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Nyheder2019dec19-jan09

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways
Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a Baylor University study has found.

19h

Study links nutrients in blood to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults
A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults.

18h

Astronomers discover first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals
The first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals has been discovered by astronomers at the University of Warwick, and our skies are filled with them.

41min

The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. This new to science species is the first known representative of the whole order of beetles to exclusively inhabit the underground waters of Portugal. The insect is described by the team of Dr Ignacio Ribera an

14h

The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. This new to science species is the first known representative of the whole order of beetles to exclusively inhabit the underground waters of Portugal. The insect is described by the team of Dr Ignacio Ribera an

14h

Synthetic glycolate metabolism pathways stimulate crop growth and productivity in the field
Photorespiration is required in C 3 plants to metabolize toxic glycolate formed when ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase oxygenates rather than carboxylates ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate. Depending on growing temperatures, photorespiration can reduce yields by 20 to 50% in C 3 crops. Inspired by earlier work, we installed into tobacco chloroplasts synthetic glycolate metabolic pathways th

14h

Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas
Scientists seeking to bring the fusion reaction that powers the sun and stars to Earth must keep the superhot plasma free from disruptions. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a process that can help to control the disruptions thought to be most dangerous.

11h

James Mattis’s Letter of Resignation
On Thursday, December 20, Secretary of Defense James Mattis submitted a letter of resignation to President Donald Trump. “Because you have the right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects,” he wrote, “I believe it is right for me to step down from my position.” The full text of the letter is reproduced below. Dear Mr. President: I have been

27min

Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension
Uppsala University researchers have devised a new model for the universe – one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article, published in Physical Review Letters, proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

7h

E.P.A. Proposes Rule Change That Would Let Power Plants Release More Toxic PollutionBarack Obama M.
The change would make it easier for coal-fired power plants to emit mercury and other pollutants linked to developmental and respiratory disorders.

4h

A mathematical approach for understanding intra-plant communication
A team of researchers at the Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI) and Istituto Italiano di Technologia (IIT) have devised a mathematical approach for understanding intra-plant communication. In their paper, pre-published on bioRxiv, they propose a fully coupled system of non-linear, non-autonomous discontinuous and ordinary differential equations that can accurately describe the adapting behavior a

3h

Amoeba finds approximate solutions to NP-hard problem in linear time
Researchers have demonstrated that an amoeba—a single-celled organism consisting mostly of gelatinous protoplasm—has unique computing abilities that may one day offer a competitive alternative to the methods used by conventional computers.

9h

Yale experts treat severe, disfiguring sarcoidosis with novel therapy
An all-Yale team of researchers successfully treated a patient with disfiguring sarcoidosis, a chronic disease that can affect multiple organs, with a drug approved for rheumatoid arthritis. Successful treatment of two other patients with similarly severe disease suggests an effective treatment for an incurable, sometimes life-threatening illness is within reach, the scientists said.

19h

'Christmas berry' plant compound could fight Uveal melanoma
A molecule derived from a type of primrose could prove to be a potent inhibitor of metastatic growth for a rare and aggressive cancer.

11h

Space and Time Could Be a Quantum Error-Correcting Code
The fabric of space-time may get its robustness from a network of quantum particles, according to a principle called quantum error correction.

6h

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy
Chemotherapy is an effective treatment for breast cancer, yet some patients develop metastasis in spite of it. Researchers at EPFL have discovered that chemotherapy-treated mammary tumors produce small vesicles that may help them spread to other organs. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology.

11h

Pediatric leukemia ‘super drug’ may be within reach
When scientists stabilized a key protein responsible for leukemia, MLL, it slowed the progression of the disease in mice, according to a new study. The next step, researchers say, is to combine the treatments from the past two years of research into a pediatric leukemia “super drug” to test on humans in a clinical trial. “This is a monster cancer that we’ve been dealing with for many years in chi

8h

Catastrophic galactic collision could send Solar System flying into space
A nearby galaxy is hurtling towards the Milky Way on a collision course that could fling our Solar System into interstellar space.

9h

Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology
A study conducted at Politecnico di Torino and published by the journal Nature Sustainability promotes an innovative and low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone. In the future, this innovation could have a positive impact on the quality of life in regions affected by drinking water scarcity.

7h

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth by 40 percent
Plants convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis; however, most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers from the University of Illinois and U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service report in the journal Sci

14h

New Horizons successfully explores Ultima ThuleNASA New Horizons UT
NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past Ultima Thule in the early hours of New Year's Day, ushering in the era of exploration from the enigmatic Kuiper Belt, a region of primordial objects that holds keys to understanding the origins of the solar system.

7h

Trods EU-forbud vil Danmark bruge bidræber-pesticid på sukkerroer
Den danske sukkerbranche har fået Miljøstyrelsens tilladelse til at fortsætte med at bejdse frø til sukkerroer med et af de neonikotinoider, som skader bier.

7h

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs: New hope for tackling antibiotic resistance
Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA. Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research. The World Health Orga

7h

Japan whale hunting: Commercial whaling to restart in July
One conservation group warns that the move shows "a troubling disregard for international rule".

17h

Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties
Lightning was the main electromagnetic presence in the Earth's atmosphere long before the invention of electricity. There are some 2,000 thunderstorms active at any given time, so humans and other organisms have been bathed in extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for billions of years.

2h

Beyond the black hole singularity
Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using "loop quantum gravity"—a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. Loop quantum gravity, originated at Penn State and subsequently developed by a large number of scientists worldwide, is opening up a new paradigm in mo

6h

‘For 30 years I’ve been obsessed by why children get leukaemia. Now we have an answer’
Newly knighted cancer scientist Mel Greaves explains why a cocktail of microbes could give protection against disease Mel Greaves has a simple goal in life. He is trying to create a yoghurt-like drink that would stop children from developing leukaemia. The idea might seem eccentric; cancers are not usually defeated so simply. However, Professor Greaves is confident and, given his experience in th

16h

‘For 30 years I’ve been obsessed by why children get leukaemia. Now we have an answer’
Newly knighted cancer scientist Mel Greaves explains why a cocktail of microbes could give protection against disease Mel Greaves has a simple goal in life. He is trying to create a yoghurt-like drink that would stop children from developing leukaemia. The idea might seem eccentric; cancers are not usually defeated so simply. However, Professor Greaves is confident and, given his experience in th

16h

Image of the Day: Embryo in Blue
A bright blue stain highlights the sensory nerves of a developing mouse embryo.

12h

People with extreme political views have trouble thinking about their own thinking
Science Your super liberal and super conservative relatives might all have one thing in common. Radical political views of all sorts seem to shape our lives to an almost unprecedented extent. But what attracts people to the fringes?

14h

Using sound to independently levitate a range of objects is achieved for the first time
Asier Marzo-Pérez, researcher at the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA), and Bruce Drinkwater, lecturer at the University of Bristol (United Kingdom), have for the first time achieved the acoustic levitation of a whole range of objects independently. This technology could be used to manipulate small particles inside the human body without any type of incision, and also to display information

19h

The Networks Blew the Call
O n Tuesday night , Donald Trump is planning to give an address on immigration, the southern border, and the government shutdown that has arisen from his insistence that any budget measure must include money for “the wall.” When plans for the speech were announced on Monday evening, I opined on Twitter that it would be better for the major broadcasts not to carry the speech. There would have been

3h

The Networks Blew the Call
O n Tuesday night , Donald Trump is planning to give an address on immigration, the southern border, and the government shutdown that has arisen from his insistence that any budget measure must include money for “the wall.” When plans for the speech were announced on Monday evening, I opined on Twitter that it would be better for the major broadcasts not to carry the speech. There would have been

3h

Mars Express beams back images of ice-filled Korolev crater
Trapped layer of cold air keeps water frozen in 50-mile-wide impact crater The stunning Korolev crater in the northern lowlands of Mars is filled with ice all year round owing to a trapped layer of cold Martian air that keeps the water frozen. The 50-mile-wide crater contains 530 cubic miles of water ice, as much as Great Bear Lake in northern Canada, and in the centre of the crater the ice is mo

12h

Why Is Trump Spouting Russian Propaganda?
It was only one moment in a 90-minute stream of madness. President Donald Trump convened a Cabinet meeting, at which he invited all its members to praise him for his stance on the border wall and the government shutdown. There’s always a lively competition to see which member of the Cabinet can grovel most abjectly. The newcomer Matthew Whitaker may be only the acting attorney general, but despit

18h

China lands probe on far side of moon in world first
A Chinese lunar rover landed on the far side of the moon on Thursday, in a global first that boosts Beijing's ambitions to become a space superpower.

1d

Dit indsamlede plastaffald bliver snart til diesel på fabrik i Skive
Den norske virksomhed Quantafuel vil omdanne 60 ton plastaffald om dagen til brændstof og andre produkter på dansk fabrik. Der er rejsegilde i næste måned.

7h

Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high blood pressure
Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high (140 mm Hg) blood pressure, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, in what is thought to be the first study of its kind, and published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

13h

Ice-filled Martian crater is a permanent winter wonderland
The European Space Agency's Mars Express probe captured this striking view of ice-filled Korolev Crater, near the north pole of the Red Planet

10h

Virkelighedstjek: Hvordan får vi 1 million elbiler på vejene i 2030?
Hvad snakker politikerne om, når de gerne vil have 1 mio. elbiler på vejene i 2030? Er det realistisk, og hvad skal der til? Læs, hvad eksperterne mener.

3h

Bad moods might be a sign of health trouble
Negative mood—such as sadness and anger—is associated with higher levels of inflammation and may be a signal of poor health, report researchers. The investigators found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. This extends prior research showing that clinical depression and hostility are associated with higher inflamma

17h

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods
Researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing.

11h

In 1983, Isaac Asimov predicted the world of 2019. Here's what he got right (and wrong).
In 1983, the Toronto Star asked science fiction writer Isaac Asimov to predict what the world would be like in 2019. His predictions about computerization were mostly accurate, though some of his forecasts about education and space utilization were overly optimistic. Asimov's predictions highlight just how difficult it is to predict the future of technology. None Isaac Asimov was one the world's

5h

In 1983, Isaac Asimov predicted the world of 2019. Here's what he got right (and wrong).
In 1983, the Toronto Star asked science fiction writer Isaac Asimov to predict what the world would be like in 2019. His predictions about computerization were mostly accurate, though some of his forecasts about education and space utilization were overly optimistic. Asimov's predictions highlight just how difficult it is to predict the future of technology. None Isaac Asimov was one the world's

5h

New Horizons spacecraft homing in on Kuiper Belt targetNASA New Horizons UT
Only hours from completing a historic flyby of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69, nicknamed Ultima Thule, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is on course and ready to gather scientific data on the small object's geology, composition, atmosphere and more. Closest approach takes place in the early morning hours of New Year's Day — 12:33 a.m. EST — marking the event as the most distant exploration of worlds

11h

‘New Chapter’ in Space Exploration as China Reaches Far Side of the Moon
It was China’s second moon landing, and the first spacecraft to touch down on the side of the moon that always faces away from Earth.

1d

How Trump's Wall Would Alter Our Biological Identity Forever
It would destroy an extraordinary web of biodiversity that evolved over millions of years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Female penguins are getting stranded along the South American coast
Every year, thousands of Magellanic penguins are stranded along the South American coast–from northern Argentina to southern Brazil — 1,000 kilometers away from their breeding ground in northern Patagonia. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 7 have new evidence to explain the observation that the stranded birds are most often female: female penguins venture farther north than ma

8h

Trump Has Defeated Himself
Well, that was the shortest, most easily resolved national emergency in U.S. history. Twelve hours ago, the president was preparing to set aside the regular process of law. By 9 p.m. eastern time? Not so much. Perhaps somebody pointed out that 15-year civil-engineering projects do not look very convincingly like emergency measures. “My house is burning! Time to begin the process of calling for de

14h

Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy
The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team led by Dongsheng Duan, PhD, at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments u

21h

Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible
Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km.

11h

Singapore researchers develop gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials
A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death.

20h

'We have a healthy spacecraft': NASA succeeds in historic flyby of faraway worldNASA New Horizons UT
NASA rang in the New Year on Tuesday with a historic flyby of the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever explored by humankind—a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule—in the hopes of learning more about how planets took shape.

7h

NASA's New Horizons mission reveals entirely new kind of world
Scientists from NASA's New Horizons mission released the first detailed images of the most distant object ever explored — the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule. Its remarkable appearance, unlike anything we've seen before, illuminates the processes that built the planets four and a half billion years ago.

1d

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3-D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
UNSW researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) have shown for the first time that they can build atomic precision qubits in a 3-D device—another major step towards a universal quantum computer.

9h

Persistence of false paradigms in low-power sciences [Social Sciences]
We develop a model describing how false paradigms may persist, hindering scientific progress. The model features two paradigms, one describing reality better than the other. Tenured scientists display homophily: They favor tenure candidates who adhere to their paradigm. As in statistics, power is the probability (absent any bias) of denying…

21h

There was no relationship between obesity and poverty — until high-fructose corn syrup
Before 1990, there was no noticeable correlation between obesity and poverty. Within a quarter-century, impoverished regions showed a massive uptick in obesity and type 1 diabetes. Researchers chart the relationship between "food deserts" along with obesity levels. None In 1841, Orlando Jones patented alkali starch extraction , a process that separated corn starch from kernels in what is known as

10h

Trump EPA Says Mercury Limits On Coal Plants Too Costly, Not 'Necessary'
The EPA says it will keep limits on toxic mercury emissions from coal plants but now deems them not cost-effective. Environmental groups worry the move could hinder future regulations. (Image credit: Matt Brown/AP)

3h

Physicists uncover new competing state of matter in superconducting material
A team of experimentalists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and theoreticians at University of Alabama Birmingham discovered a remarkably long-lived new state of matter in an iron pnictide superconductor, which reveals a laser-induced formation of collective behaviors that compete with superconductivity.

1d

Chinese rover powers up devices in pioneering moon mission
All systems are go as a Chinese spacecraft and rover power up their observation equipment after making a first-ever landing on the far side of the moon, the Chinese National Space Administration said.

4h

Mars: Pictures reveal 'winter wonderland' on the red planet
Earth is not the only planet with icy scenes this festive season, the European Space Agency says.

9h

Quantum Communication Can Travel Faster—It's Not Just a Myth
A new experiment showed for the first time that quantum messages can indeed be speedier than what's seen in regular computing.

5h

World's first no-kill eggs go on sale in Berlin
Scientists can now quickly determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, potentially ending the need to cull billions of male chicks worldwide The world’s first ever no-kill eggs are now on sale in Berlin after German scientists found an easy way to determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, in a breakthrough that could put an end to the annual live shredding of billions of male chicks worldwi

1d

Året hvor vi vinkede farvel til rent, urenset grundvand
PLUS. I årtier har det været en fast del af den danske selvforståelse, at vi kan pumpe vand op fra undergrunden og sende det direkte ud i vandhanerne. Men efter flere fund af gamle pesticidrester lakker denne praksis mod enden.

7h

Don’t Go Out on New Year’s Eve
If you have ever turned on your television on New Year’s Eve and felt even a little bit jealous of the partyers gathered in Times Square to watch the ball drop, I want you to remember one thing: A lot of those people are wearing diapers . It has been widely reported that there is nowhere for New Year’s Eve revelers to use the bathroom in Times Square— no porta-potties , and don’t even think about

17h

Center for Cybersikkerhed vil overvåge virksomheders datatrafik uden at spørge om lov
Et nyt lovforslag vil give Center for Cybersikkerhed mulighed for at placere sikkerhedssoftware i samfundsvigtige virksomheders servere og interne netværk ved tvang.

8h

Evidence of a fearsome shark taking down a pterosaur in mid-flight
It was a prehistoric clash of the ages that didn't end pretty when a monster in the sky clashed with a beast of the deep.

21h

NASA: Icy object past Pluto looks like reddish snowman
A NASA spacecraft 4 billion miles from Earth yielded its first close-up pictures Wednesday of the most distant celestial object ever explored, depicting what looks like a reddish snowman.

1d

Study shows the Sahara swung between lush and desert conditions every 20,000 years, in sync with monsoon activity
The Sahara desert is one of the harshest, most inhospitable places on the planet, covering much of North Africa in some 3.6 million square miles of rock and windswept dunes. But it wasn't always so desolate and parched. Primitive rock paintings and fossils excavated from the region suggest that the Sahara was once a relatively verdant oasis, where human settlements and a diversity of plants and an

1d

Extraordinary treefrog discovered in the Andes of Ecuador
A new treefrog species was discovered during a two-week expedition to a remote tabletop mountain at Cordillera del Cóndor, a largely unexplored range in the eastern Andes.

