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nyheder2019august29

Brain waves detected in mini-brains grown in a dish

Scientists have created miniature brains from stem cells that developed functional neural networks. Despite being a million times smaller than human brains, these lab-grown brains are the first observed to produce brain waves that resemble those of preterm babies. The study, published August 29 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, could help scientists better understand human brain development.

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Lab-Grown "Mini Brains" Can Now Mimic the Neural Activity of a Preterm Infant

The so-called organoids are not capable of complex thought but could be used to study neurological diseases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Opioid Reckoning Will Not Be Just

A hospital is a menagerie of dangerous products. The magnets in an MRI scanner could hurl an IV pole across the room and impale a person. A defibrillator can restart your heart, but the same electric shock could stop it. The operating room is a repository of scalpels and saws and drills made specifically to penetrate and shred human organs. Opiate medications likewise serve as powerful tools to r

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A protective factor against Alzheimer's disease?

Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich have found that a protein called TREM2 could positively influence the course of Alzheimer's disease.

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First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives

By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives.

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Global warming may diminish plant genetic variety in Central Europe

Only a few individuals of a plant species may be prepared for increasing droughts.

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Biophysics: The art of worming through tight spaces

How active matter, such as assemblages of bacterial or epithelial cells, manages to expand into narrow spaces largely depends on their growth dynamics, as Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists demonstrate in a newly published study.

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Hints of a volcanically active exomoon

A rocky extrasolar moon (exomoon) with bubbling lava may orbit a planet 550 light-years away from us. This is suggested by an international team of researchers led by the University of Bern on the basis of theoretical predictions matching observations. The 'exo-Io' would appear to be an extreme version of Jupiter's moon Io.

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All-optical neural network for deep learning

In a key step toward making large-scale optical neural networks practical, researchers have demonstrated a first-of-its-kind multilayer all-optical artificial neural network. Researchers detail their two-layer all-optical neural network and successfully apply it to a complex classification task.

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This protein is how creatures sense cold, researchers discover

Researchers have identified a receptor protein that can detect when winter is coming.

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Brain waves detected in mini-brains grown in a dish

Scientists have created miniature brains from stem cells that developed functional neural networks. Despite being a million times smaller than human brains, these lab-grown brains are the first observed to produce brain waves that resemble those of preterm babies. The study, published August 29 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, could help scientists better understand human brain development.

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Ancient teeth shed light on Miocene 'mouse' migration

A new species of prehistoric murine—the group of mammals that includes mice, rats, and their relatives—has been identified from fossils discovered in Lebanon. The findings, presented in Scientific Reports, represent the first known physical evidence that the initial dispersal of mice from Asia to Africa took place through the Levant.

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Lab-Grown "Mini Brains" Can Now Mimic the Neural Activity of a Preterm Infant

The so-called organoids are not capable of complex thought but could be used to study neurological diseases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can we choose to fall out of love? | Dessa

What's the best way to get over heartbreak? Rapper and writer Dessa came up with an unconventional approach after a chance viewing of Helen Fisher's TED Talk about the brains of the lovestruck. In a wryly funny talk, she describes how she worked with a neuroscientist to try to get her brain to fall out of love with her ex — and shares wisdom about romance that she gained along the way.

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Parenting stress may affect mother's and child's ability to tune in to each other

A study has revealed the effects of the stress of parenting in the brains of both mothers and their children. The researchers analyzed the brain activity of 31 pairs of mother and child from Singapore while they were watching children's animation clips together.

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Plant diversity and endemism in China: Unreachable locations and diverse microclimates

Researchers have embarked on a treasure hunt into China's biodiversity hotspots, including the descriptions of 23 species previously unknown to science and new insights into the ecological diversity of ferns based on their DNA sequences.

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Small changes, big gains: Low-cost techniques dramatically boost learning in STEM classes

Low-cost, active teaching techniques — particularly group work and worksheets — substantially improve learning in university science classes, according to a new study involving 3,700 biology students.

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Ultra-fast bomb detection method could upgrade airport security

Researchers have revealed a new ultra-fast method to detect materials that could be used to build explosives. The new detection method is able to analyze a wider range of materials than current thermal based detection systems used in today's airports, while reducing false positive reports.

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Business this week

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Capcom Teases New ‘Resisdent Evil’ Game ‘Project Resistance’

Like a zombie, Capcom’s Resident Evil series refuses to die. Unlike a zombie, that’s a good thing. The seminal survival horror series has gifted us some of the greatest …

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New ways to make vertical farming stack up

Cultivating fresh produce in an artificial environment is getting cheaper

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Cerebral organoids are becoming more brainlike

Like real brains, they show signs of synchronous electrical activity

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Pregnant women of color say doctors and nurses mislead them

Many pregnant women of color perceive their interactions with doctors, nurses, and midwives as being misleading, according to new research. The study finds women of color believe information is being “packaged” in such a way as to disempower them by limiting maternity health care choices for themselves and their children. “Given the significant birth-related disparities faced by women of color, p

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Having multiple spouses can benefit women, too

New research challenges evolution-derived sexual stereotypes about men and women and finds that multiple spouses can be good for women, too. It’s well known that men benefit reproductively from having multiple spouses, but the reasons why women might benefit from multiple marriages are not as clear. Women, as a result of pregnancy and lactation, can’t reproduce as quickly. “We can’t pin down the

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Norsk lejlighed hærget efter løbehjulsbrand

En lejlighed er 'ubeboelig', efter en brand, der blev startet under opladning af elløbehjul.

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Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber

The quantum internet promises absolutely tap-proof communication and powerful distributed sensor networks for new science and technology. However, because quantum information cannot be copied, it is not possible to send this information over a classical network. Quantum information must be transmitted by quantum particles, and special interfaces are required for this. The Innsbruck-based experimen

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Africa's Mukula trees score a victory as trade is put under closer scrutiny

CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – has decided to include Mukula trees, one of many rosewood species, in its Annex II listing. Species covered by CITES are listed in three Annexes according to how much protection they need. Annex II includes species not directly threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled to ensure thei

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Treat citizens as partners, not participants, to improve air quality research

Encouraging citizens to take part in almost every step of scientific air quality research improves their understanding of how air pollution affects their health, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

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The 'inflammation' of opioid use

New research correlates inflammation in the brain and gut to negative emotional state during opioid withdrawal.

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Changes in ice volume control seabed methane emissions

New research shows that episodes of methane emission from the seabed off western Svalbard correlate with changing ice volumes in the Arctic.

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How changes in land use could reduce the browning of lakes

Over the past 50 years, the water in lakes and watercourses has turned increasingly brown. The so-called browning has a negative impact on both drinking water production and ecosystems. If nothing is done, the water is likely to turn even browner — however, there is hope.

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Theory reveals the nature of crystals defects (of silicon carbide)

Imperfections of crystal structure, especially edge dislocations of an elongated nature, deeply modify basic properties of the entire material and, in consequence, drastically limit its applications. Using silicon carbide as an example, physicists from Cracow and Warsaw have shown that even such computationally demanding defects can be successfully examined with atomic accuracy by means of a cleve

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Immortalized blood cell lines enable new studies of malaria invasion

Researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London have established a new model system that uses red blood cells grown in the laboratory to study how malaria parasites invade red blood cells.

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Africa's Mukula trees score a victory as trade is put under closer scrutiny

CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – has decided to include Mukula trees, one of many rosewood species, in its Annex II listing. Species covered by CITES are listed in three Annexes according to how much protection they need. Annex II includes species not directly threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled to ensure thei

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Adults with cerebral palsy about twice as likely to develop non-communicable diseases

Adults with cerebral palsy are about twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and chronic respiratory disease compared to adults without cerebral palsy, according to a new study.

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All-optical neural network for deep learning

In a key step toward making large-scale optical neural networks practical, researchers have demonstrated a first-of-its-kind multilayer all-optical artificial neural network. Researchers detail their two-layer all-optical neural network and successfully apply it to a complex classification task.

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Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)

New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it.

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Creepy Robotic Worm Could Wriggle Through Your Brain Arteries

A team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have invented a tiny robotic worm that could be steered through the tiny arteries in the human brain using a magnet. The invention could open new doors for minimally invasive brain surgery by accessing places in the brain that have thus far remained unreachable. It could treat lesions and help unblock blockages in the brain

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Negative interest rate policies are backfiring: new research

Negative interest rate policies—where nominal rates are set below zero percent—have been introduced in Europe and Japan to stimulate flagging economies but research from the University of Bath shows the unconventional monetary strategy may be doing more harm than good.

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Modern hunter-gatherer children could tell us how human culture evolved and inspire new ways of teaching

When Eteni, a 13-month-old baby living in the dense rainforests of Congo, attempts to cut freshly hunted meat with a sharp knife, no one interferes. In fact, Eteni can often be found playing with sharp tools and imitating her nine-year-old aunt, Bwaka, who is already efficient at digging wild yams and cutting bush meat with her machete.

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The Health Benefits of Coffee

How does drinking coffee help your body and your brain? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study discovers abnormal expression of genes in psychopathy

The expression of many genes that have previously been associated with autism is abnormal also in violent psychopathy, a new study shows. The researchers used stem cell technology to analyze the expression of genes and proteins in the brain cells of psychopathic violent offenders. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the findings may open up new avenues for the treatment of psychopathy.

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Researchers describe a key protein for Epstein-Barr virus infection

Two studies by IRB Barcelona and IBMB-CSIC published in Nature Communications reveal the portal structure of the Epstein-Barr virus and bacteriophage T7.No treatment is currently available for the infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, which, in addition to causing mononucleosis, leads to various types of cancer.The studies were done in collaboration with CNB-CSIC and the University of Oxford

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Treat citizens as partners, not participants, to improve air quality research

Encouraging citizens to take part in almost every step of scientific air quality research improves their understanding of how air pollution affects their health, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

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Plant diversity and endemism in China: Unreachable locations and diverse microclimates

The latest special issue of the scholarly, open-access and peer-reviewed journal PhytoKeys embarks on a treasure hunt into China's biodiversity hotspots, including the descriptions of 23 species previously unknown to science and new insights into the ecological diversity of ferns based on their DNA sequences.

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Researchers demonstrate all-optical neural network for deep learning

In a key step toward making large-scale optical neural networks practical, researchers have demonstrated a first-of-its-kind multilayer all-optical artificial neural network. In Optica, The Optical Society's journal for high-impact research, researchers from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong detail their two-layer all-optical neural network and successfully apply it to

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Amazon fires: Local Indigenous people show fire can be used sustainably

As thousands of fires rage across the Amazon, world headlines have highlighted the associated illegal deforestation and international outcry. But the implicit categorization of all these fires as "wildfires" or even just "bad" fires hides the fact that fire is also used sustainably in the region. In fact, for numerous smallholders and Indigenous peoples, it is part of their livelihood and cultural

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Amazon fires: Brazil bans land clearance blazes for 60 days

The 60-day ban comes as a leading environmentalist warns "the worst of the fire is yet to come".

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Should parents help their kids with homework?

Schools across the country encourage parents to help their children with homework.

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Luxembourg's Bold Plan to Mine Asteroids for Rare Minerals

Photographer Ezio D'Agostino documents the tiny European country's space-mining ambitions.

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Why you might want a NAS drive

A NAS drive gives you a central repository for all your files. (Alex Cheung via Unsplash/) They don't get as much attention as smart speakers or fitness trackers , but network attached storage (NAS) drives are still worth a place in your smart home. Essentially, NAS drives are hard drives that connect to the web, making them extremely versatile and presenting a host of useful applications. The ba

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Round-up: the key decisions to protect wildlife from the CITES summit

Giraffes, sharks and otters were granted stronger protections at the CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva, but a stalemate prevailed on elephants and the ivory trade

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Researchers demonstrate all-optical neural network for deep learning

Even the most powerful computers are still no match for the human brain when it comes to pattern recognition, risk management, and other similarly complex tasks. Recent advances in optical neural networks, however, are closing that gap by simulating the way neurons respond in the human brain.

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Amazon fires: Eight ways you can help

A tragedy continues to unfold across the Amazon. Tens of thousands of fires are raging across the region, destroying large swathes of forest in Brazil, Bolivia and Peru. Unlike boreal forests, the Amazon is not adapted to fire, which means that burnt forests may take centuries to recoup the lost indigenous trees, wildlife and carbon-storing capacity.

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Nuke Mars? Here Are Some (Hopefully Better) Alternatives

Scientists and science fiction writers have been toying with the idea of terraforming Mars for the better part of a century. Turning the red planet green is seen as a crucial step towards humankind becoming an interstellar species. One recent suggestion is that it could be done by launching nuclear weapons at Mars. The explosions would, in theory, release CO2 and create a greenhouse effect, there

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Parenting stress may affect mother's and child's ability to tune in to each other

A study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has revealed the effects of the stress of parenting in the brains of both mothers and their children.The researchers analysed the brain activity of 31 pairs of mother and child from Singapore while they were watching children's animation clips together.

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Adults with cerebral palsy about twice as likely to develop non-communicable diseases

Adults with cerebral palsy are about twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and chronic respiratory disease compared to adults without cerebral palsy, according to a new study led by RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) and Brunel University London.

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Researchers reveal ultra-fast bomb detection method that could upgrade airport security

Researchers from the University of Surrey have revealed a new ultra-fast method to detect materials that could be used to build explosives. The new detection method is able to analyse a wider range of materials than current thermal based detection systems used in today's airports, while reducing false positive reports.

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Better chemistry through tiny antennae

A research team at The University of Tokyo has developed a new method for actively controlling the breaking of chemical bonds by shining infrared lasers on tiny antennae. This research may have applications in improving the yields of chemical reactions.

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Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association August 2019 issue

The August 2019 issue of the journal also features research about housing loss and cognitive decline, napping as an early marker of cognitive impairment and a special article on 'super-agers'.

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Estimate of the national burden of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck cancers

Investigators from the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (DFBWCC) have conducted the largest study to date on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in the U.S., finding that 75 percent of oropharynx cancers are related to HPV and the U.S. incidence of HPV-related throat cancer is 4.6 per 100,000 people, peaking in those aged 60-64.

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Small changes, big gains: Low-cost techniques dramatically boost learning in STEM classes

Low-cost, active teaching techniques — particularly group work and worksheets — substantially improve learning in university science classes, according to a new study involving 3,700 University of British Columbia (UBC) biology students.

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Nanoparticles 'click' immune cells to make a deeper penetration into tumors

IBS scientists reported a novel targeting strategy that allows deep tumor penetration of drug-loaded nanoparticles. They induced the linking of immune cell-targeting antibodies to drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cells, instead of taking them up in the cells or using antibody-nanoparticle conjugates.

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Mars mission readies tiny chopper for Red Planet flight

The next US space agency robot to explore the Red Planet will carry a small helicopter with it.

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Arctic team maps five islands found by Russian student

Marina Migunova spotted the islands in photos showing a shrinking Arctic glacier.

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Helping giraffes and 6 other key decision from CITES wildlife summit

Giraffes, sharks and otters were granted stronger protections at the CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva, but a stalemate prevailed on elephants and the ivory trade

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If I have a disease-causing gene, should my doctor tell my family?

Genetic testing is undermining medical norms as people sue their doctors for either telling them or not telling them a relative’s diagnosis, says Laura Spinney

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Don’t go bananas: Should we be cutting down on the fruit we eat?

News that some zoos have stopped feeding monkeys fruit has led people to suggest humans avoid it too. But that ignores a few crucial details, says James Wong

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Apple will let more independent repair shops buy ‘genuine’ iPhone parts

Apple will now allow more independent repair shops to buy “genuine” iPhone parts and tools, allowing them to complete repairs in roughly the same way that an Apple Store would. The …

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By continuously watching the moon, we could detect interstellar meteorites

When "Oumuamua crossed Earth's orbit on October 19th, 2017, it became the first interstellar object ever to be observed by humans. These and subsequent observations, rather than dispelling the mystery of "Oumuamua's true nature, only deepened it. The debate raged about whether it was an asteroid or a comet, with some even suggesting it could be an extraterrestrial solar sail.

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The art of worming through tight spaces

How active matter, such as assemblages of bacterial or epithelial cells, manages to expand into narrow spaces largely depends on their growth dynamics, as LMU physicists demonstrate in a newly published study.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Bør jeg sætte en lynafleder på mit hus?

Sommerens tordenvejr kan få enhver til at se sig omkring efter det højeste punkt. Hvis det er huset, bør man så få sig en lynafleder?

