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nyheder2019december06

Hoag's Object Is a Galaxy Within a Galaxy Within a Galaxy (and Nobody Knows Why)

Hoag's object, which is a galaxy within a galaxy within a galaxy, has befuddled stargazers since astronomer Arthur Hoag discovered it in 1950.

19h

Gamma-ray laser moves a step closer to reality

A physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has performed calculations showing hollow spherical bubbles filled with a gas of positronium atoms are stable in liquid helium.

12min

14h

The Woman Who Souped Up Baby Yoda's Popularity

When TV writer Julie Benson first saw Baby Yoda sip soup, she had to tweet about it. The rest of the internet noticed.

now

10min

Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor

Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a road map that reveals the quantum "rules of the road" that electrons must follow in the enigmatic superconductor.

31min

Reassessment of Alzheimer's Drug Raises Hope–and Concerns

Will the benefits of aducanumab be enough to justify FDA approval, given its small benefit and high price? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

32min

This Roleplaying AI Makes a Great Dungeon Master

ReRoll When AI development firm OpenAI released its GPT-2 algorithm, it warned that the tech was capable of flooding the internet with fake news and propaganda. What it didn't predict, however, is that the algorithm can also make a pretty effective dungeon master. AI Dungeon 2 ( playable here ) uses the full-sized GPT-2 algorithm to bring players through a text adventure-style game that it writes

38min

Where's Vikram? NASA Photos and Amateur Sleuthing Led to Crashed Indian Moon Lander

The Indian space agency has been tight-lipped about the fate of the probe, but crowdsourcing and NASA's openness led to its discovery.

39min

Reassessment of Alzheimer's Drug Raises Hope–and Concerns

Will the benefits of aducanumab be enough to justify FDA approval, given its small benefit and high price? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

40min

Reassessment of Alzheimer's Drug Raises Hope–and Concerns

Will the benefits of aducanumab be enough to justify FDA approval, given its small benefit and high price? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

40min

48min

AI and Economic Productivity: Expect Evolution, Not Revolution

https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/ai-and-economic-productivity-expect-evolution-not-revolution Article cites 'evidence' that AI is nothing special and no major disruption will occur. submitted by /u/2Wonder [link] [comments]

48min

Gamma-ray laser moves a step closer to reality

A physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has performed calculations showing hollow spherical bubbles filled with a gas of positronium atoms are stable in liquid helium. The calculations take scientists a step closer to realizing a gamma-ray laser.

53min

New Mammal Fossil May Show How Ear Bones Evolved from Jaw Bones

An ancient animal's hammer, anvil, and stirrup bones are at the base of the jaw but completely detached from it.

58min

This Startup Made a Nose Spray for Microdosing Psilocybin

Take a large enough dose of psilocybin, the compound found in " magic mushrooms ," and you could find yourself largely incapacitated for hours while you ride out the trip. But some people microdose psilocybin , meaning they take just a tiny bit of it. Advocates claim the practice does everything from increasing creativity and concentration to helping cope with depression and anxiety — all without

1h

Looking back on ways the internet consumed our life in 2019

Spotify can show you when you most commonly listen to music. (Spotify/) Social media was particularly musical this week. Streaming music behemoth Spotify unleashed its annual Wrapped recaps, which tell users about their most frequently played tracks and artists. Spotify really stepped up its presentation this year, baking those stats into pre-made stories ready to share on Instagram, Facebook, or

1h

New ultra-miniaturized scope less invasive, produces higher quality images

Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images.

1h

Study debunks notion that C-section would increase risk of obesity in the child

Women who have C-sections are no more likely to have children who develop obesity than women who give birth naturally, according to a large study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal PLOS Medicine. The findings contradict several smaller studies that did find an association between C-section deliveries and offspring obesity but did not consider the numerous ma

1h

Nanocontainer ships titan-size gene therapies and drugs into cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have created a tiny, nanosize container that can slip inside cells and deliver protein-based medicines and gene therapies of any size — even hefty ones attached to the gene-editing tool called CRISPR.

1h

Researchers add order to polymer gels

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers from the University of Tokyo's Institute for Solid State Physics have found a way to produce a new kind of gel which overcomes this limitation. It is still malleable and adaptable like existing gels, b

1h

No link between caesarian delivery and obesity, research finds

Mode of delivery unrelated to whether a baby is overweight as a young adult, study suggests Delivery by caesarean section does not increase the chance of a baby ending up overweight or obese as a young adult, researchers have found, contrary to previous research . The authors of the study say their work drew on a huge number of people and more fully takes into account a wide range of possible fac

1h

Organism That Eats Meteorites Could Help Us Find Alien Life

A microbial descendant of some of Earth's earliest life can not only survive by eating meteorites, but also seemingly thrive on the space rocks — a finding that could help us detect signs of past life throughout the universe. Humans and all other animals need to eat organic matter to survive. The single-celled organism Metallosphaera sedula (M. sedula), however, can produce its energy by eating n

1h

Interstellar comet Borisov is about to pass close to Earth and the sun

Astronomers are about to get their best opportunity to observe the interstellar comet Borisov as it reaches its closest point to Earth and the sun on 8 December

1h

Cannibalistic Dinosaurs Went Through a Lot of Teeth

The only known cannibal among dinosaurs replaced its pearly whites more often than scientists expected, and so did some other carnivores.

1h

Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor

Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a detailed map that reveals the "rules of the road" for electrons both in normal conditions and in the critical moments just before the material transforms into a superconductor.

1h

Nanocontainer ships titan-size gene therapies and drugs into cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have created a tiny, nanosize container that can slip inside cells and deliver protein-based medicines and gene therapies of any size—even hefty ones attached to the gene-editing tool called CRISPR. If their creation—constructed of a biodegradable polymer—passes more laboratory testing, it could offer a way to efficiently ferry larger medical compou

1h

Researchers add order to polymer gels

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers from the University of Tokyo's Institute for Solid State Physics have found a way to produce a new kind of gel which overcomes this limitation. It is still malleable and adaptable like existing gels, b

1h

Fluorescence microscopy visualization of the roughness-induced transition between lubrication regimes

We investigate the transition between different regimes of lubrication and directly observe the thickness of nanometric lubrication films with a sensitivity of a single molecular layer at a multi-asperity interface through fluorescence microscopy. We redefine specific film thickness as the ratio of the lubricant film thickness and the surface roughness measured only at those regions of the interf

1h

A minimally invasive lens-free computational microendoscope

Ultra-miniaturized microendoscopes are vital for numerous biomedical applications. Such minimally invasive imagers allow for navigation into hard-to-reach regions and observation of deep brain activity in freely moving animals. Conventional solutions use distal microlenses. However, as lenses become smaller and less invasive, they develop greater aberrations and restricted fields of view. In addi

1h

Inverting singlet and triplet excited states using strong light-matter coupling

In organic microcavities, hybrid light-matter states can form with energies that differ from the bare molecular excitation energies by nearly 1 eV. A timely question, given the recent advances in the development of thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials, is whether strong light-matter coupling can be used to invert the ordering of singlet and triplet states and, in addition, enhance r

1h

Daltons and Amagats laws fail in gas mixtures with shock propagation

A shock propagating through a gas mixture leads to pressure, temperature, and density increases across the shock front. Rankine-Hugoniot relations correlating pre- and post-shock quantities describe a calorically perfect gas but deliver a good approximation for real gases, provided the pre-shock conditions are well characterized with a thermodynamic mixing model. Two classic thermodynamic models

1h

Tailoring solvent coordination for high-speed, room-temperature blading of perovskite photovoltaic films

The efficiencies of small-pixel perovskite photovoltaics have increased to above 24%, while most reported fabrication methods cannot be transferred to scalable manufacturing process. Here, we report a method of fast blading large-area perovskite films at an unprecedented speed of 99 mm/s under ambient conditions by tailoring solvent coordination capability. Combing volatile noncoordinating solven

1h

Polymer gel with a flexible and highly ordered three-dimensional network synthesized via bond percolation

Gels are a soft elastic material consisting of a three-dimensional polymer network with nanometer-sized pores and are used in a variety of applications. However, gel networks typically have a substantial level of defects because the network formation reaction proceeds stochastically. In this study, we present a general scheme to fabricate gels with extremely low levels of defects by applying geom

1h

FeSe quantum dots for in vivo multiphoton biomedical imaging

An immense demand in biomedical imaging is to develop efficient photoluminescent probes with high biocompatibility and quantum yield, as well as multiphoton absorption performance to improve penetration depth and spatial resolution. Here, iron selenide (FeSe) quantum dots (QDs) are reported to meet these criteria. The synthesized QDs exhibit two- and three-photon excitation property at 800- and 1

1h

Spin-dependent charge transport through 2D chiral hybrid lead-iodide perovskites

Chiral-induced spin selectivity (CISS) occurs when the chirality of the transporting medium selects one of the two spin 1/2 states to transport through the media while blocking the other. Monolayers of chiral organic molecules demonstrate CISS but are limited in their efficiency and utility by the requirement of a monolayer to preserve the spin selectivity. We demonstrate CISS in a system that in

1h

Grain boundary decohesion by nanoclustering Ni and Cr separately in CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloys

The loss of ductility with temperature has been widely observed in tensile tests of single-phase face-centered cubic structured high-entropy alloys (HEAs). However, the fundamental mechanism for such a ductility loss remains unknown. Here, we show that ductility loss in the CrMnFeCoNi HEA upon deformation at intermediate temperatures is correlated with cracking at grain boundaries (GBs). Nanoclus

1h

Printing of wirelessly rechargeable solid-state supercapacitors for soft, smart contact lenses with continuous operations

Recent advances in smart contact lenses are essential to the realization of medical applications and vision imaging for augmented reality through wireless communication systems. However, previous research on smart contact lenses has been driven by a wired system or wireless power transfer with temporal and spatial restrictions, which can limit their continuous use and require energy storage devic

1h

Polyelectrolytes induce water-water correlations that result in dramatic viscosity changes and nuclear quantum effects

Ions interact with water via short-ranged ion-dipole interactions. Recently, an additional unexpected long-ranged interaction was found: The total electric field of ions influences water-water correlations over tens of hydration shells, leading to the Jones Ray effect, a 0.3% surface tension depression. Here, we report such long-range interactions contributing substantially to both molecular and

1h

Expedient synthesis of E-hydrazone esters and 1H-indazole scaffolds through heterogeneous single-atom platinum catalysis

Unprotected E -hydrazone esters are prized building blocks for the preparation of 1 H -indazoles and countless other N-containing biologically active molecules. Despite previous advances, efficient and stereoselective synthesis of these compounds remains nontrivial. Here, we show that Pt single atoms anchored on defect-rich CeO 2 nanorods (Pt 1 /CeO 2 ), in conjunction with the alcoholysis of amm

1h

Carboxylated branched poly({beta}-amino ester) nanoparticles enable robust cytosolic protein delivery and CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

Efficient cytosolic protein delivery is necessary to fully realize the potential of protein therapeutics. Current methods of protein delivery often suffer from low serum tolerance and limited in vivo efficacy. Here, we report the synthesis and validation of a previously unreported class of carboxylated branched poly(β-amino ester)s that can self-assemble into nanoparticles for efficient intracell

1h

Simple experiment explains magnetic resonance

Physicists have designed an experiment to explain the concept of magnetic resonance. A versatile technique employed in chemistry, physics, and materials research, magnetic resonance describes a resonant excitation of electron or atomic nuclei spins residing in a magnetic field by means of electromagnetic waves.

1h

Elon Musk Keeps Buying Mansions in a Particular Neighborhood

Musk City Over the past seven years, Elon Musk has bought up a cluster of expensive homes in Los Angeles' ritzy Bel-Air neighborhood. Musk paid about approximately $100 million for the homes, six of which are all in close proximity within Bel-Air, according to The Wall Street Journal . The seventh is a full estate with a $27 million mansion in Northern California, near Tesla headquarters. While i

1h

Uber's Crime Report Is 'Highly Alarming,' Says a Criminologist

In its first compilation, the ride-hail service says there were more than 3,000 sexual assaults related to Uber rides last year, up 4% from the year before.

1h

Japan launches human trial of new Ebola vaccine

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

2h

Philippines floods force 66,000 from homes

The Philippines' north has been hit by some of its worst flooding in decades, with torrents of muddy runoff forcing 66,000 from their homes and prompting rescues of trapped locals, authorities said Friday.

2h

Bacteria, fungus combo can help crops fight salty conditions

Researchers at Florida International University have found coating seeds with a fungus and a bacterium could help valuable crops block the one-two punch of saltier groundwater and soil.

2h

EU bans controversial pesticide

A controversial pesticide linked to developmental problems in humans will be definitively banned in the EU in 2020 after a vote on Friday by member states, the European Commission said.

2h

Team finds link between vitamin A and brain response in Monarch butterflies

Biologists at Texas A&M University are making strides in understanding biological clock function in several model organisms and translating these studies into broader implications for human health.

2h

Novel way to ID disease-resistance genes in chocolate-producing trees found

Chocolate-producing cacao trees that are resistant to a major pathogen were identified by an international team of plant geneticists. The findings point the way for plant breeders to develop trees that are tolerant of the disease.

2h

Discovery of a new protein gives insight into a long-standing plant immunity mystery

When a plant senses an invading pathogen, it activates a molecular signaling cascade that switch on its defense mechanisms. One such mechanism involves sacrificing host cells to the pathogen. This is a tightly controlled process that involves the work of plant proteins to ensure that the sacrificial cells are only killed if the pathogen is attacking. This process, called the cell death response, e

2h

Skincare 101: The science behind your favorite moisturizers, serums, actives, and more

Taking care of your largest organ can be a daunting task (DepositPhotos/) As the first line of defense to the onslaught of the outside world, our skin fends off cosmic UV rays, reaction-hungry free radicals, and the imminent impact of concrete pavement on an icy day. But laboring on the front lines of anatomy can take its toll—wrinkles, acne, and sunburn are just a handful of the common battle sc

2h

Uber Gets Thousands of Sexual Assault Complaints per Year

Disturbing Trend Between 2017 and 2018, nearly 6,000 American Uber passengers filed complaints saying that their drivers or another passenger sexually assaulted them . And that's just the official reports. "Each of those incidents represents an individual who has undergone a horrific trauma," Uber chief legal officer Tony West told NBC News . "But I'm not surprised by those numbers. And I'm not s

2h

Why Virginity Tests Are Making News — In The U.S. And Afghanistan

When the rapper T.I. said he has his teenage daughter undergo an annual virginity test, protests arose in the U.S. In fact, the virginity test is a global issue. (Image credit: Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images)

2h

Bacteria, fungus combo can help crops fight salty conditions

Researchers at Florida International University have found coating seeds with a fungus and a bacterium could help valuable crops block the one-two punch of saltier groundwater and soil.

2h

Republican Politicians Really Like Their Videogames Too

House representative Duncan Hunter pleaded guilty this week to stealing more than $150,000 in campaign money for games and movies, among other pleasures.

