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nyheder2019december09

When penguins ruled after dinosaurs died

What waddled on land but swam supremely in subtropical seas more than 60 million years ago, after the dinosaurs were wiped out on sea and land?

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Why the Laws of Physics Are Inevitable – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine ' s Abstractions blog. These three objects illustrate the principles behind "spin," a property of fundamental particles. A domino needs a full turn to get back to the same place. A two of clubs needs only a half turn. And the hour hand on a clock must spin around twice before it tells the same time again. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine Compared

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Ramping up carbon capture could be key to mitigating climate change

As the world gathers in Madrid to discuss how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a newly released study makes the case that trapping emissions underground could go a long way toward solving the problem.

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New function for plant enzyme could lead to green chemistry

Scientists have discovered a new function in a plant enzyme that could inspire the design of new chemical catalysts. The enzyme catalyzes, or initiates, one of the cornerstone chemical reactions needed to synthesize a wide array of organic molecules, including those found in lubricants, cosmetics, and those used as raw materials for making plastics.

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Climate change: Amazon oil boom under fire at UN talks

Indigenous people come to COP25 to protest plans to expand oil production in the western Amazon.

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Refugees at 'increased risk' from extreme weather

Climate change could make the problem worse, multiplying the misery for displaced people.

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New function for plant enzyme could lead to green chemistry

Scientists have discovered a new function in a plant enzyme that could inspire the design of new chemical catalysts. The enzyme catalyzes, or initiates, one of the cornerstone chemical reactions needed to synthesize a wide array of organic molecules, including those found in lubricants, cosmetics, and those used as raw materials for making plastics.

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New bone healing mechanism has potential therapeutic applications

A new mechanism that contributes to adult bone maintenance and repair opens the possibility of developing therapeutic strategies for improving bone healing.

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Reorganizing a computer chip: Transistors can now both process and store information

Researchers have created a more feasible way to combine transistors and memory on a chip, potentially bringing faster computing.

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Last remaining glaciers in the Pacific will soon melt away

The last remaining tropical glaciers between the Himalayas and the Andes will disappear in the next decade — and possibly sooner — due to climate change, a new study has found. The glaciers in Papua, Indonesia, are "the canaries in the coal mine" for other mountaintop glaciers around the world, said one of the researchers.

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Ramping up carbon capture could be key to mitigating climate change

As the world gathers in Madrid to discuss how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a newly released study makes the case that trapping emissions underground could go a long way toward solving the problem.

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Even light alcohol consumption linked to higher cancer risk in Japan

In a new study conducted in Japan, even light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with elevated cancer risks.

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'Safety signals' may help slow down anxiety

For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Researchers at Yale University and Weill Cornell Medicine report on a novel way that could help combat such anxiety. In humans and in mice, a 'safety signal' — a symbol or a sound that is never associated with adverse events — can

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: States Alone Can't Fix It

It's Monday, December 9. What we're still following: Newly revealed documents about the Afghanistan war: "Almost everyone in the government has been lying about it for years," David Graham argues. In today's newsletter: what 24 states and Puerto Rico still can't do. Plus, new arguments about America's "magical-thinking" involvement in the Middle East. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (ERIN SCOTT / REUTERS

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Here's Why New Zealand's White Island Volcano Erupted Without Warning

There are currently no signs of life on the island.

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Artificial Neurological Implants and the Retention of Personal Identity

submitted by /u/andypandy678 [link] [comments]

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How does political news affect moods? New study in young doctors shows real-time effects

They work in a bubble of 80-hour work weeks, and 24-hour shifts. The constant stress wears on their mental health. But for first-year doctors who started their careers in the past few years, a new study shows that certain political events pierced that bubble of intense training. In fact, some political events affected their mood just as much as the intense first weeks of their training had.

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Major political events linked to mood decline among young US doctors

Major political events, such as the 2016 presidential election and inauguration, were associated with declines in mood among young US physicians, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ.

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Have your health and eat meat too

Barbecued, stir-fried or roasted, there's no doubt that Aussies love their meat. Consuming on average nearly 100 kilograms of meat per person per year, Australians are among the top meat consumers worldwide. But with statistics showing that most Australians suffer from a poor diet, and red meat production adding to greenhouse-gas emissions, finding a balance between taste preferences, environmenta

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New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate fluctuations

For decades the biggest threat to the industry has been overfishing, but it is no longer the only threat. According to new research, fluctuations in the climate have already cost some New England fishermen their jobs. This specific effect of climate is distinct from the overall job losses and gains caused by other factors, such as changes in market demand, regulatory changes to curb overfishing, a

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Researcher designs headphones that warn pedestrians of dangers

To counter a growing public safety concern, researchers are designing an intelligent headphone system that warns pedestrians of imminent dangers.

