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nyheder2019august30

Using bacteria from hot springs, biochemist studies RNA splicing in humans

About 70 percent of the human genome doesn't code for anything. When it's transcribed to RNA—the instructions our cells follow when they make proteins—most of the message doesn't contain any useful information. As West Virginia University researcher Aaron Robart put it, it's "junk DNA."

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Richard's '68 Shelby Mustang Gets an Upgrade | Fast N' Loud

Richard shows off his upgraded 1968 Shelby Mustang, just in time for the prestigious Shelby Mustang Meet. Stream Full Episodes of Fast N' Loud: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FastNLoudTV https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FastNLoudTV https://

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Can hearing lots of languages offer benefits of bilingualism?

It may be possible to reap some rewards of bilingualism just by being in the vicinity of multiple languages, researchers report. Numerous studies have noted the brain benefits that come from being bilingual —among them increased executive-level cognitive function and a four- to five-year delay in the risk of developing dementia symptoms. “The phenomenon is known as ambient linguistic diversity, a

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The best hand creams to soothe and protect your paws

Prepare for softness. (Matthew Henry via Unsplash/) Your hands do—and weather—so much. During the dead of winter, your mitts can crack and hurt, but some sources of phalange anguish happen year-round, like dishwashing with harsh detergents and frequent temperature variation. And it's not just the short-term pain and ugliness of cracked and flaking hands; the skin on your hands also show signs of

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Menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer incidence

New research suggest that all types of MHT, except topical vaginal estrogens, are associated with increased risks of breast cancer, and that the risks are greater for users of estrogen-progestagen hormone therapy than for estrogen-only hormone therapy. For estrogen-progestagen therapy, the risks were greater if the progestagen was included daily rather than intermittently (eg, for 10-14 days per m

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New insights into how diet & medication impact the influence of gut bacteria on our health

Research published in Cell on 29th August by the groups of Filipe Cabreiro from the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences and Imperial College and Christoph Kaleta from Kiel University in Germany has demonstrated that diet can alter the effectiveness of a type-2 diabetes drug via its action on gut bacteria.

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‘Local, Local, Local’: How a Small Newspaper Survives

This is another road report on the state of local journalism, which is more and more important, and more and more imperiled. It is important because so much of the future of American economic, cultural, and civic life is now being devised and determined at the local or state level. Educational innovation, promotion of new industries and creation of fairer opportunities, absorption of new arrivals

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1.3 billion tons of food being wasted each year. Can we stop it?

Across the planet, more than a billion tons of essential, nutritious, life-sustaining food goes to waste each year.

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New Organs, Better Pain Management, Climate Change, and Asteroid Rocks

A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. New Organs, Opioids, Climate Change, and Space Rocks (August 2019 Monthly Roundup) Video of New Organs, Opioids, Climate Change, and Space Rocks (August 2019 Monthly Roundup) Human Friday, August 30, 2019 – 10:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor On this monthly roundup, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of August's most interestin

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Exoplanets can't hide their secrets from innovative new instrument

In an unprecedented feat, an American research team discovered hidden secrets of an elusive exoplanet using a powerful new instrument at the 8-meter Gemini North telescope on Maunakea in Hawai'i. The findings not only classify a Jupiter-sized exoplanet in a close binary star system, but also conclusively demonstrate, for the first time, which star the planet orbits.

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Daisies that close at night have camouflaged petals to protect them from herbivores

Researchers from Stellenbosch University, South Africa found that tortoises, one of the main herbivores of the daisies, were unable to distinguish the lower petal surfaces against a green leaf background. Tortoises prefer to eat protein-rich flowers over leaves, but when confronted with closed flowers, they showed no preference between them.

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Preparing for hurricanes: 3 essential reads

The National Hurricane Center forecast on Aug. 29 that Hurricane Dorian could make landfall this weekend and bring large amounts of rain, strong winds and potential flooding from storm surge.

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Aw, shucks: Vet says corn on the cob no treat for dogs

Corn on the cob is a treat that many people enjoy each summer. But a Kansas State University veterinarian says don't share that cob with your dog.

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Hurricane Dorian Is Getting Stronger As It Heads Toward Florida

Hurricane Dorian becomes stronger as it makes its way up the Atlantic toward the Bahamas, according to the latest forecast.

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Where's My Consciousness-ometer?

Whether an entity is conscious may soon be a testable question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Daisies that close at night have camouflaged petals to protect them from herbivores

Researchers from Stellenbosch University, South Africa found that tortoises, one of the main herbivores of the daisies, were unable to distinguish the lower petal surfaces against a green leaf background. Tortoises prefer to eat protein-rich flowers over leaves, but when confronted with closed flowers, they showed no preference between them.

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Aw, shucks: Vet says corn on the cob no treat for dogs

Corn on the cob is a treat that many people enjoy each summer. But a Kansas State University veterinarian says don't share that cob with your dog.

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Military now controls Myanmar’s scientifically important amber mines

Hundreds of scientifically priceless fossils are extracted in horrendous conditions in Myanmar’s amber mines and smuggled over the border for sale in China

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It's never too late to start exercising, new study shows

Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programs have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research.

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Number of years in NFL, certain positions portend greater risk for cognitive, mental health problems

Study shows link between longer NFL career and higher risk of cognitive, mental health problems. Risk persisted over time, even 20 years following injury. Certain positions also carried elevated risk for cognitive problems, depression and anxiety. Running backs, linebackers, defensive linemen had the greatest risk for cognitive problems.

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Drug use, excess alcohol and no helmet common among US injured eScooter users

A significant proportion of eScooter injuries in the US seem to be occurring while 'drivers' are under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol and almost never wearing a helmet, suggests a new study.

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The Last of Stemcentrx

The final implosion of the Stemcentrx deal is worth a note, although I said a lot of what I have to say about it back in December . I want to especially emphasize two points I made back then – first, that the failure of this whole acquisition is different only in degree, and not in kind, from many others in this business. AbbVie paid an awful lot of money for Stemcentrx, and in the end they got z

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Amazon deforestation has a significant impact on the local climate in Brazil

The loss of forest cover in the Amazon has a significant impact on the local climate in Brazil, according to a new study.

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What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?

Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the U.S. have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. In a recent study, they developed three different design options for an intergovernmental biodiversity financing mechanism. Asking what would happen if money was given to countries for providing protected areas, they simulated where the money would f

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What you might have missed

The ape-like face of one of our earliest ancestors, the subtle but important differences between human and mouse brains, and bacteria holding their own against mozzies – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?

Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the U.S. have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. In a recent study, they developed three different design options for an intergovernmental biodiversity financing mechanism. Asking what would happen if money was given to countries for providing protected areas, they simulated where the money would f

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They Met in an Elevator; Now They Travel the World Together

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two men who have a tradition of taking an annual international trip to see a soccer game—they’ve been going for more than 20 years now, sometimes alone, sometimes with their families, and in rece

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Ingen enskild gen avgör vem du vill ha sex med

Tidigare forskning har visat att genetik spelar viss roll för vår sexuella läggning, men har inte kunnat identifiera vilka specifika gener som är inblandade. Den aktuella studien som är gjord på fler än 490 000 deltagare identifierade fem genvarianter som var vanligare hos de som haft samkönat sex. Två av genvarianterna återfanns hos både män och kvinnor medan två hittades enbart hos män och en e

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Defrosting surfaces in seconds

Researchers have developed a way to remove ice and frost from surfaces extremely efficiently, using less than 1% of the energy and less than 0.01% of the time needed for traditional defrosting methods. Instead of conventional defrosting, which melts all the ice or frost from the top layer down, the researchers established a technique that melts the ice where the surface and the ice meet, so the ic

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Where's My Consciousness-ometer?

Whether an entity is conscious may soon be a testable question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bargain-Hunting Robocars Could Spell the End for Downtown Parking

Imagine a scene from the near future: you get dropped off downtown by a driverless car . You slam the door and head into your office or appointment. But then where does the autonomous vehicle go? It’s a question that cities would be wise to consider now. Self-driving cars may be on the roads within the next decade or two. Automakers and specialized startups alike are aggressively developing autom

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Lost Irish words rediscovered, including the word for 'oozes pus'

Researchers from Cambridge and Queen's University Belfast have identified and defined 500 Irish words, many of which had been lost, and unlocked the secrets of many other misunderstood terms. Their findings can now be freely accessed in the revised version of the online dictionary of Medieval Irish (www.dil.ie).

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Twitter can improve accuracy of profit forecasts

New research from The ANU shows Twitter data can be used to give more accurate profit forecasts for companies in the consumer sector.

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Building a moon base is a huge task, but these tiny satellites will pave the way

The space race between the US and Russia ended half a century ago when US astronauts became the first to walk on the moon. Today there's yet another race, prompted by China's successful landing on the far side of the moon and involving private companies as well as national space agencies, to put humans back on the lunar surface.

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The science that stops possums eating your garden

In Australia, we have a love-hate relationship with our native possums.

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Elon Musk: We Communicate Too Slowly for Future AI to Understand

Bad Connection When scientists finally crack the code of superhuman artificial intelligence , verbal communication between us humans and the machines may be a total wash, according to SpaceX and Tesla leader Elon Musk. The problem, Musk believes, comes from the different speeds at which a human and a computer can process information, according to Business Insider . Computer engineers have built p

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Where's My Consciousness-ometer?

Whether an entity is conscious may soon be a testable question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The science that stops possums eating your garden

In Australia, we have a love-hate relationship with our native possums.

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Psychosensory electronic skin technology for future AI and humanoid development

Scientists have developed electronic skin technology for robots or electronic devices to feel pain through sense of touch. Expected to be applied in humanoid that needs 5 human senses and patients wearing prosthetic hands.

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Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global

A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle.

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Biochar: A better start to rain forest restoration

An indigenous farming technique that's been around for thousands of years provides the basis for restoring rain forests stripped clear of trees by gold mining and other threats.

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Plex signs deal with Warner Bros. to stream free ad-supported content

Following a recent refresh of its desktop app, Plex will soon be home to some free ad-supported content from Warner Bros. The company is also looking to resell video subscription services via …

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Is it a cult, or a new religious movement?

A trend in pop culture is a mix of current affairs and anniversaries, and saturating the media landscape is documentary storytelling about cults in popular culture. Last year was the 40th anniversary of Jonestown, and this summer marks 50 years since the Manson Family murders. 2019 saw the trial of NXIVM members, and Netflix's "Wild Wild Country" piqued interest in a peculiar unfolding of events i

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Biochar: A better start to rain forest restoration

An indigenous farming technique that's been around for thousands of years provides the basis for restoring rain forests stripped clear of trees by gold mining and other threats.

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What it takes to put out forest fires

In Brazil, the world's largest tropical rainforest is burning. Indonesia is home to the third-largest tropical forest and this too is burning in parts of Sumatra and Kalimantan.

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Using a phosphine oxide catalyst to make nucleophilic substitution reactions of alcohols greener

A team of researchers with the University of Nottingham, Jealott's Hill International Research Centre and the GlaxoSmithKline, Medicines Research Centre, has found a way to use a phosphine oxide catalyst to make nucleophilic substitution reactions of alcohols greener. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and its benefits. Lars Longwitz and Thomas Werne

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What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?

Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. In a recent study, they developed three different design options for an intergovernmental biodiversity financing mechanism. Asking what would happen if money was given to countries for providing protected areas, they simulated where the money would fl

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Daisies that close at night have camouflaged petals to protect them from herbivores

Species of daisy that close their flowers at night, produce colour in their exposed lower petals that makes them harder to spot for herbivores, reducing herbivory rates of flowers. The findings are presented in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.

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Deep snow cover in the Arctic region intensifies heat waves in Eurasia

Variations in the depth of snow cover in the Arctic region from late winter to spring determines the summer temperature pattern in Eurasia, according to Hokkaido University researchers. In particular, deeper-than-usual snow cover in Western Russia enhanced the likelihood of summer heat waves in Europe and Northeast Asia in recent years.

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Amazon deforestation has a significant impact on the local climate in Brazil

The loss of forest cover in the Amazon has a significant impact on the local climate in Brazil, according to a new study.

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Understanding probiotic yeast

Researchers led by Prof. Johan Thevelein (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) have discovered that Saccharomyces boulardii, a yeast with probiotic properties, produces uniquely excessive amounts of acetic acid, the main component of vinegar. They were also able to find the genetic basis for this trait, which allowed them to modify the acetic acid production of the yeast.

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Scientists uncover key new molecules that could help to tackle tooth loss and regeneration

New research published in the Journal of Dental Research has shed light on the science behind the formation of the periodontal ligament, which helps keep the tooth stable in the jawbone. This improved understanding will help scientists work towards regenerating the tissues that support teeth. This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in rodent teeth and human cells.

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Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation

Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many

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Illinois engineer continues to make waves in water desalination

University of Illinois researcher Kyle Smith continues to build on his highly praised work to develop new methods of deionizing saltwater. His latest paper, 'Effect of Conductive Additives on the Transport Properties of Porous Flow-Through Electrodes with Insulative Particles and their Optimization for Faradaic Deionization,' published this week in Water Research, demonstrated promising results fo

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Foreign interference under the spotlight at Australian universities

Nature, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02588-3 The government has acted following concerns about China's influence on campuses.

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Ny teknologi kan opdage revner på roterende vindmøllevinger

Forskere fra Aalborg Universitet har formået at adskille forskellige signaler fra sensorer for at opdage skader på vindmøllevinger.

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We may have seen signs of an exomoon spewing out volcanic gas

Astronomers have spotted a plume of sodium near a distant planet. The gas is so far from the surface that they say it must have come from a volcanic exomoon

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Flood victims likely to resettle in flood-prone areas that are whiter and wealthier

New research from Rice University sociologists finds that flood victims are likely to resettle in flood-prone areas, so long as their new neighborhoods are whiter and wealthier than where they used to live.

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Quantum engineering atomically smooth single-crystalline silver films

Ultra-low-loss metal films with high-quality single crystals are in demand as the perfect surface for nanophotonics and quantum information processing applications. Silver is by far the most preferred material due to low-loss at optical and near infrared (near-IR) frequencies. In a recent study now published on Scientific Reports, Ilya A. Rodionov and an interdisciplinary research team in Germany

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Gender-based violence: Being not male increases risk of victimization

A woman or girl is killedin Canada every 2.5 days. In a recent interview with Maclean's magazine, Maryam Monsef, Canada's minister for women and gender equality, called the problem of gender-based violence a "four-alarm fire."

