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nyheder2019december05

Recordings reveal that plants make ultrasonic squeals when stressed

For the first time plants have been recorded making sounds when stressed. The sounds differed when they were injured or thirsty, a finding that could help farmers

3h

Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes

Once, single-cell life claimed sole dominion over the earth. For some three billion years, unfathomable generations of unicellular organisms ate, grew and reproduced among only each other. They evolved into predators and prey, thrived and spread across the primordial waters and land, and formed complex and dynamic ecosystems in every ecological niche on the planet. Around 600 million years ago, so

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Comparative analysis of squamate brains unveils multi-level variation in cerebellar architecture associated with locomotor specialization

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13405-w The cerebellum is critical in sensory-motor control and is structurally diverse across vertebrates. Here, the authors investigate the evolutionary relationship between locomotory mode and cerebellum architecture across squamates by integrating study of gene expression, cell distribution, and 3D morphology.

9h

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events

Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space.

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As China rapidly adopts clean energy, use of traditional stoves persists

Old habits are hard to break. A McGill-led study of replacement of traditional wood and coal burning stoves with clean energy in China suggests that, without a better understanding of the reasons behind people's reluctance to give up traditional stoves, it will be difficult for policies in China and elsewhere in the world to succeed in encouraging this shift towards clean energy. The study was pub

8min

Behavioral interventions may be as effective at reducing food intake as anorectic drugs

Simulations predict that behavioral interventions such as imposing strict no-food restrictions after meals can be as effective as strong anorectic drugs in reducing food intake in rodents, according to a study published Dec. 5 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Tom McGrath, Kevin Murphy and Nick Jones of Imperial College London, and colleagues.

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Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion

, and this information transfer is at least partially mediated by a brain region called the anterior cingulate cortex, according to a study published Dec. 5 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Christian Keysers of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues.

8min

New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules

A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province.

8min

Technique shows how individual cancer cells react to drugs

sci-Plex, a new cell-response screening method, pools genetically different cells and shows what happens to individual cells when the sample is treated, such as with cancer drugs. The technology collects information on changes in genetic expression in each labeled cell, providing data useful in exploring mechanisms triggered by drugs or other agents.

8min

Three types of cells help the brain tell day from night

Researchers at the Salk Institute report the discovery of three cell types in the eye that detect light and align the brain's circadian rhythm to our ambient light. The study marks the first direct assessment in humans of light responses from these cells, called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) — and the implications for health are substantial.

8min

Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up

Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research.

8min

Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered

A fundamental change in our understanding of the childhood kidney cancer Wilms' tumor is on the horizon, after the discovery of its earliest genetic root by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. By comparing genome sequences from normal kidney tissue and tumors, the team identified patches of normal-looking kidney tissue that in fact carried DNA changes that cause Wi

8min

Forest fragmentation hits wildlife hardest in the tropics

Animals that evolved in environments subject to large-scale habitat-altering events like fires and storms are better equipped to handle forest fragmentation caused by human development than species in low-disturbance environments.

8min

Animals that evolved in low-disturbance areas more 'sensitive' to modern disruption

Animal species that have evolved, and survived, in low-disturbance environments — with little interruption from glaciation, fires, hurricanes, or anthropogenic clearing — are more sensitive to modern forest fragmentation, report Matthew Betts and colleagues.

8min

New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution

Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study.

8min

OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu

Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. The images offer a detailed look at small-scale mass loss events on an active asteroid, whereas before, observations have been limited to only the largest phenomena.

8min

Biochemical model enhances power to predict MicroRNA targeting

Through millions of affinity measurements, researchers have developed a biochemical model that reveals novel insights into microRNAs, which function in part to silence gene expression, but other biological functions of which are unknown.

8min

Immune system can be coaxed into selecting key antibodies to fight HIV

Researchers have cleared a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine, proving in animal models that effective, yet short-lasting antibodies can be coaxed into multiplying as a fighting force against the virus

8min

The tangled tale of Kilaueas 2018 eruption as told by geochemical monitoring

Changes in magma chemistry that affect eruptive behavior occur during many volcanic eruptions, but typical analytical techniques are too slow to contribute to hazard monitoring. We used rapid energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis to measure diagnostic elements in lava samples within a few hours of collection during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. The geochemical data provided important informa

10min

Magma reservoir failure and the onset of caldera collapse at Kilauea Volcano in 2018

Caldera-forming eruptions are among Earth's most hazardous natural phenomena, yet the architecture of subcaldera magma reservoirs and the conditions that trigger collapse are poorly understood. Observations from the formation of a 0.8–cubic kilometer basaltic caldera at Kīlauea Volcano in 2018 included the draining of an active lava lake, which provided a window into pressure decrease in the rese

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News at a glance

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Ready to retire?

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Folding unpredicted

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Editor's Note

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Tracking excitations

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Here comes the flood

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Epigenetic plasticity

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Stem cell-driven lymphatic remodeling coordinates tissue regeneration

Tissues rely on stem cells (SCs) for homeostasis and wound repair. SCs reside in specialized microenvironments (niches) whose complexities and roles in orchestrating tissue growth are still unfolding. Here, we identify lymphatic capillaries as critical SC-niche components. In skin, lymphatics form intimate networks around hair follicle (HF) SCs. When HFs regenerate, lymphatic–SC connections becom

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Electrical and optical control of single spins integrated in scalable semiconductor devices

Spin defects in silicon carbide have the advantage of exceptional electron spin coherence combined with a near-infrared spin-photon interface, all in a material amenable to modern semiconductor fabrication. Leveraging these advantages, we integrated highly coherent single neutral divacancy spins in commercially available p-i-n structures and fabricated diodes to modulate the local electrical envi

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Direct determination of mode-projected electron-phonon coupling in the time domain

Ultrafast spectroscopies have become an important tool for elucidating the microscopic description and dynamical properties of quantum materials. In particular, by tracking the dynamics of nonthermal electrons, a material's dominant scattering processes can be revealed. Here, we present a method for extracting the electron-phonon coupling strength in the time domain, using time- and angle-resolve

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Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals

Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity—affected by avoidance of habitat edges—should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary responses to disturbance. Using a database containing

10min

Ultrafast stimulated emission microscopy of single nanocrystals

Single-molecule detection is a powerful method used to distinguish different species and follow time trajectories within the ensemble average. However, such detection capability requires efficient emitters and is prone to photobleaching, and the slow, nanosecond spontaneous emission process only reports on the lowest excited state. We demonstrate direct detection of stimulated emission from indiv

10min

Transmitting the quantum state of electrons across a metallic island with Coulomb interaction

The Coulomb interaction generally limits the quantum propagation of electrons. However, it can also provide a mechanism to transfer their quantum state over larger distances. Here, we demonstrate such a form of electron teleportation across a metallic island. This effect originates from the low-temperature freezing of the island's charge which, in the presence of a single connected electronic cha

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Embryonal precursors of Wilms tumor

Adult cancers often arise from premalignant clonal expansions. Whether the same is true of childhood tumors has been unclear. To investigate whether Wilms tumor (nephroblastoma; a childhood kidney cancer) develops from a premalignant background, we examined the phylogenetic relationship between tumors and corresponding normal tissues. In 14 of 23 cases studied (61%), we found premalignant clonal

10min

Functional diversity of human intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are a subset of cells that participate in image-forming and non–image-forming visual responses. Although both functional and morphological subtypes of ipRGCs have been described in rodents, parallel functional subtypes have not been identified in primate or human retinas. In this study, we used a human organ donor preparation method to

10min

Design of an in vitro biocatalytic cascade for the manufacture of islatravir

Enzyme-catalyzed reactions have begun to transform pharmaceutical manufacturing, offering levels of selectivity and tunability that can dramatically improve chemical synthesis. Combining enzymatic reactions into multistep biocatalytic cascades brings additional benefits. Cascades avoid the waste generated by purification of intermediates. They also allow reactions to be linked together to overcom

10min

Structures of the AMPA receptor in complex with its auxiliary subunit cornichon

In the brain, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) form complexes with their auxiliary subunits and mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission. Signals transduced by these complexes are critical for synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. The two major categories of AMPAR auxiliary subunits are transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) and cornichon homologs (CNIHs); the

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New Products

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A mother's guilt

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Episodes of particle ejection from the surface of the active asteroid (101955) Bennu

Active asteroids are those that show evidence of ongoing mass loss. We report repeated instances of particle ejection from the surface of (101955) Bennu, demonstrating that it is an active asteroid. The ejection events were imaged by the OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security–Regolith Explorer) spacecraft. For the three largest observed events, we esti

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A generalized HIV vaccine design strategy for priming of broadly neutralizing antibody responses

Vaccine induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to HIV remains a major challenge. Germline-targeting immunogens hold promise for initiating the induction of certain bnAb classes; yet for most bnAbs, a strong dependence on antibody heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) is a major barrier. Exploiting ultradeep human antibody sequencing data, we identified a diverse s

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Comment on "The role of electron-electron interactions in two-dimensional Dirac fermions"

Tang et al . (Research Articles, 10 August 2018, p. 570) report on the properties of Dirac fermions with both on-site and Coulomb interactions. The substantial decrease, up to ~40%, of the Fermi velocity of Dirac fermions with on-site interaction is inconsistent with the numerical data near the Gross-Neveu quantum critical point. This results from an inappropriate finite-size extrapolation.

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Response to Comment on "The role of electron-electron interactions in two-dimensional Dirac fermions"

Hesselmann et al . question one of our conclusions: the suppression of Fermi velocity at the Gross-Neveu critical point for the specific case of vanishing long-range interactions and at zero energy. The possibility they raise could occur in any finite-size extrapolation of numerical data. Although we cannot definitively rule out this possibility, we provide mathematical bounds on its likelihood.

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Cyclic lava effusion during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea Volcano

Lava flows present a recurring threat to communities on active volcanoes, and volumetric eruption rate is one of the primary factors controlling flow behavior and hazard. The time scales and driving forces of eruption rate variability, however, remain poorly understood. In 2018, a highly destructive eruption occurred on the lower flank of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, where the primary vent exhibited

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*Watchmen* Is Finally Being Called a Hit

Likely thanks to a lot of online discussion, the HBO drama is amassing pretty good viewership numbers.

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Biogen divulges more data on Alzheimer's trials

Biotech's shares fluctuate as it tries to win over sceptics of aducanumab

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Tracking excitations

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Here comes the flood

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Monthly Contraceptive Pill Shows Promise in Pig Study

A device that releases synthetic hormones slowly over time could one day provide a more practical alternative to daily birth control pills, say scientists.

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Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up

Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research.

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New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules

A joint research team led by Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Meng Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province.

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Sygehuslærere er vigtig brik i ­udredning af børn

Nedskæringer i de tværfaglige teams på hospitalerne har gjort, at skolelærernes bidrag i udredningen af børn med socialpædiatriske problemstillinger er endnu vigtigere, mener formand for Dansk Pædiatrisk Selskab.

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The Evolutionary Breakthrough That Gave Mammals Their Hearing

A hundred and twenty million years ago, when northeastern China was a series of lakes and erupting volcanoes, there lived a tiny mammal just a few inches long. When it died, it was fossilized down to its most miniscule ear bones . And it is these ear bones that have so intrigued scientists: They are evidence of how evolution created the unique ear of mammals, giving modern mammals—including us—a

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With Shovels and Drones, Volcano Hunters Probe Kilauea

New studies reveal inner workings of the massive 2018 Hawaiian flow—the "Super Bowl" of eruptions

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No One Knows Why Rocks Are Exploding From Asteroid Bennu

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft spotted the asteroid spitting out rocks—more evidence that these alien worlds aren't so inert after all.

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Now Hear This: New Fossils Reveal Early Ear-Bone Evolution

A change in chewing led to the emergence of the mammalian middle ear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The 2018 Eruption of Kīlauea Might Show That It's Easier to Collapse a Volcano Than We Thought

The remarkable 2018 eruption at Kīlauea disgorged over a cubic kilometer of lava and collapsed the volcano's summit.

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Chinese 23andMe Knockoff Gives Different Results From 23andMe

23Mofang, a Chinese DNA testing startup that's highly similar to 23andMe — down to its name — is giving customers some interesting results. Notably, it totally missed Bloomberg reporter K. Oanh Ha's predominately Vietnamese heritage. That's because the company relies entirely on a pool of genetic data from Chinese participants, according to Bloomberg , so ancestry reports only trace people's DNA

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Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up

Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research.

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'Stomach-ache' neurons rush to the rescue when bacteria invade

Nature, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03725-8 Gut neurons that trigger unpleasant symptoms also rally the body's defenses against Salmonella.

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Now that's an active asteroid

OSIRIS-Rex catches Bennu throwing rocks around.

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Tropical species more sensitive to deforestation

Geography must guide conservation planning, study suggests.

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Weight lifting made easy

Study suggests using bamboo poles to carry loads is integral to creating a safer, more practical world.

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Playing ukulele in the key of 3D

Early attempt to print an instrument falls short of the real thing.

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New clues to the Milky Way's age

Star-quake vibrations suggest 'thick disc' is 10 billion years old.

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A biology boost

Assistance during the first years of a biology major leads to higher retention of first-generation students.

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Now Hear This: New Fossils Reveal Early Ear-Bone Evolution

A change in chewing led to the emergence of the mammalian middle ear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Metalenses in focus

Engineers work at the nanoscale to make them bigger.

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Coral meals come with side order of microplastics

Researchers have found that some corals are more likely to eat microplastics when they consume other food, but they don't have a taste microplastics alone. Two coral species tested responded differently to the synthetic material, suggesting variations in how corals adapt to life with microplastics, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports . Tiny microplastic particles are about as

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Nearly a Third of Teens Use One or More Tobacco Products

While e-cigarettes are still the most popular, teens are also using other items like little flavored cigars — a worrisome sign for nicotine addiction, the C.D.C. says.

