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nyheder2019december04

Scientists 'Blown Away' by Unexpected Results From NASA's Sun-Kissing Solar Probe

"The complexity was mind-blowing when we first started looking at the data."

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Plastic pollution kills half a million hermit crabs on remote islands

Experts fear species decline after huge number of deaths on Henderson and Cocos More than half a million hermit crabs have been killed after becoming trapped in plastic debris on two remote island groups, prompting concern that the deaths could be part of a global species decline. The pioneering study found that 508,000 crabs died on the Cocos (Keeling) Islands archipelago in the Indian Ocean, al

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Hair Dyes and Straighteners May Raise Breast Cancer Risk for Black Women

A new study finds a weak link between coloring and straightening treatments and breast cancer. But experts caution the results are far from certain.

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Rainforest Dwellers and Urbanites Have Consistently Different Microbiomes

A South America study found that with increasing population density humans had more diversity of fungi in our skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rainforest Dwellers and Urbanites Have Consistently Different Microbiomes

A South America study found that with increasing population density humans had more diversity of fungi in our skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Make Working Fiber Optic Cables Out of Wood

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun's Mysteries

Scientists working with the solar diving mission have released the spacecraft's first batch of findings.

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The RCS Texting Protocol Is Way Too Easy to Hack

Rich Communication Services promises to be the new standard for texting. Thanks to sloppy implementation, it's also a security mess.

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Author Correction: Genomewide Study of Epigenetic Biomarkers of Opioid Dependence in European- American Women

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55022-z

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Author Correction: LSD1 activation promotes inducible EMT programs and modulates the tumour microenvironment in breast cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55020-1

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Publisher Correction: Development of an optogenetic toolkit for neural circuit dissection in squirrel monkeys

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55025-w

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Author Correction: Interplay of fibroblasts with anaplastic tumor cells promotes follicular thyroid cancer progression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54273-0

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Author Correction: Perspectives on the prediction of catastrophic slope failures from satellite InSAR

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55024-x

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Author Correction: Plant recording across two centuries reveals dramatic changes in species diversity of a Mediterranean archipelago

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54272-1

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Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic

A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents.

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Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking

Researchers are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed is the first time a synthetic actuator 'learns' to do new 'tricks' based on its past experiences, without computer programming.

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun's Mysteries

Scientists working with the solar diving mission have released the spacecraft's first batch of findings.

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Predictive impact of rare genomic copy number variations in siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorders

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13380-2 Siblings of those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have increased likelihood of ASD or related subclinical traits. Here, studying 253 ASD families, D'Abate et al. test the predictive value of genomic copy number variation involving ASD-associated loci, with confirmation in a second cohort.

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Springy bamboo poles help villagers carry more than their own body weight

Southeast Asia is a riot of colour and biodiversity. Boasting luxuriant rainforest and thousands of insects and mammals, the region is ripe for a biologist in search of inspiration. But when James Croft, then at Edith Cowan University, Australia, went travelling, it wasn't the flora and fauna that caught his eye: it was the villagers carrying massive loads, sometimes more than their own body weigh

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Springy bamboo poles help villagers carry more than their own body weight

Southeast Asia is a riot of colour and biodiversity. Boasting luxuriant rainforest and thousands of insects and mammals, the region is ripe for a biologist in search of inspiration. But when James Croft, then at Edith Cowan University, Australia, went travelling, it wasn't the flora and fauna that caught his eye: it was the villagers carrying massive loads, sometimes more than their own body weigh

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A Once-a-Month Birth Control Pill, an Arctic Warning, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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New tool to predict the global spread of dengue

Researchers have developed a new tool to predict the global spread of human infectious diseases, like dengue, and track them to their source.

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Atmospheric river storms create $1 billion-a-year flood damage

Researchers found that flooding has caused nearly $51 billion in damages to western states in the last 40 years. More than 84 percent of these damages were caused by atmospheric rivers (ARs), long narrow corridors of water vapor in the atmosphere capable of carrying more than twice the volume of the Amazon river through the sky.

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Adding copper strengthens 3D-printed titanium

Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications.

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Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic

A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents.

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Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species

Researchers have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two species of lark.

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Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking

Researchers are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed is the first time a synthetic actuator 'learns' to do new 'tricks' based on its past experiences, without computer programming.

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Eight ways to make your Twitter feed less toxic

Let that reply guy scream into the void. (Marten Bjork via Unsplash/) Twitter is a fast, fluid way to keep your finger on the pulse of just about everything, but it's also a place where the discourse can quickly become disorganized, combative, or downright toxic. The team behind Twitter knows this, and its engineers are continually rolling out new features to help manage abuse if and when it beco

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New tool to predict the global spread of dengue

Researchers at CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, QUT and Queensland Health have developed a new tool to predict the global spread of human infectious diseases, like dengue, and track them to their source.

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Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal

A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting.

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Gulf of Mexico coral reefs to protect from storm surge in the future — But will they?

Researchers used 120,000-year-old fossils to predict how Gulf of Mexico coral reefs will respond to climate change toward the end of this century.

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Early humans domesticated themselves, new genetic evidence suggests

Selection against bullies may have caused significant changes in the way our species looks

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Gulf of Mexico coral reefs to protect from storm surge in the future — But will they?

LSU researcher Kristine DeLong uses 120,000-year-old fossils to predict how Gulf of Mexico coral reefs will respond to climate change toward the end of this century.

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Children with food allergies seen faster under new paediatric model

Children with food allergies are seen 10 months sooner and have fewer allergic reactions when treated by a paediatrician in their own community, a new study shows.

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Ancient Romans Got Their Wood From as Far Away as France, Study Finds

Wood planks unearthed during subway construction in Rome show just how far the empire's trade networks spread.

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This Giant Planet is 4 Times Bigger Than its Dead Star

Astronomers discovered a Neptune-sized planet orbiting an Earth-sized star. The white dwarf star is making the planet lose some 260 million tons of material every day.

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France bans two US pesticides, citing risk to bees

French authorities on Wednesday banned two US pesticides which ecologists deem harmful to bees.

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France bans two US pesticides, citing risk to bees

French authorities on Wednesday banned two US pesticides which ecologists deem harmful to bees.

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How plants harness 'bad' molecules for good ends

When most people think of a plant, they picture stems, leaves, flowers, and all the parts that are visible above ground. But Duke biologist Philip Benfey is more interested in the hidden half of the plant that is buried beneath the soil. Roots: they may be out of sight, Benfey says, but they play critical roles, anchoring the plant and taking up water and nutrients.

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How plants harness 'bad' molecules for good ends

When most people think of a plant, they picture stems, leaves, flowers, and all the parts that are visible above ground. But Duke biologist Philip Benfey is more interested in the hidden half of the plant that is buried beneath the soil. Roots: they may be out of sight, Benfey says, but they play critical roles, anchoring the plant and taking up water and nutrients.

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How do world's smallest sea turtles become stranded in Cape Cod?

A computational analysis has surfaced new insights into the wind and water conditions that cause Kemp's ridley sea turtles to become stranded on beaches in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Xiaojian Liu of Wuhan University, China, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 4, 2019.

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Capital costs: Research offers truer calculation of 'footprint' of purchases

If one wants to calculate the environmental impact of purchasing a product or services, they must consider the role of the capital assets that went into their production—machinery, factories, IT, vehicles, and roads—and the energy and materials required to create those assets. For instance, any assessment of the environmental "footprint" of renting a home should include the materials and processes

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Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply

India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University.

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Non-adiabatic dynamics of strongly driven diffusive Josephson junctions

Researchers from the University of Paris-Saclay, the University of Regensburg (Germany) and the University of Jyvaskyla; (Finland) have delivered a combined experimental and theoretical work which reveal the profound nature of quantum transport in strongly driven diffusive Josephson junctions. Results are published in Physical Review Research in October.

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Parker Solar Probe: 'We're missing something fundamental about the sun'

Our closest-ever look inside the sun's corona has unveiled an unexpectedly chaotic world that includes rogue plasma waves, flipping magnetic fields and distant solar winds under the thrall of the sun's rotation, according to University of Michigan researchers who play key roles in NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission.

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Famous Fox Domestication Experiment Challenged

The tamed foxes, whose appearances changed with breeding, weren't wild to begin with, say the authors of a new study.

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How do world's smallest sea turtles become stranded in Cape Cod?

A computational analysis has surfaced new insights into the wind and water conditions that cause Kemp's ridley sea turtles to become stranded on beaches in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Xiaojian Liu of Wuhan University, China, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 4, 2019.

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Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows

People around the world consume rice in their daily diets. But in addition to its nutrient and caloric content, rice can contain small amounts of arsenic, which in large doses is a toxin linked to multiple health conditions and dietary-related cancers.

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Looking for exoplanet life in all the right spectra

A Cornell senior has come up with a way to discern life on exoplanets loitering in other cosmic neighborhoods: a spectral field guide.

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Nitrogen crisis from jam-packed livestock operations has 'paralyzed' Dutch economy

Ecological damage from manure fumes triggers calls for drastic change to agriculture

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Five gifts for the home cook who already has everything

All the kitchen gear you'll want. (Jason Briscoe via Unsplash/) A good home cook will already have the basic gadgets they need—so use the holiday season to buy them that thing they might not even know they need. It could be a big fancy gadget, but it could also be a simple, classic one. Either way, they can put these gifts to good use cooking you delicious food all year long. Slow cooker Which ki

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Scientists detail how chromosomes reorganize after cell division

Researchers have discovered key mechanisms and structural details of a fundamental biological process—how a cell nucleus and its chromosomal material reorganizes itself after cell division. The new findings in chromosomal architecture and function may offer important insights into human health and disease.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm 06A maintaining strength

NASA's Aqua satellite found some powerful storms in Tropical Storm 06A as it moved through the Arabian Sea toward Somalia.

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Scientists detail how chromosomes reorganize after cell division

Researchers have discovered key mechanisms and structural details of a fundamental biological process—how a cell nucleus and its chromosomal material reorganizes itself after cell division. The new findings in chromosomal architecture and function may offer important insights into human health and disease.

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Host cell proteases can process viral capsid proteins

It has long been suggested that a cell protease could take part in enterovirus infection. However, the identity of such proteases have remained unknown. The work performed in the University of Jyväskylä shows, for the first time, that host cell calpain proteases can process enterovirus polyprotein in vitro. The research was published in Viruses scientific journal in November 2019.

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Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice

Researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains.

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A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice

New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning — the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense — could be used to help people with disabilities. For example, temporary sight deprivation might be used to h

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Probiotic may help treat colic in infants

Probiotics — or 'good bacteria' — have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. In a new trial, investigators have shown that drops containing a particular probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12) reduced the duration of daily crying by more than 50% in 80% of the 40 infants who received the probiotic once daily for 28 days, with beneficial effects on sleep du

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe sheds new light on the sun

Since its 2018 launch, NASA's Parker Solar Probe (record-holder for closest-ever spacecraft to the Sun) has finished three of 24 planned passes through never-before-explored parts of the Sun's atmosphere. Four new articles describe what scientists have learned from its unprecedented exploration, and what they look forward to learning next.

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Experts Horrified by Leaked CRISPR Baby Study

Chinese scientist He Jiankui's creation of the world's first gene-edited human babies was undoubtedly one of the most impactful science stories of 2018. But for as much attention as the experiment received, the paper detailing it was never actually published — until now. On Tuesday, MIT Technology Review published excerpts from a copy of He's manuscript, titled "Birth of Twins After Genome Editin

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How do world's smallest sea turtles become stranded in Cape Cod?

A computational analysis has surfaced new insights into the wind and water conditions that cause Kemp's ridley sea turtles to become stranded on beaches in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

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Signs of life: New field guide aids astronomers' search

A senior has come up with a way to discern life on exoplanets loitering in other cosmic neighborhoods: a spectral field guide.

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Closest-ever approach to the sun gives new insights into the solar wind

The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind.

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Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans May Affect Health of Black Infants

Maternal stress arising from perceived racial discrimination could cause premature births and lower birth weights — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans May Affect Health of Black Infants

Maternal stress arising from perceived racial discrimination could cause premature births and lower birth weights — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply

India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University.

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Scientists detail how chromosomes reorganize after cell division

Researchers have discovered key mechanisms and structural details of a fundamental biological process–how a cell nucleus and its chromosomal material reorganizes itself after cell division. The new findings in chromosomal architecture and function may offer important insights into human health and disease.

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Incumbent CEOs working with new CFOs earn 10% more money

Researchers studied more than 20 years of data from S&P 1500 firms and found CEOs took home an average of 10% more compensation when working with a CFO who was hired after them, also known as a 'co-opted' CFO.

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Russia to replace Wikipedia with the 'Great Russian Encyclopaedia'

A government resolution said the measure will ensure that "reliable information that is constantly updated on the basis of scientifically verified sources of knowledge." The move is likely part of Russia's effort to crack down on citizens' internet access. Russia has centuries-old history of censorship, and state officials have even been observed to edit Wikipedia articles to serve Russian intere

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Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans May Affect Health of Black Infants

Maternal stress arising from perceived racial discrimination could cause premature births and lower birth weights — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ethiopia's Salt Ponds Are One of the Few Places Life Cannot Survive on Earth

The Dallol pools are likely so hot, salty and acidic that even extremophile microbes are unable to enter.

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DARPA Scientist: Engineers Must Stop Making Autonomous Weapons

Community Effort If we really want to prevent the rise of autonomous weapons — killer robots that can pull the trigger without needing a human's approval — then engineers will actually need to stop working towards them . So argues Christoffer Heckman, a University of Colorado Boulder computer scientist who's funded by DARPA, the Pentagon's research division, in an essay in The Conversation . It m

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This A.I. pocket device translates languages in real-time

The ONE Mini translates and transcribe 12 languages in real time. Advanced speech recognition tech produces text or verbal translations instantly. Live premium translator service is available through ONE Mini. None Some of the best holiday gifts are the ones we never realized we desperately needed. And if you've watched much sci-fi, you've undoubtedly wished universal translators that bridged lan

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: What NATO Was

It's Wednesday, December 4. In today's newsletter: NATO, impeachment, and what came after the poisoning of the former Russian spy, Sergei Skripal. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (Peter Nicholls / Reuters) NATO was supposed to represent shared Western values. This year, disagreements rankled. Our London-based writer Tom McTague reports: … as the leaders of the world's most enduring military alliance have

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Capital costs: Yale research offers truer calculation of 'footprint' of purchases

Researchers at Yale have created a model that enables more accurate calculations of the environmental footprints associated with a range of industrial processes — and the products and services we purchase.

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Cellular repair response to treadmill test can predict cardiac outcomes

The information gained from the changes in CPC counts during exercise may be more useful to cardiologists in risk stratifying these patients than the treadmill exercise test itself, the researchers say.

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This A.I. pocket device translates languages in real-time

The ONE Mini translates and transcribe 12 languages in real time. Advanced speech recognition tech produces text or verbal translations instantly. Live premium translator service is available through ONE Mini. None Some of the best holiday gifts are the ones we never realized we desperately needed. And if you've watched much sci-fi, you've undoubtedly wished universal translators that bridged lan

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Tiny pores trap a pollutant — and put it to good use

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03742-7 Porous material removes nitrogen dioxide from exhaust and transforms it into a valuable commodity.

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How plants harness 'bad' molecules for good ends

Researchers show how plants harness toxic molecules called reactive oxygen species for the signaling pathway that gives rise to roots. Identifying the complex molecular interactions that regulate root growth could lead to more productive crops with roots optimized for different soil types.

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Hidden giant planet revealed around tiny white dwarf star

The first evidence of a giant planet orbiting a dead white dwarf star has been found in the form of a disc of gas formed from its evaporating atmosphere.

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Molecular bodyguards against Parkinson's disease

Chaperone proteins in human cells dynamically interact with the protein alpha-Synuclein, which is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease. A disturbed relationship to these 'bodyguards' leads to cell damage and the formation of Lewy bodies typical for Parkinson's disease.

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Some stress in early life extends lifespan

Some stress at a young age could actually lead to a longer life, new research shows.