2h

Hopeful Images From 2019

This has been another year filled with news stories and photos that can often be difficult or disturbing to view. I've made it an annual tradition, after rounding up the "news photos of the year," to compose an essay of uplifting images from the past 12 months—an effort to seek out and recognize some of the abundant joy and kindness present in the world around us. The following are images from th

2h

Team finds link between vitamin A and brain response in Monarch butterflies

Biologists at Texas A&M University are making strides in understanding biological clock function in several model organisms and translating these studies into broader implications for human health.

2h

Novel way to ID disease-resistance genes in chocolate-producing trees found

Chocolate-producing cacao trees that are resistant to a major pathogen were identified by an international team of plant geneticists. The findings point the way for plant breeders to develop trees that are tolerant of the disease.

2h

Discovery of a new protein gives insight into a long-standing plant immunity mystery

When a plant senses an invading pathogen, it activates a molecular signaling cascade that switch on its defense mechanisms. One such mechanism involves sacrificing host cells to the pathogen. This is a tightly controlled process that involves the work of plant proteins to ensure that the sacrificial cells are only killed if the pathogen is attacking. This process, called the cell death response, e

2h

Scientists have spotted new compounds with herbicidal potential from sea fungus

Scientists at the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the G.B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (FEB RAS) together with German colleagues spotted six new and three already known biologically active compounds in a new strain of the fungus Penicillium piltunensein the first time it has been isolated. One compound has a pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, others have herbici

2h

Scientists have spotted new compounds with herbicidal potential from sea fungus

Scientists at the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the G.B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (FEB RAS) together with German colleagues spotted six new and three already known biologically active compounds in a new strain of the fungus Penicillium piltunensein the first time it has been isolated. One compound has a pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, others have herbici

2h

Barriers to reintegration lead to poorer health for the formerly incarcerated

Formerly incarcerated individuals with barriers to re-entry and service needs following their release are subsequently more likely to experience poor physical and mental health, according to an eye-opening new Rutgers University-Camden study.

2h

Pioneering research gives fresh insight into one of the pivotal building blocks of life

The quest to better understand how genomic information is read has taken a new step forward, thanks to pioneering new research.

2h

Dial-a-frog: Researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild

Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild. The FrogPhone is the world's first solar-powered remote survey device that relays environmental data to the observer via text messages, whilst conducting real-time remote acoustic surveys over the phone. These findings are presented in the British Ecologica

2h

Animated videos advance adoption of agriculture techniques

In remote areas with low literacy rates, showing animated videos in the local language demonstrating agricultural techniques results in high retention and adoption rates of those techniques, found researchers from Michigan State University.

2h

Orbiting Robots Could Soon Repair Satellites in Space

By repairing and refueling satellites in space, fewer satellites would have to be launched into low-Earth orbit.

2h

First-Ever "Pig-Monkey Chimeras" Born in Chinese Lab

According to a New Scientist exclusive , the first ever piglets with cells from monkeys have been born in a Chinese lab. "This is the first report of full-term pig-monkey chimeras," State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology researcher Tang Hai, a co-author on a new paper about the birth, told the magazine. The researchers' final aim is to grow human organs inside animals — but th

2h

Pioneering research gives fresh insight into one of the pivotal building blocks of life

The quest to better understand how genomic information is read has taken a new step forward, thanks to pioneering new research.

2h

Dial-a-frog: Researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild

Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild. The FrogPhone is the world's first solar-powered remote survey device that relays environmental data to the observer via text messages, whilst conducting real-time remote acoustic surveys over the phone. These findings are presented in the British Ecologica

2h

Buick Throws in the Towel on Cars in the US

2019 Buick Regal GS Sedans are out at Buick in the United States as it shifts to an all-SUV lineup in 2020. The final sedan in the US lineup, the Regal (main photo), will sell off what remains in stock. That also includes the well-regarded and soft-selling Buick Regal Tour X, a European-style sporty station wagon. Buick will end the year selling about 15,000 Regals, or one of every 14 Buicks sold

2h

Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds

Nocturnal seabirds nesting on remote islands can be extremely difficult to study. An increasingly important tool for monitoring these populations involves acoustic sensors deployed in the field to record sounds over long periods of time. But analysis of the resulting recordings to identify and count the calls of different species can be time-consuming, even with computers and artificial intelligen

3h

Using a molecular motor to switch the preference of anion-binding catalysts

Many organic molecules are chiral, which means that they are non-superimposable on their mirror image. Those mirror images are called enantiomers and can have different properties when interacting with other chiral entities, for example, biomolecules. Selectively producing the right enantiomer is therefore important in, for example, pharmaceuticals. University of Groningen chemists Ruth Dorel and

3h

How saving the ozone layer in 1987 slowed global warming

The Montreal Protocol, an international agreement signed in 1987 to stop chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) destroying the ozone layer, now appears to be the first international treaty to successfully slow the rate of global warming.

3h

Genetic typing of a bacterium with biotechnological potential

Pseudomonas putida is a bacterium occuring in soil, aquatic environments and plants. Although the virulence of Pseudomonas p.—the ability of the bacterium to infect its host and inflict a disease—is considered to be low, infection in severely ill patients can be lethal. P. putida strains (also called isolates) have been found in hospitals, e.g. in urine, blood or wound discharge from patients, and

3h

Huge waves and disease turn Marshall Islands into 'war zone,' health official says

The level of alarm is already high in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, as the Pacific island nation struggles with rising sea levels and the after-effects of decades of U.S. nuclear testing on its atolls.

3h

How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?

Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body. But what about a healthy plant microbiome?

3h

Daily briefing: Sounds of life revitalize reefs

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03788-7 Piped-in sounds of a healthy reef tempt young fish to re-colonize degraded areas. Plus: The San Andreas and Cascadia earthquake faults might be linked and how to build a better malaria vaccine.

3h

Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds

Nocturnal seabirds nesting on remote islands can be extremely difficult to study. An increasingly important tool for monitoring these populations involves acoustic sensors deployed in the field to record sounds over long periods of time. But analysis of the resulting recordings to identify and count the calls of different species can be time-consuming, even with computers and artificial intelligen

3h

Genetic typing of a bacterium with biotechnological potential

Pseudomonas putida is a bacterium occuring in soil, aquatic environments and plants. Although the virulence of Pseudomonas p.—the ability of the bacterium to infect its host and inflict a disease—is considered to be low, infection in severely ill patients can be lethal. P. putida strains (also called isolates) have been found in hospitals, e.g. in urine, blood or wound discharge from patients, and

3h

How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?

Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body. But what about a healthy plant microbiome?

3h

Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant

St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands of the plant. By investigating the flowers of St. John's Wort, researchers identified genes involved in dark gland development and the biosynthesis of hypericin. The findings were published in the Plant Bi

3h

Surface effects affect the distribution of hydrogen in metals

The researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) and Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering of the Russian Academy of Sciences studied the distribution of hydrogen in metals in the process of standard testing for hydrogen cracking. They found that there is a surface effect that does not let hydrogen enter the metal. This can result in errors in industrial

3h

Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant

St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands of the plant. By investigating the flowers of St. John's Wort, researchers identified genes involved in dark gland development and the biosynthesis of hypericin. The findings were published in the Plant Bi

3h

Buyer beware of this $1 million gene therapy for aging

Offshore tests by a startup seek to lengthen people's telomeres—and their lives.

3h

Novel way to ID disease-resistance genes in chocolate-producing trees found

Chocolate-producing cacao trees that are resistant to a major pathogen were identified by an international team of plant geneticists. The findings point the way for plant breeders to develop trees that are tolerant of the disease.

3h

Move over Jules Verne — scientists deploy ocean floats to peer into Earth's interior

The release of more than 50 floating sensors, called Mobile Earthquake Recording in Marine Areas by Independent Divers (MERMAIDs), is increasing the number of seismic stations around the planet. Scientists will use them to clarify the picture of the massive mantel plume in the lower mantel lying below the South Pacific Ocean. This effort will also establish one of the most comprehensive overviews

3h

Scientists Find Dead Star Roasting Its Giant Exoplanet

Exquisite Corpse For the first time ever, New Scientist reports , scientists have discovered signs of an exoplanet orbiting a white dwarf — the corpse of an exploded star. It's estimated to be about the size of Jupiter, and it's orbiting the dead star at an incredibly close distance. The discovery could help us gain insight into the evolution of distant star systems, as well as our own. Planets t

3h

Move over Jules Verne: Scientists deploy ocean floats to peer into Earth's interior

The release of more than 50 floating sensors, called Mobile Earthquake Recording in Marine Areas by Independent Divers (MERMAIDs), is increasing the number of seismic stations around the planet. Scientists will use the floating array to clarify the picture of the massive mantel plume in the lower mantel lying below the South Pacific Ocean. This effort will also establish one of the most comprehens

3h

Can a Big Oil Company Go Carbon-Free?

Spanish oil giant Repsol SA this week announced one of the more ambitious emissions reduction efforts in the industry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Biogen Presents Data on Efficacy of Alzheimer's Drug

The company and its partner halted two clinical trials for futility early this year, but now say they'll seek approval for aducanumab.

3h

Reduced soil tilling helps both soils and yields

By monitoring crops through machine learning and satellite data, Stanford scientists have found farms that till the soil less can increase yields of corn and soybeans and improve the health of the soil — a win-win for meeting growing food needs worldwide.

3h

Why people buy, trade, donate medications on the black market

Altruism and a lack of access and affordability are three reasons why people with chronic illnesses are turning to the 'black market' for medicines and supplies, new research shows. Scientists at University of Utah Health and University of Colorado ran surveys to understand why individuals are looking beyond pharmacies and medical equipment companies to meet essential needs. The reasons listed wer

3h

Stormquakes: Powerful storms cause seafloor tremors

Stormquakes are a phenomenon characterized by seismic activity originating at the ocean floor due to powerful storms. Heavy storms, like hurricanes or nor'easters, can create seismic waves as large as magnitude 3.5 quakes. These tremors caused by the effects of storms on the seafloor are what researchers call stormquakes. Catherine de Groot-Hedlin, who was part of the group that first observed sto

3h

I quit: How poor treatment by customers leads to high turnover in the service industry

According to a new study, customer conflict plays a big role when it comes to service industry workers saying 'I quit' — and how supervisors manage that conflict helps decide whether employees stay or go.

3h

Exclusive: Two pigs engineered to have monkey cells born in China

Two pig-monkey chimeras were born in China but died within a week. This is the first time live pigs have been created that contain some primate cells

3h

Bernie Sanders releases broadband plan, targets Comcast, AT&T, Verizon

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3h

You can feel and hear these holograms

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Colossal Water Battery Reduces University's Energy Expense

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Fractured Forests Are Endangering Wildlife, Scientists Find

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A $39 Billion Wind Company Bets Hydrogen Is Key to Climate Goals

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Cold Stopped a Woman's Heart for 6 Hours, Then Helped Save Her Life

Audrey Mash got caught in a snowstorm while hiking in the Pyrenees. Doctors say she experienced the longest period of cardiac arrest that a patient has survived in Spain.

3h

How Hollywood Became Obsessed With De-aging Its Stars

G uy Williams and his fellow visual-effects artists have spent so much time staring at Will Smith's face, they've practically memorized his every pore. "We joke sometimes that we probably know his face better than his wife does," Williams told me in September, laughing. "I can tell you exactly how he forms a smile. I can even tell you the 12 different flavors of Will Smith's smile and the subtlet

3h

Why Your Kid Loves the Garbage Truck So Much

For Ryan Rucker, a dad in Vacaville, California, the weekly summons comes on Wednesday mornings, usually around seven. For Rosanne Sweeting on Grand Bahama island, in the Bahamas, it's twice a week—Mondays and Thursdays, anytime from 6 to 8:30 a.m.—and for Whitney Schlander in Scottsdale, Arizona, it's every Tuesday morning at half-past seven. At these times, the quiet of the morning is broken by

3h

Reduced soil tilling helps both soils and yields

Agriculture degrades over 24 million acres of fertile soil every year, raising concerns about meeting the rising global demand for food. But a simple farming practice born from the 1930's Dust Bowl could provide a solution, according to new Stanford research. The study, published Dec. 6 in Environmental Research Letters, shows that Midwest farmers who reduced how much they overturned the soil—know

3h

Stormquakes: Powerful storms cause seafloor tremors

Stormquakes are a recently discovered phenomenon characterized by seismic activity originating at the ocean floor due to powerful storms.

3h

Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins

Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.

3h

Simple experiment explains magnetic resonance

Physicists at University of California, Riverside, have designed an experiment to explain the concept of magnetic resonance. A versatile technique employed in chemistry, physics, and materials research, magnetic resonance describes a resonant excitation of electron or atomic nuclei spins residing in a magnetic field by means of electromagnetic waves.

3h

Team finds link between vitamin A and brain response in Monarch butterflies

Biologists at Texas A&M University are making strides in understanding biological clock function in several model organisms and translating these studies into broader implications for human health.

3h

Discovery of a new protein gives insight into a long-standing plant immunity mystery

"Our research suggests that Mai1 has a central role in immunity that likely can not be substituted by other proteins," according to first author Robyn Roberts. "Not only does this work give us better insight into how plants defend themselves on the molecular level, but this work reveals a key protein that is broadly involved in immunity. It is possible that Mai1 could serve as a target for crop im

3h

Fish scattering sound waves has impact on aquaculture

Fisheries acoustics have been studied for over 40 years to assess biomass and optimize aquaculture applications, and researchers in France have examined the phenomenon of how fish scatter acoustic waves in a dense school of fish contained in an open-sea cage. They developed an approach to help overcome issues encountered in aquaculture relating to the evaluation of the total biomass of dense schoo

3h

What's Shaking in Oklahoma?

Mysterious seismic signals lead to some scientific detective work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

What's Shaking in Oklahoma?

Mysterious seismic signals lead to some scientific detective work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Fish scattering sound waves has impact on aquaculture

Schools of fish can scatter sound waves, which has impacts on fish farming. Fisheries acoustics have been studied for over 40 years to assess biomass and optimize aquaculture applications.

4h

New Jobs, New Residents, and New Possibilities

Here are news items and developments related to trends we've been covering in the recent " Our Towns " series, and elsewhere: The furniture business returns, and is looking for furniture-makers . In a series of dispatches from Danville, Virginia , and its environs, Deb Fallows and I talked about this region's reaction after the three previous pillars of its manufacturing economy collapsed more or

4h

Current treatment for fungal meningitis is fueling drug resistance

A common first-line treatment approach for cryptococcal meningitis in low-income countries is being compromised by the emergence of drug resistance, new University of Liverpool research warns.Published in the journal mBio, the findings highlight the need to develop new drugs and treatment regimens for the lethal brain infection, which kills around 180,000 people each year.

4h

How Does a Custom Recurve Bow Get Made?

Andrew Hetherington James "Big Jim" Babcock crafts some of the finest laminated-limb recurves and longbows in the country. We paid a visit to Babcock earlier this year at his custom-bow shop in Albany, Georgia. Andrew Hetherington Taking Shape Babcock with a bow form used to press and cure the laminations of a recurve bow. Andrew Hetherington A slab of spalted maple. Andrew Hetherington Limb vene

4h

Bränsleskatt mot CO2-utsläpp bäst – men drabbar låginkomsttagare på landsbygd mest

Bränsleskatter verkar vara det mest verksamma styrmedlet för att nå Riksdagens mål om att minska koldioxidutsläppen från inrikestransporter med 70 procent till år 2030 jämfört med 2010. Höjda bränsleskatter slår mest mot låginkomsttagare i landsbygd, visar forskning. Det är forskare från VTI, Chalmers och TPmod AB har studerat hur olika styrmedel kan bidra till att Sverige når målet med minskade

4h

Science publishers review ethics of research on Chinese minority groups

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03775-y Springer Nature and Wiley have concerns about lack of consent in genetics and facial-recognition papers.