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California Bans Insurers From Dropping Policies Made Riskier by Climate Change

The state's unusual decision exposes the insurance industry's miscalculation of the cost of climate change.

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2019 in Photos: Wrapping Up the Year

As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2019. Events covered in this essay (the last of a three-part photo summary of the year) include pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong, anti-government protests in Chile and Iraq, a toxic sky over New Delhi, an all-female team of spacewalkers, a planned "storming" of Area 51, the aftermath

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How Studying Bioluminescent Creatures Is Transforming Medical Science

The natural light of insects and sea creatures can help doctors illuminate H.I.V. and even kill cancer cells

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SpaceX launches caring robot, beer malt and 'mighty mice'

SpaceX launched a 3-ton shipment to the International Space Station on Thursday, including "mighty mice" for a muscle study, a robot sensitive to astronauts' emotions and a miniature version of a brewery's malt house.

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Physical forces affect bacteria's toxin resistance, study finds

A random conversation between two Cornell researchers at a child's birthday party led to a collaboration and new understanding of how bacteria resist toxins, which may lead to new tools in the fight against harmful infections.

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Physical forces affect bacteria's toxin resistance, study finds

A random conversation between two Cornell researchers at a child's birthday party led to a collaboration and new understanding of how bacteria resist toxins, which may lead to new tools in the fight against harmful infections.

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How flowers adapt to their pollinators

The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. They are the most diverse plant group on Earth with more than 300,000 species. Evolutionary biologists have now analyzed 3-dimensional models of flowers and found that flower shapes can evolve in a modular manner in adaptation to distinct pollinators.

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Damaging rains from hurricanes more intense after winds begin to subside

Howling wind drives torrential rain sideways as tall, slender palms bow and tree limbs snap. A hurricane approaches, its gale-force winds wreaking havoc as it nears the coast. Storm surges combine with the downpour, inundating the area with water.

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A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

Move over Godzilla vs. King Kong—this is the crossover event you've been waiting for. Well, at least if you're a condensed matter physicist. Harvard University researchers have demonstrated the first material that can have both strongly correlated electron interactions and topological properties. Not entirely sure what that means? Don't worry, we'll walk you through it. All you need to know right

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Uber Admits It Didn't Let Drivers Use Employee Bathrooms

Two Classes Uber has repeatedly argued that its drivers are independent contractors rather than employees — a distinction that lets the company get away with not paying them an hourly wage or providing them with benefits. And it now seems Uber's efforts to make sure drivers know they're not employees even extends — bizarrely — to where they're allowed to use the bathroom. Very Strange Uber operat

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A Comet From Another Star Hints That Our Solar System Isn't One-Of-A-Kind

The comet, 2I/Borisov, looks surprisingly like comets closer to home. It's a sign that the processes that formed the sun and planets are at work elsewhere in the universe. (Image credit: NASA, ESA and D. Jewitt (UCLA))

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A momentous view on the birth of photoelectrons

The creation of photoelectrons through ionisation is one of the most fundamental processes in the interaction between light and matter. Yet, deep questions remain about just how photons transfer their linear momentum to electrons. With the first sub-femtosecond study of the linear photon momentum transfer during an ionisation process, ETH physicists provide now unprecedented insight into the birth

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Microwave treatment is an inexpensive way to clean heavy metals from treated sewage

A team of Florida State University researchers studying new methods to remove toxic heavy metals from biosolids—the solid waste left over after sewage treatment—found the key is a brief spin through a microwave.

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Our french fry supply is safe for now, but the future is uncertain

Our french fry stores are resilient. (DepositPhoto/) Potatoes: boil 'em, mash 'em, stick 'em in a stew . Or don't, because they're in dangerously short supply. A late start to the growing season combined with an unusually cold, wet autumn damaged potato crops in the US and Canada, leaving french fry makers hunting around for spuds with which to make their wares. But don't get too worried. Experts

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Two of the biggest US earthquake faults might be linked

Nature, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03769-w Provocative analysis of sea-floor cores suggests that quakes on the Cascadia fault off California can trigger tremors on the San Andreas.

1h

An Artist-in-Residence Creates a Sense of Place

We've seen artist-in-residence programs in a number of the towns we've visited. The first was in Eastport, Maine, where we ran into Richelle Gribble , a young artist based in Los Angeles, whom I consider an resident-artist extraordinaire. Over the past three and a half years, Richelle (as I'll refer to her) has been an artist-in-residence in 15 different programs around the world, from a biospher

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NASA finds tropical cyclone 02S consolidating

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical cyclone 02S and the visible image showed that the storm was getting better organized.

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A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the world's most intractable pollutants

A cluster of industrial chemicals known by the shorthand term "PFAS" has infiltrated the far reaches of our planet with significance that scientists are only beginning to understand.

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NASA tracking Tropical Storm 06A through Arabian Sea

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Arabian Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm 06A, now renamed Tropical Storm Pawan.

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Can Arctic 'ice management' combat climate change?

According to a much-debated geo-engineering approach, both sea-ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by using millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter. AWI researchers have now, for the first time, tested the concept using a complex climate model and published their findings in the journal Earth's Future. Their verdict is s

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NASA analyzes Kammuri's heavy rainfall

NASA provided analyses of Typhoon Kammuri's heavy rainfall on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean using the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite.

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Immune checkpoint therapy for ER+ breast cancers, a missed opportunity?

A subset of endocrine therapy-resistant luminal B breast cancers activates immune responses that could be amenable to manipulation with immunotherapy.

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How flowers adapt to their pollinators

Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or rodents. Although several studies have documented that pollinators can impose strong selection pressures on flowers, our understanding o

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Research shows that using green products leads to a warm glow in shoppers

Canadians spend a lot of money around this time of year, on gifts, food, entertainment and travel. In its annual study of holiday season spending habits, the accounting firm PwC estimates that the average Canadian consumer will drop close to $1,600 in 2019.

1h

Team pinpoints how the body repairs damage to DNA

Researchers have identified how damaged DNA molecules get repaired inside the human genome. The discovery offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA. "Our findings show that a DNA repair process is very robust, engineered through intricate structural and dynamical signatures where breaks occur," explains senior auth

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How flowers adapt to their pollinators

Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or rodents. Although several studies have documented that pollinators can impose strong selection pressures on flowers, our understanding o

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Can Arctic 'ice management' combat climate change?

According to a much-debated geo-engineering approach, both sea-ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by using millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter.

1h

Changing wildfires in the California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks

Research suggests fire, as it becomes more frequent and severe, poses a substantial risk to goshawks in the Sierra Nevada region.

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Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming

Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects — a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals.

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Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction

The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a new study.

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Space budget boost puts Europe in lead to monitor carbon from space

Funding increase for ESA's Copernicus program advances satellites to monitor Paris accord cuts

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Gene-Hacking Company Says It Can Slow Your Aging for $1 Million

A biotech firm called Libella Gene Therapeutics claims that the genetic treatment it's currently developing can reverse aging by as many as 20 years. For an eye-popping price of $1 million, the company will offer an experimental treatment to elderly customers that the company says will extend their telomeres — structures that sit at the end of our chromosomes like protective caps, but gradually s

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What Foods Can Help Prevent Alzheimer's?

It's not quite clear, but a generally healthy diet is the best advice.

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Har Penrose fundet Hawkingstråling fra et tidligere Univers?

PLUS. En af den matematiske fysiks fremmeste har gennem mange år fremført sin halvfærdige teori om et cyklisk univers. I sidste uge var Roger Penrose i København.

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Now iPhone Users Can Tap Waymo's Self-Driving Ride-Hail App

The Google sibling says it has 1,500 monthly riders, including some who are chauffeured without a human backup driver.

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Physical forces affect bacteria's toxin resistance, study finds

A random conversation between two Cornell researchers at a child's birthday party led to a collaboration and new understanding of how bacteria resist toxins, which may lead to new tools in the fight against harmful infections.

1h

'Virtual biopsy' allows doctors to accurately diagnose precancerous pancreatic cysts

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds a new diagnostic method that provides doctors with a 'virtual biopsy' that allows them to definitively diagnose cysts in the pancreas and eliminate those that pose a risk of cancer.

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Next generation of CAR-T cells possible

A new approach to programing cancer-fighting immune cells called CAR-T cells can prolong their activity and increase their effectiveness against human cancer cells grown in the laboratory and in mice, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Stanford scientists reliably predict people's age by measuring proteins in blood

Protein levels in people's blood can predict their age, a Stanford study has found. The study also found that aging isn't a smoothly continuous process.

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Er det vores solsystems skæbne? Døende stjerne river kæmpeplanet i stykker

Første planet i kredsløb om hvid dværgstjerne kan give indblik i vores fremtid.

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Climate Change Linked to Shrinking Bird Sizes: Study

The animals have a smaller body mass, shorter legs, and longer wings than they did four decades ago.

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Lake methane emissions should prompt rethink on climate change

Study sheds new light on the impact of natural methane production on global climate change assessments.

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New, young volcano discovered in the Pacific

Researchers have discovered a new petit-spot volcano at the oldest section of the Pacific Plate.

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Scientists devise catalyst that uses light to turn carbon dioxide to fuel

Scientists have used sunlight and a catalyst largely made of copper to transform carbon dioxide to methanol.

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Climate Models Got It Right on Global Warming

Even models in the 1970s accurately predicted the relationship between greenhouse gas emissions and temperature rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Porösa polymerer stabila som sjutton

Umeåfysiker Alexandr Talyzin i samarbete med Technical University of Dresden och Chalmers University är först med att visa på hög stabilitet hos det porösa nanomaterialet COFs. Studien är publicerad i Angewandte Chemie. Det porösa nanomaterial som kallas COFs (Covalent Organic Frameworks) är en bred familj av polymerer bestående av endast lätta grundämnen. Frånvaron av metallatomer i sin struktur

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New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application

Potatoes are important. They rank fourth among the world's staple crops. In the United States, they are grown commercially in 30 states and valued at $4 billion annually. Potatoes are also susceptible to 160 different fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases, such as blackleg and soft rot diseases, which are caused by the bacterium Dickeya dianthicola.

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New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application

Potatoes are important. They rank fourth among the world's staple crops. In the United States, they are grown commercially in 30 states and valued at $4 billion annually. Potatoes are also susceptible to 160 different fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases, such as blackleg and soft rot diseases, which are caused by the bacterium Dickeya dianthicola.

1h

Permanent hair dye and straighteners may increase breast cancer risk

Scientists found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products. The study suggests that breast cancer risk increased with more frequent use of these chemical hair products.

1h

Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users

Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study.

1h

Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain

Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe that this holds true for all mammals.

1h

Former Content Moderators Sue Facebook for Giving Them PTSD

As a content moderator for Facebook, it was literally Dublin resident Chris Gray's job to watch child abuse, animal torture, and executions — disturbing imagery that left his mental health in shambles. "You would wake up and you're remembering the video of someone machine-gunning people in the Middle East somewhere," he told The Guardian , "trying to think whether there was an ISIS flag, and so w

1h

Daily briefing: Climate-change models stand the test of time

Nature, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03777-w Most forecasts published between 1970 and 2007 did a good job of predicting global warming. Plus: NASA's daring solar probe discovers the secrets of the solar wind and cell biologists visualize a world of a thousand dimensions.

1h

New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application

'We hope Uniqprimer and the tests it designed will aid in the accurate detection of D. dianthicola and many other pathogens,' said lead author Shaista Karim. 'Accurate pathogen detection is the first step for management of a disease, which helps in reducing the losses in the potato industry and informing the farmers in a timely manner to better aid on-farm decision making.'

1h

Gay, bisexual men increasingly agree: HIV 'undetectable equals untransmittable'

Extensive evidence from HIV prevention research studies has firmly established that 'Undetectable Equals Untransmittable,' or U=U. This means that people living with HIV who achieve and maintain an undetectable viral load–the amount of virus in their blood–by taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) as prescribed do not sexually transmit HIV to others. The CDC estimates this strategy is 100% effectiv

1h

NASA finds tropical cyclone 02S consolidating

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical cyclone 02S and the visible image showed that the storm was getting better organized.

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What does DNA's repair shop look like? New research identifies the tools

A team of scientists has identified how damaged DNA molecules are repaired inside the human genome, a discovery that offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA.

1h

PET scans show Transcendental Meditation with cardiac rehabilitation increases blood flow to the heart

Study finds coronary heart disease (CHD) patients who include Transcendental Meditation (TM) with cardiac rehabilitation (CR) increased blood flow to the heart by 20.7%. This was the first study to show TM significantly enhanced lifestyle modification in patients, and the first to use positron emission tomography (PET) to measure their effect on cardiac function and rehabilitation. The NIH-funded

1h

Chronic disease prevention could ease opioid crisis

Preventing chronic disease could help curb the opioid epidemic, according to research from the University of Georgia. The study is the first to examine the relationship between hospitalizations due to opioid misuse and chronic disease.

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Wind and water

Damaging rains from hurricanes can be more intense after winds begin to subside, say UC Santa Barbara scientists.

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NASA tracking Tropical Storm 06A through Arabian Sea

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Arabian Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm 06A, now renamed Tropical Storm Pawan.

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A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

Harvard University researchers have demonstrated the first material that can have both strongly correlated electron interactions and topological properties, which not only paves the way for more stable quantum computing but also an entirely new platform to explore the wild world of exotic physics.

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MacOS Catalina offers new ways to watch and listen to content. Here's how to take advantage of them.