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When Hurricane Dorian Hits, Look to Your Neighbors

There’s not much to do when a hurricane or tropical storm is inbound— dropping nuclear weapons on them isn’t really an option. Evacuate if ordered, make sure you’ve stocked up on water, canned food, and batteries, and then sit down and begin a robust round of political recriminations. As Dorian’s gray, wild clouds approach Florida, having largely spared Puerto Rico, the recriminations are in full

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PastCast: Monoclonal antibodies, from basic science to blockbuster drugs

Nature, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02595-4 In the Nature PastCast series, we delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

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Lifespans Increasing for Educated Americans, Falling for Others

In 2010, a 25-year-old American could expect to live to the age of 79.34. By 2017, that dropped to 79.15, continuing a troubling trend of decreased life expectancy in the nation. Now, an international group of researchers has published a study exploring which Americans live longer. Their conclusion? People with college degrees tend to have longer lifespans. “[E]stimated life expectancy at age 25

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How to be a responsible adult and brush your teeth properly

Brushing your teeth properly can be a truly divine experience. (Goby via Unsplash/) Each year, you'll spend a total of about 24 hours brushing your teeth . No, you can't just marathon it on Dec. 31 and then forget about it for a whole year. You've got to make sure you're doing it right, day in, and day out—unless you want to have fewer teeth than your great-great-grandparents. The best sources of

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Psychosensory electronic skin technology for future AI and humanoid development

Scientists have developed electronic skin technology for robots or electronic devices to feel pain through sense of touch. Expected to be applied in humanoid that needs 5 human senses and patients wearing prosthetic hands.

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Rethinking our resilience to wildfire

The 2017 wildfire season was the most extensive and expensive in U.S. history. Fires scorched 10 million acres in the western U.S. and federal fire-suppression expenditure surpassed a record $2.9 billion. There's no end to the record breaking in sight: climate change will continue to produce longer, drier fire seasons with substantial burning that will consume residential developments. In a paper

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Burundian refugees in Tanzania face big challenges

Tanzania says it has reached an agreement with Burundi to begin sending back all Burundian refugees from October. The repatriation effort will take place in collaboration with the United Nations. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked Amelia Kuch to give some insights into the decision.

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More frequent fires could dramatically alter boreal forests and emit more carbon

These days, smoke-filled summer skies and dusky red sunsets are a common occurrence across Canada and the United States. Much of that smoke is coming from large northern wildfires.

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A Missing Link in Predicting Hurricane Damage

Eroding coastlines play a significant role in how infrastructure will be affected—but a new computer model now factors them in — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global

A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle.

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Chewing gum use in the perioperative period

Many anesthesiologists forbid patients from chewing gum in the immediate hours before surgery for fear that it would increase the risk that the patient's stomach contents might end up dumped (aspirated) into the patient's lungs, with potentially deadly consequences (aspiration pneumonitis).

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Convection-permitting models better depict the heavy rainfall events in 2016 eastern China flooding

A study by Chinese and British scientists investigates a heavy rainfall event in the Yangtze River Basin at both global and regional scale by using the Met Office Unified Modelproves the added value of the convection-permitting model in simulating heavy rainfall event.

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Overcome the bottleneck of solid electrolytes for Li batteries

On Aug 21st, Prof. MA Cheng from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) and his collaborators proposed an effective strategy to address the electrode-electrolyte contact issue that is limiting the development of next-generation solid-state Li batteries. The solid-solid composite electrode created this way exhibited exceptional capacities and rate performances.

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Survey results show positive perceptions of adaptive tree breeding

A European survey carried out by the B4EST project shows that improved forest reproductive materials are perceived positively by the forest sector, and are considered important in forest regeneration and afforestation to adapt to climate change.

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Sexual abuse against gay and bi men brings unique stigma and harm

As trauma psychologists, we're leading a team to help alleviate psychiatric distress in gay, bi and trans males who have been sexually abused or assaulted. In collaboration with two nonprofit organizations, MaleSurvivor and Men Healing, we recruited and trained 20 men who have experienced sexual abuse to deliver evidence-based online mental health interventions for sexual and gender minority males

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Using a bank analysis tool to make predictions about a national or global financial crisis

Two economics professor have modified a commonly used bank assessment tool to make predictions about a national or global financial crisis. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nobel Laureate Robert Engle and Tianyue Ruan of the National University of Singapore describe how they modified the tool and what it revealed.

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Survey results show positive perceptions of adaptive tree breeding

A European survey carried out by the B4EST project shows that improved forest reproductive materials are perceived positively by the forest sector, and are considered important in forest regeneration and afforestation to adapt to climate change.

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Huge find of silver coins provides new clues to turbulent times after Norman Conquest of England

With their metal detectors and spades "detectorists" are a common sight in the British countryside. When their equipment bleeps, they start to dig in the hope of finding something old and valuable. They are often seen as figures of fun—in fact, the BBC shows a comedy series about a pair of such amateur archaeologists which has a cult following. But part-time treasure hunters do much of the heavy l

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Banning trophy hunting can have a detrimental impact, experts say

Experts have outlined "compelling evidence" that suggests banning trophy hunting can negatively affect conservation—arguing that unregulated killings are far more prevalent in non-hunting zones.

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A Missing Link in Predicting Hurricane Damage

Eroding coastlines play a significant role in how infrastructure will be affected—but a new computer model now factors them in — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Banning trophy hunting can have a detrimental impact, experts say

Experts have outlined "compelling evidence" that suggests banning trophy hunting can negatively affect conservation—arguing that unregulated killings are far more prevalent in non-hunting zones.

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Untested tech not part of climate fix guidance: Industry group

Draft international guidance on how industry measures its efforts to fight global warming will not include untested geoengineering technology, the body compiling the advice said Friday.

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A new technique for making exciting metal oxide frameworks

Metal oxide frameworks, or MOFs, are solid materials which can behave like ultra-fine sponges. The cavities in the sponge are of nanosize—about the size of individual molecules. Being made up of such suitably sized cavities or pores gives them a huge surface area to absorb and transport different molecules and chemicals, with high efficiency. This means that MOFs are attractive materials for gas s

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Surveying international archaeologists reveals deeper and more widespread roots of the Anthropocene

Examples of how human societies are changing the planet abound—from building roads and houses, clearing forests for agriculture and digging train tunnels, to shrinking the ozone layer, driving species extinct, changing the climate and acidifying the oceans. Human impacts are everywhere. Our societies have changed Earth so much that it's impossible to reverse many of these effects.

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Researchers assemble genomic puzzle of cow gut microbes

Using high-tech tools, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their cooperators have taken a deep dive into the microbial "soup" of the cow's rumen, the first of four stomach chambers where tough plant fibers are turned into nutrients and energy.

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New study presents multiferroicity in atomic Van der Waals heterostructures

Multiferroics are defined as materials that simultaneously exhibit ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity. Such properties make those materials promising building blocks of novel multifunctional materials for a variety of applications. However, it still remains a great challenge to enhance the ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity of multiferroics.

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Deep snow cover in the Arctic region intensifies heat waves in Eurasia

Variations in the depth of snow cover in the Arctic region from late winter to spring determines the summer temperature pattern in Eurasia, according to Hokkaido University researchers. In particular, deeper-than-usual snow cover in Western Russia enhanced the likelihood of summer heat waves in Europe and Northeast Asia in recent years.

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Solving the pancake problem

If you swirl a glass of wine clockwise, the wine inside will also rotate clockwise. But, if you're making a blueberry pancake and you swirl the pan clockwise, the pancake will rotate counterclockwise. Don't believe us? Go try it.

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Researchers assemble genomic puzzle of cow gut microbes

Using high-tech tools, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their cooperators have taken a deep dive into the microbial "soup" of the cow's rumen, the first of four stomach chambers where tough plant fibers are turned into nutrients and energy.

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Understanding probiotic yeast

Researchers led by Prof. Johan Thevelein (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) have discovered that Saccharomyces boulardii, a yeast with probiotic properties, produces uniquely excessive amounts of acetic acid, the main component of vinegar. They were also able to find the genetic basis for this trait, which allowed them to modify the acetic acid production of the yeast. If this unique S. boula

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Toward a Positive Evolutionary Psychology

A new book integrates positive psychology and evolutionary psychology to help advance the human condition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Engineers Connect Two Halves of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope for First Time

Development of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) stretches all the way back to the mid-90s. No one at the time could have anticipated how long it would take to get the monstrously complex instrument built, but we’re in the home stretch now. Engineers at Northrop Grumman’s facilities in Redondo Beach, California have assembled the two halves of the telescope for the first time . It’s not quite

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MIT’s Autonomous ‘Roboats’ Learn to Shapeshift

Self-driving cars may be the future for most cities, but Amsterdam is about one-quarter water thanks to its extensive canal network. So, maybe autonomous boats are worth exploring? MIT has been working with the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Institute) to create just that. When we last checked in on the so-called “Roboat” vessels, they had just learned to reliably li

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UCI scientist identifies cone snail's strike as one of the quickest in the animal kingdom

With the use of ultra-high-speed videography, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Associate Professor Emanuel Azizi and colleagues from Occidental College Los Angeles have shed light on the hunting mechanism of the cone snail Conus catus. Published online in Current Biology – Cell Press, the researchers identified the snail's hydraulically propelled feeding structure as the quickest movement among mo

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Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew

Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found.The School of Social Sciences' Dr Andrea Kay said some scientists defined the Anthropocene as starting in the 20th century, but the new research showed human-induced landcover change was globally extensive by 2000BC.

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Psychosensory electronic skin technology for future AI and humanoid development

Professor Jae Eun Jang's team developed electronic skin technology for robots or electronic devices to feel pain through sense of touch. Expected to be applied in humanoid that needs 5 human senses and patients wearing prosthetic hands.

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Netflix Re-Ups the Puppetry—and Perturbations—of *Dark Crystal*

*The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance*, a prequel series to the 1982 movie, will freak you and your kids right the hell out in all the best ways.

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Understanding probiotic yeast

Researchers led by Prof. Johan Thevelein (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) have discovered that Saccharomyces boulardii, a yeast with probiotic properties, produces uniquely excessive amounts of acetic acid, the main component of vinegar. They were also able to find the genetic basis for this trait, which allowed them to modify the acetic acid production of the yeast. If this unique S. boula

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Watch a Self-Driving Car Deftly Zoom Through a Heavy Rainstorm

Open Source Self-Driving Hitting bad weather on a highway is stressful and dangerous, with high speed winds, reduced visibility and the risk of hydroplaning. But a new video shows that self-driving car tech is making impressive strides in dealing with stormy conditions. The video, uploaded by Logan LeGrand today, shows a modified 2019 Toyota Corolla hatchback easily maintaining its 40 mph speed t

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Breaking news: driving an eScooter when you're drunk is a very bad idea

By the end of last year, eScooter companies Bird and Lime had a combined 36 million rides. The scooters can be a convenient option, but they aren't without risk. (Pixabay/) Since 2017, rentable electric scooters have rapidly been sprouting up across the country. You can now spot jabronis in at least 65 different cities scooting down streets and in-and-out of bike lanes, often sans helmets. And to

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Deep Space Antenna 1

is ESA's first 35-m deep dish, staring out to space to communicate with missions far from home.

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Going small to determine where nuclear material came from and how it was made

Until recently, the analysis and identification of nuclear fuel pellets in nuclear forensics investigations have been mainly focused on macroscopic characteristics, such as fuel pellet dimensions, uranium enrichment and other reactor-specific features.

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Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew

Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4,000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found.

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Science Museum workers across England strike over low pay

Below-inflation pay rises have left staff with 13% real-terms wage cut since 2010, says union Staff at Science Museum sites across England have begun a 24-hour strike in protest over low pay. The action comes after the group’s directors refused to increase a below inflation 1.5% pay rise offered to more than 75% of staff this year. Continue reading…

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Why there are so many species at the equator and so few at the poles?

Earth is teeming with strange life forms—crabs with 12-foot-long legs scuttling off the Japanese coast, mushrooms that glow at night in eastern North America, butterflies that drink the tears of Amazonian turtles.

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Pet Food Mislabeling: Let Food Be Thy Dogma

Should you feed your dog organic, biodynamic, grain-fed, non-GMO, high-protein, low-carb, unpasteurized, cruelty-free, free-range, soy-lacto-egg-free caribou Num-Nums? Particularly when their last meal was cat vomit?

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Why there are so many species at the equator and so few at the poles?

Earth is teeming with strange life forms—crabs with 12-foot-long legs scuttling off the Japanese coast, mushrooms that glow at night in eastern North America, butterflies that drink the tears of Amazonian turtles.

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Burned buildings reveal sacking of ancient Turkish city 3,500 years ago

More than 3,500 years ago, a rising kingdom called the Hittite Empire was expanding, testing the limits of its strength. It would soon destroy Babylon, but first, its army sacked and burned a city nestled in the mountains of modern-day Turkey called Sam'al—located on a major route of trade between Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean Sea.

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NASA's multiple views of Hurricane Dorian from space

Several instruments and spacecraft from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, have eyes on Hurricane Dorian, capturing different types of data from the storm.

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Researchers develop a non-invasive test for smoke contamination in vineyards

Researchers from the universities of Melbourne and Adelaide have trialled a non-invasive model for detecting smoke contamination in grapevines, helping farmers to ensure quality production in increasingly challenging environments.

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For the first time, astronomers catch asteroid in the act of changing color

Last December, scientists discovered an "active" asteroid within the asteroid belt, sandwiched between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The space rock, designated by astronomers as 6478 Gault, appeared to be leaving two trails of dust in its wake—active behavior that is associated with comets but rarely seen in asteroids.

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'Google of microbes' could provide digital data from bacteria to solve world problems in health, crops

It may be an unsettling thought for some—but the human body is home to trillions of "good and bad" bacteria, viruses and other tiny organisms called microbes. But the scientific big data communities recognize the value of good microbes because they show promise in curing diseases and improving crop yields.

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Isolation may follow when older adults stop driving

When driving themselves is no longer an option, older adults may feel the short- and long-term effects of isolation, a new study shows. Whether it’s going to the local grocery store or to a friend’s home, driving a car plays a major role for seniors who want to hang onto their independence. Unlike previous studies, which focus on social engagement and participation when people no longer drive, is

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'Google of microbes' could provide digital data from bacteria to solve world problems in health, crops

It may be an unsettling thought for some—but the human body is home to trillions of "good and bad" bacteria, viruses and other tiny organisms called microbes. But the scientific big data communities recognize the value of good microbes because they show promise in curing diseases and improving crop yields.

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Directional plasmon excitation at molecular scales

NUS scientists have developed a method for directional excitation of plasmons at molecular length scale with electrically driven sources. Photonic devices which make use of light can transmit information much faster than nanoelectronic systems. However, they tend to be much larger in size and difficult to integrate with nanoelectronics systems.

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Number of years in NFL, certain positions portend greater risk for cognitive, mental health problems

Study shows link between longer NFL career and higher risk of cognitive, mental health problems. Risk persisted over time, even 20 years following injury. Certain positions also carried elevated risk for cognitive problems, depression and anxiety. Running backs, linebackers, defensive linemen had the greatest risk for cognitive problems.

