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nyheder2019december01

Underwater Loudspeakers Make Fish Flock to Dead Coral in Radical Experiment

"Juvenile fish home in on these sounds when they're looking for a place to settle."

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COP25: Island states want 'decisive' climate action to prevent inundation

The impact of rising seas prompts plea ahead of the UN climate change conference that begins on Monday in Madrid The countries most at risk of deluge from climate chaos have issued an impassioned plea to the industrialised world ahead of crucial negotiations on the Paris agreement that start on Monday in Madrid. "We see [these talks] as the last opportunity to take decisive action," Janine Felson

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23 Best Cyber Monday 2019 TV and Soundbar Deals: Samsung, Vizio, and More

(Updated Frequently) Our favorite deals on affordable televisions, OLED TVs, Roku, and more for Cyber Monday.

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Mysterious Tectonic Fault Zone Detected Off The Coast of California

A hidden network of deep sea cables makes a surprising discovery.

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Climate change: Critical year for climate change starts in Madrid

Delegates from almost 200 countries meet in the Spanish capital on Monday.

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Facial deformity in royal dynasty was linked to inbreeding, scientists confirm

The 'Habsburg jaw,' a facial condition of the Habsburg dynasty of Spanish and Austrian kings and their wives, can be attributed to inbreeding, according to new results published in the Annals of Human Biology.

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25 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Laptop and Tablet Deals: iPad, Surface, and More

(Updated Frequently) MacBooks, Windows laptops, Chromebooks, iPads, Surface tablets, hard drives, you name it. We scoured the sales to find you all the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals on laptops and tablets.

53min

Climate defenders: Taking wind power to another level

Henrik Stiesdal has been thinking about wind turbines since he was a teenager.

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UK suffering 'lack of confidence' on research funding

Ex-minister David Willetts says any new government must be bold in backing R&D

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Home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis

A new home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis — according to new research. As well as diagnosing aggressive prostate cancer, the test predicts whether patients will require treatment up to five years earlier than standard clinical methods. It also means that men don't have to come into the clinic to provide a urine sample — or have to undergo an uncomfortable rectal exa

1h

Air pollution linked to several new causes of hospital admissions

Short term exposure to fine particulate matter in the air (known as PM2.5) is associated with several newly identified causes of hospital admissions, even at levels below international air quality guidelines, finds a US study.

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Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains

For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research.

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Prostate cancer 'super responders' live for 2 years on immunotherapy

Some men with advanced prostate cancer who have exhausted all other treatment options could live for two years or more on immunotherapy, a major clinical trial has shown. Researchers found that a small proportion of men were 'super responders' and were alive and well even after the trial had ended despite having had a very poor prognosis before treatment.

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Why do we freeze when startled? New study in flies points to serotonin

A study in fruit flies has identified serotonin as a chemical that triggers the body's startle response, the automatic deer-in-the-headlights reflex that freezes the body momentarily in response to a potential threat. Today's study reveals that when a fly experiences an unexpected change to its surroundings, such as a sudden vibration, release of serotonin helps to literally — and temporarily —

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Need to safeguard drones and robotic cars against cyber attacks

Researchers executed successful stealth attacks on real and simulated robotic vehicles, revealing vulnerabilities in the attack detection system most commonly used by such vehicles.

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New high-resolution images show how malaria parasites evade frontline drugs

The first-ever detailed images of a malaria protein, a known key modulator of drug resistance, show how the parasite evades antimalarials — and may help scientists find ways to restore the drugs' potency.

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Cutting nanoparticles down to size

A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems.

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Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans

Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analyzing the remains of clams.

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UN report: Pollution from planned fossil fuel production would overshoot Paris climate goals

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections In the 2015 international Paris Climate Agreement, nearly every country [see editor's note] agreed to try and limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) and preferably closer to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial temperatures. Achieving these goals will require dramatic changes, as

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32 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Camera Deals: GoPro, Sony, Nikon, DJI, and More

(Updated Frequently) We dove deep into Black Friday and Cyber Monday discounts to find the best sales on cameras, lenses, drones, and related gear.

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Cómo enfrentar el gas lacrimógeno

Cubrir tus ojos, vías respiratorias y la mayor cantidad de piel que puedas, es la premisa básica de la protección contra el gas lacrimógeno. El uniforme de marino es opcional. (Ale_Mi via Deposit Photos/) Read the English version of this article here. Cualquiera que haya visto las noticias alguna vez sabe que a veces las protestas y manifestaciones, por más pacíficas que sean, pueden transformars

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61 Absolute Best Cyber Monday 2019 Deals: Amazon, Walmart, Etc

(Updated Frequently) Don't bother trudging to the store. We've gathered the very best Cyber Monday tech deals you can buy online.

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How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

In the riddle about the origin of scar tissue, researchers have reached an important next step. Researchers found that scars are made from a tissue beneath the skin: fascia. This new knowledge led to further discoveries about scarring mechanisms and the fascia matrix which are crucial for the research on scarless skin regeneration and the prevention of fibrosis.

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Carbon intensity of power sector down in 2019

Engineers have compiled carbon emissions for the US electric power sector for the second quarter (Q2) of 2019 as part of the CMU Power Sector Carbon Index.