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Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes

New data from the Parker Solar Probe, which got closer to the sun than any other spacecraft, allowed physicists to map the source of a major component of the solar wind that continually peppers Earth. The slow solar wind seems to emerge from coronal holes along the sun's equator. Data also reveal strange magnetic field reversals that could be accelerating solar wind particles, and an unexpectedly

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New 'hyper glue' formula

With many of the products we use every day held together by adhesives, researchers hope to make everything from protective clothing to medical implants and residential plumbing stronger and more corrosion resistant thanks to a newly-developed 'hyper glue' formula.

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Chemyx: Navigating Legal and Regulatory Requirements for Cannabis Research and Product Development in the United States

Given its legal status as a controlled substance, researchers, producers, and developers still must be aware of a considerable number of regulatory guidelines and practices governing the cannabis industry.

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Despite almost no research, the pet CBD industry will grow to $1 billion

The pet CBD industry, valued at $8 million in 2017, is expected to grow to $1.16 billion by 2022. Despite the hype, there have been few clinical studies conducted on pets. While there is evidence of its potential therapeutic value, all evidence points to much higher dosages than offered on the consumer market. None In 1988, three researchers from the School of Pharmacy at Hebrew University in Jer

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Signs of life: New field guide aids astronomers' search

A Cornell University senior has come up with a way to discern life on exoplanets loitering in other cosmic neighborhoods: a spectral field guide.

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Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows

UW researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains.

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NRL, NASA combine to produce sun imagery with unprecedented clarity

Early returns from the US Naval Research Laboratory's camera on NASA's latest mission to study the Sun's corona revealed on Dec. 4 a star more complex than ever imagined.

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How plants harness 'bad' molecules for good ends

Researchers at Duke University show how plants harness toxic molecules called reactive oxygen species for the signaling pathway that gives rise to roots. Identifying the complex molecular interactions that regulate root growth could lead to more productive crops with roots optimized for different soil types.

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How do world's smallest sea turtles become stranded in Cape Cod?

A computational analysis has surfaced new insights into the wind and water conditions that cause Kemp's ridley sea turtles to become stranded on beaches in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Xiaojian Liu of Wuhan University, China, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 4, 2019.

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Smog-eating graphene composite reduces atmospheric pollution

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Harvard Graduate Students on Strike

The students' union and the university could not reach an agreement on salary, health benefits, and harassment protections.

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Sun's close-up reveals atmosphere hopping with highly energetic particles

Outbursts of energetic particles that hurtle out from the sun and can disrupt space communications may be even more varied and numerous than previously thought, according to results from the closest-ever flyby of the sun.

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Missing Link Found for How Modern Humans Evolved Friendly Faces

A genetic condition helps uncover how modern human mugs came to differ from those of Neandertals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tool tells carpenters how to build stuff with what's on hand

A new digital tool called Carpentry Compiler allows users to design woodworking projects and then gives them optimized fabrication instructions based on the materials and equipment they have available. "To make a good design, you need to think about how it will be made," says senior author Adriana Schulz, an assistant professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the

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How to infuse oils, vinegars, and booze without getting sick

Many infused oils, honeys, vinegars, and liquors could pose significant health risks, but there are ways to make these popular holiday gifts much safer. Foods that aren't processed correctly or stored at the proper temperature can become a breeding ground for bacteria. The same is true for foods that are not sufficiently acidic. For example, garlic cloves in oil look lovely. But they have also be

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Rivers could generate thousands of nuclear power plants worth of energy, thanks to a new 'blue' membrane

Boron nitride nanotube membrane creates power by controlling the flow of electrically charged ions in water

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Missing Link Found for How Modern Humans Evolved Friendly Faces

A genetic condition helps uncover how modern human mugs came to differ from those of Neandertals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Electronic structure and core electron fingerprints of caesium-based multi-alkali antimonides for ultra-bright electron sources

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54419-0

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MSC Transplantation Improves Lacrimal Gland Regeneration after Surgically Induced Dry Eye Disease in Mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54840-5

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Species-specific transcriptional profiles of the gut and gut microbiome of Ceratitis quilicii and Ceratitis rosa sensu stricto

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54989-z

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Bidirectional association between asthma and migraines in adults: Two longitudinal follow-up studies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54972-8

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Physiologic intestinal 18F-FDG uptake is associated with alteration of gut microbiota and proinflammatory cytokine levels in breast cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54680-3 Physiologic intestinal 18 F-FDG uptake is associated with alteration of gut microbiota and proinflammatory cytokine levels in breast cancer

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WIRED Book of the Month: *Dead Astronauts* by Jeff VanderMeer

Dispensing thoroughly with sense, the king of the New Weird takes us on his strangest journey yet.

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The Democrats' Missed Opportunity on Impeachment

This hearing was never going to change minds. Its purpose was not to produce damning new revelations or dramatic testimony . Unlike during the Intelligence Committee hearings last month, the public did not hear new facts from key witnesses, only legal opinions from a group of law professors explaining the history of impeachment as they evaluated the case against President Donald Trump. Yet as con

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NASA sees Tropical Storm 06A maintaining strength

NASA's Aqua satellite found some powerful storms in Tropical Storm 06A as it moved through the Arabian Sea toward Somalia.

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Probe Gets Close To The Sun — Finds Rogue Plasma Waves And Flipping Magnetic Fields

The initial results from an ambitious mission to get a spacecraft close to the Sun are shedding new light on some old mysteries about our closest star. (Image credit: KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

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Scientists Mystified: Sun's Magnetic Field Appears to be Flipping

NASA's Parker Solar Probe made the closest ever flyby of the Sun in August 2018, collecting massive amounts of data using cutting-edge scientific instruments from a distance of 15 million miles — a mission that also, incidentally, set the record for the fastest-ever human-made object of all time. Now, scientists are starting to release what they learned from the data it collected. Four new papers

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Watch NASA's New Footage of a Comet Exploding

Front Row Seats NASA's exoplanet-hunting satellite TESS caught a rare glimpse of the entirety of a "comet outburst," which is an epic cosmic event in which a comet spontaneously combusts in a brilliant explosion. The satellite captured a time-lapse video of the event, according to a NASA release . The footage is grainy, but it's an awe-inspiring glimpse of rare celestial death — and, astronomers

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Giant ice planet orbits hot star 1/4 its size

Researchers have found the first evidence of a giant planet orbiting a dead white dwarf star in the form of a disc of gas formed from its evaporating atmosphere. The Neptune-like planet orbits a star a quarter of its size about once every ten days, leaving a comet-like tail of gas comprised of hydrogen , oxygen, and sulphur in its wake. The work is the first evidence of a giant planet orbiting a

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Contamination by metals can increase metabolic stress in mussels

The researchers propose that this evidence should be used as input to public policy with the aim of mitigating the impacts of human activities on coastal and marine ecosystems.

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A single gene controls how our faces develop when we are young

and offers evidence that humans have evolved to be more domesticated in a similar way to dogs

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Monthly oral contraceptive capsule shown to work in pigs

A once-a-month oral contraceptive capsule that sits in the stomach for weeks has passed its first test in pigs

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An inside look at how Magic: The Gathering Arena digitized the world's most complex card game

The stack of cards to the right of the screen represents a complicated array of game actions that the players can sort through using the interface. (Wizards of the Coast/) When the Magic: The Gathering collectable card game first debuted back in 1993, the decks included small paper rule books explaining how the game worked. Even back then, it was complicated. Many fledgeling players—like me—learn

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Distant star's vision of our Sun's future 'death'

A newly discovered planet offers insights into the Sun's demise in 5-6 billion years.

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NASA's Mission to the Sun is Already Cracking Some of our Star's Mysteries

Initial data from the Parker Solar Probe offer a promising look at how the mission may unravel the sun's corona and solar wind.

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Studying water quality with satellites and public data

Access to abundant, clean, water for drinking, recreation and the environment is one of the 21st century's most pressing issues. Directly monitoring threats to the quality of fresh water is critically important, but because current methods are costly and not standardized, comprehensive water quality datasets are rare. In the United States, one of the most data-rich countries in the world, fewer th

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SpaceX Is Sending Super-Muscular Mice to the Space Station

Buff Rodents The International Space Station is about to get some unusually strong visitors. On Saturday, a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to deliver 2,585 kilograms (5,700 pounds) worth of cargo to the ISS . Amongst the supplies and equipment will be a few extremely muscular "mighty mice" — and they could help ensure future astronauts stay healthy while in space. Moustronauts For the Rode

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Podcast: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03748-1 Hear the latest science news, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell.

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Living at the edges

Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the mountainous Northwest survive largely because of a network of protected landscapes that crosses the U.S.-Canada border.

5h

Living at the edges

Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the mountainous Northwest survive largely because of a network of protected landscapes that crosses the U.S.-Canada border.

5h

ACR and EULAR release new classification criteria for IgG4-related disease

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) released the 2019 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria for IgG4-Related Disease. It is the first criteria developed specifically for this recently recognized disease.

5h

Drug decreases gut leakiness associated with ulcerative colitis

A research team led by biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found that a drug approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis can repair permeability defects in the gut's epithelium.

5h

First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis

A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their companions depending on their behaviour. Researchers identified a genetic network involved in the unique evolutionary trajectory of the modern human face and prosociality, which is absent in the Neande

5h

Looking at tropical forests through new eyes

New University of Arizona-led science is using air-based maps of plant chemistry to improve carbon cycling models in hyperdiverse tropical forests.

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Immigrants who naturalize outearn their peers

Looking at municipalities in Switzerland where citizenship applications were put to a popular vote, researchers identified immigrants who narrowly won or lost and tracked their earnings over the next several decades. After the vote, the winners began earning more, and the gap between the two groups widened over time. The earnings boost was about 5,637 CHF per year, on average, and was almost doubl

5h

New diagnostic techniques and drug may slow and even reverse cognitive decline from aging

When given the new drug to reduce inflammation, senile mice had fewer signs of dysfunctional brain electrical activity and were better able to learn new tasks, becoming almost cognitively adept as mice half their age. Other findings indicate two practical pathways — measuring the leakiness of the blood-brain barrier via MRI and abnormal electrical brain activity via EEG — that can be used to scr

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Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life

In a new study published in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Yale University unveil a complete overhaul of the way species data is brought together and analyzed to construct an evolutionary tree of life for mammals. It's aimed at giving scientists, conservation managers, policymakers, and environmentalists more accurate, comprehensive information about species diversity and relationships,

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A common insulin signaling pathway across cancer and diabetes

An oncology researcher has made an unexpected contribution to the understanding of type 2 diabetes. In results published in Science Advances, Patrick Hu, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, found a protein that modulates a signaling pathway often targeted by cancer therapies is also required for insulin biogenesis.

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Health care in baboons

Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate.

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Once-a-month oral contraceptive could improve patient adherence

Researchers have created a new ingestible drug delivery platform that expands in the stomach and could safely deliver a contraceptive over one month when tested in pigs.

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Police killings of unarmed black Americans may have health impacts for nearby unborn black infants

Pregnant black women give birth to infants with smaller birth weights and shorter gestational ages if they live near the site of incidents in which unarmed blacks are killed by police during their first or second trimester, according to a new study.

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Genetic screen in worms reveals critical step in insulin synthesis

The identification of a protein important for insulin synthesis may hold clues for understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes.Although the protein, called TRAP-alpha, was first discovered more than 30 years ago, its biological function has been unclear. The new findings, reported Dec. 4 in Science Advances, demonstrate that TRAP-alpha is required for both early and late steps in insulin synthesis.

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NASA's Sun-Kissing Parker Solar Probe Lifts the Veil on Our Closest Star

The daring mission's first results reveal surprises about the solar wind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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SpaceX delays space station delivery due to high wind

SpaceX has delayed its delivery to the International Space Station because of dangerous wind gusts.

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Sun's close-up reveals atmosphere hopping with highly energetic particles

Outbursts of energetic particles that hurtle out from the sun and can disrupt space communications may be even more varied and numerous than previously thought, according to results from the closest-ever flyby of the sun.

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Muddy Find Shows How Foreign Timber Helped Build Ancient Rome

Wood from the foundation of a 2,000-year-old building in Rome traced to a mountain forest in what is now France. RomanTimbers.jpg Image credits: Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma, Italy Rights information: CC-BY: Redistribution allowed with credit Culture Wednesday, December 4, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Buried in the foundatio

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Mating avoidance in female olive baboons (Papio anubis) infected by Treponema pallidum

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are ubiquitous within wild animal populations, yet it remains largely unknown whether animals evolved behavioral avoidance mechanisms in response to STI acquisition. We investigated the mating behavior of a wild population of olive baboons ( Papio anubis ) infected by the bacterium Treponema pallidum . This pathogen causes highly conspicuous genital ulcerati

5h

The polar regions in a 2{degrees}C warmer world

Over the past decade, the Arctic has warmed by 0.75°C, far outpacing the global average, while Antarctic temperatures have remained comparatively stable. As Earth approaches 2°C warming, the Arctic and Antarctic may reach 4°C and 2°C mean annual warming, and 7°C and 3°C winter warming, respectively. Expected consequences of increased Arctic warming include ongoing loss of land and sea ice, threat

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Requirement for translocon-associated protein (TRAP) {alpha} in insulin biogenesis

The mechanistic basis for the biogenesis of peptide hormones and growth factors is poorly understood. Here, we show that the conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane translocon-associated protein α (TRAPα), also known as signal sequence receptor 1, plays a critical role in the biosynthesis of insulin. Genetic analysis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and biochemical studies in pancreatic β

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Amino acid exchangeabilities vary across the tree of life

Different amino acid pairs have drastically different relative exchangeabilities (REs), and accounting for this variation is an important and common practice in inferring phylogenies, testing selection, and predicting mutational effects, among other analyses. In all such endeavors, REs have been generally considered invariant among species; this assumption, however, has not been scrutinized. Usin

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Atmospheric rivers drive flood damages in the western United States

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are extratropical storms that produce extreme precipitation on the west coasts of the world's major landmasses. In the United States, ARs cause significant flooding, yet their economic impacts have not been quantified. Here, using 40 years of data from the National Flood Insurance Program, we show that ARs are the primary drivers of flood damages in the western United Sta

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Molecular phenotyping and image-guided surgical treatment of melanoma using spectrally distinct ultrasmall core-shell silica nanoparticles

Accurate detection and quantification of metastases in regional lymph nodes remain a vital prognostic predictor for cancer staging and clinical outcomes. As intratumoral heterogeneity poses a major hurdle to effective treatment planning, more reliable image-guided, cancer-targeted optical multiplexing tools are critically needed in the operative suite. For sentinel lymph node mapping indications,

5h

Police violence and the health of black infants

Police use of force is a controversial issue, but the broader consequences and spillover effects are not well understood. This study examines the impact of in utero exposure to police killings of unarmed blacks in the residential environment on black infants' health. Using a preregistered, quasi-experimental design and data from 3.9 million birth records in California from 2007 to 2016, the findi

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Identification of TNFR2 and IL-33 as therapeutic targets in localized fibrosis

Dissecting the molecular landscape of fibrotic disease, a major unmet need, will inform the development of novel treatment strategies to target disease progression and identify desperately needed therapeutic targets. Here, we provide a detailed single-cell analysis of the immune landscape in Dupuytren's disease, a localized fibrotic condition of the hand, and identify a pathogenic signaling circu

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The effect of citizenship on the long-term earnings of marginalized immigrants: Quasi-experimental evidence from Switzerland

We provide evidence that citizenship catalyzes the long-term economic integration of immigrants. Despite the relevance of citizenship policy to immigrant integration, we lack a reliable understanding of the economic consequences of acquiring citizenship. To overcome nonrandom selection into naturalization, we exploit the quasi-random assignment of citizenship in Swiss municipalities that held ref

5h

Semblance: An empirical similarity kernel on probability spaces

In data science, determining proximity between observations is critical to many downstream analyses such as clustering, classification, and prediction. However, when the data's underlying probability distribution is unclear, the function used to compute similarity between data points is often arbitrarily chosen. Here, we present a novel definition of proximity, Semblance, that uses the empirical

5h

Genomic architecture of parallel ecological divergence: Beyond a single environmental contrast

The study of parallel ecological divergence provides important clues to the operation of natural selection. Parallel divergence often occurs in heterogeneous environments with different kinds of environmental gradients in different locations, but the genomic basis underlying this process is unknown. We investigated the genomics of rapid parallel adaptation in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis

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Single-cell connectomic analysis of adult mammalian lungs

Efforts to decipher chronic lung disease and to reconstitute functional lung tissue through regenerative medicine have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of cell-cell interactions governing tissue homeostasis. Because the structure of mammalian lungs is highly conserved at the histologic level, we hypothesized that there are evolutionarily conserved homeostatic mechanisms that keep the

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Dosage analysis of the 7q11.23 Williams region identifies BAZ1B as a major human gene patterning the modern human face and underlying self-domestication

We undertook a functional dissection of chromatin remodeler BAZ1B in neural crest (NC) stem cells (NCSCs) from a uniquely informative cohort of typical and atypical patients harboring 7q11.23 copy number variants. Our results reveal a key contribution of BAZ1B to NCSC in vitro induction and migration, coupled with a crucial involvement in NC-specific transcriptional circuits and distal regulation

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Informing trait-based ecology by assessing remotely sensed functional diversity across a broad tropical temperature gradient

Spatially continuous data on functional diversity will improve our ability to predict global change impacts on ecosystem properties. We applied methods that combine imaging spectroscopy and foliar traits to estimate remotely sensed functional diversity in tropical forests across an Amazon-to-Andes elevation gradient (215 to 3537 m). We evaluated the scale dependency of community assembly processe

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Epigenetic stabilization of DC and DC precursor classical activation by TNF{alpha} contributes to protective T cell polarization

Epigenetic modifications play critical roles in inducing long-lasting immunological memory in innate immune cells, termed trained immunity. Whether similar epigenetic mechanisms regulate dendtritic cell (DC) function to orchestrate development of adaptive immunity remains unknown. We report that DCs matured with IFN and TNFα or matured in the lungs during invasive fungal infection with endogenous

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One of the best ways to treat anxiety? A full night's rest, new research suggests.