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Her er læsernes spørgsmål til klimaministeren

Efter en livlig debat har redaktionen valgt at sende 19 af læsernes spørgsmål videre til den nye klimaminister.

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American Factory Grapples With the Notion of Freedom

“America is a place to let your personality run free.” So goes a cultural briefing for incoming Chinese workers at an auto-glass factory in Dayton, Ohio, the subject of Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert’s new Netflix documentary, American Factory . “As long as you’re not doing anything illegal, you’re free to follow your heart. You can even joke about the president. Nobody will do anything to you,

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Engineers build fleet of autonomous boats that shapeshift

MIT's fleet of robotic boats has been updated with new capabilities to "shapeshift," by autonomously disconnecting and reassembling into a variety of configurations, to form floating structures …

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‘Gay gene’ theories belong in the past – now we know sexuality is far more fluid | Owen Jones

Gender norms imprison us all, dictating our behaviour for fear of abuse – and that extends to who we sleep or fall in love with It turns out that genetics is almost as complicated as love and sex. New research has shown that the long fabled “gay gene” does not exist ; that a variety of different genes contribute to same-sex attraction, and that several other factors are in the mix too. For many LG

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Why It’s So Hard to Unlink Yourself From Facebook

WIRED’s Paris Martineau joins the show to explain all the ways Facebook tracks your activity across Instagram and the rest of its apps.

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Elite Athletes Are Changing How They Train for Extreme Heat

Runners are prepping for the high heat of next month's IAAF World Championships in Doha. Under climate change, that training may become the norm.

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Image of the Day: Viral Residue

Genetic material from the chikungunya virus remains in mouse cells after infection and may be linked to later joint pain.

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How animals (including humans) sense cold

A newly identified receptor protein lets animals, from worms to humans, sense cold temperatures, researchers report. “Clearly, nerves in the skin can sense cold, but no one has been able to pinpoint exactly how they sense it,” says Shawn Xu, a faculty member at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and senior author of the study. “Now, I think we have an answer.” When environmental t

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Scientists at MIT, Harvard, and Elsewhere Face Continued Fallout Over Epstein Connections

Scientists and their institutions faced mounting criticism this week as the extent of their connections to (and funding from) convicted pedophile and accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein continued to be aired in the press. Their responses have varied from stony silence to declarations of regret.

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Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcast

Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is a powerful tool for conservation First broadcast on 15 June 2018 Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? This is one of the 15,000 species that the soundscape ecolo

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Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcast

Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is a powerful tool for conservation First broadcast on 15 June 2018. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Great Barrier Reef outlook very poor, Australia says

A report downgrades the reef's long-term health from poor to very poor due to climate change.

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Non-Dairy Milk Alternatives Are Experiencing A 'Holy Cow!' Moment

submitted by /u/lnfinity [link] [comments]

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Compasses to point true north for first time in 360 years

Over the past few hundred years in the UK all compass needles have pointed west of true north At some point over the next two weeks, compasses at Greenwich will point true north for the first time in about 360 years. And for some parts of the UK, this may not happen for another 20 years. Either way, it is a once-in-a-lifetime event. Continue reading…

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Space to be 'next war-fighting domain', says Donald Trump – video

Donald Trump has said the newly formed US Space Command will 'defend America's vital interests in space, the next war-fighting domain'. Speaking at a ceremony in Washington, Trump said Space Command would protect US satellites orbiting the planet and detect missile launches abroad, and would be followed by the establishment of the Space Force, 'the sixth branch of the United States armed forces'.

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Titanic: The Reboot

New research on what really caused the great ship to sink is informing the design of a new version — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Butterfly Wonk Robert Pyle Pens His First Novel 44 Years in the Making – Facts So Romantic

Ecologist Robert Michael Pyle’s imaginative treatment of the nonhuman world—he includes a butterfly and a mountain among his cast of characters—is both a surprise and perhaps a natural result of his artistic development. Counterpoint Press Last year marked a first for 71-year old Robert Michael Pyle, the acclaimed author, naturalist, and ecologist: the publication of his long-awaited first novel,

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Photos Reveal the History of Montezuma Castle in Arizona

One of the best preserved and well known Sinagua ruins is Montezuma Castle National Monument, an impressive 20-room pueblo built into a white limestone cliff.

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Are Dark Photons the Secret 'Fifth Force' Holding Our Universe Together?

Wherever they are, they sure are good at hiding.

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At Least 227 Slaughtered Children Found at World's Largest Child Sacrifice Site in Peru

"Wherever you dig, there's another one," the site's chief archaeologist said.

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A California Bill Has Uber and Lyft Running Scared

The ride-hail companies offer more pay and benefits to drivers—and threaten a ballot measure to prevent those same drivers from being classified as employees.

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One Scientist’s Quest to Bring DNA Sequencing to Every Sick Kid

Ryan Taft didn’t know that he would become one of the world’s leading experts in diagnosing rare genetic diseases. Then he met Stephen Damiani.

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Titanic: The Reboot

New research on what really caused the great ship to sink is informing the design of a new version — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trapping the Tiniest Sound

Controlling the smallest unit of sound could have applications in quantum information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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With Elephant Ivory Banned, a Brisk and Worrying Trade in Mammoth Tusks

Amid fears that elephant ivory is being laundered through the booming trade in woolly mammoth ivory, some conservationists are pushing to regulate trade of mammoth tusks as though they were products from a living endangered species. The move would give an extinct animal the same regulation as polar bears.

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Working Scientist podcast: Start looking for jobs before you finish your PhD

Nature, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02590-9 Gaia Donati and Julie Gould discuss some of the career issues faced by physicists today.

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There's no such thing as a 'gay gene' finds largest study of sexuality

There’s no such thing as a 'gay gene' and a genetic test for homosexuality would be impossible, the largest ever genetic study of sexuality suggests

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Is Earth the only living planet?

Lisa Kaltenegger is among the scientists hoping to find evidence of life on worlds that orbit stars beyond our sun

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Meritocracy Is Killing High-School Sports

If you want to understand how income inequality and opportunity-hoarding by the rich can combine in toxic ways to hurt the less fortunate, you could look in all the usual places—elite colleges, housing policy, internships. Or you could look at high-school sports. In the 2018–19 school year, the number of kids participating in high-school sports declined for the first time in three decades. At lea

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The Hemingway Scene That Shows How Humanity Works

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean Ernest Hemingway’s novella The Old Man and the Sea is haunted by a recurring motif of lions running across an African beach. It’s a wet and briny book, full of boats and fish buckets and the smell of salt, so the

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Sim-svindel har bredt sig til Danmark

PLUS. Hidtil har såkaldt sim-swapping været et amerikansk fænomen, men nu har fænomenet bredt sig til Danmark. Efter at Ingeniørens stikprøve har vist huller hos tre af fire teleselskaber, lover de nu at stramme op.

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What 500,000 Americans hit by floods can teach us about fighting climate change | Elizabeth Rush

Individual action can’t fight climate crisis. These Americans know we need a collective response Last fall, as I landed in New Orleans, a seed of existential anxiety lodged itself deep in my gut. It was my fifth flight in just over a week. I was in the middle of a tour to promote a book on how coastal communities around the US were already responding to the climate crisis in surprising, often rad

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Alexa will be your best friend when you’re older

From friendly personal assistant to companion to … spouse?

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Forensics Friday: What’s wrong with this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the fifteenth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue rea

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What happens to your digital life after you die?

Death brings new challenges as we must consider the likelihood that our digital presence will outlive us. Whether it's through social media or an online bank account, the majority of people lead a digital life that they'll leave behind. BJ Miller, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, suggests preparing to close out your digital life with steps like itemizing d

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Skat undersøger 20.000 borgeres handel med kryptovaluta for korrekt skat

Skattestyrelsen har fået data fra de danske kryptobørser for at kontrollere, om danskernes har indberettet korrekt – og om der dermed er betalt skat af eventuelle gevinster.

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Farmers and animals struggle in drought-hit Botswana

A calf struggles neck-high in the stew-like mud, kicking frantically to make its way across the mire.

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New MIT paper outlines plan to fight election interference

One of the most urgent threats facing our democracy and other democracies abroad is the ability to detect and thwart foreign election interference. But, research on election interference is scarce, according to a new article published in Science this week by two professors from MIT titled "Protecting Elections from Social Media Manipulation."

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Superledning ved 200 grader celsius er mulig – i teorien

Beregning viser, at Li2MgH16 vil være superledende ved 473 K og et tryk på 250 GPa. Denne indsigt kan muligvis bane vejen for superledning ved stuetemperatur under lavere tryk.

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Draft UN report warns of rising seas, storm surges, melting permafrost

The same oceans that nourished human evolution are poised to unleash misery on a global scale unless the carbon pollution destabilising Earth's marine environment is brought to heel, warns a draft UN report obtained by AFP.

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Skræmmende rapport: Verdens største koralrev har det værre end nogensinde

Langtidsudsigterne for Great Barrier Reef er nu ’meget dårlige’.

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L.A.’s Health-Care Reform Is a Lesson for Democrats

LYNWOOD, Calif.—The dozen elementary- and middle-school students who were practicing calisthenics, before they began a class on healthy eating, surely had no idea they were at the forefront of the debate over the future of health care in America. But the young people who gathered here last week for the Healthy Cooking for Kids session at the Lynwood Family Resource Center are part of what may be

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Israel’s Prince of Paradoxes

Saul thought, “I’ll pin David to the wall,” and twice threw a spear, but David dodged it both times. So the prophet Samuel describes the tragic relationship between a weakened king and his former protégé, a drama that is now recurring in Israeli politics. Benjamin Netanyahu—master strategist, ruthless politician—is in fact no Saul, nor is Avigdor Lieberman a fair-haired harpist. Yet the purported

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What Draws Hundreds to This Lake Bed? Spellbinding Crystals

Welcome to Gem-O-Rama, California’s new gold rush.

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Ebola Outbreak in Congo Hits Milestone, and Death Toll Rises

Amid more than 3,000 confirmed and probable cases, the death toll climbed above 2,000, according to government data released on Friday.

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PODCAST: Sløseri i butikker åbner for sim-kort-svindel

Uden at vise ID fik Ingeniørens journalist stik mod alle regler udleveret et sim-kort i adskillige telebutikker. Et svigt, der gør det let for hackere at overtage andres online-konti. Kommer vi til at mangle ilt, når store skovområder forsvinder op i røg i Amazonas? IT-Universitet må afvise ansøg…

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A better future for graduate-student mental health

Nature, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02584-7 A consortium of US universities aims to examine how best to help a vulnerable population that is affected by anxiety and depression.

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Genetik og brug af ‘big data’ kan styrke kardiologien

Professor Henning Bundgaard fra Rigshospitalet forventer at komme hjem fra ESC med ny viden, som kan bruges til at udvikle mere individualiserede behandlinger af hjertepatienter.

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Ny viden om behandling af hjertesvigt vil præge kongressen

Personligt og som formand for Hjerteforeningen vil professor Christian Hassager interessere sig for nye resultater på hjertesvigtområdet

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Lovende hotline-præsentation om nyt behandlingsprincip

Gunnar Gislason får en travl kongres med megen mødeaktivitet

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Store forventninger til CONDI-2 studiet

Lærestolsprofessor Hans Erik Bøtker, Aarhus Universitetshospital, går søndag på talerstolen på ESC for at præsentere resultaterne af det store internationale CONDI-2 studie.

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Hjerteformand er tilfreds: Gode danske bidrag til ESC

Vi kommer med danske resultater, som kan få betydning for hjertepatienter også i resten af verden, siger overlæge Henrik Steen Hansen.

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Johnson wants us to feel outrage. Let’s take back control – starting with ourselves | Peter Ormerod

Shutting parliament is the latest wheeze from the trigger-happy Vote Leavers in power. Don’t buy into their politics of division What did you feel? Maybe it was anger, fury, fear. Perhaps it was excitement, hope, a certain thrill. It is unlikely that you experienced the announcement of parliament’s prorogation in purely cerebral, intellectual terms: it is hard to remain numb in the face of such dr

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Ti minutter: Stjålet SIM-kort kan knække dine koder, åbne din mail og blotte dit privatliv

PLUS. Hvis et teleselskab giver dit nummer væk, er rigtig meget på spil. Ingeniørens journalist har hacket sig selv – og nåede skræmmende langt på ti minutter.

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Association of Aggresomes with Survival Outcomes in Pediatric Medulloblastoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49027-x

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Advanced Glycation End-Products Suppress Mitochondrial Function and Proliferative Capacity of Achilles Tendon-Derived Fibroblasts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49062-8

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Newly developed Laboratory-based Size exclusion chromatography Small-angle x-ray scattering System (La-SSS)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48911-w

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Application of hyperbolic geometry in link prediction of multiplex networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49001-7

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The Vitrectomy Timing Individualization System for Ocular Trauma (VTISOT)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48862-2

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Mysterious iOS Attack Changes Everything We Know About iPhone Hacking

For two years, a handful of websites have indiscriminately hacked thousands of iPhones.

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Websites have been quietly hacking iPhones for years, says Google

Websites delivered iOS malware to thousands of visitors in the biggest iPhone hack ever. There’s no telling who was infected—or who was behind it.

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Bedre målinger af kloakoverløb på vej

Forsyningerne ved, at der ryger spildevand ud i naturen fra de fælleskloakerede afløbssystemer, når det regner kraftigt. Men de ved ikke, hvor det er værst, og hvor det bedst kan betale sig at begrænse det. Det kan nye digitale værktøjer fra Aalborg Universitet hjælpe med.

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Meet the Algorithms Planning Your Next Online Purchase

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Automation could kill 73 million U.S. jobs by 2030 | USA Today

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

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Engineers Created A New Bionic Arm That Can Grow With You

submitted by /u/Tao_Dragon [link] [comments]

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Company Tackles World Hunger By Making Food Out of Thin Air

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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Florida preps for an 'absolute monster': Hurricane Dorian

Unsure where Hurricane Dorian is going to land over Labor Day weekend, many Florida residents faced a sense of helplessness as they prepared for what President Donald Trump said could be an "absolute monster" of a storm.

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Websites have been quietly hacking iPhones for years, says Google

Websites delivered iOS malware to thousands of visitors in the biggest iPhone hack ever. There’s no telling who was infected—or who was behind it.

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Capital flight: Indonesian move could prompt new environment crisis

Abandoning Jakarta for a new capital in Borneo won't save the fast-sinking Indonesian megacity from disaster and could even spark a fresh environmental crisis in a region home to rainforests and endangered orangutans, critics have warned.