1d

The Neuroscience of Creativity: A Q & A with Anna Abraham
The latest state of the field of the neuroscience of creativity. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

6h

Electric nanoparticles can target and kill cancer cells by zapping them
Particles that produce electrical signals when bombarded with ultrasound could be a way to direct a cell-killing treatment directly to tumors.

4h

Electric nanoparticles can target and kill cancer cells by zapping them
Particles that produce electrical signals when bombarded with ultrasound could be a way to direct a cell-killing treatment directly to tumors.

4h

Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets
A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets.

3h

Holiday asteroid imaged with NASA radar
The December 2018 close approach by the large, near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220 has provided astronomers an outstanding opportunity to obtain detailed radar images of the surface and shape of the object and to improve the understanding of its orbit.

4h

Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon
A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water—resources that are scarce in much of the world. The polymer is derived from microorganisms that feed on seaweed. It is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste.

18h

Australia swelters in record-breaking heatwave
Australia's vast continent is sizzling through extreme heatwave conditions this week, with temperatures reaching record highs and emergency services on high alert for bushfires.

13h

Galapagosøerne forbyder fyrværkeri for at beskytte dyrelivet
Det vil fremover ikke være lovligt at importere, sælge, distribuere eller bruge fyrværkeri på Galapagosøerne.

13h

Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension
Researchers have devised a new model for the universe — one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

1d

Galapagosøerne forbyder fyrværkeri for at beskytte dyrelivet
Det vil fremover ikke være lovligt at importere, sælge, distribuere eller bruge fyrværkeri på Galapagosøerne.

13h

Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension
Researchers have devised a new model for the universe — one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

1d

A Trump County Confronts the Administration Amid a Rash of Child Cancers
Parents in Indiana are demanding the clean-up of a toxic site and questioning environmental rollbacks that could prevent future chemical disasters like the one they face.

1d

To reproduce, new rice plant clones itself
Plant biologists have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, which plant breeders and geneticists have long sought, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant, or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world’s farmers. Since the 1920s, many crops have been grown from hybrid seeds created by crossing two varieti

1d

Drinkable cocktail stymies Alzheimer’s disease at its start
Researchers have identified a drinkable cocktail of designer molecules that interferes with a crucial first step of Alzheimer’s disease and even restores memories in mice. The binding of amyloid beta peptides to prion proteins triggers a cascade of devastating events in the progression of Alzheimer’s—accumulation of plaques, a destructive immune system response, and synapse damage. “We wanted to

1d

Chinese rover powers up devices in pioneering moon mission
All systems are go as a Chinese spacecraft and rover power up their observation equipment after making a first-ever landing on the far side of the moon, the Chinese National Space Administration said.

1d

The iconic periodic table could have looked very different
Science On its 150th anniversary, a chemist looks back at the various tables we almost ended up with. The periodic table didn’t actually start with Mendeleev. Many had tinkered with arranging the elements.

12h

Bees can count with small number of nerve cells in their brains, research suggests
Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers.

2h

Jerry Brown’s Greatest Legacy Is Proving California Is Governable
LOS ANGELES—When Jerry Brown first took the oath as governor of California on January 6, 1975, he succeeded Ronald Reagan, who was still six years away from the White House. Gerald Ford was president, Paul VI was pope, the Watergate conspirators John Mitchell, H. R. Haldeman, and John Ehrlichman had just been convicted, the Khmer Rouge was beginning its bloody rise to power in Cambodia, the Dow J

1d

Indonesian tsunami volcano lost two-thirds of its height
The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week lost more than two-thirds of its height following the eruption which triggered the killer waves.

13h

Indonesian tsunami volcano lost two-thirds of its height
The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week lost more than two-thirds of its height following the eruption which triggered the killer waves.

13h

Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit—meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously. The demonstration, which used a new kind of graphene-based qubit, represents a critical step forward for practical quantum computing, the researchers say.

1d

NASA spaceship zooms toward farthest world ever photographedNASA New Horizons UT
A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.

1d

Diversity partitioning in Phanerozoic benthic marine communities [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Biotic interactions such as competition, predation, and niche construction are fundamental drivers of biodiversity at the local scale, yet their long-term effect during earth history remains controversial. To test their role and explore potential limits to biodiversity, we determine within-habitat (alpha), between-habitat (beta), and overall (gamma) diversity of benthic marine…

1d

Can artificial intelligence tell a teapot from a golf ball?
How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, according to a team of cognitive psychologists.

5h

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
Scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips — with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer.

7h

AI App Identifies Rare Genetic Disorders from Photos of Patients' Faces
Deep-learning algorithms could help doctors narrow in on the causes of certain medical conditions, say researchers.

4h

'Pause' in global warming was never real, new research proves
Claims of a 'pause' in observed global temperature warming are comprehensively disproved in a pair of new studies published today.

13h

James Mattis’s Final Protest Against the President
Secretary of Defense James Mattis is resigning over conflicts with President Trump over American policy overseas—the highest profile official to quit the administration over disagreements of principle with the president. In a resignation letter , Mattis laid out a series of differences with Trump, who he said deserved to have a secretary of defense who was aligned with him. Mattis cited the impor

49min

Thermal energy storage: Material absorbs heat as it melts and releases it as it solidifies
MIT researchers have demonstrated a new way to store unused heat from car engines, industrial machinery, and even sunshine until it's needed. Central to their system is what the researchers refer to as a "phase-change" material that absorbs a large amount of heat as it melts and releases it as it resolidifies.

11h

New source of very high energy gamma-ray emission detected in the neighborhood of the supernova remnant G24.7+0.6
Using MAGIC telescopes and NASA's Fermi spacecraft, an international team of astronomers has discovered a new source of very high energy gamma-ray emission around the supernova remnant (SNR) G24.7+0.6. The detection of the new source, designated MAGIC J1835–069, is detailed in a paper published December 12 on the arXiv pre-print server.

3h

NASA spaceship closes in on distant world
NASA's unmanned New Horizons spacecraft is closing in on its historic New Year's flyby target, the most distant world ever studied, a frozen relic of the solar system some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.

3h

Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit—meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously. The demonstration, which used a new kind of graphene-based qubit, represents a critical step forward for practical quantum computing, the researchers say.

14h

NASA spaceship zooms toward farthest world ever photographed
A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.

18h

Extraordinary treefrog discovered in the Andes of Ecuador
A dazzling new species of treefrog was discovered at a remote tabletop mountain in the Ecuadorian Andes. The new species has an extraordinary characteristic, the presence of claw-like appendages at the base of the thumbs. The new species is described in the open-access journal ZooKeys by a team of scientists from Catholic University of Ecuador.

1d

Short men are indirectly aggressive toward taller men, study finds
A recent study examined the Napoleon complex through economic games. The results showed that shorter men are more likely than taller men to keep a disproportionate amount of resources for themselves, but only when the other player can't retaliate. The study suggests that the Napoleon complex is most likely to manifest in situations where the shorter man has all the power. None In the early 19th c

1d

Wireless 'pacemaker for the brain' could offer new treatment for neurological disorders
A new neurostimulator can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's.

2d

That Viral Video of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Dancing Is a Meta-Meme
The only reason you can watch it now is because of a copyright battle that was settled five years ago.

7h

TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered a third small planet outside our solar system, scientists announced this week at the annual American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

2h

Scientists reveal for first time the exact process by which chaotic systems synchronize
Synchronization, in which two different systems oscillate in an identical way, underlies numerous collective phenomena observed in nature, providing an example for emergent behaviors ranging from the acoustic unison of cricket choruses to the behavior of the human brain.

4h

The Suicide of a Great Democracy
We had made plans to go to Washington weeks ago, and there was no way to change the trip. The train was almost empty when it pulled into Union Station on Friday night. The next morning, we went out into the dead heart of the city. The government shutdown was in its third week. Nearly all the museums that would have interested the kids were closed, and so were the ones that would have bored them.

8h

The Suicide of a Great Democracy
We had made plans to go to Washington weeks ago, and there was no way to change the trip. The train was almost empty when it pulled into Union Station on Friday night. The next morning, we went out into the dead heart of the city. The government shutdown was in its third week. Nearly all the museums that would have interested the kids were closed, and so were the ones that would have bored them.

8h

Trump’s Oval Office Address Was Classic Stephen Miller
Almost from the moment the camera blinked on in the Oval Office, it was clear that President Donald Trump was delivering a Stephen Miller special. The 33-year-old White House speechwriter has a hand in virtually everything the president reads from a teleprompter. But as one of the most strident immigration hawks in the West Wing, Miller has been especially influential over the past two years in s

5h

Brain plasticity restored in adult mice through targeting specific nerve cell connections
Research in mice finds a new molecular mechanism that is essential for maturation of brain function and may be used to restore plasticity in aged brains. Unlike previous research that broadly manipulated brain plasticity and affected the entire brain, this work targets for the first time a specific molecule acting on a single type of neuronal connection to modulate brain function. The findings may

19h

Nu skal vi måle efter 10 gange så mange pesticidrester i grundvandet
Dagens målinger af kemikalier i grundvandet er utilstrækkelige. Ny liste indeholder 363 stoffer, vi skal have overblik over.

7h

Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough
Surfers spend much of their time watching long waves come onto the shoreline as they attempt to catch one right as it begins to curve and break.

8h

The more pets you meet as a baby, the lower your risk of allergies
Children that are exposed to multiple cats and dogs in their first year of life go on to have lower rates of asthma, hay fever and eczema later in life

16h

Lab study adds credence to life arriving on Earth from asteroids theory
A team of researchers at NASA's Ames Research Center has found some evidence that adds credence to the theory that the basic ingredients for life came to Earth from asteroids. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes the experiments they carried out, what they found, and why they believe their work offers evidence of life arriving from elsewhere.

20h

The Kurds: Betrayed Again by Washington
The warning signs were there all along, yet President Donald Trump’s brusque decision to pull U.S. forces out of northeast Syria nevertheless stunned Syria’s Kurds. Overnight, their dream of establishing an autonomous Kurdish region has been dashed, and they must now choose between a return to the mountains in a bid for survival, or staying put, awaiting a resurgent Assad regime and what it has i

22h

Tree-ring analysis explains physiology behind drought intolerance
Tree rings tell the story of what's happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.

41min

Collecting clean water from air, inspired by desert life
Humans can get by in the most basic of shelters, can scratch together a meal from the most humble of ingredients. But we can't survive without clean water. And in places where water is scarce—the world's deserts, for example—getting water to people requires feats of engineering and irrigation that can be cumbersome and expensive.

21h

NASA rings in New Year with historic flyby of faraway worldNASA New Horizons UT
NASA rang in the New Year on Tuesday with a historic flyby of the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever explored by humankind—a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule—in the hopes of learning more about how planets took shape.

14h

Patients now living a median 6.8 years after stage IV ALK+ lung cancer diagnosis
Stage IV ALK+ lung cancer patients treated at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital between 2009 and 2017 had median overall survival of 6.8 years.

1d

Don’t Go Out on New Year’s Eve
If you have ever turned on your television on New Year’s Eve and felt even a little bit jealous of the partyers gathered in Times Square to watch the ball drop, I want you to remember one thing: A lot of those people are wearing diapers . It has been widely reported that there is nowhere for New Year’s Eve revelers to use the bathroom in Times Square— no porta-potties , and don’t even think about

1d

Chang'e 4 landing: China probe makes historic touchdown on far side of the moon
Lander and rover will explore the South Pole-Aitken basin for the first time A Chinese spacecraft has become the first ever to land on the far side of the moon, according to state-run media, in a giant leap for human space exploration. The China National Space Administration (CNSA) landed the robotic probe Chang’e 4 in the unexplored South Pole-Aitken basin, the largest, oldest, deepest, crater o

1d

New nanosatellite system captures better imagery at lower cost
Ben-Gurion University researchers have developed a new satellite imaging system that could revolutionize the economics and imagery available from space-based cameras and even earth-based telescopes.

3h

Dark matter on the move
Scientists have found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies. The findings provide the first observational evidence for the effect known as 'dark matter heating', and give new clues as to what makes up dark matter. The research is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

18h

1d

Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA
Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells.

4h

The Exceptions to the Rulers
Conservatives’ obsession with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may seem ridiculous. Ever since the 29-year-old former bartender wrested the Democratic primary nomination from the 10-term incumbent Joe Crowley, right-wing media has fixated on the unapologetically left-wing representative. From her clothes to her nickname to her high school to her childhood home , conservatives seem particularly intent on

1h

Exposure to cannabis alters the genetic profile of sperm
New research suggests men in their child-bearing years should consider how THC could impact their sperm and possibly the children they conceive during periods when they've been using the drug. Much like previous research that has shown tobacco smoke, pesticides, flame retardants and even obesity can alter sperm, the new research shows THC also affects epigenetics, triggering structural and regulat

21h

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound
Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step.

9h

You Can't Serve Both Trump and America
The story is told of Jim Mattis, when he was the commanding general at Quantico, relieving a young lance corporal on Christmas. The rest of that wintry day, those entering the front gate of the Marine base were startled to see that the sentry was a general, checking passes and waving cars through so that a young man could spend the holiday with his family. It is the kind of behavior animated by s

22h

U-M howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation
A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species.

1d

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs—new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance
Researchers analysing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.

59min

It's official: NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has made historyNASA New Horizons UT
Space Visiting the most distant object ever. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, which visited Pluto back in 2015, has successfully completed a flyby of 2014 MU69.

9h

China just landed the first spacecraft on the moon's farside
China’s Chang’e-4 lander and rover just became the first spacecraft to land on the farside of the moon.

17h

Trump Is Grinding the System to a Halt
The nation’s roughly 15,000 air-traffic controllers don’t do exactly what some people might imagine—namely, keep airplanes from completely losing their way or falling out of the sky. As William Langewiesche memorably described in The Atlantic back in 1997 in ”Slam and Jam,” planes and flight crews are perfectly capable of taking off and landing on their own (as smaller planes do at the vast major

5h

Three new open clusters discovered in the Milky Way
Using data from ESA's Gaia satellite, Brazilian astronomers have detected three new open clusters in the Milky Way. The clusters, designated UFMG 1, UFMG 2 and UFMG 3, were found in the Sagittarius arm of the galaxy. The discovery is reported in a paper published December 27 on the arXiv.org pre-print server.

11h

How the periodic table went from a sketch to an enduring masterpiece
150 years ago, Russian chemist Dmitrii Mendeleev created the periodic table of the elements, revolutionizing chemistry.

2h

How the periodic table went from a sketch to an enduring masterpiece
150 years ago, Russian chemist Dmitrii Mendeleev created the periodic table of the elements, revolutionizing chemistry.

2h

Citizen scientists find new world with NASA telescope
Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, citizen scientists have discovered a planet roughly twice the size of Earth located within its star's habitable zone, the range of orbital distances where liquid water may exist on the planet's surface. The new world, known as K2-288Bb, could be rocky or could be a gas-rich planet similar to Neptune. Its size is rare among exoplanets—planets beyond ou

3h

Rabbit gene helps houseplant detoxify indoor air
We like to keep the air in our homes as clean as possible, and sometimes we use HEPA air filters to keep offending allergens and dust particles at bay.

38min

New houseplant can clean your home's air
Researchers have genetically modified a common houseplant to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it.

19h

Mount Etna eruption causes airspace closure
The Mount Etna volcano erupted on Monday, spewing ash as several minor earthquakes hit the region, and prompting a partial closure of the Sicilian airspace around the mountain.

