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nyheder2019december07

General election 2019: Labour 'beats other parties on climate change'

Friends of the Earth rates the party above the Greens and Lib Dems in its environment policy survey.

12h

Ancient worm reveals way to destroy toxic cells in Huntington's disease

Insights from their study may provide a novel therapeutic approach for diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's.

9h

When a DNA Test Says You're a Younger Man, Who Lives 5,000 Miles Away

After a bone marrow transplant, a man with leukemia found that his donor's DNA traveled to unexpected parts of his body. A crime lab is now studying the case.

4h

Why Do People With Alzheimer's Tend to Sleep a Lot?

The disease causes changes to our brain's circuitry that can make sleep difficult.

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Katrina Karkazis: 'You can't use testosterone levels to divide people into male or female'

The cultural anthropologist on why our view of testosterone as the male sex hormone skews both science and society Katrina Karkazis , a senior research fellow at Yale University, is a cultural anthropologist working at the intersection of science, technology, gender studies and bioethics. With Rebecca Jordan-Young , a sociomedical scientist, she has written Testosterone: An Unauthorised Biography

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What does DNA's repair shop look like? New research identifies the tools

A team of scientists has identified how damaged DNA molecules are repaired inside the human genome, a discovery that offers new insights into how the body works to ensure its health and how it responds to diseases that stem from impaired DNA.

1h

A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

Researchers have demonstrated the first material that can have both strongly correlated electron interactions and topological properties, which not only paves the way for more stable quantum computing but also an entirely new platform to explore the wild world of exotic physics.

1h

Brain differences detected in children with depressed parents

The largest brain imaging study of children ever conducted in the United States has revealed structural differences in the brains of those whose parents have depression.

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Microwave treatment is an inexpensive way to clean heavy metals from treated sewage

A team of researchers studying new methods to remove toxic heavy metals from biosolids — the solid waste left over after sewage treatment — found the key is a brief spin through a microwave.

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Water animation gets easier

A team of computer science professors created a method to quickly resize animations of fluids without having to completely re-simulate the entire sequence.

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Evolutionary connection between pregnancy and cancer metastasis

Pregnancy might hold the key to understanding how cancer metastasizes in various mammals — including humans, according to researchers.

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Whales may owe their efficient digestion to millions of tiny microbes

A study shows that the microbial communities inside whales may play an important role in the digestion of one of the ocean's most abundant carbon-rich lipids, known as a wax ester.

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Rolls-Royce Touts Nuclear Reactors as Key to Clean Jet Fuel

submitted by /u/andygates2323 [link] [comments]

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Can Underwater Turbines Solve Our Energy Problems?

submitted by /u/Daktush [link] [comments]

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Toyota really believes hydrogen fuel cells are the future: Here's why

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

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Men & women will mainly have sex with sex robots by 2050

submitted by /u/gunpas11 [link] [comments]

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A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

Researchers have demonstrated the first material that can have both strongly correlated electron interactions and topological properties, which not only paves the way for more stable quantum computing but also an entirely new platform to explore the wild world of exotic physics.

1h

Many Americans are actually centrists—in theory, anyway

A new study finds that Americans aren't as politically polarized as you might think. Respondents generally agreed on the issues of climate change, free speech, and the value of international agreements. The study also found that majorities want a smaller government that provides more services. None If you haven't been living under a rock for the last few years, you might notice that the United St

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Fusion by strong lasers

Nuclear physics usually involves high energies, as illustrated by experiments to master controlled nuclear fusion. One problem is how to overcome the strong electrical repulsion between atomic nuclei which requires high energies to make them fuse. But fusion could be initiated at lower energies with electromagnetic fields that are generated by state-of-the-art free electron lasers emitting X-ray l

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Scientists see defects in potential new semiconductor

A research team has reported seeing, for the first time, atomic scale defects that dictate the properties of a new and powerful semiconductor. The study shows a fundamental aspect of how the semiconductor, beta gallium oxide, controls electricity.

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New instrument extends LIGO's reach

Technology 'squeezes' out quantum noise so more gravitational wave signals can be detected.

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First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a sunnier side of climate change

Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.

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What is a scream? The acoustics of a primal human call

Listeners show strong agreement for parameters of a scream, including a higher pitch, roughness and a higher peak frequency.

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Using lungs from increased-risk donors expands donor pool, maintains current survival rates

Researchers have found that using lungs from donors who are considered high risk for certain infectious diseases compared to standard risk donors results in similar one-year survival for recipients. In addition, researchers saw no difference in rejection or graft (donor lung) survival after one year in patients receiving lungs from increased-risk donors.

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Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates

Researchers have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion – the ways animals move – and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains.