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Rising seas threaten Egypt's fabled port city of Alexandria

Egypt's coastal city of Alexandria, which has survived invasions, fires and earthquakes since it was founded by Alexander the Great more than 2,000 years ago, now faces a new menace in the form of climate change.

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Algoritme muliggør forbedret forskning i tilbagefald hos kræftpatienter

Ny algoritme kan være et vigtigt redskab for forskning i tilbagefald af kræft. Det kan give ny evidens og viden om, hvordan opfølgningsforløb skal tilrettelægges, siger forsker.

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Internationalt studie: Natarbejde øger risiko for kræft

Natarbejde øger risikoen for kræft hos både kvinder og mænd, men forskningen mangler løsningsforslag på, hvordan natarbejde skal struktureres for at undgå sygdom, siger professor.

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Robot pilot that can grab the flight controls gets its plane licence

A robot pilot is learning to fly. It has passed its pilot’s test and flown its first plane, but it has also had its first mishap too

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Hunters turn gamekeepers to help C. Africa's threatened wildlife

Jean moves deftly through the tangle of roots and branches before waiting for the rainforest to give him a clue.

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Hunters turn gamekeepers to help C. Africa's threatened wildlife

Jean moves deftly through the tangle of roots and branches before waiting for the rainforest to give him a clue.

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US rolls back regulations on industrial methane leaks

The US Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday plans to roll back regulations that limit leaks of potent greenhouse gas methane from pipelines and wells, even as some industry players opposed the move.

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Skull of humankind's oldest-known ancestor discovered

‘Iconic’ finding of 3.8m-year-old fossil in Ethiopia casts doubt on previous evolutionary theory The face of the oldest species that unambiguously sits on the human evolutionary tree has been revealed for the first time by the discovery of a 3.8 million-year-old skull in Ethiopia. The fossil belongs to an ancient hominin, Australopithecus anamensis , believed to be the direct ancestor of the famo

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Australia downgrades outlook for Great Barrier Reef to 'very poor'

Australia downgraded the Great Barrier Reef's long-term outlook to "very poor" for the first time Friday, as the world heritage site struggles with "escalating" climate change.

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Tiny thermometer measures how mitochondria heat up the cell by unleashing proton energy

Armed with a tiny new thermometer probe that can quickly measure temperature inside of a cell, University of Illinois researchers have illuminated a mysterious aspect of metabolism: heat generation.

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Researchers uncover ocean iron level mystery

The middle of the Earth's oceans are filled with vast systems of rotating currents known as subtropical gyres. These regions occupy 40% of the Earth's surface and have long been considered remarkably stable biological deserts, with little variation in chemical makeup or the nutrients needed to sustain life.

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Tiny thermometer measures how mitochondria heat up the cell by unleashing proton energy

Armed with a tiny new thermometer probe that can quickly measure temperature inside of a cell, University of Illinois researchers have illuminated a mysterious aspect of metabolism: heat generation.

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Human-like brain waves detected in mini brains grown in a dish

submitted by /u/Voyage_of_Roadkill [link] [comments]

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Boris Johnson, Brexit, and Britain’s Constitutional Quagmire

The authors of The Federalist Papers , that great series of essays defending the Constitution of the United States, set out to convince the public that democracy, at least in its original, ancient Athenian form, was not only impossible, but dangerous. Their preferred system of government was a republic, based on the principle of representation. Even some of the most radical Enlightenment thinkers

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Præsidenter, medier og astronauter står i kø for at snakke Amazonas: Her er noget af det, de har misforstået

Vi har udvalgt fem påstande om brandene i Amazonas og givet dem et kritisk eftersyn.

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Photos of the Week: Alpine Opera, Japanese Dunes, Weed Museum

An orphaned lion cub in Turkey, wildfires in Bolivia, ongoing protests in Hong Kong, a performance by Lizzo in New Jersey, a mudflat horse race in Germany, the Tango World Championship in Buenos Aires, La Tomatina in Spain, bog snorkeling in Wales, the Soldier Hollow Classic Sheepdog Championship in Utah, and much more.

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It's never too late to start exercising, new study shows

Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programs have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

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Hovedstadens ventetider sejler fortsat

Brystkræft: Antallet af brystkræftpatienter, som behandles inden for forløbstiden, falder fortsat i Region Hovedstaden. Nu behandles kun en tredjedel til tiden mod 47 pct. for et halvt år siden. Det sker på trods af stor politisk bevågenhed og en »klar forståelse af, hvor skoen trykker«, ifølge ledende overlæge. To ekstra operationslejer skal løse problemet.

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Nye epikrisestandarder tegner lovende

1. juli trådte de nye standarder for epikriser i kraft i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland. Formålet er bedre patientovergange og dermed bedre patientsikkerhed. De første tendenser ser lovende ud, mener PLO-formand Christian Freitag.

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Guide: Sådan tager du orlov fra praksis

Der er to ting, du skal have styr på, når du skal på orlov: Vikaren og økonomien. Læs herunder, hvordan du får regnestykket til at gå op.

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»Det var en fed tid med Alfred«

Michael Perlt Hansen sagde farvel til livet som praktiserende læge for at tage orlov i et halvt år. Tiden brugte han på at passe sit barnebarn Alfred. Det var en investering i familieforholdet, men også i lægevirket, siger han.

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Orlov vil gøre almen ­praksis mere attraktiv

PLO ønsker bedre muligheder for, at praktiserende læger kan holde orlov. Det vil afhjælpe lægemanglen, siger Gunver Lillevang.

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New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought

Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought.

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The Neuroscience of the Breath

Scientists search to uncover the mind-body connection Mind-body practices, which stem from traditions originating in countries such as India, China, and Tibet, have become increasingly popular in Western society. These practices, which include yoga, meditation and tai chi, revolve around breathing techniques or pranayama- learning to control the breath […]

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Cracking the code of a brain cancer that keeps coming back

Researchers used a powerful new computer-assisted technology called single-cell transcriptomics that measures thousands of individual cells simultaneously to map cell types and molecular cascades that drive the growth of SHH-medulloblastoma. The scientists report they discovered new treatment strategies for the disease that may help patients fight a recurrent cancer.

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Gene therapy reduces obesity and reverses type 2 diabetes in mice

The obesity epidemic affects nearly half a billion people worldwide, many of them children. Obesity-related diseases including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and cancer are a leading cause of preventable death. Researchers have now developed a gene therapy that specifically reduces fat tissue and reverses obesity-related metabolic disease in obese mice.

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First all-metamaterial optical gas sensor

Researchers have developed the first fully-integrated, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas sensor enabled by specially engineered synthetic materials known as metamaterials. The sensor has no moving parts, requires little energy to operate and is among the smallest NDIR sensors ever created.

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Svindlerens drøm: Danske telebutikker udleverer sim-kort til dit nummer – helt uden at se ID

Det er i strid med loven, når flere telebutikker udsteder nye sim-kort til Ingeniørens journalister uden at se ID. Den hullede praksis betyder, at mange numre og dermed mail- og facebook-konti, uden videre kan stjæles.

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Exercise in pregnancy improves health of obese mothers by restoring their tissues, mouse study finds

Exercise immediately prior to and during pregnancy restores key tissues in the body, making them better able to manage blood sugar levels and lowering the risk of long term health problems, suggests new research carried out in mice.

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Human stomach pathogen is attracted to bleach

Researchers have uncovered a molecular mechanism by which the human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is attracted to bleach. The study revealed that H. pylori uses a protein called TlpD to sense bleach and swim toward it. The researchers propose H. pylori uses the protein to sense sites of tissue inflammation, which could help colonize the stomach and perhaps locate damaged tissue and nutrient

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First all-metamaterial optical gas sensor

Researchers have developed the first fully-integrated, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas sensor enabled by specially engineered synthetic materials known as metamaterials. The sensor has no moving parts, requires little energy to operate and is among the smallest NDIR sensors ever created.

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How visceral leishmaniasis spread through central-Southern Brazil

The protozoan disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has recently expanded to places where it had not previously been reported and has expanded its geographic distribution within countries where it was already endemic. Now, researchers describe three dispersion routes that have moved Leishmania infantum into and through central-Southern Brazil, helping shed light on the overall mechanisms of VL dispe

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New method could help assess a worker's situational awareness while multitasking

With the ever-increasing connectivity of today's society, the demand for a real-time way to evaluate how well an employee understands their current situation — often called situational awareness — has become a paramount safety issue for employers, especially those in industrial and manufacturing industries. Researchers believe studying a person's eyes could help with this.

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White matter affects how people respond to brain stimulation therapy

Tiny changes in the microscopic structure of the human brain may affect how patients respond to an emerging therapy for neurological problems.

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Abnormal expression of genes in psychopathy

The expression of many genes that have previously been associated with autism is abnormal also in violent psychopathy, a new study shows. The researchers used stem cell technology to analyse the expression of genes and proteins in the brain cells of psychopathic violent offenders.

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Key protein for Epstein-Barr virus infection

Two studies reveal the portal structure of the Epstein-Barr virus and bacteriophage T7. No treatment is currently available for the infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, which, in addition to causing mononucleosis, leads to various types of cancer.

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Deep-sea sediments reveal solar system chaos: An advance in dating geologic archives

Scientists used geologic records from deep-sea drill cores to extend the astronomical time scale beyond 50 million years, by about 8 million years. Using their new chronology, they provide a new age for the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (56.01 Ma) with a small margin of error (0.1%).

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Global warming may diminish plant genetic variety in Central Europe

Only a few individuals of a plant species may be prepared for increasing droughts.

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Better chemistry through tiny antennae

A research team has developed a new method for actively controlling the breaking of chemical bonds by shining infrared lasers on tiny antennae. This research may have applications in improving the yields of chemical reactions.

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A protective factor against Alzheimer's disease?

Researchers have found that a protein called TREM2 could positively influence the course of Alzheimer's disease.

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HMS Terror shipwreck offers up secrets of lost Arctic expedition

Almost two centuries after descending to its watery grave, the HMS Terror could offer up new clues to its demise—and solve one of the most enduring mysteries in the history of Arctic discovery.

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Endangered bats: The manicure helping to save a species

Scientists explore the home of a bat species that is confined to a single cave in Cuba.

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Effect of alder on soil bacteria offers an alternative explanation to the role played by alder in rock weathering [Letters (Online Only)]

The article by Perakis and Pett-Ridge in PNAS (1) stimulated an interesting discussion (2) on the role of nitrogen-fixing alder in enhancing rock weathering and supply of rock-derived nutrients. The authors ascribe the accelerated rate of weathering to the generation of acidic conditions in the soil due to excess nitrogen…

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Reply to Krishna et al.: Resolving age-related changes in nitrogen fixation and mineral weathering by Alnus tree species [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS we report that the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing tree red alder (Alnus rubra) accesses more rock-derived nutrients than nonfixing trees (1). We further hypothesize that excess nitrogen fixation by alder, leading to high rates of nitrification and nitric acid generation in soil, could accelerate mineral weathering (1, 2). Krishna et…

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High-performance all-solid-state batteries enabled by salt bonding to perovskite in poly(ethylene oxide) [Chemistry]

Flexible and low-cost poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based electrolytes are promising for all-solid-state Li-metal batteries because of their compatibility with a metallic lithium anode. However, the low room-temperature Li-ion conductivity of PEO solid electrolytes and severe lithium-dendrite growth limit their application in high-energy Li-metal batteries. Here we prepared a PEO/perovskite Li3/8Sr7/

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Structural insight into multistage inhibition of CRISPR-Cas12a by AcrVA4 [Biochemistry]

Prokaryotes possess CRISPR-Cas systems to exclude parasitic predators, such as phages and mobile genetic elements (MGEs). These predators, in turn, encode anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins to evade the CRISPR-Cas immunity. Recently, AcrVA4, an Acr protein inhibiting the CRISPR-Cas12a system, was shown to diminish Lachnospiraceae bacterium Cas12a (LbCas12a)-mediated genome editing in human…

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The Ramsey property implies no mad families [Mathematics]

We show that if all collections of infinite subsets of N have the Ramsey property, then there are no infinite maximal almost disjoint (mad) families. The implication is proved in Zermelo–Fraenkel set theory with only weak choice principles. This gives a positive solution to a long-standing problem that goes back…

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Engineering energetically efficient transport of dicarboxylic acids in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Applied Biological Sciences]

Biobased C4-dicarboxylic acids are attractive sustainable precursors for polymers and other materials. Commercial scale production of these acids at high titers requires efficient secretion by cell factories. In this study, we characterized 7 dicarboxylic acid transporters in Xenopus oocytes and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for dicarboxylic acid production. Among the…

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Researchers demonstrate all-optical neural network for deep learning

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Study of bile acids links individual's genetics and microbial gut community

Researchers have identified genetic variants in mice that impact the levels of different bile acids as well as the size of a specific population of microbes in the gut.

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How chikungunya virus may cause chronic joint pain

A new method for permanently marking cells infected with chikungunya virus could reveal how the virus continues to cause joint pain for months to years after the initial infection, according to a study.

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Trump Authorizes a Space Command. Next, He Wants a Space Force.

While there is widespread agreement on the need to protect American interests in space, there is disagreement on how to go about it.

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Uncovering ocean iron-level mystery

A new study uncovered the reason behind chemistry variations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre ecosystem.

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Tiny thermometer measures how mitochondria heat up the cell by unleashing proton energy

Armed with a tiny new thermometer probe that can quickly measure temperature inside of a cell, University of Illinois researchers have illuminated a mysterious aspect of metabolism: heat generation. Mitochondria, the cell's power stations, release quick bursts of heat by unleashing the power stored in an internal proton 'battery,' the researchers found. Better understanding of this process could p

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how neurons in the mouse neocortex form billions of synaptic connections

Researchers have combined two high profile, large-scale datasets to produce something completely new — a first draft model of the rules guiding neuron-to-neuron connectivity of a whole mouse neocortex. They generated statistical instances of the micro-connectome of 10 million neurons, a model spanning five orders of magnitude and containing 88 billion synaptic connections. A basis for the world's

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Hints of a volcanically active exo-moon

A rocky extrasolar moon (exomoon) with bubbling lava may orbit a planet 550 light-years away from us. This is suggested by an international team of researchers on the basis of theoretical predictions matching observations. The 'exo-Io' would appear to be an extreme version of Jupiter's moon Io.

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Why the number of fires in the Amazon is terrifying climate experts

Never before has so much of the Amazon rainforest been on fire. The fires are largely set by humans clearing areas for development. The fires may push us into a vicious, irreversible climate pattern. None There's a reason the Amazon rainforest is referred to as the "Lungs of the World": It accounts for 17 percent of the carbon dioxide absorbed by the world's trees and produces 20 percent of the o

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Bagsiden: Mere om kanoner – og et knust klaver

Vi bliver nødt til at dvæle endnu en stund ved sidste uges autentiske vandrehistorie om kanonskyderiet på begge ingeniørkollegierne i Lyngby. Den første beboer af værelse 1208 på Ostenfeld Kollegiet, som blev opført i 1968, har meldt sig med en førstehåndsberetning.

