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nyheder2019december02

New study reveals how ancient Puerto Ricans cooked

A new study by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami (UM) College of Arts and Sciences, and Valencia College analyzed the fossilized remains of clams to reconstruct the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico. The results showed that Puerto Ricans over 2,500 years ago were partial to roasting rather th

4h

Ing.dk fylder 25: Nettet BLEV en tidsrøver

I dag er det 25 år siden Ingeniøren som det første danske medie gik på internettet. Kønt var det ikke. Til gengæld var det den rigtige satsning.

7h

Tysk mand dør, efter hans hund har slikket på ham

Manden blev indlagt med influenza-lignende symptomer.

13h

Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste

The U.S. spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers. A team of researchers at WSU is developing a more sustainable solution using grape skins and other agricultural waste.

3min

Usman Khan, sentencing and the rehabilitation of serious offenders | Letters

Peter Lock , a former probation officer, and psychotherapist Tricia Scott on jail conditions that can do more harm than good to prisoners As a retired probation officer who was involved in the delivery of training programmes for the Criminal Justice Act 2003, I would suggest that the inadequacy of sentencing in Usman Khan's case was rooted in the manner in which imprisonment for public protection

3min

'Clever drugs for slimy bugs' in fight against staph infections

Bacterial biofilms that develop around golden staph infections make treatment difficult and prolonged, but researchers have shown in laboratory work that the hybrid antibiotics they have developed can destroy staph biofilms.

3min

Image of Madagascan snake wins 2019 British Ecological Society photography competition

The Malagasy tree boa is under threat from poaching and fires.

5min

A Crossfit gift guide for the WOD-obsessed athlete in your life

Gear you need if you're getting into CrossFit. (Victor Freitas via Unsplash/) CrossFitters may be notorious for having something of a cult-like attitude towards their gyms, but there's a good reason: They're a passionate bunch. So while workout gear may be a weird, or even sad, gift for most people, it's a great idea for any WOD lover. They'll get plenty of use out of whatever you buy for them. H

8min

Study shows link between precipitation, climate zone and invasive cancer rates in the US

In a new study, researchers provide conclusive evidence of a statistical relationship between the incidence rates of invasive cancer in a given area in the US and the amount of precipitation and climate type (which combines the temperature and moisture level in an area).

9min

Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste

The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers. A team of researchers at WSU is developing a more sustainable solution using grape skins and other agricultural waste.

9min

Top 25 News Photos of 2019

As we approach the end of a year of unrest, here is a look back at some of the major news events and moments of 2019. Massive protests were staged against existing governments in Hong Kong, Chile, Iraq, Iran, Venezuela, Haiti, Algeria, Sudan, and Bolivia, while climate change demonstrations and strikes took place worldwide. An impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump was started, conflict

12min

Monkeys inform group members about threats, following principles of cooperation

Cooperation—working together or exchanging services for the benefit of everyone involved—is a vital part of human life and contributes to our success as a species. Often, rather than helping specific others, we work for the good of the community, because this helps our friends and family who are part of the group, or because we share in the benefits with everyone else. However, even though the who

21min

The Race is Heating Up to Open the First Space Hotel

Space Race As companies push to become the first to launch a commercial hotel in space, it's becoming increasingly clear just how many obstacles are in their path. The laws that govern space ventures are generally focused on weapons and rockets, not tourist destinations, Reuters reports . That means the companies trying to launch their hotels into orbit, like Orion Span and the Gateway Foundation

25min

Monkeys inform group members about threats, following principles of cooperation

Cooperation—working together or exchanging services for the benefit of everyone involved—is a vital part of human life and contributes to our success as a species. Often, rather than helping specific others, we work for the good of the community, because this helps our friends and family who are part of the group, or because we share in the benefits with everyone else. However, even though the who

27min

Black hole or newborn stars? SOFIA finds galactic puzzle

Universities Space Research Association (USRA) today announced that scientists on NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) found a strange black hole that is changing its galactic surroundings in a way that is usually associated with newborn stars.

27min

Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought

Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth — but new research suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought.

28min

Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack

A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores. Researchers have identified this substance and shown that the mechanism is not only limited to the attacked plant itself but also alerts unaffected neighboring plants to defend themselves against attackers. This response is specific and not observed in every sweet potato cultivar. The result

28min

'Clever drugs for slimy bugs' in fight against staph infections

Bacterial biofilms that develop around golden staph infections make treatment difficult and prolonged, but researchers have shown in laboratory work that the hybrid antibiotics they have developed can destroy staph biofilms.

28min

Why stress doesn't always cause depression

Rats susceptible to anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, possess more serotonin neurons after being exposed to chronic stress, but the effect can be reversed through amygdala activation, according to new research in JNeurosci.

30min

The neurobiological basis of gender dysphoria

A new theory of gender dysphoria argues the symptoms of the condition are due to changes in network activity, rather than incorrect brain sex, according to work recently published in eNeuro.

30min

Exposure to e-cigarette vapor fails to induce pneumonia in mouse models

Exposure to e-cigarette vapor containing nicotine had no impact on the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain TIGR4 to infect mouse models. The research is published Dec. 2 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

30min

FBI Warns That Your New Smart TV Could Be Used to Spy on You

Smart TVs often come equipped with microphones or cameras that enable you to control the device via your voice or use it for video chatting. Those features can be useful, but if you picked up a smart TV during the year-end buying blitz that kicked off on Black Friday — or plan to purchase one soon — the FBI wants you to know that the device could be used to spy on you or the loved one you plan to

32min

Choose hope or climate surrender, says UN chief

Confronted with a climate crisis threatening civilisation itself, humanity must choose between hope and surrender, UN chief Antonio Guterres told the opening plenary of a UN climate conference Monday.

33min

Former FDA Commissioner Frank Young Dies

The physician-researcher laid the groundwork for genetic cloning and led the US Food and Drug Administration as the country faced the AIDS crisis in the 1980s.

37min

Scientists develop new primary method for measurement of pressure

Scientists from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have implemented a novel pressure measurement method, partly as a byproduct of the work on the "new" kelvin. In addition to being new, this procedure is a primary method, i.e. it only depends on natural constants. As an independent method, it can be used to check the most accurate pressure gauges, for which PTB is known as the world l

39min

Evacuations, airport closure as Typhoon Kammuri nears Philippines

Typhoon Kammuri barrelled towards the Philippines on Monday, pushing tens of thousands of people into evacuation centres and prompting authorities to order a temporary closure of Manila's international airport as a safety precaution.

39min

European Space Windfall Will Fast-Track Science Missions

Europe's space agency is set to receive 45% more money than in the previous three-year budget — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

41min

NYC Has an Old-Timey Plan to Fix Its Traffic Future

As the city plans out its congestion charge, critics are already saying it would do well to take a few lessons from London.

42min

Toxin-laced bubbles cause pollution hazard on Indian beach

A menacing white foam covered one of India's most famous beaches in Chennai for the fourth straight day Monday creating a new pollution hazard for the country.

45min

Hot weather linked to rise in early childbirth: study

Hot weather can cause a spike in the number of babies being born early, a phenomenon that may harm infant health and is likely to get worse as temperatures climb due to climate change, scientists said Monday.

45min

Spacewalking astronauts add new pumps to cosmic detector

Spacewalking astronauts installed new pumps on a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Monday in a bid to extend its scientific life.

51min

Family support reduces chance of school and workplace bullying

Having a supportive family environment makes school-age LGB children in the UK significantly less likely to be victims of bullying, according to new research by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

51min

Pot while pregnant: UNLV medicine doctors urge caution

Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study from a team of UNLV Medicine doctors.

52min

A nimbler way to track alcohol use — by mining Twitter and Google searches

Collecting rigorous public health data through large survey-based studies is a slow, expensive process. New research from Boston Children's Hospital shows that mining people's alcohol-related tweets and online searches offers a more immediate, localized information source to complement traditional methods, offering public health professionals the opportunity to spot emerging trends and measure the

52min

Revealed: The deadly superbugs lurking in more than nine in ten make-up bags

The vast majority of in-use make-up products such as beauty blenders, mascara and lip gloss are contaminated with potentially life threatening superbugs, new research from Aston University published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology has revealed.

52min

The Bittersweet Lessons of Law & Order: SVU

H ere is something that will come as no surprise if you are familiar with Law & Order: Special Victims Unit : The show, as it airs its 21st season on NBC, currently has a character caught in the limbo of a cliffhanger. During SVU 's most recent episode, members of the New York City Police Department's sex-crimes squad, under the leadership of Captain Olivia Benson, investigate a shady billionaire

53min

Climate Talks Kick Off: Here Is What's at Stake

Negotiators need to iron out rules on carbon trading and compensation for climate-related damage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

54min

Designing and repurposing cell receptors

EPFL scientists have developed a computational method modeling and designing protein allostery that allows the accurate and rational engineering and even repurposing of cell receptors. The method can be a significant tool for drug development.

57min

Scientists reveal the structure of viral rhodopsins

The structure of an Organic Lake Phycodnavirus rhodopsin II (OLPVRII), which is a unique protein found in the genome of giant viruses, has been determined thanks to the work of MIPT graduates and Ph.D. students. The paper was published in Nature Communications.

57min

Designing and repurposing cell receptors

EPFL scientists have developed a computational method modeling and designing protein allostery that allows the accurate and rational engineering and even repurposing of cell receptors. The method can be a significant tool for drug development.

57min

Video: Will cryogenically freezing yourself and coming back to life ever be reality?

When you die, many things can be done with your body—embalming, cremation, donation to science and so on.

57min

Scientists reveal the structure of viral rhodopsins

The structure of an Organic Lake Phycodnavirus rhodopsin II (OLPVRII), which is a unique protein found in the genome of giant viruses, has been determined thanks to the work of MIPT graduates and Ph.D. students. The paper was published in Nature Communications.

57min

Antarctica's thinning ice shelves causing more ice to move from land into sea

New study provides the first evidence that thinning ice shelves around Antarctica are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea.

58min

Climate Science Legal Defense Fund Fights for Whistle-Blowing Climate Scientist

Sea level rise expert forced out after a dispute over government censorship — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

59min

59min

China Makes Deepfakes Illegal

Cracking Down The Chinese government just made it illegal to pass off deepfake s or other AI-created media as legitimate. The Cyberspace Administration of China will begin to enforce the new law on January 1, according to Reuters , at which point anyone who uses artificial intelligence or virtual reality tech to synthesize realistic media will have to disclose that their creations aren't real lif

1h

High-fat diet fuels prostate cancer's growth

Saturated fat intake leads to cellular reprogramming associated with prostate cancer progression and lethality, according to new research. These findings could help in identifying patients at higher risk of a more aggressive, lethal disease. In addition, they suggest that dietary intervention involving the reduction of animal fat, and specifically saturated fat consumption in men with early-stage

1h

Discovery of an unusual protein

Nitrogen is an essential component of life. For example, it is required for the production of proteins. Boran Kartal, head of the Microbial Physiology group at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, studies nitrogen-cycling microorganisms, which control the bioavailability of this vital resource. A particularly interesting part of the nitrogen cycle is the anammox process, sho

1h

Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack

Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are becoming more and more popular: Whether in soup or as fries, they increasingly compete with "regular" potatoes which, surprisingly, are only distantly related. Although economically not as important as the potato world-wide, the sweet potato has a higher nutritional value and is richer in vitamins. Particularly in Asia, the crop is an important source of nutrie

1h

Scientist leads international team to crack 60-year-old mystery of Sun's magnetic waves

A Queen's University Belfast scientist has led an international team to the ground-breaking discovery of why the Sun's magnetic waves strengthen and grow as they emerge from its surface, which could help to solve the mystery of how the corona of the Sun maintains its multi-million degree temperatures.

1h

Tiny woodlands are more important than previously thought

Small woodlands in farmland have more benefits for humans per area, compared to large forests according to a new study. The small woodlands, sometimes even smaller than a football field, can easily go unnoticed in agricultural landscapes. Yet, these small forest remnants can store more carbon in the topsoil layer, are more suitable for hunting activities and host fewer ticks than large forests.

1h

Bank on it: Gains in one type of force produced by fusion disruptions are offset by losses in another

Doughnut-shaped tokamaks—facilities designed to reproduce the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars on Earth—must withstand forces that can be stronger than hurricanes created by disruptions in the plasma that fuels fusion reactions. Recent findings by physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) show that certain forces released by disruptio

1h

New research finds missing link between soft surface adhesion and surface roughness

Tires gripping the road. Nonslip shoes preventing falls. A hand picking up a pen. A gecko climbing a wall.

1h

In hunted rainforests, termites lose their dominance

A tiny termite might see an elephant's foot as its biggest threat. But when elephants and other large herbivores are lost to hunting, the termite's troubles are just beginning.

1h

1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria

DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL.

1h

Testing barley's salt tolerance is a numbers game

Plant scientists are striving to cultivate crops that can cope with saline soils in the hope that this may help feed the world's growing population, particularly in the face of climate change. Now, KAUST researchers have applied a newly developed robust statistical technique to examine how different barley plant traits affect yields grown in saline and nonsaline conditions.

1h

A trick for taming terahertz transmissions

An Osaka University research team has introduced a new terahertz detector that allows extremely rapid wireless data communication and highly sensitive radar by using a frequency range that has previously been very difficult to work with. Their approach combined sensitive electronics and a novel method for handling high frequencies to achieve the long-sought goal of using terahertz radiation for se

1h

2-D materials boost carrier multiplication

Physicists at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have discovered an intriguing phenomenon, known as carrier multiplication (CM), in a class of semiconductors with incredible thinness, outstanding properties, and possible applications in electronics and optics. Published in Nature Communications, these new findings hav

1h

Discovery of an unusual protein

Nitrogen is an essential component of life. For example, it is required for the production of proteins. Boran Kartal, head of the Microbial Physiology group at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, studies nitrogen-cycling microorganisms, which control the bioavailability of this vital resource. A particularly interesting part of the nitrogen cycle is the anammox process, sho

1h

Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack

Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are becoming more and more popular: Whether in soup or as fries, they increasingly compete with "regular" potatoes which, surprisingly, are only distantly related. Although economically not as important as the potato world-wide, the sweet potato has a higher nutritional value and is richer in vitamins. Particularly in Asia, the crop is an important source of nutrie

1h

In hunted rainforests, termites lose their dominance

A tiny termite might see an elephant's foot as its biggest threat. But when elephants and other large herbivores are lost to hunting, the termite's troubles are just beginning.

1h

Arabic 'Sesame Street' to represent refugee children in 2020

Sesame Workshop and the International Rescue Committee have partnered launch a Arabic version of Sesame Street named "Ahlan Simsim." The show will provide early learning education to refugee children who are robbed of their education when displaced from their communities. The show will include Arabic-speaking characters who are developed to "speak" to refugee children, providing psychologically b

1h

How to digitize your handwritten notes

Digitize and preserve your handwritten notes. (Moleskine/) Computers and phones may be more ubiquitous than ever, but many people still prefer the traditional feeling of writing with ink on paper . (After all, this method served us well for hundreds of years of human history.) The problem is that you can't organize and search through handwritten notes the way you can with files on a digital devic

1h

1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria

DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL.