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Common hair products linked to cancer risk, says breaking new study

New research found that hair dyes and chemical straighteners might significantly increase the risk of breast cancer. According to the study, black women who used permanent dyes at least every 5-8 weeks raised their risk of developing cancer by 60 percent. This isn't the first time beauty products have been found to contain cancerous chemicals. None Earlier this week, a disturbing report came out

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Science-themed ties, bowties, and socks that make great gifts

Smart fashion choices. (Amazon/) Do you want to use fashion to signal your personal or professional interest in all things science without giving the impression that Albert Einstein was in a punk band? (You know the photo we're talking about. Yes, that one. ) Don't worry, it's not just possible, it's provable. Here are some tasteful and (mostly) understated accessories to help you get the message

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Technique shows how individual cancer cells react to drugs

sci-Plex, a new cell-response screening method, pools genetically different cells and shows what happens to individual cells when the sample is treated, such as with cancer drugs. The technology collects information on changes in genetic expression in each labeled cell, providing data useful in exploring mechanisms triggered by drugs or other agents.

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Immune system can be coaxed into selecting key antibodies to fight HIV

Researchers have cleared a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine, proving in animal models that effective, yet short-lasting antibodies can be coaxed into multiplying as a fighting force against the virus.

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Physical forces affect bacteria's toxin resistance, study finds

A random conversation between two researchers at a child's birthday party led to a collaboration and new understanding of how bacteria resist toxins, which may lead to new tools in the fight against harmful infections.

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Next generation of CAR-T cells possible

A new approach to programing cancer-fighting immune cells called CAR-T cells can prolong their activity and increase their effectiveness against human cancer cells grown in the laboratory and in mice, according to a new study.

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Using green products leads to a warm glow in shoppers

A new article suggests that spending some of that money on green products might make consumers feel quite a bit better about their purchases. The study looks at the so-called "greenconsumption effect" — how using a green product creates a "warm glow" feeling in users — and what it means for retailers in an increasingly eco-conscious marketplace.

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Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises

A new effective treatment of hepatitis C not only combats the virus, but is also effective against potentially fatal complications such as reduced liver functioning and cirrhosis.

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Dangerous skin tumor now has treatment guidelines

A new study reports the first guidelines for treating sebaceous carcinoma, a cancer of the oil glands. If not removed and treated promptly, it can spread to other organs and cause grave harm to patients, including death. But up until now there was no commonly agreed method to treat it.

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New protein function could be key to treatment of drug addiction and behavioral disorders

The reward pathway of the brain causes feelings of happiness but is also involved in behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and addiction. A breakthrough study has now identified the role of a protein called Npas4 in the reward pathway, mediated by the well-known proteins MAPK and CBP, opening doors to potential therapies for associated disorders. Cocaine-treated mice with inactivated Npas4 exhib

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Titan's Geomorphologic Map

From hummocky to dune- and lake-covered, Titan is revealed in its latest global map — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Long-term study finds faster breast cancer radiation treatment as effective as long course

Approximately half of the patients were randomly assigned whole breast radiation, delivered once per day over 3 to 5 weeks. The other half received external beam APBI which was given twice a day over 5 to 8 days. The study was long-term, with a median followup of 8.6 years.

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A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the world's most intractable pollutants

Engineers have developed a treatment train for a PFAS compound called HFPO-Dimer Acid, also known by its trade name, GenX.

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Machine learning helps scientists measure important inflammation process

Inflammation is a hallmark of many health conditions, but quantifying how the underlying biology of inflammation contributes to specific diseases has been difficult. For the first time, researchers now report the development of a new technology to identify white blood cells called neutrophils that are primed to eject inflammatory DNA into the circulation via a process called NETosis.

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Improving blood vessel health in brain may help combat Alzheimer's

Researchers have found that very slow spontaneous blood vessel pulsations drive the clearance of substances from the brain, indicating that targeting and improving this process may help to prevent or treat amyloid-beta accumulation.

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Being active reduces risk of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK , yet we still don't know all of its causes. The largest ever study to use genetics as a measurement for physical activity to look at its effect on prostate cancer, reveals that being more active reduces the risk of prostate cancer. Over 140,000 men were included in the study, of which, 80,000 had prostate cancer.

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Possible early test for fetal heart health

Changes in heart rate, due to low oxygen conditions, experienced by the fetus during pregnancy, could be used to predict the future heart health of babies, shows new research.

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Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply

India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study.

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Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal

A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting.

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Nanocontainer ships titan-size gene therapies and drugs into cells

Scientists report they have created a tiny, nanosize container that can slip inside cells and deliver protein-based medicines and gene therapies of any size — even hefty ones attached to the gene-editing tool called CRISPR.

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Using fidget spinners may actually impede learning

Though fidget spinners have been around since the early 1990s, it was 2017 when they really started to make a stir, becoming a seemingly overnight sensation and starting to appear in offices, classrooms, public transport and pretty much anywhere else they were permitted. The actual provenance of the design has been debated, but many companies market the toys as a tool for concentration, particula

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Link between vitamin A and brain response in Monarch butterflies

Biologists are making strides in understanding biological clock function in several model organisms and translating these studies into broader implications for human health.