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New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought

Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought.

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Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber

For the first time, a team has sent a light particle entangled with matter over 50 km of optical fiber. This paves the way for the practical use of quantum networks and sets a milestone for a future quantum internet.

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Bacteria feeding on Arctic algae blooms can seed clouds

New research finds Arctic Ocean currents and storms are moving bacteria from ocean algae blooms into the atmosphere where the particles help clouds form. These particles, which are biological in origin, can affect weather patterns throughout the world, according to the new study.

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Ancient civilizations were already messing up the planet

As issues like climate change, global warming, and renewable energy dominate the national conversation, it's easy to assume these topics are exclusive to the modern world. But a huge collaborative study in Science reveals that early humans across the entire globe were changing and impacting their environments as far back as 10,000 years ago.

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'It's a big deal': Trump takes giant leap in space command launch

President detailed operations in ceremony, including defending against Chinese and Russian anti-satellite weapons, and promised space force will soon follow It was one small step for man, one giant leap for Trumpkind. Donald Trump made the short journey on Thursday from the Oval Office to the White House Rose Garden, then promised to unleash an army of space warriors to infinity and beyond. Conti

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White matter affects how people respond to brain stimulation therapy

Tiny changes in the microscopic structure of the human brain may affect how patients respond to an emerging therapy for neurological problems.

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Warnings on individual cigarettes could reduce smoking

Health warnings printed on individual cigarettes could play a key role in reducing smoking, according to new research from the University of Stirling.

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Exercise in pregnancy improves health of obese mothers by restoring their tissues, mouse study finds

Exercise immediately prior to and during pregnancy restores key tissues in the body, making them better able to manage blood sugar levels and lowering the risk of long term health problems, suggests new research carried out in mice.

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Scientists Grow Mini-Brains With Recognizable Brainwaves

It may sound like something out of science fiction, but scientists grew mini-brains in a lab with functional neural networks that can produce brain waves. (Credit: Shutterstock) These pea-sized lumps of cells don’t look like much, but they are mini-brains, also called brain organoids, that were grown in a lab using human stem cells. And for the first time, scientists have created mini-brains with

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Breast cancer risk from HRT is double previous estimate, finds study

One million cases since 1990 are due to hormone therapy, global analysis suggests

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Changing treatment practices for alcohol use disorder could save lives

Treatment practices in Canada and abroad need to change in order to help more people with alcohol use disorder, according to a CAMH-led article just published in The Lancet. More than 1 million Canadians have alcohol use disorders in any given year, but the vast majority never receives professional help. Despite interventions for alcohol use disorders being effective and — if performed according

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The Lancet: New analyses of the worldwide epidemiological evidence demonstrate link between different forms of menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer incidence, and find that some risk persists for many years

The findings, published in The Lancet, suggest that all types of MHT, except topical vaginal oestrogens, are associated with increased risks of breast cancer, and that the risks are greater for users of oestrogen-progestagen hormone therapy than for oestrogen-only hormone therapy. For oestrogen-progestagen therapy, the risks were greater if the progestagen was included daily rather than intermitte

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Suggested move to plant-based diets risks worsening brain health nutrient deficiency

The momentum behind a move to plant-based and vegan diets for the good of the planet is commendable, but risks worsening an already low intake of an essential nutrient involved in brain health, warns a nutritionist in the online journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.

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Drug use, excess alcohol and no helmet common among US injured eScooter users

A significant proportion of eScooter injuries in the US seem to be occurring while 'drivers' are under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol and almost never wearing a helmet, suggests a study of admissions to three US major trauma centres, published online in Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.

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Hospitals Should Replace Infection-Prone Scopes With Safer Models, F.D.A. Says

Reusable duodenoscopes, used for internal examinations of patients, have been linked to a series of hospital outbreaks.

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Breast cancer risk from using HRT is ‘twice what was thought’

Study prompts medicines regulator to advise all women using HRT to remain vigilant The risk of breast cancer from using hormone replacement therapy is double what was previously thought, according to a major piece of research, which confirms that HRT is a direct cause of the cancer. The findings of the definitive study will cause concern among the 1 million women in the UK and millions more aroun

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A massive study confirms no one 'gay gene' controls sexual preference

Researchers at the Broad Institute analyzed genomes from nearly half of a million people to better understand if and how genetics play a role in sexual orientation. (Pixabay/) Genetics can't predict whether a person will engage in same-sex sexual behavior, according to new research published in the journal Science . The study , which tested nearly half a million people, found that while there are

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Depth of Field: Visual Poetry in the Chicken Sandwich War

This one paradoxical photo captures the essence of unmet fried-food desires.

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New Images Illuminate Milky Way's Mysterious Far Side

The Milky Way Galaxy, seen edge-on. (Credit: NASA) Although it’s relatively nearby, the far side of the Milky Way is one of the hardest parts of the observable universe to see. That means there are still outstanding questions in astronomy as to what our galactic home really looks like. But a new study charting over 1,100 new stars on the Milky Way’s distant side provides astronomers fresh insight

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Apple just made it easier to get your old iPhone fixed

Apple is expanding its certified repairs to independent fixers in the United States. (Pexels/) Apple has a long history of aversion to independent repair shops cracking open its devices and fixing broken parts. Sure, that kiosk in the mall is willing to swap out your phone screen while you scarf down a hot pretzel, but that may not be an official channel and you won't necessarily what kind of par

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Family perceptions of end-of-life care for patients with advanced kidney disease

Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease who died in Department of Veterans Affairs' facilities often received intensive patterns of end-of-life care that appeared to be primarily directed at life extension. Patients who received more intensive patterns of care had lower family ratings of overall quality of care, whereas those who received palliative care and hospice services had higher ratin

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The value of understanding feedbacks from ecosystem functions to species for managing ecosystems

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11890-7 Value of information analyses are a promising approach to decision-making in conservation. Here the authors develop a dynamic approach to show that knowing which species benefit from an ecosystem function improves ecosystem service and biodiversity management, particularly for risk-prone managers.

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Changes in gene expression predictably shift and switch genetic interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11735-3 Non-additive genetic interactions are plastic and can complicate genetic prediction. Here, using deep mutagenesis of the lambda repressor, Li et al. reveal that changes in gene expression can alter the strength and direction of genetic interactions between mutations in many genes and develop mathematical model

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Molecular ground-state dissociation in the condensed phase employing plasmonic field enhancement of chirped mid-infrared pulses

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11902-6 There is a growing interest in controlling the chemical process at molecular level. Here the authors show the mid-IR chirped pulse driven ground-state dissociation of condensed phase tungsten hexacarbonyl using efficient vibrational ladder climbing process by employing plasmonic near-field enhancement.

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Field theory for recurrent mobility

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11841-2 Systematic methods to characterize human mobility can lead to more accurate forecasting of epidemic spreading and better urban planning. Here the authors present a methodology to analyse daily commuting data by representing it with an irrotational vector field and a corresponding scalar potential.

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Facilitating nitrogen accessibility to boron-rich covalent organic frameworks via electrochemical excitation for efficient nitrogen fixation

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11846-x Covalent organic frameworks are potential catalysts for nitrogen reduction, but limited nitrogen transport restricts the utilization ratio of active sites. Here, the authors demonstrate that electrochemical excitation of covalent organic frameworks can lead to efficient nitrogen reduction.

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EGR1 recruits TET1 to shape the brain methylome during development and upon neuronal activity

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11905-3 It is unclear why neuronal activity induced methylation changes are limited to specific loci in the genome. Here, authors show that the DNA demethylation enzyme, TET1, gains its specificity via the interaction with EGR1, a sequence specific DNA binding protein.

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Author Correction: Discrepancy in scientific authority and media visibility of climate change scientists and contrarians

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12061-4

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Impaired mitochondrial calcium efflux contributes to disease progression in models of Alzheimer’s disease

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11813-6 Dysregulation of intracellular calcium is reported in Alzheimer’s disease. Here the authors show that loss of the mitochondrial Na+ /Ca2+ exchanger, NCLX – primary route of mitochondrial calcium efflux, precedes neuronal pathology in experimental models and contributes to Alzheimer’s disease progression.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Root of the Mattis

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, August 29. ‣ Hurricane Dorian could hit Florida as a Category 4 storm ahead of Labor Day—one of the busiest travel weekends of the year. Here’s what else we’re watching. A Taste of His Own Medicine: The inspec

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EPA Aims To Roll Back Limits On Methane Emissions From Oil And Gas Industry

"This would be a huge step backward," said one environmental advocate. "It would cause greatly increased pollution." The Trump administration says it will help the oil and gas industry save money. (Image credit: Charlie Riedel/AP)

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Watch: Bill Gates Reveals His Worst Fear in Netflix Docuseries Trailer

The three-part docuseries 'Inside Bill’s Brain: Decoding Bill Gates' premieres on Netflix on Sept. 20. (Photo Credit: Saeed Adyani / Netflix) If you’ve …

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NSF’s huge ecological observatory is open for business. But tensions remain

The National Ecological Observatory Network struggles to gain researchers’ trust

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Stretchy sensor keeps close eye on brain aneurysms

A wireless sensor so small clinicians can implant it in the blood vessels of the brain could help evaluate healing of aneurysms. Aneurysms are bulges that can cause death or serious injury if they burst. The stretchable sensor, which operates without batteries, would wrap around stents or diverters implanted to control blood flow in vessels that aneurysms affect. To reduce costs and accelerate ma

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Here's Why DARPA Wants to Borrow aLabyrinth of Underground Urban Tunnels

DARPA would like to enter your labyrinthine network of underground, urban tunnels.

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Blue Brain finds how neurons in the mouse neocortex form billions of synaptic connections

Researchers at EPFL's Blue Brain Project, a Swiss brain research Initiative, have combined two high profile, large-scale datasets to produce something completely new — a first draft model of the rules guiding neuron-to-neuron connectivity of a whole mouse neocortex. They generated statistical instances of the micro-connectome of 10 million neurons, a model spanning five orders of magnitude and co

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Flathead Bio Station researcher helps uncover ocean iron level mystery

In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group of researchers uncovered the reason behind chemistry variations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre ecosystem.

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'Control' Is a Paranoiac's Dream Turned Into a Videogame

On the surface, the game feels cold and brutal. But beneath all that, it's disturbingly alive.

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Set ablaze: More fires burning in Central Africa than Amazon

There are more than five times as many fires in central Africa than the Amazon. While the fires are mostly confined to savanna, they could threaten the Congo Basin. The Congo Basin is the second largest rainforest in the world. As the forest fires in South America's Amazon rainforest blaze on, concurrent disastrous fires are raging in large swathes of Central Africa and parts of Southern Africa.

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Arthritis-causing virus hides in body for months after infection

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a way to fluorescently tag cells infected with chikungunya virus. The technique opens up new avenues to study how the virus persists in the body and potentially could lead to a treatment.

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Tiny thermometer measures how mitochondria heat up the cell by unleashing proton energy

Armed with a tiny new thermometer probe that can quickly measure temperature inside of a cell, University of Illinois researchers have illuminated a mysterious aspect of metabolism: heat generation. Mitochondria, the cell's power stations, release quick bursts of heat by unleashing the power stored in an internal proton 'battery,' the researchers found. Better understanding of this process could p

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Huge Study Conclusively Debunks the “Gay Gene” Myth

Complicated Story The notion of a so-called gay gene, or a single genetic marker that determines a person’s sexual orientation, got tossed out the window by a massive new study. While scientists still expect sexual orientation to at least partially be determined by genetics, those not-yet-understood factors are far more complex than a single genetic on/off switch, according to Live Science . The

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A.I. could give eye charts a personalized overhaul

Artificial intelligence could help make eye charts a whole lot better, Zhong-Lin Lu says. Eye charts date back to the middle of the 19th century, and, over the ensuing decades, have changed relatively little. Many optometrists and ophthalmologists still gauge patients’ vision by having them read rows of letters or numbers. Lu, associate provost and chief scientist at New York University Shanghai

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Hurricane Dorian is juicing up to hit Florida with extreme floods

Hurricane Dorian on Friday, August 30. (NOAA/) This post has been updated As of Friday afternoon Dorian is officially a major hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), meaning it has reached Category 3 status. The NHC reports that Dorian, which now has sustained winds of nearly 115 mph, poses "a major threat" to Florida and the northwestern Bahamas. This could be the strongest

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Brain waves detected in mini-brains grown in a dish

Scientists have created miniature brains from stem cells that developed functional neural networks. Despite being a million times smaller than human brains, these lab-grown brains are the first observed to produce brain waves that resemble those of preterm babies.

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MIT’s Fleet of Autonomous Boats Can Now Shapeshift

Roboat Advance MIT scientists have been working with officials in Amsterdam for the past several years to develop autonomous boats that could one day navigate the city’s many canals. In June, they announced they’d found a way to get their “roboats” to latch together . And now, they’ve given the fleet another capability: shapeshifting . Superpower Boat On August 22, the MIT scientists presented a

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A chip made with carbon nanotubes, not silicon, marks a computing milestone

submitted by /u/running_with_swords [link] [comments]

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Elon Musk: ‘A.I. will make jobs kind of pointless’

submitted by /u/atomicspace [link] [comments]

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Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Parts of America may already be facing recession

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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US calls for rescinding rules on oil industry methane leaks

The Trump administration moved Thursday to revoke Obama-era regulations on climate-changing methane leaks from oil facilities, a proposal that environmental advocates said would renounce key federal legal authority to regulate the gas's outsize damage to the climate.

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How I help people understand vitiligo | Lee Thomas

TV news anchor Lee Thomas thought his career was over after he was diagnosed with vitiligo, an autoimmune disorder that left large patches of his skin without pigment and led to derision and stares. In a captivating talk, he shares how he discovered a way to counter misunderstanding and fear around his appearance with engagement, dialogue — and a smile. "Positivity is something worth fighting for

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Crouching lion, hidden giraffe

The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food.

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A new way to measure how water moves

A new method to measure pore structure and water flow can help scientists more accurately and cheaply determine how fast water, contaminants, nutrients and other liquids move through the soil — and where they go.