1h

Testing barley's salt tolerance is a numbers game

Plant scientists are striving to cultivate crops that can cope with saline soils in the hope that this may help feed the world's growing population, particularly in the face of climate change. Now, KAUST researchers have applied a newly developed robust statistical technique to examine how different barley plant traits affect yields grown in saline and nonsaline conditions.

1h

Molecular vibrations lead to high performance laser

Lasers. They are used for everything from entertaining our cats to encrypting our communications. Unfortunately, lasers can be energy intensive and many are made using toxic materials like arsenic and gallium. To make lasers more sustainable, new materials and lasing mechanisms must be discovered.

1h

Scientists invent a way to see attosecond electron motions with an X-ray laser

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have invented a way to observe the movements of electrons with powerful X-ray laser bursts just 280 attoseconds, or billionths of a billionth of a second, long.

1h

Family support reduces chance of school and workplace bullying

Having a supportive family environment makes school-age LGB children in the UK significantly less likely to be victims of bullying, according to new research by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

1h

Immunology — Activation by breakdown

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers report that a central component of the innate immune response is activated by two short RNAs which are produced by site-specific cleavage of a precursor RNA molecule — and both derivatives are generated by the same enzyme.

1h

Percentage of African ancestry affects gene expression

The percentage of African ancestry in a person's genome determines the level that certain genes are expressed, called mRNA, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The discovery could offer insight into the different risk of diseases as well as a different response to medications in African Americans. This is the first study to compare gene production between African Americans. Previous st

1h

Gains in one type of disruption force are offset by losses in another

Simulations show that halo currents can serve as a proxy for the total force produced by vertical disruptions.

1h

Researchers at IRB Barcelona study how altered protein degradation contributes to the development of tumors

Published in the journal Nature Cancer, the study analyses how genetic alterations in tumour cells prevent the correct degradation of the proteins involved in tumour development and growth, thereby leading to abnormal cell behaviour.A machine-learning model has allowed the scientists to obtain the most extensive annotation of the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation system.The analysis proposes

1h

A close look at a sticky situation

New research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds the missing link between soft surface adhesion and the roughness of the hard surface it touches. The key to this foundational discovery is a close look at the rough surface itself using an electron microscope.

1h

In hunted rainforests, termites lose their dominance

Termite populations in African rainforests decline sharply when elephants and other large animals disappear. Reduced dung and deadwood after large herbivores are hunted out may harm the forest's 'ecosystem engineers.'

1h

Scientists reveal the structure of viral rhodopsins

The structure of an Organic Lake Phycodnavirus rhodopsin II (OLPVRII), which is a unique protein found in the genome of giant viruses, has been determined thanks to the work of MIPT graduates and PhD students.

1h

Researchers discover a potential window for managing insects without chemicals

The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40 percent of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. Intensive agriculture is the main driver, particularly the heavy use of pesticides.

1h

Unexpected pattern of fish species richness found in the Amazon Basin

The Amazon Basin contains the largest number of scientifically described freshwater fish species in the world: 2,257 or 15% of the total number of known freshwater species. According to a new study, however, this vast biodiversity is unevenly distributed and follows a completely unexpected pattern.

1h

Cats' faces hard to read, except for 'cat whisperers,' research finds

Cats have a reputation for being hard to read, but new research from the University of Guelph has found that some people are veritable "cat whisperers" who excel at deciphering subtle differences in cats' faces that reveal mood.

1h

Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age

If you ask Northwestern Engineering's Michael Jewett, the potential of cell-free gene expression has always made sense. Rip off the wall of the cell, collect its insides, and teach the cell catalyst to produce new kinds of molecules and biological processes without the evolutionary constraints of using intact living cells.

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes a strengthening Typhoon Kammuri

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with infrared and nighttime views of Typhoon Kammuri that showed the storm continued to strengthen. Satellite imagery provided a look at the clouds and storms over the storm's developing eye.

1h

No kale left behind: A new supple management method to limit perishable waste

Whether it's the decomposing lettuce you bought with the best of intentions or the cheese that's not supposed to be green but is, many of us know that sting of disappointment when we realize our fridge contents are seriously past their prime.

1h

Researchers discover a potential window for managing insects without chemicals

The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40 percent of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. Intensive agriculture is the main driver, particularly the heavy use of pesticides.

1h

Unexpected pattern of fish species richness found in the Amazon Basin

The Amazon Basin contains the largest number of scientifically described freshwater fish species in the world: 2,257 or 15% of the total number of known freshwater species. According to a new study, however, this vast biodiversity is unevenly distributed and follows a completely unexpected pattern.

1h

Cats' faces hard to read, except for 'cat whisperers,' research finds

Cats have a reputation for being hard to read, but new research from the University of Guelph has found that some people are veritable "cat whisperers" who excel at deciphering subtle differences in cats' faces that reveal mood.

1h

Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age

If you ask Northwestern Engineering's Michael Jewett, the potential of cell-free gene expression has always made sense. Rip off the wall of the cell, collect its insides, and teach the cell catalyst to produce new kinds of molecules and biological processes without the evolutionary constraints of using intact living cells.

1h

Cyber Monday 2019 Deal: DJI's Osmo Action Cam Is $130 Off

This action camera is a compelling GoPro alternative, and its Cyber Monday 2019 price makes it one of the best deals we've seen this holiday season.

1h

Amazon Joins Tech's Great Quantum Computing Race

The company's AWS unit will allow customers to tap quantum machines from three startups. The offering follows a similar service from Microsoft.

1h

Advancement made in the visualization of large, complex datasets

An improvement to the premier data visualization tool t-distributed Stochastic Neighborhood Embedding (t-SNE), called optimized-t-SNE (opt-SNE), shines new light on researchers' ability to view exactly what is in their datasets.

1h

Advancement made in the visualization of large, complex datasets

An improvement to the premier data visualization tool t-distributed Stochastic Neighborhood Embedding (t-SNE), called optimized-t-SNE (opt-SNE), shines new light on researchers' ability to view exactly what is in their datasets.

1h

Satellite imagery shows Typhoon Kammuri's center obscured

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP or S-NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found Typhoon Kammuri's eye obscured.

1h

MBL team images the bacterial hitchhikers on plastic trash in ocean

Millions of tons of plastic trash are fouling the world's ocean, most of it tiny pieces of microplastic less than a quarter-inch in size. Even the smallest marine animals can ingest these microplastics, potentially threatening their survival.

1h

Satellite imagery shows Typhoon Kammuri's center obscured

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP or S-NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found Typhoon Kammuri's eye obscured.

1h

Cats' faces hard to read, except for 'cat whisperers,' research finds

Women and those with veterinary experience were better at recognizing cats' expressions — even those who reported no strong attachment to cats.The study involved more than 6,300 people from 85 countries.Most participants found the test challenging. Their average score was 12 out of 20 — somewhat above chance. But 13 percent of participants performed well, correctly scoring 15 or better — a grou

1h

Biophysics: Pattern formation on the cheap

Many cellular processes involve patterned distributions of proteins. Scientists have identified the minimal set of elements required for the autonomous formation of one such pattern, thus enabling the basic phenomenology to be explored.

1h

Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age

In a review paper published in Nature Reviews Genetics, Professor Michael Jewett explores how cell-free gene expression stands to help the field of synthetic biology dramatically impact society, from the environment to medicine to education.

1h

New treatment triggers self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. The research holds great potential for the development of a new effective therapy to treat this aggressive cancer in humans.

1h

Researchers may have discovered where HIV takes refuge during antiretroviral treatment

An international team led by Professor Jerome Estaquier from Universite Laval's Faculty of Medicine may have discovered where in the body HIV takes refuge during antiretroviral treatment. Research conducted using an animal model indicates that the virus may hide in lymph nodes in the spleen and gut. The researchers believe those lymph nodes are the staging ground from which the virus prepares to r

1h

Discovery of an unusual protein

Scientists from Bremen discover an unusual protein playing a significant role in the Earth's nitrogen cycle. The novel heme-containing cytochrome is involved in the anammox process, which is responsible for producing half of the dinitrogen gas in the atmosphere and important in greenhouse gas regulation.

1h

Decision-making process becomes visible in the brain

Transparent fish larvae reveal how a decision makes its way through the brain.

1h

Advancement made in the visualization of large, complex datasets

An improvement to the premier data visualization tool t-distributed Stochastic Neighborhood Embedding (t-SNE), called optimized-t-SNE (opt-SNE), shines new light on researchers' ability to view exactly what is in their datasets.

1h

Cultural differences account for global gap in online regulation — study

Differences in cultural values have led some countries to tackle the specter of cyber-attacks with increased internet regulation, whilst others have taken a 'hands-off' approach to online security — a new study shows.

1h

A Way to Reduce the Science Achievement Gap

Innovative teaching tools could compensate for gaps in knowledge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

How to Unsubscribe From Annoying Marketing Emails

It's worth the effort to find a little inbox zen.

1h

Europe's Space Agency Joins Mission to Deflect Killer Asteroids

Team Effort Mission Hera is officially a go for the European Space Agency. On Thursday, Europe's space ministers approved the budget for the mission , through which the ESA will team up with NASA to slam a probe into an asteroid and study the aftermath — all in the hopes of saving Earth from potentially deadly asteroid collisions in the future. DART Damage In June 2021, NASA plans to launch a spa

1h

Daily briefing: Authors of five seminal HIV/AIDS papers tell what happened next

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03738-3 "It showed us just how little we knew." Plus: tools for visualizing genomic data and a European space windfall.

1h

Did you solve it? Smart as a box of frogs

The solutions to today's puzzles and the results of the Xmas univocalic challenge Earlier today I set you a Christmas challenge (about which more below) and these three puzzles from the Mathigon advent calendar : Continue reading…

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3D printing is the way forward for the power sector

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The Timeline of the Future

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Stellar view? Space hotels race to offer tourists a room in the sky

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Biosensor-equipped glasses could monitor diabetes through tears

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Government workers with autism may go unpaid, despite their valuable contributions to science

Apparently, the @USGS is currently operating a program where autistic students act as "volunteers" for the Bureau – performing work that they would typically pay non-disabled people significant amounts of money for. https://t.co/Tnga2QILJn pic.twitter.com/3SLYsZFUl3 — Ari Ne'eman (@aneeman) November 17, 2019

1h

Decades old debate settled: Golgi key to maintenance of molecule-sorting station in cells

Contrary to current knowledge in the field, a different mechanism in which the Golgi is crucial, is responsible for maintaining the cell organelle that sorts and distributes substances entering a cell. Knowing this can ultimately help improve treatments for several diseases.

1h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2019

ORNL story tips: An additively manufactured polymer layer applied to specialized plastic proved effective to protect aircraft from lightning strikes in lab test; injecting shattered argon pellets into a super-hot plasma, when needed, could protect a fusion reactor's interior wall from runaway electrons; ORNL will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Liane Russell on December 20.

1h

Scientist leads international team to crack 60-year-old mystery of Sun's magnetic waves

A Queen's University Belfast scientist has led an international team to the ground-breaking discovery of why the Sun's magnetic waves strengthen and grow as they emerge from its surface, which could help to solve the mystery of how the corona of the Sun maintains its multi-million degree temperatures.

1h

Deep learning identifies molecular patterns of cancer

An artificial intelligence platform developed at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) can analyze genomic data extremely quickly, picking out key patterns to classify different types of colorectal tumors and improve the drug discovery process. The deeper analysis shows some colorectal subtypes need to be reclassified.

1h

Tiny woodlands are more important than previously thought

Small woodlands in farmland have more benefits for humans per area, compared to large forests according to a new study. The small woodlands, sometimes even smaller than a football field, can easily go unnoticed in agricultural landscapes. Yet, these small forest remnants can store more carbon in the topsoil layer, are more suitable for hunting activities and host fewer ticks than large forests.

1h

1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria

DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL published in Molecular Biology and Evolution.

1h

Developing a new AI breast cancer diagnostic tool

Scientists are developing a new way to identify the unique chemical 'fingerprints' for different types of breast cancers.These new chemical footprints will be used to train AI software — creating a new tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of breast cancers.

1h

Testing barley's salt tolerance is a numbers game

Factors influencing the tolerance of barley to saline soils have been uncovered using an advanced robust statistical technique.

1h

Researchers investigate the effects of eye movements when reading texts in different languages

The existence of language universality has been a key issue in psychology and linguistics, since the understanding of universals is crucial for the development of information perception models. In the course of their in-depth study of linguistic universality, Lobachevsky University researchers studied readers' eye movements when reading texts in different languages. The research was aimed at study

1h

novel bednet design improves safety, affordability and lethality to resistant mosquitoes

Researchers from LSTM have designed a new bednet that can kill mosquitoes more efficiently than existing nets, in a way that increases the choice of insecticide used, while minimising risk to the person inside the bednet.

1h

Frozen car batteries won't blow up in transit

Freezing car batteries could allow their safe transport in a much cheaper and environmentally friendly way, researchers report. Currently, transporting damaged and defective car batteries is an expensive process, because they need an explosion proof box that costs thousands of dollars. An explosion proof box to transport a typical Tesla sized battery costs more than $11,000 and further thousands

1h

Fire Blight Spreads Northward, Threatening Apple Orchards

Growers in northern states are combating virulent outbreaks of a disease as seasons grow warmer, orchards have been reconfigured for higher yields and new varieties may be more vulnerable.

1h

John Kerry's New Bipartisan, Star-Studded 'War' on Climate Change

As for the sordid saga of American politics and climate change, John Kerry has not quite seen it all, but he has seen a whole lot of it. He was there in 1997 in Kyoto, Japan, when the first global climate treaty was negotiated. Four years later, he was denouncing President George W. Bush from the Senate floor after he withdrew the United States from that pact. In 2009, Kerry was one of three bipa

1h

A Way to Reduce the Science Achievement Gap

Innovative teaching tools could compensate for gaps in knowledge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Självlärande robotar i jordbruket sparar energi och arbetskraft

Manuellt jord- och skogsbruk är alltid utmanande på grund av miljöförhållanden som extrema temperaturer och svåra arbetssituationer. Att skörda grödor manuellt är mycket arbetsintensivt och blir allt mer kostsamt, samtidigt som tillgången på kvalificerad arbetskraft minskat. Dessutom utgör arbetet i sådana miljöer en hög risk för arbetsrelaterade skador. I framtiden förutspås både kostnader för o

2h

Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack

A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores. Researchers have identified this substance and shown that the mechanism is not only limited to the attacked plant itself but also alerts unaffected neighboring plants to defend themselves against attackers. This response is specific and not observed in every sweet potato cultivar. The result

2h

Evidence: Antarctica's thinning ice shelves causing more ice to move from land into sea

New study provides the first evidence that thinning ice shelves around Antarctica are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea.