Anxiety disorders are frequently associated with poor sleep. The intuitive conclusion is that anxious individuals are too worried to fall asleep. However, a recent fMRI study revealed that failing to get a good night's sleep, even for healthy individuals, can also contribute to anxiety levels the next day, raising them by up to 30 percent. The findings suggest that one of the best ways to treat a

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx in the midst of site selection

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission is just days away from selecting the site where the spacecraft will snag a sample from asteroid Bennu. After a lengthy and challenging process, the team is finally ready to down-select from the four candidate sites to a primary and backup site.

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe sheds new light on the sun

In August 2018, NASA's Parker Solar Probe launched to space, soon becoming the closest-ever spacecraft to the Sun. With cutting-edge scientific instruments to measure the environment around the spacecraft, Parker Solar Probe has completed three of 24 planned passes through never-before-explored parts of the Sun's atmosphere, the corona. On Dec. 4, 2019, four new papers in the journal Nature descri

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WFIRM scientists push bioprinting capability forward

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are the first to report using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprising of multiple different functional materials. They printed different designs of smooth muscle and cartilage regions in artificial tracheal substitutes showing similar mechanical properties to human tracheal tissue.

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Living at the edges

The clustering of protected habitats in the Americas near international borders makes many iconic, wide-ranging animals physically dependent on good relations between neighboring countries and wildlife-friendly borders.

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Studying water quality with satellites and public data

The researchers built a novel dataset of more than 600,000 matchups between water quality field measurements and Landsat imagery, creating a 'symphony of data.'

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Hundreds of environmental health professionals in US report challenges, research needs

Hundreds of environmental health professionals across the nation report challenges and research needs in six areas — drinking water, wastewater management, healthy homes, food safety, public health pests and emerging issues such as disaster risk reduction and new facility types for body art and cannabis-infused products.

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The Arctic Is Warming Much Faster Than the Rest of Earth

Rising temperatures in the northern polar cap are driving extreme heat, drought, and sea level rise in the continental US, a study says.

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A Once-a-Month Birth Control Pill Is Coming—Here's How It Works

The shape of the pill does the trick of gradually drip-feeding contraceptive hormones through the stomach.

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Qualcomm Bets Big on 5G With the Snapdragon 865 and 765

The mobile chips, unveiled today, show Qualcomm's ambition to blanket the earth in 5G-capable handsets.

5h

Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life

The mammal tree of life is a real leaner. Some branches are weighed down with thousands of species—we're looking at you, rodents and bats—while others hold just a few species.

5h

First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis

A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved to be friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their companions depending on their behaviour. Researchers identified a genetic network involved in the unique evolutionary trajectory of the modern human face and prosociality, which is absent in the

5h

Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate

Sexually transmitted diseases are widespread among animals and humans. Humans, however, know a multitude of protective and hygienic measures to protect themselves from infection. An international research team led by scientists at the German Primate Center (DPZ)-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has investigated whether primates change their sexual behavior to minimize the risk of contracting

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Once-a-month contraceptive pill developed by scientists

Gelatine capsule could prevent unplanned pregnancies caused by errors in daily pill use A contraceptive pill that needs to be taken only once a month has been developed by scientists. The gelatine capsule, which has so far only been tested on pigs, dissolves in the stomach to a release a six-armed star-shaped polylmer structure that sits in the stomach for at least three weeks and releases synthe

5h

How to boost sales of fair trade and sustainable goods

A researcher from Georgetown University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which examines how consumers approach sustainable buying decision making with on-demand production, where they are given power early in the development cycle.

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Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction

The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a study published December 4, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mauro Bernabei from the National Research Council, Italy, and colleagues.

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Scientists use air-based maps of plant chemistry to improve carbon cycling models in hyperdiverse tropical forests

An international team of scientists led by the University of Arizona used the latest technology in remote sensing to measure plant biodiversity from the Amazon basin to the Andes Mountains in Peru to better understand how tropical forests will respond to climate change.

5h

Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life

The mammal tree of life is a real leaner. Some branches are weighed down with thousands of species—we're looking at you, rodents and bats—while others hold just a few species.

5h

Outlook for the polar regions in a 2-degrees-warmer world

With 2019 on pace as one of the warmest years on record, a major new study from the University of California, Davis, reveals how rapidly the Arctic is warming and examines global consequences of continued polar warming.

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Immigrants who naturalize outearn their peers

The moment when an immigrant becomes a citizen of his adopted country looks remarkably similar in ceremonies around the world: a hand raised, an oath taken, a flag waved, and a celebration with family and friends. But the road leading to that moment differs widely by country. Some are long and steep and others more walkable, depending on the country's policies.

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First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis

A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved to be friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their companions depending on their behaviour. Researchers identified a genetic network involved in the unique evolutionary trajectory of the modern human face and prosociality, which is absent in the

5h

Atmospheric river storms create $1 billion-a-year flood damage

Atmospheric rivers pose a $1 billion-a-year flood risk in the West, according to a study released today.

5h

Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate

Sexually transmitted diseases are widespread among animals and humans. Humans, however, know a multitude of protective and hygienic measures to protect themselves from infection. An international research team led by scientists at the German Primate Center (DPZ)-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has investigated whether primates change their sexual behavior to minimize the risk of contracting

5h

Suomi NPP satellite finds Kammuri weakening in South China Sea

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Kammuri on Dec. 4.

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Mexican students launch a small satellite to the International Space Station

The first satellite built by students in Mexico for launch from the International Space Station is smaller than a shoebox but represents a big step for its builders.

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Researchers uncover early adherence step in intestinal transit of Shigella

The bacterial pathogen Shigella, often spread through contaminated food or water, is a leading cause of mortality in both children and older adults in the developing world. Although scientists have been studying Shigella for decades, no effective vaccine has been developed, and the pathogen has acquired resistance to many antibiotics. The recent discovery of an early adherence step in the infectio

5h

Florida Keys Deliver a Hard Message: As Seas Rise, Some Places Can't Be Saved

A project to calculate the cost of raising roads shows that some places may not justify the vast expense, casting doubt on the future of those areas.

5h

Researchers uncover early adherence step in intestinal transit of Shigella

The bacterial pathogen Shigella, often spread through contaminated food or water, is a leading cause of mortality in both children and older adults in the developing world. Although scientists have been studying Shigella for decades, no effective vaccine has been developed, and the pathogen has acquired resistance to many antibiotics. The recent discovery of an early adherence step in the infectio

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2019 in Photos: A Look at the Middle Months

As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2019. Events covered in this essay (the second of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the Pan American Games in Peru, a blackout in New York City, a spelling bee with eight co-champions, a polar bear on the streets of a Russian city, the testimony of Former Special Counsel Robert

6h

Deep biomarkers of aging and longevity: From research to applications

The deep age predictors can help advance aging research by establishing causal relationships in nonlinear systems.Deep aging clocks can be used for identification of novel therapeutic targets, evaluating the efficacy of various interventions, data quality control, data economics, prediction of health trajectories, mortality, and many other applications.

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Researchers uncover early adherence step in intestinal transit of Shigella

The recent discovery of an early adherence step in the infection cycle could provide a new therapeutic target or even a new method for vaccine development.

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Bone and muscle health can 'make or break' care as we age

Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work — reported this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) — can help yield hard evidence to address the range of 'soft tissue' and bone disorders that contribute to falls, fractu

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe sheds new light on the sun

Since its 2018 launch, NASA's Parker Solar Probe (record-holder for closest-ever spacecraft to the Sun) has finished three of 24 planned passes through never-before-explored parts of the Sun's atmosphere. On Dec. 4, four new papers describe what scientists have learned from its unprecedented exploration, and what they look forward to learning next.

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx in the midst of site selection

After a lengthy and challenging process, the team is finally ready to down-select from the four candidate sites to a primary and backup site.

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How to boost sales of fair trade and sustainable goods

When consumers are given responsibility for whether a product is produced, a stronger link develops between consumers and production that leads to anticipated feelings of guilt or gratification depending on the ethicality of the production process, which then influences purchase intentions.

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Sun's close-up reveals atmosphere hopping with highly energetic particles

On its first two flybys of the sun, the Princeton-led instrument IS?IS detected a surprising variety of activities by solar energetic particles — the zippy electrons, protons and other ions that fly out in advance of the solar wind — that can disrupt space travel and communications on Earth. Researchers are investigating how these particle events form, findings that will shed light on broader qu

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Brain diseases with molecular diversity

Parkinson's and multisystem atrophy (MSA) – both of them neurodegenerative diseases – are associated with the accumulation of alpha-synuclein proteins in the brain. Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (MPI-BPC) have investigated the molecular makeup of these protein deposits finding structural diversity. The

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Suomi NPP satellite finds Kammuri weakening in South China Sea

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Kammuri on Dec. 4.

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2020 Cadillac XT6 Review: Good, Not Great, Midsize SUV

2020 Cadillac XT6 General Motors hopes the 2020 XT6 will be the Cadillac of premium midsize SUVs. It's the third and largest in the newish XT series of SUVs. The XT6 rides well, the center stack isn't confusing, and the cockpit trim is tasteful. On the downside, the XT6 is hampered by a too-small center-stack display, not enough noise-damping when you tromp the throttle, and poor luggage space wi

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We've discovered a planet orbiting an exploded star for the first time

A giant planet almost as big as Jupiter has been found orbiting a white dwarf, which is the remnants of an exploded star

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NASA's closest ever flight to the sun answers solar wind mystery

The Parker Solar Probe has got closer to the sun than any other craft, revealing where the solar wind comes from and how strange magnetic switchbacks speed it up

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Science's fake news problem: How funding pressures drive bad research

A productivity-driven funding culture has allowed sloppy science to flourish – but now some researchers are fighting back, says Clare Wilson

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Here's how PrEP medications outsmart HIV

Descovy and Truvada are two of the safest and most effective measures to prevent the spread of HIV in at-risk populations. In October, the Food and Drug Administration approved Descovy as the second HIV-prevention medication available in the U.S., six years after approving Truvada for the same purpose. Both drugs, produced by Gilead Sciences, originally functioned as treatments for patients who h

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Højtalere kan guide fisk tilbage til døde koralrev

Når koralrev bukker under for klimaforandringer, kan fiskene ikke selv finde hjem.

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Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine

For the first time, researchers have used a chip-based sensor with an integrated laser to detect very low levels of a cancer protein biomarker in a urine sample. The new technology is more sensitive than other designs and could lead to non-invasive and inexpensive ways to detect molecules that indicate the presence or progression of a disease.

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c-Jun overexpression in CAR T cells induces exhaustion resistance

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1805-z Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to overexpress the canonical AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun are resistant to T cell exhaustion, and provide enhanced therapeutic benefit in mouse tumour models.

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Electrons in graphene go with the flow

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03702-1 Scattering between electrons in the material graphene can cause these particles to flow like a viscous liquid. Such flow, which has previously been detected using measurements of electrical resistance, has now been visualized.

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Additive manufacturing of ultrafine-grained high-strength titanium alloys

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1783-1 Titanium–copper alloys with fully equiaxed grains and a fine microstructure are realized via an additive manufacturing process that exploits high cooling rates and multiple thermal cycles.

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Accretion of a giant planet onto a white dwarf star

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1789-8 Observations of an accretion disk around a hot white dwarf star reveal that the chemical abundances in its disk are similar to those thought to exist deep in icy giant planets, so the white dwarf must be accreting a giant planet.

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Frontal cortex neuron types categorically encode single decision variables

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1816-9 Frontal cortex neurons can be grouped into categorical response types corresponding to particular decision variables, such as reward size, decision confidence, or value, and individual variables may be encoded in distinct projection populations; this suggests that, like neurons in sensory cortex, frontal neurons form a spar

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The molecular landscape of ETMR at diagnosis and relapse

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1815-x Analyses of primary and relapse samples of embryonal tumours with multilayered rosettes provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and opportunities for the treatment of this deadly disease.

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A step closer to the Sun's secrets

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03665-3 NASA's Parker Solar Probe is currently making a series of close encounters with the Sun. Initial observations from the spacecraft have improved our understanding of both the Sun and its environment.

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Sun-bombing spacecraft uncovers secrets of the solar wind

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03684-0 Surprise magnetic reversals and an unexpectedly fast rotating wind mark the first findings from NASA's Parker Solar Probe.

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RGF1 controls root meristem size through ROS signalling

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1819-6 RITF1, a newly identified plant transcription factor, links signalling through the peptide hormone RGF1 to the balance of reactive oxygen species and thereby enhances the stability of another transcription factor, PLETHORA2, a master regulator of root stem cells.

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The GenomeAsia 100K Project enables genetic discoveries across Asia

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1793-z Using whole-genome sequencing data from 1,739 individuals, the GenomeAsia 100K Project catalogues genetic variation, population structure and disease associations to facilitate genetic studies in Asian populations and increase representation in genetics studies worldwide.

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Alfvénic velocity spikes and rotational flows in the near-Sun solar wind

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1813-z Data collected by the Parker Solar Probe in the solar corona are used to determine the organization of Alfvén waves, revealing an increasing flow velocity peaking at 35–50 km s−1.

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Light-driven anaerobic microbial oxidation of manganese

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1804-0 Anoxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms can biomineralize manganese oxides without molecular oxygen being present and without high-potential photosynthetic reaction centres, which sheds doubt on proposed dates for the origins of oxygenic photosynthetic metabolism.

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Parker probe kicks off a golden age for solar exploration

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03710-1 Humanity is finally getting up close and personal with Earth's nearest star.

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Probing the energetic particle environment near the Sun

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1811-1 The Parker Solar Probe mission has reached the inner heliosphere of the Sun and made measurements of energetic particle events in the near-Sun radiation environment.

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Observation of the exceptional-point-enhanced Sagnac effect

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1777-z precisely controllable integrated optical gyroscope based on stimulated Brillouin scattering is used to study non-Hermitian physics, revealing a four-fold enhancement of the Sagnac scale factor near exceptional points.

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The integrative biology of type 2 diabetes

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1797-8 A Review of studies into insulin resistance and hepatic gluconeogenesis associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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Designer alloy enables 3D printing of fine-grained metals

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03701-2 Conventional alloys have undesirably coarse-grained microstructures when used in 3D printing. A designer alloy overcomes this problem, potentially opening the way to the widespread adoption of 3D metal printing.

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Visualizing Poiseuille flow of hydrodynamic electrons

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1788-9 The emergence of a liquid-like electronic flow from ballistic flow in graphene is imaged, and an almost-ideal viscous hydrodynamic fluid of electrons exhibiting a parabolic Poiseuille flow profile is observed.