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NASA Finally Assembled The James Webb Space Telescope

Baby Steps! After years of delays , NASA has made a monumental step forward in its plan to replace the Hubble Space Telescope. Its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, is finally in one piece, according to CNET . It’s still on Earth, but hey, connecting the advanced telescope to its spacecraft components has to count for something, right? Jokes aside, the fact that the space observatory is

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Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)

New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it.

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Mechanism of epilepsy causing membrane protein is discovered

The team lead by Dr. Lim Hyun-Ho of Korea Brain Research Institute published its paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). A new structure of membrane protein is discovered and the principle of ion exchange transport identified.

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Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber

For the first time, a team led by Innsbruck physicist Ben Lanyon has sent a light particle entangled with matter over 50 km of optical fiber. This paves the way for the practical use of quantum networks and sets a milestone for a future quantum internet.

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Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics

The cosmological constant introduced a century ago by Albert Einstein is a thorn in the side of physicists. The difference between the theoretical prediction of this parameter and its measurement is of the order of 10,121. This estimate is considered the worst in the history of physics. A researcher from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, proposes an approach that may resolve this inconsistenc

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Boys dance too—and in Japan they are celebrated

The western world's dance community rallied over the weekend, taking Good Morning America host Lara Spencer to task for her mockery of Prince George and his love of ballet. Under the hashtag #boysdancetoo, representatives of the dance world including Gene Kelly's widow Patricia Ward, Fame's Debbie Allen and So You Think You Can Dance US winner Travis Wall, as well as dance parents and students wor

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The Australian winter was dry, the spring will likely be dry

Winter still has a few days to run, but it's highly likely to be one of Australia's warmest and driest on record. While final numbers will be crunched once August ends, this winter will probably rank among the top ten warmest for daytime temperatures and the top ten driest for rainfall.

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How cat poop kills California sea otters

New research traces fatal strains of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii in California sea otters to feral domestic cats and bobcats from nearby watersheds. The infection is fatal for only a fraction of the wild southern sea otters, which has long puzzled scientists. The study appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B . “This is decades in the making,” says corresponding author Karen Shapiro,

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Let's change the 'girls play flute, boys bash drums' stereotypes

In 2019, surely we are past the days in music class where boys are shunted to drums and trombone while girls are pushed toward flute and choir? Not necessarily so.

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Study shows the non-exponential decay of a giant artificial atom

To date, research in quantum optics has primarily investigated the relation between light and matter using small atoms interacting with electromagnetic fields that have substantially larger wavelengths. In an unconventional new study, a team at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light set out to explore the interaction between a large atom a

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No one cares about restaurants' stances on animal welfare, study finds

Businesses are increasingly embracing social causes as a way to promote brand trust among consumers while also attempting to better society. Chipotle, for example, made headlines when it released "Back to the Start," an advertisement promoting more humane food production. Yet the restaurant industry, which is often criticized due to concerns about animal welfare and employee wages, has otherwise b

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Archaeologist unearths history in Mississippi River Valley

In the farmlands of the Mississippi River Valley, earth is continuously cleared and leveled—a result of the region's booming agriculture industry. But beneath the soil lies an important piece of American history, one a Florida State University anthropology professor is working to piece together.

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BMW Unveils a Car Coated in Vantablack

All Black Everything Vantablack is a coating so black , anything covered in it appears to disappear, replaced by the blackest of black voids. Now, the company behind the coating, Surrey NanoSystems, has teamed up with BMW to see what it looks like when you paint a vehicle with Vantablack — and it’s about as trippy as you’d expect. Barely There On Wednesday, BMW announced the creation of a BMW X6

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Spotify aims to turn podcast fans into podcast creators with ‘Create podcast’ test

Spotify is testing a new ‘Create podcast’ feature that shows up atop a user’s list of their subscribed podcasts in the app interface, as first uncovered by Jane Manchung Wong …

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Researchers develop process flow for high-res 3D printing of mini soft robotic actuators

SUTD, SUSTech and ZJU researchers' proposed process flow guides 3D printing of miniature soft pneumatic actuators. Integrating the prints into a robotic system offers potential applications in jet-engine maintenance and minimally invasive surgery.

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Synthesis of UV absorbers from cashew nut shell liquid

Researchers succeeded in using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a substitute for petroleum in organic synthesis. Their aim was the development of a sustainable synthesis of soluble organic UV filters.

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DGIST Successfully defined the identity and dynamics of adult gastric isthmus stem cells

Successfully identified the existence of two types of 'gastric isthmus stem cells' with different roles and characteristics using a multi-color identification technology. Expects to clarify and treat causes of gastric diseases such as cancer.

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Blocking specific protein could provide new treatment for deadly form of prostate cancer

Blocking a kinase known as CDK7 sets off a chain reaction that results in the death of prostate cancer cells that have spread and are resistant to standard therapies.

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Fossil colour studies are changing our idea of how dinosaurs looked

What colour were the dinosaurs? If you have a picture in your head, fresh studies suggest you may need to revise it. New fossil research also suggests that pigment-producing structures go beyond how the dinosaurs looked and may have played a fundamental role inside their bodies too.

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NASA invites students to name Mars 2020 rover

Red rover, red rover, send a name for Mars 2020 right over! NASA is recruiting help from students nationwide to find a name for its next Mars rover mission.

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Coating makes lithium metal batteries last and last

A new coating may finally make lightweight lithium metal batteries safe and long-lasting, researchers report. The new research could help usher in the next generation of electric vehicles. Scientists have for decades relegated the battery to the laboratory because of its short life expectancy and occasional fiery demise while its rechargeable sibling, the lithium-ion battery, now rakes in more th

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Air India to stop using single-use plastic on flights

Debt-ridden Air India said Thursday it will stop using single-use plastic and replace packaging with eco-friendly paper and wooden cutlery, as the government ramps up its "clean India" mission.

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James Webb Space Telescope assembled for the first time

To combine both halves of Webb, engineers carefully lifted the Webb telescope (which includes the mirrors and science instruments) above the already-combined sunshield and spacecraft using a crane. Team members slowly guided the telescope into place, ensuring that all primary points of contact were perfectly aligned and seated properly. The observatory has been mechanically connected; next steps w

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Telescope for NASA's WFIRST mission advances to new phase of development

On schedule to launch in the mid-2020s, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission will help uncover some of the biggest mysteries in the cosmos. The state-of-the-art telescope on the WFIRST spacecraft will play a significant role in this, providing the largest picture of the universe ever seen with the same depth and precision as the Hubble Space Telescope.

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How elephant declines are affecting African forests

John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, has received an $848,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the effects of declining elephant populations on Africa's forests.

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How elephant declines are affecting African forests

John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, has received an $848,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the effects of declining elephant populations on Africa's forests.

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NASA's Mars helicopter attached to Mars 2020 rover

Engineers attached NASA's Mars Helicopter, which will be the first aircraft to fly on another planet, to the belly of the Mars 2020 rover today in the High Bay 1 clean room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

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Results: Study on impact of increased information volumes on researcher workload

Elsevier, the large information and analytics company that also serves as a platform for multiple publishing entities, has released the results of a study the company carried out with a charity organization called Sense About Science. The researchers sent surveys to people in the research field analyzed the results. The goal of the study was to learn more about the impact that increasing volumes o

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A unique conducting state under UV-irradiation

A highly conducting state has been found in a molecular crystal under UV-irradiation. The state reversibly appears in accordance with UV-irradiation, but does not appear by any other method such as raising the temperature, which often induces metallic behavior in insulating molecular crystals. The UV-excited state exhibits conduction and magnetic behavior characteristic of metallic substances. The

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UN report on oceans, frozen zones: the facts

Humanity should brace itself for some serious blowback over this century and beyond from the oceans and Earth's frozen zones, known as the cryosphere, according to the draft of a major UN report obtained by AFP.

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Most-comprehensive analysis of fentanyl crisis urges innovative action

The sudden appearance of the drug fentanyl in the US has driven up overdose deaths dramatically, even as the abuse of heroin and other opioids has shown signs of stabilizing. In the most-comprehensive analysis yet of the crisis, researchers urge that innovative new strategies be pursued because the epidemic is unlike others that have struck the nation.

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Inflammation triggers silent mutation to cause deadly lung disease

Researchers have found that inflammation in the lungs of rats, triggered by something as simple as the flu, may wake up a silent genetic defect that causes sudden onset cases of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly form of high blood pressure in the lungs.

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Closing the gap: A two-tier mechanism for epithelial barrier

Scientists from Japan's National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborators report in a new study published in the Journal of Cell Biology that the epithelial barrier is composed of two molecular systems with distinct barrier properties.

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Closing the gap: A two-tier mechanism for epithelial barrier

Scientists from Japan's National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborators report in a new study published in the Journal of Cell Biology that the epithelial barrier is composed of two molecular systems with distinct barrier properties.

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Analyzing the world's oldest woody plant fossil

Mapping the evolution of life on Earth requires a detailed understanding of the fossil record, and scientists are using synchrotron-based technologies to look back—way, way back—at the cell structure and chemistry of the earliest known woody plant.

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Negative interest rate policies are backfiring — new research

Negative interest rate policies in Europe and Japan were intended to stimulate flagging economies but research from the University of Bath they may be doing more harm than good.

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A unique conducting state under UV-irradiation

A highly conducting state has been found in a molecular crystal under UV-irradiation. The state reversibly appears in accordance with UV-irradiation, but does not appear by any other method such as raising the temperature, which often induces metallic behavior in insulating molecular crystals. The UV-excited state exhibits conduction and magnetic behavior characteristic of metallic substances. The

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Global study reveals most popular marketing metrics

Satisfaction is the most popular metric for marketing decisions around the world, according to a new study from the University of Technology Sydney.

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KAIST vaccine for tick-borne disease 'SFTS' protects against lethal infection

A KAIST research team reported the development of a DNA vaccine for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus (SFTSV) which completely protects against lethal infection in ferrets. The team confirmed that ferrets immunized with DNA vaccines encoding all SFTSV proteins showed 100% survival rate without detectable viremia and did not develop any clinical symptoms.

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Singapore researchers reveal a common deficiency in genetic prediction methods

A study conducted by researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore and the School of Biological Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) revealed a common deficiency in existing artificial intelligence methods used to predict enhancer-promoter interactions, that may result in inflated performance me

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New study reveals graphenes now go monolayer and single crystalline

An international team of researchers, led by Distinguished Professor Rodney S. Ruoff (School of Natural Sciences) from the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at UNIST, has reported a truly single layer (i.e., adlayer-free) large area graphene film on large area copper foils. This might seem like the latest in a series of seemingly simi

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Nanoparticles 'click' immune cells to make a deeper penetration into tumors

IBS scientists have reported a novel targeting strategy that allows deep tumor penetration of drug-loaded nanoparticles. They induced the linking of immune cell-targeting antibodies to drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cells, instead of taking them up in the cells or using antibody-nanoparticle conjugates.

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Tracking Tumor Metastasis

Learn more about the progression from primary tumors to metastatic cancers, a step-by-step outline of the mechanism of metastasis, the phenotypes of tumor cells, and tumor analysis via 2D and 3D techniques!

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Burgundy wine grapes tell climate story, show warming accelerated in past 30 years

A new series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest line of evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in Burgundy, France, have been picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous 6 centuries, pointing to the region's hotter and drier climate in recent years.

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Food-waste study reveals trends behind discarded items

Americans throw out a lot more food than they expect they will, food waste that is likely driven in part by ambiguous date labels on packages, a new study has found.

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People's initial immune response to dengue fever analyzed

Researchers have come one step closer to understanding how our immune system responds to acute dengue fever, a disease that has affected hundreds of thousands of people in Southeast Asia this summer alone. Researchers now show that so-called natural killer cells were especially active shortly after an infection. The discovery could hopefully contribute to the development of new vaccines and improv

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Extreme mangrove corals found on the Great Barrier Reef

The first documented discovery of 'extreme corals' in mangrove lagoons around Australia's Great Barrier Reef is yielding important information about how corals deal with environmental stress, scientists say. Thirty four species of coral were found to be regularly exposed to extreme low pH, low oxygen and highly variable temperature conditions making two mangrove lagoons on the Woody Isles and Howi

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Amazing new photos of asteroid Ryugu present a new mystery: who cleaned up all the dust?

A color shot of the asteroid's surface. (MASCOT/DLR/JAXA/) Last October, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft dropped a toaster-sized lander onto the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu. The Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT) tumbled around a bit, but accomplished its objective with flying colors . It cruised the rocky landscape for 17 hours, measuring temperature and magnetism, and taking some flas

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Babies Display ‘Werewolf Syndrome’ After Getting Anti-Baldness Drug by Mistake

At least 17 children, including babies, began growing hair all over their bodies after a hair loss treatment was mislabeled as heartburn medicine.

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Oceans turning from friend to foe, warns landmark UN climate report

The same oceans that nourished human evolution are poised to unleash misery on a global scale unless the carbon pollution destabilising Earth's marine environment is brought to heel, warns a draft UN report obtained by AFP.

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Report aims to improve best practice in mine rehabilitation

A first-of-its-kind report led by the Western Australian Biodiversity Science Institute aims to improve mining industry practice of how to define and measure successful mine-site rehabilitation criteria.

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Major economies drivers, victims of sea-level rise

Sea-level rises pose increasing peril to small island nations and at-risk coastal communities but will also significantly impact the world's largest economies.

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DSB’s skandaletog er blevet mere pålidelige: »Vi har sagt farvel til hangardronningerne«

PLUS. De halter stadig langt efter de endnu ældre IC3-tog, men DSB har fået langt bedre styr på sine IC4-tog, viser DSB’s seneste statusrapport om de skandaleramte tog.

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Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics

The cosmological constant, introduced a century ago by Albert Einstein in his theory of general relativity, is a thorn in the side of physicists. The difference between the theoretical prediction of this parameter and its measurement based on astronomical observations is of the order of 10121. It's no surprise to learn that this estimate is considered the worst in the entire history of physics. In

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Praksislæger overtager patienter fra hovedstadens to regionsklinikker

De to midlertidige regionsklinikker på Amager og Frederiksberg Hospital lukker om få måneder ned og sender patienterne videre til praktiserende læger på almindelige overenskomstmæssige vilkår.

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Lægestafetten: Jeg er lægernes detektiv

I en ny portrætserie af læger i Danmark møder vi akutmediciner Mats Lindberg. I et travlt speciale består hans dagligdag i at lave detektivarbejde og placere patienter på de rigtige hylder i kapløb med tiden.

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Melting glaciers, as well as ice sheets, raising Earth's seas

As the planet's polar ice sheets destabilise amid rising temperatures, a landmark UN assessment of Earth's retreating frozen spaces is also set to spell out how melting mountain glaciers will impact humanity in the decades to come.

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Freshening up contaminated water

Nitrate is a troublesome groundwater contaminant that is mainly caused by fertilizer runoff on farmlands. Many wells in agricultural regions exceed the EPA limit for nitrate in drinking water, and without an economical treatment option the water is unfit for potable use.

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Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers

The famed quantum physicist Max Planck had an idiosyncratic view about what spurred scientific progress: death. That is, Planck thought, new concepts generally take hold after older scientists with entrenched ideas vanish from the discipline.

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Massive modern catacombs set to open in Jerusalem

Workers are completing three years of labor on a massive subterranean necropolis under a mountain just outside Jerusalem. It's comprised of one mile, or about 1.5 kilometers, of tunnels with sepulchers for interring the dead.

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Humility is a double-edged sword for some leaders, study shows

Most would agree that hubris is commonplace in corporate America. (Cue the joke that CEO stands for chief ego officer.) Some studies have concluded that the very narcissism that defines many leaders is detrimental to good leadership.

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Bacteria-attacking phages could provide clues to antibiotic resistance

Is there a solution to bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics? One answer may be found by studying the world's largest and most brutal army, new University of Otago microbiology research shows.

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Pancreas on a chip

'Islet-on-a-chip' offers continuous monitoring of insulin-producing cells, indicating whether they have therapeutic value and are suitable for transplant. Miniature, automated, easy-to-use device improves decision making for clinicians. New method streamlines fundamental research into insulin-producing cells and insulin-stimulating compounds, and improves drug screening.

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Closing the gap — a two-tier mechanism for epithelial barrier

Scientists from Japan's National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborators report in a new study published in The Journal of Cell Biology that epithelial barrier is composed of two molecular systems with distinct barrier properties.