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Empowering mucosal healing with an engineered probiotic

Researchers developed a living material approach that uses a strain of genetically engineered E.coli Nissle bacteria as a locally acting probiotic. The engineered bacteria produce a network of nanofibers that directly binds to mucus to fill inflamed areas like a patch, shielding them from gut microbes and environmental factors. This probiotic-based therapeutic strategy protected mice against the e

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Dial-a-frog — researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild

Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild. The FrogPhone is the world's first solar-powered remote survey device that relays environmental data to the observer via text messages, whilst conducting real-time remote acoustic surveys over the phone.

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Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons

A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such

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Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds

An important tool for monitoring seabird populations involves acoustic sensors deployed at nesting sites to record sounds over long periods of time. But analysis of the recordings to identify and count the calls of different species can be time-consuming, even with computers and artificial intelligence. An alternative approach is to evaluate all of the sounds in an environment as a 'soundscape', u

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'Randomizers' Are Breathing New Life Into Old Games

A small but growing community in the retro emulation scene is using a class of mods and hacks to revamp the classics.

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Study debunks notion that C-section would increase risk of obesity in the child

Women who have C-sections are no more likely to have children who develop obesity than women who give birth naturally, according to a large study. The findings contradict several smaller studies that did find an association between C-section deliveries and offspring obesity but did not consider the numerous maternal and prenatal factors that the researchers did in this study.

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Nanocontainer ships titan-size gene therapies and drugs into cells

Scientists report they have created a tiny, nanosize container that can slip inside cells and deliver protein-based medicines and gene therapies of any size — even hefty ones attached to the gene-editing tool called CRISPR.

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Gamma-ray laser moves a step closer to reality

A physicist has performed calculations showing hollow spherical bubbles filled with a gas of positronium atoms are stable in liquid helium. The calculations take scientists a step closer to realizing a gamma-ray laser.

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Novel way to ID disease-resistance genes in chocolate-producing trees found

Chocolate-producing cacao trees that are resistant to a major pathogen were identified by an international team of plant geneticists. The findings point the way for plant breeders to develop trees that are tolerant of the disease.

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Current treatment for fungal meningitis is fueling drug resistance

A common first-line treatment approach for cryptococcal meningitis in low-income countries is being compromised by the emergence of drug resistance, new research warns. The findings highlight the need to develop new drugs and treatment regimens for the lethal brain infection, which kills around 180,000 people each year.

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Ni ud af ti penicillin-allergikere kan faktisk godt tåle medicinen

Fejldiagnosticering betyder, at mange tror, de er allergiske – helt uden at være det.

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3D Printing Can Keep Aging Air Force Aircraft Flying

And the military wants you—to help it make spare parts for decades-old B-52 bombers and other planes.

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We need to learn how to relax, without guilt

Being busy all the time is part of the way we live. But, whether gardening, reading or spacing out on the sofa, taking time to rest is just as important I'm not very good at resting. When I told friends that after writing books covering emotions, time perception and the psychology of money I had started writing one on rest, their first reaction was usually, "But you're always working. You never r

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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through December 7)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Former Go Champion Beaten by DeepMind Retires After Declaring AI Invincible James Vincent | The Verge "'With the debut of AI in Go games, I've realized that I'm not at the top even if I become the number one through frantic efforts,' Lee [Sedol] told Yonhap. ' Even if I become the number one, there is an entity that cannot be defeated.'" GENE EDITING Why the Paper on the C

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New kind of soft elastic material has medical and technological applications

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers have found a way to produce a new kind of gel which overcomes this limitation. It is still malleable and adaptable like existing gels, but it has a more ordered structure, which can open up a new range

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Reduced soil tilling helps both soils and yields

By monitoring crops through machine learning and satellite data, scientists have found farms that till the soil less can increase yields of corn and soybeans and improve the health of the soil — a win-win for meeting growing food needs worldwide.

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Space Photos of the Week: What the Parker Solar Probe Will See Once It Reaches the Sun

Images from Parker's predecessors show us what it'll see once it arrives at the Sun.

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Watch an Electric Eel Light up a Christmas Tree

Light It Up The Tennessee Aquarium has found a shocking yet wholesome way to celebrate the holiday season: the aquarium's electric eel, Miguel Wattson, can control the lights on his very own Christmas tree. "Whenever Miguel discharges electricity, sensors in the water deliver the charge to a set of speakers," Joey Turnipseed, the aquarium's audio visual production specialist, explained in a press

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Parker Hires a Productivity Manager | Gold Rush

In need of a fresh perspective, Parker hires a productivity manager from California with no mining experience. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://

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Weekend reads: Leading stem cell researcher's work under scrutiny; faked drug trial data; troubling China practice snares publisher

Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Researchers suing a journal over a retraction; A publisher retracting … Continue reading

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Når computerspil bliver kunst: »Spil skal ikke bare være sjove«

PLUS. Computerspillenes dogmefilm, indie-spil, vinder frem. Og for dem gælder helt andre værdier end for de konventionelle kæmpetitler.