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Regulation of α-synuclein by chaperones in mammalian cells

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1808-9 Chaperones interact with a canonical motif in α-synuclein, which can be prevented by phosphorylation of α-synuclein at Tyr39, whereas inhibition of this interaction leads to the localization of α-synuclein to the mitochondria and aggregate formation.

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Near-Sun observations of an F-corona decrease and K-corona fine structure

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1807-x Observations of the solar corona by the Parker Solar Probe reveal evidence for the predicted dust-free zone and confirm that streamers comprise smaller substreamers that channel continuous multiscale density fluctuations.

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Developmental ROS individualizes organismal stress resistance and lifespan

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1814-y A subpopulation of Caenorhabditis elegans, in which there is a naturally occurring transient increase in reactive oxygen species during early development, exhibits increased stress resistance, improved redox homeostasis and prolonged lifespan, which are linked to a global decrease in level of the histone mark H3K4me3.

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Key role for CTCF in establishing chromatin structure in human embryos

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1812-0 The chromatin regulator CTCF has key roles in the gradual development of hierarchical chromatin structure during human embryogenesis.

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Non-Hermitian ring laser gyroscopes with enhanced Sagnac sensitivity

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1780-4 A method based on non-Hermitian singularities, or exceptional points, is established and used to increase the Sagnac scale factor and enhance the sensitivity of ring-laser gyroscopes.

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Highly structured slow solar wind emerging from an equatorial coronal hole

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1818-7 Measurements from the Parker Solar Probe show that slow solar wind near the Sun's equator originates in coronal holes.

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A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice

New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning — the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense — could be used to help people with disabilities. For example, temporary sight deprivation might be used to h

6h

Closest-ever approach to the sun gives new insights into the solar wind

The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind.

6h

Asia-wide genome mapping project reveals insights into Asian ancestry and genetic diversity

After a global genetic comparison, a team of international scientists has discovered that Asia has at least 10 ancestral lineages, whereas northern Europe has a single ancestral lineage.

6h

Adding copper strengthens 3D-printed titanium

Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications.

6h

Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes

New data from the Parker Solar Probe, which got closer to the sun than any other spacecraft, allowed physicists to map the source of a major component of the solar wind that continually peppers Earth. The slow solar wind seems to emerge from coronal holes along the sun's equator. Data also reveal strange magnetic field reversals that could be accelerating solar wind particles, and an unexpectedly

6h

U-M researchers discover stress in early life extends lifespan

Some stress at a young age could actually lead to a longer life, new research shows.

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Molecular bodyguards against Parkinson's disease

Chaperone proteins in human cells dynamically interact with the protein α-Synuclein, which is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease. A disturbed relationship to these 'bodyguards' leads to cell damage and the formation of Lewy bodies typical for Parkinson's disease. The findings by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum have been published in Nature.

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First giant planet around white dwarf found

Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, found evidence of a giant planet associated with a white dwarf star. The planet orbits the hot white dwarf, the remnant of a sun-like star, at close range, causing its atmosphere to be stripped away and form a disc of gas around the star. This unique system hints at what our own solar system might look like in the distant futur

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Hidden giant planet revealed around tiny white dwarf star

The first evidence of a giant planet orbiting a dead white dwarf star has been found in the form of a disc of gas formed from its evaporating atmosphere.

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Nasa's Parker Solar Probe beams back first insights from sun's edge

Flying closer than any other mission, spacecraft set to unravel the sun's mysteries Nasa's Parker Solar Probe, which has flown closer to the sun than any spacecraft, has beamed back its first observations from the edge of the sun's scorching atmosphere. The first tranche of data offers clues to long-standing mysteries, including why the sun's atmosphere, known as the corona, is hundreds of times

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A new gene involved in strawberry fruiting time is identified

Their great taste and their health benefits have made them one of the most popular fruits. The world market for strawberries, rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, was greater than 9 millon tons in 2016. According to the latest report by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Spain is the top producer of this food within the European Union, while China and the U.S. are the largest produce

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Silverswords may be gone with the wind

Silversword plants of Hawai'i—known by their Hawai'ian name 'ahinahina which translates to very grey—are unique to the Maui's Haleakalā volcano summit area and to the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the Big Island. Each volcanic mountain has its own unique type of silversword. The Haleakalā species is highly threated and is considered by many to be the most beautiful. But they are growing rar

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A new gene involved in strawberry fruiting time is identified

Their great taste and their health benefits have made them one of the most popular fruits. The world market for strawberries, rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, was greater than 9 millon tons in 2016. According to the latest report by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Spain is the top producer of this food within the European Union, while China and the U.S. are the largest produce

6h

Silverswords may be gone with the wind

Silversword plants of Hawai'i—known by their Hawai'ian name 'ahinahina which translates to very grey—are unique to the Maui's Haleakalā volcano summit area and to the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the Big Island. Each volcanic mountain has its own unique type of silversword. The Haleakalā species is highly threated and is considered by many to be the most beautiful. But they are growing rar

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First results from close to the Sun

Parker Solar Probe data paint a complex picture.

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Pavlov's plastic

Inanimate material can be 'trained' to behave like small artificial muscles, a new study suggests.

6h

Do we have the right to colonise other planets?

Quite apart from the practicalities, there are serious ethical issues at stake, says astrophysicist Paul Davies.

6h

Clever canines recognise words, regardless of who's speaking

It's not just a human skill, new research suggests.

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Citizen scientists 'deserve more credit'

Researchers say academic journals should recognise non-professional input and indigenous knowledge.

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What to buy new parents to make their lives easier

They welcome all the help. (Picsea via Unsplash/) Facing down first-time parenting is the most terrifying thing I've experienced, and I'm not alone. Because of this, parents like me buy bucketloads of baby-related products aimed at delivering sleep, quiet, and healthy babies. Some of that stuff works, some don't, and some are still in boxes. This is not a list of that stuff. This is a list of the

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How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling

The recycling of most of the carbon in nature depends on the breakdown of two polymers in woody matter, notably cellulose and lignin. In a paper just published in the journal Biochemistry, Richard Wolfenden, Ph.D., and colleague Charles Lewis, Ph.D., both in the UNC Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, show the extent to which enzymes from woodland fungi accelerate the breakdown of lignin, a

6h

Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database

It's hard to find a place in the U.S. that isn't impacted by wildfires and smoke.

6h

First giant planet around white dwarf found

Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, found evidence of a giant planet associated with a white dwarf star. The planet orbits the hot white dwarf, the remnant of a Sun-like star, at close range, causing its atmosphere to be stripped away and form a disc of gas around the star. This unique system hints at what our own Solar System might look like in the distant futur

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Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes

A year ago, NASA's Parker Solar Probe flew closer to the sun than any satellite in history, collecting a spectacular trove of data from the very edge of the sun's million-degree corona.

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Researchers discover stress in early life extends lifespan

Some stress at a young age could actually lead to a longer life, new research shows.

6h

Adding copper strengthens 3-D-printed titanium

Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3-D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications.

6h

Asia-wide genome mapping project reveals insights into Asian ancestry and genetic diversity

After a global genetic comparison, a team of international scientists has discovered that Asia has at least ten ancestral lineages, whereas northern Europe has a single ancestral lineage.

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Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication

In nature social living is strongly connected to the ability to communicate with others. Maintaining social ties and coordinating with group mates require frequent communication. Therefore, complex social systems are usually associated with well-developed communication abilities. The apex of communication complexity is undoubtedly human language. However, intensive and informationally rich communi

6h

Study shows lake methane emissions should prompt rethink on climate change

A new study from Swansea University has given new insights into how the greenhouse gas methane is being produced in the surface waters of lakes, which should signal a rethink on the global methane cycle.

6h

How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling

The recycling of most of the carbon in nature depends on the breakdown of two polymers in woody matter, notably cellulose and lignin. In a paper just published in the journal Biochemistry, Richard Wolfenden, Ph.D., and colleague Charles Lewis, Ph.D., both in the UNC Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, show the extent to which enzymes from woodland fungi accelerate the breakdown of lignin, a

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Standard compression algorithm could revolutionize physical and biological computations, researchers say

Entropy, a measure of the molecular disorder or randomness of a system, is critical to understanding a system's physical composition. In complex physical systems, the interaction of internal elements is unavoidable, rendering entropy calculation a computationally demanding, and often impractical, task. The tendency of a properly folded protein to unravel, for example, can be predicted using entrop

6h

Researchers discover stress in early life extends lifespan

Some stress at a young age could actually lead to a longer life, new research shows.

6h

Asia-wide genome mapping project reveals insights into Asian ancestry and genetic diversity

After a global genetic comparison, a team of international scientists has discovered that Asia has at least ten ancestral lineages, whereas northern Europe has a single ancestral lineage.

6h

Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication

In nature social living is strongly connected to the ability to communicate with others. Maintaining social ties and coordinating with group mates require frequent communication. Therefore, complex social systems are usually associated with well-developed communication abilities. The apex of communication complexity is undoubtedly human language. However, intensive and informationally rich communi

6h

National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?

National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected.

6h

Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine

For the first time, researchers have used a chip-based sensor with an integrated laser to detect very low levels of a cancer protein biomarker in a urine sample. The new technology is more sensitive than other designs and could lead to non-invasive and inexpensive ways to detect molecules that indicate the presence or progression of a disease.

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Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor

Little bits of black carbon littering the ocean floor, separate and distinct from the organic carbon believed to come from the ocean's surface. The source of that strange, and older, carbon has now been identified by UD researchers. The discovery is an important step in understanding the marine carbon cycle.

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Lung images of twins with asthma add to understanding of the disease

In a case study published today, researchers used a specialized MRI technique in a set of twins with asthma. While the twins are non-identical, the researchers found that they actually had identical ventilation defects in the same upper left lung segment, which stayed the same over the duration of the seven year study.

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Scientists create 'epigenetic couch potato' mouse

A study in mice shows for the first time that epigenetics — the molecular mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off — plays a key role in determining an individual's innate drive to exercise.

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Artificial Neurons Fire in Life-Like Patterns

The silicon chips receive and send electrical signals, recreating activity from neurons in the rat brain that play a role in breathing and thinking.

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Australia, stripped back

New algorithm offers a more accurate picture of the Earth's top layer.

6h

National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?

National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected.

6h

NASA finds wind shear battering tropical cyclone 07A

NASA's Aqua satellite found that wind shear was tearing at Tropical Storm 07A in the Arabian Sea.

6h

Scientists have found out why photons from other galaxies do not reach Earth

An international group of scientists, including Andrey Savelyev, associate professor of the Institute of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Information Technologies of the IKBFU, has improved a computer program that helps simulate the behavior of photons when interacting with hydrogen spilled in intergalactic space. Results are published in the scientific journal Monthly Notices of the Royal A

6h

Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors

Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws—and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier.

6h

Brewing beer that tastes fresh longer

Unlike wine, which generally improves with time, beer does not age well. Usually within a year of bottling, the beverage starts to develop an unpleasant papery or cardboard-like flavor that drinkers describe as "stale." Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have engineered lager yeast to make more molecules that protect beer against staling, resulting in imp

6h

A new way to measure long-term firm performance and shareholder value

Business leaders and investors are increasingly rating companies not just on short-term financial performance but on their ability to create long-term value for shareholders.

6h

Businesses need to rethink where they put cell towers

Placing cell towers 500 meters (1,640 feet) away from schools and hospitals could save companies trouble down the road, researchers report. Their new paper offers ways to include simple precautionary approaches to siting cell towers. And there are many cell towers—and more coming—since almost everyone has a cell phone and the towers are being used for more data intensive applications. In the US,

6h

The wellbeing connection

Soya and beef from South America, timber from Russia, fish from China—in an era of globalisation, central Europe has become a market for animal and plant products from all over the world. But in addition to these tangible goods, faraway ecosystems also supply intangible or cultural services that do not appear in any trade balance sheet. For example, they provide habitats for species whose existenc

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Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions

Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study by Oregon State University shows.

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Jane Fonda On Climate Change And Civil Disobedience

The Hollywood icon trades the red carpet for the Capitol steps. (Image credit: Rick Diamond/Getty Images for GCAPP)

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The wellbeing connection

Soya and beef from South America, timber from Russia, fish from China—in an era of globalisation, central Europe has become a market for animal and plant products from all over the world. But in addition to these tangible goods, faraway ecosystems also supply intangible or cultural services that do not appear in any trade balance sheet. For example, they provide habitats for species whose existenc

6h

Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions

Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study by Oregon State University shows.

6h

I quit: How poor treatment by customers leads to high turnover in the service industry

Whether they're dealing with impatient diners at a restaurant, handling returns at a clothing store or appeasing angry consumers at a call centre, anyone working in the service industry will tell you: it's a tough gig.

6h

Water was a winner in capturing carbon dioxide

Climate worries go hand in hand with CO2 emissions concerns. Emissions hit an all-time high last year. The CO2 level in the atmosphere may be higher than it's been in 3 million years.

6h

How good have climate models been at truly predicting the future?

A new paper from Hausfather and colleagues (incl. me) has just been published with the most comprehensive assessment of climate model projections since the 1970s. Bottom line? Once you correct for small errors in the projected forcings, they did remarkably well. Climate models are a core part of our understanding of our future climate. They also have been frequently attacked by those dismissive o

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Climate change is causing birds to shrink, study says

In the 'largest study of its kind' researchers studied 70,000 bird specimens over a 40-year period.

6h

Silverswords may be gone with the wind

In a new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Monographs, researchers seek to understand recent population declines of Haleakalā silverswords and identify conservation strategies for the future.

7h

Stricter alcohol policies related to lower risk of cancer

In a new study, researchers at Boston Medical Center and Boston University have uncovered a new association between more restrictive alcohol policies and lower rates of cancer mortality.

7h

The Most Enthralling Movie of the Year

When Marianne (played by Noémie Merlant), the heroine of Céline Sciamma's Portrait of a Lady on Fire , paints, the viewer can feel every dab on the canvas and hear every brushstroke as her workmanlike effort creates a graceful piece of art. After a while, Héloïse (Adèle Haenel), the woman Marianne is painting, sidles up to gaze at what she's produced. "When do we know it's finished?" Héloïse asks

7h

Atom music lets listeners experience atomic world through sound

Atom music is a fun new way to explore the atomic world via musical synthesis techniques.

7h

How Microbiomes Affect Fear

Our brains may seem physically far removed from our guts, but in recent years, research has strongly suggested that the vast communities of microbes concentrated in our digestive tract open lines of communication between the two. The intestinal microbiome has been shown to influence cognition and emotion , affecting moods and the state of psychiatric disorders, and even information processing. Bu

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CO2 Emissions Will Break Another Record in 2019

The recent increase in emissions from fossil fuel burning did slow down, but huge cuts are needed to avoid dangerous warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Low Gravity May Make Astronauts' Guts More Fragile

Microgravity may stop the insides of human intestines from forming strong barriers against food-borne diseases.

7h

Elon Musk on the Stand: 'Pedo Guy' Doesn't Mean 'Pedophile'

The Tesla CEO defended himself by arguing semantics on the first day of a defamation trial that stems from an insult Musk made on Twitter.

7h

Why the Great Auk Is Gone for Good

New research finds that the extinction of this flightless bird was completely our fault.

7h

Your zip software can calculate the complex physical quantity called entropy

A new Tel Aviv University study proposes a radically simple and efficient way of calculating the complex physical quantity known as entropy — and it probably exists on your own computer.

7h

Reprogramming inner ear to regrow hair cells promising target for hearing loss treatments

Mass. Eye and Ear scientists report the identification of a new pathway linked to cell division in the ear. With this pathway, they were able to reprogram the inner ear's cells to proliferate and regenerate hair cell-like cells in adult mice.

7h

Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database

Researchers have created the first comprehensive database of all the wildfire fuels that have been measured across North America. Ultimately, it can help scientists make more informed decisions about fire and smoke situations.

7h

A mouse model of prostate cancer bone metastasis in a syngeneic immunocompetent host

The research team reports the establishment of B6Ca P, an allograft tumor line from a Hi-Myc transgenic mouse that had been backcrossed onto C57BL/6J background.

7h

National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?

National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected. During the 178th ASA Meeting, Kurt Fristrup will present the findings and how human responses to noise might be studied.