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Burgundy wine grapes tell climate story, show warming accelerated in past 30 years

A new series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest line of evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in Burgundy, France, have been picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous 6 centuries, pointing to the region's hotter and drier climate in recent years. The results are publ

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Bacteria-attacking phages could provide clues to antibiotic resistance

Is there a solution to bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics? One answer may be found by studying the world's largest and most brutal army, new University of Otago microbiology research shows.

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Return to sender: Malaysia seeks origin of tons of plastic waste

Malaysia wants to return almost 200 shipping containers believed to contain plastic waste, officials said Thursday, but first they need to work out where they came from.

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UN chief moots summit to tackle Amazon fires

The head of the United Nations Thursday mooted a meeting of key countries to drum up support to tackle the devastating Amazon forest fires, which he called a "very serious situation."

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Burgundy wine grapes tell climate story, show warming accelerated in past 30 years

A newly published series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest line of evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in Burgundy, eastern France, have been picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous six centuries, pointing to the region's hotter and drier climate in recent years

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Synthesis of UV absorbers from cashew nut shell liquid

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg in South Africa and the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania, succeeded in using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a substitute for petroleum in organic synthesis. Their aim was the development of a sustainable synthesis of soluble organi

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Right-wing WhatsApp users in Brazil are more effective at spreading disinformation

After Brazil's 2018 presidential election, international political pundits and journalists wondered if social media platform WhatsApp enabled far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro's rise to power. Northwestern University computer scientists now confirm that WhatsApp use played a key role in the electoral process.

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NASA's ECOSTRESS detects Amazon fires from space

NASA's Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) captured imagery of fires in the Amazon regions of Brazil and Bolivia on Aug. 23, 2019.

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Paying people to vote could backfire

Last week, voter enrollment for the 2019 local government elections closed in New Zealand and concerns about low voter turnout resurfaced. During a panel discussion run by Auckland Council, the idea was raised to pay people to vote to encourage participation.

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Study finds private school vouchers boost the English scores of poor children in Delhi

A decade-long study co-conducted by University of Arkansas professor Patrick Wolf shows that students in India who attended private schools through a voucher program achieved noticeably higher scores on English assessments.

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Extreme mangrove corals found on the Great Barrier Reef

The first documented discovery of "extreme corals" in mangrove lagoons around Australia's Great Barrier Reef is yielding important information about how corals deal with environmental stress, scientists say. Thirty four species of coral were found to be regularly exposed to extreme low pH, low oxygen and highly variable temperature conditions making two mangrove lagoons on the Woody Isles and Howi

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CERN simulating Jupiter

This test facility at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, was used to simulate the high-radiation environment surrounding Jupiter to prepare for ESA's JUICE mission to the largest planet in our Solar System.

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Artificial intelligence for medicine needs a Turing test – STAT

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Of Course Citizens Should Be Allowed to Kick Robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Det bureaukratiske betalingsmonster skal tæmmes

Den kommunale medfinansiering er skabt i den bedste mening for at sikre de rigtige incitamentsstrukturer i det nære sundhedsvæsen, men det fungerer ikke i praksis, skriver tidl. sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).

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What the Jetflicks and iStreamItAll Takedowns Mean for Piracy

In a sweeping indictment, the feds came down hard on two unauthorized streaming services that allegedly crossed a very important line.

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How Anthony Levandowski Put Himself at the Center of an Industry

Levandowski has been part of key developments in self-driving tech, from the Darpa Grand Challenge to his time at Google and Otto and Uber.

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How America's Spooks Seek to Spy on Distant Satellites

The intelligence community has plans for a telescope network that can see not just a blob in orbit but details such as a satellite’s solar panels.

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Image of the Day: Spinal Tap

A medical art student's master's project will be used to help train junior physicians to perform lumbar punctures.

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Pancreas on a chip: Scientists combine organ-on-a-chip and stem-cell technologies

By combining two powerful technologies, scientists are taking diabetes research to a whole new level. In a study led by Harvard University's Kevin Kit Parker, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an "Islet-on-a-Chip". The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimul

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Global warming may diminish plant genetic variety in Central Europe

Plant genetic varieties in Central Europe could collapse due to temperature extremes and drought brought on by climate change. According to a new paper, only a few individuals of a species have already adapted to extreme climate conditions. These findings suggest that the overall species genetic diversity could be greatly diminished. The publication was led by Moises Exposito-Alonso, who joins Car

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Engineers build advanced microprocessor out of carbon nanotubes

After years of tackling numerous design and manufacturing challenges, MIT researchers have built a modern microprocessor from carbon nanotube transistors, which are widely seen as a faster, greener alternative to their traditional silicon counterparts.

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Rare 3.8-Million-Year-Old Skull Recasts Origins of Iconic "Lucy" Fossil

An ancient cranium discovered in Ethiopia suggests the early hominin evolutionary tree is messier than we thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pancreas on a chip: Scientists combine organ-on-a-chip and stem-cell technologies

By combining two powerful technologies, scientists are taking diabetes research to a whole new level. In a study led by Harvard University's Kevin Kit Parker, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an "Islet-on-a-Chip". The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimul

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Global warming may diminish plant genetic variety in Central Europe

Plant genetic varieties in Central Europe could collapse due to temperature extremes and drought brought on by climate change. According to a new paper, only a few individuals of a species have already adapted to extreme climate conditions. These findings suggest that the overall species genetic diversity could be greatly diminished. The publication was led by Moises Exposito-Alonso, who joins Car

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Facebook is creating an AI assistant for Minecraft

The popular video game provides the best environment for an AI to learn a wide range of tasks, the company’s researchers say.

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Physicists create device for imitating biological memory

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have created a device that acts like a synapse in the living brain, storing information and gradually forgetting it when not accessed for a long time. Known as a second-order memristor, the new device is based on hafnium oxide and offers prospects for designing analog neurocomputers imitating the way a biological brain learns. The fin

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Break in temporal symmetry produces molecules that can encode information

In a study published in Scientific Reports, a group of researchers affiliated with São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil describes an important theoretical finding that may contribute to the development of quantum computing and spintronics (spin electronics), an emerging technology that uses electron spin or angular momentum rather than electron charge to build faster, more efficient device

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Thousands of intentionally set fires push Brazil's rainforest close to the tipping point

Thousands of fires raging across the Amazon, many deliberately set by loggers, ranchers, and others seeking to clear land, have triggered public outrage in recent weeks and prompted climate experts to warn of a fast-approaching point of no return for the lush jungle that covers more than 2 million square miles and extends into nine countries. The rich rainforest is critical to the Earth's climate,

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Sanofi R&D Head John Reed knows how to science

In 2018, the pharma giant Sanofi appointed with John Reed a new R&D head. Apparently Sanofi does not believe in PubPeer.

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The First Fatal Car Crash

In August 1869, Mary Ward took a badly needed holiday at her cousin’s castle in the Irish midlands west of Dublin. Ward was an active naturalist and astronomer, working hard to carve out a place for herself in the overwhelmingly male world of Victorian science. She was also raising eight children more or less alone. She needed some rest, and when someone at the castle suggested taking her cousin’

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The Fine Line Campus Tour Guides Walk—Backwards

T he clouds are playing matador defense on the sun when I get to the Washington, D.C., campus of Georgetown University in mid-July. They stunt at shading my already sweaty neck before retreating and allowing the sun to beat down once again. Walking into the Edward B. Bunn, S. J. Intercultural Center is a respite. There, seated and smiling behind a white pop-up table, I meet Jaydon Skinner—one of

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Microsoft's HoloLens 2 goes on sale in September – CNET

Executive vice president Harry Shum revealed the release date in Shanghai, according to Reuters.

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Extreme mangrove corals found on the Great Barrier Reef

The first documented discovery of 'extreme corals' in mangrove lagoons around Australia's Great Barrier Reef is yielding important information about how corals deal with environmental stress, scientists say. Thirty four species of coral were found to be regularly exposed to extreme low pH, low oxygen and highly variable temperature conditions making two mangrove lagoons on the Woody Isles and Howi

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The Tricky Problem with Other Minds – Issue 75: Story

Human “exceptionalism” is for many people an unquestioned assumption. For the religious, it is a God-given fact; for humanists, it is a celebration of our unique mental capacities. No other species has created music, art, literature, or built skyscrapers, or imagined going to the moon and figured out how to go there and how to get back. No other species has found treatments for common illnesses a

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Human Emotions Are Personal Narratives – Issue 75: Story

For his next book, Joseph LeDoux knew he had to go deep. He had to go back in time, way back, 3.5 billion years ago. The author of the seminal The Emotional Brain , followed by Synaptic Self and Anxious , sensed a missing element in those books on how brain anatomy and function shape human behavior and emotions. That element was evolution. In his new book, The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-

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Homo Narrativus and the Trouble with Fame – Issue 75: Story

Our understanding of fame is critical to how we see each other and our society. But it is also badly wrong. Let me tell you why. We humans are storytelling and story-finding machines: homo narrativus , if you will. In making sense of the world, we look for the shapes of meaningful narratives in everything. Even in science, we enjoy mathematical equations and algorithms because they are a kind of

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Algorithmic Foreign Policy

Artificial intelligence capable of predicting world events could radically change geopolitics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Photos: The Eerily Beautiful Bats of Arizona

The 28 species of bats that make their colonies in Arizona all belong to the Microchiroptera sub-order.

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Astronomers Baffled by 'Cosmic Mountain Ranges' Jutting Through the Milky Way

They have very little idea how these stunning geographic features form.

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More Than a Dozen Babies in Spain Developed 'Werewolf Syndrome' from Drug Mix-Up

In a pharmaceutical mix-up, babies across Spain had been inadvertently dosed with a medication for alopecia, or hair loss.

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What Is Wi-Fi 6 and When Will I Get It?

The new standard promises to improve the speed and reliability of your home Wi-Fi network. And it arrives as soon as this fall.

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Levandowski’s Fate May Turn on the Meaning of ‘Trade Secret’

Former Google and Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski was indicted on charges of stealing trade secrets. But what exactly are those, anyway?

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Of Course Citizens Should Be Allowed to Kick Robots

Seen in the wild, robots often appear cute and nonthreatening. This doesn't mean we shouldn't be hostile.

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Algorithmic Foreign Policy

Artificial intelligence capable of predicting world events could radically change geopolitics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Graphene inventor Andre Geim: No-deal Brexit would destroy UK science

Fanatics who want no-deal Brexit and remainers who refuse to compromise are risking science and the UK’s future in the process, says Nobel prizewinning physicist Andre Geim

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Perfect Crepes, by Way of Physics

Fluid-mechanics simulations point to the ideal technique — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny blog: Lad os diskutere kvinder i tech

IT-Universitetet leverer diskussionsoplæggene.

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Ny chipteknologi høster overskudsvarme fra elektronik

Ny forskning viser, hvordan små nanotråde af silicium kan bruges til at høste energi fra overskudsvarmen i elektronik, og konvertere det til elektricitet. Det kan være en ny metode til at erstatte batterier i millioner af sensorer.

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Puzzling signals seen by LIGO may be gravitational wave split in two

LIGO detected two gravitational waves coming from the same area on the same day. This unusual event may have been caused by the same wave splitting in two

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Babies, Chiropractors, and the Curse of Wishful Thinking

In the U.S., chiropractors are currently free to treat infants, and many do. Proponents argue that back manipulations are harmless and can help with everything from colic to constipation. But while the evidence for those benefits is shaky, some experts say the potential harms are very real.

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Iran’s Enemy du Jour: A Guy Who Runs a Think Tank

The same weekend Iran’s foreign minister showed up unexpectedly in France as world leaders met, his ministry went on the attack. Iran, it said in a statement, was suffering under a campaign of “economic terrorism,” pushed in part by an institution with what it called “a deceitful name”—the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD)—and its CEO, Mark Dubowitz, both of which would henceforth be sa

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Greenland Should Unite the U.S. and Denmark—Not Divide Them

Last week, President Donald Trump canceled his state visit to Denmark. What a pity. His trip would have provided American and Danish leaders an opportunity to discuss our shared opposition to routing a Russian natural-gas pipeline through Danish waters, our cooperation in the global fight against terrorism, our attitude toward Russia and China—and our common security and environmental challenges

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The People Who Think Bernie Is Moderate

Senator Elizabeth Warren wants new taxes on wealth. Senator Bernie Sanders wants Medicare for All. Senator Cory Booker wants guaranteed jobs. Jeff Mackler wants the elimination of the military budget, the nationalization of the energy and banking industries, open borders, the creation of a state-run health-care system, and the end of capitalism in the United States. A member of the Trotskyist par

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I tried the Fairphone 3: the third generation of sustainability

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How to Choose a Job That Won't Be Replaced By Robots

submitted by /u/shellfish_bonanza [link] [comments]

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California Management Review examines how AI will change business

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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UCLA group has three papers retracted

The Journal of Biological Chemistry has retracted three papers by a group from the University of California, Los Angeles, citing problems with the figures. Two of the papers, published in 2002, 2004 and 2009, have the same last author, Mark H. Doolittle, who is the first author of the most recent article. Doolittle, who appears … Continue reading

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Have conservative groups mastered the art of internet activism?

Initially, people saw the internet as a tool for driving more participatory, pluralistic, and personal discussions, especially around politics. However, with the exception of major movements like Occupy Wall Street, left-leaning groups haven't made as much use of the internet as right-leaning ones. In her research, Jen Schradie found that liberals see the internet as one tool of many to advocate

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Ny database: Lille gruppe forskere citerer sig selv hele tiden

En ny database afdækker såkaldte ‘citationsfarme’, hvor en gruppe af forskere konstant citerer sig selv og hinanden for kunstig at kravle op i forskningshierarkiet. Problemet kalder på et selv-citations-indeks, lyder det fra eksperter.

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Beetle scales hold secret to creating sustainable paint from recycled plastic, research shows

The structure of ultra-white beetle scales could hold the key to making bright-white sustainable paint using recycled plastic waste, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.

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Rigsadvokaten har i årevis kendt til usikkerhed om positionering via teledata

Usikkerheden og den manglende præcision i mastedata bør ikke være en nyhed for Rigsadvokaten, skriver Politiken.

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Aniara: an angst-fuelled journey through the void

Nature, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02581-w Elizabeth Gibney explores a remarkable Swedish science-fiction film featuring a spaceship fleeing a burning Earth.

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Miljøudvalgsformand: »Vi bader jo i lort«

Som så mange andre danske kommuner har Rudersdal store udfordringer med overløb, der ved kraftig regn lukker spildevand ud i søer, åer og havet. Men de er længst fremme med at gøre noget ved problemet.

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Anthony Scaramucci Wants You to Believe Him This Time

When I last visited Anthony Scaramucci , in the middle of his investment company’s annual conference in Las Vegas, he made it known that if President Donald Trump wanted him, he’d be game for a sequel. That was back in May. Much has happened since in the life of the erstwhile White House adviser, who in the summer of 2017 spent 11 memorable days as Trump’s communications director before he was fi

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Michael Bennet, Mad as Hell

Picture it: Michael Bennet, the insurgent. It’s almost a journalistic requirement to use mild-mannered to describe the 54-year-old senator from Colorado. Bennet comes off as the standard guy in a suit with the standard guy-in-a-suit haircut. He has a calm smile and a voice that creaks through conversations about provisions of bills he’s helped write. He’s sober. He’s serious. But now, the prep-sc

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The Man Who Couldn’t Take It Anymore

On December 19 of last year, Admiral Michael Mullen, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, met James Mattis for lunch at the Pentagon. Mattis was a day away from resigning as Donald Trump’s secretary of defense, but he tends to keep his own counsel, and he did not suggest to Mullen, his friend and former commander, that he was thinking of leaving. To hear more feature stories, see our

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Beetle scales hold secret to creating sustainable paint from recycled plastic, research shows

The structure of ultra-white beetle scales could hold the key to making bright-white sustainable paint using recycled plastic waste, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.

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People's initial immune response to dengue fever analyzed

Researchers have come one step closer to understanding how our immune system responds to acute dengue fever, a disease that has affected hundreds of thousands of people in Southeast Asia this summer alone. In a study published today in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Duke-NUS Medical School show that so-called natural killer cells were especially active shortly afte

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Inflammation triggers silent mutation to cause deadly lung disease, Stanford study shows

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that inflammation in the lungs of rats, triggered by something as simple as the flu, may wake up a silent genetic defect that causes sudden onset cases of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly form of high blood pressure in the lungs.