Say hello to macOS Catalina, which manages your content in a more specialized and efficient way. (David Nield/) With the arrival of macOS Catalina , iTunes is no more—on the Mac, at least. The long-running app that once housed all content for Apple devices has now been replaced by three separate and specialized apps: Music, TV, and Podcasts. These apps aren't hugely different from what iTunes use

1h

After exercise, signs in the blood may signal heart attack chances

Signs of cardiac stress that appear in the blood after exercise can indicate which patients with coronary artery disease are most at risk of heart attack or other issues, researchers report. Identifying patients with otherwise stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who are high-risk and would benefit from more intense or invasive interventions is currently a major theme in cardiology research. Ofte

2h

Klimarådgiver om COP25: Klimakatastrofe-fond skal redde verdens fattigste

Hør, hvad klimaministeren, industridirektøren, klimaaktivisten og ngo-arbejderen håber, der kommer ud af klimatopmødet.

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Hjälpprotein påverkar utvecklingen av Parkinsons

När proteiner i hjärnan bildar fällningar till olösliga aggregat kan sjukdomar som till exempel Alzheimers eller Parkinsons uppstå. En forskargrupp i Göteborg har kommit ett steg närmare till att förstå denna process. Parkinsons sjukdom är en progressiv neurologisk sjukdom som kännetecknas av rörelseproblem, stelhet och skakningar. När proteinet alfa-synuklein klumpar ihop sig till aggregat i hjä

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Your food may help make stickier, safer glues for laptops, packaging, furniture

You cannot make glue out of a ham sandwich—but you may be able to use the components of that food to create a strong adhesive.

2h

The Next Debate Stage Won't Look Like the Democratic Party

With Kamala Harris's unexpected departure from the presidential race Tuesday, the lineup of the next primary debate has become something the Democratic Party as a whole decidedly is not: all white. With Tulsi Gabbard and Andrew Yang yet to qualify, and Cory Booker and Julían Castro unlikely to, the debate stage will be notably lacking in ethnic diversity. For a political party—and a country—whose

2h

The Language You Speak Influences Where Your Attention Goes

It's all because of the similarities between words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Water animation gets easier thanks to BYU professors

A team of computer science professors at BYU created a method to quickly resize animations of fluids without having to completely re-simulate the entire sequence.

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Taming chronic inflammation may reduce illness, save lives

Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide.

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St. Michael's Hospital study examines the relationship between sugars and heart health

There's an assumption that sugars are all bad, but a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital suggests that the impact of sugars on heart health depends on the dose and type of sugar consumed. Led by Dr. John Sievenpiper, the team conducted a review of previous studies investigating the association between reported intakes of sugars and heart disease. The team found that that sugars beha

2h

A momentous view on the birth of photoelectrons

The creation of photoelectrons through ionisation is one of the most fundamental processes in the interaction between light and matter. Yet, deep questions remain about just how photons transfer their linear momentum to electrons. With the first sub-femtosecond study of the linear photon momentum transfer during an ionisation process, physicists at ETH Zurich provide now unprecedented insight into

2h

Microwave treatment is an inexpensive way to clean heavy metals from treated sewage

A team of Florida State University researchers studying new methods to remove toxic heavy metals from biosolids — the solid waste left over after sewage treatment — found the key is a brief spin through a microwave.

2h

Brain differences detected in children with depressed parents

The largest brain imaging study of children ever conducted in the United States has revealed structural differences in the brains of those whose parents have depression.

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Prenatal and early life exposure to multiple air pollutants increases odds of toddler allergies

A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows a significant association between multiple prenatal and early life exposures to indoor pollutants and the degree of allergic sensitivity in 2-year-olds.

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Whales may owe their efficient digestion to millions of tiny microbes

A study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that the microbial communities inside whales may play an important role in the digestion of one of the ocean's most abundant carbon-rich lipids, known as a wax ester.

2h

A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the world's most intractable pollutants

Colorado State University engineers have developed a treatment train for a PFAS compound called HFPO-Dimer Acid, also known by its trade name, GenX.

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UConn researchers draw an evolutionary connection between pregnancy and cancer metastasis

Pregnancy might hold the key to understanding how cancer metastasizes in various mammals — including humans, according to UConn and Yale researchers.

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Recruitment of miR-8080 by luteolin inhibits AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer

Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have a poor clinical response to drugs for CRPC, including enzalutamide. Recently, an mRNA splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR), called AR-V7, that lacks a functional ligand-binding domain has been highlighted as a major resistance mechanism in CRPC. This important study describes a novel mechanism for down-regulation of AR-V7 by mi

2h

Can 3D-printing musical instruments produce better sound than traditional instruments?

Music is an art, but it is also a science involving vibrating reeds and strings, sound waves and resonances. The study of acoustics can help scientists produce beautiful music even with musical instruments fashioned with high-tech methods, such as 3D printing. Researchers studied the sound quality of a 3D-printed ukulele and compared it to a standard wooden instrument, and will present the group's

2h

New Technology Improves Gravitational Wave Detectors by Cutting Quantum Noise

Refined instruments reduce noise at the quantum level, allowing for discoveries of more distant gravitational waves. grav_wave_4.jpg This is a view of the LIGO detector in Hanford, Washington. Image credits: LIGO Laboratory Physics Thursday, December 5, 2019 – 12:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Physicists have successfully developed a new instrument that significantly reduces qu

2h

A robot and software make it easier to create advanced materials

A team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications such as drugs and regenerative medicine through tis

2h

A robot and software make it easier to create advanced materials

A team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications such as drugs and regenerative medicine through tis

2h

Hungry North Pole explorers Horn and Ousland near end of epic trek

The Norwegian-South African duo are tired and hungry after trekking hundreds of miles.

2h

Former EPA advisers say agency's mercury proposal is flawed

As the EPA gets closer to finalizing changes to an Obama-era air pollution rule, a group of former agency advisers says the Trump administration's attempt to weaken the mercury emissions regulations is based on faulty and outdated data.

2h

The Language You Speak Influences Where Your Attention Goes

It's all because of the similarities between words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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At least 265 dead in floods, landslides as rains batter East Africa

Two months of relentless rains have submergedvillages and farms and sent rivers of mud crashing into houses across East Africa, with at least 265 killed, according to an AFP tally, as meteorologists warn of more to come.

2h

Fusion by strong lasers

Nuclear physics usually involves high energies, as illustrated by experiments to master controlled nuclear fusion. One of the problems is how to overcome the strong electrical repulsion between atomic nuclei which requires high energies to make them fuse. But fusion could be initiated at lower energies with electromagnetic fields that are generated, for example, by state-of-the-art free electron l

2h

Graphene takes off in composites for planes and cars

The Graphene Flagship brought together top European researchers and companies to discuss the most disruptive ways graphene could enhance composites used in the aerospace, automotive and energy industries. The multidisciplinary team involved researchers from academic institutions, business enterprises such as Graphene Flagship Partners Nanesa and Avanzare, and large transportation end-user industri

2h

Can Arctic 'ice management' combat climate change?

According to a much-debated geo-engineering approach, both sea-ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by using millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter.

2h

NASA analyzes Kammuri's heavy rainfall

NASA provided analyses of Typhoon Kammuri's heavy rainfall on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean using the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite.

2h

How flowers adapt to their pollinators

The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. They are the most diverse plant group on Earth with more than 300,000 species. In a new study in Communications Biology, evolutionary biologists around Agnes Dellinger and Jürg Schönenberger from the University of Vienna have analysed 3-dimensional models of flowers and found that flower shapes can evolv

2h

Concordia research shows that using green products leads to a warm glow in shoppers

A new paper out of Concordia's John Molson School of Business suggests that spending some of that money on green products might make consumers feel quite a bit better about their purchases.The study looks at the so-called "greenconsumption effect" — how using a green product creates a "warm glow" feeling in users — and what it means for retailers in an increasingly eco-conscious marketplace.

2h

Machine learning, imaging technique may boost colon cancer diagnosis

Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a new imaging technique based on a technology that has been used for two decades in ophthalmology that can provide accurate, real-time, computer-aided diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

2h

Insilico publishes a review of deep aging clocks and announces the issuance of key patent

Insilico Medicine announced the publication of a comprehensive review of the deep biomarkers of aging and the publication of a granted patent titled 'Deep transcriptomic markers of human biological aging and methods of determining a biological aging clock.'

2h

The Lancet Public Health: One in two people who are homeless may have experienced a traumatic brain injury in their lifetime

This systematic review and first meta-analysis on the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in people who are homeless or in unstable housing situations — including 38 studies published between 1995 and 2018, and published in The Lancet Public Health journal — suggests that homeless people experience a disproportionately high lifetime prevalence of TBI.

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The Lancet: First long-term estimates suggest link between cholesterol levels and risk of heart disease and stroke

The observational and modelling study which used individual-level data from almost 400,000 people, published in The Lancet, extends existing research because it suggests that increasing levels of non-HDL cholesterol may predict long-term cardiovascular risk by the age of 75 years. Past risk estimates of this kind are based on 10-year follow-up data.

2h

Trump's Supporters Are Displaying the Will to Win. Democrats Are Not.

What on Earth was the point of the first day of the House Judiciary Committee hearings on impeachment? The House Intelligence Committee hearings in November told a coherent story. Public-spirited career personnel and a Purple Heart Army officer were aligned on one side; venal and untruthful political operatives aligned on the other. Each witness was called for a reason. A televised hearing in a h

2h

California must act now to prepare for sea level rise, state lawmakers say

A special committee of California lawmakers gathered Tuesday, for the first time in five years, to discuss sea level rise and what the state needs to do to better prepare coastal communities from devastating loss.

2h

Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties

Ommochromes, the pigments that colour the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This is confirmed by analyses carried out by researchers from the University of Sonora in Mexico and the Miguel Hernández University in Spain.

2h

Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates

Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion—the ways animals move—and brain architecture, using high-definition 3-D models of lizard and snake brains.

2h

Mice in space: NASA's latest experiment

Scientists are sending mighty mice to space, but rather than being gym rats, their strength was enhanced through genetic experimentation in the hopes of preventing human astronauts from experiencing muscle loss in microgravity.

2h

Brown bananas and squishy avocados no more? Food tech could keep your produce from going bad

Imagine bananas that never go bad. To Aidan Mouat, CEO of Chicago-based Hazel Technologies, it's not so far-fetched.

2h

Researchers develop method to improve skeleton of common chemicals

Every chemical, from the simplest to the most complex, have a structural skeleton of atoms. The atoms can be added or removed to transform the chemical into different types, for use in different applications. For many pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals, the skeleton consists of a multi-membered carbon ring called a carbocycle.

2h

The Language You Speak Influences Where Your Attention Goes

It's all because of the similarities between words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

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Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties

Ommochromes, the pigments that colour the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This is confirmed by analyses carried out by researchers from the University of Sonora in Mexico and the Miguel Hernández University in Spain.

2h

Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates

Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion—the ways animals move—and brain architecture, using high-definition 3-D models of lizard and snake brains.

2h

Brown bananas and squishy avocados no more? Food tech could keep your produce from going bad

Imagine bananas that never go bad. To Aidan Mouat, CEO of Chicago-based Hazel Technologies, it's not so far-fetched.

2h

Does Natural Law Need Elegant Mathematics?

Ever since I was very young, I have been enamored of elegant mathematics. Like many people of a similar bent, I agreed completely with Eugene Wigner's famous article "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences," in which the Nobel Prize-winning physicist discusses how elegant mathematics has been "unreasonably" successful in explaining physical law. Wigner further state

2h

Trolls Immediately Attack Vatican Minecraft Server

Virtual Eden When a Roman Catholic priest made a Vatican-themed Minecraft server, he meant for it to be an online haven where people could hang out free from internet toxicity. Instead, trolls descended, immediately overwhelming the server with a DDOS attack, Business Insider reports . And while internet trolls, especially on Minecraft , are far from new, it's bizarre to see the Vatican get wrapp

2h

Older adults who 'train' for a major operation spend less time in the hospital

Older adults who 'train' for a major operation by exercising, eating a healthy diet, and practicing stress reduction techniques preoperatively have shorter hospital stays and are more likely to return to their own homes afterward rather than another facility, compared with similar patients who do not participate in preoperative rehabilitation, according to research findings.

2h

Dramatic rise in patients 'cured' of heart condition after GP performance pay scheme

The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost 5-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been 'cured'.

2h

Modern technology and old-fashioned legwork solve science mystery

Researchers hope put to rest a century-old scientific debate by demonstrating that the low-level organism S. roeseli is capable of decision making. They also offer the video evidence to prove it.

2h

Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties

Ommochromes, the pigments that color the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This is confirmed by the analyses carried out by researchers from the University of Sonora in Mexico and the Miguel Hernández University in Spain.

2h

Fusion by strong lasers

Nuclear physics usually involves high energies, as illustrated by experiments to master controlled nuclear fusion. One problem is how to overcome the strong electrical repulsion between atomic nuclei which requires high energies to make them fuse. But fusion could be initiated at lower energies with electromagnetic fields that are generated by state-of-the-art free electron lasers emitting X-ray l

2h

Young people with IBD five times more likely to develop serious infections

Young patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are five times more likely than the general population to develop viral infections that can lead to hospitalisation or permanent organ damage, a new study published in the UEG Journal has found.

2h

Between arousal and inhibition

Why nerve cells in the brain process information differently.