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Community characteristics shape climate change discussions after extreme weather

Political affiliations, the presence of local environmental organizations and prior local media coverage of climate change play a role in how a community reacts to an extreme weather event, according to new research.

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Detours may make batteries better

Adding atom-scale defects to battery materials may help them charge faster, theoretical models show.

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When did societies become modern? 'Big history' dashes popular idea of Axial Age

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03785-w Humanity's supposed singular transition to modernity in the first millennium BC was much messier than previously thought, finds sweeping study of historical data.

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Experimental leukemia combination proves toxic for older, frail patients

About 32% of older, sicker patients enrolled on a leukemia clinical trial experienced serious side effects from a treatment that combined a chemotherapy and an immunotherapy drug, leading investigators to pause the trial and the US Food and Drug Administration to eventually pull the combination from the current study.

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Author Correction: ENMD-1068 inhibits liver fibrosis through attenuation of TGF-β1/Smad2/3 signaling in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55877-2

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Disparity in Tech Jobs, Green Monday Deals, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves

New research finds that killer whale grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. This may be because grandmothers without calves of their own are free to focus time and resources on the latest generation, the researchers suggest.

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Study reveals increased cannabis use in individuals with depression

New findings reveal the prevalence of cannabis, or marijuana, use in the United States increased from 2005 to 2017 among persons with and without depression and was approximately twice as common among those with depression in 2017.

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Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity

New research has found that strong and long-lasting droughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland. Findings also included evidence that recovery from some climate change-related damage is possible.

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Some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity

Researchers have identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity.

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Orca Grandmothers Shed New Light on The Mysterious Benefits of Menopause

Female usefulness doesn't end with reproduction.

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Pharmacy assessment of penicillin allergies finds safe, less-expensive options

A pharmacy-driven assessment found more than half of patients with reported penicillin allergies were able to take antibiotics from the same drug class rather than resorting to substitutes that may be more costly, have more side effects and have other downsides. The study presented at the American Society of Health System Pharmacists Midyear meeting showed the assessments saved one hospital nearly

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This Plastic Bunny is Filled With Artificial DNA. The Data Inside: More Bunnies

Researchers store the blueprint for a plastic bunny in DNA that's then injected into the bunny's body.

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The best basic gadgets for frequent travelers

Gear so your friend can visit you. ( Brandless via Unsplash/) Whether it's for work or pleasure, not many people like the traveling part of travel. If we could magically transport to our destination we'd all be a lot happier. Alas, planes are a fact of life ( for now ), but that doesn't make them enjoyable. These gifts will help make frequent flyers' endless journeys a little easier—and make your

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Jobs, Jobs Everywhere, But Most of Them Kind of Suck

submitted by /u/Logiman43 [link] [comments]

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Why Electronic Voting Is Still A Bad Idea

submitted by /u/Wuz314159 [link] [comments]

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Bioethicists: GoFundMe Is Profiting off Medical Scams

On GoFundMe, it's not hard to find people raising money for unproven, illegal, or otherwise questionable medical treatments — and bioethicists want the company to finally do something about it. In recent years, according to The Verge , GoFundMe campaigns have raised millions of dollars for unregulated stem cell treatments, unproven cancer cures, and medical scams. On Sunday, bioethics researchers

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Calculating genetic links between diseases, without the genetic data

In a new study, data scientists from the University of Chicago estimated heritability and mapped out relationships among thousands of diseases using data from electronic health records.

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Grandmother killer whales boost survival of calves

The "grandmother effect" was even stronger with grandmothers that had gone through the menopause.

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Studying Food's 'Dark Matter' Could Help Illuminate Diet's Ties to Health

A new paper shows just how diverse the biochemicals in our food are, and how hard it is to understand how they impact our bodies. Table-of-Food.jpg Image credits: Mishadp/Shutterstock Human Monday, December 9, 2019 – 16:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (IInside Science) — For decades, scientists have tried to understand how different elements in food — say vitamin C in an orange or selenium in

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Research shows ramping up carbon capture could be key to mitigating climate change

As the world gathers in Madrid to discuss how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a newly released study makes the case that trapping emissions underground could go a long way toward solving the problem.