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An American Prisoner Comes Home From Iran

Updated at 12 p.m. ET on December 7, 2019. One family's ordeal ends today with the release of Xiyue Wang, an American citizen and Princeton doctoral student imprisoned in Iran on vague espionage charges since 2016—at the end of a [ dissertation research trip ] gone terribly wrong. Iran, which has been wracked by weeks of violent protests and economically crippled under a U.S. sanctions campaign,

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Why the iPhone 11 Tracks Your Location Even When You Tell It Not To

Russian disinformation, a VC hack, vulnerable VPNs, and more are in the week's top security news.

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20 Gifts for Xbox One Owners: Games, Controllers, Headsets, and More

From the Master Chief Collection to Microsoft's Adaptive Controller, these gift ideas will make any Xbox fan happy.

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Genomic features of AML in patients over age 60 can predict success of stem cell transplant

For older patients with AML, the prospects for success of a stem cell transplant can often be predicted based on the particular set of genetic mutations within the tumor cells, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will report at the ASH Annual Meeting.

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Tiny Tyrant Gets a New Identity

A fossil thought to be a young Daspletosaurus turns out to be something else — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Closing critical gap in weather forecasting

Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information–called subseasonal forecasts–in the hands of the public and emergency managers can provide the critical lead time necessary to prepare for natural hazards like heat waves or the next po

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Scientists Built a "FrogPhone" to Remotely Survey Frog Habitats

FrogPhone Scientists have finally solved an age-old problem: how to track wild frog populations without leaving the lab. The answer is an acoustic surveillance device delightfully dubbed the FrogPhone, according to a press release . Using the FrogPhone, scientists can access remote survey sites and record frog calls from up to 150 meters away, immediately gathering important information on the he

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Five retinol products for baby-smooth skin in the new year

Take care of your skin. (DepositPhotos/) I'm a huge skincare buff, so I'm almost always swapping new products in and out of my rotation—we're talking oil cleansers, toners, moisturizers, essences, the works. But no matter what, one product always stays constant: my retinoid. Retinoids are a form of vitamin A, and they boast a laundry list of benefits that, shockingly, all have some solid scientif

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theologian Karen Armstrong on the lost art of getting outside of yourself

Confucianism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism—the world's scriptural belief systems take many different forms but all tend toward 'kenosis'—self-transcendence for the benefit of others. And all have been used and abused for less spiritual ends. Former nun and renowned theologian Karen Armstrong on the lost art of scripture. None I've spent more of my life than most people I know immersed by choice

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20 Best Gifts for Dad (2019): Gift Ideas for the Father in Your Life

Dads are almost impossible to shop for but don't worry, there's bound to be something here in our list of gifts for dad that he'll love.

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The Aeronauts Falls Flat

For years I have been cursed with sleepless nights and restless days, haunted by one unanswered question: Do women belong in balloons? A random naysayer in The Aeronauts , Tom Harper's airy new Victorian adventure film, gives a resounding "no." "Women don't belong in balloons!" she cries at Amelia Wren (played by Felicity Jones), outlining a sexist obstacle to the world of hot-air ballooning in t

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The Surprising Link Between Recreational Math and Undecidability

The Fibonacci numbers and Hilbert's 10th problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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E1912 follow-up shows ibrutinib effective, well tolerated by majority of CLL patients

The ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group today announced results from extended follow-up of patients in its randomized Phase 3 clinical trial, E1912. Previously untreated patients (aged 70 or younger) with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who received ibrutinib-based therapy lived longer and with sustained benefit, compared to standard FCR chemoimmunotherapy. The updated analysis supports the earlie

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Lymphoma patients may have new path to remission, even when CAR T therapy fails

A new, experimental immunotherapy can put patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) that is resistant to or has come back after multiple other therapies, including CAR T therapy, into remission.

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What Is The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Afraid Of?

The great irony of Amy Sherman-Palladino's television shows is that the dialogue gushes forth with the insistence of a burst hydrant, and yet the most beguiling moments are the ones in which no one speaks at all. Midway through the third season of Amazon's The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel , a man and a woman whose chemistry has smoldered almost since the show's inception find themselves alone, in the ea

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How Deepfakes Scramble Our Sense of True and False

Artificial intelligence enables more realistic—but fictitious—images and sounds. Researchers are racing to develop better detection tools.

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The CW's 'Crisis on Infinite Earths' Puts a Gen X Headlock on Superhero TV

The crossover event will tie together multiple stories while HBO's Watchmen is redefining the meaning of superheroes—just like their comics did in the 1980s.

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Nobel science laureates stress urgency of addressing climate

Three of this year's Nobel Prize laureates say addressing climate change is of great importance.