18h

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health
A growing body of research shows keeping a log of what you are thankful for can lower stress, help you sleep better, and may even reduce the risk of heart disease. But it's not for everyone. (Image credit: Kristen Uroda for NPR)

1d

Women — not men — are more willing to punish 'sexually-accessible' women, researchers find
It's commonly thought that the suppression of female sexuality is perpetuated by either men or women. In a new study, researchers used economics games to observe how both genders treat sexually-available women. The results suggests that both sexes punish female promiscuity, though for different reasons and different levels of intensity. None Researchers from the University of Warwick recently sou

9h

2019 Preview: Experimental vaccine could let coeliacs eat gluten
A vaccine that teaches a person's immune system to see gluten as harmless could enable some people with coeliac disease to eat bread and pasta made from wheat

9h

2019 Preview: Experimental vaccine could let coeliacs eat gluten
A vaccine that teaches a person's immune system to see gluten as harmless could enable some people with coeliac disease to eat bread and pasta made from wheat

9h

Quantum chemistry on quantum computers
Quantum computing and quantum information processing technology have attracted attention in recently emerging fields. Among many important and fundamental issues in science, solving the Schroedinger equation (SE) of atoms and molecules is one of the ultimate goals in chemistry, physics and their related fields. SE is the first principle of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, whose solutions, terme

1d

China Moon mission lands Chang'e-4 spacecraft on far sideChina Chang e 4 Moon
The robotic space mission is the first landing on the side of the Moon that never faces Earth.

1d

Buzz grows on 'flying cars' ahead of major tech show
Will flying cars take off at the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show?

2h

There Are Plants and Animals on the Moon Now (Because of China)
China's Chang'e-4 lander contains a living experiment that could lay the groundwork for agriculture at its future lunar base.

13h

Babies’ Genomes Identify Risks Overlooked by Newborn Screens
A trial called BabySeq, in which researchers performed genomic sequencing on 159 newborns, identified children susceptible to diseases that regular screening doesn’t look for.

17h

Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere, study finds
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought.

21h

China’s Chang’e 4 makes historic first landing on the moon’s far side
A lander and rover have touched down on the side of the moon that never faces Earth. The Chang’e 4 mission marks the first time anyone has explored the far side

23h

New Caledonian crows found able to infer weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind
A team of researchers with members affiliated with the University of Auckland, the University of Cambridge, Bertha von Suttner University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has found evidence that suggests New Caledonian crows can infer the weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the grou

4h

Optoacoustic microscopy at multiple discrete frequencies
Optoacoustic imaging powered by short bursts of continuous wave (CW) lasers can stimulate the emission of ultrasound waves inside an animal or in human subjects. The method can noninvasively capture blood flow and produce 3-D images of cellular microarchitecture. Writing in Light: Science & Applications, Stephan Kellnberger and colleagues at the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging, now rep

4h

The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps
Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species described in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ – the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences by Italian paleontologists, is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (one ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya).

1h

World's smallest tic-tac-toe game board made with DNA
Researchers have developed new dynamic DNA origami technology.

4h

The EU just finalized an agreement to ban tons of single-use plastics
Environment What next? In Brussels on Wednesday, EU leaders signed a provisional agreement to ban 10 major single-use plastic products and mandate cleanup of other items.

10h

Astronauts land from ISS stint marred by air leak, rocket failure
Three astronauts landed back on Earth on Thursday after a troubled stint on the ISS marred by an air leak and the failure of a rocket set to bring new crew members.

2h

Study shows women lower their voice when competing for a man
A team of researchers with members from the U.K., Poland and Germany has found that women tend to lower their voices when competing sexually for a man. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study involving participants in a speed-dating event and what they found.

21h

Neurons made from stem cells can suppress seizures
Researchers have discovered that transplanting stem-cell-derived neurons into the brain suppressed seizures in an animal model. About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the dr

12h

2019 Preview: People will receive transfusions of artificial blood
Volunteers will be injected with red blood cells grown from stem cells in the lab. If it works it could mean blood donors are no longer required

1d

50 Years Ago, *Earthrise* Gave Us the View of a Lifetime
Astronauts on NASA's Apollo 8 mission snapped the first photos of Earth from space, forever changing how we see our place in the universe.

1d

Danmark kræver bakterie-dræbende program til opvaskemaskiner
Alle opvaskemaskiner skal kunne varmes op til 70 grader i minimum ti minutter for at sikre, at alle resistente bakterier bliver slået ihjel, mener både Statens Serum Institut og regeringen.

3h

Phys.org
Kattegatbro uden tog: Hvad med en selvkørende superbus eller en monorail?
Rambøll har for Transportministeriet udarbejdet et idékatalog med syv forslag til, hvordan der kan komme kollektiv transport på Kattegatbroen, selv hvis den ikke får plads til tog. Det mest fantasifulde er busser, der kobler sig sammen på broen.

2h

Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing
Spin-based quantum computers have the potential to tackle difficult mathematical problems that cannot be solved using ordinary computers, but many problems remain in making these machines scalable. Now, an international group of researchers led by the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two differ

10h

Chilling discovery: ice house found under London street
Cavernous 18th-century store reveals link to lost trade in ice blocks from Norwegian fjord For the well to-do residents of Georgian London, serving chilled drinks at a festive party was a more complicated process than today. In the absence of electricity to make ice cubes and keep them frozen, they had to source their ice from elsewhere. For the most discerning hosts, that meant using blocks of p

10h

Tysk virksomhed vil erstatte bilmotorens tændrør med mikrobølger
Ved at bruge mikrobølgeantænding i stedet for tændrør kan både brændstofforbrug og udledninger fra forbrændingsmotoren reduceres, mener et tysk virksomhed. Muligheden for integration i eksisterende motorer har fanget bilindustriens interesse.

13h

Tysk virksomhed vil erstatte bilmotorens tændrør med mikrobølger
Ved at bruge mikrobølgeantænding i stedet for tændrør kan både brændstofforbrug og udledninger fra forbrændingsmotoren reduceres, mener et tysk virksomhed. Muligheden for integration i eksisterende motorer har fanget bilindustriens interesse.

13h

New Horizons: Nasa probe survives flyby of Ultima Thule
The New Horizons spacecraft confirms its "healthy" status after a historic encounter with an icy world.

10h

Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion
A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, a researcher says.

1d

Fewer monarch butterflies are reaching their overwintering destination
The monarch butterfly is currently experiencing dire problems with its migration in eastern North America. Fewer and fewer monarchs are successfully reaching their overwintering destinations, and scientists aren't sure why. New research published in De Gruyter's Open Access journal Animal Migration, aims to help with this effort.

1d

The Path to Give California 12 Senators, and Vermont Just One
In 1995, Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan declared , “Sometime in the next century the United States is going to have to address the question of apportionment in the Senate.” Perhaps that time has come. Today the voting power of a citizen in Wyoming, the smallest state in terms of population, is about 67 times that of a citizen in the largest state of California, and the disparities among the stat

1d

Jay Inslee Is Betting He Can Win the Presidency on Climate Change
OLYMPIA, Wash.—What if a meteor were hurtling toward the Earth, about to kill millions and reshape life on the planet as we know it? And what if the president, instead of doing anything to help, made it worse in just about every way, and called it a hoax (and any solutions a scam) instead of the very real, very clear disaster taking shape? And what if all the Democrats running to beat him in the

1d

Juno mission captures images of volcanic plumes on Jupiter's moon Io
A team of space scientists has captured new images of a volcanic plume on Jupiter's moon Io during the Juno mission's 17th flyby of the gas giant. On Dec. 21, during winter solstice, four of Juno's cameras captured images of the Jovian moon Io, the most volcanic body in our solar system. JunoCam, the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU), the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) and the Ultraviolet Imagi

2d

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth 40%
Most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers reportthat crops engineered with a photorespiratory shortcut are 40 percent more productive in real-world agronomic conditions.

13h

14h

GRAFIK: Sådan burde lastbilstrailer være fastgjort til ulykkestog
En særlig låseanordning sikrer lastbilstrailere fra at blive blæst af godsvogne. Alligevel gik det galt den 2. januar, da en trailer kolliderede med et IC4-tog

18h

The Dinosaur Who Went out to Sea
The skeleton of a new carnivorous dinosaur bears damage caused by seagoing invertebrates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

LG flexes roll-up TV as screens start to bendLG CES Signature OLED TV R
LG on Monday unveiled a roll-up television screen as a trend of bendable displays began taking shape at a consumer electronics extravaganza in Las Vegas.

4h

India scientists dismiss Einstein theories
Speakers at a major conference have been criticised for making irrational claims based on Hindu mythology.

19h

A second repeating fast radio burst has been tracked to a distant galaxy
Astronomers have spotted a second repeating fast radio burst, and it looks a lot like the first.

36min

Two to Tango: Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers
Last night an Associated Press tweet claimed that, in placing blame for the government shutdown, "it takes two to tango." Twitter thought otherwise.

2h

Research explains public resistance to vaccination
Why is it so challenging to increase the number of people who get vaccinated? How does popular resistance to vaccination remain strong even as preventable diseases make a comeback?

13h

Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift
The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist.

3h

A new study proves parachutes are useless
Scientists working at medical schools across the United States discovered that parachutes don't lower the death rate of people jumping out of airplanes. The study flies in the face of decades of anecdotal evidence. The findings should be carefully applied, due to "minor caveats" with the experimental structure. There is an old joke that says "If your parachute doesn't deploy, don't worry: you hav

15h

Scientists create genetically-modified houseplant that removes carcinogens from air
Houseplants are rumored to be natural air purifiers, but most research suggests their benefits are only marginal. Genetically-modified plants might change that because they're able to produce special proteins that absorb and break down particular compounds. The results of the recent research show promise for future applications of the technique. None A NASA experiment, in 1989, famously showed th

2h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel
Scientists at Stanford University have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research, published December 20 in the journal Joule, could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

7h

The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps
Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (1 ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya).

10h

Facebook’s Privacy Message Undermined by the Times—Again
Facebook has spent much of 2018 apologizing to people. A recent *New York Times* investigation calls all those apologies into question.

13h

You can now drag and drop whole countries to compare their size
Our world maps lie to us: North America and Europe aren't really that big and Africa really is much bigger. It's all the fault of Mercator: even if the man himself wasn't necessarily Eurocentric, his projection is. This interactive map tool reveals countries' true sizes without having to resort to the Peters projection. Is Texas really bigger than Poland? Does Russia stretch further east to west

14h

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?
Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some U.S. East Coast regions compared to others. A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals why.

16h

They Shall Not Grow Old Is a Stunning World War I Documentary
What immediately stands out in Peter Jackson’s documentary They Shall Not Grow Old is the faces of its subjects. A painstaking restoration of century-old video footage from the First World War, the film is a complex project with a simple goal: to try to convey what it was like to live and fight on the Western Front from 1914 to 1918. But the technology Jackson deploys is so advanced that the docu

17h

High levels of carcinogenic chemical found in everyday consumer products
High levels of the carcinogenic chemical cadmium can still be found in everyday household products like second-hand plastic toys, drinking glasses, alcoholic beverage bottles, ceramics and artists' paints, according to new research by the University of Plymouth.

21h

Incoming Democrat Wants to Make Climate a 2020 Election Issue
California Representative-elect, Mike Levin, thinks climate can rally voters in the next presidential race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Out There: Apollo 8’s Earthrise: The Shot Seen Round the World
Half a century ago today, a photograph from the moon helped humans rediscover Earth.

8h

Bees can count with just four nerve cells in their brains
Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London.

9h

12h

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression
Research suggests the winter blues are triggered by specialized light-sensing cells in the retina that communicate directly with brain areas involved in mood. (Image credit: Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source)

14h

Naturopaths cannot call themselves “Medically Trained” in New Brunswick
A judge in the Canadian province of New Brunswick has ruled that alternative-to-medicine practitioners knows as naturopaths cannot claim that they are "medically trained" or that they offer "family practice".

4h

Galapagos bans fireworks to protect unique wildlife
Fireworks have been banned on the Galapagos Islands to protect the archipelago's unique fauna, the local government said on Friday.

1h

Nancy Grace Roman, 'Mother Of Hubble' Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93
Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, its first chief of astronomy and she played an instrumental role in making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality. She died on Dec. 25. (Image credit: Courtesy of NASA)

12h

Get live updates on New Horizons’ flyby of a distant Kuiper Belt object
The New Horizons spacecraft is ready for the most distant close flyby of a rocky object in the solar system, a rocky body called MU69 or Ultima Thule.

14h

Nancy Grace Roman, 'Mother Of Hubble' Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93
Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, its first chief of astronomy and she played an instrumental role in making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality. She died on Dec. 25. (Image credit: Courtesy of NASA)

12h

Get live updates on New Horizons’ flyby of a distant Kuiper Belt object
The New Horizons spacecraft is ready for the most distant close flyby of a rocky object in the solar system, a rocky body called MU69 or Ultima Thule.

14h

The immune system's fountain of youth
Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.

18h

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive
Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts. (Image credit: Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images)

22h

What the Believers Are Denying
For two years, they formed a community of experts, about 1,000 in all, including 300 leading climate scientists inside and outside 13 federal agencies. For two years, they volunteered their time and expertise to produce the Fourth National Climate Assessment. There is no parallel process to tackle the questions I study; there is no ongoing national racial assessment mandated by a law summarizing

14h

NASA spacecraft opens new year at tiny, icy world past PlutoNASA New Horizons UT
The NASA spacecraft that yielded the first close-up views of Pluto opened the new year at an even more distant world, a billion miles beyond.

16h

The immune system's fountain of youth
Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.

1d

New Horizons shows Ultima Thule looks like a snowman, or maybe BB-8
Ultima Thule’s snowmanlike shape shows the New Horizons target was probably two space rocks that got stuck together.

1d

To Get Mental Health Help For A Child, Desperate Parents Relinquish Custody
Doctors told Toni and Jim Hoy their young son needed intensive, specialized care away from home — institutional services that cost at least $100,000 a year. Insurance wouldn't cover the cost. (Image credit: Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media)

1d

Russian researchers explore the prospects for creating photonic integrated circuits
The transition from electronic integrated circuits to faster, more energy-efficient and interference-free optical circuits is one of the most important goals in the development of photon technologies. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are already used today for transmitting and processing signals in optical networks and communication systems, including, for example, I/O multiplexers of optical s

1d

What the Press Won’t Tell You About Elizabeth Warren’s Presidency
Read enough news reports about Elizabeth Warren’s declaration that she is running for president, and you notice certain common features. In its story on her announcement, The New York Times noted that Warren has “become a favorite target of conservatives” and that, in a recent national poll, “only about 30 percent [of respondents] viewed her favorably, with 37 percent holding an unfavorable view.

1d

Why Millions Of Kids Can't Read, And What Better Teaching Can Do About It
The instruction many students get is not based on the overwhelming scientific evidence about how kids turn spoken sounds into letters and words on a page. (Image credit: Emily Hanford/APM Reports)

1d

Gut immune cells cut inflammation in multiple sclerosis
Researchers have discovered that the intestine is the source of immune cells that reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and that increasing the number of these cells blocks inflammation entirely in a preclinical model of the disease.

13h

How Space and Time Could Be a Quantum Error-Correcting Code
In 1994, a mathematician at AT&T Research named Peter Shor brought instant fame to “quantum computers” when he discovered that these hypothetical devices could quickly factor large numbers — and thus break much of modern cryptography. But a fundamental problem stood in the way of actually building quantum computers: the innate frailty of their physical components. Unlike binary bits of informatio

16h

The Best Skin-Care Trick Is Being Rich
As a longtime resident of New York City, I’ve developed a little game I play when I’m alone in one of Manhattan’s especially ritzy neighborhoods: “Famous or Just Rich?” To play, all you have to do is notice a person and try to decide if they’ve caught your eye because they’re famous. It will feel as if they’re famous. But more often than not, it’ll just be a regular person who looks like a celebr

20h

The secrets of learning a new language | Lýdia Machová
Want to learn a new language but feel daunted or unsure where to begin? You don't need some special talent or a "language gene," says Lýdia Machová. In an upbeat, inspiring talk, she reveals the secrets of polyglots (people who speak multiple languages) and shares four principles to help unlock your own hidden language talent — and have fun while doing it.

2h

Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors
In the 1980s, the discovery of high-temperature superconductors known as cuprates upended a widely held theory that superconductor materials carry electrical current without resistance only at very low temperatures of around 30 Kelvin (or minus 406 degrees Fahrenheit). For decades since, researchers have been mystified by the ability of some cuprates to superconduct at temperatures of more than 10

3h

The Great Illusion of The Apprentice
I’m a Cabernet-sipping coastal elitist, so of course I never watched The Apprentice at the time it aired. But after Donald Trump emerged as the Republican front-runner in the summer of 2015, I decided I’d better look at him through the eyes of his many fans. I thought back to those bouts of reality TV after reading Patrick Radden Keefe’s profile of the television producer Mark Burnett in The New

4h

Extinction and the Rise of the Dinosaurs
Paleontologists are still puzzling over why dinosaurs succeeded while crocodile cousins faded away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Japan finds a huge cache of scarce rare-earth minerals
Enough rare earth minerals have been found off Japan to last centuries Rare earths are important materials for green technology, as well as medicine and manufacturing Where would we be without all of our rare-earth magnets? Rare earth elements are a set of 17 metals that are integral to our modern lifestyle and efforts to produce ever-greener technologies . The "rare" designation is a bit of a mi

1d

Vi presser naturen til det yderste: Fem dyr, vi snart har udslettet
Fiskeri, krybskytteri og ødelæggelse af levesteder er nogle af årsagerne til, at mange dyr nu uddør.