4h

Leukemia, lymphoma squarely in sights of new class of drugs

A new class of drugs degrades an essential survival protein in cancer cells while sparing platelets. Therefore, it could be a safer therapy for multiple types of leukemia and lymphoma, say researchers at UT Health San Antonio.

4h

Infant morbidity decreases with incentive-based prenatal tobacco interventions

A new study in Colorado reveals a significant reduction in NICU (up to 55%) and preterm births due to incentive-based programs implemented to help low-income pregnant women stop smoking cigarettes. Colorado saved over 4 million dollars in healthcare costs by providing these programs and has an opportunity to save 16 million. The issue is critical because smoking in the third trimester of pregnancy

4h

Scientists have spotted new compounds with herbicidal potential from sea fungus

Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the G.B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (FEB RAS) together with German colleagues spotted six new and three already known biologically active compounds in a new strain of the fungus Penicillium piltunense first time isolated. One compound has a pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, others have herbicidal potential, i.e., p

4h

Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons

A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such

4h

Acupuncture reduces radiation-induced dry mouth for cancer patients

After receiving acupuncture treatment three days a week during the course of radiation treatment, head and neck cancer patients experienced less dry mouth, according to study results from researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

4h

Astronomy fellowship demonstrates measures to dismantle bias, increase diversity in STEM

Joyce Yen of the University of Washington recently worked with the Heising-Simons Foundation to dismantle bias and promote diversity in a prominent grant that the Foundation awards to postdoctoral researchers in planetary science. Here, Yen shares the many, sometimes counterintuitive ways bias can work against goals toward greater diversity, equity and inclusion in STEM fields.

4h

Hire more LGBTQ and disabled astronomers or risk falling behind, review finds

In a paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Professor Lisa Kewley, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in All Sky Astrophysics (ASTRO 3D), finds that encouraging astronomers from marginalized communities will increase the chances of significant research discoveries.

4h

'Bad' cholesterol in newborn blood could signal mental health at 5

"Bad" cholesterol and fat levels in a newborn's blood can reliably predict the child's psychological and social health five years later, according to a new study. If confirmed, the discovery could point to new ways for monitoring or treating mental illnesses, such as depression, early on in childhood. The results correlated lipids in a newborn's umbilical cord blood with teacher ratings of childr

4h

Inflatable hot tubs that will make you instantly popular

Hot tubs you can put away when it's too cold. (DepositPhotos/) There's nothing like climbing into a steamy hot tub with the massage jets blasting at the end of a long day. It makes you feel like a mogul in the '70s, or like you're in a trailer for a feel-good holiday film. But most people only soak when they're at the spa or a hotel. Installing a hot tub on your deck or in your yard is expensive

4h

A cancer that strikes small children is traced to the embryo

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03779-8 Genetic changes in utero set the scene for a paediatric kidney tumour.

4h

Science and Surveillance: Western Institutions Consider Role in China's Uighur Crackdown

Chinese government researchers, some working with national security forces, are using genetic material from members of the oppressed Uighur minority group to develop next-generation surveillance tools that could allow authorities to construct an image of someone's face from information in their DNA.

4h

These single-cell organisms don't need brains to make up their minds

These little cells might be capable of more decision-making than we ever thought a cell could. (Flickr/Picturepest/) What do single-celled organisms think about? The answer, apparently, is quite a bit more than we give them credit for. Scientists usually frame cellular behavior as "programming"—innate and encoded responses to simple stimuli—rather than as a form of thinking or decision making. Bu

4h

Denmark Raises Antibiotic-Free Pigs. Why Can't the U.S.?

American pigs are raised on a liberal diet of antibiotics, fueling the rise of resistant germs. Danish pork producers are proving there's a better way.

4h

Barriers to reintegration lead to poorer health for the formerly incarcerated,

Formerly incarcerated individuals with barriers to re-entry and service needs following their release are subsequently more likely to experience poor physical and mental health, according to an eye-opening new Rutgers University-Camden study.

4h

Reducing risk in AI and machine learning-based medical technology

A key strength and potential benefit from most AI/ML technology is derived from its ability to evolve as the model learns in response to new data.

4h

Pioneering research gives fresh insight into 1 of the pivotal building blocks of life

The quest to better understand how genomic information is read has taken a new step forward, thanks to pioneering new research.

4h

The profound power of an authentic apology | Eve Ensler

Genuine apology goes beyond remorse, says legendary playwright Eve Ensler. In this frank, wrenching talk, she shares how she transformed her own experience of abuse into wisdom on what wrongdoers can do and say to truly repent — and offers a four-step roadmap to help begin the process. (This talk contains mature content.)

4h

Hire more LGBTQ and disabled astronomers or risk falling behind, review finds

Ensuring research opportunities for indigenous, disabled and LGBTQ astronomers is essential if Australian research is to succeed in the new era of "mega-telescopes", a major analysis has found.

4h

Astronomy fellowship demonstrates measures to dismantle bias, increase diversity in STEM

In 2017, the Heising-Simons Foundation—a family foundation that works in climate and clean energy, science, education, and human rights—established the 51 Pegasi b Fellowship to support early-career astronomers engaged in planetary research. Just over a year later, the Foundation announced that it would overhaul the selection process for the program because, out of 12 fellowships awarded in the pr

4h

HIV-fighting antibodies may lead to new vaccine

Researchers have figured out how to coax effective, yet short-lasting antibodies into multiplying as a fighting force against HIV in animal models. The work may clear a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine. "The reason we don't have a vaccine is because the immune system doesn't want to make the kind of antibodies that are needed to neutralize the virus," says co-senior author Bart

4h

Margarita Salas (1938–2019)

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03758-z Biochemist whose discoveries led to faster, more-accurate DNA testing.

4h

The Books Briefing: Looking Back on Moving Forward

When W. E. B. Du Bois devised the idea of "double-consciousness" in his 1897 Atlantic article "Strivings of the Negro People," which he later included in his book The Souls of Black Folk , he set a new language for meditating on black progress in the United States. He's one of many thinkers who devoted his life to analyzing and ruminating on the overwhelming effects of slavery, which still reverb

5h

Medical marijuana cards often sought by existing heavy users

Young adults who seek enrollment in state medical marijuana programs are often those who already use heavily rather than those with mental or physical issues that could be addressed by the drug.

5h

Metrion Biosciences and LifeArc extend ion channel drug discovery collaboration to accelerate neuroscience-focused research

Initial twelve month collaboration successfully identifies hit compounds and progresses into hit-to-lead optimisation phase

5h

Dial-a-frog — researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild

Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild. The FrogPhone is the world's first solar-powered remote survey device that relays environmental data to the observer via text messages, whilst conducting real-time remote acoustic surveys over the phone. These findings are presented in the British Ecologica

5h

Animated videos advance adoption of agriculture techniques

In remote areas with low literacy rates, showing animated videos in the local language demonstrating agricultural techniques results in high retention and adoption rates of those techniques, found researchers from Michigan State University.

5h

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants

Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say.

5h

Lack of psychological support for those dealing with infertility in the UK

Psychological support for those dealing with infertility and its treatment is received by only just half of those who want it in the UK – with many left to suffer with anxiety, depression, or suicidal thoughts, according to a new study published in Human Fertility.

5h

Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant

Summary:- St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands of the plant.- By investigating the flowers of St. John's Wort, researchers identified genes involved in dark gland development and the biosynthesis of hypericin.- The findings were published in th

5h

5h

Fossila bränslen subventioneras för miljarder

3000-6000 miljarder kronor. Så mycket subventioneras fossila bränslen globalt årligen. Förnybart får långt mindre än hälften. Jakob Skovgaard, statsvetare och expert på klimatskadliga subventioner, har koll på hur länder bör agera för att lyckas dra ner på stödet till fossil energi. – Få känner till det här. Många tror till och med att det är tvärtom, att förnybart får så mycket stöd medan fossil

5h

Nobelpristagarnas upptäckt kan ge nya cancermediciner

Flera nya behandlingar mot cancer testas nu – med årets Nobelpris i medicin som utgångspunkt.

5h

This Is Not Where Nancy Pelosi Wanted to Be

Her mournful countenance made it clear. Nancy Pelosi has at last found herself just where she never wanted to be: leading an impeachment of President Donald Trump that has drawn nary an ounce of bipartisan backing in Congress, has fixed-in-place public support of about 50 percent, and seems all but certain to end in acquittal in the Republican-controlled Senate. But Pelosi also seems to have woun

5h

Meme Thievery Goes Corporate

For a company that sells fancy skin-care products, Drunk Elephant's Instagram account tells a lot of jokes about carbohydrates. "I miss the 90s, when bread was good for you, and no one knew what kale was," the brand posted in August. Two weeks later , the brand exposed carb trickery: "Raisin cookies that look like chocolate chip cookies are the reason I have trust issues." A few days ago, Drunk E

5h

200 Researchers, 5 Hypotheses, No Consistent Answers

Just how much wisdom is there in the scientific crowd?

5h

Using a molecular motor to switch the preference of anion-binding catalysts

Many organic molecules are chiral, which means that they are non-superimposable on their mirror image. These enantiomers can have different properties when interacting with other chiral entities, for example, biomolecules. Selectively producing the right enantiomer is therefore important in for example the pharmaceutical. University of Groningen chemists Ruth Dorel and Ben Feringa have now devised

5h

How saving the ozone layer in 1987 slowed global warming

It may have been an accidental side effect but new research shows that when the world's nations signed the Montreal Protocol in 1987 to ban CFCs and save the ozone layer they also signed an agreement that has already done more to slow global warming than the Kyoto Protocol.

5h

Study shows first signs of cross-talk between RNA surveillance and silencing systems

Scientists in Korea find a protein that mediates the interaction between the cellular systems involved in rapid responses against foreign genes in plants.

5h

Manuka honey 'sandwich' could be key to fighting infections

Sandwiching nano-layers of manuka honey between layers of surgical mesh inhibits bacteria for up to three weeks as the honey is slowly released, new research shows.

5h

National greenhouse gas reporting needs an overhaul: It's time to directly measure the atmosphere

How much greenhouse gas is emitted by any individual country? With global emissions of carbon dioxide hitting a record of 36.8 billion tonnes this year, and delegates gathering in Madrid for the latest UN climate talks, it's a pressing question.

5h

The Hidden Crisis in Rural America

It's prohibitively difficult to access mental-health services in rural America. That's because, relative to urban areas, rural counties have so few mental-health professionals. The majority of nonmetropolitan counties in the U.S. don't have a psychiatrist , and almost half lack a psychologist. The paucity has resulted in a public-health crisis—rural Americans suffering from a psychiatric conditio

5h

5h

Genetic typing of a bacterium with biotechnological potential

Researchers at Kanazawa University describe in Scientific Reports the genetic typing of the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. The bacterium is normally not highly infectious but isolated from several clinical sites.

5h

Bile duct biomarker? Protein found to pinpoint patients with a lethal cancer

Patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a form of bile duct cancer, have a poor prognosis. Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a protein called ARID1A that contributes to poor outcomes in ICC. Loss of ARID1A enhances the malignancy of ICC tumor cells and can predict worse survival outcomes. The findings could eventually form the basis of a prognostic b

5h

Physics Explains Why You Can't Open a Plane Door in the Air

A British Airways passenger caused chaos after trying to open the aircraft door during a flight, but air pressure and clever design make it impossible.

5h

How Rocket Wrecks the Ravagers With Physics

In *Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2*, our favorite furry antihero deals out cosmic justice—and some great material for video analysis.

5h

Emails outside working hours: Are they against employment law?

It is common for many employees to send, read and reply to work emails at all hours of the day and night, including weekends. This change in work culture developed in recent decades and has accelerated with the advent of smartphones. But is this a breach of employment law? The short answer is that "it depends" and we need some test cases to clarify the situation, not least in the UK.

5h

3 Problems with High-Intensity Interval Training

The allure of short, intense workouts is obvious. But is High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) really the only workout you need for good overall fitness? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

'Jeg bliver altid så skør af snaps': Holder dine julefrokost-påstande?

Der er mange påstande, der overhovedet ikke er sande, når eksperter tjekker dem.

5h

First-Ever Artificial Neuron Could Let Us Repair Brain Injuries with Silicon

The merging of man and machine is a staple of sci-fi and at the heart of the philosophy of transhumanism. B ut interfacing our brains with computers has proven incredibly hard, despite the fact that both essentially run on electrical impulses. Imagine, for example, if a brain injury could be repaired with a computer chip. That may not be too far off; this week , researchers reported on a "solid-s

5h

How do these food items make you feel? 5-10 minutes survey

submitted by /u/jsneuro [link] [comments]

5h

IBM's Watson skal forhindre italienske broer i at kollapse

Software, sensorer og supercomputer kan fordoble Storebæltsbroens levetid. Nu skal ekspertisen bruges i hele Europa.

5h

Short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure

A new study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, 90 or more days. Researchers placed two test kits, a short term (five-day) and long term (90-day) in the same homes. Tests were conducted during summer and winter months. Findings showed the short-term kits were imprecise up to 99 percent of the time when compared to a long term test.

6h

Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors

Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws — and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier.

6h

Large-scale education tests often come with side effects

When results come out for big education tests like the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which primarily measures 15-year-old students' knowledge and skills in reading, mathematics and science, the focus is often on which countries scored the highest.

6h

Life of a foam

A fine coffee froth does not last forever. The bubbles that make the milk light and creamy are eventually torn apart by the pull of gravity. But there is a place where foams have a more stable life—in the weightless environment of the International Space Station, bubbles don't burst so quickly and foams remain wet for longer.

6h

Water metering can reduce consumption by a fifth, but only high-income households gain financially

New research has indicated that water consumption can be reduced by more than 20 percent, significantly more than current policy targets following the installation of meters. Whilst this shows that overall benefits of water metering outweigh the costs, the researchers also found that high income households benefit financially by switching to a metered tariff despite reducing their consumption by c

6h

Scientists create 'epigenetic couch potato' mouse

A study in mice shows for the first time that epigenetics — the molecular mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off — plays a key role in determining an individual's innate drive to exercise.

6h

Short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure

A new study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, 90 or more days. Researchers placed two test kits, a short term (five-day) and long term (90-day) in the same homes. Tests were conducted during summer and winter months. Findings showed the short-term kits were imprecise up to 99 percent of the time when compared to a long term test.

6h

Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication

With the Law of Brevity in mind, researchers examined whether call amplitude, rather than call duration, might be the main factor by which animal vocal repertoires are optimized. They fitted rock hyraxes with audio recorders and logged all of their calls, creating full vocal repertoire. The researchers demonstrate how changing necessities can affect the development of different voices for various

6h

Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors

Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws — and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier.