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To Drain the Swamp, Start With Rudy Giuliani

If the grassroots right wants to "drain the swamp" in Washington, D.C., it can't ignore the suspicious behavior of Rudy Giuliani. Here's one red flag: Wealthy, powerful people tend to pay their lawyers top dollar. But as Donald Trump's personal attorney, Giuliani works for free. In fact, an attorney representing Giuliani's wife in divorce proceedings told the New York Post that he's losing money.

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Russia's Twin Nostalgias

SOCHI, Russia—Gazing up at the bust of Joseph Stalin, the young boy listened silently as his mother squatted next to him, whispering the Soviet dictator's story into his ear. The pair studied the black-colored sculpture, among many of Stalin in this city's history museum (just one, apparently, is not enough). "He built this city," the mother told the child, who stared admiringly at Stalin's signa

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How much does it cost to save a life?

For the amount it costs to save one life in the United States, several hundred or a thousand lives could be saved in developing countries. You can make small sacrifices to fuel your personal philanthropy. Instead of giving, "we're buying ourselves things that we don't really need," says philosopher Peter Singer. "Things that might range from expensive cars to simply buying bottled water when we c

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1973: Storno leverer Europas første fuldautomatiske bilradionet

Fra januar 1973 vil finske bilister kunne dreje sig frem til enhver telefonabonnent i Finland og resten af verden, skrev Ingeniøren. Radiosamtalerne til og fra bilen etableres uden medvirken af ekspedienter og kan i modsætning til de bestående biltelefontjenester ikke aflyttes af uvedkommende.

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Climate change: Oceans running out of oxygen as temperatures rise

A warmer world means oceans are able to hold less dissolved oxygen, which is bad news for many fish.

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Women, exercise and longevity

Women who can exercise vigorously are at significantly lower risk of dying from heart disease, cancer and other causes. The research is presented today at EuroEcho 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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The Interstellar Comet Has Arrived in Time for the Holidays

This weekend an ice cube from beyond our solar system will make its closest approach to the sun, trailing mystery and dust.

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Help! I am Allergic to Apples and Was Kicked Off a Plane

In this week's Tripped Up column, Sarah Firshein investigates the rights that airplane passengers with allergies have when flying. (Not as many as they should.)

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Can Biology Class Reduce Racism?

When it comes to race, "It's always like 'O.K., but now we're going to start the lesson on peas,''' a biology teacher said. A study will test a new approach.

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Fossil fuel groups 'destroying' climate talks: NGOs

Oil and gas groups were accused Saturday of seeking to influence climate talks in Madrid by paying millions in sponsorship and sending dozens of lobbyists to delay what scientists say is a necessary and rapid cut in fossil fuel use.

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Australia braces for heatwave as more than 100 fires burn

Out of control bushfires forced residents in eastern Australia to flee their homes on Saturday, as other parts of the country braced for a heatwave due next week.

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Experiment closes critical gap in weather forecasting

Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information—called subseasonal forecasts—in the hands of the public and emergency managers can provide the critical lead time necessary to prepare for natural hazards like heat waves or the next pola

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Ancient worm reveals way to destroy toxic cells in Huntington's disease

Insights from their study may provide a novel therapeutic approach for diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's.

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World's Oceans Are Losing Oxygen Rapidly, Study Finds

A new report found that oxygen levels in the world's oceans declined by 2 percent over 50 years, threatening marine life around the planet.

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North America's first English settlers were unlucky scientists

The English founded Jamestown, Virginia in the 17th century to search for gold. They didn't find much, but that wasn't for lack of effort or scientific skill

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Scientists issue wake-up call on dangerous loss of oxygen from oceans

The world's oceans have lost 2 per cent of their oxygen on average over the last 50 years, alarming scientists who warn that the trend will impact fisheries

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Ugens debat: Ny løsning skal få opladning op i omdrejninger

En ny hurtigladestation til elbiler udnytter det ældgamle svinghjulsprincip til at booste den kapacitet, elnettet kan levere. Læserne på ing.dk mente, ideen var interessant, men mange foretrak batterier.

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Gamma-ray laser moves a step closer to reality

submitted by /u/chicompj [link] [comments]

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Har vi avlet os selv til at se venligere ud end neandertalerne?

DNA-analyser tyder på, at det moderne menneske har avlet sig selv.

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Ancient worm reveals way to destroy toxic cells in Huntington's disease

Research led by a Monash University scientist has identified a highly conserved mechanism in worms and humans that controls the removal of toxic protein aggregates — hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 7. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Nobelpristagaren: "Hoppas hitta en jord-tvilling innan jag dör"

Nästa vecka skjuts rymdteleskopet Cheops upp från den europeiska rymdbasen Kourou i Sydamerika. Det ska undersöka främmande planetsystem mycket mer exakt än vad man förut har kunnat göra.