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Starwatch: Taurus, the Bull of Heaven

One of the oldest recognised constellations with red giant star Aldebaran forming the bull's red eye Taurus is one of the oldest recognised constellations. Around 1000BC, the Babylonians included it in their star charts and called it GU 4 .AN.NA, the Bull of Heaven. However, its association with a bull is possibly much older. Its pattern of stars has been recognised in the 17,000-year-old cave ar

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Underwater telecom cables make superb seismic network

Photonic systems can transform underwater fiber-optic cables into a dense network of seismic stations to illuminate ocean-floor earthquake zones impossible to study today, according to a new study. The scientists turned 20 kilometers of cable around the underwater San Gregorio Fault system in Monterey Bay into an array of some 10,000 seismic sensors by interferometrically measuring backscattered l

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Researchers hope to use big data to make pipelines safer

Researchers look at the methodologies currently used by industry and academics to predict pipeline failure and their limitations. Researchers found that the existing academic literature and industry practices around pipeline failures need to further evolve around available maintenance data.

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Scientists now know what DNA's chaperone looks like

Researchers have discovered the structure of the FACT protein — a mysterious protein central to the functioning of DNA.

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Irregularly shaped parks reduce mortality risk

Some community parks are square, a reflection of the city block where they're located — but irregularly shaped parks reduce the mortality risk of residents who live near them, concluded a new study.

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Thermo-chemical power generation integrated with forced convection cooling

Scientists combine forced convection cooling with thermo-electrochemical energy conversion to create a self-sustaining liquid cooling system. A liquid electrolyte is circulated through a cell to cool a hot object, and the reversible chemical reaction in the cell generates a higher electric power than the hydrodynamic pump work required to drive the liquid through the cell. This technology resolves

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A method with roots in AI uncovers how humans make choices in groups and social media

Using a mathematical framework with roots in artificial intelligence and robotics, researchers were able to uncover the process for how a person makes choices in groups. And, they also found they were able to predict a person's choice more often than more traditional descriptive methods.

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Nearly 40% of plant species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change

Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new research.

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A carnivorous dinosaur species regrew all its teeth every few months

A meat-eating dinosaur species that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, a new study has found, surprising even the researchers. In fact, Majungasaurus grew new teeth roughly two to 13 times faster than those of other carnivorous dinosaurs, says paper lead author Michael D. D'Emic, an assistant professor of biology at Adelphi University

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Future painkillers: Activation of opioid receptor uncovered

Researchers have uncovered the binding mechanism of an important pain receptor. The results facilitate the development of new active substances. The opioids used today to treat severe pain can be addictive and sometimes have life-threatening side effects.

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Combine chemical probe resources to optimize biomedical research, scientists urge

A new report urges biomedical researchers to use online web resources very carefully, taking into account their complementary benefits and weaknesses, when selecting small-molecule chemical probes to help answer their research questions.

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Machine-guided engineering of AAV capsids

Taking a more systematic approach to the capsid protein-engineering problem, researchers mutated one by one each of the 735 amino acids within the AAV2 capsid, the best-known member of the AAV family, including all possible codon substitutions, insertions and deletions at each position. They generated a virus library containing about 200,000 variants and identified capsid changes that both maintai

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Toward more efficient computing, with magnetic waves

Researchers have devised a novel circuit design that enables precise control of computing with magnetic waves — with no electricity needed. The advance takes a step toward practical magnetic-based devices, which have the potential to compute far more efficiently than electronics.

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New vaccine will stop the spread of bovine TB

Scientists at the University of Surrey have developed a novel vaccine and complementary skin test to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB).

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Immediate treatment with antiretroviral therapy helps infants with HIV

As part of an international collaborative effort, investigators conducted immunological and virological testing on newborns in Botswana, finding that initiating antiretroviral therapy immediately, rather than waiting a few weeks, provided measurable benefits for infants born with HIV.

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Neonicotinoids and bees: Despite EU moratorium, insecticides still detectable

Since 2013, a European Union moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years.

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Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration

Young fish can be drawn to degraded coral reefs by loudspeakers playing the sounds of healthy reefs, according to new research.

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Fine-tuning gene expression during stress recovery

Scientists have discovered non-coding RNA has a novel role to fine-tune gene expressions during stress recovery, getting closer to uncovering a 30-year-old nuclear mystery.

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Additive manufacturing and NI/TI metal bolster cooling technology

Scientists have developed a novel elastocaloric cooling material, comprised of a nickel (Ni)-titanium (Ti) alloy and sculpted using additive technology, that is highly efficient, eco-friendly and easily scaled-up for commercial use.

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Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older moms more likely to develop heart problems

Changes occur in the placenta in older pregnant mothers leading to a greater likelihood of poor health in their male offspring, a study in rats has shown. Both male and female fetuses do not grow as large in older mothers, but there are sex-specific differences in changes to placental development and function. These are likely to play a central role in the increased likelihood of later-life heart

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Japanese anime and zoos boost public interest in conservation of real-life animal characters

Animated shows with animal characters — specifically the Japanese anime Kemono Friends — can increase public interest in real wildlife, including boosting donations to conservation programs at zoos. A new national analysis in Japan highlights the potential of entertainment-conservation partnerships to increase public interest in the natural world even as communities become increasingly urbanized

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Producing better guides for medical-image analysis

Researchers have devised a method that accelerates the process for creating and customizing templates used in medical-image analysis, to guide disease diagnosis.

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Vision: Not seeing the trees for the wood

Researchers have shown how it is possible that objects stand out less when they are surrounded by similar objects. This surroundings-suppressing effect is caused by feedback from higher visual brain areas. The results of this research are important for a better understanding of the way in which the brain transforms incoming light into a cohesive image.

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Gene discovery in fruit flies could help search for new treatments for mitochondrial disease

Scientists have identified a protein in fruit flies that can be targeted to reverse the effects of disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial genes. The discovery could provide clues about how to counteract human mitochondrial diseases, for which there is currently no cure.