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Nitrogen-based gas molecule adsorption of monolayer phosphorene under metal functionalization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48953-0

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A Langevin equation that governs the irregular stick-slip nano-scale friction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48345-4

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Assessing Susceptibility of Debris Flow in Southwest China Using Gradient Boosting Machine

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48986-5

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Microfluidics Chip for Directional Solvent Extraction Desalination of Seawater

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49071-7

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Effect of addition of adjuvants on physical and chemical characteristics of Bt bioinsecticide mixture

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48939-y

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Probing the solution structure of the E. coli multidrug transporter MdfA using DEER distance measurements with nitroxide and Gd(III) spin labels

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48694-0 Probing the solution structure of the E . coli multidrug transporter MdfA using DEER distance measurements with nitroxide and Gd(III) spin labels

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Seasonal and annual changes in PAH concentrations in a remote site in the Pacific Ocean

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47409-9

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A Story Of Nazi Uranium

A cube of uranium from a Nazi nuclear reactor has turned up in Maryland. Now two researchers are trying to figure out how it got there and what happened to similar artifacts.

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KU-spinout får rygstød til udvikling af cancer-lægemiddel

Lægemiddelvirksomheden ADCendo ApS, et spinout-firma fra Biotech Research and Innovation Centre…

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Microscopic photoelectron analysis of single crystalline LiCoO2 particles during the charge-discharge in an all solid-state lithium ion battery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48842-6 Microscopic photoelectron analysis of single crystalline LiCoO 2 particles during the charge-discharge in an all solid-state lithium ion battery

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Using a trait-based approach to understand the efficiency of a selective device in a multispecific fishery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47117-4

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Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acid Alphabet Are Inherited from Its Subsets

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47574-x

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Duped In The Deli Aisle? 'No Nitrates Added' Labels Are Often Misleading

Consumer groups are urging the USDA to change labeling rules for processed meats. They argue that "uncured" and "no nitrates added" labels may falsely lead people to believe these meats are healthier. (Image credit: Getty Images/Foodcollection)

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Psykologisk behandling av trauma kan förstärkas med ny medicin

Detta enligt en experimentell studie från Linköpings universitet som gjorts på friska frivilliga personer. – Vi har använt en medicin som blockerar nedbrytningen av kroppens egna cannabisliknande ämnen, eller endocannabinoider. Vår studie visar att denna kategori av läkemedel, kallade FAAH-hämmare, kan möjliggöra ett nytt sätt att behandla PTSD och kanske också andra stressrelaterade psykiatriska

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Toll in Japan rains hit 3, some evacuation orders lifted

The death toll from heavy rains in Japan rose to three on Thursday, as authorities urged local authorities to stay on alert despite the lifting of some evacuation orders.

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Mine spill turns PNG coastline red

Papua New Guinea officials have sealed off the area around a Chinese-owned nickel plant in the north of the country after the leakage of potentially toxic slurry that has turned the ocean red.

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Brazil bans burning for two months to defuse Amazon crisis

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro signed a decree Wednesday to ban burning throughout the country for two months, government sources cited in local media said, as the authorities scramble to defuse the Amazon fires which have triggered a global outcry.

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New Huawei handset to launch without Google apps

Huawei's upcoming flagship Mate 30 smartphone will launch next month without key Google apps, creating a disadvantage for the Chinese tech giant hit by US sanctions.

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HMS Terror shipwreck offers up secrets of lost Arctic expedition

Almost two centuries after descending to its watery grave, the HMS Terror could offer up new clues to its demise—and solve one of the most enduring mysteries in the history of Arctic discovery.

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Novo Nordisks ‘Mother of molecules’ skabte grundlaget for diabetestabletten

PLUS. Trods en del modstand skabte Lotte Bjerre Knudsen for over 20 år siden det molekyle, som har dannet grundlag for Novo Nordisks nye satsning: diabetes­behandling i tabletform.

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OpenAI has released the largest version yet of its fake-news-spewing AI

The AI lab has also released a report to explain why it is releasing the model in increments.

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Marriott hotels ditching small plastic toiletry bottles

Marriott International, the world's largest hotel chain, said Wednesday it was ditching single-use toiletry bottles as part of plans to reduce its environmental impact.

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Hurricane heads for Florida after brushing Caribbean islands

Hurricane Dorian moved out over open waters early Thursday after doing limited damage in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, though forecasters warned it was gaining strength and probably would grow into a dangerous storm while heading toward the northern Bahamas and Florida's east coast.

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Corps official: Study needed of Missouri River flood options

An official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday a study is needed to consider changes to flood-control measures along the Missouri River south of Sioux City, Iowa.

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Bolivia lost 1.2 mn hectares to fires this year, govt says

Fires have destroyed 1.2 million hectares (3.2 million acres) of forest and grasslands in Bolivia this year, the government said on Wednesday, though environmentalists claim the true figure is much greater.

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'Mental rigidity' at root of intense political partisanship on both left and right

People who identify more intensely with a political tribe or ideology share an underlying psychological trait: low levels of cognitive flexibility, according to a new study.

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'Mental rigidity' at root of intense political partisanship on both left and right — study

Latest research shows that reduced cognitive flexibility is associated with more 'extreme' beliefs and identities at both ends of the political spectrum. Researchers say that 'heightening our cognitive flexibility might help build more tolerant societies'.

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Ancient die-off greater than the dinosaur extinction

Clues from Canadian rocks formed billions of year ago reveal a previously unknown loss of life even greater than that of the mass extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, when Earth lost nearly three-quarters of its plant and animal species.

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Curbs on Methane, Potent Greenhouse Gas, to Be Relaxed in U.S.

If the proposal is adopted, the government would no longer require oil and gas companies to inspect for and repair methane leaks from wells and pipelines.

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Much fridge food 'goes there to die'

Americans throw out a lot more food than they expect they will, food waste that is likely driven in part by ambiguous date labels on packages, a new study has found.

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One of The Most Rigorous Experiments We Have Shows Gluten Isn't Bad For Healthy People

If you're cutting out gluten 'just because', you need to read this.

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Lundamodellen som räddar liv vid svåra skallskador

Detta är berättelsen om innovation i vården och om hur neurokirurger vid Skånes universitetssjukhus för drygt 25 år sedan vågade ändra på behandlingen av patienter med svåra skallskador. Deras modell används idag över hela världen. Vetenskap & hälsa träffar två neurokirurger vid Skånes universitetssjukhus, som berättar mer.

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At this Bengaluru school, robots teach and teachers mentor

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

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Europe’s Complicity in Turkey’s Syrian-Refugee Crackdown

ISTANBUL—Under the cover of night, Turkish police officers pushed Ahmed onto a large bus parked in central Istanbul. In the darkness, the Syrian man from Damascus could discern dozens of other handcuffed refugees being crammed into the vehicle. Many of them would not see the Turkish city again. Ahmed, who asked that his last name not be used to protect his safety, was arrested after police discov

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Improving mental health is a walk in the park (but mind the volcanoes)

Using Twitter and geotagging, researchers add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating an association between contact with nature and improved mood.

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Mystikken breder sig i Himalaya: Hundredvis af skeletter fylder bjergsø

De ældste skeletter er 1.000 år gamle – de yngste kun 200 år, viser DNA-analyser. Men hvorfor endte de der?

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Much fridge food 'goes there to die'

Americans throw out a lot more food than they expect they will, food waste that is likely driven in part by ambiguous date labels on packages, a new study has found.

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Researchers develop low-power, low-cost network for 5G connectivity

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a cheaper and more efficient method for Internet-of-Things devices to receive high-speed wireless connectivity.

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Most-comprehensive analysis of fentanyl crisis urges innovative action

The sudden appearance of the drug fentanyl in the US has driven up overdose deaths dramatically, even as the abuse of heroin and other opioids has shown signs of stabilizing. In the most-comprehensive analysis yet of the crisis, researchers urge that innovative new strategies be pursued because the epidemic is unlike others that have struck the nation.

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Ny forskning: Så startade Golfströmmen

Golfströmmen startade för 34 miljoner år sedan när förflyttningar av kontinentalplattor täppte till flöden av sötvatten till Atlanten. Det visar ny svensk forskning som genom data-simuleringar har hittat sambandet.

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Cosmos article wins Eureka Prize

Michael Lucy recognised for highlighting the scourge of plastic pollution.

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Sådan redder vi Version2’s skygge-server efter nedbrud

Et script gør det muligt at gendanne Version2’s skygge-server i skyen, hvis uheldet skulle være ude.

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Microbiota in home indoor air may protect children from asthma

Large amounts of a certain type of bacteria, most likely from outdoors, may reduce the child's risk of developing asthma.

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Naturfredningsforening: Eksisterende havbrug skal også væk

Man kan ikke rense forureningen fra havbrug. Derfor er regeringens udmelding om, at stoppe nye havbrug ikke nok. Der bør også laves en plan for, hvordan de eksisterende 19 danske anlæg kan lukkes, mener Dansk Naturfredningsforening.

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Busy older stars outpace stellar youngsters

The oldest stars in our Galaxy are also the busiest, moving more rapidly than their younger counterparts in and out of the disk of the Milky Way, according to a new analysis.

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Addition of growth factors to unique system helps new bone formation

The development of new bone can be a multistep process: first, stem cells differentiate into cartilage cells. Next, the cartilage cells become bone cells. But that's not all: the cells must experience some mechanical stresses during the transformation in order to transform efficiently from stem cells to bone cells.

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The most exciting thing about the 2020 Games might be the robots

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Serious advancement for computer engineering.

submitted by /u/AdamJefferson [link] [comments]

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Neutrophils promote tumor resistance to radiation therapy [Medical Sciences]

Nearly two-thirds of cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy (RT), often with the intent to achieve complete and permanent tumor regression (local control). RT is the primary treatment modality used to achieve local control for many malignancies, including locally advanced cervical cancer, head and neck cancer, and lung cancer….

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Multiplexed protein force spectroscopy reveals equilibrium protein folding dynamics and the low-force response of von Willebrand factor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Single-molecule force spectroscopy has provided unprecedented insights into protein folding, force regulation, and function. So far, the field has relied primarily on atomic force microscope and optical tweezers assays that, while powerful, are limited in force resolution, throughput, and require feedback for constant force measurements. Here, we present a modular…

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Cryo-EM structure of pleconaril-resistant rhinovirus-B5 complexed to the antiviral OBR-5-340 reveals unexpected binding site [Microbiology]

Viral inhibitors, such as pleconaril and vapendavir, target conserved regions in the capsids of rhinoviruses (RVs) and enteroviruses (EVs) by binding to a hydrophobic pocket in viral capsid protein 1 (VP1). In resistant RVs and EVs, bulky residues in this pocket prevent their binding. However, recently developed pyrazolopyrimidines inhibit pleconaril-resistant…

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Leveraging protein dynamics to identify cancer mutational hotspots using 3D structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Large-scale exome sequencing of tumors has enabled the identification of cancer drivers using recurrence-based approaches. Some of these methods also employ 3D protein structures to identify mutational hotspots in cancer-associated genes. In determining such mutational clusters in structures, existing approaches overlook protein dynamics, despite its essential role in protein function….

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Bioluminescence chemistry of fireworm Odontosyllis [Biochemistry]

Marine polychaetes Odontosyllis undecimdonta, commonly known as fireworms, emit bright blue-green bioluminescence. Until the recent identification of the Odontosyllis luciferase enzyme, little progress had been made toward characterizing the key components of this bioluminescence system. Here we present the biomolecular mechanisms of enzymatic (leading to light emission) and nonenzymatic (dark)…

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Hydrophobic gasket mutation produces gating pore currents in closed human voltage-gated proton channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The hydrophobic gasket (HG), a ring of hydrophobic amino acids in the voltage-sensing domain of most voltage-gated ion channels, forms a constriction between internal and external aqueous vestibules. Cationic Arg or Lys side chains lining the S4 helix move through this “gating pore” when the channel opens. S4 movement may…

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Microsoft Office For iOS And Android To Get A Dark Mode

Last year, we heard that Microsoft could be working on a dark mode for its Outlook app. Just last month, renders of the upcoming dark mode were leaked, and now for those who are fan of dark …

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SpaceX: Starhopper soars above Texas in record-breaking test

The test marked the first time a craft used a liquid-methane-burning engine to lift itself that high. The successful test paves the way for larger-scale tests of Starship prototypes. SpaceX could send Starship to Mars by as early as 2024. More realistically, the company plans to use the rocket to conduct cargo missions in 2021. None Spacex successfully on Tuesday completed its highest and most di

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Climate change: Big lifestyle changes 'needed to cut emissions'

Reaching Net Zero emissions will be a huge challenge, says UK's outgoing chief environment scientist.

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The supervolcano that can wipe out the U.S. and kill billions may be overdue for an eruption

The supervolcano in Yellowstone National Park could cause an "ultra-catastrophe," warns an extinction events writer. The full eruption of the volcano last happened 640,000 years ago. The blast could kill billions and make United States uninhabitable. None If there weren't enough cataclysms to worry about, a recently published book brought another terrible possibility back into the public spotligh

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Busy older stars outpace stellar youngsters, new study shows

The oldest stars in our Galaxy are also the busiest, moving more rapidly than their younger counterparts in and out of the disk of the Milky Way, according to new analysis carried out at the University of Birmingham.

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Graphene Garment Blocks Blood-Sucking Skeeters

A small patch of graphene on human skin seemed to block the mosquitoes’ ability to sense certain molecules that trigger a bite. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Busy older stars outpace stellar youngsters, new study shows

The oldest stars in our Galaxy are also the busiest, moving more rapidly than their younger counterparts in and out of the disk of the Milky Way, according to new analysis carried out at the University of Birmingham.

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Graphene Garment Blocks Blood-Sucking Skeeters

A small patch of graphene on human skin seemed to block the mosquitoes’ ability to sense certain molecules that trigger a bite. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Greta Thunberg arrives in New York City for UN Climate Summits

The teen climate change activist arrives in New York City after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic Ocean on a solar-powered boat.

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Planned delivery reduces impact of potentially fatal pregnancy complication, trial finds

In research published today in the Lancet and funded by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), researchers from King's College London have found that early, planned delivery for women with pre-term pre-eclampsia reduces complications and severe hypertension, as well as costs, compared to the current method of care.

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Graphene Garment Blocks Blood-Sucking Skeeters

A small patch of graphene on human skin seemed to block the mosquitoes’ ability to sense certain molecules that trigger a bite. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient die-off greater than the dinosaur extinction

When significant oxygen entered the atmosphere, ancient life multiplied. But after a few hundred million years, Earth's oxygen plummeted, resulting in a die-off likely greater than the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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Giving trauma patients blood pressure stabilizing hormone cuts transfusions by half

Giving trauma patients with severe blood loss the hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) cut the volume of blood products required to stabilize them by half, according to results of a new, first-of-its-kind clinical trial from Penn Medicine. The authors say the study is particularly important for the treatment of patients with gun-related injuries. Each year, there are over 100,00 firearm-related inju

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Ecopipam reduces stuttering symptoms in proof-of-concept trial

Psychiatrists have tested the orally administered investigational medication ecopipam on adults who stutter in an open-label, uncontrolled clinical trial and found that it reduced their stuttering symptoms from the start of therapy after eight weeks of dosing. Positive results included increased speech fluency, faster reading completion, and shortened duration of stuttering events.

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This Tiny Robot Snake is Made to Slither Through Your Brain

The robot snake in a model of human veins. (Credit: Kim et al., Sci. Robot. 4, eaax7329 (2019)) You probably didn’t picture the robots of the future to be slimy, magnetized snakes. But a hyper-flexible robot modeled after the legless reptiles and designed by researchers at MIT could make it easier to diagnose and treat blood clots, aneurysms and perform other small-scale procedures in the brain. T

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Author Correction: Niche stiffness underlies the ageing of central nervous system progenitor cells

Nature, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1552-1

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Johnson & Johnson will pay $572 million for the Oklahoma opioid epidemic—and this is just the beginning

Monday’s decision in Oklahoma rests largely on the state’s public nuisance law, which mark actions that interfere with or obstruct the rights of the community as criminal. (Flickr/) Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay $572 million to the state of Oklahoma on Monday, after a judge found that the company deceptively marketed opioids and bore some responsibility for the state’s opioid crisis. The c

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Mathematical Mondegreens

Can AI be creative? Maybe not, but it can be amusing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Great Winnowing Begins

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, August 28. ‣ Republican Senator Johnny Isakson of Georgia announced that he plans to resign at the end of the year, citing his declining health. ‣ Tropical Storm Dorian strengthened into a hurricane over Puer

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Italy’s Transition From One Weak Government to Another

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET on August 29, 2019. Italy is a country of firsts. In its last national elections in 2018, it produced the first populist government in the heart of Europe. Now that’s given way to the first coalition government in the heart of Europe between a mainstream party and a populist party. Today, two sworn political enemies said they had come to an agreement to form an alliance w

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John W. Campbell Award Is Renamed After Winner Criticizes Him

Jeannette Ng, who won the prize this year, said the man it was named after “set the tone of science fiction that still haunts the genre.”