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Food, predators, and people influence giraffe social behavior

The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food. An international team of researchers from Penn State and the University of Zürich studied giraffe behavior in a 2,000 square kilometer region of Africa and pinpointed some of the special requirements needed

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New research reveals that a human stomach pathogen is attracted to bleach

Researchers at the University of Oregon have uncovered a molecular mechanism by which the human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is attracted to bleach, also known as hypochlorous acid or HOCI. The study revealed that H. pylori uses a protein called TlpD to sense bleach and swim toward it, and that the bacteria Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli can use TlpD-like proteins to detect bleac

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Food, predators, and people influence giraffe social behavior

The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food. An international team of researchers from Penn State and the University of Zürich studied giraffe behavior in a 2,000 square kilometer region of Africa and pinpointed some of the special requirements needed

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A new way to measure how water moves

When a chemical spills in the environment, it's important to know how quickly the spill will spread. If a farmer irrigates a crop, the person will need to know how fast the water should move through the soil and be absorbed by the roots. In both cases, a good understanding of water pore structure is necessary.

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New research reveals that a human stomach pathogen is attracted to bleach

Researchers at the University of Oregon have uncovered a molecular mechanism by which the human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is attracted to bleach, also known as hypochlorous acid or HOCI. The study revealed that H. pylori uses a protein called TlpD to sense bleach and swim toward it, and that the bacteria Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli can use TlpD-like proteins to detect bleac

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6.3-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Off Oregon Coast

A strong earthquake struck off the coast of Oregon today (Aug. 29), according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

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People transformed the world through land use by 3,000 years ago

Humans started making an impact on the global ecosystem through intensive farming much earlier than previously estimated, according to a new study published in the journal Science. Evidence of the earliest domesticated plants and animals dates back to around 10,000 years ago. But findings from a team of more than 250 archeologists, including two from SMU (Southern Methodist University), show that

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Facebook Research is Using Minecraft to Train AI. Here’s Why.

MineBot A team of Facebook computer scientists is trying to build an advanced new AI assistant, and they’re using Minecraft to do it. The ultimate goal is to create an assistant that can handle a wide variety of tasks — AI algorithms are generally very good at just one thing — and learn even more as it interacts with humans, MIT Technology Review reports . First up: building a bot that can build

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Samsung Launches Beta Program For The Galaxy Home Mini In Korea

Last year, Samsung announced their upcoming smart speaker in the form of the Galaxy Home. The speaker has yet to be released following a series of delays, but it looks like Samsung is already …

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A robo-thread wiggles through some of the body’s most intricate spaces

Nature, Published online: 28 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02579-4 Robots that are roughly half a millimetre wide veer around sharp corners and down tiny corridors.

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There's a Big Problem With Making Vaccines Mandatory, And It's Worth Paying Attention

Vaccines work. But mandatory vaccination isn't always the best solution.

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Nissan Develops Self-Steering Golf Ball for ‘Stress-Free’ Perfect Putts

Nissan is finding new uses for its ProPilot Assist self-driving technology. Right nows, it’s ramping up for the September debut of the Nissan Skyline, the Skyline being, effectively, the Infiniti Q50 in the US. And so Nissan-Infiniti developed the ProPilot golf ball with self-guiding technology embedded. Seriously. On the green, you putt the ball more or less in the direction of the hole, and it

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Artifacts Found in North America Suggest Humans Came By Sea

Dating back to 16,000 years, items from a dig site in Idaho point to the first settlers arriving by a Pacific coastal route rather than by an ice-free land bridge from Siberia.

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Crouching lion, hidden giraffe

The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food.

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New research reveals that a human stomach pathogen is attracted to bleach

University of Oregon researchers have uncovered a molecular mechanism by which the human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is attracted to bleach. The study, which appeared Aug. 29, 2019 in the journal PLOS Biology, revealed that H. pylori uses a protein called TlpD to sense bleach and swim toward it. The researchers propose H. pylori uses the protein to sense sites of tissue inflammation, whic

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A new way to measure how water moves

A new method to measure pore structure and water flow can help scientists more accurately and cheaply determine how fast water, contaminants, nutrients and other liquids move through the soil — and where they go.

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US probing Juul's deceptive social media marketing: report

US regulators are looking into potentially "deceptive marketing" used by popular e-cigarette brand JUUL Labs that targeted teens, according to a news report.

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Artifacts Found in North America Suggest Humans Came By Sea

Dating back to 16,000 years, items from a dig site in Idaho point to the first settlers arriving by a Pacific coastal route rather than by an ice-free land bridge from Siberia.

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A New Kind of Wi-Fi, a Streaming Piracy Bust, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Apple Will Give Indie Repair Shops the Tools to Fix iPhones

Your options for repairing a broken Apple device just got a lot better as the company loosens its policies on third-party fixes.

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Christian church supports international students, new research reveals

The Christian church can provide an important social support community for international college students in the United States, according to researchers at Penn State. Specifically, the team found that the church also may help to provide culturally sensitive counseling to international students. The team focused its investigation on Chinese international students.

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Researchers demonstrate first all-metamaterial optical gas sensor

Researchers have developed the first fully-integrated, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas sensor enabled by specially engineered synthetic materials known as metamaterials. The sensor has no moving parts, requires little energy to operate and is among the smallest NDIR sensors ever created.

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New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance

Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in international waters, not just the commercial species, warns an analysis by American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers.

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Researchers demonstrate first all-metamaterial optical gas sensor

At FiO + LS conference, researchers will discuss the first fully integrated, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas sensor enabled by specially engineered synthetic materials known as metamaterials. The sensor has no moving parts, requires little energy to operate and is among the smallest NDIR sensors ever created.

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Christian church supports international students, new research reveals

The Christian church can provide an important social support community for international college students in the United States, according to researchers at Penn State. Specifically, the team found that the church also may help to provide culturally sensitive counseling to international students. The team focused its investigation on Chinese international students.

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New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance

Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers.

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New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance

Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in international waters, not just the commercial species, warns an analysis by American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers.

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Oldest Evidence of North American Settlement May Have Been Found in Idaho

The first settlers of North America might have been seafarers

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‘The Punch Escrow’ Is a Sci-Fi Thriller About Teleportation Run Amok

When it comes to teaching people a little something about humanity at large, the science fiction genre manages to enlighten our minds time and again. From Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” to Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World,” this type of literature offers an intimate commentary on both human nature and our modern world. Thanks to the works of these writers and the success of iconic films like the

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Everything We Know About the Capital One Hacking Case So Far

A new indictment against alleged Capital One hacker Paige Thompson includes a few fresh details about the case.

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NASA sees a transitioned, merging Extra-Tropical Storm Erin off US east coast

Former tropical depression Erin has made the transition into an extra-tropical system off the eastern coast of the U.S. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite provided temperature data on storms associated with Erin and the weather system it is merging with.

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New science blooms after star researchers die, study finds

Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers.

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Major Climate Change Rules the Trump Administration Is Reversing

The Trump administration is trying to roll back more than 80 environmental rules; half involve climate change. Here are some of the biggest climate-related ones.

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First Americans Arrived More Than 16,000 Years Ago, According To Find In Idaho

A sampling of some of the scores of artifacts produced by First Americans at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho. Dotted lines along some of the tools indicate patterns of wear. (Credit: Davis et al 2019) Stone tools, charcoal and other artifacts from Cooper's Ferry, Idaho, are the latest evidence that the First Americans arrived more than 16,000 years ago — well before an overland route exis

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You won’t believe how well this algorithm spots clickbait

With training from humans and machines, an artificial intelligence model can outperform other clickbait detectors, according to new research. In addition, the new AI-based solution was also able to tell the difference between headlines that machines—or bots—generated and ones people wrote, they says. In a study, the researchers asked people to write their own clickbait—an interesting, but mislead

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There Is no Single 'Gay Gene,' Massive New Study Confirms

A new study into the genetics of same-sex attraction reveals how complex it is. (Credit: EpicStockMedia/Shutterstock) In the largest study of its kind yet, researchers find no single gene influences whether a person engages in same-sex sexual behavior. Instead, like height, variations in many genes throughout the human genome contribute to sexual preference, researchers report Thursday in the jour

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Changes in Earth's Orbit Likely Kickstarted One of the Hottest Periods in History

An artist's illustration shows Earth from orbit. (Credit: Dima Zel/Shutterstock) Our planet is getting warmer today, that's a fact. But, this isn't the hottest time in our planet's history — far from it, in fact. At various points, millions or billions of years ago, Earth was much more toasty than it is now. One of the most notable hot flashes came 56 million years ago, during the Paleocene-Eocene

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Diversity of inter-species interactions affects functioning of ecological communities

Mathematical modeling suggests that the diversity of interactions between species in an ecological community plays a greater role in maintaining community functioning than previously thought. Vincent Miele of the CNRS in Lyon, France, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Researchers gain new insight about bacteria within grapevine-killing crown gall tumors

Scientists have mapped the DNA of bacteria found within a chronic disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar grape industry that produces juice, jelly, wine and other important products.

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Diversity of inter-species interactions affects functioning of ecological communities

Mathematical modeling suggests that the diversity of interactions between species in an ecological community plays a greater role in maintaining community functioning than previously thought. Vincent Miele of the CNRS in Lyon, France, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Researchers gain new insight about bacteria within grapevine-killing crown gall tumors

Scientists have mapped the DNA of bacteria found within a chronic disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar grape industry that produces juice, jelly, wine and other important products.

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NASA estimates heavy rainfall in Hurricane Dorian

Hurricane Dorian is packing heavy rain as it moves toward the Bahamas as predicted by NOAA's NHC or National Hurricane Center. NASA analyzed the storm and found heavy rainfall in the storm.

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Steve Wozniak: I Didn’t Mean the Gov’t Should Break up Apple

Clarifying Comments Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak said that he’s “pretty much in favor of looking into splitting up big companies” during an interview with Bloomberg on Tuesday. “I mean, I wish Apple on its own had split up a long time ago,” he continued, a statement that some interpreted to mean Wozniak thought Apple should be broken up into separate companies , like presidential candidate Eliz

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Scientists Grew Tiny Human Brains and Hooked Them up to Robots

On the International Space Station, clusters of nerve cells called mini-brains are developing in ways that scientists didn’t previously think was possible. The organoids were grown from stem cells at the University of California, San Diego lab of biologist Alysson Muotri, before being packed into a box and shipped to space , where Muotri told The New York Times they’re likely “replicating like cr

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NASA sees a transitioned, merging Extra-Tropical Storm Erin off US east coast

Former tropical depression Erin has made the transition into an extra-tropical system off the eastern coast of the US Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite provided temperature data on storms associated with Erin and the weather system it is merging with.

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Researchers gain new insight about bacteria within grapevine-killing crown gall tumors

Scientists have mapped the DNA of bacteria found within a chronic disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar grape industry that produces juice, jelly, wine and other important products.

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NASA estimates heavy rainfall in Hurricane Dorian

Hurricane Dorian is packing heavy rain as it moves toward the Bahamas as predicted by NOAA's NHC or National Hurricane Center. NASA analyzed the storm and found heavy rainfall in the storm.

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Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage

A new Cornell study, 'A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay that Integrates the Host Injury Response to Infection,' published Aug. 26, 2019 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a technique to identify viruses and bacteria in the human body and quantify injuries to organs by using dead fragments of DNA, called cell-free DNA, that roam throughout the bloodstream and ur

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Diversity of inter-species interactions affects functioning of ecological communities

Mathematical modeling suggests that the diversity of interactions between species in an ecological community plays a greater role in maintaining community functioning than previously thought. Vincent Miele of the CNRS in Lyon, France, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Study of bile acids links individual's genetics and microbial gut community

In a new study published Aug. 29, 2019 in PLOS Genetics, Federico Rey of the University of Wisconsin — Madison and colleagues identified genetic variants in mice that impact the levels of different bile acids as well as the size of a specific population of microbes in the gut.

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Humans were changing the environment much earlier than believed

New research, which assessed global land use from 10,000 to 170 years ago, reveals that hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists had made significant alterations to the planet by 4,000 years ago, much earlier than indicated by Earth scientists' previous land-use reconstructions. The finding will not only inform future environmental action based on knowledge of the past, but also has implications

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Deep-sea sediments reveal solar system chaos: An advance in dating geologic archives

In a study published in the journal Science, Richard Zeebe from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and Lucas Lourens from Utrecht University used geologic records from deep-sea drill cores to extend the astronomical time scale beyond 50 million years, by about 8 million years. Using their new chronology, they provide a new age for the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (56.01 Ma) with a small margin of err

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Archaeological assessment reveals Earth's early transformation through land use

The first global assessment of archaeological land use changes from 10,000 BP to 1850 CE reveals that our planet was dramatically transformed from its earlier state by hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists by 3,000-4,000 years ago. This is far earlier than estimated by the conventional global land-use reconstructions used by Earth scientists and overturns the conventional paradigm that anthro

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A global assessment of Earth's early anthropogenic transformation

A global archaeological assessment of ancient land use reveals that prehistoric human activity had already substantially transformed the ecology of Earth by 3,000 years ago, even before intensive farming and the domestication of plants and animals.

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Maleness-on-the-Y: A novel male sex determiner in major fruit fly pests

Becoming a male Mediterranean fruit fly relies on the newly identified Y-chromosome linked gene — Maleness-on-the-Y (MoY) — which encodes the small protein required to signal male sex determination during development, a new study shows.

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No genome signature predicts same-sex sexual behavior, GWAS study finds

According to a genome-wide association study involving more than 470,000 people, a person's genetic variants do not meaningfully predict whether they will engage in same-sex sexual behavior.

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Cooper's Ferry archaeological finds reveal humans arrived more than 16,000 years ago

Archaeological discoveries from the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho indicate that humans migrated to and occupied the region by nearly 16,500 years ago.

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Ancient civilizations were already messing up the planet

As issues like climate change, global warming, and renewable energy dominate the national conversation, it's easy to assume these topics are exclusive to the modern world. But a huge collaborative study in Science reveals that early humans across the entire globe were changing and impacting their environments as far back as 10,000 years ago.

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Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years

A new map synthesized from more than 250 archaeologists worldwide argues that the human imprint on our planet's soil goes back much earlier than the nuclear age.

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How visceral leishmaniasis spread through central-Southern Brazil

The protozoan disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has recently expanded to places where it had not previously been reported and has expanded its geographic distribution within countries where it was already endemic. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases describe three dispersion routes that have moved Leishmania infantum into and through central-Southern Brazil, helping shed

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How chikungunya virus may cause chronic joint pain

A new method for permanently marking cells infected with chikungunya virus could reveal how the virus continues to cause joint pain for months to years after the initial infection, according to a study published Aug. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Deborah Lenschow of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues.

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Mutation that causes rare muscle disease protects against HIV-1 infection

A mutation that causes a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the limbs protects against HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Aug. 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Sara Rodríguez-Mora, Mayte Coiras and José Alcamí of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, Spain, and colleagues.

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Gut microbiota linked to organ damage in patients with sepsis

Sepsis is a serious condition that can result in organ failure and even death. A novel human study published in The FASEB Journal demonstrates for the first time that the gut microbiota of patients with sepsis plays a major role in organ damage.