13h

All Sand on Earth Could Be Made of Star Stuff
Silica, a common ingredient in sand, concrete and glass, may have its origins in supernovae — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

How writing technology shaped classical thinking
The Roman poet Lucretius' epic work "De rerum natura," or "On the Nature of Things," is the oldest surviving scientific treatise written in Latin. Composed around 55 B.C.E., the text is a lengthy piece of contrarianism. Lucreutius was in the Epicurean school of philosophy: He wanted an account of the world rooted in earthly matter, rather than explanations based on the Gods and religion.

7h

U.S. Carbon Emissions Surged in 2018 Even as Coal Plants Closed
America’s carbon dioxide emissions rose by 3.4 percent in 2018, the biggest increase in eight years.

8h

Vi presser naturen til det yderste: Fem dyr, vi snart har udslettet
Fiskeri, krybskytteri og ødelæggelse af levesteder er nogle af årsagerne til, at mange dyr nu uddør.

13h

All Sand on Earth Could Be Made of Star Stuff
Silica, a common ingredient in sand, concrete and glass, may have its origins in supernovae — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

How writing technology shaped classical thinking
The Roman poet Lucretius' epic work "De rerum natura," or "On the Nature of Things," is the oldest surviving scientific treatise written in Latin. Composed around 55 B.C.E., the text is a lengthy piece of contrarianism. Lucreutius was in the Epicurean school of philosophy: He wanted an account of the world rooted in earthly matter, rather than explanations based on the Gods and religion.

7h

U.S. Carbon Emissions Surged in 2018 Even as Coal Plants Closed
America’s carbon dioxide emissions rose by 3.4 percent in 2018, the biggest increase in eight years.

8h

Evidence found of oysters syncing valve behavior with lunar cycle
A team of researchers from the University of Bordeaux and CNRS, EPOC, UMR has found evidence that suggests oysters sync their valve behavior with the lunar cycle. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of oysters in the wild over three and a half lunar cycles and what they observed.

4h

Cancer Death Rate Continues to Decline
The new data are in – cancer deaths continue to decline at a steady rate.

5h

Climate change: 'Right to repair' gathers force
EU and US states are to introduce laws helping people to mend appliances that break down.

18h

Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time
Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

21h

Disordered crystals are promising for future battery technology
Tiny, disordered particles of magnesium chromium oxide may hold the key to new magnesium battery energy storage technology, which could possess increased capacity compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, find UCL and University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

8h

Chemists create new quasicrystal material from nanoparticle building blocks
The strange class of materials known as quasicrystals has a new member. In a paper published on Thursday, Dec. 20, in Science, researchers from Brown University describe a quasicrystalline superlattice that self-assembles from a single type of nanoparticle building blocks.

4h

There Is No Such Thing as Conscious Thought
Philosopher Peter Carruthers insists that conscious thought, judgment and volition are illusions. They arise from processes of which we are forever unaware — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Chemical synthesis breakthrough holds promise for future antibiotics
University of Colorado Boulder chemistry researchers have developed a novel way to synthesize and optimize a naturally-occurring antibiotic compound that could one day be used to fight lethal drug-resistant infections such as Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA.

2h

10 atheist quotes that will make you question religion
Belief systems arise to address the time and social conditions of each era and culture. Your relationship to your community and environment is very influential in what you believe. Neuroscience explains many of the questions as to why we believe in the first place. None When I was studying for my degree in religion, I was most fascinated by what people believe. The fact that members of the same s

13h

Facebook gave Spotify and Netflix access to users’ private messagesFacebook Netflix Spotify
The report is based on internal documents and interviews with former employees of Facebook and its corporate partners. It shows how Facebook gave more than 100 tech companies access to user data that goes beyond the scope that the social media giant had previously disclosed. Below are some tips for how you can prevent Facebook from sharing your personal data. None A new report shows how Facebook

13h

We’re creeping back up to mid ‘90s-level gun death rates
Health Nearly 40,000 people died in 2017 from firearms. The 21st century has been fairly smooth sailing as far as gun deaths go, but in the last few years we’ve begun to ruin our track record. Data from the Centers for…

15h

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?
Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study reveals why.

16h

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats
Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats.

16h

Precision experiment first to isolate, measure weak force between protons, neutrons
A team of scientists has for the first time measured the elusive weak interaction between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. They had chosen the simplest nucleus consisting of one neutron and one proton for the study.

16h

The Casimir torque: Scientists measure previously unexamined tiny force
Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque.

17h

Proposed test of quantum superposition measures 'quantum revivals'
Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle—the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. The new test is based on examining the quantum rotation of a macroscopic object—specifically, a nanoscale rotor, which is considered macroscopic despite its tiny size.

20h

The Republican Majority's Last Act: A Government Shutdown
The federal government on Friday evening stood on the verge of its second partial shutdown of the year, as congressional leaders and the White House scrambled to reopen negotiations hours before a midnight deadline. The talks represent the final act of unified Republican control in Washington—and a bookend to showdowns of years past over federal spending and immigration. With President Trump dug

25min

SpaceX launches Air Force's best GPS yet, ends banner year
SpaceX has launched the U.S. Air Force's most powerful GPS satellite ever built.

12h

How the stunning Earthrise became the world’s most famous photograph
On Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 became the first crewed spacecraft to circle the moon. Emerging from its dark side, one astronaut reached for his camera

9h

New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration
On today's increasingly crowded globe, human migration can strain infrastructure and resources. Accurate data on migration flows could help governments plan for and respond to immigrants. Yet these figures, when available, tend to be spotty and error-ridden, even in the developed world. Researchers have developed approaches to estimate migration rates, but even the best of these rely on unrealisti

20h

Nucleus-specific X-ray stain for 3-D virtual histology
Histology is used to identify structural details of tissue at the microscale in the pathology lab, but analyses remain two-dimensional (2D) as they are limited to the same plane. Nondestructive 3D technologies including X-ray micro and nano-computed tomography (nanoCT) have proven validity to understand anatomical structures, since they allow arbitrary viewing angles and 3D structural detail. Howe

3h

Sønderjyder går sammen for at forhindre datacentre i at fyre for fuglene
Fire sønderjyske kommuner opretter fælles energisekretariat, der skal rådgive om, hvordan de bedst udnytter spildvarmen fra datacentre og etablerer store varmepumper.

4h

Biokemisk gennembrud kan føre til nye dufte, smagsstoffer og medicin
Forskere fra bl.a. Københavns Universitet har fundet ud af, hvordan man manipulerer med vigtige kulstofforbindelser. Det kan bringe nye smagsindtryk til såvel mad som tandpasta.

13h

Top Retractions of 2018
From a self-sampling scientist to the downfall of a leading stem cell scientist, here's our naughty list.

1d

Rotating Detonation Engines Could Propel Hypersonic Flight
It runs on an endless shockwave, but, sadly, it’s still in the prototype stage.

13h

Reactive optical matter: Light-induced motion
Newton's third law dictates that forces between interacting particles are equal and opposite for closed systems. In a non-equilibrium environment, the third law can be defied, giving rise to "nonreciprocal" forces. Theoretically, this was shown when dissimilar, optically trapped particles were mediated by an external field. In a recent study, Yuval Yifat and colleagues measured the net nonreciproc

10h

NASA's New Horizons Probe Prepares To Make History—Again
The intrepid spacecraft has traveled 13 years and 4 billion miles to glimpse Ultima Thule, a cold, dark world at the fringes of our solar system.

10h

Social media has made Gen Z less engaged in the classroom, says math lecturer Clio Cresswell
Mathematics lecturer noticed the changes in her students after returning to teaching after a five-year break. She says her students are noticeably less engaged, increasingly on their smartphones or computers, and ask more "stupid questions." A batch of results from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study recently showed alarming results about the impacts that screen use has on developing b

17h

Fireworks banned on the Galapagos to protect wildlife
Authorities in Ecuador say animals suffered elevated heart rates and anxiety after pyrotechnic shows.

23h

Social media has made Gen Z less engaged in the classroom, says math lecturer Clio Cresswell
Mathematics lecturer noticed the changes in her students after returning to teaching after a five-year break. She says her students are noticeably less engaged, increasingly on their smartphones or computers, and ask more "stupid questions." A batch of results from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study recently showed alarming results about the impacts that screen use has on developing b

17h

Fireworks banned on the Galapagos to protect wildlife
Authorities in Ecuador say animals suffered elevated heart rates and anxiety after pyrotechnic shows.

23h

The Leaked Louis C.K. Set Is Tragedy Masked as Comedy
A little over a year ago, Louis C.K. published a statement in The New York Times , after several women had come forward to confirm the rumors that had, for years, been swirling around him . “These stories are true,” he wrote, expressing regret for several instances of sexual misconduct and suggesting that the acts being made public would be a turning point for him. His confession concluded with c

13h

How ancient DNA may rewrite prehistory in India
Aryans are not the earliest or only source of Indian civilisation, suggests new research on genetic ancestry.

21h

Books are good for your brain. These techniques will help you read more.
DIY Turn yourself into a bookworm. Want to kick off the New Year with a new habit? Reading is a great way to relax, strengthen your brain, and improve your health. Here’s how to fit more books into your…

10h

Known as the ‘mother of Hubble,’ astronomer Nancy Roman dies at 93
Astronomer Nancy Roman, the “mother of Hubble,” has died.

1d

The immune system's fountain of youth
Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.

1d

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive
Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts. (Image credit: Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images)

1d

Guide: Sådan hjælper du din hund nytårsaften
Hunde kan opleve frygt og angst, når der skydes fyrværkeri af. Men der er heldigvis flere ting du kan gøre for at hjælpe din hund.

1d

How Monet’s paintings ‘trick’ our eyes
Claude Monet used a very limited color palette in his Waterloo Bridge series, but could still evoke a wide range of ambiances. New research shows how. During three trips to London at the turn of the 20th century, Monet painted more than 40 versions of a single scene: the Waterloo Bridge over the Thames River. Monet’s main subject was not the bridge itself, however, so much as the landscape and at

1d

Juno mission captures images of volcanic plumes on Jupiter's moon Io
The Juno spacecraft captured new images of a volcanic plume on Jupiter's moon Io during a December 21 flyby. JunoCam, the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU), the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM), and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVS) observed Io for over an hour, providing a glimpse of the moon's polar regions as well as evidence of an active eruption.

1d

Fewer monarch butterflies are reaching their overwintering destination
The monarch butterfly is currently experiencing dire problems with its migration in eastern North America. Fewer and fewer monarchs are successfully reaching their overwintering destinations, and scientists aren't sure why.

1d

Natural-based antibiofilm and antimicrobial peptides from microorganisms
New developments in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with antibiofilm properties are rapidly materializing. ABP works by inhibiting antibiotic resistant bacteria in the biofilm through nucleotide signaling molecules.

1d

Regulating Fringe Practitioners
Fringe professions like chiropractic and naturopaths are not adequately regulated. This needs to be fixed.

1d

Trump Escalates His Assault on Civil-Military Relations
We’ve gotten used to so much in Donald Trump’s two years in office, from the cruelty of his immigration policies to his childlike understanding of international trade, and from his apparent fear of Vladimir Putin to his whipsawing of the financial markets. Too many Americans have simply become accustomed to the president’s antics as a normal part of the background noise of their lives. Sometimes

1d

Trump’s Strange, Fleeting Briefing-Room Cameo
With the government shutdown headed for the two-week mark with no end in sight, President Donald Trump had a succinct message for the press and the nation on Thursday: Please look at me . All the attention in Washington had been concentrated down Pennsylvania Avenue for the swearing-in of the new Congress, and especially its new Democratic House majority. As my colleagues Russell Berman and Elain

11h

KAL’s cartoon
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17h

Greener hydrogen from water
The idea of using hydrogen as the basis of a clean sustainable energy source, often termed a hydrogen economy, has been a topic of conversation for decades. Hydrogen fuel, for example, doesn't emit any carbon dioxide and is considered more sustainable than traditional fossil fuels.

4h

Japan finds a huge cache of scarce rare-earth minerals
Enough rare earth minerals have been found off Japan to last centuries Rare earths are important materials for green technology, as well as medicine and manufacturing Where would we be without all of our rare-earth magnets? Rare earth elements are a set of 17 metals that are integral to our modern lifestyle and efforts to produce ever-greener technologies . The "rare" designation is a bit of a mi

56min

Katharine Hayhoe: 'A thermometer is not liberal or conservative'
The award-winning atmospheric scientist on the urgency of the climate crisis and why people are her biggest hope Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She has contributed to more than 125 scientific papers and won numerous prizes for her science communication work. In 2018 she was a contributor to the US National Climate

2h

Mysterious Sounds Recorded at Cuba Embassy Were … Crickets
Crickets may have produced the sounds that sickened U.S. Embassy staffers.

3h

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria
Bacteria, which are vital for the health of all animals, also played a major role in the evolution of animals and their tissues. In an effort to understand just how animals co-evolved with bacteria over time, researchers have turned to the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes.

4h

What Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s 60 Minutes Interview Actually Reveals
Ever since Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won an insurgent primary campaign in June against a well-established party elder, it hasn’t been clear whether she plans to push or pull the Democratic Party to the left. Will the former Bernie Sanders volunteer and self-identified democratic socialist try to push House leadership on policy while remaining well outside the party’s power structure? Or will the y

7h

Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon
Up to 15 million hectares of tropical rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon could lose protection and be clear-cut because of an article in the country's new Forest Code. The warning comes from Brazilian researchers at the University of São Paulo's Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ-USP) and Swedish researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and Chalmers University of Te

12h

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods
Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores, and scaffold-like implants are used to repair bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are developing biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

13h

Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Triggered Mile-High Tsunami That Spread Through Earth's Oceans
When the dinosaur-killing asteroid collided with Earth more than 65 million years ago, it did not go gently into that good night. Rather, it blasted a nearly mile-high tsunami through the Gulf of Mexico that caused chaos throughout the world's oceans.

13h

Never mind killer robots—here are six real AI dangers to watch out for in 2019
Last year a string of controversies revealed a darker (and dumber) side to artificial intelligence.

4h

Essential nutrient may help fight Alzheimer's across generations
Researchers are exploring a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are investigatign the effects of choline, an important nutrient that may hold promise in the war against the memory-stealing disorder.

4h

New way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material
A weird feature of certain exotic materials allows electrons to travel from one surface of the material to another as if there were nothing in between. Now, researchers have shown that they can switch this feature on and off by toggling a material in and out of a stable topological state with pulses of light. The method could provide a new way of manipulating materials that could be used in future

7h

Never mind killer robots—here are six real AI dangers to watch out for in 2019
Last year a string of controversies revealed a darker (and dumber) side to artificial intelligence.

4h

Essential nutrient may help fight Alzheimer's across generations
Researchers are exploring a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are investigatign the effects of choline, an important nutrient that may hold promise in the war against the memory-stealing disorder.

4h

New way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material
A weird feature of certain exotic materials allows electrons to travel from one surface of the material to another as if there were nothing in between. Now, researchers have shown that they can switch this feature on and off by toggling a material in and out of a stable topological state with pulses of light. The method could provide a new way of manipulating materials that could be used in future

7h

Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera shuts down
The Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera has shut down.

1h

Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record
Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected past temperature cycles and extends the record 900 years into the past, well beyond the previous early date of 1850.

1h

Voter preference for Trump linked to bullying in middle schools
Bullying rates among middle school students in the spring of 2017 were 18 percent higher in localities where voters had favored Donald Trump than in those that had supported Hillary Clinton, according to a new study.

2h

George the Snail, the Last and Loneliest of His Kind, Dies
George the snail won't be leaving any more silvery trails in his wake. The 14-year-old champ — the last known snail of his species — died in captivity on New Year's Day, 2019.

2h

Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy
The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments using the technique.