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Silencing retroviruses to awaken cell potential

Silencing of retroviruses in the human genome is a crucial step in the production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells. Researchers led by a team from the University of Tsukuba have now identified a protein that controls retrovirus silencing, allowing the production of high quality iPSCs that could be used in applications ranging from stem cell therapy and organ regeneratio

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Armored with plastic 'hair' and silica, new perovskite nanocrystals show more durability

Researchers have demonstrated a novel approach aimed at addressing the perovskite's durability problem: encasing the perovskite inside a double-layer protection system made from plastic and silica.

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Three anti-seizure drugs equally effective for severe form of epilepsy

There are three treatment options commonly used by doctors in the emergency room to treat patients with refractory status epilepticus, severe seizures that continue even after benzodiazepine medications, which are effective in controlling seizures in more than two-thirds of patients. New findings reveal that the three drugs, levetiracetam, fosphenytoin, and valproate, are equally safe and effectiv

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Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak

Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food.

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Inadequacies in current early-stage lung cancer treatment revealed

Researchers have revealed why some existing cancer treatments are ineffective in tackling the early-stages of lung cancer. The team investigated the ability of anti-cancer agents to affect early-stage lung metastatic tumors.

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Researchers finally grasp the work week of enzymes

Scientists have found a novel way of monitoring individual enzymes as they chomp through fat. The method offers far greater insight into how enzymes function and opens up the possibility of tailoring enzyme composition for useful industrial applications such as pharmaceutical and bioethanol development and production.

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Photosynthesis — living laboratories

Biologists have demonstrated for the first time that cyanobacteria and plants employ similar mechanisms and key proteins to regulate cyclic electron flow during photosynthesis.

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First implantable magnet resonance detector

A new miniature NMR implant measures neuronal activity.

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Dance of the RNases: Coordinating the removal of RNA-DNA hybrids

Scientists have deciphered how two enzymes, RNase H2 and RNase H1, are coordinated to remove RNA-DNA hybrid structures from chromosomes.

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Politically extreme counties may act as magnets, migration patterns suggest

In a study of county-to-county migration patterns in the US, researchers found that when people migrate, they tend to move to other counties that reflect their political preferences.

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Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers

A new study finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace.

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Animal embryos evolved before animals

A new study has discovered that animal-like embryos evolved long before the first animals appear in the fossil record.

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Impact crater data analysis of Ryugu asteroid illuminates complicated geological history

Analysis of the impact craters on Ryugu using the spacecraft Hayabusa2's remote sensing image data has illuminated the geological history of the Near-Earth asteroid and revealed 77 craters. Through analyzing the location patterns and characteristics of the craters, it was discovered that the asteroid's eastern and western hemispheres were likely formed at different periods of time. It is hoped tha

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Solving fossil mystery could aid quest for ancient life on Mars

The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth.

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Material for safer football helmets may reduce head injuries

Scientists have developed elastic microlattice pads that can withstand both single hits and a series of impacts better than existing state-of-the-art foams used in football helmets. Their research suggests that the material may pave the way for helmets that better protect football players from brain injuries caused by repeated head hits.

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Guidebooks or grandmas? Where most moms get their pregnancy advice

A new study says pregnant women still rely on their mothers despite what many self-help guidebooks recommend.

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Hydromethylthionine could slow cognitive decline: Minimum dose

Researchers have reported unexpected results of a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in over 1,000 patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

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Atomic-scale manufacturing method could enable ultra-efficient computers

As computers continue to infiltrate almost every aspect of modern life, their negative impact on the environment grows. According to recent estimates, the electricity required to power today's computers releases a total of more than 1 gigatonne of carbon emissions to the atmosphere each year. Now, researchers have developed a new manufacturing process that could enable ultra-efficient atomic compu

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Working-age Americans dying at higher rates, especially in economically hard-hit states

Mortality rates among working-age Americans continue to climb, causing a decrease in US life expectancy that is severely impacting certain regions of the United States, according to a new study. The report, 'Life Expectancy and Mortality Rates in the United States, 1959-2017,' is one of the most comprehensive 50-state analyses of US mortality.

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What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?

White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells — called cytotoxic lymphocytes — avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tum

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Artificial intelligence-based algorithm for intensive care of traumatic brain injury

A recent study presents the first artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that may be utilized in the intensive care unit for treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

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Molecular eraser enables better data storage and computers for AI

Scientists have added a crucial tool to the atomic-scale manufacturing toolkit with major implications for today's data driven — carbon-intensive — world, according to new research.

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On balance, some neonicotinoid pesticides could benefit some bees

The story of neonicotinoids is growing more nuanced. Europe has banned outdoor use of three of these insecticides to protect bee populations. Two other neonicotinoids are still permitted, but little is known about their impact on bees. New research on one of the permitted neonicotinoids indicates it effectively controls pests and might even help bees.

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'Smart' surfaces to help blood-vessel grafts knit better, more safely

Researchers have created a new coating to prevent clotting and infection in synthetic vascular grafts, while also accelerating the body's own process for integrating the grafted vessels.

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Alcohol and tobacco policies can reduce cancer deaths

Policies aimed at cutting alcohol and tobacco consumption, including the introduction of random breath testing programs and bans on cigarette advertising, have resulted in a significant reduction in Australian cancer death rates, new research shows.

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Increase in calls to US poison control for natural psychoactive substances

A new study found there were more than 67,300 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to natural psychoactive substances. The study looked at calls from January 2000 through December 2017, which totaled an average of 3,743 exposures each year, or approximately 10 calls every day.