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Nobelpristagarna: Vi vågade först inte tro på upptäckten

När forskarna Didier Queloz och Michel Mayor 1995 upptäckte planeten Pegasus 51b var de till en början skeptiska. Ingen inom forskarvärlden trodde nämligen att en stor planet kunde cirkulera så nära en stjärna. – Jag tror det tog mig tio år att smälta, säger Didier Queloz.

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Den mörka sektorn styr universum

Det finns överväldigande bevis för att 95 procent av all massa i universum består av något ingen ännu vet vad det är. Det är en av de allra största vetenskapliga mysterierna idag.

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Once-a-month oral contraceptive pill in development

Investigators have designed a drug-delivery vehicle that consists of six arms joined by an elastic-coated core. The arms were loaded with the oral contraceptive drug levonorgestrel and folded up into a capsule that can be swallowed. Once in the stomach, the arms unfold and have a span that is larger than the opening of the human pylorus, helping the system stay in the stomach where it can release

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First-ever "pig-monkey chimeras" born in Chinese lab

submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]

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Sono-optogenetics facilitated by a circulation-delivered rechargeable light source for minimally invasive optogenetics [Applied Physical Sciences]

Optogenetics, which uses visible light to control the cells genetically modified with light-gated ion channels, is a powerful tool for precise deconstruction of neural circuitry with neuron-subtype specificity. However, due to limited tissue penetration of visible light, invasive craniotomy and intracranial implantation of tethered optical fibers are usually required for…

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Equilibrium structure and deformation response of 2D kinetoplast sheets [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The considerable interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials and complex molecular topologies calls for a robust experimental system for single-molecule studies. In this work, we study the equilibrium properties and deformation response of a complex DNA structure called a kinetoplast, a 2D network of thousands of linked rings akin to molecular…

16h

Antitumor astins originate from the fungal endophyte Cyanodermella asteris living within the medicinal plant Aster tataricus [Microbiology]

Medicinal plants are a prolific source of natural products with remarkable chemical and biological properties, many of which have considerable remedial benefits. Numerous medicinal plants are suffering from wildcrafting, and thus biotechnological production processes of their natural products are urgently needed. The plant Aster tataricus is widely used in traditional…

16h

Molybdate pumping into the molybdenum storage protein via an ATP-powered piercing mechanism [Biochemistry]

The molybdenum storage protein (MoSto) deposits large amounts of molybdenum as polyoxomolybdate clusters in a heterohexameric (αβ)3 cage-like protein complex under ATP consumption. Here, we suggest a unique mechanism for the ATP-powered molybdate pumping process based on X-ray crystallography, cryoelectron microscopy, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational studies of MoSto..

16h

Mitochondrial dysfunctions trigger the calcium signaling-dependent fungal multidrug resistance [Microbiology]

Drug resistance in fungal pathogens has risen steadily over the past decades due to long-term azole therapy or triazole usage in agriculture. Modification of the drug target protein to prevent drug binding is a major recognized route to induce drug resistance. However, mechanisms for nondrug target-induced resistance remain only loosely…

16h

Symbionts exploit complex signaling to educate the immune system [Immunology and Inflammation]

The mammalian immune system is tolerized to trillions of microbes residing on bodily surfaces and can discriminate between symbionts and pathogens despite their having related microbial structures. Mechanisms of innate immune activation and the subsequent signaling pathways used by symbionts to communicate with the adaptive immune system are poorly understood….

16h

Intermittent rolling is a defect of the extravasation cascade caused by Myosin1e-deficiency in neutrophils [Immunology and Inflammation]

Neutrophil extravasation is a migratory event in response to inflammation that depends on cytoskeletal dynamics regulated by myosins. Myosin-1e (Myo1e) is a long-tailed class-I myosin that has not yet been studied in the context of neutrophil–endothelial interactions and neutrophil extravasation. Intravital microscopy of TNFα-inflamed cremaster muscles in Myo1e-deficient mice revealed…

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17h

How to have a more sustainable Christmas

From renting your tree, to sponsoring a turkey, a growing number of people are having a greener Christmas.

17h

Biodiversity: The best plants for attracting insects to gardens

With insect populations in decline, a study shows how gardens can support beetles, spiders and the like.

18h

Elon Musk Wins in Defamation Suit by British Diver

The verdict in favor of the Tesla CEO capped a four-day trial in Los Angeles over insults Musk tweeted in 2018.

18h

Master a second language in easy 10-15 minute blocks

A lifetime Babbel subscription can help you learn up to 14 popular languages. 10-to-15 minute language lessons focus on building basic conversational skills. Babbel's speech recognition technology monitors and assesses your verbal performance. None As any high school junior will tell you, learning a new language isn't easy. Even if you're interested and motivated, it can often be difficult to fin

19h

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Greta at United Nations climate talks one year apart

Life has changed a lot for the environmental activist in the space of a year.