18h

Stick insects: Egg-laying techniques reveal new evolutionary map
Known for exceptional mimicry, stick insects have evolved a range of egg-laying techniques to maximize egg survival while maintaining their disguise—including dropping eggs to the ground, skewering them on leaves, and even enlisting ants for egg dispersal. Scientists have now combined knowledge on these varied techniques with DNA analysis to create the best map of stick-insect evolution to date. C

5h

Note to Michael Flynn: Federal Court Is Not Twitter
Former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn on Tuesday got an unpleasant lesson on the difference between politically effective arguments and legally astute ones. Backed by an array of well-wishers, including President Donald Trump, and buoyed by widespread conservative arguments that the FBI had violated his rights, Flynn walked into a federal courtroom in Washington, D.C., hoping for the pro

12h

Three generations, 1,000s of miles: Scientists unlock mystery of a dragonfly's migration
Thanks to photos and films featuring clouds of stunning orange and black monarch butterflies flying across North America, many people today are familiar with how monarchs migrate. The migration patterns of other insects, however, remain more mysterious, for both the public and scientists alike. A new paper in Biology Letters describes a dragonfly's full life cycle for the first time, in compelling

13h

Cell-by-cell DNA science is 'Breakthrough of 2018'
The US journal Science on Thursday coined as "Breakthrough of the Year" for 2018 new technologies that reveal how DNA cues individual cells to grow through time.

2h

Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing
Droplet microfluidics has revolutionized single-cell RNA sequencing, offering a low-cost, high-throughput method for single-cell genomics. However, this method has been limited in its ability to capture complete RNA transcription information.

2h

Organic farming is 'much worse' for the climate than conventional food production, researchers say
A report from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, found that organic food production leads to higher carbon emissions. This includes livestock as well as vegetables, as organic farming requires no fertilizer usage. Certain types of organic foods are less impactful than others, the researchers note. None History has not been kind to Earl Butz. From 1971–76, the Indiana native served as secr

3h

Starchy food may reduce autoimmune reactions in people with lupus
A study in mice shows that certain gut bacteria may exacerbate lupus, but eating starch can halt their growth, hinting at a possible treatment

6h

Faint glow within galaxy clusters illuminates dark matter
A new look at Hubble images of galaxies could be a step toward illuminating the elusive nature of dark matter, the unobservable material that makes up the majority of the universe, according to a study published online today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

7h

Newborn insects trapped in amber show first evidence of how to crack an egg
Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology.

11h

'Blind' on Climate, Trump Inspires Name for Sightless, Slimy, Worm-Like Creature
A blind, worm-like amphibian species has a new and presidential name.

16h

450 fossilized millipedes found in 100-million-year-old amber
Over 450 millipedes, fossilized in 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, were recently discovered by a research team. Using micro-CT technology, the scientists identified 13 out of the 16 main groups of modern millipedes amongst them. For half of these groups, the findings also represent the oldest known fossils.

16h

Chemical catalyst turns 'trash' into 'treasure,' making inert C-H bonds reactive
For decades, chemists have aspired to do carefully controlled chemistry on carbon-hydrogen bonds. The challenge is staggering. It requires the power of a miniature wrecking ball to break these extremely strong bonds, combined with the finesse of microscopic tweezers to single out specific C-H bonds among the many crowded onto a molecule.

17h

Nye afsløringer: Facebook deler dine private data med mere end 150 virksomheder
Det sociale medie udnytter et smuthul i reglerne til fortsat at dele dine private data til techgiganter som Microsoft, Spotify og Netflix – uden at spørge om lov.

17h

DNA from 6000-year-old chewing gum reveals how an ancient woman lived
Lola lived 6000 years ago and made glue by chewing birch bark pitch. By analysing DNA left on the pitch we know about her diet, appearance, and ancestry

17h

Milestone Experiment Proves Quantum Communication Really Is Faster
Quantum computers are still a dream, but the era of quantum communication is here. A new experiment out of Paris has demonstrated, for the first time, that quantum communication is superior to classical ways of transmitting information. “We are the first to show a quantum advantage for transmitted information that two parties have to share to perform a useful task,” said Eleni Diamanti , an elect

18h

Planetary astronomers identify cycle of spectacular disturbances at Jupiter's equator
A regular pattern of unusual meteorological events at Jupiter's equator has been identified by planetary scientists at the University of Leicester.

21h

An inside look at the first solo trip to the deepest point of the Atlantic
Science To reach the bottom of all five oceans, this Texas businessman commissioned “the most significant vehicle since Apollo 11.” “Five Deeps" began when Vescovo asked Triton Subs if they could make him a vehicle capable of reaching any point in the world’s oceans. This was a big ask. Three years…

2h

Image: Hubble's cosmic holiday wreath
This festive NASA Hubble Space Telescope image resembles a holiday wreath made of sparkling lights. The bright southern hemisphere star RS Puppis, at the center of the image, is swaddled in a gossamer cocoon of reflective dust illuminated by the glittering star. The super star is ten times more massive than the sun and 200 times larger.

8h

Electronically programmable photonic molecule
Physical systems with discrete energy levels are ubiquitous in nature and form fundamental building blocks of quantum technology. Artificial atom-like and molecule-like systems were previously demonstrated to regulate light for coherent and dynamic control of the frequency, amplitude and the phase of photons. In a recent study, Mian Zhang and colleagues engineered a photonic molecule with two dist

10h

Cold atoms offer a glimpse of flat physics
These days, movies and video games render increasingly realistic 3-D images on 2-D screens, giving viewers the illusion of gazing into another world. For many physicists, though, keeping things flat is far more interesting.

10h

Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets
A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by University of Warwick astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets.

12h

Scuba-diving lizard can stay underwater for at least 16 minutes
The water anole of Costa Rica dives underwater to escape from predators such as birds by blowing out and re-inhaling a large bubble of air

13h

Ole Birk: Ny undersøgelse viser, at bilisterne alene kan betale Kattegat-bro
Hvis der findes lidt besparelser hist og pist, kan ny vejbro over Kattegat blive betalt af brugerne alene, siger transportministeren ved offentliggørelsen af ny screeningsrapport. Blå blok sætter forundersøgelse til 60 mio. kr. i gang.

14h

Too far right and left? DC think tank releases manifesto for radical centrism
Niskanen Center, a Washington think tank, argues for avoiding the extremes of political positions. The analysts propose that both a regulated free market and bolstered social insurance programs are important. If we don't correct course soon, the American political system may never recover, warn the authors. None If you've had enough of all the political bickering coming from all sides, a Washingt

18h

Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch
A study found parachutes were no more effective than backpacks in preventing harm to people jumping from aircraft. The researchers' tongue-in-cheek experiment makes a deeper point about science. (Image credit: Michael Htten/EyeEm/Getty Images)

20h

3 pieces of historical evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ
Jesus's historical existence is generally accepted among scholars. The evidence for the reality of Jesus Christ includes writings by historians, artifacts and eyewitness accounts. The spiritual and miraculous nature of Jesus is a different story. None Can we prove that Jesus Christ actually walked the Earth about 2,000 years ago? Without getting into the spiritual, science should be able to provi

9h

10 great minds we lost in 2018
We lost a great deal of internet pioneers and geniuses of physics in 2018. Creations of fiber optic cables, men on the moon and the unsung heroes of the life sciences made their mark on the scientific enterprise. The loss of men like Stephen Hawking leaves a hole in the sciences, but his work and many others will continue to inspire the generations to come. Death is an inevitability every passing

3h

Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity
Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over—or having many other species die out.

20h

What Was Steve Mnuchin Thinking? Three Possibilities
Imagine having a runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, and a sore throat, and your doctor telling you that you shouldn’t worry about cancer—she consulted her colleagues and they’re certain it is not cancer, and if it were, they could fight it. This is roughly what happened on Sunday evening, when Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin put out a press release on calls he held with executives from the cou

1d

Team gets closer to precise treatment for arrhythmia
New research makes a significant step toward precision medicine for patients with a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat by determining in which patients a common drug treatment would be most beneficial. In 2015, then-President Barack Obama launched a precision medicine initiative, saying that its promise was “delivering the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right per

1d

Archaeologists find remains of horses in ancient Pompeii stable
Military officer’s stable preserved under ash from eruption of Mount Vesuvius Archaeologists have unearthed the petrified remains of a harnessed horse and saddle in the stable of an ancient villa in a Pompeii suburb. The Pompeii archaeological park’s head, Massimo Osanna, told the Italian news agency Ansa that the villa belonged to a high-ranking military officer, perhaps a general, in ancient Ro

1d

Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says
One of the first astronauts to orbit the Moon thinks there's no public support to send people to Mars.

1d

Online mirrors: Video bloggers and viewers share emotions
An amusing commercial shows someone having a bad day, and how that person's mood affects each person down the line, with more bad moods. This emotional "contagion" may be a real-world phenomenon, and it appears that what we experience online can have a similar effect. Examining over 2000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube, researchers from Tilburg University, Netherlands, found we mirror the emotion

8h

Ancient Purebred Horse With Bronze-Plated Saddle Is Discovered in Pompeii
The horse is the latest treasure unearthed from the city buried by pumice and ash after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

1d

CBD makes glaucoma worse, researchers find
For decades, marijuana has been touted as providing glaucoma relief. A study out of Indiana University shows that while THC reduces eye pressure, CBD does the opposite. Of the 18 mice tested, females were less responsive to marijuana than males. None While glaucoma has been the butt of many well-intentioned, wink-wink weed jokes for decades, the disease is quit serious. In fact, glaucoma is the l

7h

The mystery of the ISS hole just got even weirder
Space The hole came from the inside. Earlier this week, a Russian cosmonaut who investigated the mysterious hole in the Soyuz capsule docked to the International Space Station revealed that the hole was…

2h

2019 Preview: We will see the first ever picture of a black hole
We have never seen a picture of a black hole, but that will change when the Event Horizon Telescope reveals its first snap of the behemoth at the Milky Way's centre

6h

Scientists model Mercury's glaciers
The processes that led to glaciation at the cratered poles of Mercury, the planet closest to the sun, have been modeled by a University of Maine-led research team.

6h

Earliest records of three plant groups uncovered in the Permian of Jordan
A "hidden cradle of plant evolution" has been uncovered in Jordan. In Permian sedimentary rocks exposed along the east coast of the Dead Sea, a team led by palaeobotanists from the University of Münster discovered well-preserved fossils of plant groups bearing characteristics typical of younger periods of Earth history. The Permian began some 300 million years ago and ended around 250 million year

7h

A New Book Describes Hunter S. Thompson’s Prescience
If Hunter S. Thompson were still alive—if the so-called Gonzo journalist hadn’t killed himself in 2005, his ashes subsequently propelled from a cannon in a ceremony financed by Johnny Depp—the odds are high that he’d be linking Donald Trump to “that dark, venal and incurably violent side of the American character,” and contending that Trump “speaks for the Werewolf in us.” That’s how Thompson rep

11h

Reliable tropical weather pattern to change in a warming climate
Every month or two, a massive pulse of clouds, rainfall and wind moves eastward around the Earth near the equator, providing the tropics their famous thunderstorms.

13h

Fynsk pilotanlæg skal producere fremtidens grønne råstof fra biogas og brint
Projektet, som netop har fået 16,6 mio. kr. i støtte fra EUDP, skal booste overskydende CO2 fra biogasproduktionen med brint fra vindmøllestrøm ved hjælp af en ny, biologisk metode.

11h

Anak Krakatau: Indonesian volcano's dramatic collapse
Satellite images indicate Anak Krakatau lost over two-thirds of its height and volume when it erupted.

21h

Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer
Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow again. This suggests that patients with h

1d

Fynsk pilotanlæg skal producere fremtidens grønne råstof fra biogas og brint
Projektet, som netop har fået 16,6 mio. kr. i støtte fra EUDP, skal booste overskydende CO2 fra biogasproduktionen med brint fra vindmøllestrøm ved hjælp af en ny, biologisk metode.

11h

Anak Krakatau: Indonesian volcano's dramatic collapse
Satellite images indicate Anak Krakatau lost over two-thirds of its height and volume when it erupted.

21h

Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer
Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow again. This suggests that patients with h

1d

Known as the ‘mother of Hubble,’ astronomer Nancy Roman dies at 93
Astronomer Nancy Roman, the “mother of Hubble,” has died.

10h

Researchers discover a metamaterial with inherently robust sound transport
Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and at the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a metamaterial that can transport sound in unusually robust ways along its edges and localize it at its corners.

14h

How to Follow New Horizons' Historic Flyby of Ultima Thule
On New Year's Eve, NASA's probe will reach Ultima Thule, an icy body at the edge of our solar system. Here's its timeline.

20h

Guide: Sådan hjælper du din hund nytårsaften
Hunde kan opleve frygt og angst, når der skydes fyrværkeri af. Men der er heldigvis flere ting du kan gøre for at hjælpe din hund.

1d

The Leaked Louis C.K. Set Is Tragedy Masked as Comedy
A little over a year ago, Louis C.K. published a statement in The New York Times , after several women had come forward to confirm the rumors that had, for years, been swirling around him . “These stories are true,” he wrote, expressing regret for several instances of sexual misconduct and suggesting that the acts being made public would be a turning point for him. His confession concluded with c

1d

Researchers discover a metamaterial with inherently robust sound transport
Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and at the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a metamaterial that can transport sound in unusually robust ways along its edges and localize it at its corners.

1d

How to Follow New Horizons' Historic Flyby of Ultima ThuleNew Horizons Ultima Thule
On New Year's Eve, NASA's probe will reach Ultima Thule, an icy body at the edge of our solar system. Here's its timeline.

1d

How ancient DNA may rewrite prehistory in India
Aryans are not the earliest or only source of Indian civilisation, suggests new research on genetic ancestry.

1d

Like your grandparents, monarch butterflies are now wintering in Florida
Science Understanding where the insects travel will help biologists better track their overall population levels. A new study out today in the journal Animal Migration contradicts prevailing wisdom about where at least some migratory monarchs go in the winter—and what they do when…

1d

Self-powered microfluidic sheet that wraps, flaps and creeps
Researchers for the first time apply catalytic chemical reactions to 2D sheets to generate flows that transform these sheets into mobile, 3D objects.

1d

Is habitat restoration actually killing plants in the California wildlands?
New work shows for the first time just how widespread and deadly the threat of pathogens from restoration nurseries may be to natural forests. The team surveyed five native plant nurseries in Northern California and found that four harbored exotic, or non-native, Phytophthora pathogens. New management techniques, coupled with new methods for detecting pathogens, can help these nurseries limit the

1d

Nasa's New Horizons: 'Snowman' shape of distant Ultima Thule revealedNew Horizons Ultima Thule
The first detailed picture from Tuesday's historic flyby in the outer Solar System is released.

1d

Snowman-like Photo of Ultima Thule Sent Home by NASA’s New Horizons SpacecraftNew Horizons Ultima Thule
At a Wednesday news conference, scientists will announce some of the results from the flyby of the most distant object ever visited.

1d

Seagrass saves beaches and money
Seagrass beds are so effective in protecting tropical beaches from erosion, that they can reduce the need for regular, expensive beach nourishments that are used now. Biologists and engineers from the Netherlands and Mexico describe experiments and field observations around the Caribbean Sea.

1d

Marijuana can alter DNA in sperm
New research shows that THC affects epigenetics, triggering structural and regulatory changes in the DNA of users’ sperm. As legal access to marijuana continues expanding across the US, more scientists are studying the effects of its active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in teens, adults, and pregnant women. The new study suggests men in their child-bearing years should also consider how

1d

Powerful Icelandic Vikings were buried with stallions
Archaeologists in Iceland have for decades examined the remains of more than 350 graves from the Viking Age. In approximately 150 examples, teeth or bones of horses were found. Geneticists and archaeologists have now examined ancient DNA from 19 horses in such graves, and found that all the horses except one were male.

1d

Early protostar already has a warped disk
Using observations from the ALMA radio observatory in Chile, researchers have observed, for the first time, a warped disk around an infant protostar that formed just several tens of thousands of years ago. This implies that the misalignment of planetary orbits in many planetary systems—including our own—may be caused by distortions in the planet-forming disk early in their existence.

1d

Machine learning speeds up atomistic simulations of water and ice
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why does heavy water have a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study of researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the University of Göttingen and the University of Vienna and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy o

1d

In the opioid crisis, here's what it takes to save a life | Jan Rader
As a fire chief and first responder, Jan Rader has spent her career saving lives. But when the opioid epidemic hit her town, she realized they needed to take a brand-new approach to life-saving. In this powerful, hopeful talk, Rader shows what it's like on the front lines of this crisis — and how her community is taking an unusual new approach to treating substance-abuse disorder that starts with

1d

Archaeologists find Mexico temple to god of skinning sacrifices
Archaeologists in Mexico have found the first temple to the pre-Hispanic deity Xipe Totec, a god of fertility and war who was worshipped by sacrificing and skinning captives.