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How to measure inequality as 'experienced difference'

Researchers propose a novel twist on the widely used Gini coefficient — a workhorse statistical measure for gauging the gap between haves and have-nots.

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Woody plants with undesirable tendencies

A weed is normally defined as a plant, native or non-native, that is not valued where it is growing. An invasive species is generally defined as a species that not only spreads geographically outside its typical range but also has a proclivity for displacing native flora and fauna. People are encouraged to not stereotype native or non-native plants, but rather to suggest that people should conside

6h

Earthquakes, chickens, and bugs, oh my!

Computer scientists have developed two algorithms that will improve earthquake monitoring and help farmers protect their crops from dangerous insects, or monitor the health of chickens and other animals. The algorithms spot patterns in enormous datasets quickly, with less computing power and lower cost, than other methods and have been used to improve earthquake detection, monitor the insect vecto

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Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients

who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a new study.

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New method enables easier and faster detection of celiac disease antibodies

Researchers have developed a novel diagnostic method for the rapid on-site measurement of antibodies from patient samples. Now they have applied this new method for the diagnostics of celiac disease, with promising results. These results may prompt the development of similar tests for the diagnostics of other autoimmune disorders.

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2019 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar

Time once more for one of my favorite holiday traditions: the 12th annual Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. Every day until Wednesday, December 25, this page will present one new incredible image of our universe from NASA's Hubble telescope. Be sure to come back every day until the 25th, or follow on Twitter ( @ TheAtlPhoto ) or Facebook for daily updates. I hope you enjoy these amazing and

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Satellite broken? Smart satellites to the rescue

Scientists are developing robotic networks that can work independently but collaboratively on a common task. The goal? To make smart satellites that can repair other satellites in space.

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New technology makes internet memes accessible for people with visual impairments

People with visual impairments use social media like everyone else, often with the help of screen reader software. But that technology falls short when it encounters memes, which don't include alternate text, or alt text, to describe what's depicted in the image. To counter this, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method to automatically identify memes and apply prewritten

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Additives result in higher toxins for vape users

Portland State University Chemistry Professor Rob Strongin led a research team to study what happens when additives are put into vaping products. Specifically, they studied the chemical reaction that takes place when cannabis is consumed using a vape pen or dab rig. 'What's inhaled is actually different than what's listed in the ingredients,' Strongin said.

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Once hidden cellular structures emerge in fight against viruses

A researcher describes how a cellular structure that was once lost to science combats attacks waged in the 'world's oldest war.'

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Hourglass-shaped silicon nanowire photodiodes with increased absorption of light developed

Scientists have proposed creating vertical silicone nanowires with high sensitivity by using silicone and semiconductor process.

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HIV: Overwhelming the enemy from the start

Virologists have identified a way to thwart HIV infection at its very early stages.

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Key to rubustness of plants discovered

Scientists have decoded the mechanism of Adipose-Biosynthesis – the basis for the production of sugar molecules for neu fine chemicals or biopharmaceuticals.

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Autism and ADHD share genes

Researchers have found that autism and ADHD share changes in the same genes. The new knowledge relates directly to the biological causes of the two child psychiatric disorders.

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Changes in pupils after asymptomatic high-acceleration head impacts indicate changes in brain function

Researchers used quantitative pupillometry to detect pupillary changes in high-school athletes after they sustained a high-acceleration head impact. These pupillary changes, indicative of changes in brain function, were evident even when the athletes had no discernible symptoms.

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The Impact of Robots on the U.S. Labor Market | St. Louis Fed

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Machine learning and automation are merging. What will we call systems that integrate both?

Automation and machine learning are coming together in important ways. Automation is becoming more intelligent, thanks to machine learning. Boston Dynamics, for example, used to code its dog-like, ANYmal robots by hand but recently switched to machine learning and saw a 25 percent jump in the running speed of these machines. Going the other direction, Google , Microsoft , and others are accelerat

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World-first mobile phone detection cameras rolled out in Australia

submitted by /u/DarkMoon99 [link] [comments]

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Scientists Find Evidence That Music Really is a Universal Language

Features common to the world's music may underlie a universal musical grammar, according to a controversial new study.

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Cyber Monday 2019 Is Almost Here, and These Are Futurism's Favorite Deals

Some people are really into the whole Black Friday thing. They love getting up early the day after Thanksgiving and lining up outside some big box store for their chance to score some heavily discounted deals. If you are one of these people, more power to you! However, if you are, instead, the kind of person who'd rather spend the day after Thanksgiving lounging around in your pajamas instead of

7h

Leaders with economics know-how drive faster GDP growth

National economies may perform better after politicians who have studied economics take power, according to new research. Researchers pored over the educational and professional backgrounds of 1,681 government leaders, including several United States presidents, and the economic data of 146 countries from 1950 to 2014. "When I look at cases within the US, such as Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, w

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Bad news for Nemo: Clownfish can't adapt to rapid environmental changes

The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies 'Finding Nemo' and 'Finding Dory' don't have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study.

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From firearms to fish — following patterns to discover causality

Mathematicians have successfully applied a new, pictorial approach to answer complex questions that puzzle analysts, such as, do media stories on firearm legislation influence gun sales? Cause-and-effect queries like this pop up in various fields, from finance to neuroscience, and objective methods are needed to deliver reliable answers. The team of researchers wrestled mathematical theory into qu

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Industrial bread dough kneaders could use physics-based redesign

When making bread, it's important not to overknead the dough, because this leads to a dense and tight dough due to a reduced water absorption capacity that impairs its ability to rise. But bakers also want to avoid underkneading, because this decreases the gas retention capacity. Researchers have now explored the local mechanical and microstructural changes that occur during different stages of th

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Biotech breakthrough turns waste biomass into high value chemicals

A move towards a more sustainable bio-based economy has been given a new boost by researchers who have been able to simplify a process to transform waste materials into high value chemicals.