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Atom music lets listeners experience atomic world through sound

Atoms absorb and release energy in the form of photons that we perceive as different colors, which can be passed through a prism that reveals the atom's spectrum as colored lines. The lines are specific to the atom and can be used to identify the element it belongs to. During the 178th ASA Meeting, Jill Linz will describe how her interpretation of the interconnectedness of sound and light waves le

7h

Mindfulness could lower your blood pressure

Mindfulness could reduce blood pressure, a new study finds. As the leading cause of death in both the United States and the world, heart disease claims nearly 18 million lives every year, according to the World Health Organization. Many of these deaths are due to hypertension, or abnormally high blood pressure, and could be prevented through medication or lifestyle changes such as healthier eatin

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #48, 2019

Reminder! The crowdfunding campaign to complete development of the Cranky Uncle game for improving our climate cognition is running right now. It takes only a few minutes and a few dollars to make a difference, by contributing right now while you're thinking about it. Thank you! " Not just your opinion, man*" From time to time scientists or groups of scientists pull their heads out of instrumenta

7h

Hyundai, Nikola and Toyota Start to Build Hydrogen Highway

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

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The UK could be on the verge of a major Universal Basic Income trial

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

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SpaceX's Satellite Constellation Could Hide Killer Asteroids

SpaceX's Starlink satellites could cost us more than a clear view of the stars. Astronomers have told Axios they fear the mega-constellation of tiny satellites could make it harder to spot asteroids near Earth — and that could mean they might not see one on a collision course with our planet in time to stop it. Eventually, SpaceX hopes to have thousands of Starlink satellites in Earth's orbit as

7h

Even 50-year-old climate models correctly predicted global warming

Study debunks idea that older models were inaccurate

7h

Daily briefing: An assumption borrowed from physics is breaking economics

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03752-5 Get rid of 'ergodicity' and a bunch of puzzling economic phenomena suddenly make sense. Plus, gene therapy tackles sickle-cell disease and doubts about whether tame animals necessarily get cuter.

7h

Revamp your home office for $20

Find a space and make it your own. (Candis McDow/) When we think about decorating, we usually imagine transforming the parts of our homes that mean the most to us. We spend so much effort making our bedrooms, living rooms , and kitchens feel like our own that we often neglect the place many of us spend a significant amount of time: the office. You don't have to be a CEO to have your own space, an

7h

New Analysis: Marijuana Seems to Be Linked to Testicular Cancer

Bad news, stoners: a massive new study has linked frequent weed smoking to an increased risk of testicular cancer. To be fair, the kind of heavy use analyzed in the study is the equivalent of smoking a full joint every single day for a decade, according to Inverse , so unless you personally have a massive weed budget , odds are you don't need to panic. For that particular type of heavy smoker, th

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The Spiritual Disunity of the West

On January 22, 1948, Britain's foreign secretary, Ernest Bevin, got to his feet in the House of Commons to lay the foundations of the Western world's postwar order. Bevin—a working-class titan, trade-union leader, and fierce critic of Communism—set out the urgent need to "organise the kindred souls of the West" in the face of the emerging totalitarian reality of the Soviet Union. Addressing his f

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Writing Articles of Impeachment Is Exhausting

Updated at 12:21 p.m. ET on December 4, 2019. It's an exclusive club that members of the House Judiciary Committee are joining today: The United States has undergone impeachment just three other times in its history, and only a handful of people each time have been charged with compiling a list of the president's impeachable offenses. James Rogan knows what that's like. Rogan, now a superior-cour

7h

Depression affects one-third of lung cancer patients

About one-third of patients newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer have moderate to severe symptoms of depression, a new study suggests. For many of these patients — particularly those with severe symptoms — depression occurs in a toxic blend of high levels of anxiety, traumatic stress, impaired day-to-day functioning and significant pain and other physical symptoms, findings s

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How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling

That white rot fungi on fallen logs in a forest, it's super important.

7h

Single dose of ketamine plus talk therapy may reduce alcohol use

A single infusion of ketamine plus behavioral therapy helped alcohol-dependent individuals reduce their drinking, a new study finds.

7h

Bullying others increases the risk of developing mental health problems and vice versa

A new study suggests there is a two-way relationship between bullying perpetration and mental health problems among U.S. youth. Researchers report that bullying perpetration increased the risk of developing internalizing problems, and having internalizing problems increased the probability of bullying others. While previous research has focused on the causes and consequences of bullying victimizat

7h

The Missing Link in Fighting Antibiotic Resistance

Rapid diagnostics can flag outbreaks of "superbugs" before they spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

'No Time to Die' Trailer Predicts James Bond's Future

The newest 007 movie is the end of an era in more ways than one.

7h

Are the Kids Alright? Young People are Getting Seriously Injured on E-Scooters

CT scans and X-ray data show surprising numbers of injuries among riders ages 18 to 30.

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Diabetes drug has unexpected, broad implications for healthy aging

Metformin is the most commonly prescribed type 2 diabetes drug, yet scientists still do not fully know how it works to control blood sugar levels. Researchers have now used a novel technology to investigate why it functions so well. The findings could also explain why metformin has been shown to extend health span and life span in recent studies.

7h

Meteorite-loving microorganism

The archaeon Metallosphaera sedula can uptake and process extraterrestrial material. This is shown by an international team led by astrobiologists, who examines microbial fingerprints on meteorite materials. The researchers also conclude that M. sedula colonizes meteorite minerals faster than those of terrestrial origin.

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Machine learning helps scientists measure important inflammation process

Inflammation is a hallmark of many health conditions, but quantifying how the underlying biology of inflammation contributes to specific diseases has been difficult. For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers and colleagues now report the development of a new technology to identify white blood cells called neutrophils that are primed to eject inflammatory DNA into the circulation via a

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Controlling attention with brain waves

Having trouble paying attention? MIT neuroscientists may have a solution for you: Turn down your alpha brain waves. In a new study, the researchers found that people can enhance their attention by controlling their own alpha brain waves based on neurofeedback they receive as they perform a particular task.

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Getting to the 'art' of dementia: UC researchers highlight benefits of art intervention

University of Canberra researchers have shown that art gallery programs can improve the wellbeing of people living with dementia — and they've backed it up by testing study participants' saliva.

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Online therapy helped cardiovascular disease patients with depression

Researchers at Linköping University have developed a treatment for depression among people with cardiovascular disease. The results, recently published in JMIR Mental Health, show that cardiovascular disease patients who underwent internet-based therapy for their depression became less depressed and gained a better quality of life.

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NASA finds wind shear battering tropical cyclone 07A

NASA's Aqua satellite found that wind shear was tearing at Tropical Storm 07A in the Arabian Sea.

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Atmospheric chemists move indoors

Most people spend the majority of their time at home, yet little is known about the air they breathe inside their houses. That's why some atmospheric chemists are turning their attention toward indoor air, using tools developed for monitoring pollutants outside. By cataloguing compounds in indoor air, scientists could someday link them with health effects, according to an article in Chemical & Eng

7h

Brewing beer that tastes fresh longer

Unlike wine, which generally improves with time, beer does not age well. Usually within a year of bottling, the beverage starts to develop an unpleasant papery or cardboard-like flavor that drinkers describe as 'stale.' Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have engineered lager yeast to make more molecules that protect beer against staling, resulting in imp

7h

New study provides insight into chronic kidney disease

Researchers have further analyzed a known signaling pathway they believe brings them one step closer to understanding the complex physiology of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which might provide a path to new treatment options.

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By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for training

People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study. Fluid intelligence is a measure of one's ability to adapt to new situations and solve never-before-seen problems.

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Scientists have found out why photons flying from other galaxies do not reach the Earth

In the Universe there are extragalactic objects such as blazars, which very intensively generate a powerful gamma-ray flux, part of photons from this stream reaches the Earth, as they say, directly, and part — are converted along the way into electrons, then again converted into photons and only then get to us.

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Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors

Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws — and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier.

7h

Rural women at higher risk of life-threatening pregnancy complications

Women in rural communities experience higher rates of life-threatening complications during or after childbirth than mothers in urban cities, a new study finds.

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Trump Administration Program Will Provide HIV Prevention Drug for Free

The "Ready, Set, PrEP" program will provide donated drugs that could protect up to 200,000 people a year for 11 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Apple udvider indbygget tyverisikring: Forhindrer genbrug af mange iPhones og Mac-computere

Apple har tændt for aktiveringslåsen på nye Mac-computere, lige som vi kender det fra iPhones og iPads. Det vil betyde mere elektronikskrot og mindre genbrug af funktionelt elektronik lyder det fra flere genanvendelsesvirksomheder og interesseorganisationer, som nu overvejer at føre sag mod Apple

8h

Trump's border wall threatens an Arizona oasis with a long, diverse history

A few hundred yards from the Mexican border in southern Arizona lies a quiet pond, about the size of two football fields, called Quitobaquito. About 10 miles to the east, heavy machinery grinds up the earth and removes vegetation as construction of President Trump's vaunted border wall advances toward the oasis.

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Trump's border wall threatens an Arizona oasis with a long, diverse history

A few hundred yards from the Mexican border in southern Arizona lies a quiet pond, about the size of two football fields, called Quitobaquito. About 10 miles to the east, heavy machinery grinds up the earth and removes vegetation as construction of President Trump's vaunted border wall advances toward the oasis.

8h

China Is Using Blood From Minorities For Genetic Research

China is running a disturbing genetic experiment on its persecuted Muslim Uigher population: trying to digitally reconstruct their faces based on genetic code. China has rounded up at least a million Uighurs and other minorities and placed them in detention camps. And now, The New York Times reports that the country is using those camps to develop and test new mass surveillance techniques, includ

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The problem of light pollution — and 5 ridiculously easy ways to fix it | Kelsey Johnson

Ever gaze up at the starry night sky? This stunning view is at risk of disappearing — unless we act now, says astrophysicist Kelsey Johnson. In this fascinating, unexpectedly funny talk, she explains how light pollution affects almost every species on earth (including us) and shares five "stupidly simple" things you can do to help solve the problem.

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3D model of human liver for better diagnosis

Dresden researchers create liver model for improved diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

8h

A new way to measure long-term firm performance and shareholder value

INSEAD and Wharton introduce LIVA: a metric that gauges the true impact of investment or strategic action on shareholder value.

8h

A new gene involved in strawberry fruiting time is identified

The study, published by the University of Cordoba (Spain) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), takes a step further in understanding the mechanisms that control fruiting in strawberries.

8h

Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication

With the Law of Brevity in mind, researchers examined whether call amplitude, rather than call duration, might be the main factor by which animal vocal repertoires are optimized. They fitted rock hyraxes with audio recorders and logged all of their calls, creating full vocal repertoire. The researchers demonstrate how changing necessities can affect the development of different voices for various

8h

Study shows lake methane emissions should prompt rethink on climate change

Study sheds new light on the impact of natural methane production on global climate change assessments.

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Differences in replacement level fertility point to inequalities

The percentage of the world's population that is above or below the 'replacement level of fertility' has long been used as a measure of demographic development. A new study revisited how this metric is calculated and how useful it really is in terms of informing policy decisions.

8h

Researchers discover a new, young volcano in the Pacific

Researchers from Tohoku University have discovered a new petit-spot volcano at the oldest section of the Pacific Plate. The research team, led by Associate Professor Naoto Hirano of the Center for Northeast Asian Studies, published their discovery in the in the journal Deep-Sea Research Part I.

8h

New cell models for ocular drug discovery

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed two new cell models that can open up new avenues for ocular drug discovery. The new cell models are continuously growing retinal pigment epithelial cells, which have many benefits over the models currently used by researchers and pharmaceutical companies.

8h

How race is associated with differences among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Researchers in this observational study looked at how race was associated with difference in symptoms, access to care, genetic testing and clinical outcomes among 2,467 patients (8.3% black and 91.7% white) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition where the heart muscle becomes abnormally thick, which can make it harder to pump blood.

8h

Beta blocker use identified as hospitalization risk factor in 'stiff heart' heart failure

A new study links the use of beta-blockers to heart failure hospitalizations among those with the common 'stiff heart' heart failure subtype.

8h

Liquid crystal polymer learns to move and grab objects

A specially conditioned liquid crystal polymer could be controlled with the power of light alone, with new potential applications in soft robotics.

8h

Like Pavlov’s dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking

Researchers in Finland are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed, published Dec. 4 in the journal Matter, is the first time a synthetic actuator 'learns' to do new 'tricks' based on its past experiences, without computer programming.

8h

Gene Therapy Arrives

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03716-9 After false starts, drugs that manipulate the code of life are finally changing lives.

8h

Curing What Ails Us

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03712-z

8h

All of Us

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03717-8 DNA-based medicine needs more diversity to avoid harmful bias. One big research project is fixing that.

8h

23 and Baby

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03715-w We now have the ability to screen for thousands of genetic diseases in newborns. That may not always be the healthy thing to do.

8h

Malaria cases are falling worldwide

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03746-3 The trend is driven by progress tackling the disease in southeast Asia, but elsewhere infections remain 'unacceptably high'.

8h

The Power of Spheres

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03713-y DNA or RNA molecules, arranged into spherical shapes, can attack brain cancers and other illnesses that evade conventional drug design.

8h

Astronauts will soon get to light a fire onboard the ISS

SpaceX is sending a slew of weird new experiments to the space station, including one where astronauts will experiment with fire.

8h

Properties of graphene change due to water and oxygen

A research team investigated the oxidation-reduction principle of two-dimensional materials by interfacial diffusion.

8h

Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows

North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear to be responses to a warming climate.

8h

New screening method identifies potential anticancer compounds that reawaken T cells

Scientists have developed a method for rapidly discovering potential cancer-treating compounds that work by resurrecting anti-tumor activity in immune cells called T cells. Cancerous tumors often thrive because they render T cells dysfunctional or 'exhausted.' The new method uncovers medicinal compounds that can restore the function of these T cells, making cancers vulnerable to them again.

8h

Brachytherapy proves effective in treating skin cancer

The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy to treat elderly patients with common skin cancers offers excellent cure rates and cosmetic outcomes, according to a new study.

8h

Exoplanet-hunting mission catches a natural comet outburst in unprecedented detail

Astronomers have captured a clear start-to-finish image sequence of an explosive emission of dust, ice and gases during the close approach of comet 46P/Wirtanen in late 2018.

8h

How accumulating useful genes helps older yeast fare better in tougher times

Researchers have used yeast to learn more about how satellite (extrachromosomal) DNA circles are formed to carry amplified genes, how the gene duplication is specific to the environmental pressure and the effects of age. Understanding the mechanism of gene duplication and DNA circle formation has relevance to the biology of ageing and the development of drug resistance in cancers cells.

8h

One in four children grow up in a single-parent family – so why is there still a stigma?

Given that one in four children now grow up in one-parent homes and that 42% of marriages end in divorce you might expect prejudice against single parents to be a thing of the past. Yet a 2014 poll found that 75% of single parents had experienced stigma.

8h

Through the eyes of animals

Humans are now closer to seeing through the eyes of animals, thanks to an innovative software framework.

8h

A new way to control microbial metabolism

To help optimize microbes' ability to produce useful compounds but also maintain their own growth, chemical engineers have devised a way to induce bacteria to switch between different metabolic pathways at different times.

8h

Another year, another carbon emissions record

Emissions are continuing to clog up our air (Martin Sepion/Unsplash/) Despite this year's momentum in climate advocacy, the globe's carbon emissions stubbornly continue to climb. According to the Global Carbon Project, an international partnership of climate scientists, this year polluters around the world will emit a new record amount of carbon dioxide. Starting in 2006, the Global Carbon Projec

8h

Read Jerry Nadler's Opening Statement in the Judiciary Committee's Impeachment Hearing

The next phase of the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump kicked off today, as the House Judiciary Committee convened its first public hearing on whether the president's alleged wrongdoing amounts to impeachable offenses. Representative Jerry Nadler of New York, the committee's chairman, finds himself back in the impeachment spotlight with the unenviable task of trying to maintain

8h

The wellbeing connection

In an era of globalization, central Europe has become a market for animal and plant products from all over the world. But in addition to these tangible goods, faraway ecosystems also supply intangible or cultural services that do not appear in any trade balance sheet. But what kind of regions provide such cultural ecosystem services for highly developed and densely populated countries in Europe?

8h

New treatment to tackle drug-resistant strains of TB could now be possible

New drugs to treat strains of TB which have become resistant to treatment are now a possibility following a groundbreaking discovery from the University of Surrey.