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Preventable heart-related deaths have gone up

Total deaths from heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and hypertension—collectively known as cardiometabolic disease—have risen since 2011, a new study shows. Cardiometabolic disease is the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, researchers say. While the overall rate of heart disease deaths decreased over time, the rate of decline slowed after 2010. Deaths from stroke and diabetes declined f

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Many Genes Influence Same-Sex Sexuality, Not a Single ‘Gay Gene’

The largest study of same-sex sexual behavior finds the genetics are complicated, and social and environmental factors are also key.

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Fountain pens for people who want writing to be pleasurable

Your bullet journal will be Instagram-beautiful in no time. (Aaron Burden via Unsplash/) Fountain pens aren’t relics: they’re functional, durable, and customizable. They can turn writing into a pleasurable, meditative experience. With fountain pens, you can select the nib-size that’s right for your handwriting, whether you want a precise narrow line or a broad one, and you can shop for a beautifu

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No ‘gay gene’: Massive study homes in on genetic basis of human sexuality

Nature, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02585-6 Nearly half a million genomes reveal five DNA markers associated with sexual behaviour — but none with the power to predict the sexuality of an individual.

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Ancient stone tools hint at settlers’ epic trek to North America

Nature, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02589-2 16,000-year-old artefacts discovered in Idaho could be the oldest ever found on the continent.

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Mounting Evidence Suggests People First Came to North America by Boat

Artifacts found in Idaho support theory that humans reached the Americas before a land route to Asia existed. CoopersFerry.jpg The Cooper's Ferry area, Idaho. Image credits: Loren Davis, Oregon State University Culture Thursday, August 29, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Ancient stone artifacts and other traces of human activity may be the oldest evidence yet of peo

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Brainwaves detected in mini-brains grown in a dish

Algorithm can’t distinguish them from premature babies. Paul Biegler reports.

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There is no single ‘gay gene’

Because we’re human, there are many factors, study finds.

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We've been changing the planet for thousands of years

Unique archaeological study takes a new look at land use. Dyani Lewis reports.

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NASA tracks Tropical Storm Podul's landfall approach to Vietnam

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Podul as it moved closer to the coast of north and central Vietnam where it is expected to make landfall on August 29.

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Scientists quash idea of single 'gay gene'

Many genetic variants each play role in homosexual behaviour, study finds A vast new study has quashed the idea that a single “gay gene” exists, scientists say, instead finding homosexual behaviour is influenced by a multitude of genetic variants which each have a tiny effect. The researchers compare the situation to factors determining a person’s height, in which multiple genetic and environment

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Massive Study Finds No Single Genetic Cause of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior

Analysis of half a million people suggests genetics may have a limited contribution to sexual orientation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny forskning: ”Bög-genen” finns inte

Vissa mönster i arvsmassan är extra vanliga bland människor som har samkönat sex. Det visar världens hittills största studie av kopplingen mellan gener och sexuellt beteende. Men inget gentest kan förutsäga vem som kommer att ligga med någon av samma kön.

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Förbundsordförande RFSL: “Forskningen gör mig orolig”

Det är aldrig intressant att ta reda på varför någon blir en hbtq-person. Det anser Sandra Ehne, förbundsordförande för RFSL (Riksförbundet för homosexuellas, bisexuellas, transpersoners och queeras rättigheter).

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Giant Study Helps Clarify Role of Genes in Same-Sex Sex

The largest study of its kind to date estimates that genetics accounts for at most 8-25 percent of variation in whether or not a person reports engaging in non-heterosexual behaviors.

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Our favorite affordable lip balms

Ban flaky lips from your life. (Photo by Yoann Boyer via Unsplash/) If you’ve passed a winter without experiencing uncomfortable chapped, cracked, peeling lips, consider yourself very, very lucky. The skin on your lips is thinner than the rest of your face, and especially vulnerable to showing signs of dryness. Cold temperatures, bracing winds, and forced-air heating all draw moisture from your s

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Deep-sea sediments reveal solar system chaos: An advance in dating geologic archives

A day is the time for Earth to make one complete rotation on its axis, a year is the time for Earth to make one revolution around the Sun—reminders that basic units of time and periods on Earth are intimately linked to our planet's motion in space relative to the Sun. In fact, we mostly live our lives to the rhythm of these astronomical cycles.

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Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years

Humans' ability to transform the natural environment is often considered a modern phenomenon, from increasing deforestation, soil erosion and greenhouse gas emissions. This year, an international group of geologists deemed the start of the Anthropocene—the time of humans' most far-reaching effects on the Earth—to be the middle of the 20th century.

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New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought

Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought.

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Space Command set to open, will defend US interests in space

Mindful of President Donald Trump's intense interest in space, the Pentagon is declaring U.S. Space Command open for business as part of a broader effort to better defend American interests in space.

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The 'Gay Gene' Is a Total Myth, Massive Study Concludes

But collectively, genes do play a role in sexual orientation.

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Filling a dating hole

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NASA tracks Tropical Storm Podul's landfall approach to Vietnam

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Podul as it moved closer to the coast of north and central Vietnam where it is expected to make landfall on Aug. 29, 2019.

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Right-wing WhatsApp users in Brazil are louder, more active, more effective

After performing the first large-scale analysis of partisan WhatsApp groups in the context of Brazil's 2018 election, the researchers found that right-wing users were more effective in using the social media tool to spread news, disinformation and opinions.

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News at a glance

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Changing conception

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Recursion: A Novel

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Filling a dating hole

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Superhuman AI for multiplayer poker

In recent years there have been great strides in artificial intelligence (AI), with games often serving as challenge problems, benchmarks, and milestones for progress. Poker has served for decades as such a challenge problem. Past successes in such benchmarks, including poker, have been limited to two-player games. However, poker in particular is traditionally played with more than two players. M

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Late Upper Paleolithic occupation at Coopers Ferry, Idaho, USA, ~16,000 years ago

Radiocarbon dating of the earliest occupational phases at the Cooper’s Ferry site in western Idaho indicates that people repeatedly occupied the Columbia River basin, starting between 16,560 and 15,280 calibrated years before the present (cal yr B.P.). Artifacts from these early occupations indicate the use of unfluted stemmed projectile point technologies before the appearance of the Clovis Pale

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Archaeological assessment reveals Earths early transformation through land use

Environmentally transformative human use of land accelerated with the emergence of agriculture, but the extent, trajectory, and implications of these early changes are not well understood. An empirical global assessment of land use from 10,000 years before the present (yr B.P.) to 1850 CE reveals a planet largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists by 3000 years ago, consid

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Deep magma ocean formation set the oxidation state of Earths mantle

The composition of Earth’s atmosphere depends on the redox state of the mantle, which became more oxidizing at some stage after Earth’s core started to form. Through high-pressure experiments, we found that Fe 2+ in a deep magma ocean would disproportionate to Fe 3+ plus metallic iron at high pressures. The separation of this metallic iron to the core raised the oxidation state of the upper mantl

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Dynamical charge density fluctuations pervading the phase diagram of a Cu-based high-Tc superconductor

Charge density modulations have been observed in all families of high–critical temperature ( T c ) superconducting cuprates. Although they are consistently found in the underdoped region of the phase diagram and at relatively low temperatures, it is still unclear to what extent they influence the unusual properties of these systems. Using resonant x-ray scattering, we carefully determined the tem

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Redox-neutral organocatalytic Mitsunobu reactions

Nucleophilic substitution reactions of alcohols are among the most fundamental and strategically important transformations in organic chemistry. For over half a century, these reactions have been achieved by using stoichiometric, and often hazardous, reagents to activate the otherwise unreactive alcohols. Here, we demonstrate that a specially designed phosphine oxide promotes nucleophilic substit

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Skyrmion lattice with a giant topological Hall effect in a frustrated triangular-lattice magnet

Geometrically frustrated magnets can host complex spin textures, leading to unconventional electromagnetic responses. Magnetic frustration may also promote topologically nontrivial spin states such as magnetic skyrmions. Experimentally, however, skyrmions have largely been observed in noncentrosymmetric lattice structures or interfacial symmetry-breaking heterostructures. Here, we report the emer

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Rhizobial tRNA-derived small RNAs are signal molecules regulating plant nodulation

Rhizobial infection and root nodule formation in legumes require recognition of signal molecules produced by the bacteria and their hosts. Here, we show that rhizobial transfer RNA (tRNA)-derived small RNA fragments (tRFs) are signal molecules that modulate host nodulation. Three families of rhizobial tRFs were confirmed to regulate host genes associated with nodule initiation and development thr

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Programmed chromosome fission and fusion enable precise large-scale genome rearrangement and assembly

The design and creation of synthetic genomes provide a powerful approach to understanding and engineering biology. However, it is often limited by the paucity of methods for precise genome manipulation. Here, we demonstrate the programmed fission of the Escherichia coli genome into diverse pairs of synthetic chromosomes and the programmed fusion of synthetic chromosomes to generate genomes with u

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Solar System chaos and the Paleocene-Eocene boundary age constrained by geology and astronomy

Astronomical calculations reveal the Solar System’s dynamical evolution, including its chaoticity, and represent the backbone of cyclostratigraphy and astrochronology. An absolute, fully calibrated astronomical time scale has hitherto been hampered beyond ~50 million years before the present (Ma) because orbital calculations disagree before that age. Here, we present geologic data and a new astro

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Membrane-associated periodic skeleton is a signaling platform for RTK transactivation in neurons

Actin, spectrin, and related molecules form a membrane-associated periodic skeleton (MPS) in neurons. The function of the MPS, however, remains poorly understood. Using super-resolution imaging, we observed that G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and related signaling molecules were recruited to the MPS in response to extracellul

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New Products

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Between two worlds

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Validation of the protein kinase PfCLK3 as a multistage cross-species malarial drug target

The requirement for next-generation antimalarials to be both curative and transmission-blocking necessitates the identification of previously undiscovered druggable molecular pathways. We identified a selective inhibitor of the Plasmodium falciparum protein kinase Pf CLK3, which we used in combination with chemogenetics to validate Pf CLK3 as a drug target acting at multiple parasite life stages.

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Identification of a T follicular helper cell subset that drives anaphylactic IgE

Cross-linking of high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) results in the life-threatening allergic reaction anaphylaxis. Yet the cellular mechanisms that induce B cells to produce IgE in response to allergens remain poorly understood. T follicular helper (T FH ) cells direct the affinity and isotype of antibodies produced by B cells. Although T FH cell–derived interleukin-4 (IL-4) is necessary for Ig

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Large-scale GWAS reveals insights into the genetic architecture of same-sex sexual behavior

Twin and family studies have shown that same-sex sexual behavior is partly genetically influenced, but previous searches for specific genes involved have been underpowered. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 477,522 individuals, revealing five loci significantly associated with same-sex sexual behavior. In aggregate, all tested genetic variants accounted for 8 to 25% of variat

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Cell migration and axon guidance at the border between central and peripheral nervous system

The central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS, respectively) are composed of distinct neuronal and glial cell types with specialized functional properties. However, a small number of select cells traverse the CNS-PNS boundary and connect these two major subdivisions of the nervous system. This pattern of segregation and selective connectivity is established during embryonic development,

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First people in the Americas came by sea, ancient tools unearthed by Idaho river suggest

16,000-year-old occupation predates possible land route into the continents

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Forget single genes: CRISPR now cuts and splices whole chromosomes

New ability gives biologists tool to rework bacterial genomes in many ways

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Genetics may explain up to 25% of same-sex behavior, giant analysis reveals

Still, researchers caution that genes can’t predict who might be gay, bi, or straight

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Humans arrived in North America earlier than we thought

New finds in Idaho push things back to 16,500 years ago.

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Acid oceans are shrinking plankton

New Australian research reveals how that’s fuelling climate change. Katherina Petrou and Daniel Nielsen explain.

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Beautiful view of failed experiment

Things get tough if your proboscis doesn’t cut it.

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Massive Study Finds No Single Genetic Cause of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior

Analysis of half a million people suggests genetics may have a limited contribution to sexual orientation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Taylor Swift Wants to Be ‘The Man’

When John Travolta mistook a drag queen who plays Taylor Swift for the actual Taylor Swift at the MTV Video Music Awards, it made for a hilariously apt turn in Swift’s recent year of gender play. She’s been hanging in public with —and lobbying on behalf of —LGBTQ people, who challenge traditional notions of guyhood and girldom. She’s performed in boxy business suits and short-styled hair . Most p

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Massive Study Finds No Single Genetic Cause of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior

Analysis of half a million people suggests genetics may have a limited contribution to sexual orientation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Social cognition, mood and fatigue in multiple sclerosis

The researchers emphasized the preliminary nature of their findings and recommended further research in individuals with MS, as well in other populations with non-neurologic conditions, and healthy controls.

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Ingeniøren bygger om: Nyt login på vores sites

Ingeniøren vil være det mest transparente mediehus i landet ved at give brugerne indsigt i og magten over den data, vi har om dem. I dag tager vi første skridt mod en ny profilside til vores brugere.

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OSIRIS-REx's final four sample site candidates in 3-D

This animated flyover of each of the four candidate sample collection sites on asteroid Bennu, selected by NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission, was produced using close-range data from the OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA), an instrument contributed by the Canadian Space Agency. It illustrates the location of each site on Bennu, the topography of each site, and the potential sampling r

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Detailed map shows how viruses infect humans

Biologists at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons have leveraged a computational method to map protein-protein interactions between all known human-infecting viruses and the cells they infect. The method, along with the data that it generated, has generated a wealth of information about how viruses manipulate the cells that they infect and cause disease. Among the study'

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Detailed map shows how viruses infect humans

Biologists at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons have leveraged a computational method to map protein-protein interactions between all known human-infecting viruses and the cells they infect. The method, along with the data that it generated, has generated a wealth of information about how viruses manipulate the cells that they infect and cause disease. Among the study'

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Detailed map shows how viruses infect humans

Columbia University researchers have generated a comprehensive map of protein-protein interactions that reveal how viruses infect human cells.

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MIT's fleet of autonomous boats can now shapeshift

MIT's fleet of robotic boats has been updated with new capabilities to 'shapeshift,' by autonomously disconnecting and reassembling into a variety of configurations, to form floating structures in Amsterdam's many canals.