2h

Study identifies brain networks that play crucial role in suicide risk

An international team of researchers has identified key networks within the brain they say interact to increase the risk that an individual will think about — or attempt — suicide. In an article published today in Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers say their review of existing literature highlights how little research has been done into one of the world's major killers, particularly among the

2h

Pharmacy service will save NHS £651 million

A research team from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, and UCL evaluating a service delivered by pharmacists since 2011 have calculated it will save the English NHS around £651 million.

2h

Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails

A team led by researchers from Osaka University have characterized a protein, called VSP, that keeps sperm swimming in straight lines. Deletion of the protein caused sperm to swim in circles, significantly reducing fertilization rates. VSP also controlled the influx of calcium ions into the flagellum, which is necessary for propulsion of the sperm towards the egg. The researchers hope that their d

2h

Significant developments in gamut mapping for the film industry

Presented in an article published on Nov. 14 in the journal IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence by Syed Waqas Zamir, a researcher at the Inception Institute of Artificial Intelligence, Abu Dhabi (UAE); along with Javier Vázquez-Corral and Marcelo-Bertalmío, researchers at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies.

2h

Major epilepsy study offers much-needed answers on 3 lifesaving seizure drugs

There are effective treatments to stop life-threatening epilepsy seizures when the initial treatment has failed, a sweeping new study reveals. The study offers important answers about three such emergency drugs that are used to treat prolonged seizures, known as status epilepticus, even though physicians have had little understanding of the drugs' effectiveness. Until now, there has been no clear

2h

The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds

Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates. The origin of this unique isotope effect of water molecules remains to be elucidated

2h

Australian GPs widely offering placebos, new study finds

Most Australian GPs have used a placebo in practice at least once, with active placebos (active treatments used primarily to generate positive expectations) more commonly used than inert placebos, according to a new study from University of Sydney.

2h

A trick for taming terahertz transmissions

Osaka University researchers have invented a wireless communication receiver that can operate in the terahertz frequency band. By increasing the sensitivity 10,000-fold, they achieved the fastest Researchers at Osaka University invent a new receiver for terahertz-frequency radiation — by implementing coherent detection, they achieve record transmission rates — this work may lead to much faster w

2h

2D materials boost carrier multiplication

IBS researchers discover a carrier multiplication process in 2D semiconductors that could increase the efficiency of future solar cells.

2h

Smoking may cause white scars on the brain

Nearly half of all people over the age of 50 have scarring in their brain's white matter. It turns out that does more harm than previously thought.

2h

Dietary supplements may delay aging in animal models

Patients with Werner Syndrome age significantly earlier than others. In animal models for the disease supplements of the drug NAD+ prolong life and delay age-related diseases. This is shown in new research from the Center for Healthy Aging, the University of Copenhagen, and the US National Institutes of Health, just published in Nature Communications. It also shows that Werner patients have less N

2h

To see the invisible

Scientists are curious by nature and often look where they should not. From such looking, discoveries are born that literally broaden the horizons. Working jointly, researchers from Professor Wojtkowski's team at IPC PAS, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Baltic Institute of Technology and their US collaborators from UC Irvine have recently managed to make practical use of infrared vision and by des

2h

Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns

Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned.

2h

Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves

Physicists have found that large-amplitude acoustic waves, launched by ultrashort laser pulses, can dynamically manipulate the optical response of semiconductors.

2h

Providing safe, clean water

In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. Filtration of large volumes of water, however, is slow and impractical. Scientists have now introduced a new water purification method based on magnetic nanoparticles coated with a so-called "ionic liquid" that simultaneously remove organic, inorganic, and microbial contaminants, as well as microplastics. The nanopar

2h

Potential solution to overheating mobile phones

Researchers have developed a revolutionary way to encode computational information without using electrical current. As a global first, this could lead to faster technological devices that could efficiently use energy without overheating.

2h

New study reveals high levels of pollution in London Underground

Researchers have carried out the first comprehensive study of fine particles on the London Underground to evaluate the exposure of people traveling on different parts of the network.

2h

New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds

An international team has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells, the cells that hold genetic information which is passed on to the next generation. The researchers found that the GRC is tens of millions of years old and plays a key role in songbird biology, having collected genes used for embryonic d

2h

No kale left behind: A new supple management method to limit perishable waste

Many of us know that sting of disappointment when we realize our fridge contents are seriously past their prime. Imagine that on a much bigger scale, like the nearly $54 billion in perishable retail food lost in the U.S. in 2011. That problem helped compel operations management researchers to devise a method for a timelier and less costly distribution of perishable inventory under simultaneous, mu

2h

'Knives Out' Carved Up a Big Weekend at the Box Office

Also, Martin Scorsese would prefer you didn't watch movies on your phone.

2h

Russia Wants to Build an Observatory on the Moon

Eyes Up Roscosmos, Russia's space agency, wants to build an observatory on the Moon's south pole that'd keep an eye out for any asteroids on a collision course with Earth. Russia has long planned on setting up a base on the Moon, a goal it shares with China and the U.S. Now, the state media agency TASS says that the outpost will include a series of telescopes to help the country better track any

2h

Australia's push for hydrogen power may prop up fossil fuel industry

Australia wants to be a world leader in hydrogen, but its new strategy could favour fossil fuels instead of supporting the shift to green energy

2h

Ebola-Response Workers Killed in Attacks Force Withdrawal From Critical DRC Region

Four health care workers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo were killed in two attacks last week, and six others were injured — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

VW har valgt: Elbilen bliver fremtidens klimavenlige folkevogn

PLUS. Brint og brændselsceller er dømt ude i VW-koncernens nye strategi for at blive klimaneutral i 2050. Frem mod 2025 bliver der investeret 450 mia. kroner i digitalisering, pluginhybridbiler og rene elbiler.

2h

EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience: "Q&A Session"

Q&A Session All speakers EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

Societal relations, neuroethics and inclusive community building

Lars Kluver, Danish Board of Technology Foundation EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

Advances in neuromorphic computing technology

Steve Furber, The University of Manchester EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

Scientists: Ominous Black Hole Is Way Too Big to Exist

Chungus Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a mindbogglingly colossal black hole, according to Live Science, that's roughly 70 times the mass of the Sun. That's more than three times the presumed upper limit of 20 solar masses that astrophysicists believed a black hole in our galaxy could be, setting up a scientific race to explain the existence of the cosmic monster. "Bla

2h

Bacterial communities 'hitchhiking' on marine plastic trash

Using an innovative microscopy method, scientists have revealed the structure of the microbial communities coating microplastic trash collected from a variety of ocean sites.

2h

Monkeys inform group members about threats — following principles of cooperation

Humans are often faced with the choice of investing in the greater good or being selfish and letting others do the work. Animals that live in groups often encounter threats, and informing others could potentially save lives. Researchers show that wild sooty mangabeys, when facing dangerous vipers, do not just call out of fear or to warn their family, but will call when the information about the th

2h

The First Interstellar Comet Could Disintegrate When it Gets Close to the Sun

Comet 2I/Borisov has a lot in common with comets from our own solar system. That could be a sign the alien comet will burn up on its closest approach to the sun.

2h

Molecular vibrations lead to high performance laser

Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have discovered a new phenomenon and are applying it to make a laser with over 40% efficiency-nearly 10 times higher than other similar lasers. The laser itself is made from a single layer of molecules anchored to a glass ring on a silicon wafer. It has improved power consumption and is fabricated from more sustainable materials than previous la

2h

SLAC scientists invent a way to see attosecond electron motions with an X-ray laser

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have invented a way to observe the movements of electrons with powerful X-ray laser bursts just 280 attoseconds, or billionths of a billionth of a second, long.

2h

Mechanism that triggers the inflammatory process by Mayaro virus is discovered

A Brazilian team at FAPESP-supported Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases identified the strategy used by immune cells to combat the pathogen Mayaro virus, which causes symptoms similar to those of chikungunya fever.

2h

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers

The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that ca

2h

Bushmeat may breed deadly bacteria

People who eat wildebeests, wart hogs and other wild African animals may be at risk for contracting potentially life-threatening diseases, according to an international team of researchers. The team analyzed samples of bushmeat — meat derived from wildlife — in the Western Serengeti in Tanzania and identified several groups of bacteria, many of which contain the species that cause diseases such

2h

New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage

Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts.

2h

High androgen levels during pregnancy increase the risk of PCOS for several generations

Daughters of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are five times more likely to be diagnosed with PCOS as adults, and the generational transmission is driven by high androgen levels during pregnancy, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. Their results, which are based on register-based and clinical studies as well as transgenerational animal studies, are published in Natu

2h

Designing and repurposing cell receptors

EPFL scientists have developed a computational method modeling and designing protein allostery that allows the accurate and rational engineering and even repurposing of cell receptors. The method can be a significant tool for drug development.

2h

A question of pressure

The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has implemented a novel pressure measurement method, as a byproduct of the work on the 'new' kelvin. As a primary method it only depends on natural constants. It offers unique possibilities to check the most accurate pressure gauges, for which PTB is known as the world leader, and to investigate helium – an important model system for the fundamentals

2h

Making higher-energy light to fight cancer

Researchers have achieved photon up-conversion, the emission of light with energy higher than the one that excites the material, using carefully designed structures containing silicon nanocrystals and specialized organic molecules. The accomplishment brings scientists one step closer to developing minimally invasive photodynamic treatments for cancer. The advance could also hasten new technologies

2h

Researchers discover new way to split and sum photons with silicon

A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Riverside have found a way to produce a long-hypothesized phenomenon — the transfer of energy between silicon and organic, carbon-based molecules — in a breakthrough that has implications for information storage in quantum computing, solar energy conversion and medical imaging. The research is described

2h

Scientists build a 'Hubble Space Telescope' to study multiple genome sequences

Scientists can now simultaneously compare 1.4 million genetic sequences, helping classify how species are related to each other at far larger scales than previously possible. Sequencing the evolutionary history of life on Earth can unlock previously unknown secrets that yield fresh insights into the evolution of life, while bringing new foods, drugs and materials that pinpoint strategies for savin

2h

This 'fix' for economic theory changes everything from gambles to Ponzi schemes

Whether we decide to take out that insurance policy, buy Bitcoin, or switch jobs, many economic decisions boil down to a fundamental gamble about how to maximize our wealth over time. How we understand these decisions is the subject of a new perspective piece in Nature Physics that aims to correct a foundational mistake in economic theory.

2h

Unexpected viral behavior linked to type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

New results from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study show an association between prolonged enterovirus infection and development of autoimmunity to the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells that precedes type 1 diabetes. Conversely, adenovirus C infection seems to confer protection from autoimmunity. The international research suggests new therapeutic avenues fo

2h

Breathing? Thank volcanoes, tectonics and bacteria

A Rice University study in Nature Geoscience suggests Earth's first burst of oxygen was added by a spate of volcanic eruptions brought about by tectonics. In addition to explaining the appearance of significant concentrations of oxygen in the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) 2.5 billion years ago, the theory also accounts for the Lomagundi Event, a puzzling shift in the ratio of carbon isotopes in carb

2h

Study highlights potential for 'liquid health check' to predict disease risk

Proteins in our blood could in future help provide a comprehensive 'liquid health check,' assessing our health and predicting the likelihood that we will we will develop a range of diseases, according to research published today in Nature Medicine.

2h

New treatment could ease the passage of kidney stones

Researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a potential new treatment that could make passing kidney stones faster and less painful, and eliminate surgery. They identified a combination of two drugs that relax the lining of the ureter and can be delivered directly with a catheter-like instrument.

2h

Study: lack of tolerance, institutional confidence threaten democracies

The stability of democracies worldwide could be vulnerable if certain cultural values continue to decline, according to a new study published in Nature Human Behavior. The findings by researchers from the United States and New Zealand are based on an analysis of survey data from 476,583 individuals in 109 countries.

2h

LJI researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor

New work from the lab of La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) investigator Anjana Rao, Ph.D., reveals a previously unrecognized activity for a highly conserved DNA repair factor. The researchers report that mouse lymphocytes engineered to lack that protein (known as HMCES and pronounced Hem'-sez) cannot recombine their DNA in a manner necessary to make new classes of antibodies, called Immunogl

2h

Researchers find common measures of immune status, inflammation can predict mortality

A new collaborative study led by Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals has found that commonly used clinical indicators of immune status and inflammation can predict mortality in the general population.Published in JAMA Network Open, the study showed that lymphopenia (a condition characterized by low levels of a specific type of white blood cell, called lymphocytes) is associated with death du

2h

A lifeline for leaky lung cells

Leaky lungs are a very common side effect of heart failure, but all currently available drugs do is reduce the amount of fluid in the body, rather than plug the leak itself. A new gene therapy created at the Wyss Institute and Boston Children's Hospital and tested in human Lung Chips blocks the mechanical function of a channel protein implicated in lung leakage while leaving its chemical functions

2h

Researchers develop 'clever drugs for slimy bugs' in fight against staph infections

Bacterial biofilms that develop around golden staph infections make treatment difficult and prolonged, but QUT researchers have shown in laboratory work that the hybrid antibiotics they have developed can destroy staph biofilms.

2h

Analyzing seismic patterns to forecast the magnitude of the largest earthquake aftershocks

Earthquakes can have devastating impacts on communities all around the world. Associate Professor Jiancang Zhuang and Emeritus Professor Yosihiko Ogata from The Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM) in Japan, in collaboration with colleagues, have developed a method that can forecast the probability of when and where aftershocks are likely to occur, and how strong the largest of these will be

2h

Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought

Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth — but new research by the University of South Australia suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought.

2h

Study sheds new light on role iron biology plays in disease

New research shows that the body's system for regulating iron is much more complex than originally thought–and this has surprising implications in at least three human diseases, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

2h

Study pinpoints barriers to preventive care for people at high risk for HIV

Many high-risk people eligible for medication to prevent HIV infection face barriers to obtaining a prescription, according to research by University of Massachusetts Amherst psychologist Avy Skolnik.

2h

Scientists have developed environmentally friendly way to build up road foundations

Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Federal University of Technology — Paraná/Brazil together with colleagues from Kazakhstan have proposed to build road foundations from a mixture of loam, metal slag and lime waste instead of traditional layers of natural sand and gravel. The new composite is durable, water and frost resistant, meeting the requirements for building materi

2h

Spirituality affects the behavior of mortgagers

According to Olga Miroshnichenko, a Sc.D in Economics, and a Professor at the Department of Economics and Finance, Tyumen State University, morals affect the thinking of mortgage payers and help them avoid past due payments. The study was presented at the 3rd All-Russia Research and Practice Conference 'Financial and Legal Aspects of Socially-Oriented Investments' in Ural State University of Econo

2h

TikTok Bans 17-Year-Old for Criticizing China

Delete This After 17-year-old Feroza Aziz posted a video on TikTok that criticized China's state-sanctioned discrimination against its Muslim Uighur population, she found herself locked out of her account. While the Beijing-based TikTok told CNBC that it doesn't censor China-critical content, clear signs of censorship come back again and again when a user gets too much attention for pointing out

2h

Red tide is back in Florida and rare egrets are at risk

A lethal Gulf Coast red tide that littered beaches with dead wildlife in 2018 is back and this time around, it's claiming one of North America's rarest bird species.