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Breakthrough in 'distributed deep learning'

Computer scientists, using a divide-and-conquer approach that leverages the power of compressed sensing, have shown they can train the equivalent of a 100 billion-parameter distributed deep learning network on a single machine in less than 35 hours for product search and similar extreme classification problems.

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The Antarctic: Data about the structure of the icy continent

Satellite data from the European Space Agency (ESA) has now been used as the basis for new insights on the deep structure of the continent Antarctica.

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Newly Identified Jet-Stream Pattern Could Imperil Global Food Supplies

New study finds a 20-fold increase in the risk of simultaneous heat waves in major crop-producing regions when a newly-identified extreme jet stream pattern is in place — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Granny killer whales pass along wisdom—and extra fish—to their grandchildren

Study is first direct evidence in nonhuman animals of the "grandmother hypothesis"

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Object Engineered to Carry a DNA Code for its Own Replication

A 3-D printed rabbit is made from a blueprint stored in DNA, which itself is stored in a printed rabbit.

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Consider soil in fall-applied ammonia rates, Illinois study says

Fall-applied anhydrous ammonia may not fulfill as much of corn's nitrogen needs as previously assumed. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the effectiveness of the practice depends on the soil.

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BU study finds new factors linked to suicide

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that physical illness and injury raises the risk of suicide in men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person's risk of suicide.

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Lactobacillus balances gut microbiome and improves chronic-alcohol-induced liver injury

Researchers demonstrated that Lactobacillus rhamnosus can dose-dependently reestablish a balanced intestinal microbiome and counter the liver-damaging effects of alcohol consumption in mice to reverse the results of chronic alcohol-induced liver injury.

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Giving common antibiotic before radiation may help body fight cancer

The antibiotic vancomycin alters the gut microbiome in a way that can help prime the immune system to more effectively attack tumor cells after radiation therapy.

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Inflammatory marker linked to dementia

Higher levels of an inflammatory marker, sCD14, were associated with brain atrophy, cognitive decline and dementia in two large heart studies. The research is from UT Health San Antonio and collaborators.

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Impeachment Gets Weird

Today's impeachment hearing was supposed to be a check-the-box session for House Democrats—a formality, really: Its purpose was to televise the evidence against President Donald Trump that party lawmakers presented in a voluminous written report released last week. What it turned into, however, was the weirdest, most chaotic hearing of the entire impeachment saga so far. The witnesses were not ex

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Researchers find over 40 new species of fish in one lake

Researchers have found dozens of new fish species in just one African lake — a feat of diversity. The find also proves a key point in evolutionary biology.

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NYC Is Planning Giant High-Rise Prisons

Room With A View New York City may finally close down Riker's Island, a prison infamous for violence and crowding. And to replace it, the city has suggested constructing four high-rise buildings — one in each city borough other than Staten Island — to house inmates moving forward, according to The Guardian . And while immediate backlash has already reduced the scope of the project, the proposal i

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ProPublica Creates Database of Researchers' Conflicts of Interest

The nonprofit newsroom has collected more than 29,000 disclosures of faculty members' outside income, but they represent just the tip of the iceberg.

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Last remaining glaciers in the Pacific will soon melt away

The last remaining tropical glaciers between the Himalayas and the Andes will disappear in the next decade—and possibly sooner—due to climate change, a new study has found.

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So Much For the Deep State Plot Against Donald Trump

Inspector general Michael Horowitz's report shows that the FBI's investigation of ties between Russia and the Trump campaign was both justified and without political bias.

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Lighting up cardiovascular problems using nanoparticles

Heart disease and stroke are the world's two most deadly diseases, causing over 15 million deaths in 2016 according to the World Health Organization. A key underlying factor in both of these global health crises is the common condition, atherosclerosis, or the build-up of fatty deposits, inflammation and plaque on the walls of blood vessels. By the age of 40, around half of us will have this condi

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Scientists accidentally discover a new water mold threatening Christmas trees

Grown as Christmas trees, Fraser firs are highly prized for their rich color and pleasant scent as well as their ability to hold their needles. Unfortunately, they are also highly susceptible to devastating root rot diseases caused by water molds in the genus Phytophthora.

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Researchers identify top ways to stop projected 142% rise in Latino cancer

This open-source book shares results of first conference with the same name.

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Rice, Amazon report breakthrough in 'distributed deep learning'

Computer scientists from Rice University and Amazon, using a divide-and-conquer approach that leverages the power of compressed sensing, have shown they can train the equivalent of a 100 billion-parameter distributed deep learning network on a single machine in less than 35 hours for product search and similar extreme classification problems.