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Delivering immunotherapy directly to brain tumors

A new study published this week gives insight into how cancer immunotherapies might one day be delivered directly to the brain in order to treat brain tumors. The study, in Nature Communications, demonstrated that a new type of nano-immunotherapy traversed the blood-brain barrier in laboratory mice, inducing a local immune response in brain tissue surrounding the tumors. The tumor cells stopped mu

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NASA Attaches Helicopter Drone to Mars 2020 Rover

NASA is still busy integrating the systems that will let the new Mars 2020 rover explore the red planet, but engineers took time to hook up the rover’s sole passenger this week: the Mars Helicopter. The small experimental aircraft is now installed on the belly of the rover , ready to ride the larger robot down to the surface of Mars. Once there, it will, hopefully, make history as the first-ever

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It's officially now the worst ever August for Amazon deforestation

The amount of Amazon rainforest being cleared in Brazil has hit a record high. But president Jair Bolsonaro is moving to ban the setting of fires for two months

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What it's like to eject out of a military jet

A pilot ejects from a Harrier jet in Afghanistan in 2009. (Courtesy Martin-Baker/) When things go terribly wrong in a military aircraft , the pilot's last resort is the equipment they're sitting on: the seat. And it cannot fail, ever. The 200-lb ejection seat , with its 3,500 or so parts, is a remarkable piece of technology that not only gets pilots out of a crashing plane but also ensures they s

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Tesla Just Launched a Car Insurance Program

Ready for Launch Tesla has been teasing plans to enter the car insurance business in the United States for years — and now it’s finally ready to make the leap. “Starting today, we’re launching Tesla Insurance,” the company wrote in a blog post on Wednesday, later adding that “Tesla Insurance offers comprehensive coverage and claims management to support our customers in California, and it will ex

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This Electric Car Uses Moss in the Dashboard to Filter Air

Moss Dashboard You won’t see them on the street any time before the summer of 2020, but German startup Sono Motors has revealed a new solar-powered electric car with a strange twist: strands of moss integrated into the vehicle’s dashboard that help the car’s air filtering system. As pointed out by Electrek , the moss is no longer alive — but that doesn’t stop it from keeping the air inside the ca

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Optimism could be good for your lifespan

Optimism could boost our chances of living 85 years or more by over 50%, according to a new study based on decades of research. Although research has identified many risk factors that increase the likelihood of diseases and premature death, much less is known about positive psychosocial factors that can promote healthy aging. Researchers found that individuals with greater optimism are more likel

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India–Pakistan nuclear escalation: where could it lead?

Nature, Published online: 29 August 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02578-5 India says its ‘no first use’ nuclear policy could change. Nature examines what that means for the country's fraught relationship with Pakistan.

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Lack of oxygen doesn't kill infant brain cells, as previously thought

Research, conducted at OHSU and published in the Journal of Neuroscience, raises new concerns about the vulnerability of the preterm brain to hypoxia. Results confirm that brain cells do not die as previously believed. Rather, hippocampal cells fail to mature normally, causing a reduction in long-term potentiation, or the cellular basis of how the brain learns.

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Gene therapy reduces obesity and reverses type 2 diabetes in mice

The obesity epidemic affects nearly half a billion people worldwide, many of them children. Obesity-related diseases including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and cancer are a leading cause of preventable death. In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers developed a gene therapy that specifically reduces fat tissue and reverses obesity-related metabolic disease in obese mic

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Nike reveals 'Marty McFly' style self lacing sneakers that can be controlled using Apple's Siri

Nike's FitAdapt lacing system uses a midfoot motor to carry out the lacing process for wearers, which has previously been used on other trainers such as the Nike Adapt BB.

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Apple expected to unveil new iPhone at Sept. 10 event

Apple sent out invitations on Thursday to a September 10 event at its Silicon Valley campus where it is expected to unveil a new-generation iPhone.

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Brazil's burning ban takes effect as Amazon fires rage

A 60-day ban on burning in Brazil takes effect Thursday after a global outcry over fires raging in the Amazon and data showing hundreds of new blazes in the rainforest.

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'Charismatic carbon': Seaweed farming to combat climate change

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combatting climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight.

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Forecast: Dorian Will Slam into Florida As a 'Major' Category 4 Hurricane

Hurricane Dorian will likely hit Florida Sunday (Sept. 1) as a Category 4 hurricane, according to the latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center.

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After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

Researchers say clusters of human brain cells grown in the lab can spontaneously generate electrical patterns similar to the brain waves of a 6-month-old fetus. (Image credit: Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences)

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Affordable, effective sheet masks for all your skin ailments

No one would judge you if you sliced cucumbers to put over your eyelids like you're a mildly evil woman in a musical. (Asheesh via Reshot/) While they look otherworldly, sheet masks are pretty simple: paper or fabric drenched in serums and essences that give your skin a boost in just 10-15 minutes. They're portable, effective, and facilitate incredible selfies. They come in the form of a thin mas

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Doctors to Test Fringe Theory That Zero Gravity Kills Cancer Cells

A team of doctors has a new idea in the fight against cancer : ship tumors up into space. That’s based on a recent finding that most cancer cells subjected to microgravity in a lab died off without any other treatment, according to ABC News . Now the team of doctors from Australia’s University of Technology Sydney wants to send samples up to the International Space Station to further test the biz

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'Charismatic carbon': Seaweed farming to combat climate change

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combatting climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight.

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Post opioid-overdose interventions emerge in US

Opioid-related deaths continue to take the lives of thousands in the US each year, with non-fatal opioid overdoses as a significant risk factor for a subsequent fatal overdose. Post-overdose interventions are emerging in affected communities, using what support systems are available to assist in the program design.

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Seaweed farming as a versatile tool in effort to mitigate climate change

Addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combating climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight.

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Den første kulstofprocessor

PLUS. Nu kan kulstofelektronik masseproduceres næsten på samme vis som elektronik baseret på silicium.

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Warsaw sewage plant malfunction contaminates Vistula river

Polish authorities on Thursday were warning residents in cities along the Vistula river that runs into the Baltic Sea of a "crisis" situation after Warsaw's new sewage collection plant malfunctioned.

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Nanostructured material with potential for use in catalyzers

Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. When TiO2 is excited by ultraviolet light, it degrades organic material. Hence, TiO2 can be applied to filter wastewater for reuse, for example.

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Illegal logging threatens 'ecological disaster': DR Congo bishop

A Congolese bishop says an "ecological disaster" is unfolding in the southeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo as illegal logging destined for Chinese buyers is threatening the rare mukula tree.

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Chilean Patagonia: an open-air lab to study climate change

In one of the most inhospitable places on Earth, the southernmost part of Chile's Patagonia region, scientists are studying whales, dolphins and algae in order to help predict how climate change will affect the world's oceans.

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James Comey Gets a Taste of His Own Medicine

Three summers ago, then–FBI Director James Comey stepped to a lectern and delivered a harsh scolding to then–presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Comey’s agents had been investigating Clinton’s use of a personal email server and account as secretary of state, and while he said that “no reasonable prosecutor” would bring a criminal case against her, he was unsparing. “Although we did not find c

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No-fly boys: new Russian space suit clashes with pee ritual

Russia on Thursday unveiled a new space suit for a future spaceship, but the design may have to be changed to continue a decades-old tradition: making a stop to pee on the way to the launch.

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Hurricane Dorian picks up steam, menaces Florida

Leaving mercifully little damage in its wake in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, a strengthening Hurricane Dorian posed an increasing menace to Florida on Thursday as it swirled toward a possible direct hit on the state over Labor Day weekend.

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New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place

A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. Crystal-like structures in the photoreceptors of larval mantis shrimp simultaneously reflect and transmit light onto light sensitive cells. This newly described structure resembles how a human-made optical device, known as Fiber Bragg Grating, works. Fiber Bragg Grating is a filter commonly u

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Biological 'Rosetta Stone' brings scientists closer to deciphering how the body is built

Every animal, from an ant to a human, contains in their genome pieces of DNA called Hox genes. Architects of the body, these genes are keepers of the body's blueprints; they dictate how embryos grown into adults, including where a developing animal puts its head, legs and other body parts.

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Microbe apocalypse was bigger than the dinosaur die-off

Clues from Canadian rocks formed billions of years ago reveal a previously unknown loss of life even greater than the mass extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, according to new research. Rather than prowling animals, this die-off involved microorganisms that shaped the Earth’s atmosphere and ultimately paved the way for those larger animals to thrive. “This shows that even when biolo

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New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place

A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. Crystal-like structures in the photoreceptors of larval mantis shrimp simultaneously reflect and transmit light onto light sensitive cells. This newly described structure resembles how a human-made optical device, known as Fiber Bragg Grating, works. Fiber Bragg Grating is a filter commonly u

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Biological 'Rosetta Stone' brings scientists closer to deciphering how the body is built

Every animal, from an ant to a human, contains in their genome pieces of DNA called Hox genes. Architects of the body, these genes are keepers of the body's blueprints; they dictate how embryos grown into adults, including where a developing animal puts its head, legs and other body parts.

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Getting to the root of how plants tolerate too much iron

Iron is essential for plant growth, but with heavy rainfall and poor aeration, many acidic soils become toxic with excess iron. In countries with dramatic flood seasons, such as in West Africa and tropical Asia, toxic iron levels can have dire consequences on the availability of staple foods, such as rice.

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Getting to the root of how plants tolerate too much iron

Iron is essential for plant growth, but with heavy rainfall and poor aeration, many acidic soils become toxic with excess iron. In countries with dramatic flood seasons, such as in West Africa and tropical Asia, toxic iron levels can have dire consequences on the availability of staple foods, such as rice.

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Is a charter school the right choice for your child?

(HealthDay)—Charter schools have been around for more than 25 years, yet many people know little about them or whether they're a smart option for their children. Created as a way to increase student achievement, the concept has its share of both critics and supporters.

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Satellite photos show burning Iran space center launch pad

A rocket at an Iranian space center that was to conduct a satellite launch criticized by the U.S. apparently exploded on its launch pad Thursday, satellite images show, suggesting the Islamic Republic suffered its third failed launch this year alone.

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What a Virginia wildflower can tell us about climate change

When climates change, plants and animals often are forced to colonize new areas—or possibly go extinct. Because the climate is currently changing, biologists are keenly interested in predicting how climate-induced migrations influence organisms over time.

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Lab-on-a-chip may help identify new treatments for liver disease

Investigators have developed a 'lab on a chip' technology that can simulate different levels of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease progression.

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Biological 'rosetta stone' brings scientists closer to deciphering how the body is built

Every animal contains in their genome pieces of DNA called Hox genes. Architects of the body, these genes are keepers of the body's blueprints. Scientists have long searched for a key to decoding this body map. Now researchers have found one such key: a method that can systematically identify the role each Hox gene plays in a developing fruit fly. Their results offer a new path forward for researc

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New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place

A research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. Crystal-like structures in the photoreceptors of larval mantis shrimp simultaneously reflect and transmit light onto light sensitive cells. This newly described structure resembles how a human-made optical device, known as Fiber Bragg Grating, works.

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What a Virginia wildflower can tell us about climate change

When climates change, plants and animals often are forced to colonize new areas — or possibly go extinct. Because the climate is currently changing, biologists are keenly interested in predicting how climate-induced migrations influence organisms over time.

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New biomarker for rare autoimmune disease

Researchers have identified a unique biological marker that can be used to identify the presence of the rare autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, predict the course of the disease and identify new, personalized treatments.

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Engineers demonstrate key step in robotic disassembly

Engineers have successfully designed a robotic system that can perform a key task in disassembling component parts.

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What a Virginia wildflower can tell us about climate change

When climates change, plants and animals often are forced to colonize new areas—or possibly go extinct. Because the climate is currently changing, biologists are keenly interested in predicting how climate-induced migrations influence organisms over time.

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'Charismatic carbon'

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combatting climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight.

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Review: Post opioid-overdose interventions emerge in US

Opioid-related deaths continue to take the lives of thousands in the US each year, with non-fatal opioid overdoses as a significant risk factor for a subsequent fatal overdose. Post-overdose interventions are emerging in affected communities, using what support systems are available to assist in the program design.

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Nanostructured material with potential for use in catalyzers

A titanium oxide nanofiber sheet was developed by a FAPESP-funded research group through electrospinning and atomic layer deposition.

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Getting to the root of how plants tolerate too much iron

Scientists have found a major genetic regulator of iron tolerance, a gene called GSNOR. The findings could lead to the development of crop species that produce higher yields in soils with excess iron.

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JUUL CEO Tries Blaming “Worrisome” Vaping-Related Illness on THC

Since June 28, nearly 200 people across the United States have been afflicted by a mysterious respiratory sickness . One person has even died from it , and so far, health officials have just one clue as to the illness’ cause: each person vaped prior to experiencing symptoms. On Thursday, “CBS This Morning” aired an interview with Kevin Burns , CEO of Juul Labs, the world’s most prominent vaping b

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Greta Thunberg crossed the ocean on a carbon-free sailboat. Can we do it too?

Greta Thunberg aboard the Malizia II. Her journey from Portsmouth, England, The teen set sail from England on August 14 and arrived in New York City on August 28. (Greta Thunberg Media Handout/EPA/) I have travelled from Plymouth, England, to the UN headquarters in New York many times, often to discuss how to protect the oceans from climate change. The deeply uncomfortable irony was that the carb

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Mysterious Dark Patches in Venus' Clouds are Affecting the Weather There

This composite image of the cloud-covered planet Venus uses data from the Japanese probe Akatsuki. (Credit: Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Something mysterious swirls amidst the clouds of Venus. The planet’s hot, harsh atmosphere is thick with carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid. Atmospheric gases circulate amid cloud layers according to patterns that

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What a Virginia wildflower can tell us about climate change

A Virginia wildflower is providing clues to what happens when a plant species adapts to a changing climate.

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Research Brief: New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place

A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. Crystal-like structures in the photoreceptors of larval mantis shrimp simultaneously reflect and transmit light onto light sensitive cells. This newly described structure resembles how a human-made optical device, known as Fiber Bragg Grating, works.

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Biological 'Rosetta Stone' brings scientists closer to deciphering how the body is built

Every animal contains in their genome pieces of DNA called Hox genes. Architects of the body, these genes are keepers of the body's blueprints. Scientists have long searched for a key to decoding this body map. Now researchers have found one such key: a method that can systematically identify the role each Hox gene plays in a developing fruit fly. Their results offer a new path forward for researc

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Lab-on-a-chip may help identify new treatments for liver disease

Investigators have developed a 'lab on a chip' technology that can simulate different levels of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression.

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Getting to the root of how plants tolerate too much iron

Salk scientists have found a major genetic regulator of iron tolerance, a gene called GSNOR. The findings could lead to the development of crop species that produce higher yields in soils with excess iron.

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Monstrous ‘Kilonova’ Explosions May Be Showering a Nearby Galaxy in Gold

The universe's most massive objects are crashing into each other, and they're leaving a rain of gold and platinum behind them.

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American Health Care Is Sick–and Its Workers Are, Too

In West Virginia, we’re developing a different approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Canada's 'largest' solar project gets green light for construction

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How Russia and China are preparing to exploit a warming planet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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