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Doctors Find Bizarre Mass of Bone, Teeth & Hair in Teen's Stomach. It Was Her Own Twin.

A large lump in a teenager's stomach turned out to be her own "twin" growing inside her.

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DARPA Needs a Creepy Underground Lair ASAP

Going Underground Sounds like the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) was just kicked out of mom’s basement. In an inexplicable tweet , DARPA asked for help finding “commercially managed underground urban tunnels and facilities able to host research and experimentation.” And nobody knows why. Deep Cover The facilities need to be “currently closed off from pedestrians” and ideally sp

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New AR glasses found to improve mobility in low vision patients

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Worm robot could wiggle its way through arteries in the brain

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Tesla Model 3 Cost of Ownership Slightly Cheaper Than a Camry

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

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MIT engineers build advanced microprocessor out of carbon nanotubes

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Nanoparticles Will Give You Superhuman Night Vision

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

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Switzerland aims to go climate neutral by 2050

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Florida Wild Cats Struggle to Walk Due to Unknown Disorder

Both bobcats and the state's namesake panther, an endangered species, have been spotted with signs of the condition.

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Make science PhDs more than just a training path for academia

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02586-5 Science PhD programmes cater almost exclusively to students bound for academia, but they don’t have to, says Sarah Anderson.

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Cannabis: Miracle Medicine or Dangerous Drug? review – weeding out the truth

This documentary on the pleasurable highs and puritanical prejudices around cannabis use was lively and educational – even when its presenter got the munchies It is the best and the worst time to have a documentary that requires you to balance two contradictory thoughts in your head; we are out of practice. We are a bit too mono, in everything, these days. But the latest instalment of the flagshi

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Capitalism Burns the Amazon, Lawsuits Burn YouTube, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Giving trauma patients blood pressure stabilizing hormone cuts transfusions by half

Giving trauma patients with severe blood loss the hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) cut the volume of blood products required to stabilize them by half, according to results of a new, first-of-its-kind clinical trial from Penn Medicine. The authors say the study is particularly important for the treatment of patients with gun-related injuries. Each year, there are over 100,00 firearm-related inju

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The Post-Truth World of Influencer Romances

Internet celebrity fauxmances are turning fans into cynical, screen-bound sleuths.

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This Tiny Robot Snake is Made to Slither Through Your Brain

The robot snake in a model of human veins. (Credit: Kim et al., Sci. Robot. 4, eaax7329 (2019)) You probably didn’t picture the robots of the future to be slimy, magnetized snakes. But a …

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Spotted: A Black Hole That Shouldn’t Be Physically Possible

Chonk Equipment designed to detect gravitational waves have picked up on some bizarre signals — possibly originating from a black hole twice as massive as physicists previously believed was possible. The potential black hole would have to be 100 times as massive as our Sun to give off the signals that the facilities recorded, according to Quanta Magazine . Physicists now find themselves in a whir

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Roadkill hurts a lot more than just animals. A new bill aims to ease the pain.

This story was originally published on Outdoor Life . The state of Montana has determined that a bighorn ram has a public value of about $30,000. (Max Pixel/) If you don’t think roadkill can take a bite out of hunters’ opportunity, just ask Bruce Sterling. Since 1985, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks biologist has counted bighorn sheep that have been killed near Thompson Falls, wh

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James Webb Space Telescope comes together

The successor to the famous Hubble Space Telescope reaches a key milestone in its construction.

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Greta Thunberg: Why are young climate activists facing so much hate?

In the fractious climate debate, criticism of young activists has sometimes spiralled into abuse.

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Ancient die-off greater than the dinosaur extinction

When significant oxygen entered the atmosphere, ancient life multiplied. But after a few hundred million years, Earth's oxygen plummeted, resulting in a die-off likely greater than the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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A. anamensis Hominin Skull Could Recast Our Human Family Tree

Researchers say the skull belongs to a species once thought to be a predecessor to “Lucy,” but now that relationship is murky.

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Autism rates among minority kids rise sharply

Autism rates among racial minorities in the United States have seen double digit increases in recent years, a new study shows. Rates for black children now exceed those of whites in most states and rates among Hispanics are growing faster than any other group, according to the study. The study also finds that the prevalence of autism among white youth is ticking up again , after flattening in the

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Earth’s ‘fingerprint’ could help find habitable exoplanets

A “fingerprint” for Earth could help identify exoplanets capable of supporting life, researchers report. The researchers used over a decade of observations of Earth’s atmosphere taken by the SCISAT satellite to construct a transit spectrum of Earth, a sort of fingerprint for Earth’s atmosphere in infrared light, which shows the presence of key molecules in the search for habitable worlds. This in

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Stretchable wireless sensor could monitor healing of cerebral aneurysms

A wireless sensor small enough to be implanted in the blood vessels of the human brain could help clinicians evaluate the healing of aneurysms — bulges that can cause death or serious injury if they burst. The stretchable sensor, which operates without batteries, would be wrapped around stents or diverters implanted to control blood flow in vessels affected by the aneurysms.

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Report: China’s Central Bank is Ready to Launch Cryptocurrency

Digital Renminbi China’s central bank is set to launch a state-backed cryptocurrency and hand it out to several major institutions in the country, according to Forbes . The plan is for those institutions — the Commercial Bank of China and tech juggernauts Alibaba and Tencent among them — to help distribute the cryptocurrency into the country’s economy. The news comes after China has been actively

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University of Illinois Protected Harassers: Investigation

Comparative biosciences professor Valarmathi Thiruvanamalai was among those able to leave the institution quietly despite credible accusations of misconduct, ProPublica reports.

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AAN issues guideline on vaccines and multiple sclerosis

Can a person with multiple sclerosis (MS) get regular vaccines? According to a new guideline, the answer is yes. The guideline, developed by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), recommends that people with MS receive recommended vaccinations, including yearly flu shots. The guideline is published in the Aug. 28, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the AAN.

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'David Makes Man' Invents a Doorway to a New Kind of TV

The show rebels against a genre of television-making that has historically cast out the stories of black teen boys.

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Newly Discovered Exoplanet Is “Unlike Any Other”

First of Its Kind About 100 light-years from Earth is a star called HR 5183, and circling that star is HR 5183 b — an exoplanet whose strange orbit makes it wholly unique. “This planet is unlike the planets in our solar system,” Caltech researcher Sarah Blunt, who recently co-authored a study on HR 5183 b, said in a press release , “but more than that, it is unlike any other exoplanets we have di

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2020 Volvo XC60 Polestar Review: the PHEV Path to High Performance

The new Volvo XC60 Polestar Engineered is how other future performance cars should be propelled, as long as we have combustion engines: with help from electric booster motors in addition to turbochargers and superchargers. That is the case with the 2020 Volvo T8 XC60 eAWD Polestar-Engineered, a compact SUV with a big name, meant to compete with the Audi SQ5, BMW X3 M, Mercedes-AMG GLC 43, and eve

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What Trump Has Shown Us About Leadership (Continued).

Whatever is wrong with Donald Trump is getting worse. A week ago, it seemed noteworthy that he was canceling a long-planned state visit because an allied government didn’t want to let him “buy Greenland.” Now: proposals to stop hurricanes with nuclear bombs ; turning a G-7 news conference into a late-night cable infomercial for Trump’s own badly struggling golf resort; “imaginary-friend” discussi

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Gene linked to where warblers migrate for the winter

How do birds migrate such long distances? The genes of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers hold a clue. A new study is the first to combine whole genome sequencing and migration tracking technology to pinpoint a single gene associated with the complex suite of traits that determine migratory behavior. These findings may have important conservation implications for the declining populations of

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Overlooked No More: Elizabeth Rona, Pioneering Scientist Amid Dangers of War

Rona moved from lab to lab — and country to country — and in the process made important findings about the behavior of atoms and radioactivity.

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A String of Unusual Experiments Claim to Show Plants Can Think. Few Scientists Are Buying It

Mimosa plants have long inspired intrigue with their ability to move when touched. (Credit: Discover/Stipple engraving by R. Earlom, 1789, after G. Romney. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY) When The Secret Life of Plants came out in 1973, Lincoln Taiz was a graduate student, just embarking on what would become a many-decades long career in plant biology. Plants, the book revealed, can make their

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Thermo Fisher Scientific: Handling Volumes in the Wet Lab

Accurate and precise manual pipetting approximates the diligence and dedication of an art form. Being mindful of the causes that allow discrepancies to creep into your pipetting and taking preventive measures will ensure the quality and reproducibility of your data.

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High-tech gel aids delivery of drugs

Drugs that help prevent the formation of unwanted or harmful proteins are currently being developed to treat a number of diseases, including cancer. The drugs are based on small interfering RNA, or siRNA, which are pieces of nucleic acids that work by interfering with the production of proteins. But getting these drugs to the right target, such as to a tumor, remains challenging because siRNAs can

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Ultra-soft underwater gripper safely catches and releases jellyfish

Jellyfish are about 95% water, which makes them very difficult to study because most of the underwater tools available to marine biologists are clunky, heavy, and often shred jellyfish and other delicate creatures to pieces. A new ultra-soft gripper uses fettuccini-like 'fingers' inflated with water to gently grasp jellyfish and release them without harm, allowing scientists to safely interact wit

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New ultra-soft underwater gripper safely catches and releases jellyfish without damage

Jellyfish are about 95% water, making them some of the most diaphanous, delicate animals on the planet. But the remaining 5% of them have yielded important scientific discoveries, like green …

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High-tech gel aids delivery of drugs

Drugs that help prevent the formation of unwanted or harmful proteins are currently being developed to treat a number of diseases, including cancer. The drugs are based on small interfering RNA, or siRNA, which are pieces of nucleic acids that work by interfering with the production of proteins. But getting these drugs to the right target, such as to a tumor, remains challenging because siRNAs can

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Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind

Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. A new study found that milkweeds and other plants that have seeds carried by the wind are an important source for enriching the diversity of plants in these valuable ecosystems.

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Ultra-soft underwater gripper safely catches and releases jellyfish

Jellyfish are about 95% water, which makes them very difficult to study because most of the underwater tools available to marine biologists are clunky, heavy, and often shred jellyfish and other delicate creatures to pieces. A new ultra-soft gripper uses fettuccini-like 'fingers' inflated with water to gently grasp jellyfish and release them without harm, allowing scientists to safely interact wit

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Music-based biofeedback shows promise in improving deadlift technique

A study of 31 recreational weightlifters suggests that a real-time, music-based feedback system helps improve deadlift technique.

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Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves

Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a new study.

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Friday News Roundup – International

The world is on fire. No, seriously.

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Behold the Firenado's Twisting, Infernal Column of Flames

Call them fire tornadoes or fire whirls, these spinning conflagrations can tear roofs off houses and spread flames unpredictably. Here's how they work.

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Trial Testing Psilocybin’s Impact on Anorexia Launches in US

Anorexia nervosa is a mental disorder whose sufferers, worried about weight gain, will sometimes starve themselves to the point that they literally die. In fact, anorexia is responsible for more deaths than any other mental illness, which has left healthcare officials desperate to find for an effective treatment for the disorder. Now, one group of researchers believes such a treatment might invol

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Eco search engine sees surge in downloads as Amazon burns

Can you save the rainforest from your desk? A spike in downloads for a search engine that's contributing profits to planting trees shows people are looking for ways to help as fires rage across the Brazilian Amazon.

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NASA sees Dorian become a hurricane

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean as Dorian reached hurricane status during the afternoon of August 28, 2019.

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First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity—the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss.

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Clostridium difficile infections may have a friend in fungi

The pathogen Clostridium difficile, which causes one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in the United States, may have accomplices that until now have gone largely unnoticed.

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Climate change, human activity lead to nearshore coral growth decline

New research compares the growth rates between nearshore and offshore corals in the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System, the world's second-largest reef system. While nearshore corals have historically grown faster than those offshore, over the past decade there was a decline in the growth rates of two types of nearshore corals, while offshore coral growth rates in the same reef system stayed

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Waist size, not body mass index, may be more predictive of coronary artery disease

For years, women have been told that weight gain could lead to heart disease. A new study indicates that it is the location of the fat that matters most, with abdominal fat representing the greatest harm and not overall body mass index (BMI) when assessing risk for coronary artery disease (CAD).

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New insights into genetic basis of bird migration

A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances.

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New DNA sequencer method achieves early-stage and broad-range detection of wheat diseases

As wheat is one of the world's most important crops, a group of scientists wanted to develop a new method for analyzing pathogen DNA in wheat leaf samples. Using a portable DNA sequencer, they were able to achieve early-stage and broad-range detection of pathogens in wheat — and they were also able to characterize all organisms in the wheat and confirmed the presence of an unexpected diseases not

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The role of a single molecule in obesity

A single molecule, derived from cholesterol, lurks inside your bloodstream and will increase your body fat, even if you don't eat a diet filled with red meat and fried food. A biologist reports that reducing the levels of the molecule could result in reduced capacity for making fat.

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Narrowing risk of preeclampsia to a specific phenotype

Researchers look at preeclampsia when it coincides with type 1 diabetes. By studying patients with elevated lipoproteins, these researchers determined that the diabetic patients with a certain phenotype were at greater risk for preeclampsia. But by monitoring these patients, physicians can take proactive measures to keep their blood pressure down which lowers the patient's risk for a stroke or sei

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Community-based wildlife carcass surveillance is key for early detection of Ebola virus

Scientists have developed a low-cost educational outreach program and surveillance system for wildlife mortality that has continued now for over a decade.

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Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science

They may all be in the same classroom together, but each child in preschool may have a very different experience, a new study suggests. The researchers documented these different experiences using a novel technique in the classroom: They had children wear a video camera on their head for two hours on one day to see what the class was like from the child's perspective.

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Astronomers determine earth's fingerprint in hopes of finding habitable planets beyond the solar system

Two McGill University astronomers have assembled a "fingerprint" for Earth, which could be used to identify a planet beyond our Solar System capable of supporting life.

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Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science

They may all be in the same classroom together, but each child in preschool may have a very different experience, a new study suggests.

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High-tech gel aids delivery of drugs

Drugs that help prevent the formation of unwanted or harmful proteins are currently being developed to treat a number of diseases, including cancer. The drugs are based on small interfering RNA, or siRNA, which are pieces of nucleic acids that work by interfering with the production of proteins. But getting these drugs to the right target, such as to a tumor, remains challenging because siRNAs can

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Tropical Storm Dorian Just Turned into a Hurricane

Dorian might strengthen to a Category 3 Hurricane before hitting Florida.

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Youth: Transgender people should use bathroom they're most comfortable in

Young people clash with older adults when it comes to bathroom policies related to gender identity, a University of Michigan study suggests.

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Paleontologists discovered diversity of insect pollinators in 99-million-year old amber

A team of paleontologists from the Borissiak Paleontological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow) discovered four new species of extinct insects with sucking mouthparts in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Researchers believe that they visited first angiosperm flowers, but eventually went extinct due to the inefficient design of the proboscis. According to the research, Paradoxosisyrinae,

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NASA sees Dorian become a hurricane

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean as Dorian reached hurricane status during the afternoon of August 28, 2019.

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Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind

Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. Grassland restorations are crucial for recovering this important but highly degraded ecosystem. Restored grasslands, however, tend to be more species poor and lose diversity through time as compared to remnant, or never-been plowed, grasslands. A new study from the University of Missouri found that milkweeds and

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Chance, not ideology, drives political polarization

Ever-widening divisions between Democrats and Republicans are believed to reflect deeply rooted ideological differences, but a new study points to a radically different interpretation: it may be mostly a matter of luck.