2h

There are only two supplements proven to help you build muscle
Muscle Month A balanced diet is best, but these additions could help. Take a look at any weightlifting or bodybuilding forum and it’s easy to feel out of the loop. People throw around advice about BCAAs and HMB and various kinds of protein…

13h

Fixing a flaw in photosynthesis could massively boost food production
Compensating for a fundamental flaw in photosynthesis boosts biomass in tobacco by up to 40 per cent – next up are food crops

14h

Why Your Doctor Should Also Be a Scientist
Opinion: Physician-scientists are an endangered species. Without them, patients could lose out on the next generation of life-saving treatments.

15h

Trump’s New Catchphrase Is an Attempt to Delegitimize Dissent
Donald Trump is a devoted sloganeer, from “You’re fired” to “Make America great again.” But slogans grow tired and lose their oomph with time and repetition, which means it’s important to keep refreshing and replacing them. Enter “presidential harassment.” On Thursday, with the government shutdown in its 13th day, with no sign of abating, and the new Democratic majority taking over the House, the

15h

China just accomplished the first landing on the far side of the moonChina Chang e 4 Moon
Space It's the first time a working rover has touched down on the far side. China successfully landed its robotic Chang’e 4 probe on the surface of the far side of the moon on Thursday, around noon Beijing time.

15h

The US and China are in a quantum arms race that will transform warfare
Radar that can spot stealth aircraft and other quantum innovations could give their militaries a strategic edge.

16h

China Makes Historic First Landing on Mysterious Far Side of the Moon
The milestone marks a turning point for China’s space exploration, and may unlock deep secrets of lunar history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Trump Calls Wall 'Moral' Because Vatican Has One. So What's Its History?
Any border wall between the United States and Mexico can't be immoral, President Trump said at a Cabinet meeting yesterday (Jan. 2), because the Vatican has one, too.

17h

Researchers suggest missing crust layer can be blamed on 'Snowball Earth'
An international team of researchers has found evidence supporting a theory that suggests a missing crust layer can be blamed on "Snowball Earth." In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the evidence they found and why they believe it supports their theory.

18h

China Becomes First Country To Land On Far Side Of Moon, State Media Announce
Lunar lander Chang'e 4 successfully touched down on Thursday morning. China's Xinhua News published a photo it says was taken by the probe "on the never-visible side of the moon." (Image credit: Imaginechina via AP)

1d

Tidligere chef-operatør: Vi havde en lignende ulykke med godstog
PLUS. Den svenske jernbaneoperatør Hector Rail oplevede for fem år siden et uheld, der på flere måder minder om ulykken på Storebælt, fortæller tidligere chef.

4h

Half of people who think they have a food allergy do not – study
US study finds some people needlessly avoid foods while others do not have life-saving medication The number of adults who think they have a food allergy is almost double the figure who actually have one, research has revealed. While the study was conducted in the US, experts say a similar situation is also seen in other countries, including the UK. The researchers found that many people with an

1h

Hackers have leaked personal details of hundreds of German politicians
A significant data breach has exposed the personal information of chancellor Angela Merkel along with hundreds of other German politicians

2h

Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor
A giant toadstool that swallows up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys: This is how one receptor that absorbs B12 vitamins in the small intestine looks. For the first time, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have an insight into an as-yet unknown biology which has persisted for hundreds of millions of years of evolution.

4h

Researchers find bottom of Pacific getting colder, possibly due to Little Ice Age
A pair of researchers, one with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the other Harvard University, has found evidence of deep ocean cooling that is likely due to the Little Ice Age. In their paper published in the journal Science, Jake Gebbie and Peter Huybers describe their study of Pacific Ocean temperatures over the past 150 years and what they found.

5h

Strength in weakness: Fragile DNA regions key to vertebrate evolution
DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. The findings may lead to new understanding of human evolution.

5h

Rabbits that don’t eat their own faeces are small and weak
We know that rabbits eat some of their own faeces – they may do so in order to better metabolise their food so they can grow larger

6h

Mammoth DNA found in Cambodia market items
Scientists tackling the illegal trade in elephant ivory got more than they bargained for when they found woolly mammoth DNA in trinkets on sale in Cambodia, they revealed Friday.

22h

Computers can be a real pain in the neck
Many people slouch or strain their necks while working at the computer. A new study shows how jutting the head forward to read more closely compresses the neck and leads to neck and shoulder problems.

22h

Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice
Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice.

23h

ContraPoints Is Political Philosophy Made for YouTube
Marie, a slender woman wearing white lingerie and glitter-encrusted nails, gets into her bath with a bottle of Moët and calls for her servant Antoine. When the door opens, it’s not Antoine, but another woman in a lab coat and a purple wig. “The Doctor,” as the visitor is known, has come to force Marie to watch an educational video about climate change. The pair argue, insult one another, and even

1h

Knock Knock. Who’s There? Kids. Kids Who? Kids Tell Terrible Jokes.
When I was 4, my favorite joke to tell my family members went like this: “Knock, knock.” “Who’s there?” “Guitar.” “Guitar who?” “Guitar if you don’t have a house!” Every time I delivered the punch line, I would look expectantly at my audience, who would, after a moment, either politely chuckle or just squint in bewilderment. Guitar if you don’t have a house? Literally nothing is funny or clever a

1d

Marie Kondo Is All of Us in This Year of Self-Optimization
In 2018, all we wanted was tea and sympathy. But by the look of Twitter, 2019’s vibe is slanting towards dogged, intentional improvement.

1d

Mammoth DNA found in Cambodia market items
Scientists tackling the illegal trade in elephant ivory got more than they bargained for when they found woolly mammoth DNA in trinkets on sale in Cambodia, they revealed Friday.

1d

Computers can be a real pain in the neck
Many people slouch or strain their necks while working at the computer. A new study shows how jutting the head forward to read more closely compresses the neck and leads to neck and shoulder problems.

1d

Fossil of prehistoric deer found in Argentina
The well-preserved fossil of a prehistoric deer has been discovered just to the north of Buenos Aires, the La Matanza University revealed on Monday.

3h

These are the top 10 new motorcycles we’re dying to ride in 2019Harley-Davidson LiveWire
Technology Top picks from the editors at Cycle World. Velocity and variety are both available in 2019 as the motorcycle space is full of motorcycles we’re dying to ride next year.

4h

Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous
Why are some animals committed to their mates and others are not? According to a new study led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species—turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.

5h

Satellite images reveal global poverty
How far have nations come in achieving the U.N.'s sustainable development goals? It can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to provide a good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries.

5h

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed
Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study.

5h

Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology
Engineers have developed an innovative, low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone.

6h

Half of the people who think they have food allergies actually don't
Health But that doesn’t mean you’re imagining things. Food allergies can be confusing to figure out. Once a food item has wreaked havoc on any part of your body, whether its an itchy rash or a bout of diarrhea, its easy to…

7h

How game theory can bring humans and robots closer together
Researchers have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner.

7h

A weird type of zirconium soaks up neutrons like a sponge
Zirconium-88 captures neutrons with extreme efficiency, and scientists don’t yet know why.

9h

Researchers discover new bat-borne virus related to Ebola
Researchers from Singapore's Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with scientists in China, have identified and characterised a new genus of filovirus from a Rousettus bat in China. Their findings were published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

9h

Deep low-frequency earthquakes indicate migration of magmatic fluids beneath Laacher See Volcano
Magma could rise from the upper mantle into the middle and upper crust beneath the Laacher See Volcano (Germany). The scientists present evidence of deep and low-frequency earthquakes caused by magma movements under the Laacher See Volcano.

9h

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation
High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large a

10h

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways
Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a new study has found.

12h

Green darner dragonflies migrate a bit like monarch butterflies
Some dragonflies do a north-south annual migration that takes at least three generations.

13h

Impending Galactic Crash Could Rip Open the Black Hole at the Milky Way’s Center
The end of the Milky Way as we know it may come 2 billion years ahead of schedule.

13h

The Supreme Court Could Make Gerrymandering Worse
The Supreme Court’s decision on Friday to take up partisan-gerrymandering cases from North Carolina and Maryland brought to mind a saying attributed to Judy Garland : Behind every cloud is another cloud. The now firmly conservative Court likely took the cases not to announce that such activities violate the Constitution, but to reverse the lower courts that said they do. Down the road, the Court

14h

Sandra Oh Wins a Golden Globe—And the Night
The Golden Globes have long had a reputation for being Hollywood’s most rollicking awards show, but Sunday evening’s proceedings began with a tender moment of reflection amid the romp and the revelry. “I said yes to the fear of being on this stage tonight because I wanted to be here, to look out onto this audience and witness this moment of change,” the Killing Eve star Sandra Oh said as she clos

20h

Tungmetaller i byen øger forekomsten af antibiotikaresistens
Undersøgelse fra Københavns Universitet viser, at tungmetaller i byjord giver antibiotikaresistente bakterier rig mulighed for at sprede deres gener til andre organismer.

21h

A protein in mosquito eggshells could be the insects’ Achilles’ heel
A newly discovered protein found exclusively in mosquitoes may one day help control their numbers.

22min

Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled
Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a study published today in eLife.

3h

Cancer Death Rates Reach 25-Year Low
U.S. cancer death rates have declined continuously for the last quarter of a century, according to a new report.

4h

Computer simulation sheds new light on colliding stars
Unprecedented detail of the aftermath of a collision between two neutron stars depicted in a 3-D computer model created by a University of Alberta astrophysicist provides a better understanding of how some of the universe's fundamental elements form in cosmic collisions.

5h

Worse Than Watergate
For decades, Watergate has served as the benchmark against which all other presidential scandals are measured. One sign of its continuing importance in the popular imagination is the use of the “-gate” suffix to indicate scandal: “Billygate,” “Lewinskygate,” “Plamegate,” and far too many others to mention here. But Watergate’s time as the gold standard of presidential malfeasance might well be co

8h

New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics
Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility.

8h

Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous
According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species — turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.

16h

A protein in mosquito eggshells could be the insects’ Achilles’ heel
A newly discovered protein found exclusively in mosquitoes may one day help control their numbers.

22min

Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled
Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a study published today in eLife.

3h

Cancer Death Rates Reach 25-Year Low
U.S. cancer death rates have declined continuously for the last quarter of a century, according to a new report.

4h

Computer simulation sheds new light on colliding stars
Unprecedented detail of the aftermath of a collision between two neutron stars depicted in a 3-D computer model created by a University of Alberta astrophysicist provides a better understanding of how some of the universe's fundamental elements form in cosmic collisions.

5h

Worse Than Watergate
For decades, Watergate has served as the benchmark against which all other presidential scandals are measured. One sign of its continuing importance in the popular imagination is the use of the “-gate” suffix to indicate scandal: “Billygate,” “Lewinskygate,” “Plamegate,” and far too many others to mention here. But Watergate’s time as the gold standard of presidential malfeasance might well be co

8h

New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics
Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility.

8h

Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous
According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species — turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.

16h

Paul Manafort Is Bad at Basic Tech, From Passwords to PDFs
The former Trump campaign chair keeps getting in trouble thanks at least in part to subpar digital security.

1h

Spinning Black Holes Could Open Up Gentle Portals for Hypersonic Spacecraft
Feel like visiting another star system or dimension? You can do this by traveling through a spacetime portal of a black hole. But you better choose carefully. All black holes are not created equal.

2h

Millions of College Students Are Going Hungry
As the costs of college have climbed, some students have gone hungry. When they’ve voiced frustration , they’ve often been ridiculed : “Ramen is cheap ,” or “ Just eat cereal .” But the blight of food insecurity among college students is real, and a new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a nonpartisan congressional watchdog, highlights the breadth of those affected. There are

3h

Rotating black holes may serve as gentle portals for hyperspace travel
One of the most cherished science fiction scenarios is using a black hole as a portal to another dimension or time or universe. That fantasy may be closer to reality than previously imagined.

3h

Scientists confirm that chromosomes are formed by stacked layers
A new study based on electron microscopy techniques at low temperatures demonstrates that during mitosis, chromosome DNA is packed in stacked layers of chromatin. The research, published in EMBO Journal, confirms a surprising structure proposed by UAB researchers over a decade ago, but criticized due to the limitations of the technique used.

4h

Artificial intelligence detects the presence of viruses
Many biosensing applications rely on characterization of specific analytes such as proteins, viruses and bacteria, among many other targets, which can be accomplished by using micro- or nano-scale particles. In such biosensors, these particles are coated with a surface chemistry that makes them stick to the target analyte forming clusters in response. The higher the target analyte concentration is

4h

Study shows younger children and chimps less likely to make irrational decisions when social comparison is in play
A team of researchers affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Yale University and the University of Göttingen, has found that older children are more likely to make seemingly irrational decisions when social comparison is at play. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group describes experiments they carried out wit

4h

T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'
Tyrannosaurus rex, renowned for being one of the most fearsome creatures to have ever lived, evolved a bite that was less impressive in relation to its body size than a tiny Galapagos ground finch, scientists say.

4h

Astronomers investigate open cluster NGC 6530
Italian astronomers have investigated the young open cluster NGC 6530 by conducting a statistical study of its global properties. The research, which provides important insights on the cluster membership, was presented in a paper published December 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

4h

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment
With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.

5h

Cowi: Der er jord nok i København til de nye Holme
I alt regner Cowi med, at der skal bruges svimlende 23 millioner m3 jord til opfyldningen af de 3,1 millioner kvadratmeter store øer. Hvis det bliver svært at skaffe jord kan det true hele projektets businesscase.

6h

Another Casualty of the Government Shutdown: Hurricane Preparedness
Weather models are not being updated and training sessions might be canceled during the budget standoff — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

With 86% Drop, California’s Monarch Butterfly Population Hits Record Low
The monarchs’ declining wintertime numbers are “potentially catastrophic,” according to the nonprofit conservation group that conducted the count.

7h

Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time
Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

18h

19h

Space microbes aren't so alien after all
A new study has found that — despite its seemingly harsh conditions — the ISS is not causing bacteria to mutate into dangerous, antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The bacteria are instead simply responding, and perhaps evolving, to survive in a stressful environment.

23h

"Vi finder nok ud af det": Øplan er blot en 'vision'
Der er ikke tale om et projekt med faste rammer – men en vision, fastslår Hvidovres borgmester. Budgettet vil blive ændret, efterhånden som projektet skrider frem, siger erhversvminister Rasmus Jarlov.

6h

41min

#54 Kroppen i rummet
Professor i rummedicin Peter Norsk og astronaut Andreas Mogensen forklarer, hvordan menneskekroppen bliver påvirket af at være i rummet.

14h

2h

‘ANYmal’ robot stalks dark sewers to test its navigation
Researchers are working to make sure a seeing, hearing, door-opening robot called “ANYmal” can also function in extreme conditions—a mission that takes them to the labyrinth of drains and tunnels below Zurich. Their aim is to determine whether ANYmal—a robot that ANYbotics, an ETH Zurich spin-off company, jointly developed with Robotic Systems Lab—could one day be useful in sewer systems. It migh

4h

‘Beyond Weird’ and ‘What Is Real?’ try to make sense of quantum weirdness
The books ‘Beyond Weird’ and ‘What is Real?’ have different perspectives on what quantum physics says about reality.