6h

Surface effects affect the distribution of hydrogen in metals

The researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University and Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering of the Russian Academy of Sciences studied the distribution of hydrogen in metals in the process of standard testing for hydrogen cracking. They found that there is a surface effect that does not let hydrogen enter the metal. This can result in errors in industrial quality

6h

Siberian researchers contribute to global monitoring of the Earth's Green Lungs

Researchers of Siberian Federal University took part in a global project to collect, systematize and universalize data on the composition of forests in all climatic zones and on all continents of the planet.

6h

Dendrites filtering neuron's excitement

Kyoto University research shows that Purkinje cell dendrites filter out signals to the Soma. Distal dendrites modulate the incoming signals through intrinsic plasticity associated with the down-regulation of SK channels

6h

How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?

Crops today never see their parents' microbiome, so how do they develop a leaf microbial community that's healthy and resistant to invasion by pathogens? UC Berkeley biologists sequenced the microbiomes of tomatoes through four generations and saw three-quarters of the bacteria disappear, leaving a core community that proved resistant to random invaders. The findings show it's possible to cultivat

6h

Hennes matematik visar hur rykten sprids

Hur rykten fortplantar sig i sociala nätverk, hur en smittsam sjukdom sprids i befolkningen eller vad som avgör om släktnamn dör ut eller lever kvar. Det är några exempel på frågor som kan utforskas inom en gren av matematiken som kallas grafteori. Företag som Google och Amazon anställer matematiker som använder grafteori för att utveckla de algoritmer som används för sökningar och rekommendatione

6h

Exclusive: First ever piglets containing monkey cells born in China

Two pig-monkey chimeras were born in China but died within a week. This is the first time live pigs have been created that contain some primate cells

6h

Improved pH probes may help toward cancer treatments

Nanopipettes with zwitterionic membranes may offer improved monitoring of changes in pH surrounding living cells, which can indicate traits of invasive cancer cells and their response to treatment, report researchers at Kanazawa University in Nature Communications.

6h

A new view for glasses

Researchers at the University of Tokyo introduced a new physical model that predicts the dynamics of glassy materials based solely on their local degree of atomic structural order. Using computer simulations, they showed how this theory greatly improves the understanding of how glassy liquids become more viscous on cooling. This work has many potential applications in manufacturing, especially for

6h

The Coastal Communities Network – a force for nature

At Fauna & Flora International (FFI) we strongly believe that the people best placed to protect biodiversity—and the resources it provides—are those who live closest to it. That's why we put particular emphasis on supporting in-country organizations and investing in their capacity for conservation. Our work with coastal communities is no exception.

6h

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants

Plants that can "bounce back" after disturbances like plowing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be "invasive" if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say.

6h

Improved pH probes may help toward cancer treatments

Nanopipettes with zwitterionic membranes may offer improved monitoring of changes in pH surrounding living cells, which can indicate traits of invasive cancer cells and their response to treatment, report researchers at Kanazawa University in Nature Communications.

6h

The Coastal Communities Network – a force for nature

At Fauna & Flora International (FFI) we strongly believe that the people best placed to protect biodiversity—and the resources it provides—are those who live closest to it. That's why we put particular emphasis on supporting in-country organizations and investing in their capacity for conservation. Our work with coastal communities is no exception.

6h

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants

Plants that can "bounce back" after disturbances like plowing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be "invasive" if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say.

6h

What's an Influencer? The Complete WIRED Guide

Everything you need to know about what an influencer is, the history of influencers, the difference between influencers and celebrities, and more.

6h

New tool for rapidly analyzing CRISPR edits reveals frequent production of unintended edits

Amidst rising hopes for using CRISPR gene editing tools to repair deadly mutations linked to conditions like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease, a study in Communications Biology describes a new innovation that could accelerate this work by rapidly revealing unintended and potentially harmful changes introduced by a gene editing process.

6h

Smart simulations chart the behavior of surprising structures

AMOLF researchers are studying three-dimensional prismatic structures that can assume different shapes with the aim of producing metamaterials that have multiple properties. Researchers have found a new way to simulate the deformations in such structures, and in doing so, they discovered a wide range of unexpected shapes. The results will be published today in the scientific journal Nature Communi

6h

Three studies describe different parts of the 2018 Kīlauea caldera collapse

Three separate teams working independently have learned more about what happens during a slow-moving volcanic caldera collapse by studying the 2018 Kīlauea eruption in Hawaii. Each has published their findings in the journal Science. Freysteinn Sigmundsson with the University of Iceland has published a companion piece in the same journal issue giving an overview of caldera collapse, and outlining

6h

New tool for rapidly analyzing CRISPR edits reveals frequent production of unintended edits

Amidst rising hopes for using CRISPR gene editing tools to repair deadly mutations linked to conditions like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease, a study in Communications Biology describes a new innovation that could accelerate this work by rapidly revealing unintended and potentially harmful changes introduced by a gene editing process.

6h

Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds

An important tool for monitoring seabird populations involves acoustic sensors deployed at nesting sites to record sounds over long periods of time. But analysis of the recordings to identify and count the calls of different species can be time-consuming, even with computers and artificial intelligence. An alternative approach is to evaluate all of the sounds in an environment as a 'soundscape', u

6h

Has physics ever been deterministic?

Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna and the University of Geneva, have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers. This new study challenges the traditional view of classical physics as deterministic.

6h

Image: Mato Grosso, Brazil

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over part of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso deep in the Amazon interior.

6h

Optical switch illuminates cell development

Combining light and a protein linked to cancer, researchers at Princeton University have created a biological switch to conduct an unprecedented exploration of cellular development in the embryo.

6h

Novel bioprinter shows potential to speed tissue engineering

The dream of tissue engineering is a computer-controlled manufacturing of complex and functional human tissue for potential organ regeneration or replacement.

6h

Optical switch illuminates cell development

Combining light and a protein linked to cancer, researchers at Princeton University have created a biological switch to conduct an unprecedented exploration of cellular development in the embryo.

6h

Novel bioprinter shows potential to speed tissue engineering

The dream of tissue engineering is a computer-controlled manufacturing of complex and functional human tissue for potential organ regeneration or replacement.

6h

Study shows first signs of cross-talk between RNA surveillance and silencing systems

A recent study by a team of scientists in Korea reveals new findings about how various systems involved in cellular surveillance interact. This research is the first to identify a "cross-talk" molecule between these systems. Because these pathways are involved in fighting toxic cellular or foreign substances, the study has various potential applications in antiviral development, gene therapy, and

6h

Seahorse breeding project aims to recover endangered species from near extinction

Following a dramatic decline in numbers over the past decade, White's seahorse, also known as the Sydney seahorse, has recently been listed as an endangered species in NSW. It is now Australia's only threatened seahorse species and the second endangered seahorse species worldwide.

6h

Research: A country's degree of gender equality can affect men's ability to recognize famous female faces

Our ability to recognize faces is a complex interplay of neurobiology, environment and contextual cues.

6h

Study shows first signs of cross-talk between RNA surveillance and silencing systems

A recent study by a team of scientists in Korea reveals new findings about how various systems involved in cellular surveillance interact. This research is the first to identify a "cross-talk" molecule between these systems. Because these pathways are involved in fighting toxic cellular or foreign substances, the study has various potential applications in antiviral development, gene therapy, and

6h

Seahorse breeding project aims to recover endangered species from near extinction

Following a dramatic decline in numbers over the past decade, White's seahorse, also known as the Sydney seahorse, has recently been listed as an endangered species in NSW. It is now Australia's only threatened seahorse species and the second endangered seahorse species worldwide.

6h

Reparations for slavery and genocide should be used to address health inequities

As soon as I entered Elmina Castle (the dungeons) in Cape Coast in Ghana, I felt haunted by over 400 years of brutality and the enslavement and genocide of millions of African and Indigenous peoples. That violence still impacts the health of Black and Indigenous folks today.

6h

The Disappearing Y Chromosome

In the 1960s, doctors counting the number of chromosomes in human white blood cells noticed a strange phenomenon . Frequently—and more frequently with age—the cells would be missing the Y chromosome. Over time, it became clear this came with consequences. Studies have linked loss of the Y chromosome in blood to cancer, heart disease, and other disorders. Now a new study—the largest yet of this ph

6h

Gear companies are giving synthetic down and fleece eco-friendly makeovers

The synthetic insulation in some puffy jackets is cured in giant ovens during manufacturing. (Photo by Joshua Earle on Unsplash/) The synthetic down in your puffy jacket comes at an environmental cost: one stage of the manufacturing process that creates the insulation involves giant ovens. And those big ovens need fuel. That fuel is typically either coal or liquid petroleum gas in textile factori

6h

Leica SL2 Review: Wonderful (If You Can Afford It)

The iconic company's take on the big, powerful, DSLR-style camera delivers beautifully sharp, detailed images while offering surprisingly powerful video capabilities.

6h

Cuneiform reveals shared birthplace

Assyriologists in Leiden have been conducting research into ancient clay tablets from the Middle East for 100 years already. What exactly do these clay tablets tell us? And why is Leiden such a good place to study them?

6h

Research suggests that hibernation is a likely option to make deep space exploration a reality

Space travelers sleeping in hibernation chambers before continuing with their missions, whether to go on a trip to Jupiter or hunt down an extraterrestrial creature. The concept was first imagined in the 20th century before making its way to the big screen. Are these images getting hauntingly prophetic?

6h

Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk

It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has some scientists very excited. According to its discoverers, Danuvius guggenmosi combines some human-like features with others that look like those of living chimpanzees. They suggest that it would have had an entirely distinct way of moving that combined upright walking with swinging

6h

China's failed gene-edited baby experiment proves we're not ready for human embryo modification

More than a year ago, the world was shocked by Chinese biophysicist He Jiankui's attempt to use CRISPR technology to modify human embryos and make them resistant to HIV, which led to the birth of twins Lulu and Nana.

6h

We're using lasers and toaster-sized satellites to beam information faster through space

Satellites are becoming increasingly important in our lives, as they help us meet a demand for more data, exchanged at higher speeds. This is why we are exploring new ways of improving satellite communication.

6h

This Single-Celled Creature Is Weirdly Smart

They're Learning Scientists say they've observed what they're calling signs of complex decisionmaking in a single-celled organism, breathing new life into a theory that was laughed off over a century ago. The aquatic creature, Stentor roeseli , responds differently over time to the same stimulus, which ScienceAlert reports is evidence that the critter can make decisions — or at least do whatever

6h

Empowering mucosal healing with an engineered probiotic

Harvard Wyss Institute researchers developed a living material approach that uses a strain of genetically engineered E.coli Nissle bacteria as a locally acting probiotic. The engineered bacteria produce a network of nanofibers that directly binds to mucus to fill inflamed areas like a patch, shielding them from gut microbes and environmental factors. This probiotic-based therapeutic strategy prote

6h

China's failed gene-edited baby experiment proves we're not ready for human embryo modification

More than a year ago, the world was shocked by Chinese biophysicist He Jiankui's attempt to use CRISPR technology to modify human embryos and make them resistant to HIV, which led to the birth of twins Lulu and Nana.

6h

Leaders of nonprofits that use sport to better society often lack business skills

While the number of nonprofits promoting sport as a tool for empowerment and social justice has increased significantly over the past two decades, many of these organizations fail—their efforts to change the world stymied by leadership deficits and stakeholder skepticism, a new study suggests.

7h

Kammeradvokat og eksterne eksperter sættes ind mod pesticidrod

Miljøministeren sætter kammeradvokaten til at granske Miljøstyrelsen forvaltning af pesticidområdet. Nye dispensationer skal godkendes af eksterne eksperter

7h

They Don't Know

Well, Biogen has released more data on its Alzheimer's antibody, aducanumab. The people ( like me ) who were doubtful ( or worse ) that they had enough to make a case for FDA approval remain doubtful. And the people (there are some) who think that it's approvable haven't changed their minds, either, from what I can see. Frankly, if you wanted it approved after the very limited information we had

7h

Finding time for play

Before I step into the classroom, I hear children's voices and feel the energy these five- and six-year-olds radiate. Once inside, I see bins of materials strewn about—a scene of organized chaos. The bins are full of toys, blocks, interactive cards, game pieces and other materials meant to develop the children's fine motor skills and enhance their engagement with words and numbers. Some children c

7h

Gaining insight into the energy balance of earthquakes

Researchers at EPFL's Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory and the Weizmann Institute of Science have modeled the onset of slip between two bodies in frictional contact. Their work, a major step forward in the study of frictional rupture, could give us a better understanding of earthquakes—including how far and fast they travel.

7h

What the United Kingdom's 'Brexit election' means for science

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03774-z Promises to raise research spending and take action on climate change overshadowed by scientists' fears about leaving the European Union.

7h

Research reveals past rapid Antarctic ice loss due to ocean warming

New research from the University of Otago has found the sensitive West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapsed during a warming period just over a million years ago when atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were lower than today.

7h

Bone 'beams' pave the way for 3D printing stuff that lasts

The way "beams" in human bone material handle a lifetime's worth of wear and tear could lead to longer lasting 3D-printed lightweight materials, researchers report. When researchers mimicked this beam and made it about 30% thicker, they could make an artificial material last up to 100 times longer. "Bone is a building. It has these columns that carry most of the load and beams connecting the colu

7h

How a bacteria digests a sugar can be key to new treatments

The severity of a common and often lethal type of bacteria depends on its ability to process a type of sugar, research from the University of Adelaide reveals.

7h

Exciplex emission observed over much longer distances than previously thought possible

Light-emitting exciplex complexes can form over far greater distances than ever suspected, a RIKEN-led team has shown. This discovery could lead to highly sensitive sensors and photodetectors.

7h

The genome and transcriptome of the parasitic plant Striga sequenced

The genome of the parasitic plant Striga, commonly known as witchweed, has been sequenced for the first time by RIKEN plant geneticists. This genetic analysis both offers insights into how parasitic plants evolved and a tool for improving the monitoring and control of the costly weed.

7h

How a bacteria digests a sugar can be key to new treatments

The severity of a common and often lethal type of bacteria depends on its ability to process a type of sugar, research from the University of Adelaide reveals.

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The genome and transcriptome of the parasitic plant Striga sequenced

The genome of the parasitic plant Striga, commonly known as witchweed, has been sequenced for the first time by RIKEN plant geneticists. This genetic analysis both offers insights into how parasitic plants evolved and a tool for improving the monitoring and control of the costly weed.

7h

A 6,000-year-old fruit fly gave the world modern cheeses and yogurts

Historians often trace the dawn of human civilization back 10,000 years, when Neolithic tribes first settled and began farming in the Fertile Crescent, which stretches through much of what we now call the Middle East. Prehistoric peoples domesticated plants to create the cereal crops we still grow today, and in the Zagros mountains of Iran, Iraq and Turkey, sheep, goats and cows were bred from the

7h

SpaceX Dragon heads to space station with NASA science

A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station after launching at 12:29 p.m. EST today (Dec. 5). Dragon will deliver more than 5,700 pounds of NASA cargo and science investigations, including studies of malting barley in microgravity, the spread of fire, and bone and muscle loss.