8h

Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species

Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two species of lark.

8h

Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: walking

Researchers in Finland are "training" pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed, published December 4 in the journal Matter, is the first time a synthetic actuator "learns" to do new "tricks" based on its past experiences, without computer programming.

8h

How to find the most sustainable and long-lasting children's toys

Think about the way plastic pollution has been reported in recent years and you're probably picturing plastic packaging, films and microfibres. But Christmas brings a deluge of another relatively short-lived plastic product that has received a lot less attention—children's toys.

8h

Researchers use genomics to discover potential new treatment for parasite disease

Using innovative RNA sequencing techniques, researchers identified a promising novel treatment for lymphatic filariasis, a disabling parasitic disease that is difficult to treat. The potential new therapy is an experimental cancer drug called JQ1 and targets proteins found prominently in the worm's genome; it appears to effectively kill the adult worms in a laboratory setting, according to the stu

8h

New treatment triggers self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells

A new study finds that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. The research holds great potential for the development of a new effective therapy to treat this aggressive cancer in humans.

8h

Machine learning that works like a dream

Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that classifies the sleep stages of mice with record accuracy. This work may be used to greatly enhance the field of sleep research.

8h

Citizen scientists deserve more credit, researchers argue

Biologists argue that newfound respect for indigenous knowledge and changes in technology mean that non-professionals are taking greater roles in science work.

8h

Hospitals Sue Trump to Keep Negotiated Prices Secret

The administration wants to require hospitals to reveal the rates they privately negotiate with insurers for all sorts of procedures, amid the public outcry over surprise medical bills.

8h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor slutter det periodiske system?

118 forskellige grundstoffer findes naturligt eller er skabt kunstigt, og jagten på at fremstille grundstof 119 er godt igang. Der er dog en grænse for, hvor tunge grundstoffer man kan have og lave. Teoretikerne har forskellige bud.

8h

Call for cooperation as 'blue boats' rob Pacific reefs

A flotilla of Vietnamese fishing boats with crews suffering in harsh conditions is stripping Pacific coral reefs of seafood as the poaching escalates to become an international human rights and security issue.

8h

How we can recycle more buildings

More than 35 billion tonnes of non-metallic minerals are extracted from the Earth every year. These materials mainly end up being used to build homes, schools, offices and hospitals. It's a staggering amount of resources, and it's only too likely to increase in the coming years as the global population continues to grow.

8h

Conservative boards more likely to dismiss CEO

When considering an organisation's long-term survival, existential threats that come to mind include external competition or technological disruption. But a potential threat lurks within the firm itself—organisational misconduct among employees can destroy billions of dollars of market value and result in lasting reputational damage.

8h

Call for cooperation as 'blue boats' rob Pacific reefs

A flotilla of Vietnamese fishing boats with crews suffering in harsh conditions is stripping Pacific coral reefs of seafood as the poaching escalates to become an international human rights and security issue.

8h

Albedo matters for the climate, and forestry can have an impact on it

A research project conducted by Aalto University found that favoring broadleaved species in boreal forestry is a climate-friendly option when considering the forest albedo. Therefore, forest management actions can directly affect forest albedo, and hence the climate, without decreasing forest productivity.

8h

Study finds direct links between old carbon, graphite and seafloor hydrothermal vents

For years, researchers looking at seafloor sediments would find bits of black carbon along with organic carbon strewn across the ocean floor, but they couldn't say exactly where it originated. The challenge with studying deep marine carbon is that it is a mixture of fresh material delivered from the surface and an aged component, the origin of which had been previously unknown.

8h

It takes an ecosystem to raise a successful start-up

The geography of entrepreneurship is "spiky", meaning that from region to region there are significant variations in rates of start-ups and, in particular, "scale-ups"—new businesses that are evolving into larger enterprises.

8h

The gut may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis

It is incompletely understood which factors in patients with multiple sclerosis act as a trigger for the immune system to attack the brain and spinal cord. A potential factor is described by a research team in the journal PNAS. The medical researchers used an animal model to show that the protein Smad7 mobilizes immune cells in the intestines which, in turn, trigger inflammation in the central ner

8h

Finnish children's motor skills at the top in Europe

Data gathered in Finland, Belgium and Portugal reveal that Finnish children are ahead of their European peers in motor skills at ages 6 to 10 years. Differences in motor skills increase with age and independently of the remarkable differences in overweight across the countries.

8h

Water was a winner in capturing CO2

Reducing the level of CO2 in the atmosphere will almost certainly require carbon capture. A surprising substance just might be the ticket.

8h

All-optical diffractive neural networks process broadband light

Developed by researchers at UCLA, diffractive optical networks provide a low power, low latency and highly-scalable machine learning platform that can find numerous applications in robotics, autonomous vehicles, defense industry, among many others. In addition to providing statistical inference and generalization to classes of data, diffractive neural networks have also been used to design determi

8h

Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic

A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents.

8h

Most of America's national parks are facing a grave and immediate threat

More than half of America's national parks are facing a grave and immediate threat: the ongoing presence and spread of invasive animal species. The National Park Service has taken the first step in combating this invasion by asking a group of experts to help chart a course that will ensure the survival of these national treasures.

9h

Through the eyes of animals

Humans are now closer to seeing through the eyes of animals, thanks to an innovative software framework.

9h

Link between obesity and gum disease

Obesity and gum (periodontal) disease are among the most common non-communicable diseases in the United States — and studies show these chronic conditions may be related. This new study explores the effect of obesity on non-surgical periodontal care and evaluates potential pathways that may illustrate the connection between the two conditions.

9h

Fattiga ensamhushåll ökar

Andelen fattiga bland ensamhushållen har ökat kraftigt i Sverige, enligt officiell statistik. Medan fattigdomsrisken för ensamstående föräldrar länge varit känd, visar en studie från Stockholms universitet att även singlar utan barn har en dramatiskt ökad risk att hamna i fattigdom. Forskarna kopplar också ökningen av fattigdom till restriktioner i arbetslöshetsförsäkringen. – Idag är risken för

9h

NASA launching RiTS 'robot hotel' to International Space Station

Sometimes robots need a place to stay in space, too. NASA is attaching a "robot hotel" to the outside of the International Space Station with the upcoming launch of the Robotic Tool Stowage (RiTS), a protective storage unit for critical robotic tools.

9h

GRID3 project aims to put everyone on the map

In the U.S., our Constitution mandates that a census takes place every 10 years. Other countries tend to have similar standards. Yet some parts of the world have not conducted a national census in decades. Somalia hasn't had one since 1985; Afghanistan's first and only census took place in 1979 and didn't cover the entire country; Lebanon's last census was in 1932. The reasons for this may be poli

9h

How Dan the Zebra Stopped an Ill-Fated Government Breeding Program in Its Tracks

At the centennial of the death of this captive animal, an archaeozoologist visited collections at the Smithsonian to examine human-animal relationships

9h

The Conundrum of Lucian Freud's Portraits

"You'll be dead very soon and I want you to do naked self-portraits and put in everything you feel is relevant to your life and how you think about yourself … Try and make it the most revealing, telling, and believable object … Make a visual statement and forget your inhibitions and be over the top. Take your clothes off and paint yourself. Just once." According to Lucian Freud, this is a talk he

9h

Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species

Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two species of lark.

9h

Inequity takes a toll on your gut microbes, too

People worry about having access to clean water, power, health care and healthy foods because they are essential for survival. But do they ever think about their access to microbes?

9h

New treatment to tackle drug-resistant strains of TB could now be possible

New drugs to treat strains of TB which have become resistant to treatment are now a possibility following a ground breaking discovery from the University of Surrey.

9h

Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species

Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two species of lark.

9h

Inequity takes a toll on your gut microbes, too

People worry about having access to clean water, power, health care and healthy foods because they are essential for survival. But do they ever think about their access to microbes?

9h

Face time innovates online language learning

Learning another language can take years of commitment and effort amid our busy lives. A new online learning innovation pairing students face-to-face with native speakers is helping to speed up progress because it is tailored to the learner's needs, lifestyle and level.

9h

New treatment to tackle drug-resistant strains of TB could now be possible

New drugs to treat strains of TB which have become resistant to treatment are now a possibility following a ground breaking discovery from the University of Surrey.

9h

Extent of the challenge to clean up space debris revealed

Current levels of space activity may not be sustainable, even without the introduction of so-called 'mega-constellations,' a new study from the University of Southampton has shown.

9h

Degrowth is the key to tackling climate change – but it won't be easy

If we want to tackle climate change and protect our future on the Earth, societies will need to adopt a degrowth model, in which we consume less, and use fewer materials and resources. Given how reliant we are on the growth model this won't be an easy transition.

9h

Subsiding air parcels are among the causes of hot spells

Climate researchers have assumed that hot spells are caused by hot Mediterranean or Sahara air flowing to central Europe. Now, causes of extreme hot spells are the focus of a project coordinated by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). They study weather and climate processes in the troposphere up to 10 kilometers and have now identified another cause of hot spells, namely, air p

9h

Freeze frame: Scientists capture atomic-scale snapshots of artificial proteins

Protein-like molecules called "polypeptoids" (or "peptoids," for short) have great promise as precision building blocks for creating a variety of designer nanomaterials, like flexible nanosheets—ultrathin, atomic-scale 2-D materials. They could advance a number of applications—such as synthetic, disease-specific antibodies and self-repairing membranes or tissue—at a low cost.

9h

How small is a small-world network?

Discovered in the field of social sciences in the 1960s, the phenomenon known as small-world networks has fascinated popular culture and science for decades. It arose from the observation that in the world, any two people are connected by a short chain of social ties.

9h

Call for cooperation as 'blue boats' rob Pacific reefs

A flotilla of Vietnamese fishing boats with crews suffering in harsh conditions is stripping Pacific coral reefs of seafood as the poaching escalates to become an international human rights and security issue.

9h

New 'hyper glue' formula developed by UBCO and UVic researchers

With many of the products we use every day held together by adhesives, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus and the University of Victoria hope to make everything from protective clothing to medical implants and residential plumbing stronger and more corrosion resistant thanks to a newly-developed 'hyper glue' formula.

9h

Freeze frame: Scientists capture atomic-scale snapshots of artificial proteins

Scientists at Berkeley Lab are the first to use cryo-EM (cryogenic electron microscopy), a Nobel Prize-winning technique originally designed to image proteins in solution, to image atomic changes in a synthetic soft material. Their findings have implications for the synthesis of 2D materials for a wide variety of applications.

9h

Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions

Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study shows.

9h

Star-quake vibrations lead to new estimate for Milky Way age

In a paper published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, a team of 38 scientists led by researchers from Australia's ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D) use data from the now-defunct probe to calculate that the disc is about 10 billion years old.

9h

Conservative boards more likely to dismiss CEO

Leaning left or right in the political spectrum may affect how a company's board manages CEO dismissal, finds SMU Assistant Professor David Gomulya.

9h

How Do You Do, Fellow Kids?

Senator Cory Booker is running in slow motion through Reagan National Airport as Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song" blasts. In the middle of a presidential bid, Booker is in his campaign casual: blue jeans, black dress shoes, a white button-down, and a black sport coat. As far as we know, he has one minute to catch a 6 p.m. flight to Iowa. It's 5:59. He exits his slo-mo daze and steamrolls an unsusp

9h

EU climate leadership in doubt as bloc set to miss 2030 goal

The European Union said Wednesday that it will likely miss its target for reducing greenhouse gases by 2030, dealing a blow to the bloc's efforts to be a leader in the fight against climate change.

9h

Tug of War With a 1,400 Pound Grizzly! | Man vs. Bear

A former MMA fighter tries to withstand the strength of an Alaskan Kodiak grizzly! Catch the new series MAN VS. BEAR starting Wednesday Dec. 4 at 9p on Discovery. Learn more about Man vs. Bear: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/man-vs-bear/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dis

9h

A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury

Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.

9h

The year the world woke up to the climate emergency

Schoolchildren skipping class to strike, protests bringing city centres to a standstill: armed with dire warnings from scientists, people around the world dragged the climate emergency into the mainstream in 2019.

9h

Media Multitasking Gives Us Mixed Feelings

Using media to brighten up dull tasks leaves adolescents feeling both better and worse. multitasking.jpg Image credits: Artie Medvedev/Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, December 4, 2019 – 10:00 Amanda Heidt, Contributor (Inside Science) — People are multitasking, maybe more than ever before, even as research shows it's not always healthy. A new study breaks down how adolescents experience "mix

9h

Is ASMR Real or Just a Pseudoscience?

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is all the rage lately. Is it real? Is there something special about people who have it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Deadly swine flu outbreak breaks out in Poland near Germany

Poland's agriculture minister says 21 wild boars have died as a result of an outbreak of African swine fever close to the German border.

9h

New high-performance triboelectric materials fabricated from by-products of petroleum refining process

Triboelectric generation is an energy harvesting technique that generates electricity through induction of triboelectric effects using discarded physical energy. Materials employed to triboelectric generators (TEG) are classified positive or negative according to their value of electron affinity; negative materials generally employ fluorinated carbon-based polymers. Yet, most of the research for i

9h

Research finds short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure

As awareness increases about the health danger of radon gas, more people are making the decision to test their homes for the deadly gas. A University of Calgary led study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, which takes readings within the home for 90 or more days.

9h

Typhoon Kammuri death toll rises to four in Philippines

At least four people are known to have died after a powerful typhoon ripped through the Philippines, officials said Wednesday, with high-speed winds prompting large-scale evacuations, tearing off roofs and shutting down Manila airport.

9h

Deadly swine flu outbreak breaks out in Poland near Germany

Poland's agriculture minister says 21 wild boars have died as a result of an outbreak of African swine fever close to the German border.

9h

Calculate the Thrust Force on Your Drone\!

A physicist puts his quadcopter through the paces to see what kind of mojo those little rotors throw down.

9h

F-16-piloter får udleveret gamle Nokia-telefoner efter hacking og trusler

Der skal efterlades et 'minimalt digital spor', så piloterne i Litauen har fået udleveret en gammel Nokia-telefon, og besøgende opfordres til at sætte deres smartphone på flytilstand for at undgå russisk hacking og chikane.

9h

Why Your 5G Phone Connection Could Mean Lousy Weather Forecasts

Will getting full bars on your 5G connection mean getting caught out by sudden weather changes? The question may strike you as hypothetical, nonsensical even, but it is at the core of ongoing disputes between meteorologists and telecommunications companies. Everyone else, including you and I, are caught in the middle, wanting both 5G's faster connection speeds and precise information about our in

9h

Targeted therapy better for repeat kidney cancer patients than FDA-approved counterpart

Kidney cancer patients who had already tried two or three different treatments had improved chances of preventing cancer progression with an experimental drug called tivozanib compared to an alternative approved by the FDA, reports a City of Hope-led study. Published in The Lancet Oncology, the study is the first to show the benefit of tivozanib for patients with renal cell carcinoma (kidney cance

9h

NOTCH1 signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma via a TEL2/SERPINE1 axis

In this study, the research team investigated NOTCH1 mutations in keratinocyte lines derived from OSCC biopsies that had been subjected to whole exome sequencing.

9h

Toxic corporate workplace culture could be linked to Australia's spiral into depression

Here's a sobering statistic for the 'lucky country': 36 million prescriptions for antidepressant medication were issued in Australia in 2018, the second highest in the developed world after Iceland.

9h

More pollution, less rain

Emissions from Asian slums could be a contributory factor in changing weather patterns, according to work published in the International Journal of Environment and Pollution, perhaps leading to worsening windspeeds, but less rainfall.

9h

Giant tortoises found to be trainable and to have long memories

A trio of researchers with the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, the Hebrew University and Tiergarten Schönbrunn, Maxingstrasse, has found that giant tortoises are not only trainable, but have long memories. In their paper published in the journal Animal Cognition, Tamar Gutnick, Anton Weissenbacher and Michael Kuba describe training exercises they carried out with the huge tortoises an

9h

Filaments are weapons in 'world's oldest war'

New research reveals the structure and function of one of bacteria's latest strategies in the fight against viruses. It's a fleet of highly organized enzymes that provide a rapid immune response capable of quickly shredding the harmful DNA of viral invaders. "This is part of what's often referred to as the world's oldest war," says Nancy Horton, associate professor of molecular and cellular biolo

9h

Giant tortoises found to be trainable and to have long memories

A trio of researchers with the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, the Hebrew University and Tiergarten Schönbrunn, Maxingstrasse, has found that giant tortoises are not only trainable, but have long memories. In their paper published in the journal Animal Cognition, Tamar Gutnick, Anton Weissenbacher and Michael Kuba describe training exercises they carried out with the huge tortoises an

9h

Is ASMR Real or Just a Pseudoscience?

