pain, and neuropathic pain, in particular, paving the way for more effective treatments.

14d

In Landmark Case, The First Pharma Giant Has Been Blamed For Fueling The Opioid Crisis

It'll cost them $572 million – and that's just the beginning.

14d

'Overwatch' Switch case raises hopes for a port

Blizzard might finally bring Overwatch to the Switch a year after the developer admitted that it's a possibility. Gaming tipster Wario64 has posted photos of a black and yellow …

14d

Instagram is building an app called Threads to share location, battery life, and speed, says report

While Instagram already offers direct messaging in its app, The Verge suggests that the newest idea may be a concerted effort to help claim territory from rival photo and video messaging app, …

14d

Here's What Would Happen if You Nuked a Hurricane

Researchers have actually looked into it.

14d

China Trade Spillover, LA’s Pollution by Block, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

14d

Metal particles abraded from tattooing needles travel inside the body

Allergic reactions are common side effects of tattoos and pigments have been blamed for this. Now researchers prove, for the first time, that particles wear from the needle during the tattooing process and contain the allergens nickel and chromium and therefore could also induce allergies.

14d

High-fat diet in utero protects against Alzheimer's later, Temple team shows in mice

A high-fat diet can carry health risks, but for mothers-to-be, it may make all the difference when it comes to Alzheimer's disease prevention for their children. In a report published online Aug. 26 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, researchers at Temple's Lewis Katz School of Medicine show for the first time in animals that high maternal fat consumption during gestation protects offspring agai

14d

SpaceX Dragon Set for Return Trip From ISS

The SpaceX Dragon cargo capsule approaches the International Space Station on July 27, 2019. (Credit: NASA) A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will return to Earth on August 27, bringing back experiments from the International Space Station (ISS), including investigations into how moss grows in space. The capsule originally launched July 25 from Cape Canaveral on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, taking two

14d

How Komodo Dragons Survived Extinction as Other Giant Reptiles Went Extinct

(Credit: Ruchira Somaweera) (Inside Science) — Extinction wiped out their closest family members as well as most of the ancient reptiles of comparable size. But the largest lizards still on the planet, the Komodo dragon, survived due to a lucky combination of mediocre habitat on their home islands and unintended human interventions. “You would have thought the Komodo would have been wiped out, an

14d

Apple re-patches vulnerability that briefly allowed users to jailbreak their iPhones

However, for Apple fans that largely enjoy the iOS experience and don't want to jump ship over the lack of customization alone, there's one solution: jailbreaking their device.

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

Researchers target cancer's protective barrier

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

14d

Cyborgs will replace humans and remake the world, James Lovelock says

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

14d

Robots Taking Over Jobs? Workers Might Welcome That

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

14d

14d

Googles real-time sign language translation

submitted by /u/dbrion [link] [comments]

14d

14d

K+ channel study could help develop drugs for life-threatening conditions

Scientists recently completed a study in which they attempted to capture at atomic resolution a picture/snapshot of one of the two ion-bound configuration that seem to coexist within the selectivity filter of K+-channel.

14d

Our social lives (and sex lives) are key to good health

Having lunch with your friends may be just as important in keeping you alive as exercising, Linda Waite argues. Waite’s research on social well-being has provided key insights into how our social lives affect our physical health. “My dream would be that people would have healthier more satisfying lives,” says Waite, a professor of urban sociology at the University of Chicago. “If they and we as a

14d

Martian Winds Could Spread Microbe Hitchhikers

Microbes fly tens of miles over Chile’s dry, UV-blasted Atacama Desert—and scientists say the same could happen on Mars. Christopher Intagliata reports.

14d

There are 12 million stateless people in the world. Who are they?

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the world is host to 12 million people who don't officially belong to any state. People can become stateless through a variety of means, including racial discrimination, sexist nationality laws, voluntary choice, or bureaucratic accidents. Who are these millions of stateless individuals? What is life like for them? Can their situatio

14d

Scientists identify potential cause of statin-related muscle pain

An international team of BHF-funded researchers may have discovered why some people experience muscle pain after taking statins and have shown that moderate exercise may be a good way for people taking statins to avoid these symptoms.

14d

Individualized approach to identify 'fertile windows' could benefit many women

Menstrual cycles are considerably varied with only 13% of women having cycles that last 28 days, according to a new study led by UCL and Natural Cycles, a contraceptive app.

14d

Social, executive brain functions crucial for communication

Impairments in social and executive brain functions hinder effective communication, according to new research in patients with dementia.

14d

Deep transformations needed to achieve Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change call for deep transformations that require complementary actions by governments, civil society, science, and business.

14d

Daydreams Shape Your Sense of Self – Facts So Romantic

Certain daydreams reflect what is important to a person; what worries them, who they care about, and what they love and aspire to do. Photograph by Crispy Fish Images / Shutterstock You are at home, cutting onions for dinner, and tear up from the vapor. Your mother, teaching you how to cut onions when you were a child, pops into your mind: Guide the blade against the knuckles of your free hand, c

14d

Mosquito incognito: Could graphene-lined clothing help prevent mosquito bites?

A new study shows that graphene sheets can block the signals mosquitoes use to identify a blood meal, potentially enabling a new chemical-free approach to mosquito bite prevention.

14d

Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

Scientists have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models.

14d

Biotech companies issue first declaration on human gene editing

Industry declares that it will not make DNA changes affecting future generations

14d

Fallout suggests a nuclear reactor blew up in Russia, experts say

Nuclear experts confirm that the Russian explosion that occurred earlier in August was likely from a nuclear reactor. Rapidly decaying radioactive isotopes were found in the surrounding area. A number of independent researchers confirmed the findings. In the aftermath of the mysterious nuclear explosion at a Russians weapons site, more details are beginning to emerge regarding the spread of radia

14d

Elusive key to stopping neglected tropical diseases

Researchers have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America.

14d

Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil

In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil.

14d

K+ channel study could help develop drugs for life-threatening conditions

Scientists recently completed a study in which they attempted to capture at atomic resolution a picture/snapshot of one of the two ion-bound configuration that seem to coexist within the selectivity filter of K+-channel.

14d

How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea

An international team of scientists reports that a single amino acid change in the light-sensing rhodopsin protein played a critical role when herring adapted to the red-shifted light environment in the Baltic Sea. Remarkably about one third of all fish living in brackish or freshwater carry the same change.

14d

Quest for new cancer treatment crosses milestone

A cancer therapy has crossed a milestone in clinical trials, a major development in a decades-long quest to develop a treatment that destroys tumors without the debilitating side effects of chemotherapy, invasive surgery and radiation.

14d

Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

Scientists have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models.

14d

Martian Winds Could Spread Microbe Hitchhikers

Microbes fly tens of miles over Chile’s dry, UV-blasted Atacama Desert—and scientists say the same could happen on Mars. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Chemists discover water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide

Despite its abundance, water retains a great many secrets. Among them, chemists have discovered, is that water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide.

14d

Mosquito incognito: Could graphene-lined clothing help prevent mosquito bites?

A new study shows that graphene sheets can block the signals mosquitoes use to identify a blood meal, potentially enabling a new chemical-free approach to mosquito bite prevention.

14d

Martian Winds Could Spread Microbe Hitchhikers

Microbes fly tens of miles over Chile’s dry, UV-blasted Atacama Desert—and scientists say the same could happen on Mars. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Gee, 8?

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, August 26. Here’s what we’re watching. (LUDOVIC MARIN / POOL / REUTERS) A Tale of Two Summits: As the G7 summit in France wrapped up today, President Donald Trump said he’d be open to meeting with Iranian Presid

14d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image