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Gamma-ray laser moves a step closer to reality

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

19h

Intel: Reports of Moore's Law's death have been greatly exaggerated

submitted by /u/HeinrichTheWolf_17 [link] [comments]

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New CRISPR tool could fix almost all disease-causing DNA glitches

submitted by /u/BiotechNews [link] [comments]

19h

Uber's Alarming Crime Report, T-Mobile's 5G Test, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

20h

Three tricks to make your fresh herbs last year-round

Hanging mistletoe around the holidays is creepy. Hang herbs instead. (robynmac via Deposit Photos/) Every cooking enthusiast knows that few things make more of a difference in the kitchen than adding fresh herbs to your recipes. It's not only flavor, but also aroma and that bright pop of color that makes dishes look even more delicious. But especially during the winter months, fresh herbs are har

20h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: How Nancy Pelosi Hopes This Ends

It's Friday, December 6. In today's newsletter: An old Democratic kingmaker might return to the scene. Plus, can the pro-abortion-rights umbrella expand again? * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (ERIN SCOTT / REUTERS) How Nancy Pelosi hopes this ends When the House speaker asked committee chairs to begin drafting articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, her tone seemed to communicate how relu

20h

Cellular repair response to treadmill test can predict cardiac outcomes

The information gained from the changes in CPC counts during exercise may be more useful to cardiologists in risk stratifying these patients than the treadmill exercise test itself, the researchers say.

20h

'Conductor' gene found in plant root stem cell 'orchestra'

Researchers lift the veil on the 'conductor' plant root stem cell gene that helps orchestrate and coordinate stem cell division of different root stem cell types, ensuring the harmonic communication necessary for plant growth and maintenance.

20h

'Junk DNA' affects inherited cancer risk

A person's risk of developing cancer is affected by genetic variations in regions of DNA that don't code for proteins, previously dismissed as 'junk DNA', according to new research. This new study shows that inherited cancer risk is not only affected by mutations in key cancer genes – known as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes – but that variations in the DNA that controls the expression of the

20h

Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve esophageal cancer survival rates

A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of esophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a new study.

20h

Scientists create 'epigenetic couch potato' mouse

A study in mice shows for the first time that epigenetics — the molecular mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off — plays a key role in determining an individual's innate drive to exercise.

20h

CDC: These Are the Brands Linked to the Vaping Epidemic

As of Tuesday, 48 people have died from a mysterious lung disease health officials are now calling by the mouthful "e-cigarette or vaping product use associated lung injury," often shortened to EVALI. When researchers first identified the disease this summer, the only link they could find between patients was that they all vaped. But now, they're starting to home in on exactly what the 2,291 know

20h

New Theory: Dark Matter Black Holes Are Detonating Stars

Chain Reaction A pair of scientists has a new guess for what triggers dead stars called white dwarves to detonate in supernovae. The hidden trigger that sets off the destructive chain reaction, the team suggests, may be a tiny black hole made of dark matter growing in the star's core, according to New Scientist . Basically, dark matter — the mysterious, invisible substance that makes up most of t

20h

BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated

Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed. The study provides the first evidence that the measurements relied upon by regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration, are flawed, underestimating exposure levels by as much as 4

20h

Study seeks to answer whether effects of 'abortion pill' can be reversed

Women who initiate medical abortion but opt to stop in the middle of treatment may be at risk for serious blood loss, a study finds. Researchers found this is true even for women who use an experimental treatment that claims to 'reverse' the effects of the abortion pill. The study provides important insights into the safety of using high doses of progesterone during early pregnancy to try to stop

20h

Newly engineered peptide shows potential as long-acting anti-HIV drug

A newly engineered peptide called IBP-CP24 has the potential to be further developed as a long-acting anti-HIV drug that can be used alone or in combination with a broad neutralizing antibody for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection, according to a new study.

20h

Brewing beer that tastes fresh longer

Unlike wine, which generally improves with time, beer does not age well. Usually within a year of bottling, the beverage starts to develop an unpleasant papery or cardboard-like flavor that drinkers describe as 'stale.' Now, researchers have engineered lager yeast to make more molecules that protect beer against staling, resulting in improved flavor stability.

20h

How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling

That white rot fungi on fallen logs in a forest, it's super important.

20h

Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database

Researchers have created the first comprehensive database of all the wildfire fuels that have been measured across North America. Ultimately, it can help scientists make more informed decisions about fire and smoke situations.