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400 US police agencies partner with Amazon on smart doorbell

Amazon said Wednesday more than 400 US police departments had joined its "Ring Neighbors" network, a program aimed at curbing crime using video from the company's smart doorbell that has raised …

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The Photography of Margaret Bourke-White

Margaret Bourke-White was born in New York City in 1904, and grew up in rural New Jersey. She went on to study science and art at multiple universities in the United States from 1921 to 1927, then began a successful run as an industrial photographer, making notable images of factories and skyscrapers in the late 1920s. By 1929, she began working for magazine publishers, joining both Fortune and,

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Robotic thread is designed to slip through the brain's blood vessels

Engineers have developed a magnetically steerable, thread-like robot that can actively glide through narrow, winding pathways, such as the labrynthine vasculature of the brain.

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Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind

Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. Grassland restorations are crucial for recovering this important but highly degraded ecosystem. Restored grasslands, however, tend to be more species poor and lose diversity through time as compared to remnant, or never-been plowed, grasslands. A new study from the University of Missouri found that milkweeds and

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Netflix Can Kill *The OA*, but It Can't Kill a Movement

The effort to save the beloved but little-watched sci-fi show is one that understands the stakes of the streaming wars.

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New DNA sequencer method achieves early-stage and broad-range detection of wheat diseases

Plant diseases, especially those caused by fungal pathogens, jeopardize global crop biosecurity and preventing them requires rapid detection and identification of causal agents. Traditional methods for crop disease diagnosis rely on the expertise of pathologists who can identify diseases by eye, but this approach comes with many limitations, including the reliance on physical appearance of disease

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NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Depression Erin

Visible and infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed that strong wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Depression Erin, located about 200 miles off the Carolina coast.

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New DNA sequencer method achieves early-stage and broad-range detection of wheat diseases

Plant diseases, especially those caused by fungal pathogens, jeopardize global crop biosecurity and preventing them requires rapid detection and identification of causal agents. Traditional methods for crop disease diagnosis rely on the expertise of pathologists who can identify diseases by eye, but this approach comes with many limitations, including the reliance on physical appearance of disease

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Chance, not ideology, drives political polarization

Michael Macy, Cornell University professor and director of the Social Dynamics Laboratory, published new research examining a phenomena called an 'opinion cascade' — in which partisans pile onto whatever emerging position they identify with their party.

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Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind

Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. A new study from the University of Missouri found that milkweeds and other plants that have seeds carried by the wind are an important source for enriching the diversity of plants in these valuable ecosystems.

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High-tech gel aids delivery of drugs

High tech gel aids in the delivery of drugs.

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UK Watchdog Is Worried Government Will Deploy Lip-Reading CCTVs

Closed Captioning CCTV Surveillance watchdogs in the United Kingdom are worried that the government will deploy CCTV cameras equipped with lip-reading and gait-analyzing artificial intelligence. Tony Porter, who serves as the Surveillance Camera Commissioner, invoked the dystopian society of George Orwell’s “1984.” He predicts residents will soon start to cover their mouths when speaking, lest th

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Some vaccine doubters may be swayed by proximity to disease outbreak

An individual's trust in institutions such as the CDC, and how close they live to a recent measles outbreak, may affect their attitudes on measles vaccination.

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Clickbait secrets exposed! Humans and AI team up to improve clickbait detection

Humans and machines worked together to help train an artificial intelligence — AI — model that outperformed other clickbait detectors, according to researchers.

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Earth's fingerprint hints at finding habitable planets beyond the solar system

Astronomers have assembled a 'fingerprint' for Earth, which could be used to identify a planet beyond our Solar System capable of supporting life.

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A face for Lucy's ancestor

Researchers have discovered a remarkably complete 3.8-million-year-old cranium of Australopithecus anamensis at Woranso-Mille in Ethiopia. The 3.8 million-year-old fossil cranium represents a time interval between 4.1 and 3.6 million years ago.

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Stretchable wireless sensor could monitor healing of cerebral aneurysms

A wireless sensor small enough to be implanted in the blood vessels of the human brain could help clinicians evaluate the healing of aneurysms — bulges that can cause death or serious injury if they burst. The stretchable sensor, which operates without batteries, would be wrapped around stents or diverters implanted to control blood flow in vessels affected by the aneurysms.

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NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Depression Erin

Visible and infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed that strong wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Depression Erin, located about 200 miles off the Carolina coast.

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The Alarming Case of the Missing Insects

In the biological wonderland of Puerto Rico’s Luquillo Mountains, slinky boas and emerald anoles hang out in lowland tabonuco trees, delicate bromeliads decorate the mountaintop cloud forests , and the island’s eponymous parrots forage in the canopy. At dawn, the rain forest swells with the mating calls of thousands of coquí frogs . Underpinning this ecological tapestry is a world teeming with ar

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An Auditory Expert Hopes to Replace Lost Hearing Cells

A. James Hudspeth, winner of the 2018 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience, spoke with Scientific American editor emerita Mariette DiChristina about his efforts to regenerate lost or damaged… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We're one step closer to tracking down another Earth

No place like home? Not if you scope out 33 sun-like stars. (Pixabay/) Astronomers have found more than 4,000 planets circling distant stars, yet none feel quite like home. Teegarden b is the right size, but it zips around its dim dwarf star in just five (Earth) days. Kepler-452 b takes a familiar 385 days to complete an orbit around its sun-like star, but appears to be a lumbering "superterran"

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Climate change affects floods in Europe

For a long time, scientists argued whether or not climate change is affecting floods. No clear trends seemed to be evident. Now, in a major international study, data from numerous measurement stations all across Europe have been evaluated. The data clearly shows that climate change is indeed influencing the magnitude of flood events. However, climate change has different consequences in different

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First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

Scientists have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity – the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss. The first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors, its similarity to the cuprates raises hopes that it can be made to superconduct at relatively high temperatures. But it's also different in key ways that could overturn theo

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High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme

The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. Malfunction can lead to serious disorders. For the first time, structural biologists have now visualized and analyzed the enzyme's atomic structure with the support of the institute's newly installed high-end cryo-electron microscope.

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Brain stem cells have a good memory

During embryogenesis, dozens of types of neurons with distinct functions come together to form the circuits that drive our thoughts and actions. They are generated by progenitor cells, which produce them one after the other in a very precise order. Researchers now provide proof that progenitor cells are transplanted into a young mouse embryo, they recover their past skills and rejuvenate.

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An actin-based viscoplastic lock ensures progressive body-axis elongation

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1509-4 Molecular analysis and mathematical modelling are combined to identify a network of factors that account for viscoplastic deformation in elongation of Caenorhabditis elegans during embryonic development.

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A 3.8-Million-Year-Old Skull Puts a New Face on a Little-Known Human Ancestor

The cranium of a male Australopithecus anamensis , a close relative of Lucy, provides clues about one of the earliest hominins to walk on two legs

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FAA warns that illegal weaponized drones will incur a $25k fine

Federal Aviation Administration publishes a notice warning the public not to weaponize their personal drones. Doing so will result in a $25,000 fine per violation. The FAA is keeping pace with the rapid development of this new and popular technology. None Drones can be an incredible boon to society if properly utilized. Farmers can monitor their crops with them and public agencies can react faste

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EPA’s controversial ‘secret science’ plan still lacks key details, advisers say

Transparency proposal has been widely lambasted by research groups

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Newfound Alien Planet Has a Bizarre Looping Orbit

Astronomers have never seen a world quite like HR 5183 b before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Verdens ældste velbevarede kranie fundet: Sår tvivl om menneskets udvikling

Kraniet er ekstremt sjældent og et stort videnskabeligt fremskridt, mener dansk professor.

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A Clarification about Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

A recent Scientific American essay overlooked some important points — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kaiser Permanente reduces secondary cardiac events through virtual cardiac rehabilitation program

Kaiser Permanente has demonstrated promising results in reducing secondary cardiac events and rehospitalizations by creating a virtual cardiac rehabilitation program that fits seamlessly into patients' lives. Increasing rates of program enrollment and completion have been key factors in the improved outcomes. Results and details about the program were published today in NEJM Catalyst.

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Exposing how pancreatic cancer does its dirty work

Pancreatic cancer is a puzzle — tumors slough off cells into the bloodstream early in the disease, but the tumors themselves have almost no blood vessels in them. Why? New research using an organ-on-chip model of the disease has found that pancreatic cancer actively destroys nearby blood vessels and replaces them with cancerous cells, which prevents chemotherapy from getting to tumors. This insig

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Research sheds new light on Antarctic control of global climate

Scientists have made a new discovery that challenges previous understanding of the relationship between the polar Southern Ocean, next to Antarctica, and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Their findings show that, contrary to existing assumptions, biological processes far out at sea are the most important factors determining how the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide.

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Southern Ocean circulation patterns that keep the lid on stored carbon are more complex than previously thought

Scientists have found evidence that the horizontal circulation of carbon-rich ocean water in the subpolar Southern Ocean works in tandem with vertical circulation, together controlling how much carbon the region stores in the deep ocean or releases to the atmosphere. These findings contradict the conventional framework for carbon cycling in Antarctic waters,

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A dual imaging approach may improve diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer

A new platform that combines two established imaging methods can peer into both the structure and molecular makeup of the prostate in men with prostate cancer.

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New sequencing study provides insight into HIV vaccine protection

Scientists led by the US Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) identified a transcriptional signature in B cells associated with protection from SIV or HIV infection in five independent trials of HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

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Robotic thread is designed to slip through the brain's blood vessels

MIT engineers have developed a magnetically steerable, thread-like robot that can actively glide through narrow, winding pathways, such as the labrynthine vasculature of the brain.

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Math shows why animals see at night

By combining mathematics with science, an interdisciplinary team at Hiroshima University (HU) found how changes in the shape of DNA structure affect the nuclei of nocturnal animals. Their findings could help explain how nocturnal animals, such as mice, see at night.

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UCI-led study: Plankton are more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought

Surface ocean phosphate is a key mineral supporting the growth and diversification of phytoplankton, a marine organism the absorbs significant amounts of carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. A University of California, Irvine-led team has used highly sensitive measurements to create a map of the global distribution of surface phosphate, finding regional differences and ultimately learning that

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A gentle grip on gelatinous creatures

Jellyfish are about 95% water, which makes them very difficult to study because most of the underwater tools available to marine biologists are clunky, heavy, and often shred jellyfish and other delicate creatures to pieces. A new ultra-soft gripper developed by the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and collaborators at Baruch College uses fettuccini-like 'fingers' inflated with water to gently

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Clickbait secrets exposed! Humans and AI team up to improve clickbait detection

Humans and machines worked together to help train an artificial intelligence — AI — model that outperformed other clickbait detectors, according to researchers at Penn State and Arizona State University.

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Music-based biofeedback shows promise in improving deadlift technique

A study of 31 recreational weightlifters suggests that a real-time, music-based feedback system helps improve deadlift technique. Valerio Lorenzoni of Ghent University, Belgium, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Aug. 28, 2019.

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Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves

Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a study released Aug. 28, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by an international team of archaeologists, anthropologists and neuroscientists of the Ba'ja Neolithic Project hosted at the Free University of Berlin in cooperation with the Department of Antiquitie

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Some vaccine doubters may be swayed by proximity to disease outbreak, study finds

An individual's trust in institutions such as the CDC, and how close they live to a recent measles outbreak, may affect their attitudes on measles vaccination, according to a study published Aug. 28, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Florian Justwan of the University of Idaho, USA, and colleagues.

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Worm robot could wiggle its way through arteries in the brain

A tiny worm robot can be controlled by magnets to wiggle through arteries in a model brain. It could one day be used to make brain surgery less invasive

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OPPO Reno2 Launches With Quad Rear Cameras, 5X Hybrid Zoom And Shark Fin Selfie Cam

Over in India, smartphone maker Oppo is releasing its new "Reno2" series (stylized without a space), with a global launch planned sometime later. According to Oppo, the Reno2 models are about …

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SpaceX Starhopper Rocket Completes Second and Final Test Flight

SpaceX has big plans for the Starship that include launching deep space missions and colonizing Mars. Before it can do any of that, it has to finish designing the vehicle. The final Starship will be a sci-fi masterpiece of stainless steel, but the Starhopper is its stubby precursor. This prototype rocket is still plenty sci-fi, though. In its latest and final test, the Starhopper successfully hov

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The public and legislative impact of hyperconcentrated topic news

News has been shown to influence public perception, affect technology development, and increase public expression. We demonstrate that framing, a subjective aspect of news, appears to influence both significant public perception changes and federal legislation. We show that specific features of news, such as publishing volume, appear to influence sustained public attention, as measured by annual

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JLP-centrosome is essential for the microtubule-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport induced by extracellular stimuli

JLP belongs to the JIP family whose members serve as scaffolding proteins that link motor proteins and their cargo for intracellular transport. Although JLP is mainly cytoplasmic, it accumulates as a focus in the perinuclear region when stimulated by extracellular stimuli. Focus formation, which changes the nucleus shape and concentrates the nuclear pores, depends on p38MAPK activation and the dy

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Hypervelocity impacts as a source of deceiving surface signatures on iron-rich asteroids

Several arguments point to a larger proportion of metal-rich asteroids than that derived from spectral observations, as remnants of collisional disruptions of differentiated bodies. We show experimentally that this apparent deficit may result from the coating of metallic surfaces by silicate melts produced during impacts of hydrated or dry projectiles at typical asteroid impact speeds. Spectral a

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Reframing the carbon cycle of the subpolar Southern Ocean

Global climate is critically sensitive to physical and biogeochemical dynamics in the subpolar Southern Ocean, since it is here that deep, carbon-rich layers of the world ocean outcrop and exchange carbon with the atmosphere. Here, we present evidence that the conventional framework for the subpolar Southern Ocean carbon cycle, which attributes a dominant role to the vertical overturning circulat

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A biomimetic pancreatic cancer on-chip reveals endothelial ablation via ALK7 signaling

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive, lethal malignancy that invades adjacent vasculatures and spreads to distant sites before clinical detection. Although invasion into the peripancreatic vasculature is one of the hallmarks of PDAC, paradoxically, PDAC tumors also exhibit hypovascularity. How PDAC tumors become hypovascular is poorly understood. We describe an organotypic PDA

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The role of aseismic slip in hydraulic fracturing-induced seismicity

Models for hydraulic fracturing–induced earthquakes in shales typically ascribe fault activation to elevated pore pressure or increased shear stress; however, these mechanisms are incompatible with experiments and rate-state frictional models, which predict stable sliding (aseismic slip) on faults that penetrate rocks with high clay or total organic carbon. Recent studies further indicate that th

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Functional diversification of hybridoma-produced antibodies by CRISPR/HDR genomic engineering

Hybridoma technology is instrumental for the development of novel antibody therapeutics and diagnostics. Recent preclinical and clinical studies highlight the importance of antibody isotype for therapeutic efficacy. However, since the sequence encoding the constant domains is fixed, tuning antibody function in hybridomas has been restricted. Here, we demonstrate a versatile CRISPR/HDR platform to

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Epigenetic signatures of methylated DNA cytosine in Alzheimers disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the most common untreatable form of dementia. Identifying molecular biomarkers that allow early detection remains a key challenge in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of the disease. Here, we report a novel experimental and analytical model characterizing epigenetic alterations during AD onset and progression

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Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by deletion of the ANT family and CypD

The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) has resisted molecular identification. The original model of the MPTP that proposed the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) as the inner membrane pore-forming component was challenged when mitochondria from Ant1/2 double null mouse liver still had MPTP activity. Because mice express three Ant genes, we reinvestigated whether the ANTs compris

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Evolutionary adaptation in fucosyllactose uptake systems supports bifidobacteria-infant symbiosis

The human gut microbiota established during infancy has persistent effects on health. In vitro studies have suggested that human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in breast milk promote the formation of a bifidobacteria-rich microbiota in infant guts; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here, we characterized two functionally distinct but overlapping fucosyllactose transporter

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Cushings syndrome driver mutation disrupts protein kinase A allosteric network, altering both regulation and substrate specificity

Genetic alterations in the PRKACA gene coding for the catalytic α subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C) are linked to cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas, resulting in Cushing’s syndrome. Among those, a single mutation (L205R) has been found in up to 67% of patients. Because the x-ray structures of the wild-type and mutant kinases are essentially identical, the mechanism e

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Biogeochemical controls of surface ocean phosphate