2h

Red tide is back in Florida and rare egrets are at risk

A lethal Gulf Coast red tide that littered beaches with dead wildlife in 2018 is back and this time around, it's claiming one of North America's rarest bird species.

2h

Federated HPC, cloud and storage services for research in Europe

Dirk Pleiter, Forschungszentrum Julich EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

Translation of neuromorphic principles towards closed loop SNN-based sensomotoric robot controls

Rudiger Dillman, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

The Virtual Brain Platform: Applications in medicine and research

Professor Petra Ritter, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

EBRAINS – A platform for collaboration in digital neuroscience

Professor Jan Bjaale, University of Oslo EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience: "Introduction to the Human Brain Project"

Introduction to the Human Brain Project (video message) Professor Katrin Amunts, Forschungszentrum Julich EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

2h

California is famous for earthquakes and wildfires—but don't forget about its volcanoes

Margaret Mangan didn't sleep well in the weeks following the Ridgecrest, Calif., earthquakes. The July shaking triggered a swarm of smaller tremors in the nearby Coso Volcanic Field, a cluster of lava domes and cinder cones at the northern end of the Mojave Desert. And it was Mangan's job to watch for a possible eruption.

2h

Scientists build a 'Hubble Space Telescope' to study multiple genome sequences

A new tool that simultaneously compares 1.4 million genetic sequences can classify how species are related to each other at far larger scales than previously possible. Described today in Nature Biotechnology by researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, the technology can reconstruct how life has evolved over hundreds of millions of years and makes important inroads for the a

2h

This 'fix' for economic theory changes everything from gambles to Ponzi schemes

Whether we decide to take out that insurance policy, buy Bitcoin, or switch jobs, many economic decisions boil down to a fundamental gamble about how to maximize our wealth over time. How we understand these decisions is the subject of a new perspective piece in Nature Physics that aims to correct a foundational mistake in economic theory.

2h

Researchers discover new way to split and sum photons with silicon

A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Riverside have found a way to produce a long-hypothesized phenomenon—the transfer of energy between silicon and organic, carbon-based molecules—in a breakthrough that has implications for information storage in quantum computing, solar energy conversion and medical imaging. The research is described in a p

2h

Researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor

If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency—some estimate as many as 10,000 times a day per cell—usually without consequence. That's because legions of DNA repair proteins prevent genomic catastrophe by repairing DNA damaged by chemical or physical mutagens or ju

2h

New study points to one cause for several mysteries linked to breathable oxygen

Earth's breathable atmosphere is key for life, and a new study suggests that the first burst of oxygen was added by a spate of volcanic eruptions brought about by tectonics.

2h

Study: Lack of tolerance, institutional confidence threaten democracies

The stability of democracies worldwide could be vulnerable if certain cultural values continue to decline, according to a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour.

2h

New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage

Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts.

2h

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers

The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that ca

2h

Alternative leather from fungi

Animal skin is an excellent material, but the tanning process of leather causes significant chromium emissions that are damaging to the environment and human health. Synthetic leathers also burden the environment and fail to match the quality and durability of animal leather. Therefore, new bio-based replacement materials are sought for leather. VTT is using fungal mycelium to produce skinlike mat

2h

Mercury transit observed at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory

About 13 times per century, fleeting Mercury can be seen passing directly in front of the Sun in what is called a transit. The most recent Mercury transit occurred on November 11, 2019.

2h

Daughters of women with PCOS face five times greater risk

Polycystic ovary syndrome is believed to affect about one in five women of reproductive age Daughters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome, a common disorder that can cause excessive body hair, acne and fertility problems, are five times more likely than the average woman to develop the condition, a major study has found. Researchers in Sweden examined the medical histories of nearly 30,000 wo

2h

Scientists build a 'Hubble Space Telescope' to study multiple genome sequences

A new tool that simultaneously compares 1.4 million genetic sequences can classify how species are related to each other at far larger scales than previously possible. Described today in Nature Biotechnology by researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, the technology can reconstruct how life has evolved over hundreds of millions of years and makes important inroads for the a

2h

Researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor

If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency—some estimate as many as 10,000 times a day per cell—usually without consequence. That's because legions of DNA repair proteins prevent genomic catastrophe by repairing DNA damaged by chemical or physical mutagens or ju

2h

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers

The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that ca

2h

Alternative leather from fungi

Animal skin is an excellent material, but the tanning process of leather causes significant chromium emissions that are damaging to the environment and human health. Synthetic leathers also burden the environment and fail to match the quality and durability of animal leather. Therefore, new bio-based replacement materials are sought for leather. VTT is using fungal mycelium to produce skinlike mat

2h

How I use art to tackle plastic pollution in our oceans | Alejandro Durán

Alejandro Durán uses art to spotlight the ongoing destruction of our oceans' ecosystems. In this breathtaking talk, he shows how he meticulously organizes and reuses plastic waste from around the world that washes up on shores — everything from water bottles to prosthetic legs — to create vivid, environmental artworks that may leave you mesmerized and shocked.

2h

The Accidental Experiment That Changed Men's Lives

Festooned with mustard-yellow drapes and a dangling American flag, the room resembled a grange hall on bingo night. At center stage sat a wide vase containing oblong, plastic lotto balls, and over that vessel stood Representative Alexander Pirnie of New York. As his hand dug into the vase he averted his eyes, like a game-show contestant pulling prizes from a mystery bag. Almost as many U.S. telev

2h

The Return of the Mueller Report

Remember a man named Robert S. Mueller III? For almost two years, the news revolved around him. There were Mueller T-shirts and a cultish kind of Muellermania on cable television. There were even Mueller votive candles. More recently, though, the House of Representatives has proceeded with the president's impeachment as though the man who investigated Russian electoral interference didn't exist a

2h

Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns

Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned.

2h

Endometriosis could be treated with cancer drug, study suggests

The painful symptoms of endometriosis — a chronic condition which affects millions of women — could potentially be reduced with a drug that had previously been investigated as a cancer treatment. Researchers found that using dichloroacetate to treat the cells of women with endometriosis lowered the production of lactate — a potentially harmful waste product — and stopped abnormal cell growth.

2h

Dialogue between locals, scientists and governments tackles climate change

The indigenous people of northern regions often perceive environmental conditions quite differently from scientists. The lack of a properly built dialogue between ordinary people, administration and researchers leads to a decrease in the effectiveness of measures taken to prepare Siberia for future climate changes. The international research group summarized and analyzed the results of the seminar

2h

World-first studies reveal occurrence of 'chew and spit' eating behaviour

A landmark study into the prevalence of the disordered eating behaviour known as 'chew and spit' has revealed concerning levels of such episodes among teenagers. Phillip Aouad from the University of Sydney is calling for chew and spit to be recognised as a separate symptom to improve clinical screening.

2h

Paleontologists identify new group of pterosaurs

New research suggests that ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists including scientists at the University of Alberta and the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

2h

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes a strengthening Typhoon Kammuri

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with infrared and nighttime views of Typhoon Kammuri that showed the storm continued to strengthen. Satellite imagery provided a look at the clouds and storms over the storm's developing eye.

2h

No kale left behind: A new supple management method to limit perishable waste

Many of us know that sting of disappointment when we realize our fridge contents are seriously past their prime. Imagine that on a much bigger scale, like the nearly $54 billion in perishable retail food lost in the U.S. in 2011. That problem helped compel operations management researchers to devise a method for a timelier and less costly distribution of perishable inventory under simultaneous, mu

2h

Ancient microbes helped to keep Earth's early climate warm

Ancient ancestors of modern microbes played a critical role in setting the stage for life on a dimly lit early Earth, and in creating the world's largest iron ore deposits, according to new research.

2h

EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience: "Welcome address"

Welcome address Bernhard Eitel, Rector of Heidelberg University EBRAINS – New enabling infrastructure for neuroscience Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject

3h

Fighting fruit flies: Aggressive behavior influenced by previous interactions

Aggression doesn't just depend on who you are or who you're interacting with but also depends on your previous interactions, a new fruit fly study has found.

3h

Daylight damage to photovoltaics

A research team has investigated the ways sunlight can degrade the efficiency of newly developed organic photovoltaics over time. This work may assist in the wide commercialization of next-generation solar sheets.

3h

New device enables battery-free computer input at the tip of your finger

Computer scientists have created a device for wearable computer input suitable for many situations, just by touching your fingertips together in different ways. The device, called Tip-Tap, is inexpensive and battery-free through the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to sense when fingertips touch. The device could, therefore, be added to disposable surgical gloves, allowing surgeon

3h

Biologists examine sperm quality on the basis of their metabolism

Every tenth couple worldwide is affected by infertility. The reasons for this are manifold, but mostly well researched. Nevertheless, about fifteen percent of cases remain unexplained. A team of biologists has now gained new insights into the metabolic properties that make up a good sperm cell.

3h

Disclaimers on retouched photos don't solve problem of negative body image

Labels that warn an image has been altered or enhanced do nothing to mitigate women's negative perceptions of their appearance, according to a new study. More importantly, some disclaimers heightened and even harmed body dissatisfaction in at-risk women, the study showed.

3h

Compound controls biological clock with light

A chemical cage suppresses the activity of a biological clock regulator in the dark and releases it with light, showing potential for future treatments of circadian-clock-related diseases.

3h

Concussion recovery not clear cut for children

Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter.

3h

Dogs promote page turning for young readers

Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a researcher. A new study examines the behavior of 17 children from Grades 1 to 3 while reading with and without a dog.

3h

Compliance with Paris Agreement would limit loss of productivity in fishing, agriculture

Scientists show that 90% of the global population may face decreases in productivity for both agriculture and fishing if greenhouse emissions are not reduced. On the other hand, most countries are in a position to limit these losses if emissions are drastically cut, as stipulated by the Paris Agreement.

3h

Solar wind slows farther away from the Sun

Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored. Astronomers now show how the solar wind — the supersonic stream of charged particles blown out by the Sun — evolves at increasing distances from the Sun.

3h

Scientists re-counted Australia's extinct species, and the result is devastating

It's well established that unsustainable human activity is damaging the health of the planet. The way we use Earth threatens our future and that of many animals and plants. Species extinction is an inevitable end point.

3h

Scientists re-counted Australia's extinct species, and the result is devastating

It's well established that unsustainable human activity is damaging the health of the planet. The way we use Earth threatens our future and that of many animals and plants. Species extinction is an inevitable end point.

3h

Black Hole Singularities Are as Inescapable as Expected

In January 1916, Karl Schwarzschild, a German physicist who was stationed as a soldier on the eastern front, produced the first exact solution to the equations of general relativity, Albert Einstein's radical, two-month-old theory of gravity. General relativity portrayed gravity not as an attractive force, as it had long been understood, but rather as the effect of curved space and time. Schwarzs

3h

Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns

Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought as current biodiversity assessments fail to take into account the long-lasting impact of abrupt land changes, a new study has warned.

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Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns

Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought as current biodiversity assessments fail to take into account the long-lasting impact of abrupt land changes, a new study has warned.

3h

Creating the conditions for a globally just energy transition

How can energy transition be organized in a globally just way? Will developing countries struggle to transition to clean energy because they lack the financial and technical means? A new policy brief by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) focuses on the risks of an uneven transition and makes concrete proposals to prevent such risks.

3h

Researchers measure worldwide nitrogen levels in grasslands

Soil nitrogen in grasslands covering almost a third of Earth's surface is a critical ingredient for producing food and stemming climate change.

3h

Solving the thermoelectric 'trade-off' conundrum with metallic carbon nanotubes

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used aligned "metallic" carbon nanotubes to create a device which converts heat to electrical energy (a thermoelectric device) with a higher power output than pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in random networks. The new device bypasses the troublesome trade-off in semiconductors between conductivity and electrical voltage, significantly

3h

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When space travel is a blur

Canadian scientists are working on a new way to measure the mechanics of the human eye to better identify astronauts at risk of developing ocular damage before they go into space. Collaborating with the Canadian Space Agency and NASA, Université de Montréal researchers Santiago Costantino and Mark Lesk hope to use their expertise in measuring ocular rigidity to protect astronauts from the adverse

3h

Käthe Beutler: 'Do something!'

Thousands of Jewish physicians were stripped of their rights and murdered by the Nazis. Käthe Beutler fled with her family to the US and started all over again. An article about the life and work of the researcher, pediatrician, and mother is now appearing in the Medizinhistorisches Journal – plus the BIH's Käthe Beutler Building is currently being built on the Berlin-Buch campus.

3h

Supermarkets and child nutrition in Africa

Hunger and undernutrition are widespread problems in Africa. At the same time, overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases are also on the rise. Recent research suggested that the growth of supermarkets contributes to obesity in Africa. However, previous studies looked at data from adults. New research shows that supermarkets are not linked to obesity in children, instead contributing to a r

3h

Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves

Physicists from Switzerland, Germany, and France have found that large-amplitude acoustic waves, launched by ultrashort laser pulses, can dynamically manipulate the optical response of semiconductors.

3h

Study examines the effects of weight loss surgery between pregnancies

New findings published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

3h

New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds

An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells, the cells that hold genetic information which is passed on to the next generation. The researchers found that the GRC is tens of millions of years old and plays a key role in songbird biology,

3h

New study reveals high levels of pollution on London Underground

Researchers from King's College London have carried out the first comprehensive study of fine particles on the London Underground to evaluate the exposure of people travelling on different parts of the network.

3h

Providing safe, clean water

In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. Filtration of large volumes of water, however, is slow and impractical. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new water purification method based on magnetic nanoparticles coated with a so-called "ionic liquid" that simultaneously remove organic, inorganic, and microbial contaminants, as well a

3h

The Eurasian continent remembers and amplifies cold waves as the Arctic warms

Cold waves triggered by sea ice loss in the Arctic are memorized in the Eurasian Continent, amplifying cooling in the winters to follow, according to a joint research team between Hokkaido University and Niigata University in Japan.

3h

Immunology: Activation by breakdown

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers report that a central component of the innate immune response is activated by two short RNAs which are produced by site-specific cleavage of a precursor RNA molecule – and both derivatives are generated by the same enzyme.

3h

Mapping the relay networks of our brain

A team of scientists led by Karl Farrow at NeuroElectronics Research Flanders (NERF, empowered by imec, KU Leuven and VIB) is unraveling how our brain processes visual information. They identified specific roles for distinct neuronal cell types in passing on information from the eye to downstream brain regions that guide behavior. Such knowledge is essential to understand how sensory information g

3h

Fighting fruit flies: Aggressive behavior influenced by previous interactions

New research conducted on fruit flies at the University of Guelph has found that aggression doesn't just depend on who we are or who we're interacting with but on our previous interactions.