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The Downside of Solar Energy

As renewable energy expands, used photovoltaic panels are creating a growing waste problem—but recycling could be the answer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Aegean volunteers battle to turn plastic waste tide

Dressed in her protective wetsuit and scuba gear, Antigone Kouteri jumps into the murky waters of Zakynthos harbour in search of plastics—and promptly snags her arm on a submerged object.

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UN chief says humanity's 'war against nature' must stop

The devastating impact of global warming that threatens humanity is a pushback from Nature under assault, UN chief Antonio Guterres warned Sunday ahead of a key climate conference.

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Lobster catch headed for decline, not crash, scientists say

A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash.

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UN chief warns of 'point of no return' on climate change

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Sunday that the world's efforts to stop climate change have been "utterly inadequate" so far and there is a danger global warming could pass the "point of no return."

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Klimaknuden er forsvundet: Kærestepar revolutionerer dansk landbrug sammen med 1.000 fremmede

Forening gør det muligt, at unge, klimavenlige landmænd kan drive landbrug uden at drukne i gæld.

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Lobster catch headed for decline, not crash, scientists say

A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash.

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The Downside of Solar Energy

As renewable energy expands, used photovoltaic panels are creating a growing waste problem—but recycling could be the answer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Unforced variations: Dec 2019

This month's open thread. December already?

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Anchored by a dense neighborhood: What stops cells from going astray

Researchers have shown that cells can attach to the fibrous protein meshwork that surrounds them only if the fibers are spaced close enough. The team's findings can explain the abnormal motility patterns displayed by cancer cells.

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Recrutement of a lateral root developmental pathway into root nodule formation of legumes

Peas and other legumes develop spherical or cylindrical structures — called nodules — in their roots to establish a mutually beneficial relationship with bacteria that convert atmospheric nitrogen into a useable nutrient for the legume plant. Root nodule symbiosis enables legumes to grow under nitrogen-limiting conditions where most of non-leguminous plants cannot survive. Researchers in Japan n

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People, climate, and water played a role in the extinction of Australia's megafauna

For the first time, the research suggests a combination of climate change and the impact of people sealed the fate of megafauna, at least in south-eastern Australia. And that distribution of freshwater — a precious commodity for animals and people alike as the climate warmed — can explain regional differences in the timing at which megafauna died out.

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How Did Alzheimer's Disease Get Its Name?

The name dates back to the German neurologist who first discovered the disease.

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Imaging uncovers secrets of medicine's mysterious ivory manikins

Little is known about the origins of manikins — small anatomical sculptures thought to be used by doctors four centuries ago — but now advanced imaging techniques have offered a revealing glimpse inside these captivating ivory dolls. Researchers using micro-CT successfully identified the material composition and components of several ancient ivory manikins, according to a new study.

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Prayers can crowd out donations for disaster victims

A new study finds that people who prayed for hurricane victims before donating gave less than they would have otherwise: Because those who prayed believed that prayers improved the victims' well-being, they donated less.

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Cerebral organoid model provides clues about how to prevent virus-induced brain cell death

Scientists have determined that La Crosse virus (LACV), which can cause inflammation of the brain in children, affects brain cells differently depending on their developmental stage. A new study shows that uncommitted neural stems cells generally survive LACV infection, while LACV often kills neurons. The study also shows that neurons infected by LACV can be rescued by interferon, a powerful antiv

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New study analyzes viability of sustainable fuels

New technology to convert ethanol into fuels suitable for aviation, shipping and other heavy-duty applications can be price-competitive with conventional fuels while retaining the sustainability benefits of bio-based ethanol, according to a new analysis.

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Human migration out of Africa may have followed monsoons in the Middle East

A new study by geoscientists and climatologists provides evidence that summer monsoons from Asia and Africa may have reached into the Middle East for periods of time going back at least 125,000 years, providing suitable corridors for human migration.

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Senator: Humans Could Be "Test Dummies" For Self-Driving Cars

Free Rein When it comes to testing self-driving cars and making sure that their software is both safe and street legal, tech companies have a surprising amount of free rein. At least, that's the takeaway from a series of government meetings during which it became clear that regulatory framework cobbled together by individual U.S. states is likely insufficient to keep the nascent autonomous car in

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10 great physics courses you can take online right now, for free

You can find numerous physics courses currently available online for free . Courses are taught by instructors with amazing credits like Nobel Prizes and field-defining work. Topics range from introductory to Einstein's theory of relativity, particle physics, dark energy, quantum mechanics, and more. The internet has in many ways fulfilled its educational promise and can be an amazing resource to

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Minimally invasive procedure relieves tremors in Parkinson's patients

A procedure that applies pulses of focused ultrasound to the brain is safe and effective for reducing tremors and improving quality of life in people with essential tremor or Parkinson's disease tremor, according to a new study.

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Children of abused mothers 50% more likely to have low IQ

Children of women who reported domestic violence in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life are almost 50% more likely to have a low IQ at age 8, research finds.

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Leftover grain from breweries could be converted into fuel for homes

A researcher has developed a low cost technique to convert left over barley from alcohol breweries into carbon, which could be used as a renewable fuel for homes in winter, charcoal for summer barbecues or water filters in developing countries.