Surface ocean phosphate is commonly below the standard analytical detection limits, leading to an incomplete picture of the global variation and biogeochemical role of phosphate. A global compilation of phosphate measured using high-sensitivity methods revealed several previously unrecognized low-phosphate areas and clear regional differences. Both observational climatologies and Earth system mod

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Opinion cascades and the unpredictability of partisan polarization

"Culture wars" involve the puzzling alignment of partisan identity with disparate policy positions, lifestyle choices, and personal morality. Explanations point to ideological divisions, core values, moral emotions, and cognitive hardwiring. Two "multiple worlds" experiments ( n = 4581) tested an alternative explanation based on the sensitivity of opinion cascades to the initial conditions. Consi

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Covalently tethering siRNA to hydrogels for localized, controlled release and gene silencing

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has found many applications in tissue regeneration and disease therapeutics. Effective and localized siRNA delivery remains challenging, reducing its therapeutic potential. Here, we report a strategy to control and prolong siRNA release by directly tethering transfection-capable siRNA to photocrosslinked dextran hydrogels. siRNA release is governed via the hydrolytic

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Viperin catalyzes methionine oxidation to promote protein expression and function of helicases

Helicases play pivotal roles in fundamental biological processes, and posttranslational modifications regulate the localization, function, and stability of helicases. Here, we report that methionine oxidation of representative helicases, including DNA and RNA helicases of viral (ORF44 of KSHV) and cellular (MCM7 and RIG-I) origin, promotes their expression and functions. Cellular viperin, a major

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Dimeric structures of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductases (qNORs) revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

Quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductases (qNORs) are membrane-integrated, iron-containing enzymes of the denitrification pathway, which catalyze the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to the major ozone destroying gas nitrous oxide (N 2 O). Cryo–electron microscopy structures of active qNOR from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans and an activity-enhancing mutant have been determined to be at local resolutions

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Combinatorial morphogenetic and mechanical cues to mimic bone development for defect repair

Endochondral ossification during long bone development and natural fracture healing initiates by mesenchymal cell condensation, directed by local morphogen signals and mechanical cues. Here, we aimed to mimic development for regeneration of large bone defects. We hypothesized that engineered human mesenchymal condensations presenting transforming growth factor–β1 (TGF-β1) and/or bone morphogeneti

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Calcium isotopic patterns in enamel reflect different nursing behaviors among South African early hominins

Nursing is pivotal in the social and biological evolution of hominins, but to date, early-life behavior among hominin lineages is a matter of debate. The calcium isotopic compositions ( 44/42 Ca) of tooth enamel can provide dietary information on this period. Here, we measure the 44/42 Ca values in spatially located microsized regions in tooth enamel of 37 South African hominins to reconstruct ea

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The Bose 700 headphones have the strongest noise-cancelling around

Even the sturdy, zippered case feels high-end. (Stan Horaczek/) There are plenty of appropriate places to test a flagship pair of wireless headphones such as the new $400 Bose Noise Canceling Headphones 700 . An open office, for example, is a great spot to try the upgraded noise-cancelling mode that has 10 selectable levels of intensity. A crowded train full of tipsy, shouting baseball fans is an

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How mirror neurons allow us to send other people ‘good vibes’

Mirror neurons fire when we observe an action performed by another person, mentally simulating that action for ourselves. Because of these mirror neurons, studies show that smiling is, in a sense, neurologically contagious — and so are the good feelings associated with them. Low-functioning mirror neurons might underly a number of mental disorders, such as autism. None Social interactions can eli

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Ape-like face of early human ancestor revealed

Nearly complete skull from Ethiopia raises questions about our evolution. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Miniature robo-snakes might soon inch through human brains

Roboticists are working on micrometre-scale machines capable of exploring cerebral blood vessels and lasering blockages. Barry Keily reports.

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Mathematical modeling shows why animals see at night

Nocturnal and diurnal mammals see the same—but only for a brief time. When mice are born, the chromatin in the cells of their eyes has a diurnal structure. Day by day, the layout of this chromatin slowly inverts, allowing the mice to see at night. How this change happens was a mystery.

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Community-based wildlife carcass surveillance is key for early detection of Ebola virus

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and NIH (National Institutes of Health) scientists partnered with the Republic of Congo Ministry of Health to develop a low-cost educational outreach program and surveillance system for wildlife mortality that has continued now for over a decade.

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A new drug could revolutionize the treatment of neurological disorders

The international team of scientists from Gero Discovery LLC, the Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca, and Nanosyn, Inc. has found a potential drug that may prevent neuronal death through glucose metabolism modification in stressed neurons. The positive results obtained in mice are rather promising for future use in humans.

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Mathematical modeling shows why animals see at night

Nocturnal and diurnal mammals see the same—but only for a brief time. When mice are born, the chromatin in the cells of their eyes has a diurnal structure. Day by day, the layout of this chromatin slowly inverts, allowing the mice to see at night. How this change happens was a mystery.

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Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves

Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a study released August 28, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by an international team of archaeologists, anthropologists and neuroscientists of the Ba'ja Neolithic Project hosted at the Free University of Berlin in cooperation with the Department of Antiquit

12d

Research sheds new light on Antarctic control of global climate

Scientists have made a new discovery that challenges previous understanding of the relationship between the polar Southern Ocean, next to Antarctica, and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Their findings show that, contrary to existing assumptions, biological processes far out at sea are the most important factors determining how the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide. The results are published th

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Plankton are more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought

An international team of Earth system scientists and oceanographers has created the first high-resolution global map of surface ocean phosphate, a key mineral supporting the aquatic food chain. In doing so, the University of California, Irvine-led group learned that marine phytoplankton are a lot more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought.

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No microbiome is an island, unprecedented survey of Hawaiian valley reveals

Plants and animals acquire their microbial partners from organisms below them in food chain or from wider environment

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A Clarification about Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

A recent Scientific American essay overlooked some important points — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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On Instagram, 'Unlink Account' Won't Unlink a Facebook Account

Facebook knows so much about its users that it can link their accounts, even when created under different names, from different devices.

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Giant planet slingshots around its star

It’s big, it’s the first of its kind, and it follows a bizarre path.

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Climate change implicated by a flood of data

Multinational study reveals different flooding trends across Europe.

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Don’t count your corals before they attach

A big piece of pumice probably won’t save a really big reef. Amelia Nichele reports.

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A space masterpiece remembered

NASA thinks it’s time to celebrate Spitzer and its best work.

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Toward a Universal Theory of ‘Mom Jeans’

When I was 19 years old, brimming with the kind of giddy, fragile confidence common to those who have just returned to campus to start their sophomore year of college, I marched into the edgiest salon in our particular suburb of Chicago and asked an objectively edgy stylist to shear off all my hair. I wanted a funky, razor-cut pixie, the kind that style gurus often imposed on America’s Next Top M

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3D-printed salt gives form to absorbable bone implants

3D-printed ‘salt templates’ have paved the way for new porous magnesium scaffolds for creating bone implants the body can absorb, researchers report. For the treatment of complex bone fractures or even missing bone parts, surgeons typically deploy metal implants. In this context, biodegradable magnesium and its alloys are attractive alternatives to the traditional materials like bioinert titanium

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10-cent TB test is 95% accurate

A new test detects tuberculosis in 10-20 minutes with 95%-99% accuracy and only costs 10 cents per test, researchers report. Until now, early detection has posed a serious challenge for people suffering at various stages of the epidemic. In 2016, 10.4 million people got tuberculosis (TB) and 1.7 million died—95% of whom lived in low- and medium-income countries. Researchers designed the new biose

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Oldest Australopith Skull Raises Questions About Hominin Evolution

At 3.8 million years old, this mostly complete cranium of Australopithecus anamensis is the oldest australopith skull in the fossil record. (Credit: Dale Omori, courtesy of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History) On Feb. 10, 2016, the face of a ghost emerged from weathered Ethiopian sandstone. The nearly complete skull, 3.8 million years old, was found less than 20 miles from the site where Lucy,

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Innovative hand sanitizers to help you ward of sickness

You too could be this happy about hand sanitizer. (Anna Earl via Unsplash/) If you travel a lot, spend your days with kids, or are just very germ-averse, hand sanitizer makes it easy to stay relatively clean when you don't have soap and warm water at hand. Still, convenience doesn't come without its downsides: when you use these products regularly, they can leave your hands feeling extra dry, and

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How Galaxies Live, Breathe and Die

Gas glows white, lit by a stellar nursery, in this view of a region within the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Milky Way’s largest satellite galaxy. Most cosmic gas is not so visible and lies outside of galaxies — in halos surrounding galaxies and in the vast spaces in between. Yet the gas determines galactic life cycles. (Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA) Most of what astronomers know about the universe com

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Narrowing risk of preeclampsia to a specific phenotype

In a recent paper in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, MUSC researchers look at preeclampsia when it coincides with type 1 diabetes. By studying patients with elevated lipoproteins, these researchers determined that the diabetic patients with a certain phenotype were at greater risk for preeclampsia. But by monitoring these patients, physicians can take proactive measures to keep

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Behavioral therapy, physical strengthening may prevent disability in minority elders

New disability prevention intervention indicates that improving coping skills and physical strengthening can improve functioning and mood in racial and ethnic minority and immigrant older adults.

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Nanotube microchips could make computers more energy efficient

A microchip that uses carbon nanotubes can be used to make a simple computer and could be more energy efficient than current chips

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We've finally found a skull from one of our most important ancestors

A skull found in Ethiopia has been identified as belonging to Australopithecus anamensis, which lived 4 million years ago and may be one of our direct ancestors

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Physicists Publish Instructions For DIY Wormhole

Here’s a simple how-to on how to construct a traversable cosmic wormhole that could send your spaceship to the furthest reaches of space: take two charged black holes, place them back to back, and thread two cosmic strings through both. Stretch both strings to infinity and presto! You’ve got yourself a traversable wormhole. Confused yet? A team of astrophycisists dreamed up this solution, which c

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With our low voter turnout, is America still a democracy?

In his latest book, Upheaval , Jared Diamond points out that America's voter turnout is the lowest of all prosperous democracies. While Australia, Belgium, and Indonesia top at 90 percent voter turnout, America's average is around 60 — and that's only during presidential races. Local elections are even lower; the last Los Angeles mayoral race only turned out 20 percent of Angelenos. None In the f

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This Could Be the Face of a 3.8 Million-Year-Old Human Ancestor

Nearly complete skull of Australopithecus anamensis found in Ethiopia. MRD4_crop.jpg Image credits: Composite photo by Jennifer Taylor, courtesy of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Photography by Matt Crow and Dale Omori. Culture Wednesday, August 28, 2019 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A nearly complete 3.8 million-year-old skull found in Ethiopia offers the fi

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Saturn’s Interior May Actually Flow “Like Honey”

In 2017, the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn , ending an exploratory mission that had lasted nearly two decades. But even that final act has proven incredibly useful to scientists, some of whom have now used the data from Cassini’s final transmission to make a remarkable discovery about Saturn: the gas giant’s liquid interior might be viscous, flowing “like honey.” First, here’s some of wh

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The First Reused Spacecraft, 56 Years Ago

A record-breaking altitude and a few minutes of weightlessness in an extraordinary vehicle — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New DNA sequencer method achieves early-stage and broad-range detection of wheat diseases

As wheat is one of the world's most important crops, a group of Australia-based scientists wanted to develop a new method for analyzing pathogen DNA in wheat leaf samples. Using a portable DNA sequencer, they were able to achieve early-stage and broad-range detection of pathogens in wheat — and they were also able to characterize all organisms in the wheat and confirmed the presence of an unexpec

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Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science

They may all be in the same classroom together, but each child in preschool may have a very different experience, a new study suggests. The researchers documented these different experiences using a novel technique in the classroom: They had children wear a video camera on their head for two hours on one day to see what the class was like from the child's perspective.

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MIPT physicists create device for imitating biological memory

Researchers from the MIPT have created a device that acts like a synapse in the living brain, storing information and gradually forgetting it when not accessed for a long time. Known as a second-order memristor, the new device is based on hafnium oxide and offers prospects for designing analog neurocomputers imitating the way a biological brain learns. The findings are reported in ACS Applied Mate

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First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

Scientists at SLAC and Stanford have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity – the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss. The first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors, its similarity to the cuprates raises hopes that it can be made to superconduct at relatively high temperatures. But it's also different in key ways tha

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A 3.8-million-year-old fossil from Ethiopia reveals the face of Lucy's ancestor

Cleveland Museum of Natural History Curator of Physical Anthropology Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie and an international team of researchers have discovered a 'remarkably complete' 3.8-million-year-old cranium in the Afar region of Ethiopia. Assigned to Australopithecus anamensis — previously only known through jaw fragments and teeth — the identification and dating of the specimen are significant

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Brain stem cells have a good memory

During embryogenesis, dozens of types of neurons with distinct functions come together to form the circuits that drive our thoughts and actions. They are generated by progenitor cells, which produce them one after the other in a very precise order. Researchers at the University of Geneva now provide proof that progenitor cells are transplanted into a young mouse embryo, they recover their past ski

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Changing climate linked to major changes in flooding across Europe

The impact of a changing climate on the severity of flooding has been demonstrated in the largest-scale study of its kind. The change ranges from an 11% increase in flood levels in northern England and southern Scotland to a 23% reduction in parts of Russia.

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Climate change affects floods in Europe

For a long time, scientists argued whether or not climate change is affecting floods. No clear trends seemed to be evident. Now, in a major international study, data from numerous measurement stations all across Europe have been evaluated. The data clearly shows that climate change is indeed influencing the magnitude of flood events. However, climate change has different consequences in different

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Cancer cells 'corrupt' their healthy neighbors

The healthy cells immediately surrounding a tumor become more stem cell-like and support cancer growth, reveals a new study published in Nature.

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High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme

The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. Malfunction can lead to serious disorders. For the first time, structural biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now visualized and analyzed the enzyme's atomic structure with the support of the institute's newly installed high-end cryo-electron

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Climate change, human activity lead to nearshore coral growth decline

New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compares the growth rates between nearshore and offshore corals in the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System, the world's second-largest reef system. While nearshore corals have historically grown faster than those offshore, over the past decade there was a decline in the growth rates of two types of nearshore corals, while offsho

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A face for Lucy's ancestor

Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest-known species of Australopithecus and widely accepted as the progenitor of 'Lucy's' species, Australopithecus afarensis. Until now, A. anamensis was known mainly from jaws and teeth. Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Stephanie Melillo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and their colleagues have disc

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Floods are impacted by a changing climate

A large international research project led by the Vienna University of Technology has demonstrated, for the first time on such a scale, that climate change is altering the magnitude of flood events. According to the data, flood events are increasing in northwestern Europe and decreasing in southeastern Europe. The study, in which Bruno Merz of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences was also in

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Clostridium difficile infections may have a friend in fungi

The pathogen Clostridium difficile, which causes one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in the United States, may have accomplices that until now have gone largely unnoticed.

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'All bets now off' on which ape was humanity's ancestor

The discovery of an ancient skull in Ethiopia underlines the complexity in the evolution of humans.

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Oldest Known Parasites Found in Ancient Puma Feces

Researchers isolate roundworm DNA from animal excrement that is about 17,000 years old.

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A. anamensis Hominin Skull Could Recast Our Human Family Tree

Researchers say the skull belongs to a species once thought to be a predecessor to “Lucy,” but now that relationship is murky.

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Why Big Movie Chains Won’t Show Martin Scorsese’s Netflix Epic

When Netflix announced in 2018 that its awards-season films Roma, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, and Bird Box would play in theaters before debuting online, it was an unusual concession for the company—an acknowledgment that it couldn’t sidestep the theater business forever. Roma played in select cinemas for three weeks, while Scruggs and Bird Box did limited one-week runs. Thus far in 2019, Netfl

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What Boris Johnson Did to the World’s Most Stable Democracy

Over the past months, the big question I’ve heard asked about Boris Johnson, the new prime minister of the United Kingdom, is whether it’s right to characterize him as an authoritarian populist in the mold of America’s Donald Trump or Italy’s Matteo Salvini. Like Trump and Salvini, Johnson makes simplistic promises, encourages a cult of personality, and loves to lambaste the elite (despite being

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Daily briefing: Secret space plane has broken records by spending nearly two years in orbit

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02582-9 The X-37B has spent almost two years in orbit, look into the face of an exceptional Australopithecus, and all the ways we’ve tried (and failed) to quash hurricanes.

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In Photos: A Nearly Complete Human Ancestor Skull

This ancient ancestor looked a lot like the iconic "Lucy."