3h

Unexpected pattern of fish species richness found in the Amazon Basin

International collaboration results in largest-ever inventory of Amazon fish fauna. Data will help estimate the risk of impacts related to the construction of dams and waterways as well as deforestation, mining and climate change.

3h

SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals

The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. Intensive agriculture is the main driver, particularly the heavy use of pesticides.Now, however, SFU biological sciences researchers Adam Blake and Gerhard Gries have made a key discovery that could help to reverse this

3h

IBM is using quantum computers to generate Minecraft-like game levels

IBM is using quantum computers to help generate video game scenes. The technology is still in its infancy but could result in more interesting or varied game levels

3h

Employers pay when workers face financial precarity

Increasing financial precarity among middle class Americans has negative consequences for their employers, research finds. "There is a business interest in individuals' financial wellness," says Carrie Leana, professor of organizations and management at the University of Pittsburgh's Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business. Money worries are a burden increasingly shared by "middle-class" worke

3h

Supplements may slow early aging syndrome

Supplements of the drug NAD+ may offer a new way of attacking Werner Syndrome, according to a study with animal models. Patients with Werner Syndrome have early signs of aging, such as grey hair, wrinkled skin, and increased incidence of cancer and type 2 diabetes . On average, they die at the age of 45. The underlying mechanisms of the disease are unknown and therefore, no treatment is yet avail

3h

Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument confirms solar wind slows farther away from the sun

Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored. In a paper recently published in the Astrophysical Journal, a team led by Southwest Research Institute shows how the solar wind—the supersonic stream of charged particles blown out by the Sun—evolves

3h

Spinster, old maid or self-partnered – why words for single women have changed through time

In a recent interview with Vogue, actress Emma Watson opened up about being a single 30-year-old woman. Instead of calling herself single, however, she used the word "self-partnered."

3h

International project aims to sequence the 'DNA' of the Arctic Ocean

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is leading a pioneering international project to sequence the DNA of marine microbes in the Arctic Ocean.

3h

How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set the stage for early life on Earth

New research in Science Advances is uncovering the vital role that Precambrian-eon microbes may have played in two of the early Earth's biggest mysteries.

3h

Move over, math. The universal language is world music.

Every culture in the world creates music, though stylistic diversity hides their core similarities. A new study in Science finds that cultures use identifiable acoustic features in the same types of songs and that tonality exists worldwide. Music is one of hundreds of human universals ethnographers have discovered. None World music's most striking feature is its diversity. A quick survey of moder

3h

How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life

Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early climate warm, and in forming the world's largest iron ore deposits billions of years ago.

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Här skapas lungvävnad på laboratoriet

I ett samarbete mellan Human Tissue Lab vid Skånes universitetssjukhus i Lund och Wallenberg centrum för molekylär medicin vid Lunds Universitet, vill forskarna skapa lungvävnad på laboratoriet. Tanken är att tillvarata de donerade lungor som inte kan transplanteras.

3h

First operational mapping system for high-resolution tropical forest carbon emissions

For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail. The approach will provide the basis for developing a rapid and cost-effective operational carbon monitoring system, making it possible to quantify the economic cost of deforestation as forests are converted from carbon sinks to sources. The study was publish

3h

New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil

Researchers from the School of Engineering in Trinity College Dublin have developed a new spatial index that measures the connections between poverty and poor accessibility.

3h

Daylight damage-saving time

Researchers at Kanazawa University have performed a detailed investigation of the molecular mechanisms by which organic solar cells suffer damage as they are exposed to sunlight. This research has important implications for developing next-generation solar panels that combine high efficiency, low cost, and long device lifetimes.

3h

Rating news sources can help limit the spread of misinformation

Online misinformation has significant real-life consequences, such as measles outbreaks and encouraging racist mass murderers. Online misinformation can have political consequences as well.

3h

Study demonstrates dogs promote page turning

Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a UBC researcher.

3h

A nice reactive ring to it: New synthetic pathways for diverse aromatic compounds

Researchers at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have introduced a new synthetic process for producing an important family of carbon-based molecules known as γ-aryl-β-ketoesters. These molecules are used in the production of many vital pharmaceuticals, including alectinib, which is administered to treat non-small-cell lung cancer, and Januvia, a diabetes drug. This chemical approach m

3h

Svalbard reindeer populations rebounding from centuries of hunting

As reindeer go, the animals living on the Norwegian arctic archipelago of Svalbard might not be Santa's first choice. They're a smaller subspecies of their common mainland relatives, and to save energy they basically never run. But because they were nearly exterminated from Svalbard around 1900 — and were then protected in 1925 — the animals provide unique insights into how conservation can help

3h

Monkeys inform group members about threats — following principles of cooperation

Humans are often faced with the choice of investing in the greater good or being selfish and letting others do the work. Animals that live in groups often encounter threats, and informing others could potentially save lives. Researcher of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology show that wild sooty mangabeys, when facing dangerous vipers, do not just call out of fear or to warn thei

3h

A new therapeutic target against diseases caused by lipid accumulation in cells

Researchers from the University of Barcelona (UB) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) found a new molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of the cholesterol movement in cells, an essential process for a proper cell functioning.

3h

New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil

Poor transportation availability can result in poor access to health care and employment, hence reinforcing the cycle of poverty and concerning health outcomes such as low life expectancy and high child mortality in rural Brazil.

3h

SwRI-built instrument confirms solar wind slows farther away from the Sun

Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored. In a paper recently published in The Astrophysical Journal, a team led by Southwest Research Institute shows how the solar wind — the supersonic stream of charged particles blown out by the Sun — e

3h

Human behaviour follows probabilistic inference patterns

According to a study published on Nov. 28 in Nature Communications by Philipp Schustek, Alexandre Hyafil and Rubén Moreno-Bote, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies.

3h

Compound controls biological clock with light

A chemical cage suppresses the activity of a biological clock regulator in the dark and releases it with light, showing potential for future treatments of circadian-clock-related diseases.

3h

NUS researchers find potential solution to overheating mobile phones

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has developed a revolutionary way to encode computational information without using electrical current. As a global first, this could lead to faster technological devices that could efficiently use energy without overheating.

3h

Inter faculty — Journal of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Social Sciences, Vol.9

Volume 9 of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of patterns of confluence and influence in the context of the movements of history.

3h

Whales stop being socialites when boats are about

The noise and presence of boats can harm humpback whales' ability to communicate and socialise, in some cases reducing their communication range by a factor of four.The discovery was made by Dr Rebecca Dunlop from The University of Queensland's Cetacean Ecology and Acoustics Laboratory, who monitored the acoustics and social behaviour of humpback whales off Queensland's Peregian Beach.

3h

U of Guelph researcher helps measure worldwide nitrogen levels in grasslands

A University of Guelph ecologist has taken part in a global project to monitor real-world nitrogen cycles in grassland soils to build understanding that is critical for measuring impacts on the ecosystem & food production.

3h

First operational mapping system for high-resolution tropical forest carbon emissions created using

For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail. The approach will provide the basis for developing a rapid and cost-effective operational carbon monitoring system, making it possible to quantify the economic cost of deforestation as forests are converted from carbon sinks to sources.

3h

Concussion recovery not clear cut for children

Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter.

3h

Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)

One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland.UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Iva Popovic said the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis – identified as one of the '100 World's Worst Invasive Species' by the IUCN Global Invasive Species Database – had steadily taken over the cou

3h

Evidence found in European birds of the transmission of tropical malaria

Scientists have found, for the first time, house sparrow in Spain to be a host for a parasite from Africa, Plasmodium PAGRI02, which had not been previously described outside that continent. This is the outcome of a study which analyzed blood samples from some 3,000 sparrows in Andalusia and Extremadura, conducted by researchers at the UEx Zoology Department, in collaboration with the Doñana Biolo

3h

People with depression experience suicidal thoughts despite treatment

One in five people with depression have suicidal thoughts despite treatment with antidepressants. This is shown by a new study from iPSYCH. The results can be used to examine whether more targeted treatment could be provided for patients where medication does not have a sufficient effect.

3h

Tiny fossils, big findings: UAlberta paleontologists discover odd mid-Cretaceous shrimp

One of the most incomplete fossil records of marine life is being filled in by a new find by a team of paleontologists from the University of Alberta, Yale University, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute — with the discovery of hundreds of tiny comma shrimp fossils.

3h

Tinder is a waste of time for most people

Dating apps won't help you much if your goal is to have more relationships. You would probably succeed just as well — or poorly — without it.

3h

ICO and IDIBELL researchers study the risk of false positives in colon cancer screening

Researchers from the Oncology Data Analytics Program (PADO), the Screening Unit of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the ICO and CIBERESP have just published in the scientific journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention a study to estimate the cumulative risk of a 'false positive' result in the fecal occult blood test.

3h

Best defense against MRSA at home: Wash your hands

A new study shows how the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus gets into our homes—and once there, spreads among family members, even furry ones. Once rare, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infects hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year and kills about 20,000. Antibiotic overuse has made MRSA more common and difficult to treat because of the bacteria

3h

Christmas tree shopping is harder than ever, thanks to climate change and demographics

If you're shopping for a live Christmas tree this year, you may have to search harder than in the past. Over the last five years Christmas tree shortages have been reported in many parts of the U.S.

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Christmas tree shopping is harder than ever, thanks to climate change and demographics

If you're shopping for a live Christmas tree this year, you may have to search harder than in the past. Over the last five years Christmas tree shortages have been reported in many parts of the U.S.

3h

What we found about bacteria that resist antibiotics in seafood

It's important to gain a deeper understanding about the various ways in which humans and animals have been exposed to antibiotics, and the rise in bacteria found in food that's resistant to the drugs. This explains why there has been a big increase in research into the sharp rise in bacteria found in food, or food sources, that are resistant to antibiotics.

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What we found about bacteria that resist antibiotics in seafood

It's important to gain a deeper understanding about the various ways in which humans and animals have been exposed to antibiotics, and the rise in bacteria found in food that's resistant to the drugs. This explains why there has been a big increase in research into the sharp rise in bacteria found in food, or food sources, that are resistant to antibiotics.

3h

Society Photographer Turns His Lens on Smartphone Addiction

Dafydd Jones shoots parties for a living. Around a decade ago, he began noticing a disturbing trend.

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Scientist anticipates breakthrough in Antarctic search for planet's oldest ice

It's summer in Antarctica, and scientists from all around the world are flying to research stations on the frozen continent as part of a now years-long campaign to uncover the world's oldest ice.

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All-optical diffractive neural networks process broadband light

Diffractive deep neural network is an optical machine learning framework that blends deep learning with optical diffraction and light-matter interaction to engineer diffractive surfaces that collectively perform optical computation at the speed of light. A diffractive neural network is first designed in a computer using deep learning techniques, followed by the physical fabrication of the designed

3h

Accessing scrambling in quantum systems using matrix product operators

In quantum physics, scrambling is the dispersal of quantum information across a complex quantum system, such as chaotic quantum many-body systems. This process can make quantum information difficult or impossible to access, particularly when using simple and conventional physics methods.

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Ny ansvarshavende chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin

Rikke Esbjerg bliver ny ansvarshavende chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin

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Alphabet Is Developing a Robot to Take Over Boring Everyday Tasks

Robots excel at carrying out specialized tasks in controlled environments, but put them in your average office and they'd be lost. Alphabet wants to change that by developing what they call the Everyday R obot, which could learn to help us out with our daily chores. For a long time most robots were painstakingly hand-coded to carry out their functions, but since the deep learning revolution earli

3h

Daylight damage-saving time

A research team led by Kanazawa University investigated the ways sunlight can degrade the efficiency of newly developed organic photovoltaics over time. This work may assist in the wide commercialization of next-generation solar sheets.

3h

UBCO study demonstrates dogs promote page turning

Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a UBC researcher. Camille Rousseau, a doctoral student in UBC Okanagan's School of Education, recently completed a study examining the behavior of 17 children from Grades 1 to 3 while reading with and without a dog. The study was conducted with Christine Tardif-Williams, a professor at Brock Univers

3h

Solving the thermoelectric 'trade-off' conundrum with metallic carbon nanotubes

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used aligned 'metallic' carbon nanotubes to create a device which converts heat to electrical energy (a thermoelectric device) with a higher power output than pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes in random networks. The new device bypasses the troublesome trade-off in semiconductors between conductivity and electrical voltage, significantly outper

3h

New principle for activation of cancer genes discovered

Researchers have long known that some genes can cause cancer when overactive, but exactly what happens inside the cell nucleus when the cancer grows has so far remained enigmatic. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a new mechanism that renders one canonical driver of cancer overactive. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, create conditions for brand new strategie

3h

Disclaimers on retouched photos don't solve problem of negative body image

Labels that warn an image has been altered or enhanced do nothing to mitigate women's negative perceptions of their appearance, according to a study published in Body Image this week. More importantly, some disclaimers heightened and even harmed body dissatisfaction in at-risk women, the study showed.

3h

Creating the conditions for a globally just energy transition

How can the energy transition be organized in a globally just way? Will developing countries struggle to transition to clean energy because they lack the financial and technical means? A new Policy Brief by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) focuses on the risks of an uneven transition and makes concrete proposals to prevent such risks.

3h

TU Dresden biologists examine sperm quality on the basis of their metabolism

Every tenth couple worldwide is affected by infertility. The reasons for this are manifold, but mostly well researched. Nevertheless, about fifteen percent of cases remain unexplained. A team of biologists at TU Dresden has now gained new insights into the metabolic properties that make up a good sperm cell.

3h

Compliance with Paris Agreement would limit loss of productivity in fishing, agriculture

An international team of scientists led by the CNRS, also involving the University of Montpellier in France, show that 90% of the global population may face decreases in productivity for both agriculture and fishing if greenhouse emissions are not reduced. On the other hand, most countries are in a position to limit these losses if emissions are drastically cut, as stipulated by the Paris Agreemen

3h

Babies in neonatal intensive care exposed to harmful chemicals, study finds

A multidisciplinary team of scientists from Granada, Spain, has detected bisphenol A (BPA) and parabens (PBs) in a wide range of plastic medical devices, fabrics, and personal care products commonly used in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), coming into direct contact with new-born babiesAmong the 50 items analysed were plastic syringes, feeding tubes and catheters, oxygen masks, endo

3h

Virtual reality becomes more real

Scientists from Skoltech ADASE (Advanced Data Analytics in Science and Engineering) lab have found a way to enhance depth map resolution, which should make virtual reality and computer graphics more realistic. They presented their research results at the prestigious International Conference on Computer Vision 2019 in Korea.

3h

Using electronics to solve common biological problems

What do an electrical engineer, an organic chemist, a materials scientist and a cell biologist all have in common? They invent and improve applications at the interface of biology and electronics.

3h

»Solid« eller »Fatamorgana«? Debatten raser om Femerns trafikprognoser

PLUS. En rapport om trafikprognoserne for Femern-forbindelsen blev holdt tilbage, og tallenes gyldighed er til diskussion. Her er parternes indlæg.