2h

India's Space Chief: We Found Our Lander Months Before NASA

Taking Credit Back in September, the Indian Space Research Organization announced that it had found its Vikram lander, which it had lost contact with days earlier as it prepared to land on the Moon — and said it was trying to reestablish contact with the lost lander. Months later, NASA made a similar announcement : that it had spotted the wreckage of the lander, with the help of amateur space ent

2h

African swine fever helps drive world food prices to two-year high

The slaughter of half of China's pigs due to the African swine fever virus raging across Asia and Europe has helped drive world food prices to a two-year high

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Single-Celled Organism Appears to Make Decisions

The unicellular species Stentor roeseli performs a form of sequential decision-making to avoid irritating stimuli.

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Politics this week

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KAL's cartoon

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Scientists see defects in potential new semiconductor

A research team has reported seeing, for the first time, atomic scale defects that dictate the properties of a new and powerful semiconductor. The study, published earlier this month in the journal Physical Review X, shows a fundamental aspect of how the semiconductor, beta gallium oxide, controls electricity.

3h

Using lungs from increased-risk donors expands donor pool, maintains current survival rates

Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that using lungs from donors who are considered high risk for certain infectious diseases compared to standard risk donors results in similar one-year survival for recipients. In addition, researchers saw no difference in rejection or graft (donor lung) survival after one year in patients receiving lungs from increased-risk donors.

3h

What is a scream? The acoustics of a primal human call

Listeners show strong agreement for parameters of a scream, including a higher pitch, roughness and a higher peak frequency.

3h

How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5 million project

The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease in both dogs and humans.Insecticide-impregnated dog collars and dog culling are used in Brazil but instead, researchers used a 'lure to kill' method by attracting female flies towards insecticide using the male pheromome.This reduced female sandflies by 49% compared with

3h

Detailed insight into stressed cells

When cells are stressed, they initiate a complex and precisely regulated response to prevent permanent damage. One of the immediate reactions to stress signals is a reduction of protein synthesis (translation). Until now, it was difficult to measure such acute cellular changes. As reported in the latest online issue of the renowned journal Molecular Cell, researchers at Goethe University have now

3h

Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins

Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.

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Mouse study shows nerve signaling pathway critical to healing fractures

Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but healing them requires the production of a protein signal that stimulates the generation, growth and spread of vital nerve cells, or neurons, throughout the injured area. That's the finding of a recent Johns Hopkins Medicine study that used mice to demonstrate what likely takes place during human fracture repair as well.

3h

Gene network sparks future autism treatment

A mutated gene found in people with intellectual disabilities that could be targeted for treatment has been identified by an international team including University of Queensland researchers.

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How gene mutation causes autism and intellectual disability

Scientists have discovered why a specific genetic mutation causes intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder in children. The mutation results in fewer brain synapses, making it harder for the brain to learn. The discovery offers a new target for treatment.

3h

First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a sunnier side of climate change

Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.

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Clinical study finds eating within 10-hour window may help stave off diabetes, heart disease

Researchers from the Salk Institute and the UC San Diego School of Medicine found that a 10-hour time-restricted eating intervention, when combined with traditional medications, resulted in weight loss, reduced abdominal fat, lower blood pressure and cholesterol for participants. The pilot study, published in Cell Metabolism on Dec. 5, 2019, could lead to a new treatment option for metabolic syndr

3h

Cancer treatment for patients with HIV

For patients with HIV, CD4 counts reflect the health of their immune system and HIV RNA levels indicate their viral load. This observational study focused on how cancer treatments were associated with those two important clinical measures and risk of death in nearly 200 patients with HIV and cancer.

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Cell phone injuries

Cell phones are mainstays of daily life. This observational study analyzed 20 years of data on people who went to emergency departments with head and neck injuries from cell phone use to estimate the number of injuries, learn what types of injuries there were, and understand how the injuries occurred, such as from distracted driving or walking.

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Study finds little increased risk of injury in high-intensity functional training program

High-intensity group workout classes are increasingly popular at fitness centers. While research has shown that these workouts can have cardiovascular and other benefits, few studies have been conducted on whether they lead to more injuries.

3h

More than a watchdog

Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body.

3h

Bats may benefit from wildfire

Bats face many threats — from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis.

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Finding meaning in 'Rick and Morty,' one burp at a time

One of the first things viewers of 'Rick and Morty' might notice about Rick is his penchant for punctuating his speech with burps. Brooke Kidner has analyzed the frequency and acoustics of belching while speaking, and by zeroing in on the specific pitches and sound qualities of a midspeech burp, aims to find what latent linguistic meaning might be found in the little-studied gastrointestinal grumb

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New instrument extends LIGO's reach

Technology 'squeezes' out quantum noise so more gravitational wave signals can be detected.

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Ecology: Wildfire may benefit forest bats

Bats respond to wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in varied but often positive ways, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. The findings could help to improve bat conservation and management strategies in fire-prone forest regions.

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New study hints at complex decision making in a single-cell organism

In an effort to replicate an experiment conducted over a century ago, researchers at Harvard Medical School present evidence confirming at least one single-cell organism — the trumpet-shaped Stentor roeselii — exhibits a hierarchy of avoidance behaviors. Exposed repeatedly to the same stimulation, the organism can in effect 'change its mind' about how to respond, indicating a capacity for relati

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Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs

Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the same way, a few specific strategies appeared time and time again. An investigation of the skulls of 160 non-avian dinosaurs revealed the evolution of common traits in the skulls and teeth of plant-eating members of otherwise very differe

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Pilot study finds time-restricted eating has benefits for people at risk for diabetes

In a study publishing Dec. 5 in the journal Cell Metabolism, researchers for the first time looked at the effects of TRE in people who had been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and therefore were at a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The investigators found that when participants restricted their eating to 10 hours or less over a period of 12 weeks, they lost weight and some sy

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Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes

More than 100 years ago, zoologist Herbert Spencer Jennings described surprisingly varied avoidance behaviors in the single-celled freshwater protist Stentor roeseli. When later experiments in a related organism failed to reproduce what he'd seen, his claims were discredited. Now, a report publishing in the journal Current Biology on Dec. 5 confirms what Jennings witnessed all those years ago: obs

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America seeks faster ways to launch military satellites

If one gets destroyed, a replacement needs to be on its way soon

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Some planks from ancient Rome started life in eastern France

The tree rings in them tell their story

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Malaria infections have stopped falling

Fine-tuning prevention may help

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Even aggressive centipedes will co-operate if they have to

Mothers of different species share nests in the rainforest

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The first computer chip with a trillion transistors

It should speed up calculations for artificial intelligence

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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan man selv dyrke bakteriekulturen til den svenske specialitet Långfil?

En læser husker de dejligt barndomsbesøg hos mormor i Sverige, hvor morgenmaden bestod af syrnet Långfil. Kan man selv lave det? Chefkonsulent i Mejeriforeningen giver opskriften.

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Wildfire may benefit forest bats: study

Bats face many threats—from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that bats in the Sierra Nevada appear to be well-adapted to wildfire.

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First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a sunnier side of climate change

Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.

3h

The Russification of the Republican Party

Just how far will Republicans go in following President Donald Trump's embrace of Russia? An answer may be crystallizing as the GOP mobilizes its defense of the president against impeachment. Both congressional Republicans and conservative commentators are defending Trump from impeachment partly by accusing Ukraine of intervening against him in the 2016 presidential election—despite repeated warn

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European plan to tackle space debris? Hug it out

Defunct satellite capture options include net, harpoon or embrace with mechanical arms The European Space Agency is working to tackle the issue of space debris with the technological version of a big hug. It hopes to be able to use tentacle-like mechanical arms to embrace a dead satellite and remove it from orbit. Continue reading…

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A video game that helps us understand loneliness | Cornelia Geppert

Step into artist Cornelia Geppert's visually stunning video game "Sea of Solitude," which explores how battling the "monsters" of loneliness and self-doubt can help us better grapple with the complexity and struggles of mental health.

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Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes

Once, single-cell life claimed sole dominion over the earth. For some three billion years, unfathomable generations of unicellular organisms ate, grew and reproduced among only each other. They evolved into predators and prey, thrived and spread across the primordial waters and land, and formed complex and dynamic ecosystems in every ecological niche on the planet. Around 600 million years ago, so

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Wildfire may benefit forest bats: study

Bats face many threats—from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that bats in the Sierra Nevada appear to be well-adapted to wildfire.

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New instrument extends LIGO's reach

Just a year ago, the National Science Foundation-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, was picking up whispers of gravitational waves every month or so. Now, a new addition to the system is enabling the instruments to detect these ripples in space-time nearly every week.

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First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a sunnier side of climate change

Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.

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Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs

Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the same way, a few specific strategies appeared time and time again. An investigation of the skulls of 160 non-avian dinosaurs revealed the evolution of common traits in the skulls and teeth of plant-eating members of otherwise very differe

3h

Finding meaning in 'Rick and Morty,' one burp at a time

One of the first things new viewers of the cartoon "Rick and Morty" might notice about Rick Sanchez is his penchant for punctuating his speech with burps. Linguistics can provide a new way to read into the dimension-hopping grandfather's midsentence belching.

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Graphene takes off in composites for planes and cars

The Graphene Flagship brought together top European researchers and companies to discuss the most disruptive ways graphene could enhance composites used in the aerospace, automotive and energy industries.

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Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops

Identifying genes that confer resistance to leaf rust infections could help generate durably resistant cereal crops.

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Your food may help make stickier, safer glues for laptops, packaging, furniture

A group of scientists at Purdue University has taken inspiration from the field, kitchen and the ocean to create strong glues.

3h

Imaging of conjunctival goblet cells helps diagnosis of dry eyes

Professor Ki Hean Kim and his research team developed the world's first biometric imaging of conjunctival goblet cells with high definition.

3h

How extreme environmental conditions affect the human brain

Members of a polar research expedition have provided researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development with an opportunity to study the effects of social isolation and extreme environmental conditions on the human brain. The researchers found changes to the dentate gyrus, an area of the hippocampus responsible for spatial thinking and memory.

3h

VM gjorde vardagen lite roligare i Jämtland

VM i Åre respektive Östersund 2019 gav stora ekonomiska och sociala effekter. Turister som besökte VM-evenemangen spenderade drygt 1 500 kr per dag. Samtidigt var andelen stolta länsbor större ju längre avståndet var till evenemangen. Det visar studie från turismforskningscentret ETOUR. I en stor VM-studie konstaterar forskarna att den totala ekonomiska effekten av världsmästerskapen i alpint och

3h

Kastrering av män byggde på kunskap om kvinnans kropp

För män med prostataproblem var kastrering länge en behandlingsmetod. Men besluten om kastrering i början av 1900 grundade sig i att man trodde att mannens prostata motsvarade kvinnans livmoder. En ny avhandling från Linköpings universitet vänder på föreställningen om mannen som norm i medicinhistorien. Många män vet att godartad prostataförstoring kan påverka livskvaliteten. Prostatan, som norma

3h

Not All Birds Fly South for the Winter

Researchers in Virginia studied how mowing, burning or animal grazing helped or hindered birds that stayed home for the winter

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Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops

Genes have been identified that confer resistance to multiple leaf rust species in barley. The findings by an international team, led by KAUST researchers, could transform the breeding of durable disease-resistant cereal crops and help support efforts to improve global food security.

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Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops

Genes have been identified that confer resistance to multiple leaf rust species in barley. The findings by an international team, led by KAUST researchers, could transform the breeding of durable disease-resistant cereal crops and help support efforts to improve global food security.

3h

Working Scientist podcast: The PhD thesis and how to boost its impact

Nature, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03773-0 The thesis a central element of how graduate students are assessed. But is it time for an overhaul? Julie Gould finds out.

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Scientist identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance.

3h

Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises

A new effective treatment of hepatitis C not only combats the virus, but is also effective against potentially fatal complications such as reduced liver functioning and cirrhosis. This is the result of a new study from Aarhus University.

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Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates

Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion – the ways animals move – and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains.

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How much will we eat in the future?

The amount of food needed to feed the world's population in the future is of vital importance. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now analysed how much extra food people are likely to eat taking into account bigger bodies as well as a rising population. They modelled increases in body size by looking at data on increasing BMI in Mexico and height in the Netherlands. The results were p

3h

Warm-sector heavy rainfall in China: Studies and challenges

Warm-sector heavy rainfall (WSHR) events often cause severe flooding, huge economic losses, and many casualties, but the operational prediction of these events is difficult and often inaccurate. A study summarizes existing researches and propose challenges presented by WSHR.

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First field measurements of laughing gas isotopes

Thanks to a newly developed laser spectrometer, Empa researchers can for the first time show which processes in grassland lead to nitrous oxide emissions. The aim is to reduce emissions of this potent greenhouse gas by gaining a better understanding of the processes taking place in the soil.

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Warm-sector heavy rainfall in China: Studies and challenges

Warm-sector heavy rainfall (WSHR) is a type of rainstorm proposed by Chinese meteorologists that had been found to only occur in South China. However, WSHR has also been found in other regions of China, according to Prof. Jianhua Sun from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

3h

Changing wildfires in California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks

Wildfire is a natural process in the forests of the western US, and many species have evolved to tolerate, if not benefit from it. But wildfire is changing. Research in the journal Biological Conservation, published by Elsevier, suggests fire, as it becomes more frequent and severe, poses a substantial risk to goshawks in the Sierra Nevada region.

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Changing wildfires in California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks

Wildfire is a natural process in the forests of the western US, and many species have evolved to tolerate, if not benefit from it. But wildfire is changing. Research in the journal Biological Conservation, published by Elsevier, suggests fire, as it becomes more frequent and severe, poses a substantial risk to goshawks in the Sierra Nevada region.