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A missing link in haze formation

Hazy days don't just block the view; they mean the air contains particulate matter that can compromise human health. Chemists have now discovered a way that alcohols can balance out the formation of new particles, a finding that could improve the accuracy of air-quality forecasts.

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I Ditched Google for DuckDuckGo. Here's Why You Should Too

Once you realize most things you search for online are boring and obvious, you realize you don't really need Google in your life.

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Our Place in the Universe Will Change Dramatically in the Next 50 Years—Here's How

In 1900, so the story goes, prominent physicist Lord Kelvin addressed the British Association for the Advancement of Science with these words: "There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now." How wrong he was. The following century completely turned physics on its head. A huge number of theoretical and experimental discoveries have transformed our understanding of the universe, and our pla

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Tænkeboks: Bring fjedersystemet i ligevægt

Nu kan du dykke ned i ugens tænkeboks.

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Spørg Fagfolket: I hvilket land tæller international søfarts CO2-udledning?

En læser har undret sig over, hvem der har ansvaret for CO2-udledningen, når f.eks. et dansk skib sejler mellem to andre lande. Det svarer Danske Rederier på.

10h

Will Machines Ever Become Conscious?

AI may equal human intelligence without matching the true nature of our experiences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Single-Sex Prawns Could Aid Fight against Snail-Borne Disease

The prawn population could eat snails without becoming invasive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Face of the Earliest Human Ancestor, Revealed

A long-sought fossil could redraw our family tree — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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GPS Is Easy to Hack, and the U.S. Has No Backup

At risk are airliners, electric grids, stock markets and other systems that rely on GPS to time their operations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Will Machines Ever Become Conscious?

AI may equal human intelligence without matching the true nature of our experiences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Escape from a Black Hole

To save quantum mechanics, information must break free from black holes. New observations may show us how that can happen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Physics Technique Reveals Hidden Bugs to Bats

Bats' hunting angle of approach cuts through the noise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Adolescent Spacefaring Dreams of Tech Billionaires

Their obsession harks back to sci-fi, but they could be doing more good on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wait, Plastic Can Be Good for the Environment?

It's usually made from petroleum, which is better in a landfill than in a tank of gasoline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Adapt or Mitigate? Both

To cope with climate change, we need every strategy we've got — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Female Genital Mutilation Continues in the U.S. It Must Be Stopped

It may be a traditional cultural practice, but it's nothing more than violence against women and girls — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sewage Treatment Offers Biodiversity Boost in U.K. River

A Thames tributary has been recovering since regulations changed in 1991 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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50, 100 & 150 Years Ago: December 2019

Poet W. H. Auden greets the New Year; Einstein helps us throw out old ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Readers Respond to the August 2019 Issue

Letters to the editor from the August 2019 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Single-Sex Prawns Could Aid Fight against Snail-Borne Disease

The prawn population could eat snails without becoming invasive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sewage Treatment Offers Biodiversity Boost in U.K. River

A Thames tributary has been recovering since regulations changed in 1991 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Leonardo da Vinci's Unexamined Life as a Painter

PARIS—The Leonardo drawings were what did it for me. Their intimacy, their vitality and freshness, the way they captured figures simultaneously at rest and in motion. The Virgin Mary washing a young Jesus's little feet in a basin. Faces—a full inner life captured in a few strokes of ink. Sketches for background figures in The Adoration of the Magi . Bridling horses, the flow of water, the sinews

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Eavesdropping on remote wildlife

An acoustic observatory will aid in mapping and monitoring Australian animals.

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Beetles may show the way to water

Scientists looking for ways to improve fog harvesting technology.

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Ultracold chemistry captures an elusive act

Researchers see what happens during a chemical reaction.

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What are lost continents and why are we discovering so many?

They're not all hidden beneath the oceans, and not all submerged features qualify as lost continents.

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To Help Coral Reefs Come Back, Fake It (With Sound) 'Til Fish Make It

Researchers have found that by playing the sounds of healthy reefs in places where coral has died, fish are more readily attracted back, and help speed the reef's recovery.

11h

MIT's Breakthrough In Propulsion Of Intra-Intestinal Micro-Muscular Agglomerations

MIT students Phoebe Li and Amber VanHemel broke the World Record for longest the hot dog toss (and catch). Hear how the sausage got made from NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro.

11h

Science history: Marie Maynard Daly, lifesaver

Chemist helped highlight the dangers of cholesterol and tobacco.

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That sounds a bit fishy

'Acoustic enhancement' may help with reef restoration

12h

Sleepwalkers Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Is Watching Us and Judging Us

In China, ubiquitous cameras surveil restive minorities. In the US, algorithms determine whether people get locked up.

12h

The Mobile Dead Zone on Airplanes

You stow your bag, settle into your airline seat, and begin swiping away at your phone until takeoff. The signal is sluggish, and the bars of service blink between one and none. Twitter feeds don't load, email struggles to come through, and texts hang unsent. It's frustrating—there's still work to be done, or loved ones to be updated on your progress. But it's also confusing. The signal was fine

12h

'Pilates-changed-my-life' stories are annoying… but it did

Over three years the exercise regime took Rachel Cooke from terrible back pain to new levels of fitness. But it was a lot harder than she expected One morning almost five years ago, I awoke from uneasy dreams and, like Gregor Samsa in Franz Kafka's story, The Metamorphosis , found myself to be… well, not precisely an insect, but the effect was similar. Trying to get out of bed, I realised I could

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Stop Obsessing Over Sleep—Your Brain Will Thank You

Worrying about sleep is perhaps the most counterproductive thing you can do, no matter how many gadgets try to tell you otherwise.