3h

Using electronics to solve common biological problems

What do an electrical engineer, an organic chemist, a materials scientist and a cell biologist all have in common? They invent and improve applications at the interface of biology and electronics.

4h

Ing.dk fylder 25: Her er de 'pinlige barndomsbilleder'

I dag er det præcis 25 år siden, at Ingeniøren som det første danske nyhedsmedie kunne søges frem på internettes www. Kønt var det ikke. Heldigvis blev det bedre op gennem teenage-årene, og nu hvor sitet er blevet 'voksent', ser det da ganske nydeligt ud, hvis vi altså selv skal sige det. Du kan bedømme det her:

4h

'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

Slabs of engineered quartz are cut to order in thousands of shops around the country that may not adequately protect workers from dangerous levels of the lung-damaging contaminant. (Image credit: Cambria)

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Ecofriendly nano-fabrication achieved with biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles

The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) succeeded in creating glass with self-cleaning and antireflective functions through the biodegradable chitosan nanoparticle coating. This is the first use of a biodegradable material in nanosphere lithography. The results of the study can be utilized to prevent the use of synthetic polymer nanoparticles in nano-fabrication, a kind of microplast

4h

How individual cell types in the brain contribute to Alzheimer's disease

Despite great investments, an effective drug-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia among the elderly, remains elusive. Scientists led by Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with Monash University, have now published an online atlas of gene expressions at single-cell level in Alzheimer's disease brains, aiming to boost to efforts to identify gene targets fo

4h

Atomic-scale imaging of defect dynamics under heating by in situ Cs-corrected TEM

Formation and atomic process of the defects of ceria nanowires was studied under heating by using in situ Cs-TEM. With the temperature elevating, ceria nanowires are reduced and defects grow up. At 1023K, the defects with rhombus or hexagon patterns are surrounded by {111} and {200} planes, and the heated ceria maintain the same cubic fluorite structure as their parent. The defects originate from

4h

Predicting molecular bond energy by artificial intelligence

Theoretical prediction of molecular bond energy is of key importance for understanding molecular properties. Herein, neural networks are employed to predict the molecular bond energies. In addition, the combination of artificial intelligence and theoretical calculations of quantum chemistry provides an efficient tool for accurately and quickly predicting molecular bond energy.

4h

Researchers find a way to collect elusive blood stem cells from zebrafish

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be used to better understand and treat blood-based diseases. Stem cell research in the model organism zebrafish is well-studied in the developmental stage, but is limited in the adult stage because HSCs are difficult to purify in this species. Researchers at Kanazawa University and their collaborators have developed a new purification scheme that allows HSCs to

4h

Seeing the world's smallest universal joints

Researchers at Osaka University used electron cryomicroscopy to produce the most accurate images to date of the bacterial flagellar hook. This work may help with nanomachine design and the fight against bacterial infections

4h

A nice reactive ring to it: New synthetic pathways for diverse aromatic compounds

Researchers at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) published a new method for synthesizing γ?aryl-β-ketoesters, which are used in the pharmaceutical manufacturing to create many drug molecules that contain a multi-substituted aromatic framework. This work may lead to efficient development of medications and other industrial chemicals.

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Student solves a 100-year-old physics enigma

An EPFL Bachelor's student has solved a mystery that has puzzled scientists for 100 years. He discovered why gas bubbles in narrow vertical tubes seem to remain stuck instead of rising upward. According to his research and observations, an ultra-thin film of liquid forms around the bubble, preventing it from rising freely. And he found that, in fact, the bubbles are not stuck at all—they are just

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Divers of the past: Plesiosaur research reveals rapid increase of blood cell size

In the Mesozoic era, about 250 to 65 million years ago a large number of reptiles populated the oceans. The most successful were the plesiosaurs, which existed for about the same time as the dinosaurs. Enlarged red blood cells ensured their survival. This was discovered by paleontologists at Bonn University and zoologist Kai R. Caspar from Duisburg-Essen University (UDE). The results can be read i

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The Eurasian Continent remembers and amplifies cold waves as the Arctic warms

Cold waves triggered by sea ice loss in the Arctic are memorized in the Eurasian Continent, amplifying cooling in the winters to follow, according to a joint research team between Hokkaido University and Niigata University in Japan.

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Potential harm of new viruses predicted by study

The threat to global human health posed by newly emerging viruses such as Ebola, SARS and the Zika virus can be predicted, a study has found.

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Image: Hubble detects dynamic galactic duo

Some galaxies are closer friends than others. While many live their own separate, solitary lives, others stray a little too close to a near neighbor and take their friendship even deeper.

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How to find molecular glues to effectively target diseases

Many of the currently available drugs are not specific enough to effectively cure complex diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. In addition, drug resistance reduces the effectiveness of existing therapies. To address these problems, biomedical engineer Eline Sijbesma designed small molecules that disarm specific disease proteins by gluing them to other proteins. These c

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Ears all round: World's first acoustic observatory

You won't see stars at the Australian Acoustic Observatory but you will "see" a galaxy of sounds from around Australia.

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How to find molecular glues to effectively target diseases

Many of the currently available drugs are not specific enough to effectively cure complex diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. In addition, drug resistance reduces the effectiveness of existing therapies. To address these problems, biomedical engineer Eline Sijbesma designed small molecules that disarm specific disease proteins by gluing them to other proteins. These c

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Potential harm of new viruses predicted by study

The threat to global human health posed by newly emerging viruses such as Ebola, SARS and the Zika virus can be predicted, a study has found.

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Finding art in 1-star product reviews

You can just tell they're typing in caps lock about the $10 blender they bought on Black Friday. (Pixabay/) Now that Black Friday has devolved from a single day of bargain-driven mayhem into a month long slog of fake deals and annoying marketing, Cyber Monday has its chance to shine. Last year, shoppers spent an estimated $7.9 billion on Cyber Monday , which was a nearly 20 percent increase from

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Climate change is reaching a tipping point

The earth's vulnerabilities could interact with each other in unpredictable ways

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Ears all round: World's first acoustic observatory

You won't see stars at the Australian Acoustic Observatory but you will "see" a galaxy of sounds from around Australia.

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Cardiac imaging with 3-D cellular resolution using few-mode interferometry to diagnose coronary artery disease

A new imaging technique developed by Biwei Yin and interdisciplinary researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in the U.S., provides resolution at the subcellular-level to image the heart's vascular system. As a result, heart researchers can study and diagnose human coronary artery disease with greater precision. Conventionally, cardiologists employ intravascular

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MBL team images the bacterial hitchhikers on plastic trash in ocean

Using an innovative microscopy method developed at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, scientists have revealed the structure of the microbial communities coating microplastic trash collected from a variety of ocean sites. The team, led by Linda Amaral-Zettler (who coined the term 'Plastisphere'), Jessica Mark Welch, and Cathleen Schlundt, reports its results this week in Molecular

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SUTD-led research sets the groundwork for patient-specific 3D printed meniscus

SUTD together with the University of Miyazaki developed a novel methodology to provide non-invasive analysis of meniscal implants.

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New device enables battery-free computer input at the tip of your finger

Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a device for wearable computer input suitable for many situations, just by touching your fingertips together in different ways.The device, called Tip-Tap, is inexpensive and battery-free through the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to sense when fingertips touch. The device could, therefore, be added to disposable surg

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How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set the stage for early life on Earth

Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early climate warm, and in forming the world's largest iron ore deposits billions of years ago.

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When your microbiome and your genome aren't a good combination

Research carried out by a team led by Osaka University has shown that various Prevotella species, along with several specific genes and biological pathways, are enriched in the gut microbiota of Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis. When the enriched biological pathways in the gut microbial metagenome were compared with enriched pathways in the host genome, a population-specific link was id

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Thermal stability and biological compatibility of the bone tissue implants are improved

Scientists from A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences (IMET RAS) have investigated the thermal stability of the synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) – the analogs material of human bone tissue. The obtained results have demonstrated that Al3+ doping of the HA structure in the tiny amounts enhanced its thermal stability and biocompatibility. This lead to ap

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Quantum dot lasers move a step closer with electric-pumping development at NTU Singapore

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a way to make Colloidal Quantum Dots produce laser light with the help of an electric field.

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Fighting fruit flies: Aggressive behavior influenced by previous interactions

Aggression doesn't just depend on who you are or who you're interacting with but also depends on your previous interactions, a new University of Guelph fruit fly study has found.

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Case report: Stem cells a step toward improving motor, sensory function after spinal cord injury

Stem cells derived from a patient's own fat offer a step toward improving — not just stabilizing — motor and sensory function of people with spinal cord injuries, according to early research from Mayo Clinic.

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Immunotherapy is safe following chemoradiotherapy for women with node-positive cervical cancer

Results from the NRG Oncology phase I clinical trial NRG-GOG 9929 show that utilizing the immunotherapy drug ipilimumab after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is tolerated in the curative treatment of women with lymph node-positive cervical cancer.

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Brain receptor that regulates body heat may also help accelerate weight loss

The brain mechanism that enables us to maintain a constant body temperature may also be the key to rapid weight loss, a new study finds. In experiments involving mice that were given a calorie-restricted diet, scientists at Scripps Research discovered that blocking a brain receptor that normally regulates body heat resulted in significant weight reductions. The findings will be further explored as

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Investigational drugs reduce risk of death from Ebola virus disease

The investigational therapeutics mAb114 and REGN-EB3 offer patients a greater chance of surviving Ebola virus disease (EVD) compared to the investigational treatment ZMapp. The new report also shows that early diagnosis and treatment are associated with an increased likelihood of survival from EVD.

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Facial deformity in royal dynasty was linked to inbreeding, scientists confirm

The 'Habsburg jaw,' a facial condition of the Habsburg dynasty of Spanish and Austrian kings and their wives, can be attributed to inbreeding, according to new results.

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Why we blurt things out (and how to stop it)

Stress makes us more likely to blurt things out, research finds, even things we're usually careful to conceal. Arousal—the degree to which someone is awake and alert—causes people to say things automatically rather than think things through before speaking, according to Brent Coker from the University of Melbourne Faculty of Business and Economics. Automatic responses are usually things that peop

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Ancient Inuit Brought Sled Dogs From Siberia That Helped Them Survive, Study Shows

Dogs were already in North America when Inuit communities arrived, but the dogs the Inuit brought with them had unique abilities that helped the people survive in a new environment.

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Ingen kris för främmande språk i skolan

Fler elever än någonsin läser ett främmande språk utöver engelska i grundskolan. Men språkstudierna är ojämlikt fördelade efter kön och social klass. Den övre medelklassens studiestarka döttrar är de som i störst utsträckning väljer att läsa språk. Det visar en ny avhandling i utbildningssociologi från Uppsala universitet. I över ett decennium har en debatt kring "språkens kris" pågått. Diskussio

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Brush your teeth to protect the heart

Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a new study.

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New technique visually depicts how cancer cells grow and spread in colon tissue

Researchers have observed how stem cell mutations quietly arise and spread throughout a widening field of the colon until they eventually predominate and become a malignancy.

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Climate change is totally reshaping ocean communities

Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a new study. As waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful, the researchers say. The scientists compiled the most comprehensive assessment of how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species in our oceans. They looked at fishes, invertebrates

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Chennai: Children play as 'toxic' foam blankets Indian beach

The foam is said to be caused by pollutants in sewage mixing with sea water and frothed by waves.

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31 Cyber Monday 2019 Amazon Deals: Echo, Kindle, Fire TV, Ring, and More

Get your Prime on with our favorite Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals on Amazon's Devices, including Fire tablets, Echos, Kindles, and more.

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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack

Sophia Xueqin Huang, a journalist who has covered the ongoing unrest in Hong Kong has been detained since October on charges of "picking quarrels and provoking trouble."

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Carbon markets shape agenda at UN climate summit

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03695-x The COP25 discussions also face a backdrop of uncertain geopolitics and intensifying public pressure.

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Investigational drugs reduce risk of death from Ebola virus disease

The investigational therapeutics mAb114 and REGN-EB3 offer patients a greater chance of surviving Ebola virus disease (EVD) compared to the investigational treatment ZMapp, according to published results from a clinical trial conducted in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The new report also shows that early diagnosis and treatment are associated with an increased likelihood of survival

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Researchers identify protein that governs human blood stem cell self-renewal

UCLA scientists have discovered a link between a protein and the ability of human blood stem cells to self-renew. In a study published today in the journal Nature, the team reports that activating the protein causes blood stem cells to self-renew at least twelvefold in laboratory conditions.

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New fossil shrimp species from Colombia helps fill 160 million-year gap

A new fossil species of comma shrimp, exceptionally preserved in mid-Cretaceous rocks of the Colombian Andes, allowed scientists to fill a 160 million-year gap in the evolution of these crustaceans.

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Forbrugere: »Vi mangler rettigheder over IoT-produkter«

PLUS. Forbrugerrådet Tænk og Dansk IT vil sidestille softwarebaserede IoT-produkter med konventionelle hardware-produkter som opladere og smartphones.

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Anthracnose alert: How bacteria prime fifth-biggest global grain crop against deadly fungus

Anthracnose of Sorghum bicolor devastates crops of the drought- and heat-resistant cereal worldwide. Priming with rhizobacteria can boost the plants' resistance and tolerance against a wide range of adverse conditions such as microbial attacks.

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Anthracnose alert: How bacteria prime fifth-biggest global grain crop against deadly fungus

Anthracnose of Sorghum bicolor devastates crops of the drought- and heat-resistant cereal worldwide. Priming with rhizobacteria can boost the plants' resistance and tolerance against a wide range of adverse conditions such as microbial attacks.

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Nanotechnologies – almost there – what's next? | SciTech Europa

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No, Machine Learning Does Not Have A Huge Carbon Debt

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Helping machines perceive some laws of physics

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Technology is not the magical solution

I'm going to keep it short, I'm not an expert (and I won't even bother providing sources, you are as qualified as me to use google), and I'm not a climate-skeptic nor a collapsist. But I'm seeing way too many people being overly optimistic about the ability of technology to "save us". The problem is that "saving us" is vague, and I have the feeling that in a lot of people mind, it means keep livi

5h

Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails

A team led by researchers from Osaka University identify a protein required for electrical signal sensing, which, when defective, causes sperm to swim in circles.

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Harnessing the power of CRISPR in space and time

Researchers in Vienna from Ulrich Elling's laboratory at IMBA—Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences—in collaboration with the Vienna BioCenter Core Facilities have developed a revolutionary CRISPR technology called "CRISPR-Switch," which enables unprecedented control of the CRISPR technique in both space and time.

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Researchers identify a minimoon fireball

A team of researchers at Curtin University studying data from Australia's Desert Fireball Network has identified a minimoon fireball. In their paper published in The Astronomical Journal, the group describes how they found the fireball and the methods they used to show that it had come from a minimoon.

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Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails

A team led by researchers from Osaka University identify a protein required for electrical signal sensing, which, when defective, causes sperm to swim in circles.