3h

TikTok may be leaking people's data from the US to China

There is real concern over how Chinese video-sharing app TikTok handles privacy. But many of the issues are the same for Silicon Valley apps too

3h

Life on Mars? Europe commits to groundbreaking mission to bring back rocks to Earth

It will be one of the most daunting, complicated and, potentially, scientifically rewarding missions ever undertaken to the red planet. Ministers at a recent meeting of the European Space Agency (ESA) have fully committed to plans to collect samples from the surface of Mars and return them to Earth, in a joint effort with NASA. Official approval for the NASA budget to cover this mission is anticip

3h

BMW Drops $80 Fee to Use Apple CarPlay on Its Pricey Bimmers

rr Score a small victory for common sense. BMW is dropping the $80 annual fee it charges owners to plug in and use their Apple iPhones via Apple CarPlay, a charge BMW extorts – sorry, extracts – even though Apple charges BMW no ongoing licensing fee BMW has to recoup. (In case there isn't enough margin in cars costing $35,000 to $150,000.) BMW said this week the fee will no longer be charged. BMW

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New protein function could be key to treatment of drug addiction and behavioral disorders

The reward pathway of the brain causes feelings of happiness but is also involved in behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and addiction. A breakthrough study by scientists in Japan has now identified the role of a protein called Npas4 in the reward pathway, mediated by the well-known proteins MAPK and CBP, opening doors to potential therapies for associated disorders. Cocaine-treated mice with

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Bystanders can help more cardiac arrest victims survive

Only 8% of Americans survive cardiac arrest outside a hospital, but that percentage could increase significantly if bystanders recognize cardiac arrest and perform simple lifesaving tasks, a UVA Health physician says in a New England Journal of Medicine article.

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Fighting bacterial infection with drug-eluting medical devices

Medical practitioners routinely outfit patients with devices ranging from cardiovascular stents, pacemakers, catheters, and therapeutic lenses to orthopedic, breast, dental, and cochlear implants and prostheses. In an article publishing in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, Raquel Bernardes, José Ferreira, Paula de Oliveira, Mario Grassi, and Manuel Nhangumbe present a mathematical model tha

4h

Rural decline not driven by water recovery

New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed.

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Protein antibiotics offer new hope for fighting common crop diseases

Scientists have tested a new way to protect crops from a widespread and devastating bacterial disease, without using environmentally damaging chemical sprays.

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Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins

Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.

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Whales may owe their efficient digestion to millions of tiny microbes

A study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that the microbial communities inside whales may play an important role in the digestion of one of the ocean's most abundant carbon-rich lipids, known as a wax ester. Their findings were published Dec. 2 in the Journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology.

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Protein antibiotics offer new hope for fighting common crop diseases

Scientists have tested a new way to protect crops from a widespread and devastating bacterial disease, without using environmentally damaging chemical sprays.

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Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins

Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.

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Image: Thermal enclosure for Orion

The Orion spacecraft with European Service Module at NASA's Plum Brook Station. The first Orion will fly farther from Earth on the Artemis I mission than any human-rated vehicle has ever flown before—but first it will undergo testing to ensure the spacecraft withstands the extremes of spaceflight.

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Scientists reveal potential new class of X-ray star system research

A scientist at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian has announced the discovery that mass in triple star systems takes on the characteristics of recipient stars before mass is actually transferred, which may allow scientists to re-examine previously labeled binary star systems for evidence of a third companion.

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Whales may owe their efficient digestion to millions of tiny microbes

A study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that the microbial communities inside whales may play an important role in the digestion of one of the ocean's most abundant carbon-rich lipids, known as a wax ester. Their findings were published Dec. 2 in the Journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology.

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Paying taxes less 'taxing' when we recognize how those dollars help others, study finds

There's nothing certain in life except death and taxes. But taxpayers' support for the latter could potentially be improved, according to a new study led by SFU psychology researchers Emily Thornton and Lara Aknin.

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Jelly invention can heal itself like human skin

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have invented a new jelly material that mimics biological matter such as skin, ligaments and bone, and which is very strong, self-healing and able to change shape.

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Extreme movements in option prices are not associated with the content of news announcements

A new study co-authored by researchers at Queen Mary University of London has found that extreme movements in option prices are not associated with the content of news announcements per se.

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Trying to read the 'mind of a group' shapes our decisions online

Using a mathematical framework with roots in artificial intelligence and robotics, researchers have uncovered the process for how people make decisions in groups. The researchers also found they could predict a person's choice more often than more traditional descriptive methods. In large groups of essentially anonymous members, people make choices based on a model of the "mind of the group" and

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What's in a title? When it comes to 'Doctor,' more than you might think

If you work in medicine, does it matter if you are called by your title? Is it all right if patients, colleagues, and others call you by your first name?

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What does DNA's repair shop look like? New research identifies the tools

A team of scientists has identified how damaged DNA molecules are repaired inside the human genome, a discovery that offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA.

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What does DNA's repair shop look like? New research identifies the tools

A team of scientists has identified how damaged DNA molecules are repaired inside the human genome, a discovery that offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA.

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Urørt skov er kommet på finansloven: »Pengene skal ikke bare klattes væk på administration og forkert skov«

PLUS. I Finansloven for 2020 er der afsat 20 mio. kr. årligt til at konvertere statens skove fra kommercielt drevet til urørt. Det er professor Carsten Rahbek glad for, men han advarer mod at klatte pengene væk på unødig administration og de forkerte skove. Minister lover 8.000 hektar urørt skov.

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The Climate Hellscape Is Coming, and Capitalism Can't Save Us

In her 2007 book, The Shock Doctrine , Naomi Klein coined the term disaster capitalism , which refers to the tendency of free markets and governments to respond opportunistically to catastrophic events. This phenomenon of extreme capitalism has troubling implications when it comes to climate change. As the staff writer Alexis C. Madrigal suggests, you can't buy your way out of a warming planet. I

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How toys became gendered—and why it'll take more than a gender-neutral doll to change how boys perceive femininity

Parents who want to raise their children in a gender-nonconforming way have a new stocking stuffer this year: the gender-neutral doll.

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How our single-celled relatives package their DNA

A group of single-celled organisms organises its DNA in a similar way to higher organisms such as plants, animals, and fungi. However, the way packaged DNA is read out differs between the two related groups, Bram Henneman discovered. Ph.D. defence on 5 December.

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How We'll Buy Things in 2030: Smart Stores and Personalized Experiences

How do you buy your stuff? Do you get in your car, or type with your fingers? E-commerce is surging while brick-and-mortar sales fall. What could possibly save malls and shopping centers? Enter the experience economy. In the next decade, AI-driven personalization, AR/VR interfaces, and sensor-geared smart environments could turn today's "shopping center" into a booming, invisible platform for edu

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How our single-celled relatives package their DNA

A group of single-celled organisms organises its DNA in a similar way to higher organisms such as plants, animals, and fungi. However, the way packaged DNA is read out differs between the two related groups, Bram Henneman discovered. Ph.D. defence on 5 December.

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Forsinkede kræftdiagnoser fylder meget i rapport om fejldiagnoser

Brud, læsioner og kræft er de tilstande, hvor diagnosen oftest overses eller forsinkes, viser ny rapport fra Patienterstatningen og Dansk Selskab for Patientsikkerhed.

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The Only Chart You Will Ever Need For Brain Health

submitted by /u/MasterCode3 [link] [comments]

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Video: Sentinel-6 mission

In a cleanroom in Ottobrunn, Germany, the latest Copernicus Sentinel satellite is ready for final testing before it is packed up and shipped to the US for liftoff next year. Designed and built to chart changing sea level, it is the first of two identical Sentinel-6 satellites that will be launched consecutively to continue the time series of sea-level measurements.

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Transition to renewable energy needs to consider global threat to species

A new study has shown the extent to which countries drive biodiversity loss overseas through their demand for electric power. For some countries more than half of the impact on species is overseas. While the study found that the shift towards renewable electric needed to combat climate change would likely reduce the impacts on biodiversity, the overseas impact makes it difficult to understand how

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Scientists: Insect populations are shrinking—here are six ways to help

Are you planning a big garden clean-up this summer, or stocking up on fly spray to keep bugs at bay? Before you do, it's worth considering the damage you might cause to the insects we share the planet with.

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Scientists see defects in potential new semiconductor

A research team has reported seeing, for the first time, atomic scale defects that dictate the properties of a new and powerful semiconductor.

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Detailed insight into stressed cells

When cells are stressed, they initiate a complex and precisely regulated response to prevent permanent damage. One of the immediate reactions to stress signals is a reduction of protein synthesis (translation). Until now, it was difficult to measure such acute cellular changes. As reported in the latest online issue of the renowned journal Molecular Cell, researchers at Goethe University have now

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Scientists use X-rays to crack the secrets of shale, a keystone of one of the nation's fastest growing energy sources

Natural gas and crude oil locked away inside layers of shale, a type of sedimentary rock, is one of the nation's largest and fastest growing energy sources. According to Drew Pomerantz, a scientist at Schlumberger, an oilfield services company, two of the most fascinating scientific questions related to shales are what they are composed of and how oil and gas are stored and transported in the rock

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Diary tool assesses epilepsy seizure risk

Researchers have the first validation of a new program to assess the risk of seizures in patients with epilepsy. In a preliminary study, the Epilepsy Seizure Assessment Tool (EpiSAT) proved equally able or better than 24 specialized epilepsy clinicians at using patients' histories to identify periods of heightened propensity for seizures. " Epilepsy affects more than 3.4 million people nationwide

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Top 5 Nutrients for Postpartum Recovery

Registered Dietitian Melissa Mitri discusses the importance of good nutrition after giving birth and the five most important nutrients for a new mom and her baby — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mobile devices blur work and personal privacy raising cyber risks, says QUT researcher

Organisations aren't moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace, warns a QUT privacy researcher.

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Study prompts call for disaster-specific pharmacy legislation

Pharmacists caught up in the Australian bushfire crisis are being hampered from providing timely and effective treatment to displaced people due to outdated laws, according to QUT researchers.The legal barriers pharmacists face across Australian jurisdictions include restrictive emergency medication that only covers three days as well as vaccination and relocation limitations.

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Researchers develop method to improve skeleton of common chemicals

It's incredibly difficult to make a carbocycle with more than five or six members. However, a research team at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan has developed a new method that can easily produce seven- and eight-membered carbocycles, which are often found in many pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals.

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Scientists: Insect populations are shrinking—here are six ways to help

Are you planning a big garden clean-up this summer, or stocking up on fly spray to keep bugs at bay? Before you do, it's worth considering the damage you might cause to the insects we share the planet with.

4h

Detailed insight into stressed cells

When cells are stressed, they initiate a complex and precisely regulated response to prevent permanent damage. One of the immediate reactions to stress signals is a reduction of protein synthesis (translation). Until now, it was difficult to measure such acute cellular changes. As reported in the latest online issue of the renowned journal Molecular Cell, researchers at Goethe University have now

4h

New eDNA tool research helps scientists find deep sea corals

Curtin University researchers have developed a promising new toolkit for monitoring threatened coral ecosystems by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from waters off the coast of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

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Women from ethnic minorities least likely to be offered speaking opportunities at scientific conferences

A new study from Queen Mary University of London has found that scientists from racial and ethnic minority populations, already underrepresented in the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), are likely to have relatively fewer speaking opportunities at scientific conferences.

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Self-healing liquid brings new life to battery alternative

Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a revolutionary technology, found in everything from cellphones to cars. Their ubiquity and role in breaking dependence on fossil fuels earned a trio of researchers this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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Rural decline not driven by water recovery

New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed.

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Half-million crabs killed by plastic debris on remote islands

In the first study of its kind, an IMAS-led research team estimates that around 570 000 hermit crabs have been killed on the Cocos (Keeling) Islands in the Indian Ocean and Henderson Island in the Pacific after being trapped in plastic debris.

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Accessible work placements support equity and diversity in engineering

Social capital, financial status and personal circumstances can impact engineering work placement experiences, leaving some students at a disadvantage, according to new research led by the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) with The University of Western Australia, Murdoch University and Curtin University.

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New eDNA tool research helps scientists find deep sea corals

Curtin University researchers have developed a promising new toolkit for monitoring threatened coral ecosystems by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from waters off the coast of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

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New study models impact of calving on retreat of Thwaites Glacier

The loss of the ice shelf supporting one of Antarctica's most vulnerable glaciers could hasten its collapse, a new study finds.

4h

Manligt könshormon gör att PCOS-symtom förs vidare i generationer

Döttrar till kvinnor med polycystiskt ovariesyndrom (PCOS) har kraftigt ökad risk att diagnostiseras med PCOS i vuxen ålder, visar forskning från karolinska institutet. Syndromet är förknippat med en rad problem, till exempel infertilitet, psykisk ohälsa och tendens att utveckla typ 2-diabetes. Höga nivåer av manligt könshormon under graviditeten bidrar till att PCOS förs vidare till nästkommande

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Så bildas rötter utanför roten

När backtravsplantor, som växt i mörker, får ljus börjar de bilda så kallade adventivrötter från stammen. Hur detta går till på molekylnivå, har Abdellah Lakehal studerat vid Umeå universitet. Adventivrot är en rot som utgår från en annan del av växten än själva roten. Den kan utgå från till exempel stamdelar eller bladdelar. Adventivrötter är viktiga för så kallad vegetativ (könlös) förökning ho

4h

Providing nature-based solutions for landscape sustainability

There is growing recognition that bringing more natural features and processes to cities could help tackle climate change, support economic growth and enhance human well-being. Nature-based solutions like green roofs and walls, sustainable urban drainage systems, natural water retention measures and urban green spaces are crucial for effectively addressing societal challenges.