7h

Simple experiment explains magnetic resonance

Physicists at University of California, Riverside, have designed an experiment to explain the concept of magnetic resonance. The project was carried out by undergraduate students in collaboration with local high school teachers.

7h

Understanding the impact of deep-sea mining

Resting atop Thomas Peacock's desk is an ordinary-looking brown rock. Roughly the size of a potato, it has been at the center of decades of debate. Known as a polymetallic nodule, it spent 10 million years sitting on the deep seabed, 15,000 feet below sea level. The nodule contains nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese—four minerals that are essential in energy storage.

7h

35-year data record charts sea-temperature change

Four trillion satellite measurements, taken over four decades from 1981 to 2018, have been merged to create a continuous global record that will help to understand the science behind Earth's climate.

7h

A 6,000-year-old fruit fly gave the world modern cheeses and yogurts

Historians often trace the dawn of human civilization back 10,000 years, when Neolithic tribes first settled and began farming in the Fertile Crescent, which stretches through much of what we now call the Middle East. Prehistoric peoples domesticated plants to create the cereal crops we still grow today, and in the Zagros mountains of Iran, Iraq and Turkey, sheep, goats and cows were bred from the

7h

Nanocontainers for targeted drug delivery

RUDN University bioengineers have created magnetic nanocontainers for smart delivery of drugs to the desired organs or tissues, which reduces the risk of side effects. An experiment on mice determined that the nanocontainers are non-toxic. The results of the study are published in the journal Polymers.

7h

The surprising individuality of microRNAs

In order for the instructions contained within a gene to ultimately execute some function in the body, the nucleotides, or letters, that make up the gene's DNA sequence must be "read" and used to produce a messenger RNA (mRNA). This mRNA must then be translated into a functional protein. A number of different pathways within the cell influence this essential biological process, informing whether,

7h

The surprising individuality of microRNAs

In order for the instructions contained within a gene to ultimately execute some function in the body, the nucleotides, or letters, that make up the gene's DNA sequence must be "read" and used to produce a messenger RNA (mRNA). This mRNA must then be translated into a functional protein. A number of different pathways within the cell influence this essential biological process, informing whether,

7h

Nanocontainers for targeted drug delivery

RUDN University bioengineers have created magnetic nanocontainers for smart delivery of drugs to the desired organs or tissues, which reduces the risk of side effects. An experiment on mice determined that the nanocontainers are non-toxic. The results of the study are published in the journal Polymers.

7h

How real-world science sets The Expanse apart from other sci-fi shows

Science chats with the showrunner, a Ph.D. in physics and electrical engineering

7h

Forced Responses: Dec 2019

Open thread for climate solution discussion. Climate science discussions should remain on the Unforced Variations thread.

7h

Six futuristic body hacks that exist right now

Though we can't predict the future, some current technologies could lead to interesting body modifications. (Christian Gralingen/) The human body is malleable — just ask any athlete or astronaut . But the pace at which we can naturally reshape our physiology is sluggish compared with the quick fixes technology can offer. Why bother with years of memory training when you can carry a search engine

7h

Image of the Day: Worm Rocket

See the winners of the American Society for Cell Biology's fluorescence imaging competition.

7h

What you might have missed

First results from NASA's sun-diving probe, artificial neurons that behave like real ones, and fractures in the Greenland ice sheet – here are some highlights from a week in science.

7h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Tesla's Lasers, the Cybertruck, and Travel Tips

Alex Davies helps us unpack the latest Tesla developments, and we share our favorite travel trips.

7h

Police Shootings May Be Causing Black Infants Long-Term Harm

By looking at data on millions of births, a researcher shows how violence against unarmed African American men might cause acute stress on pregnancies.

7h

If You Use Venmo the Good Way, Your Life Will Improve

A while ago, a friend sent me 25 cents on Venmo. My relationship to the platform has never been the same.

7h

Western, Chinese consumers divided on electric, self-driving cars

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Experts horrified by leaked CRISPR baby study

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The necessity of pulling carbon dioxide out of the air

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If aircraft can copy the way geese fly, they will save fuel

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8h

How to make the opioid epidemic worse in Pennsylvania

Two bills are pending in the Pennsylvania legislature – SB 675 aimed at restricting prescription of buprenorphine, and HB 1005 that imposes reporting requirements in cases of suspected drug overdose. Both are a bad idea, and I hope Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf will continue his past trends of vetoing bad bills that will harm his constituents.

8h

How a Flawed Experiment "Proved" That Free Will Doesn't Exist

It did no such thing—but the result has become conventional wisdom nevertheless — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The 15 Best TV Shows of 2019

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. Television in 2019 offered up sweet birthday babies and hot priests; exposed nuclear cores and examined injustices; giant octopuses and the king of edible leaves, His Majesty the Spinach. It was a year in which more than 500 original scripted series were estimated to air—a new record signaling a television landscape that's more abundant but als

8h

You Can Have Collaborative Software That's Wary of the Cloud

Research lab Ink & Switch wants to harness the benefits of productivity and communication without forcing users to give up control of their data.

8h

T-Mobile 5G Test: Wider Coverage That's Not Much Faster

You'll see slightly faster load times when watching videos and downloading apps, but the day-to-day experience hasn't changed.

8h

Diss Tech Buddhists All You Want—but Read This Book First

Tech veteran Dan Zigmond wants you to bring Buddha to the office. It's not as ironic as it sounds.

8h

How a Flawed Experiment "Proved" That Free Will Doesn't Exist

It did no such thing—but the result has become conventional wisdom nevertheless — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

How a Flawed Experiment "Proved" That Free Will Doesn't Exist

It did no such thing—but the result has become conventional wisdom nevertheless — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Number-crunchers set new record for cracking online encryption keys

A new record has been set for the largest encryption key ever broken, but there is little threat to online data for now

9h

Samoan government takes drastic measures to fight measles outbreak

Samoan government employees stopped work to administer measles vaccines in an attempt to halt an outbreak of the deadly disease sweeping the island nation

9h

Klimatforskare: Glaciärerna tappar sin balanserande roll

Rapporten presenterades på klimatmötet i Madrid av Future Earth, en paraplyorganisation för global hållbarhetsforskning. Under de senaste två veckorna har många rapporter släppts på det gemensamma temat att läget blir alltmer akut. Tanken med den här rapporten är att ge en överblick, förklarar Erik Pihl som är klimatanalytiker på Future Earth. Vad tycker du sticker ut mest i strömmen av klimatrapp

9h

Journal retracts two papers linking exposure to violence to aggressive behavior

A journal on adolescent issues has retracted a pair of papers linking exposure to violent media to aggressive behavior in youth after critics questioned the validity of the data. The studies, which appeared in Youth & Society, were led by Qian Zhang, of Southwest University in Chongqing, China and were published in 2018. According to … Continue reading

9h

Russian supply ship lifts off to International Space Station

An automatic Russian supply ship carrying tons of supplies successfully blasted off Friday heading for the International Space Station.

9h

Young people take to the streets for climate: Who are they?

Last year a 15-year old girl in pigtails decided to walk out of her classroom and sit on the steps of Sweden's parliament every Friday with a homemade sign: "School Strike For Climate".

9h

Weak Arctic ice sees 56 polar bears descend on Russian village

More than 50 polar bears have gathered on the edge of a village in Russia's far north, environmentalists and residents said, as weak Arctic ice leaves them unable to roam.

9h

Weak Arctic ice sees 56 polar bears descend on Russian village

More than 50 polar bears have gathered on the edge of a village in Russia's far north, environmentalists and residents said, as weak Arctic ice leaves them unable to roam.

9h

Statsrevisorer kritiserer Miljøstyrelsens håndtering af pesticider: »Stærkt foruroligende«

I årevis har landmænd fået dispensationer til at bruge pesticider, der ellers er forbudt i EU. Overvågningen af grundvandet blev ikke håndteret godt nok.

9h

Storing data at the speed of light

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03740-9 A memory-storage device can bank information delivered by either light or electronic signals.

9h

'Conductor' gene found in plant root stem cell 'orchestra'

In a new paper, researchers at North Carolina State University lift the veil on the "conductor" plant root stem cell gene that helps orchestrate and coordinate stem cell division of different root stem cell types, ensuring the harmonic communication necessary for plant growth and maintenance.

9h

'Conductor' gene found in plant root stem cell 'orchestra'

In a new paper, researchers at North Carolina State University lift the veil on the "conductor" plant root stem cell gene that helps orchestrate and coordinate stem cell division of different root stem cell types, ensuring the harmonic communication necessary for plant growth and maintenance.

9h

Losing the Rare in 'Safe, Legal, and Rare'

Did it come to him all at once, in a flash of inspiration? Or was it the final, elegant iteration of ideas he'd been trying to compress into a single phrase for months? He surely never imagined that it would become the credo of millions. When Bill Clinton gave the country "safe, legal, and rare" in 1992, it was meant only to be a bit of political business, a workaround. But those five syllables d

9h

The President Can Do Whatever He Wants, Which Is Why He Can't

Power enables. But in a properly functioning democratic republic, power also constrains. This was a recurrent theme in the constitutional debates of the founding era and played a particularly prominent role in the design of the executive branch. At the Constitutional Convention, at the state ratifying conventions that followed, and in the country's earliest years post-ratification, individual Fou

9h

The Most Dangerous Form of Bribery

Thus far, the facts at issue in the impeachment inquiry are relatively undisputed. President Donald Trump's administration conditioned Ukraine's access to U.S. decision makers and military aid on it publicly announcing investigations that would benefit the president's reelection campaign. Instead, the principal battleground is whether President Trump's conduct qualifies as an impeachable offense.

9h

The Self-Appointed Spies Who Use Google Earth to Sniff Out Nukes

Tracking nuclear threats used to be the sole province of secret agents and analysts at high-powered government intelligence agencies. Not anymore. Today, the world of new nuclear sleuths is straight out of the Star Wars bar scene . Peering into the hidden nuclear activities of North Korea, Iran, and other suspected proliferators are journalists, hobbyists, professors, students, political-oppositi

9h

Top-down power: Hierarchies thrive on the internet

Research shows hierarchical groups are more likely to use the internet as a platform. This might be counterintuitive, as the original rise of the internet coincided with events like the toppling of top-down structures. Despite the strong belief that the internet is horizontal, these hierarchical systems achieve high levels of online participation. The Revolution That Wasn't: How Digital Activism

9h

NASA is quietly helping satellite firms avoid catastrophic collisions

We thought NASA was just monitoring space junk for the US government, but it turns out it has been selling an orbital warning service to select customers

9h

Creation and annihilation of topological meron pairs in in-plane magnetized films

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13642-z A meron is one half of a skyrmion but whether a single meron pair can be created and stabilized remains a challenging question. Here, Gao et al. develop a method to create and stabilize individual pairs of merons in a continuous Py film by local vortex imprinting from Co disks.

10h

Engineered E. coli Nissle 1917 for the delivery of matrix-tethered therapeutic domains to the gut

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13336-6 Anti-inflammatory treatments for gastrointestinal diseases can often have detrimental side effects. Here the authors engineer E. coli Nissle 1917 to create a fibrous matrix that has a protective effect in DSS-induced colitis mice.

10h

Muscleblind acts as a modifier of FUS toxicity by modulating stress granule dynamics and SMN localization

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13383-z The exact molecular mechanisms driving FUS-mediated toxicity remain unclear. Here, the authors demonstrate that muscleblind (Mbl) is a novel modifier of FUS-associated ALS, with knockdown of endogenous Mbl suppressing neuromuscular junction defects and motor dysfunctions associated with FUS expression in Dro

10h

Strong time dependence of ocean acidification mitigation by atmospheric carbon dioxide removal

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13586-4 Carbon dioxide removal technologies are often touted as a potential strategy to combat ocean acidification. However, the authors show here that these strategies are only effective when included as part of aggressive and rapid climate-action, undermining the idea of geoengineering as a panacea.

10h

In silico prediction of high-resolution Hi-C interaction matrices

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13423-8 Existing computational approaches to predict long-range regulatory interactions do not fully exploit high-resolution Hi-C datasets. Here the authors present a Random Forests regression-based approach to predict high-resolution Hi-C counts using one-dimensional regulatory genomic signals.

10h

3D extruded composite thermoelectric threads for flexible energy harvesting

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13461-2 Flexible thermoelectric composite threads are reported for wearable thermal energy harvesting platforms where rigid materials lack compatibility. Thermoelectric thread modules are demonstrated, and pressure-dependence shows thread compression to be essential for improving electrical conductivity.

10h

Reactive metabolite production is a targetable liability of glycolytic metabolism in lung cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13419-4 Glycolysis is elevated in many cancers. In this study, the authors show that lactoylglutathione, a by-product of methylglyoxal produced from increased glycolysis, is elevated in lung cancer in mouse models and humans, arguing reactive metabolite production can be a liability for cancers.

10h

Programmable and robust static topological solitons in mechanical metamaterials

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13546-y Mechanical solitons are notoriously difficult to control. Here, the authors report a theoretical framework for programming static periodic topological solitons into a metamaterial, and demonstrate its implementation in real metamaterials computationally and experimentally.

10h

'Conductor' gene found in plant root stem cell 'orchestra'

Researchers at North Carolina State University lift the veil on the 'conductor' plant root stem cell gene that helps orchestrate and coordinate stem cell division of different root stem cell types, ensuring the harmonic communication necessary for plant growth and maintenance.

10h

New tool for rapidly analyzing CRISPR edits reveals frequent production of unintended edits

Amidst rising hopes for using CRISPR gene editing tools to repair deadly mutations linked to conditions like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease, a new study in the Nature journal Communications Biology describes a new innovation that could accelerate this work by rapidly revealing unintended and potentially harmful changes introduced by a gene editing process.

10h

Improved pH probes may help towards cancer treatments

Nanopipettes with zwitterionic membranes may offer improved monitoring of changes in pH surrounding living cells, which can indicate traits of invasive cancer cells and their response to treatment, report researchers at Kanazawa University in Nature Communications.

10h

A new view for glasses

Scientists at The University of Tokyo used computer simulations to demonstrate how the dynamics of a glassy liquid can be predicted based on the local structural ordering at the atomic level. This work may lead to a deeper understanding of glass transition.

10h

PODCAST: Vi ser på produktion af elbiler, mens danskerne køber benzinslugere

Mens bilfabrikkerne sadler om til produktion af elbiler, køber danskerne stadigt flere af den traditionelle, fossile slags – og kører samtidig mere i dem. Det gør det svært at nå regeringens klimamål – og finansloven tager ikke fat om problemet.