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Harnessing the power of CRISPR in space and time

Researchers in Vienna from Ulrich Elling's laboratory at IMBA—Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences—in collaboration with the Vienna BioCenter Core Facilities have developed a revolutionary CRISPR technology called "CRISPR-Switch," which enables unprecedented control of the CRISPR technique in both space and time.

5h

Why more clouds can mean less rain in Australia

On any given day in Australia, depending on where you are, you may look up – hoping for those rainclouds to appear in the sky, or wishing them away.

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Regionsformand retter kikkerten mod problemer på Rigshospitalet

Alvorlige fejl på Rigshospitalets patologiafdeling får nu formanden for Region Hovedstaden til at holde ekstra øje med hospitalets direktion.

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New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds

An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells, the cells that hold genetic information which is passed on to the next generation. The researchers found that the GRC is tens of millions of years old and plays a key role in songbird biology,

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Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves

Physicists from Switzerland, Germany, and France have found that large-amplitude acoustic waves, launched by ultrashort laser pulses, can dynamically manipulate the optical response of semiconductors.

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Studies highlight fragility of Antarctic ecosystems

Two studies published in a special issue of the journal Science Advances this week highlight the fragility of the Antarctic and its ecosystems in the lead up to the UNFCCC COP25 meeting in Madrid next week.

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New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds

An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells, the cells that hold genetic information which is passed on to the next generation. The researchers found that the GRC is tens of millions of years old and plays a key role in songbird biology,

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'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

Slabs of engineered quartz are cut-to-order in thousands of shops across the country that may not adequately protect workers from dangerous levels of the lung-damaging contaminant. (Image credit: Cambria)

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Elsevier Progresses in Open-Access Deal Making

The scholarly publisher has announced several new licensing agreements in both Europe and the US–but some major academic groups are still without contracts and access to journals.

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The False Promise of Morning Routines

My mornings are the messiest part of my day. I do not rise and shine. Instead, I hit Snooze on the alarm and throw the covers over my head. As I hear the early bus shuffle through my stop outside my window, my mind fills with thoughts from the night before, with to-do lists and deadlines. The alarm goes off again, and I repeat the snooze cycle twice more. By the time I roll out of bed, I'm a tang

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The Famous Baldwin-Buckley Debate Still Matters Today

"The American Dream is at the expense of the American Negro," James Baldwin declared on February 18, 1965, in his epochal debate with William F. Buckley Jr. at the University of Cambridge. Baldwin was echoing the motion of the debate—that the American dream was at the expense of black Americans, with Baldwin for, Buckley against—but his emphasis on the word is made his point clear. " I picked the

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What it means to have 'undetectable' HIV—and why you need to know

Antiretroviral drugs allow people with HIV to live completely normal lives. They also prevent them from transmitting the virus to others once they reach an undetectable viral load. It's been almost 40 years since the start of the AIDS epidemic, when hundreds of people began contracting deadly infections that doctors had no idea how to combat. It took until 1983 for researchers to identify the vir

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Cheap at Last, Batteries Are Making a Solar Dream Come True

Solar power is increasingly available around the clock as energy storage become more affordable.

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Image of the Day: Tiny Fish

This 1-centimenter-long frogfish is one of the many subjects of marine photographer Richard Smith.

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Zebra finches survive Australian heatwaves by predicting high temperatures

The survival habits of a native Australian bird have given Curtin University researchers vital clues that may help understand how wildlife can withstand harsh heatwaves that may prove fatal.

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Researchers develop early warning system for water pollution using tiny water fleas

Researchers at the University of Toronto are developing an early warning system for water quality and pollution that combines tiny water fleas and an instrument so sensitive it's able to detect changes at the molecular level.

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Zebra finches survive Australian heatwaves by predicting high temperatures

The survival habits of a native Australian bird have given Curtin University researchers vital clues that may help understand how wildlife can withstand harsh heatwaves that may prove fatal.

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New study reveals high levels of pollution on London Underground

Researchers from King's College London have carried out the first comprehensive study of fine particles on the London Underground to evaluate the exposure of people travelling on different parts of the network.

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ESA får rekordstort budget: Danmark holder på pengene

Medlemslandene har på en ministerkonference øget deres bidrag med omkring 25 pct. i forhold til for tre år siden. Danmark giver stort set det samme som tidligere.

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When reefs die, parrotfish thrive

In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching.

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India tiger on 'longest walk ever' for mate and prey

The tiger has traversed 1,300km in five months, the furthest a big cat is known to have walked in India.

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When reefs die, parrotfish thrive

In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching.

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Wood documents Hurricane Dorian's impact on the Bahamas

Richard L. Wood, a University of Nebraska–Lincoln civil engineering assistant professor who specializes in disaster damage, has turned his expertise toward the Bahamas in an effort to understand why some buildings survived Hurricane Dorian's onslaught in early September.

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10 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Deals for Holiday Gifting:

From robot vacuums to affordable streaming devices, these are the Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals that we're buying for our own friends and family.

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32 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Home Deals: Foam Mattresses, Instant Pot, and More

(Updated Frequently) Our favorite Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals on robot vacuums, Dyson, bed-in-a-box mattresses, Instant Pots, and more.

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Essential Advice for Fledgling Scientists

Among other things, practice humility—and remember that nature is the final arbiter of what's true — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dear Therapist: My Girlfriend and I Are at a Crossroads in Our Relationship

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have been seeing my girlfriend for a year and four months. We got together quickly, at a tumultuous time. Six months earlier, I'd left an abusive relationship, and my ex, who did not take it well, was in our

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Thermo-chemical power generation integrated with forced convection cooling

Scientists combine forced convection cooling with thermo-electrochemical energy conversion to create a self-sustaining liquid cooling system. A liquid electrolyte is circulated through a cell to cool a hot object, and the reversible chemical reaction in the cell generates a higher electric power than the hydrodynamic pump work required to drive the liquid through the cell. This technology resolves

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Producing better guides for medical-image analysis

Researchers have devised a method that accelerates the process for creating and customizing templates used in medical-image analysis, to guide disease diagnosis.

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First implantable magnet resonance detector

A new miniature NMR implant measures neuronal activity.

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From firearms to fish — following patterns to discover causality

Mathematicians have successfully applied a new, pictorial approach to answer complex questions that puzzle analysts, such as, do media stories on firearm legislation influence gun sales? Cause-and-effect queries like this pop up in various fields, from finance to neuroscience, and objective methods are needed to deliver reliable answers. The team of researchers wrestled mathematical theory into qu

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A missing link in haze formation

Hazy days don't just block the view; they mean the air contains particulate matter that can compromise human health. Chemists have now discovered a way that alcohols can balance out the formation of new particles, a finding that could improve the accuracy of air-quality forecasts.

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Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought

Heat from the landmass beneath the Antarctic ice sheet is a major contributor to the way that glaciers melt and flow—and their impact on potential sea level rise. Hotter conditions allow meltwater to lubricate the base of the glacier, accelerating its movement and the rate of ice loss.

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95-million-year-old fossil reveals new group of pterosaurs

Ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists.

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Ancient puppy found in permafrost still has its fur and whiskers

An 18,000-year-old puppy still has its nose, fur, teeth and whiskers – but tests to determine whether it is a dog or a wolf have come up blank

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How to Get Solar Power on a Rainy Day? Beam It From Space

A decades-old idea is finally getting a chance to shine—that is, a chance to send sunshine harvested by a satellite down to Earth.

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Would You Pay Someone $40 to Keep You Focused on Work?

I procrastinate. I get distracted. This San Francisco startup wants to help me (and everyone else) by coaching its clients through their to-do lists.

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How Airports Are Protecting Themselves Against Rising Seas

Many of the nation's busiest airports are subject to increased flooding from climate change. So they're building seawalls and relocating sensitive equipment.

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37 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Deals for Under $50: Tech, Toys, Games, and More

(Updated Frequently) We found more than two dozen affordable deals help you round out your shopping list without blowing your budget.

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Today's Cartoon: Cyber Monday

Wake up, human\! It's Cyber Monday\!

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Omstritt gentest ledde till världsunik graviditet

Ett embryo som bedömts ha låg risk för sjukdomar som cancer och diabetes har för första gången valts ut och resulterat i en graviditet genom provrörsbefruktning.

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Essential Advice for Fledgling Scientists

Among other things, practice humility—and remember that nature is the final arbiter of what's true — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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36 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Outdoor and Fitness Deals: Patagonia, Garmin, Etc

(Updated Frequently) From Patagonia outerwear to the Fitbit Versa Lite, we've got Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals to keep you moving, outside, and happy.

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First action plan in 25 years aims to save Australia's snakes and lizards from extinction

The status of Australian snakes and lizards has deteriorated significantly over the past two decades, with the number of species assessed as threatened nearly doubling from 1993 to 2017.

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Kina indfører ansigts-scanning ved telefonkøb

Den nye lovgivning skal sikre, at udbyder og regering kender identiteten på købere af nye smartphones samt datapakker. Det sker som led i den kinesiske regerings ambition om, at alle kinesere skal kunne genkendes, når de er online.

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Nu er klimatopmødet i gang: Bag kulisserne kæmpes der om ambitionsniveauet

PLUS. Til næste år skal landene bag Parisaftalen aflevere deres klimahandlingsplaner. De skal gerne være så ambitiøse som muligt og det er et af de uofficielle temaer på den 25. klimatopmøde i Madrid, der starter i dag

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First evidence that Antarctica's thinning ice shelves are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea

Researchers have produced the first physics-based quantifiable evidence that thinning ice shelves in Antarctica are causing more ice to flow from the land into the ocean.

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Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)

One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland.

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First action plan in 25 years aims to save Australia's snakes and lizards from extinction

The status of Australian snakes and lizards has deteriorated significantly over the past two decades, with the number of species assessed as threatened nearly doubling from 1993 to 2017.

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Automating History's First Draft

Computers can tell what will matter (slightly) better than humans can — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)

One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland.

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33 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Smartphone Deals: iPhone, Pixel, Galaxy, and More

(Updated Frequently) Our favorite Android phones, smartwatches, Apple Watches, Kindles, and other mobile accessories for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

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Companies could be fined if they fail to explain decisions made by AI

Businesses could face multimillion-pound fines if they are unable to explain decisions made by artificial intelligence, under plans put forward by the UK's data watchdog

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An Effort to Improve Scientific Integrity in the Federal Government

When the federal government interferes with its scientists and manipulates their research and reports, science advocates often clamor for clear scientific integrity policies. A bill introduced this year could require federal agencies to develop them, but it faces many hurdles before it can become law.

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New maps of salinity reveal the impact of climate variability on oceans

Since the saltiness of ocean surface waters is a key variable in the climate system, understanding how this changes is important to understanding climate change. Thanks to ESA's Climate Change Initiative, scientists now have better insight into sea-surface salinity with the most complete global dataset ever produced from space.

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A picture is worth a thousand base pairs

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03705-y A small but powerful toolset makes sharing genomic data visualizations straightforward.

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24 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Headphone Deals: Sonos, Sony, Beats, and More

(Updated Frequently) From Bose speakers to AirPods Pro to Bose to an Audio-Technica turntable, these are the best Cyber Monday audio deals we can find.

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Fågelvärldens största könskromosom

En rekordstor könskromosom har upptäckts hos två fågelarter. Jättekromosomen bildades när fyra kromosomer slogs samman till en och har hittats bland lärkor. – Detta var en oväntad upptäckt eftersom fåglar i allmänhet anses ha väldigt stabil arvsmassa med välbevarade kromosomer, säger Bengt Hansson, professor vid Lunds universitet. I en ny studie har forskare i Lund och Storbritannien kartlagt arv

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He's No King David

Some avowedly pious men and women have, of late, explained their support of President Donald Trump by citing the example of King David, a sinner whom the Lord used for his purposes, and whose faults—crimes, even—were redeemed by the good he did. According to this line of thinking advanced by politicians, activists, and even clerics of different hues, Trump may have wandered far from the straight

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The House Is Making This Fight Too Easy for Trump

Last week marked a low point in Donald Trump's quest for presidential superpowers. On Monday, a federal judge in the District of Columbia ruled that former White House Counsel Don McGahn does not have absolute immunity from having to testify before the House Judiciary Committee regarding misconduct by Trump and his associates in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. "Presidents are not k

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The Guns Case Is About Much More Than Guns

Sometimes the worst decision the Supreme Court can make is to decide a case at all. The Court appears poised to make this mistake in its zeal to expansively interpret the Second Amendment, and in the process will make a further error: insisting that only courts, and not legislatures or executive officials, can remedy constitutional violations. Last spring, the Supreme Court granted certiorari to

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A Theory for Why Trump's Base Won't Budge

Senator Ted Cruz once described Donald Trump as "a narcissist at a level I don't think this country's ever seen." That characterization echoes what many psychological researchers and therapists have long concluded. Although the American Psychiatric Association strongly discourages mental-health professionals from assigning mental-illness labels to public figures, some clinicians have even suggest

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China Isn't the Soviet Union. Confusing the Two Is Dangerous.

Anyone looking for evidence of a growing economic and ideological conflict between China and the United States will have no trouble finding something —the trade war now roiling both countries' economies, the standoff between police and pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, Beijing's swift retaliation against the NBA over a single Houston Rockets executive's tweet in support of those same protest

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Astronaut Luca feeling the force, to advance rover control

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano has made robotics history, reaching out from the International Space Station in orbit around Earth at 8 km/s, to control an Earth-based rover, equipped with an advanced gripper possessing the equivalent mobility and dexterity of a human hand.

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Power of connection: why the Russia–Europe gas trade is strangely untouched by politics

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03694-y Thane Gustafson argues that fuel pipelines foster stability. By Andrew Moravcsik

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Pitt researchers sue journal for defamation following retraction

A pair of researchers at the University of Pittsburgh are suing the Journal of Biological Chemistry for defamation after the publication retracted one of their papers for problematic images. Raju Reddy and Aravind Reddy Tarugu, who are not related, claim the JBC and its publisher, the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, defamed them … Continue reading

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Who is leading the private space race?

The International Space Station is the most expensive public project ever built in the history of humanity. Companies like NanoRacks, SpaceX, and Blue Origin have already entered the conversation of what the future will look like for the ISS. Now, it's important to entertain only the serious contenders in the space race. The Consequential Frontier: Challenging the Privatization of Space List Pric

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Techtopia 134: Googles nye regler for ansvarlig AI

Skal vi være nervøse for kunstig intelligens og brugen af vores personlige data? Det mener britiske dataaktivister, og Google har lyttet.

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46 Best Cyber Monday 2019 Video Game Deals: Switch, PS4, XB1, PC

(Updated Frequently) Looking for a game or console? We've rounded up the best Black Friday deals so you can spend more time gaming.

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Sperm whale dies with 100kg 'litter ball' in its stomach

Fishing nets and rope were among the debris found inside the whale which stranded on the Isle of Harris.