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New drug target may halt tough prostate cancer tumor growth

Targeting a cell surface receptor essential for the function and survival of resistant prostate cancer cells can halt tumor growth, researchers report. A clinical trial is underway using a drug originally intended for lung diseases. Hormone therapies for prostate cancer have greatly prolonged the lives of patients, but the drugs eventually become ineffective and the disease grows lethal. Resistan

4h

Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage illuminated

The important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage has been revealed. In addition, the collaborative research team consisting of members from Kobe University, RIKEN and CSIRO Australia, illuminated the role of H3K27me3 in vernalization.

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Dangerous skin tumor now has treatment guidelines

A new study reports the first guidelines for treating sebaceous carcinoma, a cancer of the oil glands. If not removed and treated promptly, it can spread to other organs and cause grave harm to patients, including death. But up until now there was no commonly agreed method to treat it.

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Patient diaries reveal propensity for epileptic seizures

A Rice alumna and her statistician mentor receive the first validation of their tool to assess patients' histories to identify periods of heightened propensity for epileptic seizures.

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Paying taxes less 'taxing' when we recognize how those dollars help others — study

There's nothing certain in life except death and taxes. But taxpayers' support for the latter could potentially be improved, according to a new study led by SFU psychology researchers Emily Thornton and Lara Aknin.Their work, conducted alongside University of Kansas psychologist Nyla Branscombe and University of British Columbia economist John Helliwell, reveals that when taxpayers recognize their

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Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage illuminated

Doctoral student Ayasha Akter (Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science) and technical staff member Satoshi Takahashi (from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science) have revealed the important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage. In addition, they illuminated the role of H3K27me3 in vernalization—a vital proce

4h

Evidence suggests some super-puffs might be ringed exoplanets

A pair of researchers from the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science and the California Institute of Technology have reported evidence that some super-puff exoplanets might be ringed exoplanets. Anthony Piro and Shreyas Vissapragada have written a paper describing their theory and the evidence supporting it and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

4h

First proof that the clock is ticking on British farm soils

Research into a UK arable farm has indicated that the soil could be eroded to the point of bedrock exposure within two centuries.

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Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage illuminated

Doctoral student Ayasha Akter (Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science) and technical staff member Satoshi Takahashi (from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science) have revealed the important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage. In addition, they illuminated the role of H3K27me3 in vernalization—a vital proce

4h

Link found between killings of unarmed black people by police and local babies born prematurely

Joscha Legewie, a sociologist at Harvard University has found a link between the killing of unarmed black people and an increase in local black babies being born prematurely. In his paper published in the journal Science Advances, he describes his study of birth records for black Americans living in the vicinity of killings by the police and what he found.

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Why you should worry about your pet's ecological footprint

From domestic cats' ecocide of small animals to the greenhouse gases they emit, owning a pet is an environmental vice we must confront, writes Graham Lawton

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Experts say Mekong River's new color a worrying sign

The Mekong River has recently acquired an aquamarine color that may beguile tourists but also indicates a problem caused by upstream dams, experts in Thailand say.

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Building preschoolers' language learning confidence

Known as the Wellington Translanguaging Project, the program involves researchers from the University's School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies—as well as Te Kawa a Māui—working with communities to collect and analyze observational data from multilingual preschools that is turned into resources to help support the successful use of translanguaging at school and at home.

4h

Scientists identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance.

5h

The 10 Best Films of 2019

Perhaps fittingly for the end of the decade, 2019 was filled with thoughtful, retrospective works from master filmmakers who cast an eye on the past amid the rapid changes of the present. While veterans like Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino wrestled with their moviemaking legacies, some of the other best works of the year were about the wrenching and rewarding labor that goes into a work of

5h

Scientists identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance.

5h

Why is the sun's atmosphere so hot? Spacecraft starts to unravel our star's mysteries

If you ask a child to paint a picture of the sun, you will most likely get a bright yellow circle on a piece of paper. This is actually quite accurate, given that the sun is a ball of hot gas and that its surface (called the photosphere) mostly shines in bright yellow light. The yellow color is determined by the temperature of the photosphere, which is about 5,500°C.

5h

Changing wildfires in the California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks

Research in the journal Biological Conservation, published by Elsevier, suggests fire, as it becomes more frequent and severe, poses a substantial risk to goshawks in the Sierra Nevada region.

5h

New methodology developed at UPV to monitor patients with glioblastoma

The UPV methodology helps medical doctors know the patients' situation with greater precision; it allows them to obtain several vascular biomarkers directly linked to their survival.

5h

New insights into regulation of root initiation

When young, dark-grown seedlings of thale cress are given light, they start to form roots from the stem-like part of the plant called the hypocotyl. Abdellah Lakehal used this system to study how the initiation of these adventitious roots is regulated at the molecular level. Abdellah Lakehal successfully defended his Ph.D. thesis on Thursday, 28th of November 2019 at Umeå University.

5h

Machine learning provides new paradigm in understanding microbial gene regulation

E. coli are hardy bacteria, able to live in diverse conditions from the surface of a lettuce leaf to an acidic stomach. To survive and thrive in so many environments, the bacteria must use a network of transcriptional regulators to change their gene expression levels in response to their surroundings. Even in E. coli, one of the best characterized bacteria, it is still a significant challenge for

5h

Should aging lab monkeys be retired to sanctuaries?

Biomedical researchers are increasingly interested in retiring monkeys, but the community is divided

5h

New clues about the origin of stellar masses

An international team led by the Astrophysics Department-AIM Laboratory of CEA-Irfu has just obtained new clues about the origin of star mass distribution, combining observational data from the large interferometer ALMA and the APEX radio telescope operated by the European Austral Observatory (ESO) and the Herschel Space Observatory.

5h

The rich, the poor and social cooperation

The thicker the wallet, the more cooperative you are? An economist from the Max-Planck-Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance proves via laboratory experiments that rich people are believed to be more cooperative than poor people—by both the "rich" and the "poor." This aspect of conditional cooperation, which is, so far, only poorly understood, can help explain cooperation failures in socially d

5h

New insights into regulation of root initiation

When young, dark-grown seedlings of thale cress are given light, they start to form roots from the stem-like part of the plant called the hypocotyl. Abdellah Lakehal used this system to study how the initiation of these adventitious roots is regulated at the molecular level. Abdellah Lakehal successfully defended his Ph.D. thesis on Thursday, 28th of November 2019 at Umeå University.

5h

Machine learning provides new paradigm in understanding microbial gene regulation

E. coli are hardy bacteria, able to live in diverse conditions from the surface of a lettuce leaf to an acidic stomach. To survive and thrive in so many environments, the bacteria must use a network of transcriptional regulators to change their gene expression levels in response to their surroundings. Even in E. coli, one of the best characterized bacteria, it is still a significant challenge for

5h

Seal takes ocean heat transport data to new depths

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current flows in a loop around Antarctica, connecting the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. It is one of the most significant ocean currents in our climate system because it facilitates the exchange of heat and other properties among the oceans it links.

5h

Genius Sues Google for Allegedly Stealing Its Music Lyrics

David vs. Goliath Lyrics and annotation website Genius is taking Google to court. In June, Genius told The Wall Street Journal that Google had been copying music lyrics directly from its site since at least 2016, causing the site's web traffic to take a major hit. That revelation apparently wasn't enough to stop the practice, because Genius is now suing Google and its lyrics partner, LyricFind, f

5h

Early climate change models held up better than you think

It turns out we understand our planet pretty well (David Menidrey//) Climate models have come a long way. The earliest attempt to estimate what an increase in carbon dioxide could do to surface temperatures on Earth was published in 1896 . More projections began to crop up in the '60s and '70s, at a time when many scientists believed the Earth was actually cooling. But when atmospheric scientists

5h

Host cell proteases can process viral capsid proteins

It has long been suggested that a cell protease could take part in enterovirus infection. However, the identities of such proteases have remained unknown. The work performed in the University of Jyväskylä shows, for the first time, that host cell calpain proteases can process enterovirus polyprotein in vitro. The research was published in Viruses in November 2019.

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Contamination by metals can increase metabolic stress in mussels

A study of six beaches in the coastal city of Guarujá in São Paulo state (Southeast Brazil) suggests that urbanization may be a source of stress not only for humans but also for mussels. Researchers affiliated with the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) in Santos, Brazil, and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, found a direct correlation among the degree of urbani

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With cellular blueprint for lungs, researchers look ahead to organ regeneration

Using sophisticated screening across animal species, researchers at Yale have created a cellular blueprint of the human lung that will make it easier to understand the design principles behind lung function and disease—and to bioengineer new lungs.

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Genetics can play key role in saving trees

Tree conservation strategies based on genetic data are best suited for landscapes affected by a rapidly changing climate, a study suggests.

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Host cell proteases can process viral capsid proteins

It has long been suggested that a cell protease could take part in enterovirus infection. However, the identities of such proteases have remained unknown. The work performed in the University of Jyväskylä shows, for the first time, that host cell calpain proteases can process enterovirus polyprotein in vitro. The research was published in Viruses in November 2019.

5h

Non-adiabatic dynamics of strongly driven diffusive Josephson junctions

Understanding how microwave absorption changes the transport properties of diffusive Josephson junctions is at the forefront of interest in the quantum transport community. It is especially relevant for current efforts to address the current-phase relation in topological Josephson junctions, and more generally, the microwave transport in quantum devices.

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Contamination by metals can increase metabolic stress in mussels

A study of six beaches in the coastal city of Guarujá in São Paulo state (Southeast Brazil) suggests that urbanization may be a source of stress not only for humans but also for mussels. Researchers affiliated with the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) in Santos, Brazil, and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, found a direct correlation among the degree of urbani

5h

Astronomers probe the nature of a peculiar pulsar wind nebula

Using ESA's XMM-Newton spacecraft, astronomers have investigated the nature of a peculiar pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the supernova remnant (SNR) CTB 87. Results of the study, presented in a paper published November 26, shed more light on the morphology and spectral properties of this object.

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With cellular blueprint for lungs, researchers look ahead to organ regeneration

Using sophisticated screening across animal species, researchers at Yale have created a cellular blueprint of the human lung that will make it easier to understand the design principles behind lung function and disease—and to bioengineer new lungs.

5h

Investigating the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis

About 2.4 billion years ago, at the end of the Archean Eon, a planet-wide increase in oxygen levels called the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) created the familiar atmosphere we all breathe today. Researchers focused on life's origins widely agree that this transition event was caused by the global proliferation of photosynthetic microbes capable of splitting water to make molecular oxygen (O2). Howev

5h

Data Brokers are Cruising for a Bruising

We blame hackers for breaches, but shadowy brokers are often just as culpable, and need to be held accountable.

5h

Stop Saying Driverless Cars Will Help Old People

And maybe start including them in research instead of just assuming we know what they want.

5h

'The Irishman' Gets De-Aging Right—No Tracking Dots Necessary

Director Martin Scorsese was not about to ask the likes of Robert De Niro and Al Pacino to walk around his set with motion-tracking markers all over their faces.

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19 Newly Discovered Galaxies Appear to Be Missing Dark Matter

Missing Stuff Scientists recently discovered 19 small galaxies, all of which share a puzzling quirk: they appear to be totally devoid of dark matter. Dark matter — the invisible stuff thought to hold together galaxies — is crucial to one of the leading explanations of galactic formation. But now, Live Science reports , astronomers are faced with a difficult choice: prove this new discovery wrong,

5h

Climate change threatens a scary number of plant species

Almost 40% of global land plant species are very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as the climate continues to change, according to new research. "When talking about global biodiversity, we had a good approximation of the total number of land plant species, but we didn't have a real handle on how many there really are," says lead author Brian Enquist, University of Arizona p

5h

Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants

There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. They are named so because of their color. To understand how such ecosystems function, scientists from Tyumen analyzed the chemical composition of water and studied the invertebrates' species living in them. These lakes are good model objects for studying the laws of geological history and the formation of the earth's

5h

A vital project for monitoring ocean currents has been saved – for now

An under-threat flagship science project that monitors an ocean current crucial to weather on both sides of the Atlantic has been given a reprieve after funding was secured for its short-term future

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NASA Probe Discovers Source of Solar Winds

NASA's Parker Solar Probe started making history the very minute it launched, taking the crown as the fastest moving launch in history. It went on to pass closer to the sun than any previous spacecraft, and now NASA has released the results of scans made during the probe's first two solar flybys. The research, published in several groundbreaking studies, offers tantalizing details on the origin o

5h

Another Shot at Major Depression Fails

This is a big day for clinical trial data, and unfortunately it didn't get off to a very good start. Everyone is waiting for more data on Biogen's Alzheimers program later today, but another anticipated trial has already read out. Sage Therapeutics made quite a few headlines in 2017 and 2018 when their trials of brexanalone ( allopregnanolone ) showed efficacy against post-partum depression (PPD)

5h

Så hanterar kroppens celler syrebrist

Efter en blodpropp går det efter några månader att se att syrebristen i det drabbade området gett upphov till nya blodkärl. Att nybilda kärl är ett långsamt sätt för kroppen att hantera syrebrist, eller hypoxi som det heter på läkarspråk. Betydligt snabbare är att slå på en gen som bildar ett hormon kallat erytropoetin, EPO, som signalerar till benmärgen att kroppen behöver fler röda blodkroppar.

5h

Utforskande och gränsöverskridande litteratur

Polen på gränsen till magin Olga Tokarczuk tilldelas 2018 års Nobelpris i litteratur. Hon är en av de yngsta mottagarna under prisets historia. En "gränsöverskridande" författare står det i motiveringen, och historiska landsgränser är en av bottnarna i hennes författarskap.

5h

De bekämpar fattigdom med experiment

– Det är ett superbra val av pristagare! Det säger Tessa Bold, forskare i nationalekonomi vid Stockholms universitet, som forskar i utvecklingsekonomi efter samma principer som pristagarna – genom så kallade fältexperiment. – Visst är det ett rätt förvånande pris, fortsätter hon. De tre forskarna är relativt unga. Men detta med utvecklingsekonomi har ju lite varit på gång, säger hon.