10h

Host alarm calls attract the unwanted attention of the brood parasitic common cuckoo

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54909-1

10h

Author Correction: The prevalence of microsporidia in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54376-8

10h

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Reveals That Sperm Modification Coincides with Female Fertility in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54920-6

10h

A multistage elastocaloric refrigerator and heat pump with 28 K temperature span

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54411-8 A multistage elastocaloric refrigerator and heat pump with 28 K temperature span

10h

Characterization of the dielectric properties of water and methanol in the D-band using a quasi-optical spectroscopy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55126-6

10h

A STELLA simulation model for in vitro dissolution testing of respirable size particles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55164-0

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Double-parabolic-reflectors acoustic waveguides for high-power medical ultrasound

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54916-2

10h

The Kingmaker

LAS VEGAS—Swing past Caesars Palace; head up the Bellagio's driveway, where its famous fountains are erupting to an auto-tuned Cher hit. Walk by the Dale Chihuly glass-flower ceiling above the check-in line, and the animatronic exhibit with the half-human, half-monkey figures. Head past the blackjack tables and the jangling slot machines and the chocolate fountain to the austere concrete corridor

10h

Schweiziske forskere 3D-printer komplekse glasfigurer

Ved at binde glasmaterialer i plast er det lykkedes ingeniører at printe glas i komplekse strukturer, der er hårdt som vinduesglas.

10h

Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying And Nobody Knows Why

A mysterious die-off of freshwater mussels has scientists scrambling to find a cause. Freshwater mussels clean water and provide habitat to countless other species. (Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR)

10h

Why kids don't trust Alexa

We tend to think of children as blindly trusting of whatever information comes their way. They're not.

10h

From Skull to Skin, a Quirky Tour of the Human Body

In "The Body: A Guide for Occupants," Bill Bryson meanders around our bodies' viscera and skeleton, always on the lookout for interesting landmarks and overlooked perspectives, from skin ("our largest organ") and hair to the brain ("strikingly unreliable'') and the marvels of the human microbiome.

10h

Nyt udbud banker støtten til sol og vind ned

I et teknologineutralt udbud var den gennemsnitlige støtte hele 30 procent mindre end sidste års rekord.

11h

Elregningen stiger efter havarier på kabler og anlæg

PLUS. Prisen på eltransmission stiger med 21 procent. Rammer mange virksomheder hårdt.

11h

Konst ger svårt sjuka andrum

Konstvandringar höjer livskvaliteten hos sjuka äldre, väcker tankar och minnen och ger en paus från sjukdomen. Forskare på Malmö universitet och Lunds universitet har följt arbetet på vårdavdelningar på Nacka sjukhus.

11h

Läromedel baserade på forskning ger bättre matematiklektioner

På Mälardalens högskola arbetar lärare tillsammans med forskare för att ta fram läromedel i matematik som är helt baserat på forskning. Läromedlet ska hjälpa läraren att förstå hur eleverna tänker och kunna agera därefter. – Lärarens centrala roll för elevers lärande och de resurser som funnits tillgängliga för lärare, till exempel lärarhandledningar, har varit enormt eftersatta i Sverige, säger

11h

A new way to make quadratic equations easy

Many former algebra students have painful memories of struggling to memorize the quadratic formula. A new way to derive it, overlooked for 4,000 years, is so simple it eliminates the need.

11h

Sydney Zoo: Does the world still need big zoos?

As Sydney gets a brand new zoo, animal experts question what we really learn from visiting captive animals.

12h

Læger inden for nichesygdomme samles på ASH

ASH er en god mulighed for forskere og læger inden for nichesygdomme at snakke med kollegaer og indgå i store internationale samarbejder.

12h

Pejlemærke for almen medicin: Vi giver mest til dem med størst behov

Vil vi sammen arbejde for incitamenter, der understøtter en differentieret indsats, og mener vi det, når vi skriver om 'populationsomsorg' i fælles faglige notater?

12h

»Vi har mere end 200 patienter med rygerlunger, som ofte bliver genindlagt, fordi vi ikke får dem gjort stabile, og de ikke selv kan klare sig«

Uligheden slår bl.a. igennem, når vi ser svære tuberkulosetilfælde, som vi intet kan gøre ved, siger Ole Hilberg, overlæge og professor i lungesygdomme.

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»Patienter med skizofreni er klart den patientgruppe, hvor jeg mærker, at ulighed i sundhed er størst«

Uligheden i sundhed er stigende, og lettere psykiske sygdomme bliver oftere prioriteret frem for de svære, siger psykiater Rasmus Handest.

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Markante ­forskelle i behandling af rygsøjlegigt

Database viser store regionale forskelle i behandlingen af patienter med rygsøjlegigt. Manglende registrering af diagnosetidspunkt og indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen i Østdanmark bidrager til et uklart billede af målopfyldelsen for behandling af rygsøjlegigt.

12h

Lægerne gør det let for mig at hjælpe

Tina Schøler Reimann har været skolelærer på Sydvestjysk Sygehus i Esbjerg i 19 år. Hun elsker det tætte samarbejde med lægerne, der har fået et bredere syn på behandlingen af børn og unge, siger hun.

12h

Dårlig byplanlægning gør flere til pendlere

PLUS. Arbejdspladser tæt på boliger er en effektiv måde at nedbringe udslippet fra bilparken på. Men ifølge forskere har vi svigtet princippet.

12h

Study says warming world could devastate fisheries, reefs

A study commissioned by 14 seafaring nations predicts that unchecked climate change could devastate fishery industries and coral reef tourism, causing hundreds of billions of dollars in losses by 2050.

12h

US tweaks restrictions on 'cyanide bomb' anti-predator devices

The US announced slightly stricter rules Thursday on the use of devices called "cyanide bombs," which are meant to protect livestock from wild predators, after the government reinstated their use in August.

12h

US tweaks restrictions on 'cyanide bomb' anti-predator devices

The US announced slightly stricter rules Thursday on the use of devices called "cyanide bombs," which are meant to protect livestock from wild predators, after the government reinstated their use in August.

12h

Black holes formed from dark matter could be making dead stars explode

White dwarfs are burnt out stars that can explode into supernovae, and this process might be kicked off by a black hole made of dark matter in the heart of the star

12h

Fortryder aldrig at tage på ASH trods hårdt program

Overlæge Henrik Gregersen vil på ASH fremlægge positive forskningsresultater for patienter med myelomatose. En kongres han har blandede følelser med at deltage i.

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Første gang til ASH: Bruger ASH til at få feedback på forskning

Når ph.d.-studerende Andreas Øvlisen præsenterer sin forskning på ASH, håber han at få feedback fra internationale kollegaer.

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Til ASH med kufferten fuld af forskningsresultater

Speciallæge Carsten Niemann er på vej til ASH og har flere forskningsresultater med til kongressen end de fleste.

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The first computer chip with a trillion transistors

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Fly a foldable Sport Utility Aircraft

submitted by /u/DiamasD [link] [comments]

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People listen to Greta Thunberg because of her creativity, not just her science | Lisette Johnston

Creative subjects are on the decline in schools and universities, yet they are vitally important to society Blue Planet, Extinction Rebellion and Greta Thunberg are all household names bringing information about serious environmental issues to the masses. They've helped green issues shoot up the agenda for this year's general election, with a poll last month revealing that more than half of voter

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Tager til ASH for at møde sine forskningsidoler

Molekylærmediciner Ida Monrad skal ikke bare til ASH for at præsentere sine egne resultater. Hun glæder sig også til at møde sine store idoler inden for sit fagområde.

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Proteins in the blood can show how old you are

A sort of physiological clock—levels of 373 proteins in your blood—can predict your age, according to a new study. "We've known for a long time that measuring certain proteins in the blood can give you information about a person's health status—lipoproteins for cardiovascular health, for example," says senior author Tony Wyss-Coray, professor of neurology and neurological sciences and a professor

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Phone distraction injuries spiked at Pokémon Go launch

Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise and correlated with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, according to a new study. The study reviewed 2,501 emergency department patients who sustained head and neck injuries resulting from cellphone use between 1998 and 2017. They found a steady increase in injuries over that

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290 virksomheder ser årligt dagens lys

Forskere, studerende og nye dimittender fra Københavns Universitet etablerer i gennemsnit 290 virksomheder…

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Forskere kortlægger dannelse af kanaler mellem fordøjelsesorganer i zebrafisk

Et system af kanaler leder galde og enzymer fra leveren og bugspytkirtlen hen til tarmene. Hvordan det…

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Vaccinemodstander på Samoa anholdt under mæslingeudbrud

Modstandere af vacciner modarbejder Samoas forsøg på at få udbrud af mæslinger, lyder det.

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Legal Education for Scientists Events at the AGU Fall Meeting

This is a repost of the December 3rd entry in the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund blog , by CSLDF Executive Director Lauren Kurtz. The Climate Science Legal Defense Fund (CSLDF) and American Geophysical Union (AGU) want to help scientists understand their legal rights and responsibilities—we believe this knowledge is an essential part of every researcher's professional development. So we've pa

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Climate models have accurately predicted global heating, study finds

This is a re-post from The Guardian and has been incorporated into the rebuttals to the myth ' Models are unreliable ' Climate models have accurately predicted global heating for the past 50 years, a study has found. The findings confirm that since as early as 1970, climate scientists have had a solid fundamental understanding of the Earth's climate system and the ability to project how it will r

14h

Measures to reduce air pollution quickly result in big health benefits

A review of evidence from around the world shows that reducing air pollution in homes, cities or countries has a dramatic effect on health almost immediately

15h

Fire læger: Her rammer uligheden mest – og her er løsningerne

Sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke (S) har gjort ulighed i sundhed til sin helt store politiske mærkesag, og fremover skal det danske sundhedsvæsen måles på, hvordan det bekæmper ulighed i sundhed. Men hvad siger lægerne til ulighed i sundhed? Hvor er problemerne, og hvad er løsningerne? Dagens Medicin har spurgt fire læger fra fire forskellige specialer.

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Hvis en reform er svaret, hvad er spørgsmålet?

Drop snakken om en strukturreform. Styrk i i stedet ledelsen, som kan koordinere mellem almen praksis og hospitalerne, skriver tidl. vicedirektør på Hvidovre Hospital Torben Mogensen.

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New report shows dramatic health benefits following air pollution reduction

Reductions in air pollution yielded fast and dramatic impacts on health-outcomes, as well as decreases in all-cause morbidity, according to findings in 'Health Benefits of Air Pollution Reduction,' new research published in the American Thoracic Society's journal, Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Pioneering Ketamine treatments: alcohol dependency – Science Weekly podcast

Ketamine might sound like an unlikely candidate for treating addiction and depression. But a growing number of scientists believe the drug could help. Over the next two episodes of Science Weekly, Hannah Devlin speaks to two experts who are using ketamine in their work in very different ways. In this episode, we're focusing on alcohol dependency and the findings that a single dose of Ketamine cou

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»Uligheden slår hårdest ­igennem for de psykisk syge«

Lang ventetid, strammere kriterier fra regionen og mangel på læger gør de psykisk syge mest udsatte, siger praktiserende læge Anne Møller.

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»Ældre medicinske patienter er skrøbelige og lider under, at vi har meget få praktiserende læger i vores område af landet«

Skrøbelige ældre og psykiatriske patienter er ramt af ulighed, så det basker, siger Anne Jung, overlæge på medicinsk afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus.

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Pioneering Ketamine treatments: alcohol dependency – Science Weekly podcast

Ketamine might sound like an unlikely candidate for treating addiction and depression. But a growing number of scientists believe the drug could help. Over the next two episodes of Science Weekly, Hannah Devlin speaks to two experts who are using ketamine in their work in very different ways. In this episode, we're focusing on alcohol dependency and the findings that a single dose of Ketamine coul

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Progress in malaria prevention questioned by experts

Call for inquiry into pace of improvement amid statistical inconsistencies

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 6. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Mærsk-CISO: Jeg stoler ikke på den indbyggede sikkerhed i cloud

I forbindelse med en præsentation om Not Petya-angrebet, kom Mærsks' it-sikkerhedsansvarlige blandt andet ind på virksomhedens brug af red team og Cloud-sikkerhed.

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This nerd fight could wreck or cure our way of life

What climate scientists have called a Hothouse Earth emergency, has been called "optimal" by a leading economist. That optimal scenario is based on "the most unrealistic and dangerous assumption in the history of economics." Leading scientists warn strongly against the methods that economists use. "No amount of economic cost–benefit analysis is going to help us. We need to change our approach." N

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Tidlig og ­struktureret indsats ­løfter kvaliteten

Konsekvent brug af kvalitetsdata og tæt opfølgning af nydiagnosticerede patienter bidrager til, at klinik for gigt- og bindevævssygdomme på Silkeborg Sygehus er i top på diagnostik og behandling af patienter med leddegigt.

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Flere patienter med leddegigt har lav sygdomsaktivitet

Flerårig strategi med aggressiv behandling med konventionelle lægemidler eller biologiske lægemidler betyder, at flere end 7 ud af 10 patienter med leddegigt har velbehandlet sygdom. Men seneste årsrapport for kvaliteten af gigtbehandling viser også, at de reumatologiske afdelinger generelt er presset på kapaciteten.

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Fishy Trick Lures Life Back to Coral Reefs

Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Student Solves a Decades-Old Physics Mystery

Why do gas bubbles appear to get stuck inside narrow vertical tubes?

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Famous World War I Battleship Discovered at the Bottom of the Atlantic

The wreck of one of the most famous German warships of World War I has been located on the seafloor near the Falkland Islands, where it sank in a battle with British warships more than 100 years ago.

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Love It or Hate It, Tesla Cybertruck Is Revolutionary

The so-called Cybertruck is an angular, stainless steel, all-electric pickup truck that quickly became polarizing. Here's why it's revolutionary.

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Brazen Thieves Plunder Priceless Jewels and Historic Artifacts in 2 Heists in Germany

In two daring heists that took place just days apart in Germany, burglars stole precious gems and artifacts from museums in two cities.

19h

Incredible Time-Lapse Video Shows Giant Greenland Lake Disappearing Within Hours

The drainage of meltwater lakes may be making Greenland more unstable than scientists previously realized.

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Lonely Antarctic Expeditions Shrink People's Brains

Researchers speculated that living in relative isolation and a "monotonous" environment may cause certain brain structures to shrink.

19h

'Crazymothers' Want You to Stop Calling Them 'Anti-Vaxxers'

An anti-vaccine group wants to rebrand itself as "vaccine risk aware." Here's why they can't.

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Once-a-Month Birth Control Pill Is in the Works

The once-a-month birth control pill is embedded into a starfish-like organic device.

19h

Evidence of an Alien Planet Spotted Around a White Dwarf, a Cosmic First

For the first time ever, astronomers have spotted evidence of a planet circling a superdense stellar corpse known as a white dwarf, a new study reports.

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Solar Probe Finds Active, Mysterious Corona, Surprising Scientists

NASA's Parker Solar Probe has passed through the outer atmosphere of the sun, and now we get to see what it found.

19h

Is the Universe Curved? Not So Fast.

A new study has called into question the prevailing notion that the universe is "flat." The stakes of this cosmological debate are huge.

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Radar Uncovers Viking Ship Buried on Norway Farm

The remains of a Viking ship have been discovered on a farm near a medieval church at Edøy, on the island of Smøla, in Norway.

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'The Pill' Might Shrink Certain Brain Regions Among Women Taking It

A brain region called the hypothalamus is smaller among women who use birth control pills, compared with non-users, a new study finds.

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19 Galaxies Are Apparently Missing Dark Matter. No One Knows Why.

Nineteen newly discovered dwarf galaxies seem to be missing their dark matter, and physicists aren't sure why.

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Concussions Damage the 'Bridge' Between the Two Halves of the Brain

The bridge between both halves of the brain fundamentally changes after concussion.