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Photoresponsive spiro-polymers generated in situ by C–H-activated polyspiroannulation

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13308-w Photoresponsive polymers are receiving great attention due to the increasing demands on smart optical and biological materials. Here, the authors report a C–H-activated polyspiroannulation route to in situ generate photoresponsive spiro-polymers with potential applications in photopatterning and silicon phot

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Seawater softening of suture zones inhibits fracture propagation in Antarctic ice shelves

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13539-x Suture zones are abundant on Antarctic ice shelves and widely observed to impede fracture propagation. Here we show that fracture detainment is principally controlled by the zones' enhanced seawater contents, reducing fracture-driving stresses by orders of magnitude and therefore greatly enhancing stability.

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DNA methylation in AgRP neurons regulates voluntary exercise behavior in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13339-3 AgRP neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) are involved in regulating hunger and energy balance. Here the authors show that knockout of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a in AgRP neurons of the ARH leads to a reduction in voluntary exercise along with numerous epigenetic and gene expression changes

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Magnetic field-tuned Fermi liquid in a Kondo insulator

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13421-w The interaction of localized and conduction electrons in some heavy fermion materials is believed to give rise to a Kondo insulating state. Kushwaha et al. present evidence that Ce3Bi4Pd3 is a Kondo insulator with a gap small enough to be driven into a Fermi liquid phase with accessible magnetic fields.

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Declines in HIV incidence among men and women in a South African population-based cohort

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13473-y Here, the authors investigate the outcome of prevention services scale-up on HIV incidence in a South African large population-based HIV surveillance cohort with over a decade of follow-up and associate a 43% reduction in incidence to earlier male medical circumcision and increased levels of antiretroviral t

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Contribution of oxic methane production to surface methane emission in lakes and its global importance

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13320-0 Anoxic lake sediments are thought to be the major source of the high amount of methane emitted from freshwaters. Here Günthel and colleagues find unexpected quantities of this greenhouse gas are produced in lake surfaces, indicating an overlooked global importance from oxygenated sources.

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LRIG1 is a pleiotropic androgen receptor-regulated feedback tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13532-4 LRIG1 is a tumour suppressor in several cancers. Here, the authors show that androgen receptor directly transactivates LRIG1 which then antagonises ERBB signalling and c-Myc expression to inhibit prostate tumorigenesis.

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Impacts of past abrupt land change on local biodiversity globally

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13452-3 Abrupt land changes may have long-lasting effects on local biodiversity. Here, Jung et al. show that past abrupt land change reduces species richness and abundance, and alters assemblage composition, with recovery often taking more than 10 years.

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IDA vil præge klimaloven med 'ingeniøraftryk'

PLUS. Udmøntningen af den kommende klimalov skal have ingeniøraftryk. Derfor opruster IDA på området, fortalte formanden under repræsentantskabsmødet.

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New technique visually depicts how cancer cells grow and spread in colon tissue

Duke Cancer Institute researchers have observed how stem cell mutations quietly arise and spread throughout a widening field of the colon until they eventually predominate and become a malignancy.

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RSNA 2019 presents session on lung injury from vaping

E-cigarette use is on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 9 million adults in the US use e-cigarettes, and vaping has become especially popular among teens. A panel of medical professionals will discuss the public health impact of e-cigarette use, or 'vaping.'

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Novel MRI-guided ultrasound treatment destroys prostate cancer

A novel MRI-guided procedure that uses therapeutic ultrasound effectively treats prostate cancer with minimal side effects, according to a new study. Researchers said the incision-free technique could also be used to treat benign enlargement of the prostate gland.

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Will John Roberts Constrain Trump?

The final weeks of November may be remembered as the moment when Donald Trump crushed the last vestiges of resistance to him in the Republican Party. The sole remaining question is whether that conquest extends to the Republican-appointed justices on the Supreme Court—especially the chief justice, John Roberts. A stark confluence of events these past few weeks, from the House of Representatives t

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Short-term depression shapes information transmission in a constitutively active GABAergic synapse

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54607-y

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LIN28B affects gene expression at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and serum testosterone levels

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54475-6

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Phase transitions, collective emotions and decision-making problem in heterogeneous social systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54296-7

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Upregulation of vitamin D-binding protein is associated with changes in insulin production in pancreatic beta-cells exposed to p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54579-z Upregulation of vitamin D-binding protein is associated with changes in insulin production in pancreatic beta-cells exposed to p , p ′-DDT and p,p ′-DDE

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Protective effects of Salidroside on cardiac function in mice with myocardial infarction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54713-x

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How suspicions of spying threaten cross-border science

An intelligence startup warns that China is exploiting Western quantum scientists for military ends. The evidence is thin, but tensions are rising.

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Myc controls a distinct transcriptional program in fetal thymic epithelial cells that determines thymus growth

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13465-y Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are essential for the maturation of functional T cells, while thymus size is proportional to the overall output efficiency. Here the authors show, using transcriptome analyses, that mouse fetal TEC maintain a Myc-dependent genetic program to ensure a rapid increase in thymus siz

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Hierarchical motor control in mammals and machines

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13239-6 Recent research in motor neuroscience has focused on optimal feedback control of single, simple tasks while robotics and AI are making progress towards flexible movement control in complex environments employing hierarchical control strategies. Here, the authors argue for a return to hierarchical models of m

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Genome-wide CRISPR screen identifies ELP5 as a determinant of gemcitabine sensitivity in gallbladder cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13420-x Gemcitabine is used to treat gallbaldder cancer but patient responses are variable. Here, the authors use a genome-wide CRISPR screen and identify the translational elongator protein ELP5 as a protein that is important for mediating gemcitabine-induced apoptosis.

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Global redox proteome and phosphoproteome analysis reveals redox switch in Akt

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13114-4 Crosstalk between protein oxidation and other post-translational modifications remains unexplored. Here, the authors map the phosphoproteome, cysteine redox proteome and total proteome of adipocytes under acute oxidative stress and reveal crosstalk between cysteine oxidation and phosphorylation-based signall

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Glacier monitoring tracks progress in limiting climate change

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03700-3

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Groundwater: a call to action

Nature, Published online: 02 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03711-0

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Rederi: Ingen oplyste os om farerne ved brandfarlig gødnings-last

PLUS. Rederiet Yara kræver op til 185 millioner kr i erstatning efter et skib fyldt med 40.000 ton kunstgødning er brændt.

9h

I Graaff-Reinet har det ikke regnet i fem år

FN har udpeget det sydlige Afrika til et brændpunkt for klimaforandringer.

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When reefs decline, parrotfish thrive

In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching.The surprise finding came when researchers led by Perth-based Dr. Brett Taylor of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) looked at fish populations in severely bleached areas of two reefs — the Great Barrier Reef in the western Pacific and the Chagos Archipelago in the Ind

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Bättre symtomhantering och hälsosammare livsstil med appar

Mobilappar kan hjälpa patienter med neurologiska sjukdomar att hantera sina symtom bättre och stimulera till en hälsosammare livsstil. Det visar ny tvärvetenskaplig forskning från forskningscentrumet CASE vid Lunds universitet.

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Egtvedpigen og Skrydstrupkvinden kom sandsynligvis langvejs fra bekræfter nyt studie

Et nyt studie fra Københavns Universitet og Nationalmuseet bekræfter og underbygger den oprindelige…

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Scientists race to document Puerto Rico's coastal heritage

A group of U.S.-based scientists is rushing to document indigenous sites along Puerto Rico's coast dating back a couple of thousand years before rising sea levels linked to climate change destroy a large chunk of the island's heritage that is still being discovered.

10h

Technology to keep lights on could help prevent wildfires

B. Don Russell wasn't thinking about preventing a wildfire when he developed a tool to detect power line problems before blackouts and bigger disasters.

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Nearly 200 countries attend ambitious climate talks

Delegates from almost 200 countries have begun a two-week international climate conference in Madrid that seeks to step up efforts to stop global warming.

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China plans new coal plants, trims support for clean energy

As world leaders gather in Spain to discuss how to slow the warming of the planet, a spotlight falls on China—the top emitter of greenhouse gases.

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Zero-hour on climate, but UN talks in another time zone

Global talks tasked with neutralising the threat of global warming get underway in Madrid Monday, but their narrow focus on rules and procedures remains out of sync with the world's climate-addled future.

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Coal power becoming 'uninsurable' as firms refuse cover

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

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China now requires face scans to sign up for phone service

submitted by /u/nopantsdolphin [link] [comments]

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Anthracnose alert: How bacteria prime fifth-biggest global grain crop against deadly fungus

Sorghum anthracnose devastates crops of the drought- and heat-resistant cereal worldwide. Priming with rhizobacteria can boost the plant's resistance against a range of microbial attacks. University of Johannesburg researchers decoded how priming enhances the 'security system' of plants for a much stronger, faster defence. Using metabolomics and machine learning algorithms, they identified changes

10h

When solids and liquids meet: In nanoscale detail

How a liquid interacts with the surface of a solid is important in batteries and fuel cells, chemical production, corrosion phenomena, and many biological processes.

10h

A matchmaker for microbiomes

Microbiomes play essential roles in the natural processes that keep the planet and our bodies healthy, so it's not surprising that scientists' investigations into these diverse microbial communities are leading to advances in medicine, sustainable agriculture, cheap water purification methods, and environmental cleanup technology, just to name a few. However, trying to determine which microbes con

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A matchmaker for microbiomes

Microbiomes play essential roles in the natural processes that keep the planet and our bodies healthy, so it's not surprising that scientists' investigations into these diverse microbial communities are leading to advances in medicine, sustainable agriculture, cheap water purification methods, and environmental cleanup technology, just to name a few. However, trying to determine which microbes con

10h

Would you pay $1 million to enroll in a phase 1 clinical trial of an "anti-aging" gene therapy?

Libella Gene Therapeutics, LLC made the news last week for announcing a "pay-to-play" trial of its telomerase-based anti-aging gene therapy. What was shocking about the announcement was not that it was a "pay-to-play" trial, given that such trials have become all too common, but rather the price of enrollment: $1 million. Worse, the trial is being conducted in Colombia; the therapy doesn't have th

10h

Climate change: Study underpins key idea in Antarctic ice loss

The notion that thinning ice shelves enable glacier speed-up and mass loss is cemented.

10h

A Pioneer of GPS Passes Away

James Spilker, Jr., helped create a technology that profoundly changed the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Can you solve it? Smart as a box of frogs

Slippery brainteasers and a Christmas challenge UPDATE: solutions and challenge winner can be read here. Today's puzzles are taken from Mathigon , a wonderful interactive mathematical encyclopaedia. Every year, the site publishes a puzzle a day from Dec 1 to 24. Here are three of my favourites from this year. Jump to it! Continue reading…

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200 countries meet in Madrid for climate change discussions

Almost 200 countries are meeting in Madrid to discuss what they're doing to tackle climate change.

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Boris Johnson urged to challenge Trump on climate denial

350 experts call on PM to address president's 'dangerous' and 'irresponsible' claims Boris Johnson is being urged by 350 leading climate researchers to robustly challenge Donald Trump on his "dangerous" and "irresponsible" denial of the risks of climate change during the US president's visit to the UK this week. Putting the prime minister under more pressure over his stance on global heating, lea

11h

The Lancet, UNSW and Khachigian's cancer cure

A dishonest cancer researcher. A dud cancer drug based on rigged lab data. A clinical trial in The Lancet. A greedy university which finds no misconduct. And a medical journal which tramples over patients.

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What is the UN's COP25 climate summit, and why does it matter?

Everything you wanted to know about international climate talks beginning in Madrid, from who's going, what's on the table and expectations for the summit

12h

Two Democracies, Two Very Different Elections

At times, it can feel as if British and American politics are on converging paths. After all, both the United States and the United Kingdom experienced seismic votes in 2016. The outcomes of both—the decision to leave the European Union in Britain and the election of Donald Trump in the U.S.—have been attributed, at least in part, to a growing polarization and division within their respective soc

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Femern-selskab forsøgte at hemmeligholde trafik-rapport

PLUS. En rapport om såkaldt dynamiske trafikeffekter i den kommende Femern-tunnel er kommet frem, efter at en kritiker klagede over hemmeligholdelsen. Projektselskab mener, at offentliggørelse ville skade Danmark i en tysk retssag.

13h

Science snapshots from Berkeley Lab

An experiment shows undersea fiber optic cable can act as earthquake detectors, a new tool will enable important insights into the microbial communities in the environment and inside our bodies, and an infrared technique at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source probes active chemistry at the solid-liquid interface.

13h

Opioid overdose risk is high after medical treatment ends, study finds

People with opioid addiction face a high risk of overdose after ending treatment, even when treated for 18 months, a Columbia study has found.

13h

Study highlights 'worrying' increase in misuse of non-opioid medications

A major new analysis of the non-opioid medications, gabapentin and baclofen, shows 'worrying' increases in related suicide attempts and hospital admissions in US adults since 2013 — coinciding with a decrease in opioid prescriptions.

13h

Brush your teeth to protect the heart

Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 2. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

13h

Den äldsta och gladaste nobelpristagaren

John Goodenough är 97-år och fick nobelpriset i kemi i år tillsammans med Stanley Whittingham och Akira Yoshino. Hur glad är han för detta? Se klippet ovan.

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Nobelprisade batterierna för elbilar kunde slagit igenom redan för 50 år sedan

Det började som ett försök att utveckla elbilar på 1970-talet. Resultatet blev den sladdlösa revolutionen med mobiltelefoner, läsplattor och drönare. Årets nobelpris i kemi går till upphovsmännen bakom litium-jonbatterierna. Och 40 år senare jobbar de fortfarande mot bättre, billigare och säkrare elfordon.

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Secrets of the Brain

The sense of position and movement is often called the sixth sense; the brain's connection to the immune system might be a seventh. In this eBook, we examine these and other areas of brain… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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US Life Expectancy Drops For Third Straight Year in Alarming Reality Check

"We've reached the point where we're going into a free fall."

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Climate change: COP25 island nation in 'fight to death'

The president of the Marshall Islands tells a summit that rising tides threaten its existence.

14h

Video I made about the effect of stress on the brain and body

submitted by /u/porterrossi [link] [comments]

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Two brain networks behave differently in people who are suicidal

People who are suicidal seem to have unusual patterns of activity in two parts of the brain that can be detected in a scanner

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Study identifies brain networks that play crucial role in suicide risk

An international team of researchers has identified key networks within the brain which they say interact to increase the risk that an individual will think about — or attempt — suicide. Writing today in Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers say that their review of existing literature highlights how little research has been done into one of the world's major killers, particularly among the most

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Chronic opioid treatment may increase PTSD risk

Long-term (chronic) treatment with opioids, such as morphine, prior to trauma enhances fear learning in mice, according to a study published in Neuropsychopharmacology. The findings, which link chronic opioid treatment before a traumatic event with responses to subsequent stressful events, may suggest a possible mechanism underlying the frequent co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTS

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Heating by Cooling: Resolving a Fusion Paradox

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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