5h

Vår plats i kosmos

När kosmologi blev vetenskap

5h

Batteri i var mans hand får årets kemipris

Upphovsmännen till litiumjonbatteriet har länge varit favorittippade till kemipriset. Få uppfinningar har fått så stort genomslag som det lätta och uppladdningsbara batteri som de utvecklade under 1970- och 1980-talen.

5h

För freden på Afrikas horn

Abiy Ahmed blev premiärminister i Etiopien i april 2018. Han återupptog då fredssamtalen med grannlandet Eritrea. De har länge haft en relation av varken krig eller fred. Abiy Ahmed har lett normaliseringen av relationerna till Eritrea och de båda länderna undertecknade nyligen ett avtal som avslutade den 20 år långa gränskonflikten.

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Nobel 2019 – här är årets pristagare

I sitt testamente uttryckte Alfred Nobel sin önskan att merparten av hans förmögenhet ska användas till att belöna dem som "hafva gjort menskligheten den största nytta". 1901 delades de första prisen ut. Så här lyder motiveringarna till årets pristagare

5h

Forsker: Alle fremtidens vindmøllevinger skal have en 'digital tvilling'

PLUS. Der er millioner at spare på at forudsige reparationer af vindmøllevinger ved hjælp af en såkaldt digital tvilling. Et fireårigt forskningsprojekt vil nu forsøge at udvikle en skabelon for alle vindmøllevinger i verden.

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To stop a tech apocalypse we need ethics and the arts

submitted by /u/yieldingTemporarily [link] [comments]

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Braille smartwatch for the blind invented

submitted by /u/Barknuckle [link] [comments]

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The danger of AI is weirder than you think | Janelle Shane

submitted by /u/right-to-die [link] [comments]

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Kidney patients report positive experiences with novel approach to dialysis access

A new study reports high levels of patient satisfaction with a minimally invasive approach to creating vascular access for kidney patients who require hemodialysis.

6h

Obesity surgery improves the heart

The benefits of bariatric surgery for obese individuals go beyond weight loss, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

6h

A robot and software make it easier to create advanced materials

A Rutgers-led team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health.

6h

NASA's solar probe reveals stunning results after swooping in close to the sun

NASA's Parker Solar Probe directly samples the solar environment. (NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben /) The sky is full of stars, but only one sits within our reach. Even as close as it is, the sun poses plenty of mysteries that can't be solved from Earth. Odd patterns in sunlight during solar eclipses suggest that the corona, the sun's outermost bit of atmosphere, inexplicably burns hundreds

6h

'When Lambs Become Lions' Review: An Ivory Poacher's Perspective

The documentarian Jon Kasbe spent years among elephant hunters in Kenya, and his movie is an intense 74-minute distillation of his efforts.

6h

Kunstig intelligens vrider skjult viden ud af Rigets sø af patientdata

Forestil dig en intelligent computer, der ud fra en gigantisk pulje af patientdata fra landets hospitaler kan afsløre hidtil ukendte sammenhænge om bl.a. kræft. Sådan et værktøj har professor Jens Lundgren og kolleger fra skabt med et internationalt team af IT-specialister.

6h

Orme i tarmen kan vise sig at blive kilde til ny type antibiotika

Forskere ved Aarhus Universitetshospital har kastet sig ud i at undersøge, om orme i tarmen udskiller sekreter, der slår bakterier ihjel. Viser det sig at holde stik, kan ormene blive kilde til ny antibiotika, der kan redde millioner af menneskeliv.

6h

Image of the Day: HIV Shuttles

Macrophages transport HIV-like particles into lymph nodes during infection.

6h

Yes, China is probably outspending the US in AI—but not on defense

New estimates show how much China's investments in AI have been overblown.

6h

Gummistøvler betød julegaveforbud: Stor forskel på julegaver fra hospitaler

Det er så vigtigt at vise anerkendelse for et hårdt stykke arbejde, siger hospitalsdirektør, der bruger 1,5 mio. kr. på julegaver. Et parti gummistøvler betød til gengæld forbud mod julegaver i en hel region.

6h

Smitsom leversygdom ­udryddet i Svendborg

Med effektiv medicinering og opsøgende indsats er det lykkedes et hold forskere ved Odense Universitetshospital at udrydde hepatitis C i Svendborg. Forskernes håb er, at strategien kan bredes ud til resten af landet.

6h

The Toothpick That Saved a Neuroscience Experiment

Sometimes the most mundane objects can turn out to be unexpectedly crucial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Russian president warns over expansion of US space force

The Russian leader says the US "militarisation" of space means Moscow has to respond.

7h

Plastic pollution has killed half a million hermit crabs, study says

As plastic piles up on beaches, hermit crabs are getting trapped in plastic containers and killed.

7h

What Happens When Computers Learn to Read Our Emotions?

As sensors connected to artificial intelligence proliferate, machines will see right through our poker face.

7h

The Mystery at the Center of the Solar System

For a little NASA spacecraft, the weather outside is frightful. The Parker Solar Probe is on a mission toward the sun. The spacecraft has been exposed to scorching temperatures and intense sunlight as it draws closer with every loop around. Eventually, Parker will glide through the star's outer atmosphere and feel the toastiness of nearly 2 million degrees Fahrenheit (more than 1 million degrees

7h

Electric eel lights up Christmas tree in Tennessee aquarium – video

The Christmas tree at the Tennessee aquarium is being powered by an unusual renewable energy source – an electric eel. Miguel Wattson is the resident eel and through a special system that connects his tank to a nearby tree, the natural shocks he produces when he is looking for food or when he is excited, is being channelled to power fairy lights Flashy fish: electric eel powers Tennessee aquarium

7h

Miljøstyrelsens dispensation til bidræber-pesticider manglede klar faglig opbakning

PLUS. En aktindsigt viser, at Aarhus Universitet aldrig anbefalede at sige ja til dispensere fra EU-forbuddet mod insektgiftene neonikotinoider. »Meget utilfredsstillende,« siger naturfredningsforeningen op til længe ventet rapport fra Rigsrevisionen.

7h

Tyggegummi skal hjælpe kvinder med at blive gravide

Et hold studerende fra Københavns Universitet arbejder på at udvikle et tyggegummi, som præcist…

7h

Sakta men osäkert på klimatmötet i Madrid

Tempot i Madrid är lite högre, ibland springer deltagare verkligen mellan de fem förhandlingar som pågår parallellt, berättar klimatforskaren Mathias Fridahl vid Linköpings universitet som jämför med över 20 klimatmöten som han varit med på tidigare, sedan 2006. − Mötena ligger lite tätare och många frågor är väldigt tekniska, med en hög detaljnivå, förklarar han.

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The Toothpick That Saved a Neuroscience Experiment

Sometimes the most mundane objects can turn out to be unexpectedly crucial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can We Identify Invasive Species before They Invade?

Scientists uncover patterns that predict which insects will harm North America's conifers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Can We Identify Invasive Species before They Invade?

Scientists uncover patterns that predict which insects will harm North America's conifers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Can We Identify Invasive Species before They Invade?

Scientists uncover patterns that predict which insects will harm North America's conifers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Best Screenplay Goes to the Algorithms – Issue 79: Catalysts

Ross Goodwin has had an extraordinary career. After playing about with computers as a child, he studied economics, then became a speech writer for President Obama, writing presidential proclamations, then took a variety of freelance writing jobs. One of these involved churning out business letters—he calls it freelance ghostwriting. The letters were all pretty much the same, so he figured out an

7h

How I Taught My Computer to Write Its Own Music – Issue 79: Catalysts

On a warm day in April 2013, I was sitting in a friend's kitchen in Paris, trying to engineer serendipity. I was trying to get my computer to write music on its own. I wanted to be able to turn it on and have it spit out not just any goofy little algorithmic tune but beautiful, compelling, mysterious music; something I'd be proud to have written myself. The kitchen window was open, and as I liste

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Picasso's Got Nothing on AI Artists – Issue 79: Catalysts

I'm trying to explain to Arthur I. Miller why artworks generated by computers don't quite do it for me. There's no human being behind them. The works aren't a portal into another person's mind, where you can wander in a warren of intention, emotion, and perception, feeling life being shaped into form. What's more, it often seems, people just ain't no good, so it's transcendent to be reminded they

7h

Do Butterflies Challenge the Meaning of Species? – Facts So Romantic

Hybridization, it turns out, plays a pivotal role in how life forms evolve. The tree of life may never look the same. Photograph by sezer66 / Shutterstock What is a species? It's a question that has agonized scientists since well before Darwin. With some exceptions, the thinking has landed on an evidently firm reproductive barrier: Members of different species don't mate. If they do, their offspr

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A robot and software make it easier to create advanced materials

A Rutgers-led team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications such as drugs and regenerative medicine

8h

Fast tandställning bäst och billigast

En fast tandställning är bästa och billigaste alternativet. Mest pengar finns att spara om behandlingen görs av specialisttandläkare, enligt ny forskning. I en ny avhandling vid Malmö universitet har Ola Sollenius, övertandläkare och doktorand, undersökt kostnadseffektiviteten av behandlingar på barn med enkelsidigt korsbett. 110 barn i åldern 8-9 år lottades till fyra olika grupper där de fick b

8h

Millionbevilling til rugekasse for fremtidens ingeniører

Over de næste år kan 50.000 skoleelever lære at arbejde som en ingeniør med afsæt i virkelighedsnære, naturvidenskabelige problemer – takket være en donation på 18,7 millioner kroner fra Villum Fonden til projektet Engineering i skolen.

8h

Meet the Activists Risking Prison to Film VR in Factory Farms

This animal liberation group actually wants to be put on trial. Their goal: force jurors to wear VR headsets and immerse them in the suffering of animals bound for slaughter.

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Think you're right? How to test yourself in the battle of ideas.

When we're convinced in the truth of our ideas, we often believe if we just explain it to others that others will immediately come onboard with them. However, what we see in practice is that we need some resistance from others to help refine those ideas. In doing so, we make them more marketable in the marketplace of ideas. When we have debates, we have to not censor our opponents. We have to be

8h

The Legal Debate About Impeachment Is Over

During yesterday's House Judiciary Committee hearing, the three law professors called by the Democrats and the one law professor called by the Republicans disagreed on a lot. They disagreed on what George Washington thought of executive privilege. They disagreed on what Alexander Hamilton intended by insisting that impeachment be included in the Constitution. Perhaps more to the point, they disag

8h

The Moral Universe of Timothy Keller

Shortly after I met my wife, Cindy, in 1989—she was living in New York City at the time, while I was living in Northern Virginia—she told me about a new church she was attending in Manhattan: Redeemer Presbyterian . The young minister, she told me, was "the best pastor in America." His name was Timothy J. Keller. Since that time Keller, 69, has become one of the most consequential figures in Amer

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Who's Really to Blame for the 'Ukraine Did It' Conspiracy Theory?

In her eloquent impeachment testimony last month, Fiona Hill, a recently departed official at the National Security Council, criticized President Donald Trump and his supporters for parroting that Ukraine, not Russia, interfered in the 2016 elections. "This is a fictional narrative that has been perpetrated and propagated by the Russian security services themselves," Hill said on November 21. The

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Psychology researcher committed misconduct, says university

A Dutch university has found a former psychology researcher at the institution guilty of misconduct for several offenses, including lack of ethics approval for some of her studies and fabricating results in grant applications. In a Nov. 11, 2019, report, officials at the University of Leiden stated that the researcher, whom it does not identify, … Continue reading

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Exclusive: NASA has been quietly commercialising orbital safety

We thought NASA was just monitoring space junk for the US government, but it turns out it has been selling an orbital warning service to select customers

8h

Studerende ophæver blokade

De studerende, der har blokeret bl.a. dekanens kontor på Humaniora, ophæver nu deres blokade….

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FBI advarer om udspionerende smart-tv'er

Smart-tv'er kan blive en indgang for hackere, advarer den amerikanske sikkerhedstjeneste FBI, ligesom tv-producenter muligvis overvåger alt, hvad du ser på dit fjernsyn.

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An effector protein of the wheat stripe rust fungus targets chloroplasts and suppresses chloroplast function

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13487-6 Chloroplasts are important for plant immunity against microbial pathogens. Here Xu et al. identify, in the wheat stripe rust fungus, a haustorium-specific protein that is translocated into chloroplasts and affects chloroplast function by interacting with a putative component of the plant cytochrome b6-f comp

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Combining tubercidin and cordycepin scaffolds results in highly active candidates to treat late-stage sleeping sickness

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13522-6 Trypanosoma brucei relies on uptake and conversion of purines from the host, which constitutes a potential drug target. Here, Hulpia et al. combine structural elements from known trypanocidal nucleoside analogues and develop a potent trypanocide with curative activity in animal models of acute and late stage

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Resonant optical Stark effect in monolayer WS2

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13501-x Many-body interactions have important consequences for the optoelectronic properties of 2D materials. Here, the authors report on how many-body interactions affect the behavior of the valley-selective optical Stark effect for excitation near the A-exciton resonance in monolayer WS2.

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Conformational pathway provides unique sensitivity to a synaptic mGluR

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13407-8 Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are dimeric G-protein–coupled receptors that operate at neural synapses. Here authors use FRET assays in live cells to monitor mGluR2/7's activation and reveal how heterodimerization can alter the glutamate response of an mGluR.