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Quantum Supremacy Is Unlikely, Scientist Says

Google claims quantum supremacy – IBM says not so fast. One researcher explains why he doesn't see quantum computers outpacing classical computers any time soon … and maybe not ever.

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What Is the Hubble Constant?

It's an expanding problem.

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Frothy and Toxic Bubbles Cover One of India's Most Famous Beaches

A beach in India is coated in knee-deep foam that experts warn is toxic.

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NASA Spots Crash Site and Debris from India's Lost Moon Lander

Scientists and amateurs alike have spent months combing through images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter looking for the remains of India's moon lander — and that search has paid off.

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Tænkeboks: Afstandene X1, X2 og X3 er 38,4, 66,7 og 86,8 cm

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 48!

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Larry, Sergey, and the Mixed Legacy of Google-Turned-Alphabet

With Larry Page and Sergey Brin stepping back (again\!), Google CEO Sundar Pichai is now in charge of Alphabet—and its dysfunction.

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Scientists develop a 'clock' to measure biological age based on blood

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Early climate change models held up better than you think

submitted by /u/nick__k [link] [comments]

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Fusion by strong lasers

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Want a lifetime of learning? Skill-up with this stack of online courses.

StackSkills Unlimited is an online learning resource with over 1,000 skill training courses. Over 550,000 students have successfully completed courses in IT, graphic design, finance and more. Save over 90% off the regular price None If you're laser-focused on hitting a career goal, mapping out every step along the way to getting you there, then congratulations. You've got a big step up on most of

20h

Accelerated PBI not equivalent, but close, to WBI to control ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence

Long-term results from the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 comparing whole-breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) indicated that, although the absolute difference between treatment was less than 1%, APBI did not meet the criteria for equivalence to WBI in controlling ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy.

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'Junk DNA' affects inherited cancer risk

A person's risk of developing cancer is affected by genetic variations in regions of DNA that don't code for proteins, previously dismissed as 'junk DNA', according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Friday). This new study shows that inherited cancer risk is not only affected by mutations in key cancer genes – known as oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes – but tha

20h

Patients at risk because NHS hospitals using different record-keeping systems

A major survey of medical record keeping in the NHS has revealed critical deficiencies that could risk patients' safety.

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Domestic abuse survivors twice at risk of long-term illnesses

Female survivors of domestic abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, shows a study by the universities of Birmingham and Warwick.

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COP25 climate change conference: What are you giving up for environment?

As the annual COP25 climate change summit continues in Madrid, we asked delegates from all over the world how they were adapting their lives for the sake of the environment.

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Open source EEG visualization tool

Researchers have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder.

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Behavioral interventions may be as effective at reducing food intake as anorectic drugs

Simulations predict that behavioral interventions such as imposing strict no-food restrictions after meals can be as effective as strong anorectic drugs in reducing food intake in rodents, according to a study.

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Nervous system doesn't merely detect Salmonella, it defends the body against it

Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body.

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Open source EEG visualization tool

Researchers have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder.

21h

Fishy Trick Lures Life Back to Coral Reefs

Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fishy Trick Lures Life Back to Coral Reefs

Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Lancet Global Health: Half of WHO-recommended policies to reduce chronic diseases are not put into practice

The first analysis of WHO-recommended policies to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) finds that implementation is slowly improving, but on average just over half get no further than being endorsed, according to results from 151 countries published in The Lancet Global Health journal. The current study is the first to analyse what progress was made in putting 18 policies into prac

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First investigational drug therapy for liver disease NASH awaiting FDA approval

Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a chronic liver disease and a leading cause for liver transplantation in the US, currently lack an approved drug therapy, but this may soon change. A large Phase III clinical trial designed in collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University is the first to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of an oral medication to treat the disease.

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Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve esophageal cancer survival rates

A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of esophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a UCL-led study published in Lancet Digital Health.

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Long-term study finds faster breast cancer radiation treatment as effective as long course

Approximately half of the patients were randomly assigned whole breast radiation, delivered once per day over 3 to 5 weeks. The other half received external beam APBI which was given twice a day over 5 to 8 days. The study was long-term, with a median followup of 8.6 years.

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Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated

Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bispehnol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed. The study provides the first evidence that the measurements relied upon by regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration, are flawed, underestimating exposure levels by as much as 4

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Democrats Have an Image Problem

It's Thursday, December 5. In today's newsletter: Where have all the non-white 2020 candidates gone? Plus, following the bread crumbs of the "Ukraine did it" conspiracy. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (BRENDAN MCDERMID / REUTERS) From the most diverse in history—to all white Before any votes had been cast, Kamala Harris dropped out of the presidential race, leaving the Democratic field with more than ju

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Author Correction: Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13715-z

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Author Correction: Characterization of Split Fluorescent Protein Variants and Quantitative Analyses of Their Self-Assembly Process

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55623-8

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Publisher Correction: Genome-wide analysis of Corsican population reveals a close affinity with Northern and Central Italy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55185-9

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Author Correction: Non-Markovianity of qubit evolution under the action of spin environment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55327-z

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Author Correction: Sole coloration as an unusual aposematic signal in a Neotropical toad

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55021-0

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Author Correction: Tracing microplastics in aquatic environments based on sediment analogies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54997-z

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Author Correction: Self-organized intestinal epithelial monolayers in crypt and villus-like domains show effective barrier function

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55181-z

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Author Correction: Annihilation of the Somali upwelling system during summer monsoon

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54632-x

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Preterm birth linked to increased rates of diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females

New research shows that preterm birth is linked to increased rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females. People who have been born preterm may need more intensive monitoring and prevention efforts to lower their risk of diabetes, concludes the study, published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of D

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Clinical study finds eating within 10-hour window may help stave off diabetes, heart disease

Researchers have found that a 10-hour time-restricted eating intervention, when combined with traditional medications, resulted in weight loss, reduced abdominal fat, lower blood pressure and cholesterol for participants. The pilot study could lead to a new treatment option for metabolic syndrome patients who are at risk for developing life-altering and costly medical conditions such as diabetes.

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Radio Atlantic: Britain Votes (Again)

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Donald Trump wasn't the only election surprise of 2016. Three months before he won the presidency, the United Kingdom shocked observers by voting to leave the European Union. Ever since, Brexit has dominated British politics. But while Americans may have to wait another 11 months to see Trump's name back on the ba

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Kamala Harris' Opposing Truths

Photographer Justin Sullivan's snapshot of the California senator's campaign office questions her ultimate message.

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Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon

Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields.

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How a volcanic eruption helped create modern Scotland

Eruption-induced cooling likely exacerbated the "Scottish ills" of the late 1690s

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Eco-friendly shoes made of recycled materials

And don't forget to wear and repair—not throw away!—the shoes you already have in your closet. Roughly 300 million pairs of shoes end up in landfills every year in the U.S. alone. To lessen your impact on our planet, try some eco-friendly shoes that are made out of recycled materials. Here are a few for your feet: Sneakers that are made out of recycled bottles. Saola is a vegan shoe company named

22h

Mechanical keyboards for gamers and writers

A satisfying click-click-click to keep you going. (Arthur Reeder via Unsplash/) The average person types about 8,000 keystrokes every hour. What if each of those keystrokes could give you a gratifying clicking sensation? We're talking about the feeling of a mechanical keyboard, which has a physical spring-loaded switch under each key to record keystrokes (normal keyboard uses a rubber dome and pl

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First of its kind study seeks to answer whether effects of 'abortion pill' can be reversed

Women who initiate medical abortion but opt to stop in the middle of treatment may be at risk for serious blood loss, a UC Davis Health study finds. Researchers found this is true even for women who use an experimental treatment that claims to 'reverse' the effects of the abortion pill. The study, published today in Obstetrics and Gynecology, provides important insights into the safety of using hi

22h

Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells — artificial cells — that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method.

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Developing a digital twin of a vehicle

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles delivering packages, maybe even people, from location to location. Researchers are developing 'digital twins' that combine computational models and machine learning to predict vehicle health and enable autonomous decision-making at the edge.

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Microfiber cloths for all your cleaning needs

Microfiber cloths for any screen or surface. (DepositPhotos/) Your first time swapping a regular rag with a microfiber cloth will be like experiencing magic for the first time . These pieces of fabric are more environmentally sustainable than paper towels. They're washable and reusable, and can clean effectively with just water. They're also safe for delicate surfaces like laptop screens or glass

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A SpaceX Beer Supply Run, Sketchy Baby Yoda Merch, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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This Huge Galaxy Has the Biggest Black Hole Ever Measured

The monster black hole in galaxy cluster Abell 85 is roughly the size of our solar system, but packs the mass of 40 billion suns.

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Handy repair kits for your broken toilet

Fix the best seat in your home. ( Edgardo Lagmay via Unsplash/) Our relationship with toilets is complicated. We trust our bare derrières to the seat day in and day out, yet most of us don't think twice about how toilets function. DIY fixes are usually limited to what we can do by jiggling the handle or plunging—and then we either resign ourselves to a finicky flush or call in a plumber. Save mon

22h

Four locks to keep your bike secure

What would you do without your bicycle? Now you don't have to find out. (Nick Karvounis via Unsplash/) If you ride your bike in a city, you know that security from theft is a major concern. Often times locking your bike frame isn't enough; the wheels and seat need to be secure, too. Here are our recommendations for different types of locks to consider for your various bike components, depending o

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Detailed insight into stressed cells

When cells are stressed, they initiate a complex and precisely regulated response to prevent permanent damage. One of the immediate reactions to stress signals is a reduction of protein synthesis (translation). Until now, it was difficult to measure such acute cellular changes. Researchers have now developed a method overcoming this hurdle.

22h

By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for cognitive training

People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study. Fluid intelligence is a measure of one's ability to adapt to new situations and solve never-before-seen problems.

22h

Controlling attention with brain waves

Having trouble paying attention? Neuroscientists may have a solution for you: Turn down your alpha brain waves. In a new study, the researchers found that people can enhance their attention by controlling their own alpha brain waves based on neurofeedback they receive as they perform a particular task.

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Skepticism persists about revived Alzheimer's drug after conference presentation

U.S. regulators will decide next year whether Biogen's antibody drug deserves market approval

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SWOG study confirms new prognostic markers for triple negative breast cancer

Physicians who treat patients with triple negative breast cancer have two new ways to predict which patients may benefit most from the well-established post-surgery treatment known as AC chemotherapy, short for adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide.

22h

Cafe Staffed by Robots Opens in Japan

RoboRestaurant On Thursday, SoftBank Robotics opened the Pepper PARLOR , a cafe where three different types of robots work alongside human staff to serve and entertain customers. "[The] aim is to create a space where people can easily experience the coexistence of people and robots and enjoy the evolution of robots and the future of living with robots," the company told ZDNet . "We want to make r

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When it gets dark, people get SAD (seasonal affective disorder)

Here in San Diego, we get a minimum of 9 hours and 59 minutes of sunlight, even in the dead of winter. Boston and Chicago get closer to 9 hours and Anchorage gets as low as 5.5 hours compared to Miami's 10.5 hours. Does this dramatic difference in sunlight have any health effects? 1% of […]

23h

'Buildings' in human bone may hold key to stronger 3D-printed lightweight structures

The discovery of how a 'beam' in human bone material handles a lifetime's worth of wear and tear could translate to the development of 3D-printed lightweight materials that last long enough for more practical use in buildings, aircraft and other structures.

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Asteroid Bennu's mysterious particle events

Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space.

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Developing a digital twin of a vehicle

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles delivering packages, maybe even people, from location to location. Researchers are developing 'digital twins' that combine computational models and machine learning to predict vehicle health and enable autonomous decision-making at the edge.

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Between arousal and inhibition

Why nerve cells in the brain process information differently.

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As a way to fight climate change, not all soils are created equal

Soil scientists offer a newly nuanced understanding of different soil organic matter components that can be increased through varied management strategies.

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Taking an Ice Bath After Working Out Might Impair Muscle Growth

A dip in chilly water might help your muscles feel less sore, at the cost of growing more slowly.

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Weight for it: Time-restricted eating benefits those at risk for diabetes, heart disease

Researchers from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies reported a form of intermittent fasting, called time-restricted eating, improved the health of study participants who had been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

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'Buildings' in human bone may hold key to stronger 3-D-printed lightweight structures

What do bones and 3-D-printed buildings have in common? They both have columns and beams on the inside that determine how long they last.

23h

Academy scientists describe 71 new species in 2019

In 2019, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 71 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 17 fish, 15 geckos, eight flowering plants, six sea slugs, five arachnids, four eels, three ants, three skinks, two skates, two w

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Academy scientists describe 71 new species in 2019

In 2019, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 71 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 17 fish, 15 geckos, eight flowering plants, six sea slugs, five arachnids, four eels, three ants, three skinks, two skates, two w

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Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells—artificial cells—that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers.

23h

Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon

Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields.

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Ratcheting up NBA rookie salaries may incentivize athletes to finish college

Going pro early may be a no-brainer for exceptional, young basketball stars like former Duke freshman and 2019 NBA draft first-pick Zion Williamson. But a study in the "International Journal of Sport Finance" proposes a new salary structure that might entice most other college players considering the NBA to graduate before trying their hand at going pro.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Ambali rapidly intensifying

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Ambali and the visible image showed that the storm was rapidly intensifying.

23h

The Convoluted Story Of How The First Atoms Of Tennessine Were Created

Tennessine is an extremely rare element. Only a few dozen atoms of it have ever been produced. The tale of how the first atoms of Tennessine were created is complicated.

23h

Study reveals how diabetes drug promotes healthy aging

Doctors often prescribe metformin for type 2 diabetes. A new mouse study on its liver mechanisms may explain its wider benefits for health and life span.

23h

Preterm births more likely when dads live in lower income areas

Lifelong lower socioeconomic status of fathers, as defined by early life and adulthood neighborhood income, is a newly identified risk factor for early preterm birth (at less than 34 weeks), according to a study published in Maternal and Child Health Journal.

23h

This Futuristic Space Hoodie is a "Self-Contained Microhabitat"

Cocoon Hoodie High-end British clothing design firm Vollebak has devised a futuristic hoodie that it says could help astronauts catch some much-needed z's while drifting through the cosmos inside a cramped spacecraft. It promises to create a "self-contained microhabitat" by cocooning the wearer's head inside a "space helmet" hood. Images courtesy of Vollebank Getting sleep is difficult in orbit:

23h

Assistance during first years of biology major leads to higher retention of first-gen students

Assistance during the first years of a biology major leads to higher retention of first-generation students.

23h

As China rapidly adopts clean energy, use of traditional stoves persists

Old habits are hard to break. A new study of replacement of traditional wood and coal burning stoves with clean energy in China suggests that, without a better understanding of the reasons behind people's reluctance to give up traditional stoves, it will be difficult for policies in China and elsewhere in the world to succeed in encouraging this shift towards clean energy.

23h

Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells — artificial cells — that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method.

23h

China's schoolkids beat American students in all academic categories

The results come from the PISA survey, OECD's triennial study of 15 year-old students across the world. Compared to other OECD member nations, American students performed especially poorly in math. Alarmingly, only 14 percent of American students were able to reliably distinguish fact from opinion in reading tests. None Chinese students far outperformed their international peers in a test of read

23h

Meet CIMON-2, a New and Improved AI Robot Astronaut

The free-floating robot could make work more efficient on the International Space Station.