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New Fossil Reveals Face of Oldest Known 'Lucy' Relative

The face of the oldest known species of Australopithecus looks a bit like the famous "Lucy" and a bit like far older hominins.

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KFC's plant-based 'chicken' sold out in five hours

submitted by /u/roku44 [link] [comments]

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Your friendly neighborhood robot: A he, a she, or an it? | ZDNet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Kids are becoming emotionally attached to robots

submitted by /u/labmonkey01 [link] [comments]

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Earth Stopped Getting Greener 20 Years Ago

submitted by /u/Dubille [link] [comments]

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Scientists Fertilize Eggs From the Last Two Northern White Rhinos

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Climate change, human activity lead to nearshore coral growth decline

New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compares the growth rates between nearshore and offshore corals in the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System, the world's second-largest reef system. While nearshore corals have historically grown faster than those offshore, over the past decade there was a decline in the growth rates of two types of nearshore corals, while offsho

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Changing climate linked to major changes in flooding across Europe

The impact of a changing climate on the severity of flooding has been demonstrated in the largest-scale study of its kind—with parts of northern Britain seeing the largest increase in Europe.

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High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme

The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. Malfunction can lead to serious disorders. For the first time, structural biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now visualized and analyzed the enzyme's atomic structure with the support of the institute's newly installed high-end cryo-electron

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A 3.8-million-year-old fossil from Ethiopia reveals the face of Lucy's ancestor

Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest-known species of Australopithecus, and widely accepted as the progenitor of Lucy's species, Australopithecus afarensis. Until now, A. anamensis was known mainly from jaws and teeth. Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Stephanie Melillo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and their colleagues have disco

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Carbon-nanotube computer scaled up

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02519-2 Electronic devices that are based on carbon nanotubes have the potential to be more energy efficient than their silicon counterparts, but have been restricted in functionality. This limitation has now been overcome.

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Structural basis of assembly of the human TCR–CD3 complex

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1537-0

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Modern microprocessor built from complementary carbon nanotube transistors

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1493-8 A 16-bit microprocessor built from over 14,000 carbon nanotube transistors may enable energy efficiency advances in electronics technologies beyond silicon.

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Rare 3.8-million-year-old skull recasts origins of iconic ‘Lucy’ fossil

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02573-w Ancient cranium discovered in Ethiopia suggests early hominin evolutionary tree is messier than we thought.

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A 3.8-million-year-old hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1513-8 Two related studies describe a newly discovered cranium of Australopithecus anamensis, the environment in which this hominin would have lived approximately 3.8 million years ago and how it is related to Australopithecus afarensis.

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Cells tagged near an early spread of cancer

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02399-6 Cancer cells that travel to a distant site can prompt the normal neighbouring cells at that location to create a tumour-promoting microenvironment. A tool that identifies these normal cells offers a way to study this process.

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Natural selection on the Arabidopsis thaliana genome in present and future climates

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1520-9 The predicted increase in frequency of droughts and rising temperatures in Europe will lead core populations of a temperate plant to an evolutionary dead-end unless they acquire genetic alleles that are present only in extreme edge Mediterranean, Scandinavian, or Siberian populations.

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Superconductivity in an infinite-layer nickelate

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1496-5 Superconductivity is demonstrated in an infinite-layer nickelate similar to infinite-layer copper oxides, which is synthesized using soft- chemistry topotactic reduction of the perovskite precursor phase.

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Emergence of tissue-like mechanics from fibrous networks confined by close-packed cells

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1516-5 Tissue rheology emerges from the interplay between fibrous networks and cell inclusions, and the mechanical properties of tissues are modulated by restricting the relaxation modes of fibres close to volume-conserving cells.

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Efficient molecular doping of polymeric semiconductors driven by anion exchange

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1504-9 The limitations of conventional chemical doping of polymeric semiconductors can be overcome by adding a second ionic species into the system, leading to enhanced doping, electrical conductivity and stability.

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Biggest carbon-nanotube chip yet says ‘Hello, World!’

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02576-7 Researchers have built a 16-bit computer processor from the material.

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Structure and mechanism of mitochondrial proton-translocating transhydrogenase

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1519-2 The structure of a mammalian proton-translocating transhydrogenase in various conformations is solved by cryo-electron microscopy, and a mechanism for the coupling process within the enzyme is proposed.

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Metastatic-niche labelling reveals parenchymal cells with stem features

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1487-6 A cell-penetrating fluorescent marker is used to label cells in the metastatic tumour microenvironment, revealing a variety of cell types including parenchymal cells with lung stem-cell characteristics.

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Age and context of mid-Pliocene hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1514-7 Two related studies describe a newly discovered cranium of Australopithecus anamensis, the environment in which this hominin would have lived approximately 3.8 million years ago and how it is related to Australopithecus afarensis.

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Ancient skull, Amazon fires and giraffe protections

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02515-6 The week in science: 23–29 August 2019.

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Organization and regulation of gene transcription

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1517-4 Structural and microscopy studies of gene transcription underpin a model in which phosphorylation controls the shuttling of RNA polymerase II between promoter and gene-body condensates to regulate transcription initiation and elongation.

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Superconductivity seen in a non-magnetic nickel oxide

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02518-3 Magnetism alone was thought to be responsible for superconductivity in copper oxides. The finding of superconductivity in a non-magnetic compound that is structurally similar to these copper oxides challenges this view.

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The flight response impairs cytoprotective mechanisms by activating the insulin pathway

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1524-5 The release of tyramine during the flight response in nematodes activates the DAF-2/insulin–IGF pathway to downregulate cytoprotective mechanisms and shorten lifespan.

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Podcast: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02577-6 Listen to the latest from the world of science, with Shamini Bundell and Benjamin Thompson.

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Fatty acids and cancer-amplified ZDHHC19 promote STAT3 activation through S-palmitoylation

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1511-x The palmitoylation of STAT3 is mediated by fatty acids and/or the palmitoyl acyltransferase ZDHHC19, and deregulation of this palmitoylation has a role in inflammation and tumorigenesis.

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Elusive cranium of early hominin found

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02520-9 A 3.8-million-year-old hominin fossil reveals what the cranium of the oldest known Australopithecus species looked like, casting doubt on assumptions about how these ancient relatives of humans evolved.

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Changing climate both increases and decreases European river floods

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1495-6 Analysis of a comprehensive European flood dataset reveals regional changes in river flood discharges in the past five decades that are consistent with models suggesting that climate-driven changes are already happening.

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Temporal plasticity of apical progenitors in the developing mouse neocortex

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1515-6 In the brains of embryonic mice, some types of progenitor (apical progenitors) can revert to earlier molecular, electrophysiological and neurogenic states when transplanted into younger hosts, whereas others cannot, highlighting progenitor-type-specific differences in fate plasticity.

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Stunning ancient skull shakes up human family tree

Researchers reveal the 4-million-year-old face of key human ancestor

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High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme

The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. Malfunction can lead to serious disorders. For the first time, structural biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now visualized and analyzed the enzyme's atomic structure with the support of the institute's newly installed high-end cryo-electron

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Hominin skull 3.8m years old excavated in Ethiopia

Discovery casts new light on the progress of human evolution

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Wildlife protections tightened as southern Africa protests

A global wildlife summit has decided to regulate trade in giraffes and tighten protections for endangered animals including elephants, triggering a threat from disgruntled southern African nations to leave an international treaty.

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Canadian astronomers determine Earth's fingerprint

Two McGill University astronomers have assembled a 'fingerprint' for Earth, which could be used to identify a planet beyond our Solar System capable of supporting life.

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Ecopipam reduces stuttering symptoms in proof-of-concept trial

A team led by a psychiatrist at the University of California, Riverside, has tested the orally administered investigational medication ecopipam on adults who stutter in an open-label, uncontrolled clinical trial and found that it reduced their stuttering symptoms from the start of therapy after eight weeks of dosing. Positive results included increased speech fluency, faster reading completion, an

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Why WIRED.com Looks Different Today

It’s faster, cleaner, and easier to read. We're ADA compliant to boot!

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Wildlife protections tightened as southern Africa protests

A global wildlife summit has decided to regulate trade in giraffes and tighten protections for endangered animals including elephants, triggering a threat from disgruntled southern African nations to leave an international treaty.

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Restaurant ads about animal welfare don’t move customers

Marketing focused on animal welfare doesn’t boost restaurants’ reputations or customer trust, according to new research. Businesses are increasingly embracing social causes as a way to promote brand trust among consumers while also attempting to better society. Chipotle, for example, made headlines when it released “Back to the Start,” an advertisement promoting more humane food production. Yet t

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Oldest Known Parasites Found in Ancient Puma Feces

Researchers isolate roundworm DNA from animal excrement that is about 17,000 years old.

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Statusjakt bland kvinnorna i antikens Rom

Den mellersta romerska republiken (år 264-133 före vår tideräkning) präglades av elitens tävlan om status. Tävlan om statusmässig överlägsenhet inom senatsaristokratin låg till grund för både social tillväxt och konflikter, och kampen om ära inom dessa grupper genomsyrade hela deras tillvaro. Tidigare forskning har i princip uteslutande fokuserat på statustävlan mellan män ur de övre samhällsskik

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in tropical storm Dorian

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with visible imagery and infrared data on Tropical Storm Dorian as it continued its western track into the Eastern Caribbean Sea. Infrared data provided an indication of the storm's heavy rain making potential.

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Native approach to controlled burns has multiple benefits

Using traditional techniques as a part of fire suppression could help revitalize American Indian cultures, economies, and livelihoods—and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, a new study suggests. Researchers say the findings could inform plans to incorporate the cultural burning practices into forest management across an area one and a half times the size of Rhode Island. Traditional baby

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Sony A6600, Canon EOS M6 Mark II show there's still a little life in APS-C cameras – CNET

Four new APS-C cameras are coming our way, with trickle-down features from their full-frame flagships.

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The Pentagon Wants Sentinel Satellites to Deter Space Warfare

Birds-Eye View The Pentagon wants to launch a small network of surveillance satellites high into orbit, where they would be able to spot and trace any acts of aggression in outer space. The three satellites, dreamed up by the Space Development Agency, would be able to autonomously navigate outside of geosynchronous orbit, where they would be able to peer down on any missiles or hostile satellites

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in tropical storm Dorian

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with visible imagery and infrared data on Tropical Storm Dorian as it continued its western track into the Eastern Caribbean Sea. Infrared data provided an indication of the storm's heavy rain making potential.

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New insights into genetic basis of bird migration

A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances.

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Combining DNA and fossil evidence to understand how pine martens evolved through the Ice Age

The Pleistocene Epoch, often called the Ice Age, was a dynamic time of fluctuating environmental conditions, but understanding exactly how animals evolved throughout this time can be challenging. New research by Dr. Leigha Lynch brings together DNA and fossil data to re-assess what scientists know about the evolution of North American pine martens.

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The Fear in Dave Chappelle’s New Special

Early into Sticks and Stones , Dave Chappelle’s newest Netflix stand-up special, the veteran comedian makes a two-part nostalgia play. “Tonight I’m gonna try some impressions out,” he says. Chappelle quickly notes that he has only two to offer, and that the first is a send-up of the Founding Fathers: “Hurry up and finish that Constitution, nigger. I’m trying to get some sleep,” the comedian grumb

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New insights into genetic basis of bird migration

A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances.

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Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in five major pollinator-dependent crops

A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California, including California's massive almond industry.

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Opioid addiction rising in India as US drugmakers push painkillers

As the Indian government loosens its prescription opioid laws after decades of lobbying, the cash-fed healthcare system is ripe for misuse In the crowded waiting room of Dr Sunil Sagar’s clinic, in the working-class neighborhood of Bhagwanpur Khera, a toddler breathes from a nebulizer. The patients sit, motionless, but there is somehow tremendous noise. The clinic is a squat cement building drape

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New insights into genetic basis of bird migration

A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances.

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Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in five major pollinator-dependent crops

A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California, including California's massive almond industry.

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Plants and sensors are being used to help Bologna locals rediscover their city

Lining rundown historic areas of cities with plant life and smart sensors and reusing old buildings for new purposes are helping to breathe new life into Europe's decaying urban spaces.

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Brazil accepts planes from Chile to fight Amazon fires

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro on Wednesday said he has accepted four planes from Chile to help fight Amazon fires, and he accused the French president of portraying himself as "the one and only person" concerned about the environment.

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Switzerland aims to go climate neutral by 2050

Switzerland has become the latest country to say it will stop adding more greenhouse gases to the atmosphere by 2050.

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Africa is the 'fire continent' but blazes differ from Amazon

While the world has watched with fear and fascination the fires burning in Brazil's Amazon rainforest, satellite images show a far greater number of blazes on the African continent.

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The Amazon, Siberia, Indonesia: A World of Fire

The growing intensity of wildfires and their spread to new corners of the globe raises fears that climate change is exacerbating the dangers.

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New optical array, multisite stimulator advances optogenetics

Researchers present an implantable optrode array capable of exciting below-surface neurons in large mammal brains at two levels, both by structured-light delivery and large-volume illumination.

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'Surrey swarm' earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, study suggests

Research has found no evidence that oil extraction caused recent earthquakes known as the 'Surrey swarm' in Surrey and Sussex, England.

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The role of a single molecule in obesity

A single molecule, derived from cholesterol, lurks inside your bloodstream and will increase your body fat, even if you don't eat a diet filled with red meat and fried food. A University of Houston biologist reports that reducing the levels of the molecule could result in reduced capacity for making fat.

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Break in temporal symmetry produces molecules that can encode information

Theoretical findings in a study performed by researchers with FAPESP's support and published in Scientific Reports could be exploited in the development of quantum computing.

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Autism rates increasing fastest among black, Hispanic youth

Autism rates among black and HIspanic children are catching up to and, in many states, exceeding rates among white youth, who have historically had higher prevalence, a new study shows.

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Animal ethics and animal behavioral science — bridging the gap

Animal ethics is an emerging concern across many disciplines. In an article in BioScience, an interdisciplinary group of scholars urges that this issue be taken up actively by animal behavior scientists.

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Teen birth control use linked to depression risk in adulthood

Women who used oral contraceptives during adolescence are more likely to develop depression as adults, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

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Breaking the Ocean Barrier

When will we take one giant leap to save our seas? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hur man styr energihungriga datormoln

De molninfrastrukturer som driver majoriteten av dagens internettjänster (till exempel Google, Facebook och Amazon) förbrukar enorma mängder energi och förvärrar klimatförändringarna. Intressant nog är situationen i ett modernt datacenter egentligen inte så annorlunda från vad som händer i ett hus med gammal elanläggning. Förmodligen kan många komma ihåg någon gång när man satt på för många appar

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Animal ethics and animal behavioral science—bridging the gap

The moral status of animals is an important emerging topic for society, one that is leading to significant changes at academic, political, and legal levels in both wealthy and developing nations. However, some fields, such as animal behavioral science, have remained relatively aloof, despite producing evidence that is deeply enmeshed in animal ethics arguments.

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Healthy foods more important than type of diet to reduce heart disease risk

Researchers examined the effects of three healthy diets emphasizing different macronutrients — carbohydrates, proteins, or unsaturated fats — on a biomarker that directly reflects heart injury.

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New optical array, multisite stimulator advances optogenetics

Researchers present an implantable optrode array capable of exciting below-surface neurons in large mammal brains at two levels, both by structured-light delivery and large-volume illumination.

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Gout 'more than doubles' risk of kidney failure

Patients with gout are at increased risk of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, according to new research.

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HIV-positive New Yorkers are living longer but still dying from underlying infection, not just from old age

A review of the autopsy reports of 252 men and women who died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in New York City between 1984 and 2016 reveals several long-term trends in combatting the epidemic.

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Exposure to second-hand e-cigarettes increasing among young people

A growing number of middle- and high-school students are being exposed to second-hand aerosols from e-cigarettes by living with or being around individuals who are vaping, according to data from a national survey.

12d

What we don't know about prenatal opioid exposure

'Will the baby be OK?' In cases of prenatal opioid exposure, the answer is unclear. Developmental psychologists collected and reviewed 52 publications to identify what's known so far about how prenatal opioid exposure affects childhood outcomes and development.

12d

How texture deceives the moving finger

The perceived speed of a surface moving across the skin depends on texture, with some textures fooling us into thinking that an object is moving faster than it is, according to a new study.

12d

Crows consciously control their calls

Crows can voluntarily control the release and onset of their calls, sug