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Biogenesis and functions of aminocarboxypropyluridine in tRNA

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13525-3 E. coli and human tRNAs contain 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine (acp3U) modification. Here the authors identify E. coli TapT and human DTWD1/2 as tRNA aminocarboxypropyltransferases responsible for acp3U formation. Inhibition of acp3U modification results in genome instability in heat-stressed E. coli and

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Saline aqueous fluid circulation in mantle wedge inferred from olivine wetting properties

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13513-7 The authors here perform experiments to investigate the dihedral angle of olivine-H2O and olivine-H2O-NaCl systems. The observed effect of NaCl to decrease dihedral angles allows fluids to percolate through forearc mantle wedge and to accumulate in the overlying crust, accounting for the high electrical cond

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Large Igneous Province thermogenic greenhouse gas flux could have initiated Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum climate change

Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12957-1 The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum constitutes one of the largest climate perturbations in Earth's history, but its exact causes are not well known. New estimates of greenhouse gas fluxes from the North Atlantic Igneous Province at high temporal resolution show that they could have initiated this event.

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Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming — study

Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects — a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals.

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Genome testing for siblings of kids with autism may detect ASD before symptoms appear

One of the key priorities of interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is starting early, with some evidence showing infants as young as seven months old could benefit. Yet, most children in North America aren't diagnosed with ASD until they're over four years of age. New research published in Nature Communications has found testing the DNA of siblings of individuals with ASD may be predict

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Why Freshwater Mussels Are Dying

A mysterious die-off of freshwater mussels has biologists scrambling to figure out a cause. Freshwater mussels are critical to river ecosystems and to U.S. water supplies.

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Comparative analysis of corrected tiger genome provides clues to its neuronal evolution

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54838-z

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The driving mechanisms of the carbon cycle perturbations in the late Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54593-1

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Visible light-induced thymine dimerisation based on large localised field gradient by non-uniform optical near-field

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54661-6

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The Role and Mechanism of SIRT1 in Resveratrol-regulated Osteoblast Autophagy in Osteoporosis Rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44766-3

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Early Pep-13-induced immune responses are SERK3A/B-dependent in potato

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54944-y

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Trauma Surgeon Battles Bullets In The Operating Room And The Community

Weary of losing neighbors and patients to gunfire, St. Louis trauma surgeon Laurie Punch has a message: Gun violence is contagious, but so is healing. Doctors who teach can be part of the solution. (Image credit: Whitney Curtis for KHN)

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Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming: study

Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects—a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals.

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Graduate Students Do Real Work. Let Us Unionize.

The National Labor Relations Board claims that graduate student workers at private universities should not be considered employees. But the ruling's logic — that graduate assistants' work is primarily educational — demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of the duties that graduate students perform.

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Researchers: Put a brake on bioenergy by 2050 to avoid negative climate impacts

The burgeoning bioenergy sector must peak and decline in the next 30 years to alleviate extreme pressure on land, warns researchers in a new analysis published today in Global Change Biology. They assert that projections envisioning the use of biomass from crops, trees or grasses for fuel through 2100 overlook the technology's high carbon footprint and excessive land use.

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UN climate talks aim to pave way for global carbon market

On a cold afternoon in late November, Jan Gerrit Otterpohl eyes the chimneys of Berlin's Heizkraftwerk Mitte, a state-of-the-art power plant that supplies the city with heat and electricity. It's not the billowing steam he's interested in, but the largely invisible carbon dioxide that the power station exhales as it burns natural gas.

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Dansk virksomhed sætter turbo på pet-scanningen

PLUS. Dansk virksomhed angriber nogle af de største udfordringer ved nuklearmedicin: stråling og spildtid.

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Climate models are often attacked, but most of the time they're remarkably good

The computer models used to simulate what heat-trapping gases will do to global temperatures have been pretty spot-on in their predictions, a new study found.

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Author Correction: Different signatures of miR-16, miR-30b and miR-93 in exosomes from breast cancer and DCIS patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44070-0

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Researchers: Put a brake on bioenergy by 2050 to avoid negative climate impacts

A peer-reviewed assessment cautions that ramping up bioenergy projects requiring large stretches of land could send renewable energy sector down an unsustainable path.

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New projection: Faster rising seas forecast in South Florida

New scientific projections released Wednesday predict that ocean levels will rise even faster than previously forecast over the next four decades in low-lying southeastern Florida, which is already prone to frequent flooding even on sunny days.

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Historic US towns endured wars, storms. What about sea rise?

Historic cities and towns along the Southeastern U.S. coast have survived wars, hurricanes, disease outbreaks and other calamities, but now that sea levels are creeping up with no sign of stopping, they face a more existential crisis.

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Sydney smoke crisis 'longest on record'

Australian bushfires have caused unprecedented pollution in Sydney and along the country's east coast, officials said Thursday, with smoke and dust burning residents' eyes and prompting a spike in respiratory complaints.

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Gulf of Mexico coral reefs to protect from storm surge in the future—But will they?

Coral reefs support 25 percent of all marine life around the globe. Those in the Gulf of Mexico, along the coasts of Louisiana, Florida, Texas and Mexico, might be less known and less popular among tourists than other reefs; nevertheless, they also serve as important barriers to storm surge, lessening the impact of dangerous hurricanes. In a new paper published in the journal Frontiers in Marine S

11h

Alcohol tolerance may have saved our ancestors from extinction

The ability to process alcohol may have saved humanity's ancestors from extinction, a new book suggests.

11h

Alcohol tolerance may have saved our ancestors from extinction

The ability to process alcohol may have saved humanity's ancestors from extinction, a new book suggests.

11h

Grøn fremtidsfond fra finansloven får ros: »Spændende og nødvendigt instrument«

PLUS. Den grønne tænketank Concitos internationale chef mener, at fondens størrelse på 25 mia. kroner er markant – også set i international sammenhæng.

11h

ASH giver mulighed for at få justeret tilgangen til patienter

Det er ikke kun sine forskningsresultater som læge Cecilie Rank glæder sig til at fremvise på ASH. Hun ser også frem til networking med nationale og internationale kollegaer.

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We need to protect nature to stand any chance of tackling climate chaos | Caroline Lucas

Voters have woken up to the climate emergency. Equally urgent is the threat to nature and wildlife – and the issues are linked It has been heartening to see how the climate emergency has finally risen up the political agenda in recent months. What has had much less attention, but is equally urgent, is the catastrophic decline in our nature and wildlife. The UK is one of the most nature-depleted c

13h

Her er de teknologier, der (måske) skal redde os fra klimakrisen

Vi skal have fjernet CO2 fra atmosfæren. Her er en række bud på, hvordan vi gør.

13h

13h

A Tiny Island Exposes Europe's Failures

On a tiny island in the Mediterranean Sea, on the fringes of the European Union, something incredible is unfolding. A political crisis and a social uprising, spurred by investigative journalism, are revealing the failures of Europe. The case is complex: Malta's best-known journalist, Daphne Caruana Galizia, was assassinated by a car bomb in October 2017. The murder has not yet been solved. A busi

13h

Anti-vaxxers try to kill Florida bill ending childhood vaccination religious exemption

Anti-vaxxers and their misinformation campaign may have killed Senate Bill 64, repealing Florida's religious exemption to childhood immunizations, which is being abused by parents. Sen. Laura Book, the bill's sponsor, remains undeterred, citing the high risk of disease outbreaks in Florida.

13h

NASA Just Gave Us Our Closest Look Ever at a Comet Exploding in Space

The most detailed observation to date of this mysterious phenomenon.

13h

En halv million eremitkrebs er døde efter at være blevet fanget i plastikaffald

Forsker kalder resultatet af undersøgelsen for "chokerende, men måske ikke overraskende".

13h

Existentiell ensamhet – att vara ensam omgiven av många?

Att inte längre vara någon att räkna med, att vara begränsad och hamna i beroende på grund av kroppens skröplighet eller att behöva ta hand om svåra situationer själv utan att kunna dela upplevelsen med någon annan. Så beskriver några sköra äldre personer vad existentiell ensamhet kan betyda för dem.

13h

13h

Potential cause of elevated nighttime blood pressure in patients with apnea identified

University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found a potential cause for elevated nighttime blood pressure that may help patients with OSA get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.

14h

New report: Teacher effectiveness has a dramatic effect on student outcomes

A new IZA World of Labor report publishing tomorrow, Dec. 5, 2019, finds teacher effectiveness to have a strong effect on pupils attainment. It goes on to look at ways to increase it including reforming hiring practices, and reforming teacher training and development.

14h

Study finds wide county-level variation in rates of surgery for early-stage lung cancer

A new study finds more than two-fold differences between counties with the lowest and highest rates of surgery for patients with early stage lung cancer, with socioeconomic and healthcare delivery factors contributing to the gap.

14h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 5. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

14h

What is the role of zoos today? The captivity v conservation debate

Many people feel uneasy about confining wild animals, but the benefits may outweigh the misgivings

14h

Målinger afslører: Selv nye huse kan have for meget radon

PLUS. I 2010 blev det lov, at der ikke må være mere end 100 Bq/m3 radon i indeluften i nye huse. Men 11 procent af husene i en ny undersøgelse ligger over det niveau.

15h

Nu kommer Verona: Et nyt sikkert sprog fra Microsoft skal løse problemer med gammel C og C++

Verona er et kommende open source-bud fra software-kæmpen med dansk islæt. Det skal gøre usikker kode sikker.

15h

Google details AI that classifies chest X-rays with human-level accuracy

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16h

Researchers develop AI that reads lips from video footage

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16h

Personal Invisibility Cloak Stymies People Detectors

submitted by /u/Metazoick [link] [comments]

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16h

Eight Degrees North

How a change of latitude changed my perspective — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Confinement of surface spinners in liquid metamaterials [Applied Physical Sciences]

We show that rotating particles at the liquid–gas interface can be efficiently manipulated using the surface-wave analogue of optical lattices. Two orthogonal standing waves generate surface flows of counter-rotating half-wavelength unit cells, the liquid interface metamaterial, whose geometry is controlled by the wave phase shift. Here we demonstrate that by…

17h

Efficient nonenzymatic cyclization and domain shuffling drive pyrrolopyrazine diversity from truncated variants of a fungal NRPS [Biochemistry]

Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) generate the core peptide scaffolds of many natural products. These include small cyclic dipeptides such as the insect feeding deterrent peramine, which is a pyrrolopyrazine (PPZ) produced by grass-endophytic Epichloë fungi. Biosynthesis of peramine is catalyzed by the 2-module NRPS, PpzA-1, which has a C-terminal reductase…

17h

Functional genetic validation of key genes conferring insecticide resistance in the major African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae [Genetics]

Resistance in Anopheles gambiae to members of all 4 major classes (pyrethroids, carbamates, organochlorines, and organophosphates) of public health insecticides limits effective control of malaria transmission in Africa. Increase in expression of detoxifying enzymes has been associated with insecticide resistance, but their direct functional validation in An. gambiae is still…

17h

Pressure-induced topological phase transition in noncentrosymmetric elemental tellurium [Physics]

Recent progress in understanding the electronic band topology and emergent topological properties encourage us to reconsider the band structure of well-known materials including elemental substances. Controlling such a band topology by external field is of particular interest from both fundamental and technological viewpoints. Here we report possible signatures of the…

17h

Solidification and superlubricity with molecular alkane films [Applied Physical Sciences]

Hydrocarbon films confined between smooth mica surfaces have long provided an experimental playground for model studies of structure and dynamics of confined liquids. However, fundamental questions regarding the phase behavior and shear properties in this simple system remain unsolved. With ultrasensitive resolution in film thickness and shear stress, and control…

17h

Unveiling dimensions of stability in complex ecological networks [Ecology]

Understanding the stability of ecological communities is a matter of increasing importance in the context of global environmental change. Yet it has proved to be a challenging task. Different metrics are used to assess the stability of ecological systems, and the choice of one metric over another may result in…

17h

Mix-and-inject XFEL crystallography reveals gated conformational dynamics during enzyme catalysis [Biochemistry]

How changes in enzyme structure and dynamics facilitate passage along the reaction coordinate is a fundamental unanswered question. Here, we use time-resolved mix-and-inject serial crystallography (MISC) at an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL), ambient-temperature X-ray crystallography, computer simulations, and enzyme kinetics to characterize how covalent catalysis modulates isocyanide hydratase (

17h

Structure and function of an unusual flavodoxin from the domain Archaea [Microbiology]

Flavodoxins, electron transfer proteins essential for diverse metabolisms in microbes from the domain Bacteria, are extensively characterized. Remarkably, although genomic annotations of flavodoxins are widespread in microbes from the domain Archaea, none have been isolated and characterized. Herein is described the structural, biochemical, and physiological characterization of an unusual flavodox

17h

Fungal aerobiota are not affected by time nor environment over a 13-y time series at the Mauna Loa Observatory [Ecology]

Fungi are ubiquitous and often abundant components of virtually all ecosystems on Earth, serving a diversity of functions. While there is clear evidence that fungal-mediated processes can influence environmental conditions, and in turn select for specific fungi, it is less clear how fungi respond to environmental fluxes over relatively long…

17h

17h

Research in sheep suggests possible early test for fetal heart health

Changes in heart rate, due to low oxygen conditions, experienced by the fetus during pregnancy, could be used to predict the future heart health of babies, shows research published in The Journal of Physiology today.

18h

Baby Yoda Merchandise Is Out There—But Wary, You Must Be

Unofficial Baby Yoda gear has flooded the internet, and some sellers are taking sketchy shortcuts to meet the demand.

18h

Rainforest Dwellers and Urbanites Have Consistently Different Microbiomes

A study done in South America found that with increasing population density humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut.

18h

Mars rover aims to grab a piece of history

British engineers test technologies that will be needed to bring samples of Martian rock to Earth.

18h

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