23h

The Company Behind Pokémon Go Is Making AR Glasses

Immersive Gaming Niantic, the company that created augmented reality games including the undying Pokémon Go and the much more forgettable Harry Potter: Wizards Unite, is now developing a new pair of AR glasses. The company announced on Thursday that it's partnering up with the tech company Qualcomm to create the glasses, according to CNET . As Apple and Facebook also work toward their own smart g

23h

Peloton Doesn't Understand the People Who Love It Most

The internet has some feedback on Peloton's holiday ad campaign . The fitness-tech company, famous for its $2,400, Wi-Fi-enabled stationary bikes that let riders stream spin classes, debuted a new television commercial in mid-November, but it didn't become infamous until earlier this week, when Twitter got ahold of it. In the ad, a young mom gains confidence in the year after her husband buys her

23h

Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences describe 71 new species in 2019

From geckos to goblin spiders, flowering plants, and Mediterranean ants — spanning five continents and three oceans — these 71 new species described by Academy scientists grow Earth's tree of life.

23h

Offshore Wind May Help The Planet — But Will It Hurt Whales?

New York has awarded two contracts for large offshore wind farms, with more anticipated. Researchers are surveying whales in the area to craft strategies to mitigate dangers to them and their habitat. (Image credit: David 'Dee' Delgado/WCS/Ocean Giants/Image taken under NMFS MMPA/ESA Permit no. 18786-04)

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Cellphone distraction linked to increase in head injuries

Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise — and correlates with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, a Rutgers study found.

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Researchers develop open source EEG visualization tool

Researchers at UT have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder.

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This once-a-month birth control pill unfurls like a star in your stomach

Taking birth control every day can be a huge pain (Simone van der Koelen/Unsplash/) Taking a birth control pill every day is difficult, especially given the fact that these hormonal methods are most effective when taken at the exact same time. It takes advance planning, a reliable schedule, and a good memory (or at least a trusty phone alarm) to keep to a regimen, and that's assuming the person o

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Danmarks klimamål drukner i fossil-biler

For femte år i træk er vejtrafikken steget, fordi vi får flere biler og kører stadigt mere i dem. Miljøorganisationer kræver straksindgreb for at vende udviklingen.

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Bats might actually benefit from wildfires

Bats in the Sierra Nevada appear to be well-adapted to wildfire, researchers report. Bats face many threats—including habitat loss, climate change, and emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome, but it appears wildfire isn't one of them. Researchers used acoustic surveys to test the effects of burn severity and variation in fire effects, or pyrodiversity, on 17 species of bats in the region.

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Impress The Science And Tech Lovers On Your List With Our 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

It's that time of year, again. Christmas is right around the corner. Hanukkah, too. Basically, if you celebrate a winter holiday that involves giving gifts to friends and loved ones, it's time to start shopping. And if you're looking for some cool gift ideas for science and tech lovers – or just a really unique product for someone special – you've come to the right place. Here at Futurism, we've

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Alleged Russian Hacker Behind $100 Million Evil Corp Indicted

The US is charging Maksim Yakubets over two of the biggest cybertheft campaigns of the last decade, and offers a record reward for information on the case.

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Gulf Coast corals face catastrophe

Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research.

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'Buildings' in human bone may hold key to stronger 3D-printed lightweight structures

The discovery of how a 'beam' in human bone material handles a lifetime's worth of wear and tear could translate to the development of 3D-printed lightweight materials that last long enough for more practical use in buildings, aircraft and other structures.

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Scientists push bioprinting capability forward

Scientists are reporting using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprising of multiple different functional materials. They printed different designs of smooth muscle and cartilage regions in artificial tracheal substitutes showing similar mechanical properties to human tracheal tissue.

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Increased stiffness and flow resistance of the inner wall of Schlemm's canal in glaucomatous human eyes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cause of the elevated outflow resistance and consequent ocular hypertension characteristic of glaucoma is unknown. To investigate possible causes for this flow resistance, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) with 10-µm spherical tips to probe the stiffness of the inner wall of Schlemm's canal as a function of distance…

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The network architecture of rat intrinsic interbrain (diencephalic) macroconnections [Neuroscience]

The endbrain and interbrain form 2 great vertebrate forebrain divisions, and the interbrain is subdivided into the hypothalamus ventrally and thalamus dorsally. General organizing principles of intrainterbrain axonal circuitry were examined here at the level of gray matter regions using network analysis tools in a mammal with the most complete…

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Synaptic control of spinal GRPR+ neurons by local and long-range inhibitory inputs [Neuroscience]

Spinal gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-expressing (GRPR+) neurons play an essential role in itch signal processing. However, the circuit mechanisms underlying the modulation of spinal GRPR+ neurons by direct local and long-range inhibitory inputs remain elusive. Using viral tracing and electrophysiological approaches, we dissected the neural circuits underlying the inhibitory control of…

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Transcriptomic analysis of field-droughted sorghum from seedling to maturity reveals biotic and metabolic responses [Plant Biology]

Drought is the most important environmental stress limiting crop yields. The C4 cereal sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is a critical food, forage, and emerging bioenergy crop that is notably drought-tolerant. We conducted a large-scale field experiment, imposing preflowering and postflowering drought stress on 2 genotypes of sorghum across a…

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5-HT2A receptor activation normalizes stress-induced dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in the ventral tegmental area [Neuroscience]

Stress is known to alter GABAergic signaling in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and this inhibitory plasticity is associated with increased alcohol self-administration. In humans, serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) agonists can treat stress- and alcohol-related disorders, but the neural substrates are ill-defined. Thus, we reasoned that 5-HT2AR pharmacotherapies may ameliorate…

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Evolution of resistance in vitro reveals mechanisms of artemisinin activity in Toxoplasma gondii [Microbiology]

Artemisinins are effective against a variety of parasites and provide the first line of treatment for malaria. Laboratory studies have identified several mechanisms for artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum, including mutations in Kelch13 that are associated with delayed clearance in some clinical isolates, although other mechanisms are likely involved. To…

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Extensive subclonal mutational diversity in human colorectal cancer and its significance [Medical Sciences]

Human colorectal cancers (CRCs) contain both clonal and subclonal mutations. Clonal driver mutations are positively selected, present in most cells, and drive malignant progression. Subclonal mutations are randomly dispersed throughout the genome, providing a vast reservoir of mutant cells that can expand, repopulate the tumor, and result in the rapid…

1d

Supercoiling DNA optically [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cellular DNA is regularly subject to torsional stress during genomic processes, such as transcription and replication, resulting in a range of supercoiled DNA structures. For this reason, methods to prepare and study supercoiled DNA at the single-molecule level are widely used, including magnetic, angular-optical, micropipette, and magneto-optical tweezers. However, it…

1d

Molecular profiling of single neurons of known identity in two ganglia from the crab Cancer borealis [Neuroscience]

Understanding circuit organization depends on identification of cell types. Recent advances in transcriptional profiling methods have enabled classification of cell types by their gene expression. While exceptionally powerful and high throughput, the ground-truth validation of these methods is difficult: If cell type is unknown, how does one assess whether a…

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Successive passaging of a plant-associated microbiome reveals robust habitat and host genotype-dependent selection [Microbiology]

There is increasing interest in the plant microbiome as it relates to both plant health and agricultural sustainability. One key unanswered question is whether we can select for a plant microbiome that is robust after colonization of target hosts. We used a successive passaging experiment to address this question by…

1d

A noncanonical vacuolar sugar transferase required for biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense compounds in oat [Plant Biology]

Plants produce an array of natural products with important ecological functions. These compounds are often decorated with oligosaccharide groups that influence bioactivity, but the biosynthesis of such sugar chains is not well understood. Triterpene glycosides (saponins) are a large family of plant natural products that determine important agronomic traits, as…

1d

Nation's Entire Gov Shuts Down to Focus on Measles Outbreak

The island nation of Samoa is in the midst of a devastating measles outbreak — and the government has now ceased all operations not focused on containing it. As of Wednesday, the measles outbreak has killed 60 people, Ars Technica reported , with 52 of those being children under the age of four. An additional 4,052 people have fallen ill, which is a huge number for a nation with a population of a

1d

Science Museum 'hiding dirty money' over £2m Sackler donation

Funds intended for specific project will instead be spread across Science Museum's work The Science Museum has been accused of trying to "quietly hide away dirty money" after it agreed to a request by the Dr Mortimer and Theresa Sackler Foundation to repurpose a £2m donation earmarked for a prominent new gallery. The donation, which was meant to fund the Medicine: the Wellcome Galleries collectio

1d

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Ambali rapidly intensifying

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Ambali and the visible image showed that the storm was rapidly intensifying.

1d

Ratcheting up NBA rookie salaries may incentivize athletes to finish college

In a paper for the 'International Journal of Sport Finance' Barbara Arel and Michael J. Tomas III, faculty in the business school at the University of Vermont, reimagined the NBA's rookie salary scale to redistribute pay in a way that compensates players for each year of college completed.

1d

Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells — artificial cells — that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers.

1d

Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon

Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields.

1d

A blockchain expert is accused of helping North Korea's leaders. But what would they want from him?

The North Korean regime appears to see cryptocurrency as a shortcut to economic development.

1d

Watch a Deepfaked Trump Say Epstein Didn't Kill Himself

Getting Dangerous A new deepfake video portrays President Trump, sitting at his desk in the Oval Office and giving an official address. It begins with him hinting that he's about to comment on the ongoing impeachment proceedings, but then pivots: the digitally-reconstructed Trump says "Jeffrey Epstein did not kill himself." The video, which could be convincing to a casual viewer, perfectly illust

1d

Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs

Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the same way, a few specific strategies appeared time and time again. An investigation of the skulls of 160 non-avian dinosaurs revealed the evolution of common traits in the skulls and teeth of plant-eating members of otherwise very differe

1d

Bats may benefit from wildfire

Bats face many threats — from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats.

1d

New study hints at complex decision making in a single-cell organism

In an effort to replicate an experiment conducted over a century ago, researchers present evidence confirming at least one single-cell organism — the trumpet-shaped Stentor roeselii — exhibits a hierarchy of avoidance behaviors. Exposed repeatedly to the same stimulation, the organism can in effect 'change its mind' about how to respond, indicating a capacity for relatively complex decision-maki

1d

Outlook for the polar regions in a 2-degrees-warmer world

With 2019 on pace as one of the warmest years on record, a major new study reveals how rapidly the Arctic is warming and examines global consequences of continued polar warming. The study reports that the Arctic has warmed by 0.75 degrees C in the last decade alone.

1d

Looking at tropical forests through new eyes

Air-based maps of plant chemistry are improving carbon cycling models in hyper-diverse tropical forests.

1d

Scientists push bioprinting capability forward

Scientists are reporting using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprising of multiple different functional materials. They printed different designs of smooth muscle and cartilage regions in artificial tracheal substitutes showing similar mechanical properties to human tracheal tissue.

1d

Fractured Forests Are Endangering Wildlife, Scientists Find

The world's forests are being carved into pieces. In tropical regions, animals are likely to pay a heavy price.

1d

As China rapidly adopts clean energy, use of traditional stoves persists

Old habits are hard to break. A McGill-led study of replacement of traditional wood and coal burning stoves with clean energy in China suggests that, without a better understanding of the reasons behind people's reluctance to give up traditional stoves, it will be difficult for policies in China and elsewhere in the world to succeed in encouraging this shift towards clean energy. The study was pub

1d

What Is A Calorie?

We encounter, and ingest, them everyday. But what does it mean to eat a calorie?

1d

OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events

Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space. The ongoing examination of Bennu—and its sample that will eventually be returned to Earth—could potentially shed light on why this intriguing phenomenon is occurring.

1d

A Tiny Leak Led to a Massive, Unexpected Collapse at Kilauea Volcano

Its caldera's dramatic, surprisingly slow collapse could point to other risks worldwide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion

, and this information transfer is at least partially mediated by a brain region called the anterior cingulate cortex.

1d

Mobile devices blur work and personal privacy raising cyber risks

Organizations aren't moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace.

1d

A Tiny Leak Led to a Massive, Unexpected Collapse at Kilauea Volcano

Its caldera's dramatic, surprisingly slow collapse could point to other risks worldwide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

US meteorite adds to origins mystery

Scientists are getting closer to tracing the sources of meteorites that fall to Earth.

1d

Assistance during the first years of a biology major leads to higher retention of first-generation students

For many young college students, the first years are a time of wonder and excitement and early steps toward long-term goals. These years, for some students, are equally fraught with anxiety, as the realities of rigorous curricula set in alongside feelings of unpreparedness and impostor syndrome. In the STEM fields, this results in roughly 50% of first-year majors leaving their original course of s

1d

Developing a digital twin

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles delivering packages, maybe even people, from location to location. Researchers from The University of Texas and MIT, in collaboration with Akselos, and Aurora Flight Sciences, are developing 'digital twins' that combine computational models and machine learning to predict vehicle health and enable au

1d

MIT Says New Technique Lets You Hack Your Own Brain Waves

MIT researchers say they've taught test subjects how to manipulate their own alpha brain waves, thereby improving attention at a given task. The key: give the participants live feedback of their brain activity. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Neuron , suggests the possibility of teaching people, particularly those with learning disabilities, how to improve their focus through neurof

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Life Time CEO sees 'healthy living village' concept as wave of the future

submitted by /u/theotherlee28 [link] [comments]

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Even 50-year-old climate models correctly predicted global warming

submitted by /u/sportsright [link] [comments]

1d

Is there a less political version of futurology?

Years ago the top posts were all about actual advancements being made. Basically a tech version of /r/upliftingnews . Now it's just politics and climate change warnings. submitted by /u/zeekaran [link] [comments]

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A planetary computer for Earth

submitted by /u/Ready_future [link] [comments]

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How AI is helping spot wildfires faster

submitted by /u/nick__k [link] [comments]

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America's AirQuality Worsens,Ending Years ofGains, Study Says

submitted by /u/nick__k [link] [comments]

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Why The United States Is Turning To Recycling Robots

submitted by /u/leonerdo_ [link] [comments]

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Nine gifts for the literal tree hugger in your life

Treet yourself. (Lukasz Szmigiel vis Unsplash/) Trees are magnificent beings. They produce oxygen for humans to breathe, sequester carbon dioxide, and provide shade for many species, including birds, rodents, and humans. If you have a tree lover in your life, you've probably heard all these facts before. Return the favor any time of year with these evergreen gifts. Tree guide By Cesare Leonardi (

1d

Cretaceous fossils are missing link in mammal ear evolution

Newly discovered mammal fossils reveal the crucial evolutionary step when the bones for hearing and chewing finally separated

1d

Mister Rogers and the Art of Paying Attention

From the hungry cries of newborns, to the whining helplessness of tired toddlers, to the sulking of older children, kids demand their parents' attention in many different ways. Adults use the phrase just looking for attention to imply that something is wrong with a child, or perhaps worse, that the child's parents aren't raising him or her well. But attention has, undeservedly, gotten a bad rap.

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