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Try Grayscale Mode to Curb Your Phone Addiction

iOS and Android make it easier than ever to sap the color from your phone, and help you save some sanity in the process.

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The Crisis of American Christianity, Viewed From Great Britain

N. T. Wright is one of those thinkers who fall into a binary: Either people have never heard of him, or they believe him to be one of the most influential figures of our time. The magazine Christianity Today has called him "the most prolific biblical scholar in a generation" and "the most important apologist for the Christian faith since C. S. Lewis." The British theologian is credited with writi

13h

What Frank Sinatra Taught Me About America

When I was 23, I came to America for the first time with my soon-to-be wife, and settled in her hometown of Katonah, New York. I was a Dubliner who knew the United States only through its literature, and I felt every bit as alien as my resident-alien card suggested. My dream was to become a writer but I needed a job. Eventually, I found one opening boxes of books at Fox & Sutherland's, the famous

13h

Radio4 giver tid og ro til videnskaben – men hvad handler programmet om?

PLUS. Anmeldelse: På trods af dygtige værter og talelystne forskere ender nyt videnskabsprogram på Radio4 med at lyde som en podcast fra kommunikationsafdelingen på Aarhus Universitet. Hvor er den kritiske videnskabsjournalistik, der tør prioritere og stille skarpt?

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Fun, physics and the God particle: a tour of Cern, Switzerland

Science and art meet on a mind-blowing visit to the European Organization for Nuclear Research, while the fairytale streets of the Swiss capital are a wonder, too There is something retro and subterranean about the maze of narrow corridors ahead of us. Exposed steel pipes run along the ceilings, the floors are shiny linoleum and the doors are moulded wood. It looks as if it has barely changed sin

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Prove or disprove: A Nobel Prize winner's approach to science

In 2018, Dr. Jim Allison was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering an effective way to attack cancer through immunology. In his lab, Allison urges researchers to get rid of the idea that they can prove something with science. All they can do is fail to disprove. Jim Allison is the subject of Jim Allison: Breakthrough , a documentary narrated by Woody Harrelson that brings filmmakers

13h

(Almost) nothing can stop bacterium decimating Florida's oranges

Peter Spyke has two types of oranges in his groves: those that are the color orange—and those that are green, unsaleable and responsible for the collapse of Florida's orange crop over the past 15 years.

14h

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown.

14h

(Almost) nothing can stop bacterium decimating Florida's oranges

Peter Spyke has two types of oranges in his groves: those that are the color orange—and those that are green, unsaleable and responsible for the collapse of Florida's orange crop over the past 15 years.

14h

How a Poisonous Mammal Evolved Its Venom

Solenodons are highly unusual, and very difficult to study.

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'People are caught up in magical thinking': was the oldest woman in the world a fraud?

Jeanne Calment was 122 when she died. But last year a Russian scientist claimed she was a con artist, sparking an international dispute over the woman who may still hold the secret to eternal life If time makes fools of us all, you couldn't blame André-François Raffray for taking it more personally than most. In 1965, Raffray, a lawyer in the southern French city of Arles, thought he had hit on t

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Vil du med i Bagedysten? Videnskaben guider dig til det perfekte chokolade-overtræk

Gastrofysiker giver sine bedste råd til at lykkes med chokoladen i dit bagværk.

14h

Vattenfall bygger flydende solcellepark

Til december går energiselskabet Vattenfall i gang med at bygge virksomhedens første flydende solcellepark i Holland. Projektet skal efter planen være klar til drift i maj 2020, hvor solcelleparken skal have en kapacitet på 1,2 megawatt.

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We need to scale this up to prepare for loss of top soil

submitted by /u/Fascinax [link] [comments]

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Book Excerpt from What Science Is and How It Really Works

Author James Zimring challenges the notion of "known" scientific entities.

18h

Cosmic Crisp: New apple launched that 'lasts for a year'

The new fruit took US scientists two decades to develop and the launch cost $10m (£7.9m).

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Innovation Farming

Nurturing ideas to fruition, like growing plants, is a complex process that relies on a suitable substrate and favorable growth conditions.

19h

A Last-Minute Science Dash to an Erupting Volcano

Researchers plan an oceanographic expedition to understand why a phytoplankton bloom developed as molten lava flowed into the sea east of Hawaii's Big Island.

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Opinion: Interdisciplinary Approach Needed to Crack Morphogenesis

Physicists, geneticists, computer scientists, and biologists are working together to gain a full appreciation of the intricacies of organismal growth and form.

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Dramatic Temperature Spikes Inside Cells Draw Interest, Skepticism

Using a tiny thermometer, researchers record fluctuations of more than 7 Kelvin in sea slug neurons when a heat-generating mitochondrial process is switched on.

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Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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Opinion: The Uncomfortable Limits of Human Knowledge

Does science describe experience or truth?

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Mitochondria from Different Brain Cells Have Different Proteins

Organelles isolated from two types of neurons and a nonneuronal astrocyte in the mouse cerebellum showed varying levels of proteins, hinting at functional differences.

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Alzheimer's Drug Reduces Chagas Disease Infection in Mice

The drug, called memantine, could enter clinical trials to determine its effectiveness in humans.

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Infographic: What's in a Mitochondrion?

A study finds variations in the levels of proteins for some important processes among organelles from different brain cells.

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Infographic: Paraspeckle Form and Function

What do scientists know about this membraneless nuclear body discovered less than two decades ago?

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Do English-Only Policies Foster or Damage Inclusivity in Science?