5h

‘DeepSqueak’ program decodes rat speak
Mice and rats are social and chatty. But what are they saying? A new software program called DeepSqueak will help figure that out. Not only can humans not hear many rodent vocalizations, but existing computer programs to detect these vocalizations have flaws. They pick up other noises, are slow to analyze data, and rely on inflexible, rules-based algorithms to detect calls. The new program takes

31min

‘DeepSqueak’ program decodes rat speak
Mice and rats are social and chatty. But what are they saying? A new software program called DeepSqueak will help figure that out. Not only can humans not hear many rodent vocalizations, but existing computer programs to detect these vocalizations have flaws. They pick up other noises, are slow to analyze data, and rely on inflexible, rules-based algorithms to detect calls. The new program takes

31min

‘Ghosts’ of fishing past can upend conservation
Conservation of a renewable resource like fish or other wildlife often hinges on habits or past decisions, research finds. The study challenges conventional expectations that the collapse of fast-growing natural resources is unlikely. Conservation is much easier to continue once it starts, says lead author Edward W. Tekwa, a postdoctoral associate in the ecology, evolution, and natural resources

1d

‘Selfish’ genes make different species incompatible
Sex chromosomes evolve to be genetically incompatible between species faster than the rest of the genetic chromosomes, research shows, and reveals the factors at play in this incompatibility. Most evolutionary biologists distinguish one species from another based on reproductivity: members of different species either won’t or can’t mate with one another, or, if they do, the resulting offspring ar

15h

‘Spit test’ detects malaria before symptoms begin
Researchers have developed an easy-to-use saliva test to screen for the parasite that causes malaria. The non-invasive “spit test” could be a key tool in efforts to eradicate malaria, which kills about 500,000 children each year, mostly under the age of 5 in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinicians currently test for malaria using a blood test, which requires skin pricks that often are stressful for childr

9h

‘Striking number’ of Danish households are food insecure
When people can’t afford enough good quality food, both their physical and mental health suffer, research in Denmark suggests. People living in approximately 200,000 households in Denmark can’t afford enough food, according to the new study. The work uses measurement methods used in the United States, where public authorities regularly monitor the prevalence of food insecurity. Because the study

1d

»Apollo 11 var vores ‘Rumrejsen 2001’ – alt blev muligt«
Cand.scient. Henrik Stub var yngstemand i radioens ekspertpanel under månelandingen og var som alle andre grebet af »berusende begejstring«. I dag erkender han, at alle overså, at Apollo slet ikke var et rumprojekt, men et politisk projekt.

3h

»Glem Mars. Vi kommer aldrig længere end til Månen«
Christian Rovsing var Danmarks Radios kommentator under månerejserne. Den 33-årige civilingeniør var bekymret for astronauternes helbred, da Apollo-æraen tog fart, og tror heller ikke i dag, at vi vil klare de lange rumrejser.

3h

»Havde jeg vidst, hvor rumfarten var i 2018, var jeg blevet skuffet«
Hendes hus hedder MECO (Main Engine Cut Off), og efter 30 års arbejde i Nasa er danske Mariann Albjerg ikke i tvivl: Vi kommer tilbage til Månen. Snart.

3h

»Uberørt« ingeniørformand vil rydde op i skandaleramt A-kasse
Formanden for IDA, Thomas Damkjær Petersen, forsøger at blive ny formand for Akademikernes A-Kasse, hvis samlede ledelse har trukket sig.

10h

1 knee replacement surgery sets the stage for another
Nearly a quarter of people who have total knee replacement surgery are likely to need a second surgery on their other knee within five years, research shows. This may be the result of abnormal walking patterns after surgery. “If we can change the way someone moves or improve their walking ability after surgery while also reducing the need for a second knee replacement, we may also be able to redu

29min

10 Strangest Medical Cases of 2018
Here are the most intriguing medical cases made headlines in 2018

3h

10 Things We Learned About the First Americans in 2018
2018 was full of scientific discoveries about the first Americans, including how and when they arrived.

2h

10 Times Humans Were Total Morons Around Animals in 2018
Here are a few of humanity's most embarrassing and shameful moments involving animals this year.

1h

10 Times Science Proved the World is Amazing in 2018
Our world is enchanted — and if you need proof, just turn to science.

2h

100 millioner kroner til naturvidenskabelig begejstring
Kriblekrable-projekt til de alleryngste, virtuelt observatorium ved Brorfelde og 17 andre projekter har fået del i Novo Nordisk Fondens støtte til naturvidenskabelig uddannelse og formidling.

11h

100 years ago, airmail took flight
On December 25, 1918 a daring French industrialist launched the world's first ever airmail service, flying between the southwestern French city of Toulouse and Barcelona in northeastern Spain.

2h

14 Most Bizarre Scientific Discoveries of 2018
2018 was a weird one in science, from boiling bats to blueberry Earth.

1h

150 years on, the periodic table has more stories than it has elements
The organized rows and columns of the Periodic Table hide a rich and twisting history.

2h

150 years on, the periodic table has more stories than it has elements
The organized rows and columns of the Periodic Table hide a rich and twisting history.

2h

15-years of satellite imagery shows snow's comings and goings
Winter snows in the Sierra Nevada Mountains create the snowpacks that serve as a primary water source for the western U.S. Due to rising average temperatures, snowpacks in the Great Basin appear to be transitioning from seasonal (predictable amount and melt rate), to "ephemeral," (short-lived, less predictable). Ephemeral snow has been poorly tracked and understood.

1d

16 Decades of Atlantic Christmases
Since publishing its first issue in 1857, The Atlantic has marked 160 Christmases. Contributors, by dint of the magazine’s New England and Christian roots, made a point each year to memorialize the birth of Jesus and the many traditions celebrating it in every section and medium of the publication. For more than 16 decades, there have been myriad articles, stories, poems, book reviews, recipes, a

2h

18 Times Quantum Particles Blew Our Minds in 2018
These are all the biggest, most shocking quantum discoveries we covered in 2018.

3h

2 diabetes drugs spike heart attack risk
Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, or amputation, a new study warns. “People should know if the medications they’re taking to treat their diabetes could lead to serious cardiovascular harm,” says lead author Matthew O’Brien, assistant professor of general internal medicine and geriatrics

7h

200 hurtigladestationer skyder op på tre år
E.ON er på vej med hurtigladestationer ved motorvejsnettet i syv store lande. Lignende anlæg kan komme på plads centralt i storbyerne.

10h

2018 in Quotes
From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community.

1d

2018 is almost finished, so I'm celebrating all the gadgets I loved
Gadgets My favorite products of the year. I've been testing products for two years. Testing for the year has come to a close. Here are the items I loved.

23h

2018 Rosetta Stones Roundup: A Very Hot Year for Geology
We take a look back at some of the hottest geology of 2018, and get a glimpse of what 2019 has to offer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

2018 Was a Year to Forget. Really.
Our memory for the details of real-life events is poor, according to a recent study . Seven MIT students took a one hour walk through Cambridge, MA. A day later, they were presented with one second video clips they may or may not have seen during their walk (the “ foils ” were taken from another person's recording). Mean recognition accuracy was 55.7%, barely better than guessing. 1 Minimal recog

11h

2018 Was a Year to Forget. Really.
Our memory for the details of real-life events is poor, according to a recent study . Seven MIT students took a one hour walk through Cambridge, MA. A day later, they were presented with one second video clips they may or may not have seen during their walk (the “ foils ” were taken from another person's recording). Mean recognition accuracy was 55.7%, barely better than guessing. 1 Minimal recog

1d

2h

2018: A Big Year In Space
This past year was a weird and eventful one for news from outer space. We saw everything from a red sports car being shot off the planet to a detailed new map of our Milky Way to a mysterious hole drilled in the International Space Station.

18h

2h

2018’s weirdest stories: Friendly horses, toddler robots and moonmoons
New Scientist has covered some strange scientific findings this year. Here is our round-up of the weirdest and wackiest

3h

2019 Preview: AI to best humans at one of world’s most complex games
A team of AI bots were beaten at the video game Dota 2 by human players in June, but in 2019 they will return with a vengeance to become the world's best

1h

2019 Preview: DNA testing will lead to a decline in genetic disorders
A large trial of a pre-pregnancy DNA test could be the first step towards marked declines in inherited disorders being passed on to future generations

1h

2019 Preview: Electric cars of all shapes and sizes will hit the road
Various kinds of electric cars are on their way from manufacturers who have never made them before, such as Volkswagen, Volvo and Audi

13min

2019 Preview: Gravitational waves will be discovered every few weeks
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and other experiments will detect dozens more ripples in space time

7h

2019 Preview: Gravitational waves will be discovered every few weeks
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and other experiments will detect dozens more ripples in space time

7h

2019 Preview: Renewable energy race to ramp up as oil use skyrockets
As global demand for energy grows, we will need to switch to renewables even faster to avoid climate catastrophe

8h

222 dead as volcano-triggered tsunami hits Indonesia
A volcano-triggered tsunami has left at least 222 people dead and hundreds more injured after slamming without warning into beaches around Indonesia's Sunda Strait, officials said Sunday, voicing fears that the toll would rise further.

12h

250 years after Captain Cook's arrival, we still can't be sure how many Māori lived in Aotearoa at the time
Two hundred and fifty years ago this year, James Cook's ship the Endeavour arrived off the eastern coast of New Zealand. The following circumnavigation marked the beginning of ongoing European contact with the indigenous population, and eventually mass British immigration from 1840.

21h

2D materials: Researchers discover multilayer band gap using its own technology
Korean researchers have proved the existence of the second band gap in a 2D structure. The result is expected to be used in various fields such as the development of emerging materials, solar cells, and catalysts.

9h

3 out of 4 Americans are lonely, study says
The pang of loneliness is far higher than even the gloomiest of previous estimates, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

3h

3 proofs that debunk flat-Earth theory
Hey flat Earthers, it's time to put your theory to bed once and for all! "There are so many proofs that the Earth is round, it's difficult to know where to start. And it's not okay to think that the Earth is flat; this is not a viable argument," says NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller. Thaller explains three observable proofs that instantly debunk flat-Earth theory with irrefutable evidence of the

1d

3 tips for avoiding ‘wine teeth’
Why do some people’s teeth stain after drinking red wine—and how can you prevent it while enjoying a glass or two during the holidays? The answer lies in understanding the relationship between the nature of wine and your tooth enamel, says Uchenna Akosa, a dentist who heads Rutgers University Health University Dental Associates in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the faculty practice of Rutgers School

12h

300 blind mice uncover genetic causes of eye disease
Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients.

1h

300 blind mice uncover genetic causes of eye disease
Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients.

6h

35 år gammelt søkabel lækker olie nær Hornbæk
Energinet og Svenska Kraftnät er med dykkere på vej ned for helt præcis at lokalisere lækken på et 400 kV-kabel ud for Ellekilde Hage. Flydespærringer og miljøskib holder styr på olien

3h

35 år gammelt søkabel lækker olie nær Hornbæk
Energinet og Svenska Kraftnät er med dykkere på vej ned for helt præcis at lokalisere lækken på et 400 kV-kabel ud for Ellekilde Hage. Flydespærringer og miljøskib holder styr på olien

3h

372,000 German drivers join legal action against Volkswagen
Some 372,000 German owners of Volkswagen cars fitted with motors that cheated emissions tests have joined a collective legal action against the auto giant, official figures showed Thursday.

19h

3-D-printed guns may be more dangerous to their users than targets
Despite fears that guns made with 3-D printers will let criminals and terrorists easily make untraceable, undetectable plastic weapons at home, my own experience with 3-D manufacturing quality control suggests that, at least for now, 3-D-printed firearms may pose as much, or maybe even more, of a threat to the people who try to make and use them.

11h

2h

3-week-old elephant dies at Ohio zoo after sudden illness
The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium says an elephant born three weeks ago has died.

17h

45% of UK scientists don’t believe in God
Scientists in the United Kingdom are significantly less religious than the general population there, research finds. In addition, UK scientists at elite universities are more likely to never attend religious services than those at less prestigious schools. The study also indicates biologists are more likely to never attend religious services than physicists. The study uses data from a survey of b

7h

50-året for Apollo 11 nærmer sig: Kommer vi nogensinde tilbage til Månen?
PLUS. Svaret er ja. Og det bliver også med bemandede missioner engang i 2020’erne. Spørgsmålet er blot, hvem der kommer først – USA eller Kina.

5h

5G-frekvenser holder køreplanen trods udskudt auktion
På trods af forsinkelse og mørklægning, bliver de to vigtige frekvensbånd 700 og 900 Mhz klar til brug i 2020.

2h

60% of US children’s deaths in 2016 were preventable
The United States lost 20,360 children and teens in 2016—60 percent of them to preventable injuries, a new study shows. More than 4,100 of them died in motor vehicle crashes, though prevention efforts and better trauma care have cut the death rate of young people from such crashes in half in less than two decades. Meanwhile, firearms—the second cause of death in youth—claimed the lives of more th

1h

67.000 solcelleejere slap for flexafregning i første omgang
Ved årsskiftet blev omkring 18.000 årsafregnede solcelleejere overflyttet til flexafregning. Resten af de i alt 85.000 vil blive overført løbende, oplyser Energinet.

2h

7,6 millioner spillerkonti lækket fra populært onlinespil
Onlinespillet »Town of Salem« har fået lækket kontooplysninger på stort set hele spillerbasen, herunder kodeord hashet med usikker algoritme.

15h

9 most common New Year’s resolutions — and how to make them happen
The top three New Year's resolutions for 2018 were to eat healthier, get more exercise, and save more money. Care to guess what the top three are this year? We check in with experts to devise strategies for tackling the most common New Year's resolutions. Knowing exactly what you want to accomplish and how you will do it can help increase your chances of success in 2019. With New Year's rounding

6h

9 Ocean Conservation Groups You Don't Know about…but Should
Big environmental groups get most of the press, but there are also many unsung heroes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

9 Ocean Conservation Groups You Don't Know about…but Should
Big environmental groups get most of the press, but there are also many unsung heroes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

A backward current
[no content]

14h

A boundary dance of amyloid-beta stepping into dementia
Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-beta peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. m

8h

A boundary dance of amyloid-beta stepping into dementia
Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-beta peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. m

8h

A boundary dance of amyloid-β stepping into dementia
Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. The findings were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

7h

A 'bran' new way to preserve healthy food with natural ingredients
A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently used by the food industry, according to researchers at Penn State.

13h

A 'bran' new way to preserve healthy food with natural ingredients
A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently used by the food industry, according to researchers.

9h

A brief history of black holes
Late in 2018, the gravitational wave observatory, LIGO, announced that they had detected the most distant and massive source of ripples of spacetime ever monitored: waves triggered by pairs of black holes colliding in deep space. Only since 2015 have we been able to observe these invisible astronomical bodies, which can be detected only by their gravitational attraction. The history of our hunt fo

6h

A catalytic flying carpet
Pitt researchers for the first time apply catalytic chemical reactions to 2D sheets to generate flows that transform these sheets into mobile, 3D objects.

1d

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. As well as the lack of capacity to generate the energy necessary for the cells, the loss of mitochondrial information can generate an increase in oxygen free radicals that attack and damage the genetic material or produce Iron-Sulphur protein deficiencies. All this brings about incorrect cell functio

13h

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. As well as the lack of capacity to generate the energy necessary for the cells, the loss of mitochondrial information can generate an increase in oxygen free radicals that attack and damage the genetic material or produce Iron-Sulphur protein deficiencies. All this brings about incorrect cell functio

19h

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.

4h

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.

16h

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.

16h

A collicular visual cortex: Neocortical space for an ancient midbrain visual structure
Visual responses in the cerebral cortex are believed to rely on the geniculate input to the primary visual cortex (V1). Indeed, V1 lesions substantially reduce visual responses throughout the cortex. Visual information enters the cortex also through the superior colliculus (SC), but the function of this input on visual responses in the cortex is less clear. SC lesions affect cortical visual respo

14h

A compound being developed to treat eye disease also kills leukemia cells
An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed for the treatment of a form of eye disease has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer. Scientists have found that this compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells. The results reveal a potential new treatment approach for an aggressive blood ca

18h

A cosmic collision may be coming for our galaxy sooner than we thought
The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud may be on a collision course with the Milky Way – and it could make our galaxy less strange when they smash in 2 billion years

9h

14h

A Dredge Landing Disaster for the Dakotas | Gold Rush: White Water
Disaster strikes after the Dakotas try landing their dredge on a remote river via a helicopter. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: White Water: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush-white-water/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.

14h

A Dredge Landing Disaster for the Dakotas | Gold Rush: White Water
Disaster strikes after the Dakotas try landing their dredge on a remote river via a helicopter. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: White Water: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush-white-water/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.

1d

A guide to hunting zombie stars
Apparently not all supernovas work. And when they fail, they leave behind a half-chewed remnant, still burning from leftover heat but otherwise lifeless: a zombie star. Astronomers aren't sure how many of these should-be-dead creatures lurk in the interstellar depths, but with recent simulations scientists are making a list of their telltale signatures so that future surveys can potentially track

1d

A hidden cradle of plant evolution in Permian tropical lowlands
The latitudinal biodiversity gradient today has deep roots in the evolutionary history of Earth’s biota over geologic time. In the marine realm, earliest fossil occurrences at low latitudes reveal a tropical cradle for many animal groups. However, the terrestrial fossil record—especially from drier environments that are thought to drive evolutionary innovation—is sparse. We present mixed plant-fo

2h

A high-performance material at extremely low temperatures: High-entropy alloy
In this paper, the mechanical properties of CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloys were deeply studied. Researchers found that twinning-dominated deformation mechanism in this alloy lead to the serration behavior on the stress-strain curves, and together with the FCC-HCP transition result in the superior mechanical property at liquid-helium temperatures.