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is all the rage lately. Is it real? Is there something special about people who have it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Dogs found able to perceive slight changes in human spoken words

A team of researchers with the University of Sussex, the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory and the University of Lyon, has found that dogs are able to detect minor differences in spoken human words. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with pet dogs and what they learned about their ability to hear slight differences in h

9h

As a way to fight climate change, not all soils are created equal

As the planet warms due to excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, a solution for drawing down that carbon—or at least a major part of it—lies silently below us.

9h

Himalayan lakes are exacerbating glacial melt

The rate glaciers are melting in the Himalaya is being significantly accelerated by lakes already formed by glacial retreat, new research led by the University of St Andrews has found.

9h

Sådan finder vi de bedste til behandling af gigt

Ranglisten over Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af leddegigt og rygsøjlegigt er baseret på data fra kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser, og speciallæger i reumatologi har vægtet betydningen af kvalitetsindikatorerne.

9h

Dogs found able to perceive slight changes in human spoken words

A team of researchers with the University of Sussex, the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory and the University of Lyon, has found that dogs are able to detect minor differences in spoken human words. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with pet dogs and what they learned about their ability to hear slight differences in h

9h

Road salt is taking its toll on insects in Toronto area, researchers find

It may help keep your car on the road in the winter, but research from the University of Toronto suggests that road salt is creating problems for wildlife.

9h

Study finds native bees turning to polystyrene for nesting places

New Curtin University research has found that polystyrene can serve as a nesting place for native bees, which are able to exploit the man-made material for their own benefit.

9h

Tiny red handfish hatchlings a lifeline for world's rarest fish

Fifty newborn red handfish are giving IMAS scientists an opportunity to help save the last known populations of the world's rarest fish.

9h

Road salt is taking its toll on insects in Toronto area, researchers find

It may help keep your car on the road in the winter, but research from the University of Toronto suggests that road salt is creating problems for wildlife.

9h

Study finds native bees turning to polystyrene for nesting places

New Curtin University research has found that polystyrene can serve as a nesting place for native bees, which are able to exploit the man-made material for their own benefit.

9h

Tiny red handfish hatchlings a lifeline for world's rarest fish

Fifty newborn red handfish are giving IMAS scientists an opportunity to help save the last known populations of the world's rarest fish.

9h

New study finds the mix that makes Titan's lakes spew nitrogen bubbles

New research explains how bubbles erupt in frigid hydrocarbon lakes on Saturn's largest moon Titan, potentially creating fizz intense enough to form geologic features on the moon.

9h

Ekspert efter test af nye, russiske missiler: »Der er ikke noget forsvar imod dem«

PLUS. Rusland har testet et hypersonisk og manøvredygtigt missil i Arktis. Sådan et våben findes der ikke noget godt forsvar mod i øjeblikket, lyder det fra Karsten Marup fra Forsvarsakademiet.

9h

China Just Completed the World's Largest 3D-Printed Structure

One of a Kind The Chinese town of Suzhou is now home to a wall unlike any other. According to a newly published story by 3D Printing Media Network, Chinese construction company Winsun has finished building a 3D-printed wall in Suzhou which, at more than 500 meters (1,640 feet) long, is now the world's largest 3D-printed structure of any kind. Saving Banks The wall is a river revetment, which is a

10h

Researchers achieve quantum control of an oscillator using a Josephson circuit

Superconducting circuits, which have zero electrical resistance, could enable the development of electronic components that are significantly more energy-efficient than most chips used today. Importantly, superconducting circuits rely on an electronic element known as the Josephson junction, which allows them to manipulate quantum information and mediate photon interactions. While past studies hav

10h

'Life just went to crap': Why army veterans are twice as likely to end up in prison

The question of whether Australia does enough to support its ex-service personnel is growing in urgency, with Labor leader Anthony Albanese this week adding his voice to those calling for a royal commission into veteran suicides.

10h

A new study reveals the function of corpora amylacea to remove brain waste substances

An article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describes a new pathway in the central nervous system to expel waste substances from the brain through the creation of corpora amylacea (CA), aggregates formed by glucose polymers amassing waste products.

10h

How small is a small-world network?

This is the subject of a study published on 14 November in Nature Physics Communications by Gorka Zamora-López, a researcher at the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC), and Romain Brasselet, a researcher at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste (Italy).

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As a way to fight climate change, not all soils are created equal

A set of studies led by CSU soil scientist Francesca Cotrufo offers a newly nuanced understanding of different soil organic matter components that can be increased through varied management strategies.

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Chronic opioid treatment may raise risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, study finds

While opioids are often prescribed to treat people with trauma-related pain, a new UCLA-led study suggests doctors should use caution before prescribing the drug to those they believe may experience severe stress in the future, in order to reduce the risk the patient will develop PTSD.

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The 11 most noteworthy health innovations of 2019

The 11 most noteworthy health innovations of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Claire Maldarelli Doctors and researchers spend hours attempting to understand, troubleshoot, and treat maladies. Some diseases are harder to dissect and design medications for, while others are ignored for years. This year's newly approved drugs, treatments, and health gadgets shine a light on a few of these of

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2019's most innovative gadgets

2019's most innovative gadgets They're the Best of What's New. By Stan Horaczek and Corinne Iozzio It's easy to get excited about a shiny new device. But this year, some of the most important advances in the gadget world didn't arrive in thoughtfully designed, sustainably sourced packaging. In fact, several of the biggest steps forward enhance the networks and engineering infrastructure that und

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2019's most impressive automotive innovations

2019's most impressive automotive innovations They're the Best of What's New. By Dan Carney and Chuck Squatriglia This year, the biggest automotive advances were all about maximizing efficiency. Whether it's a car that tells other cars about that traffic jam ahead, a diesel engine that combines fuel economy with low emissions, or hybrid and electric vehicles with clever solutions to the technolo

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2019's most exciting personal care products

2019's most exciting personal care products They're the Best of What's New. By Nicole Wetsman and Rachel Feltman At a time when people are working (and playing) harder than ever before, consumers are hungry for products that make them feel not just good, but better . But the marketing around such spaces—cosmetics, skin- and haircare, fitness, and sexual health, to name a few—has long been a mine

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2019's coolest entertainment innovations

2019's coolest entertainment innovations They're the Best of What's New. By Stan Horaczek and Corinne Iozzio Movies, music, and video games are all about escape—pulling you out of your reality into something, or someplace, extraordinary. This year, technological leaps in everything from game streaming and filmmaking to guitar playing and binge-watching made it easier than ever to lose touch, how

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The biggest security breakthroughs of 2019

The biggest security breakthroughs of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Eric Adams and Chuck Squatriglia Security is always a work in progress, as designers and engineers respond to new threats online, at home, and on the battlefield. Sometimes that means big, bold efforts like building hypersonic missiles that streak across the sky at five times the speed of sound. But it also means findi

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The 9 most useful home products of 2019

The 9 most useful home products of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Harlon Murphy and John Kennedy You don't need to stuff your house full of smart gadgets to surround yourself with cool gear. Sure, this list features an omniscient light that matches the sunshine streaming through your window—but there's also a super-rugged tape measure, as well as a stroller that'll do some of the pushin

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The 10 most thrilling recreation innovations of 2019

The 10 most thrilling recreation innovations of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Rob Verger and Stan Horaczek The best technology makes it easier to do the things you enjoy. That might mean taking a long ride knowing your helmet will summon help if you crash, or venturing farther from civilization because your activity-tracking watch draws power from the sun. And everyone will feel better

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The most amazing aerospace innovations of 2019

The most amazing aerospace innovations of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Neel V. Patel and Rob Verger The most awesome aerospace innovations of this past year aren't just cool contraptions designed to cruise through air and space at breakneck speeds. They're hints at what might be mainstream in the future. From an experimental craft that could help usher in a new period of quiet superso

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The most important engineering innovations of 2019

The most important engineering innovations of 2019 They're the Best of What's New. By Andrew Rosenblum and Sara Chodosh We may be tired of hearing about the climate crisis, but here's the thing: It's still the most important challenge we face today. The good news is, lots of companies are taking novel tacks to make smarter use of the planet's finite resources. Modernized sails might soon give th

10h

The hidden costs of social media use in elections: A Ghana case study

Social media is becoming increasingly central to election campaigns around the world. In the process, it is transforming politics in a number of ways. Unsurprisingly, journalists and analysts have focused on the more sensational aspects of this rise. Examples include the divisive targeted mass messaging ahead of the UK's Brexit vote in 2016, the use of WhatsApp to fuel violence in India and Myanma

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Mindfulness training may help lower blood pressure, new study shows

A study at Brown University finds that mindfulness could reduce blood pressure by enhancing attention control, emotion regulation and self-awareness of both healthy and unhealthy habits.

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Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows

North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear to be responses to a warming climate.

10h

Birds are shrinking as the climate warms

After 40 years of collecting birds that ran into Chicago buildings, scientists have been able to show that the birds have been shrinking as the climate's warmed up.

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UCalgary research finds short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure

A University of Calgary led study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, 90 or more days. Researchers placed two test kits, a short term (five-day) and long term (90-day) in the same homes. Tests were conducted during summer and winter months. Findings showed the short-term kits were imprecise up to 99 percent of the time when compared to a lo

10h

I quit: How poor treatment by customers leads to high turnover in the service industry

According to a new study led by the UBC Sauder School of Business, customer conflict plays a big role when it comes to service industry workers saying 'I quit' — and how supervisors manage that conflict helps decide whether employees stay or go.

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Hydrogen research fuels new solar ideas for green energy

New research led by Curtin University explores the use of methanol as a storage for hydrogen fuel, providing a potential green option for the extraction and creation of this zero pollution energy source.

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Is Automation the Key to an Effective Government Workforce?

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Daedalus Flight Pack by Gravity Industries Ltd

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Bats Play Key Pollinating Role for Durians

Researchers wanted to improve the fruit yields for small farmers in Indonesia, and hope their findings will encourage protections for bats.

10h

Homes can be better prepared for cyclones—but first we must convince the owners

Most Australians know cyclones can cause serious damage to housing. Insurance premiums in cyclone-prone regions are among the highest in the country. Unfortunately, things are likely to get worse before they get better.

10h

Expert discusses the harms of algal blooms

When dying birds and sea lions wash up by the dozens on Southern California beaches, David Caron's phone starts ringing.

10h

Auxetic membranes: Paradoxical replacement tissue for medicine

A material that thickens when you pull on it seems to contradict the laws of physics. However, the so-called auxetic effect, which also occurs in nature, is interesting for a number of applications. A new Empa study recently published in Nature Communications shows how this amazing behavior can be improved—and even used to treat injuries and tissue damage.

10h

Hot rocks offer clues to life on 'Snowball Earth'

Iron-rich rocks from ancient glaciers indicate that complex life survived a period called "Snowball Earth" by taking refuge in oxygenated seawater. Researchers Max Lechte of McGill University and Ashleigh Hood and associate professor Malcolm Wallace of the University of Melbourne describe their findings: It's 45 degrees in the Flinders Ranges, South Australia, under a cloudless sky. The landscape

10h

Global carbon emissions growth slows, but hits record high

Coal use is down dramatically in the United States and the European Union, and renewable energy is gaining traction. But rising natural gas and oil use in 2019 increased the world's carbon dioxide emissions modestly for a third straight year.

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Chemistry-Themed Books, 2019

This is the second part of my "gift list" posts, and this one is perhaps more useful for general gift-giving! These will be chemistry-themed books (and related subjects) for a more general readership – no $200 monographs on biophysical methods this time around, although if you think you can give someone one of those without getting things thrown at you, there's always Monday's post. I will start

10h

Unusual X-ray spectral variability observed in NGC 1313 X-1

An ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the NGC 1313 galaxy, known as NGC 1313 X-1, showcases an unusual X-ray spectral variability, according to a new study recently conducted by an international team of astronomers. The finding is reported in a paper published November 21 on arXiv.org.

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Ewoks Are the Most Tactically Advanced Fighting Force in Star Wars

Hate them or love them, the Ewoks have more strategic chops than any military in the Star Wars galaxy.

10h

The Not-Future of Meat

It's not beef. It's not plant protein. It's not … a good idea.

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We Need to Protect Antarctic 'Blue Carbon'

As ice retreats, carbon could be trapped on the seabed for centuries, so long as certain nations can put conservation above commercialization.

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Properties of graphene change due to water and oxygen

Professor Sunmin Ryu and his research team investigated the oxidation-reduction principle of two-dimensional materials by interfacial diffusion.

10h

Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows

North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear to be responses to a warming climate.

10h

Scientists' New Trick Can Tell if an Exoplanet Has an Atmosphere

Actually Earth-like Astronomers are using a new trick to determine whether Earth-like exoplanets outside our solar system have atmospheres or not. The technique basically comes down to measuring the light given off by a planet right before it orbits around behind its host star, according to Gizmodo . By comparing those measurements to the light an exoplanet gives off after it re-emerges, scientis

10h

Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows

North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear to be responses to a warming climate.

10h

How do gut microbes affect norovirus? It depends

Gut microbes can tamp down or boost the severity of norovirus infection depending on the virus's location along the length of the gut, a study with mice shows. The research may offer new routes to possible therapies for norovirus infection . The highly contagious norovirus causes diarrhea and vomiting and is notorious for spreading rapidly through densely populated spaces, such as cruise ships, n

10h

EU-rapport advarer: Miljøtilstanden er forværret

Den hidtil mest omfattende vurdering af miljøet i Europa slår alarm om tab af biodiversitet og overforbrug af naturressourcer.

10h

Researchers discover a new, young volcano in the Pacific

Researchers from Tohoku University have discovered a new petit-spot volcano at the oldest section of the Pacific Plate. The research team, led by Associate Professor Naoto Hirano of the Center for Northeast Asian Studies, published their discovery in the in the journal Deep-Sea Research Part I.

11h

How the U.S. hydrogen bomb secrets disappeared

Given a choice of items to lose on a train, a top-secret document detailing the newly developed hydrogen bomb should be on the bottom of the list. In January 1953, amid the Red Scare and the Korean War, that's exactly what physicist John Archibald Wheeler lost.

11h

Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic

Hokkaido University researchers have developed a hydrogel that does the opposite of what polymer-based materials, like plastic bottles, normally do: their material hardens when heated and softens when cooled. Their findings, published in the journal Advanced Materials, could lead to the fabrication of protective clothing items for traffic and sports-related accidents.

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3-D printing is helping museums in repatriation and decolonization efforts

Manchester Museum recently returned items taken from Australia more than 100 years ago to Aboriginal leaders, the latest move in an ongoing debate over calls to "repatriate" museum artifacts to their countries of origin.

11h

Scientists develop tomographic method to visualize state of 'solitary' electrons

Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), working with the University of Latvia, the University of Berlin, Cambridge University and University College London, have developed a tomographic method to visualize the state of solitary electrons emitted from electron pumps.

11h

Big data toolkit to mine the dark genome for precision medicine

EPFL researchers have developed Big Data tools for identifying new gene functions. The work identifies millions of connections between genes and their functions, and can facilitate the development of precision medicine.

11h

Researchers use sound to deliver drugs

A technique adapted from telecommunications promises more effective cancer treatments.

11h

Star-quake vibrations lead to new estimate for Milky Way age

Data gathered by NASA's now defunct Kepler telescope provides a solution to an astronomical mystery.

11h

Fecal pellets and food remains reveal what ghost bats eat in the Pilbara

UWA, Curtin university and Perth zoo researchers have discovered that Australian endangered ghost bats in the Pilbara (WA) eat over 46 different species.

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Big data toolkit to mine the dark genome for precision medicine

EPFL researchers have developed Big Data tools for identifying new gene functions. The work identifies millions of connections between genes and their functions, and can facilitate the development of precision medicine.

11h

Fecal pellets and food remains reveal what ghost bats eat in the Pilbara

UWA, Curtin university and Perth zoo researchers have discovered that Australian endangered ghost bats in the Pilbara (WA) eat over 46 different species.