Speaking a common language is key to a well-integrated team, but guidance is sparse on what—if anything—principal investigators should do about it.

19h

In Werb's Words

University of California, San Francisco, biologist Zena Werb discusses her research on breast cancer progression and treatment.

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2019 Top 10 Innovations

From a mass photometer to improved breath biopsy probes, these new products are poised for scientific success.

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Infographic: Biomarkers in Blood Provide a Window into the Brain

A look at some of the circulating molecules that may indicate various Alzheimer's pathologies and serve as the bases of noninvasive tests for the disease.

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Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2019 issue of The Scientist.

19h

What Paraspeckles Can Teach Us About Basic Cell Biology

Discovering a new type of subnuclear body taught me how pursuing the unexpected can lead to new insights–in this case, about long noncoding RNAs and liquid-liquid phase separation in cells.

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December 2019 Interactive Crossword Puzzle

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

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CRISPR-Based Tool Expands DNA-Hydrogel Versatility

DNA-responsive polymer gels used for releasing drugs, encapsulating cells, and much more now have greater adaptability thanks to the Cas12a nuclease.

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Sleep Study in Antarctica Explores Role of Cultural Differences

Habits such as napping might influence how humans cope with extreme environments, such as those at a polar research facility in winter.

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Worm Embryogenesis: Cell by Cell and Gene by Gene

A single-cell map of C. elegans's transcriptome during development finds cell lineages that start out genetically different and end up as cells of similar function and genetic profile.

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Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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Life Rides the Wind in the Desert

As the afternoon breezes blow harder in the Atacama Desert—a place so desolate it's used as a model of Mars—more microbes move into its driest regions.

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Deathly Displays, circa 1662-1731

Frederik Ruysch's collections blended specimens for scientific discovery with macabre art.

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Sergiu Pasca Builds Brains to Study Developmental Disease

The Stanford University professor helped develop a technique to grow brain organoids from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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Mars on Earth

Astrobiologist Armando Azua-Bustos draws parallels between the Red Planet and the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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Exploring the Matrix: A Profile of Zena Werb

The cell and molecular biologist unveiled a role for the breakdown of proteins in the extracellular matrix in both healthy and pathogenic cells.

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The Hunt for a Blood Test for Alzheimer's Disease

Researchers hope circulating biomarkers will enable earlier detection and better monitoring of the neurodegenerative disorder–and perhaps help usher in new treatments.

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Infographic: Sequence-directed gel degradation

A novel system for customizable DNA-hydrogel manipulations

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Innovation in a Dish

Sergiu Pasca, a neuroscientist at Stanford University, describes his unique approach studying brain diseases.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 1. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Framgång i fattigdom – med pristagarnas metod kan alla hänga med i skolan

Forskarna Esther Duflo, Abhijit Banerjee och Michael Kremer tilldelas årets ekonomipris i Alfred Nobels minne för sin forskning i att mildra global fattigdom. En metod som forskarna tagit fram är att höja kunskapsnivån med stödundervisning – genom att lära "på rätt nivå".

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Esther Duflo: "Det är lite macho inom ekonomin"

Esther Duflo, Abhijit Banerjee och Michael Kramer tilldelas ekonomipriset i Alfred Nobels minne. Sedan priset började delas ut för 50 år sedan, är Esther Duflo den andra kvinnan att ta emot det.

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Medicinal Chemistry Books, 2019

I missed putting this up last year, but once again I have a list of medicinal chemistry books of interest. As in years past, the list builds on previous recommendation posts, with updates and reader suggestions incorporated along the way. For histories and broad overviews of the field, there have not been any recent additions. Earlier ones include 2011's The Evolution of Drug Discovery , which st

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China making deepfakes illegal, requiring that AI videos be marked

submitted by /u/polymute [link] [comments]

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Is this viable?

Is there any way that plastic waste could be ground up and used in concrete instead of sand, thereby making a lighter weight, more environmentally friendly building product? I feel like repurposing plastic instead of trying to totally eliminate it is more realistic. Btw, I know zero about the building industry so This might already be a thing. submitted by /u/MaleficentAstronomer [link] [comments

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What new jobs will be created from current cutting edge, and emerging technologies?

Are there any reports on this? I'm very curious to glimpse at how the workforce may transform in the next 5 to 30 years submitted by /u/javascript_dev [link] [comments]

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This AI Makes The Mona Lisa Speak…And More!

submitted by /u/Daktush [link] [comments]

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NYC's Whale Population is Making a Comeback – Here's Why.

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Teen engineer: 'Let me introduce you to my laboratory'

Fifteen-year-old Cheikh Bamba Diaby got into robotics after he had to unblock his sister's mobile phone.

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How bland positive messages help Russian trolls spread disinformation

When we read examples of fake news headlines from the 2016 election, they seem blatantly false. However, the data shows that most Russian trolls were mostly sharing posts meant to camouflage their actions, with a small percentage of posts sharing fake headlines. As the 2020 elections approach, researchers are discovering that Russian trolls are becoming more sophisticated and savvy in how they sp

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Steven Pinker: Are guns to blame for America's homicide rate?

One of the reasons we don't know whether limiting access to guns would effectively decrease the homicide rate in America is because the Congress passed a law that bars the Centers for Disease Control from conducting such related studies. In the United States, gun rights are a sacred cause of the right and are protected vehemently. As Steven Pinker says, "anything that might compromise the right o

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Do past medicines hold the answer to antibiotic resistance?

As the effectiveness of antibiotics wanes, scientists are looking at medications that preceded them, such as those involving metals and metalloids.

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