4h

A linear cobalt(II) complex with maximal orbital angular momentum from a non-Aufbau ground state
Orbital angular momentum is a prerequisite for magnetic anisotropy, although in transition metal complexes it is typically quenched by the ligand field. By reducing the basicity of the carbon donor atoms in a pair of alkyl ligands, we synthesized a cobalt(II) dialkyl complex, Co(C(SiMe 2 ONaph) 3 ) 2 (where Me is methyl and Naph is a naphthyl group), wherein the ligand field is sufficiently weak

2h

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria
In a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers, led by UConn associate professor of molecular and cell biology Spencer Nyholm, sequenced the genome of this little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this par

4h

14h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel
Scientists at Stanford University have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research, published Dec. 20 in the journal Joule, could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

7h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel
Scientists have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

6h

A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives
By tweaking an iron-platinum alloy, researchers are trying to clear a few hurdles slowing the material's viability as a future perpendicular recording media.

4h

A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives
Magnetic recording is the primary technology underpinning today's large-scale data storage, and companies are racing to develop new hard disk devices capable of recording densities greater than 1 terabit per square inch. In AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, a group of researchers in India report their work tweaking the L10 phase, or crystallographic orientation, of an iron and platinum alloy as a

8h

14h

A Mission: Impossible Fake-Out for the Ages
Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Christopher McQuarrie’s Mission: Impossible—Fallout . (Read our previous entries here .) The ludicrously dubbed “Impossible Mission Force,” the imaginary federal agency at the heart of the Mission: Impossibl

9h

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral

14h

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral of the 2017 Paris marathon.

1h

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
Precise simulations of the movement and behavior of crowds can be vital to the production of digital sequences or the creation of large structures for crowd management. However, the ability to quantitatively predict the collective dynamic of a group responding to external stimulation remains a largely open issue, based primarily on models in which each individual's actions are simulated according

4h

A molecular hammock for cotranslational modification
Proteins do most of the real work in cells and are modified in accordance with functional requirements. An LMU team has now shown how proteins are chemically altered on the ribosome, even before they fold into the active conformations.

9h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children
A new study led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The paper in the journal Environmental Research is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the conte

6h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children
A new study led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The paper in the journal Environmental Research is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the conte

7h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children
A new study organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The article is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the context of assessing the benefits of air pollution and climate change policies.

6h

A new 'atlas' of genetic influences on osteoporosis
A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density (BMD), one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis. The paper, published in Nature Genetics, identifies 518 genome-wide loci, of which 301 are newly di

11h

A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease
Korean researchers have clarified the fundamentals of coiled toxin protein which causes neurodegenerative brain disorders. The result is expected to speed the development of treatment for neurodegenerative disorder.

3h

A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease
Researchers have clarified the fundamentals of coiled toxin protein which causes neurodegenerative brain disorders. The result is expected to speed the development of treatment for neurodegenerative disorder.

22h

A New Idea about What Triggers Alzheimer's
Changes in brain cells’ DNA may be responsible—and if so, medicines already developed for other diseases might be used to treat it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

A new way to cut the power of tumors
Instead of tackling tumors head-on, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc chose to regulate their vascularization by intervening with cellular receptor overexpressed specifically in cancer blood vessels. By acting on the development of the blood vessels within the tumor, scientists hope to modulate vasculature and deliver the treatments extremely

8h

A New Year vow for our leaders? Start taking climate change seriously
Never has there been a more important time for politicians to move beyond paying lip service to the fight against global warming, says Owen Gaffney

1d

A new, escape-proof fish cage for a lice-free salmon farm
In October this year, the first salmon were farmed in a new fish production prototype in Trøndelag, Norway. With a rigid steel construction and a water current generator, the new Aquatraz fish cage both prevents fish escape and keeps the fish in shape, while researchers from the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) are monitoring the sea lice and water quality in the cage.

1d

A newly discovered catalyst promises cheaper hydrogen production
A new catalyst could dramatically decrease the cost of producing hydrogen, one of the cleanest renewable fuels. Based on molybdenum sulfide, the catalyst was developed by a group at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, led by Shi Jie Wang.

9h

A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation
Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team has identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Furthermore, they found that it plays an import

18min

A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation
Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team led by investigators at Kanazawa University identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Further

10h

A 'pacemaker' for North African climate
Researchers at MIT have analyzed dust deposited off the coast of west Africa over the last 240,000 years, and found that the Sahara, and North Africa in general, has swung between wet and dry climates every 20,000 years.

1d

2h

14h

A quarter of all Holocaust victims were murdered during only three months
The majority of deaths during the single largest murder campaign of the Holocaust, called Operation Reinhard, occurred during a single three-month period, a new study reveals. Not only does this study indicate that the murder rate during Operation Reinhard has previously been greatly underestimated, it also provides new insights into the profound efficiency of Nazi death camps and the systematic m

1d

A ray of light for treating cardiac conduction disorders [Engineering]
Implantable cardiac pacemakers have been employed for the treatment of various arrhythmias beginning in the 1950s. Throughout the years, developments in microfabrication technologies, as well as advances in surgical procedures and the understanding of electrophysiology, have brought forth next-generation cardiac pacemakers. These are much smaller, capable of feedback regulation, and…

33min

A ray of light for treating cardiac conduction disorders [Engineering]
Implantable cardiac pacemakers have been employed for the treatment of various arrhythmias beginning in the 1950s. Throughout the years, developments in microfabrication technologies, as well as advances in surgical procedures and the understanding of electrophysiology, have brought forth next-generation cardiac pacemakers. These are much smaller, capable of feedback regulation, and…

33min

A Rising Threat to Wildlife: Electrocution
Power lines and electrified fences are killing birds, monkeys, pangolins and even elephants in surprising numbers.

36min

A rollable TV? LG's latest OLED TV television packs a futuristic 'wow' factor
Televisions have long been a staple at CES. LG's latest OLED TV, however, takes the traditional TV experience and flips it. Or rather, rolls it.

22h

A safe, wearable soft sensor
Harvard University researchers have developed a soft, non-toxic wearable sensor that unobtrusively attaches to the hand and measures the force of a grasp and the motion of the hand and fingers.

6h

A safe, wearable soft sensor
Researchers have developed a soft, non-toxic wearable sensor that unobtrusively attaches to the hand and measures the force of a grasp and the motion of the hand and fingers.

1h

2h

A salivary effector enables whitefly to feed on host plants by eliciting salicylic acid-signaling pathway [Agricultural Sciences]
Phloem-feeding insects feed on plant phloem using their stylets. While ingesting phloem sap, these insects secrete saliva to circumvent plant defenses. Previous studies have shown that, to facilitate their feeding, many phloem-feeding insects can elicit the salicylic acid- (SA-) signaling pathway and thus suppress effective jasmonic acid defenses. However, the…

33min

A salivary effector enables whitefly to feed on host plants by eliciting salicylic acid-signaling pathway [Agricultural Sciences]
Phloem-feeding insects feed on plant phloem using their stylets. While ingesting phloem sap, these insects secrete saliva to circumvent plant defenses. Previous studies have shown that, to facilitate their feeding, many phloem-feeding insects can elicit the salicylic acid- (SA-) signaling pathway and thus suppress effective jasmonic acid defenses. However, the…

33min

A skin test after a traumatic event may identify those at risk of PTSD
A simple skin test appears to predict those most at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder – a finding that may help them get the support they need

18h

A skin test after a traumatic event may identify those at risk of PTSD
A simple skin test appears to predict those most at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder – a finding that may help them get the support they need

1d

A Star Is Born Finds Movie Magic in a Parking Lot
Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time Ally (played by Lady Gaga) and Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) are sitting together in an empty parking lot in the middle of th

11h

A Star Is Born Finds Movie Magic in a Parking Lot
Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time Ally (played by Lady Gaga) and Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) are sitting together in an empty parking lot in the middle of th

11h

A subtle strategy to spend more responsibly
Couples who spend from joint accounts are more likely to spend their money on utilitarian purchases rather than pleasurable items.

10h

A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy
On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.

2h

A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy
On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.

2h

A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy
On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.

22h

A Terrifying Copycat
In 1989, the aspiring filmmaker Rolfe Kanefsky, who was then 19 years old, cobbled together $100,000 to make his dream movie. Thus, the first self-aware, meta-textual horror film was born. Although There's Nothing Out There was groundbreaking and garnered the attention of high-ranking studio executives, due to a series of unfortunate events, it tanked at the box office. It was dead on arrival. Ch

14h

A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement, researchers say
Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. How the brain does this is a mystery.

13h

A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement
Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. How the brain does this is a mystery.

8h

A tomato for everyone: 'Sunviva' for the good of all
Plant breeders at the University of Göttingen and Agrecol have launched a joint initiative to protect seeds as common property. Agrecol developed an 'Open Source Seed Licence,' which legally protects seeds as commons (i.e., a natural resource accessible to all members of society) and thus protects them from patenting and similar issues such as 'plant variety protection.' The results were published

2h

A Touch to Remember
The sense of touch generates surprisingly powerful and long-lasting memories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

A Touch to Remember
The sense of touch generates surprisingly powerful and long-lasting memories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

'A way cool way to be': Study offers new insights into children with autism
In the first study of its kind, a team of researchers was able to perform functional MRIs of a group of children with autism whose IQs averaged 54. The scans offer a glimpse into what's happening in their brains.

1d

Aboard the giant sand-sucking ships that China uses to reshape the world
Massive ships, mind-boggling amounts of sand, and an appetite for expansionism in the South China Sea: the recipe for a land grab like no other.

1h

About half of US adolescents report having private time with healthcare providers
Only about half of young people 13 to 26 years old in the United States report ever having time with their regular healthcare provider without a parent or someone else in the room, despite professional guidelines that recommend adolescents and young adults have access to confidential services and time for private discussions. Young people who report having private time or discussing confidentialit

4h

Acknowledgment of Reviewers, 2018 [Reviewer Acknowledgment]
The PNAS editors would like to thank all the individuals who dedicated their considerable time and expertise to the journal by serving as reviewers in 2018. Their generous contribution is deeply appreciated. A Lars Aagaard Stuart A. Aaronson Pierre Abad Alejandro Aballay Snezhana I. Abarzhi Maria Abascal Adam R. Abate…

21h

Acne medication changes the skin’s microbiome
Isotretinoin, a form of vitamin A that has been prescribed to treat acne for decades, changes the microbiome of the skin to more closely resemble the skin of people without acne, according to a new study. The study sheds light on how isotretinoin works and provides information that could lead to developing microbiome-based acne treatments, researchers say. There is a need for such alternatives be

5h

Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is required for the antidepressant actions of (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine [Pharmacology]
Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, produces rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. (2R,6R)-Hydroxynorketamine [(2R,6R)-HNK], a metabolite of ketamine, is reported to produce rapid antidepressant effects in rodent models without the side effects of ketamine. Importantly, (2R,6R)-HNK does not block NMDA rece

1d

14h

ADHD drugs are unlikely to cause cardiac damage in children who take them, study finds
The results of a long-term NIH-funded study published last month could allay concerns that ADHD drugs can cause cardiac damage in children.

1h

Adolescence can be awkward. Here's how parents can help their child make and maintain good friendships
Secondary school can be a lonely place for adolescents who don't have a best friend or a group of trusted friends. Young people will be more skilled in the art of making genuine friends (and keeping them) if they know how to be assertive, are optimistic about life, have some basic social skills and have a relationship with a parent/carer that includes honest talk.

6h

Adolescence can be awkward. Here's how parents can help their child make and maintain good friendships
Secondary school can be a lonely place for adolescents who don't have a best friend or a group of trusted friends. Young people will be more skilled in the art of making genuine friends (and keeping them) if they know how to be assertive, are optimistic about life, have some basic social skills and have a relationship with a parent/carer that includes honest talk.

6h

Adolescents who self-harm more likely to commit violent crime
Young people who self-harm are three times more likely to commit violent crime than those who do not, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. The study also found young people who self-harm and commit violent crime — 'dual harmers' — are more likely to have a history of childhood maltreatment and lower self-control than those who self-harm only.

4h

Adults with autism can read complex emotions in others
New research shows for the first time that adults with autism can recognise complex emotions such as regret and relief in others as easily as those without the condition.

8h

Adults with autism can read complex emotions in others
New research shows for the first time that adults with autism can recognize complex emotions such as regret and relief in others as easily as those without the condition.

8h

Adults with cerebral palsy at increased risk of depression, anxiety
While cerebral palsy is considered a pediatric condition because it develops and is diagnosed in early childhood, it is a lifelong condition with the majority of children living into adulthood. Little research exists on the mental health of adults with cerebral palsy. This study included 1,700 adults 18 years or older with cerebral palsy and 5,100 adults without cerebral palsy.

6h

After big earthquake, aftershocks continue to rattle Alaska
Nearly three weeks after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake shook up southcentral Alaska, the state continues to register frequent aftershocks.

13h

After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?
Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A new study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule.

1d

After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?
Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A new study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule.

1d

After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?
Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A UB study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule.

13h

After Pluto, New Horizons mission nears an object 'beyond the known world'
Three and a half years after giving humanity its first close-up view of Pluto, and almost 13 years after launching from Earth, the New Horizons spacecraft will explore another new frontier: a reddish hunk of rock and ice known as Ultima Thule.

6h

After scandal-filled year, what's next for Facebook?
Facebook is closing out 2018 the same way it began the year: in defense mode.

14h

Age and foaming—how to predict when a volcano will erupt
The eruption of a volcano can have devastating consequences – killing people and destroying livelihoods, as well as releasing vast amounts of ash into the sky that disrupts air travel and alters the climate. Knowing what goes on underground, however, would facilitate better warnings for when an eruption will occur – and help save lives while keeping damage to a minimum.

4h

Age and foaming—how to predict when a volcano will erupt
The eruption of a volcano can have devastating consequences – killing people and destroying livelihoods, as well as releasing vast amounts of ash into the sky that disrupts air travel and alters the climate. Knowing what goes on underground, however, would facilitate better warnings for when an eruption will occur – and help save lives while keeping damage to a minimum.

4h

Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age
A collaborative team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average.

8h

Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age
Researchers analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average.

5h

Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist
Sadists derive pleasure or enjoyment from another person's pain, yet new research shows that sadistic behavior ultimately deprives the sadists of happiness.

8h

Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist
Sadists derive pleasure or enjoyment from another person's pain, yet new research shows that sadistic behavior ultimately deprives the sadists of happiness.

10h

AI predicts cancer patients' symptoms
Doctors could get a head start treating cancer thanks to new AI that is able to predict symptoms and their severity throughout the course of a patient's treatment.

1d

AI, robotics, automation: The fourth industrial revolution is here
For Chinese guests at Marriott International hotels, the check-in process will soon get easier. The hotel giant announced last summer that it's developing facial recognition systems that will allow guests to check in at a kiosk in less than a minute via a quick scan of their facial features.

7h

AIDS — an approach for targeting HIV reservoirs
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus. Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or 'res

5h

AIDS: An approach for targeting HIV reservoirs
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus. Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or 'reservoirs', ex vivo

4h

Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease
A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Valle de México, Boise State, Universidad Veracruzana, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría and Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain Research heightens together with German company Analytik Jena concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites.These findings are published in

9h

Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease
A new study heightens concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites.

18min

Air pollution may be making us less intelligent
Not only is air pollution bad for our lungs and heart, it turns out it could actually be making us less intelligent, too. A recent study found that in elderly people living in China, long-term exposure to air pollution may hinder cognitive performance (things like our ability to pay attention, to recall past knowledge and generate new information) in verbal and maths tests. As people age, the link

19h

Alcoholic beverages are frequently considered migraine triggers
A study of 2,197 patients who experience migraines, alcoholic beverages were reported as a trigger by 35.6 percent of participants.

9min

Alcoholic beverages are frequently considered migraine triggers
In a European Journal of Neurology study of 2,197 patients who experience migraines, alcoholic beverages were reported as a trigger by 35.6 percent of participants.