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Opinion: Earth's climate needs our courage

Every year, the Global Carbon Project analyses the global sources and sinks of CO2 and their trends. The latest figures, as well as those from the UNEP emission gap report published last week, are disconcerting: global CO2 emissions rose by more than two percent in 2018 relative to the previous year, and further growth is expected for 2019. Four years after the breakthrough at the climate negotiat

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'The message of urgency cannot be overstated,' EU environment body warns

The EU is not on track to meeting the vast majority of environmental targets for 2020—and the outlook for 2030 and 2040 is even bleaker. This is the devastating verdict of the groundbreaking State of the Environment Report 2020 published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA).

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Damaging rains from hurricanes can be more intense after winds subside

Howling wind drives torrential rain sideways as tall, slender palms bow and tree limbs snap. A hurricane approaches, its gale-force winds wreak havoc as it nears the coast. Storm surges combine with the downpour, inundating the area with water.

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Within sight of New York City, an old-growth forest faces storms and sea-level rise

Bounding the southern approach to New York harbor, New Jersey's low, narrow Sandy Hook peninsula is home to an extremely rare forest: a 65-acre patch of eastern holly and red cedar trees, some of which date to the early 1800s. Close to sea level, rooted in nutrient-poor sand and exposed to wind from all directions, such forests once covered much of the East Coast. These few trees have survived the

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Salthalt i havet påverkar jätteostronets skal

Salthalten i våra hav förväntas ändras i takt med globala klimatförändringar. Kustområden, där bland annat jätteostronet lever och odlas, påverkas troligen mest. Lägre salthalt ger ett tunnare skal på ostronen. Det Japanska jätteostronet, Crassostrea gigas, är ursprungligen från västra Stilla Havet. Det är det viktigaste odlade ostronet, i volym och ekonomi, i Europa och världen. – Det japanska o

11h

Greta Thunberg's Atlantic crossing: 'Why I wanted to help'

Nikki Henderson, who helped Greta Thunberg get to Madrid, reveals what happened on their 19-day journey.

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Extra protein probably doesn't benefit everybody

Eating more protein than daily recommendations suggest may only benefit people who are cutting calories to lose weight or strength training to build more lean muscle mass, according to a new study. The study also affirms that the recommended dietary allowance, of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day—or 0.36 grams per pound—is adequate for most people. For example, an adult who

11h

Human Nature review – quiet revolution that began in a yoghurt pot

An engrossing documentary about a breakthrough in molecular biology with enormous implications for treating genetic diseases This documentary from Adam Bolt and Regina Sobel is about a revolution that has been quietly taking place in molecular biology and medicine: a revolution compared here to the invention of the internet but gaining a fraction of the attention. (The more pertinent comparison m

11h

Flying Car Leaders Talk Public Perception at a Secret Summit

At a Texas conference hosted by Ross Perot Jr., air taxi innovators focused on how to get the public onboard with their ideas.

11h

Airbnb Purges More Than Half of Its Boston Listings

The home-sharing service is adopting a more conciliatory tone with local regulators ahead of an expected initial public offering next year.

11h

When I left, you did not ask me to stay

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03689-9 The call of duty.

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Space-funding hike, 'risky' collaborations and a novichok ban

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03697-9 The latest science news, in brief.

11h

Virtual Reality Treatment for PTSD

What does the evidence say about using virtual reality to treat PTSD?

11h

Image of the Day: Snake in Smoke

An image of a Malagasy tree boa wins first place in the British Ecological Society's annual photography competition.

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Research Raises Concerns About Safety Of Hair Dyes, Chemical Straighteners

Researchers have found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products.

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Lægestafetten: Engang var genetikken noget, vi kiggede på til sidst

Teknologien har gjort, at genetiker Anja Lisbeth Frederiksens arbejde går hurtigere og oftere anvendes. Det er personligt og professionelt udfordrende at levere negative beskeder til patienter, men det er en fast del af jobbet.

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Publisher retracts nearly 50 papers at once

A year after retracting 29 papers in one fell swoop, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a scientific society which is also one of the world's largest scientific publishers, is retracting 49 articles from a journal and a conference because of problems in the way they were peer reviewed. In a statement, IEEE … Continue reading

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Women from some under-represented minorities are given too few talks at world's largest Earth-science conference

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03688-w Researchers from racial and ethnic groups that are under-represented in US geoscience are the least likely to be offered opportunities to speak at the field's biggest meeting.

12h

Better breastfeeding experiences make for a more productive office

Offices that create better access to breastfeeding facilities can perform better overall, according to new research CU Boulder's Leeds School of Business contributed to.

12h

Catherine Verfaillie, the Zombie Scientist of KU Leuven

Catherine Verfaillie is a zombie scientist: her past stem cell research long discredited, but she still is an influential and very well funded star of Belgian science. Now Elisabeth Bik had a fresh new look at Verfaillie's papers

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Study reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins

Antarctic penguins have been on the forefront of climate change, experiencing massive changes to their natural habitat as the world's temperatures and human activity in the region have increased. Now, new research has revealed how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

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Study reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins

Antarctic penguins have been on the forefront of climate change, experiencing massive changes to their natural habitat as the world's temperatures and human activity in the region have increased. Now, new research has revealed how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

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Teaching Self-Driving Cars to Watch for Unpredictable Humans

You drive differently for Sunday errands than when you're late to pick up the kids. Researchers are teaching robots how to grapple with that.

12h

Not Everything in Disney's Vault Is as Good as You Remember

Disney+ gives streaming subscribers access to nearly all of the classic back catalog, but not all of the old movies stand the test of time.

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Facebook's Head of AI Says the Field Will Soon 'Hit the Wall'

Jerome Pesenti is encouraged by progress in artificial intelligence, but sees the limits of the current approach to deep learning.

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It Takes a "Surgeon" to Cut a Building's Emissions

Large structures are unique and complex, much like human bodies, and making them healthier requires true expertise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Organisationer efter finanslov uden flyafgifter: Så skal de med i klimaplan

PLUS. Ifølge Klimarådet er flyafgifterne det bedste instrument lige nu. Uden dem har flybranchen mere favorable vilkår end den øvrige transportsektor.

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How a shopping trip becomes a guilt trip—and then a vicious cycle

The timing of Giving Tuesday, coined "a global generosity movement," is ideal. Monday having already been claimed (by online retailers, in the form of Cyber Monday), the Tuesday after Thanksgiving is the closest charitable organizations can get to the fallout of all the spending over the weekend, catching consumers—and their wallets—when they need redemption most.

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Image: A cloudy martian night through the eyes of a supercomputer

As NASA's Curiosity rover makes its way over the surface of Mars, it's sometimes accompanied by clouds drifting by in the sky above. Like Earth, the Red Planet has a water cycle, with water molecules moving between the surface and the air, traveling through the atmosphere and coming together to form clouds. The behavior of water-ice clouds on Mars plays a big role in its climate, and this computer

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New technology for protein bioconjugation and structural proteomics

Researchers at the Czech Academy of Sciences and the Brno-based start-up CF Plus Chemicals, a spin-off of ETH Zurich, has reported a new technology called CF LINK for site-selective bioconjugation of proteins and their structural characterization. The technology can selectively prepare protein conjugates via their tryptophan residues and perform post-translational modification of aromatic amino ac

12h

The Wonder of Fire Without Gravity

A fire on the International Space Station, high above Earth and far from help, could be catastrophic, even deadly. Space agencies try to reduce the risk as much as possible. The station is equipped with smoke detectors, and astronauts practice fire drills. But astronauts have been setting fires in space for years. On purpose! They do it in the name of science, at the careful instruction of resear

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It Takes a "Surgeon" to Cut a Building's Emissions

Large structures are unique and complex, much like human bodies, and making them healthier requires true expertise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Global CO2-udledning stiger igen til rekordhøjt niveau

Vi har brug for bedre energieffektivitet, hurtigere elektrificering, mindre forbrug og udvikling af teknologi til at opsamle CO2, hvis vi skal udligne den stigende udledning af CO2, skriver forskere bag ny rapport. Urealistisk, mener dansk topforsker.

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Black Hole Factories May Hide at Cores of Giant Galaxies

Gravitational-wave astronomers are probing the origins of abnormally massive black holes—and with them, the inner workings of their colossal galactic homes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Black Hole Factories May Hide at Cores of Giant Galaxies

Gravitational-wave astronomers are probing the origins of abnormally massive black holes—and with them, the inner workings of their colossal galactic homes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Finanslov giver penge til øget nummerpladegenkendelse i trafikken

Det er blevet vedtaget, at flere af de såkaldte automatisk nummerpladegenkendelseskameraer, ANPG, skal hjælpe politiet fra 2021. Allerede i oktober kom der et forslag om at øge overvågningen i Danmark – her var øget overvågning af trafikken også med.

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The Ohio abortion bill is a terrifying sign of things to come | Jill Filipovic

This dystopian bill would punish abortion with prison, and even death – and it's where the United States is heading It would almost be funny if it weren't real: a bill introduced in Ohio that would require doctors to attempt to re-implant ectopic pregnancies – a medical impossibility – or face charges of "abortion murder" (a legal invention). Related: Ohio bill orders doctors to 'reimplant ectopi

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What skills will set you apart in the age of automation?

In a rapidly changing work world it's critical to continue evolving your skills — this is especially true as automation's presence in the workforce increases. Robots are good at working off of knowledge that we already know, however, they aren't that great when it comes to developing original ideas. Though robots are good at jobs founded on patterns and data points, they currently don't excel whe

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Progressives Have Short Memories

A bitter irony underlies Kamala Harris's exit from the presidential campaign. She lost, in part, because she couldn't forthrightly defend her record as a prosecutor. She couldn't forthrightly defend that record because party activists deemed it insufficiently progressive. They portrayed her as complicit in the unjust incarceration and killing of black and Latino men. Yet had Harris—especially as

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All the President's Crooks

The first House member to endorse Donald Trump, Chris Collins of New York, pleaded guilty to insider-trading charges on October 1, 2019. The second House Trump endorser, Duncan Hunter of California, pleaded guilty to criminal misuse of campaign funds yesterday. Is a pattern emerging? The third House member to endorse Donald Trump was Representative Tom Marino of Pennsylvania. Trump thanked Marino

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The Obscure—but Critical—Rules the Trump Administration Has Sought to Corrupt

In January 1981, I was a few years out of law school and a career government lawyer—that is, not a political appointee. Although I had been (and still am) a lifelong Democrat, fate and the Reagan administration had conspired to hand me a dream professional assignment: I had joined the legal team as a junior member providing advice on the development of the most significant institutional innovatio

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How to Revive Madison's Constitution

"The aim of every political constitution is, or ought to be, first to obtain for rulers men who possess most wisdom to discern, and most virtue to pursue, the common good of the society," James Madison wrote in "Federalist No. 57," "and in the next place, to take the most effectual precautions for keeping them virtuous whilst they continue to hold their public trust." Recognizing that men are not

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Why White-Collar Workers Spend All Day at the Office

This is not a matter of opinion so much as a factual point of international comparison. The average American worker labors more hours than her counterparts in just about every similarly rich country, including Japan, Canada, and the United Kingdom. If the average American worked as much as the typical German, she'd have about 30 extra days off per year. That's a free six-week vacation in exchange

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Fighting fire with science

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03747-2 Wildfires are becoming more and more frequent around the world, making expertise in the field a hot commodity.

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The French Fries Are Doing Just Fine

After a weak harvest for many potato farmers in the United States and Canada, there were concerns about shortages of the fast food staple. But supplies aren't likely to run out anytime soon.

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Climate Change Is Accelerating, Bringing World 'Dangerously Close' to Irreversible Change

The acceleration climate change's effects have brought the world "dangerously close" to abrupt and irreversible changes, scientists warned.

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Listen to a bendy audio speaker made from liquid heavy metal

A loudspeaker made from heavy metal that works when bent brings us one step closer to audio devices that can be worn directly on the skin

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For HIV-Positive Babies, New Evidence Favors Starting Drug Treatment Just After Birth

Doctors used to worry that antiretroviral drugs were too powerful for HIV-positive newborns. More evidence is emerging that, in fact, early treatment can be safe and effective. (Image credit: Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images)

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Food for thought about manipulating gut bacteria

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03704-z Knowing how dietary fibre nourishes gut microorganisms might suggest ways to boost health-promoting bacteria. A method developed to pinpoint bacteria that consume particular types of dietary fibre could advance such efforts.

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PODD: Forskning om gott åldrande

Vilka riskfaktorer förklarar varför vi insjuknar i olika sjukdomar när vi åldras? Åldras en del snabbare än andra? Och vad påverkar ens upplevelse av livskvalitet? I dagens podd träffar vi Sölve Elmståhl, överläkare och geriatriker på Skånes universitetssjukhus och professor vid Lunds universitet. Han ansvarar för befolkningsstudien Gott Åldrande i Skåne.

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Lektor i sundhedsret: Apotekere må gerne tilbyde vaccination

Sundhedsloven giver apotekere ret til at vaccinere borgere mod f.eks. influenza, så længe Sundhedsstyrelsen har vurderet deres habilitet og givet tilladelse hertil. Det vurderer lektor i sundhedsret, trods praksislæge ikke ser en lovhjemmel.

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Mapping the energy transport mechanism of chalcogenide perovskite for solar energy use

Researchers from Lehigh University have, for the first time, revealed first-hand knowledge about the fundamental energy carrier properties of chalcogenide perovskite CaZrSe3, important for potential solar energy use. They have published their findings in NPJ Computational Materials.

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Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain

Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe that this holds true for all mammals.

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Mobile stroke units could expedite treatment and improve patient outcomes in urban areas

Stroke patients received time-sensitive, lifesaving treatment approximately 30 minutes faster via an ambulance specially designed to treat stroke called a Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU).Patients diagnosed and treated in an MSU received stroke care faster, even in a densely populated city such as New York City, where this study was conducted.

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Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users

Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study.

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Brachytherapy proves effective in treating skin cancer

The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy to treat elderly patients with common skin cancers offers excellent cure rates and cosmetic outcomes, according to a new study.

14h

Wankelmotoren gør comeback – som miljøalibi

PLUS. Kan den udskældte rotationsmotor være det, verden har brug for i de kommende år? Det mener Mazda – og de har flere gode argumenter.

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Expensive treatments for genetic disorders are arriving. But who should foot the bill?

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03709-8 The majority of people with sickle-cell disease are live in the world's poorest communities and cannot afford the eye-watering costs of treatments.

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Gene therapy is facing its biggest challenge yet

Nature, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03698-8 After finally gaining traction as a potential treatment for certain genetic disorders, gene therapy tackles the challenge of sickle-cell disease.

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Epidemic dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus in current and future climates

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13562-y Climate affects dynamics of infectious diseases, but the impact on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology isn't well understood. Here, Baker et al. model the influence of temperature, humidity and rainfall on RSV epidemiology in the USA and Mexico and predict impact of climate change on RSV dynamics.

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Dynamic and tunable metabolite control for robust minimal-equipment assessment of serum zinc

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13454-1 Tightly controlling cell output is challenging, which has limited development and applications of bacterial sensors. Here the authors develop tunable, fast-responding sensors to control production of metabolic pigments and use them to assess zinc deficiency in a low-cost, minimal equipment fashion.

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Renewed proliferation in adult mouse cochlea and regeneration of hair cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13157-7 The adult mammalian inner ear cells cannot regenerate nor proliferate. Here, the authors show that co-activation of Myc and NOTCH pathways can stimulate proliferation of inner ear sensory epithelial cells, which can be induced to become hair cell-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

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Individual face- and house-related eye movement patterns distinctively activate FFA and PPA

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13541-3 The fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area respond to face and scene stimuli respectively. Here, the authors show using fMRI that these brain areas are also preferentially activated by eye movements associated with looking at faces and scenes even when no images are shown.

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Carbon-nanotube reinforcement of DNA-silica nanocomposites yields programmable and cell-instructive biocoatings

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13381-1 DNA composite materials have potential for biomedical sciences; however, control over the materials can be an issue. Here, the authors report on a carbon-nanotube reinforced DNA-silica gel with controllable mechanical properties to steer the attachment, proliferation, migration and release of cells.

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Author Correction: Stronger zonal convective clustering associated with a wider tropical rain belt

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13645-w

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