21h

This website lets you travel back in time to abandoned airfields near your home

A 1927 photo of Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis at Swan Island Airport in Portland, Oregon. (Ralph Vincent courtesy of Lee Corbin/) This story originally featured on Flying Mag . As I write this, there were 1,729,694,062 websites (and counting) on the internet. While the World Wide Web can be a helpful place most of us cannot live without, many of those sites are useless fodder of little

21h

UM-led experiment closes critical gap in weather forecasting

Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information–called subseasonal forecasts–in the hands of the public and emergency managers can provide the critical lead time necessary to prepare for natural hazards like heat waves or the next po

21h

New Robot With 'Emotional Intelligence' Arrives at Space Station

The population of the International Space Station (ISS) is about to go up by one, but it won't be another human occupant. It'll be an AI-powered flying robot called CIMON-2, a followup to the experimental CIMON robot that debuted last year. The ISS' newest AI bot should reach the station in a few days, and its designers hope CIMON-2 can prove even more useful to the crew than its predecessor. The

21h

Climate Change Could Be Making Birds Smaller

Forty years of data show that migratory birds have been shrinking as the planet warms.

21h

Just Break the NDA, Pete

Before he became mayor of his hometown of South Bend, Indiana, the Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg worked for the consulting firm McKinsey & Company. He has used this brief experience to distinguish his record from that of longtime politicians such as Joe Biden and critics of private-sector excesses such as Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. But voters have no idea what kind of

21h

3D model of human liver for better diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming the most common chronic liver disorder in developed countries. Histological analysis of liver tissue is the only widely accepted test for diagnosing and distinguishing different stages of the disease. However, this technique provides only two-dimensional images of the liver tissue in low resolution and overlooks potentially important 3D structural chan

21h

With Sea Level Rise, We've Already Hurtled Past a Point of No Return

Climate negotiators in Madrid are trying to avoid 2 meters of sea level rise, but research suggests 10 times that — 65 feet — is already inevitable.

21h

Bernie Sanders Says Internet Service Should be a Human Right

The Vermont senator and presidential candidate proposed a $150 billion plan to expand broadband, including regulating rates for internet service.

21h

Bloodhound diary: Getting the job done at over 600mph

Land speed record holder Andy Green describes his final high-speed test run in the Bloodhound car.

21h

New marker for insecticide resistance in malaria-carrying mosquitoes

Researchers have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance.

21h

Silverswords may be gone with the wind

Silversword plants of Hawai'i – known by their Hawai'ian name 'ahinahina which translates to very grey – are unique to the Maui's Haleakala volcano summit area and to the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the Big Island. Each volcanic mountain has its own unique type of silversword.

21h

Drug decreases gut leakiness associated with ulcerative colitis

Biomedical scientists have found that a drug approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis can repair permeability defects in the gut's epithelium.

21h

Protected habitats near US borders

The clustering of protected habitats in the Americas near international borders makes many iconic, wide-ranging animals physically dependent on good relations between neighboring countries and wildlife-friendly borders.

21h

Studying water quality with satellites and public data

The researchers built a novel dataset of more than 600,000 matchups between water quality field measurements and Landsat imagery, creating a 'symphony of data.'

21h

Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine

For the first time, researchers have used a chip-based sensor with an integrated laser to detect very low levels of a cancer protein biomarker in a urine sample. The new technology is more sensitive than other designs and could lead to non-invasive and inexpensive ways to detect molecules that indicate the presence or progression of a disease.

21h

Your zip software can calculate the complex physical quantity called entropy

A new study proposes a radically simple and efficient way of calculating the complex physical quantity known as entropy — and it probably exists on your own computer.

21h

3D model of human liver for better diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming the most common chronic liver disorder in developed countries. Histological analysis of liver tissue is the only widely accepted test for diagnosing and distinguishing different stages of the disease. However, this technique provides only two-dimensional images of the liver tissue in low resolution and overlooks potentially important 3D structural chan

21h

Emerging role of adenosine in brain disorders and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

The role of adenosine in neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration has led to growing attention on adenosine receptors as potential drug targets in a range of brain disorders, including neuroregenerative therapy and treatment for amyotrophyic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

21h

Doctors Think Vaping Gave This Woman a Rare Lung Disease

There's now even more evidence that vaping isn't nearly as safe as many people believe . On Wednesday, an international team of researchers published a case study in the European Respiratory Journal . It details the treatment of a 49-year-old woman who went to the doctor complaining of coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath when she exerted herself. Doctors eventually diagnosed the woman wit

21h

The perks of actively contributing to a society

Nature, Published online: 06 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03791-y It's tempting to stay a 'silent member', but you might be missing out on conferences, collaborations and publications, says Elena Schneider-Futschik.

21h

Giant Claws and Outlandish Antlers? Thank the Sexual Arms Race

Male-male competition, and sometimes female preferences, have driven arms races for the flashiest horns, antlers, pincers, tusks and claws.

21h

Life Through A Bee's Eyes: New Software Replicates Animal Vision

By adjusting various parameters of sight, this high-power photoshop hints at what other animals might see from our perspective.

21h

Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor

Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, physicists have drawn a road map that reveals the quantum "rules of the road" that electrons must follow in the enigmatic superconductor.

21h

Imaging of conjunctival goblet cells helps diagnosis of dry eyes

Researchers have developed a biometric imaging of conjunctival goblet cells with high definition.

21h

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