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Scientists accidentally discover a new water mold threatening Christmas trees

Grown as Christmas trees, Fraser firs are highly prized for their rich color and pleasant scent as well as their ability to hold their needles. Unfortunately, they are also highly susceptible to devastating root rot diseases caused by water molds in the genus Phytophthora.

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'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' could trigger seizures. Here's what to know before you go.

cinema screen (DepositPhotos/) The flashing lights and images that you'll witness if you pop in to watch the new Star Wars flick might cause trouble for fans with epilepsy. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder where brain activity becomes abnormal due to a sudden change in electrical patterns , causing seizures, periods of unusual behavior, or loss of awareness. Anyone can develop epilepsy at pret

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Everyone Knew We Were Losing in Afghanistan

Afghanistan has long been the overshadowed war, eclipsed in public attention by the invasion of Iraq and a dozen other stories. Even so, the American occupation of Afghanistan grinds on, with an end seeming remote and any kind of positive resolution even more so. It's bitterly appropriate, then, that on Monday—with more hearings in the impeachment of Donald Trump and the release of a long-awaited

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After Bone Marrow Transplant, Man's Semen Contains Only Donor's DNA

Chris Long is an IT worker in the Washoe County Sheriff's Department in Reno, Nevada. But all the DNA in his semen belongs to a German man he's never met. That's because Long received a bone marrow transplant from the European stranger four years ago — and the unexpected impact it has had on his biology could affect the future of forensic science. According to a newly published New York Times sto

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The best action cameras to document your ill-advised adventures

Shoot on the go. (Fabrizio Verrecchia via Unsplash /) Your phone shoots amazing videos, but it can't go everywhere with you. When you're flinging yourself down a ski hill at irresponsible speeds or diving to the bottom of a lake to look for lost treasure, it's best to let your pricy mobile device chill on the sidelines. Action cameras, however, are ready for anything. They're like that irresponsi

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China tightens its grip on freedom in academics

Authoritarian governments that rely heavily on coercion must be more intrusive about how education shapes the personality and character of its members. In China, there are topics that scholars know to avoid — especially, the Three Ts: Taiwan, Tibet, and Tiananmen Square. While the majority of scholars are likely toeing the party line when it comes to their research, some are working toward encour

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Last remaining glaciers in the Pacific will soon melt away

The last remaining tropical glaciers between the Himalayas and the Andes will disappear in the next decade — and possibly sooner — due to climate change, a new study has found.The glaciers in Papua, Indonesia, are "the canaries in the coal mine" for other mountaintop glaciers around the world, said Lonnie Thompson, one of the senior authors of the study published today in the Proceedings of the

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Data Science Institute researcher designs headphones that warn pedestrians of dangers

To counter a growing public safety concern, researchers at the Data Science Institute, Columbia, are designing an intelligent headphone system that warns pedestrians of imminent dangers.

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New clues to the link between ALS and type 2 diabetes

Patients with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) often suffer from type 2 diabetes. This phenomenon has since long remained mechanistically enigmatic. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular mechanism linking these two diseases. The study is published in the scientific journal PNAS.

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New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate

For decades the biggest threat to the industry has been overfishing, but it is no longer the only threat. According to new research at the University of Delaware, fluctuations in the climate have already cost some New England fishermen their jobs. This specific effect of climate is distinct from the overall job losses and gains caused by other factors, such as changes in market demand, regulatory

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'Safety signals' may help slow down anxiety

For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Researchers at Yale University and Weill Cornell Medicine report on a novel way that could help combat such anxiety. In humans and in mice, a 'safety signal' — a symbol or a sound that is never associated with adverse events — can

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Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves

The study found that grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. This may be because grandmothers without calves of their own are free to focus time and resources on the latest generation, the researchers suggest.

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Researchers identify 'Achilles' heel' of drug-resistant superbug

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified a protein that allows vancomycin-resistant enterococci, a deadly superbug, to defy antibiotic treatment and immune system attacks. Their discovery opens the door for future treatment options in the fight against antibiotic resistance.

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Green Monday Deals (2019): From Amazon, eBay, REI, and More

This shopping holiday might be made up, but these deals aren't.

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Companies are judged more harshly for their ethical failures if the CEO is a woman

Gender inequality in the business world has been much discussed over the last few years, with a host of mentoring schemes, grants, business books and political activity all aimed at getting women into leadership positions. But what happens when this goal is achieved? According to new research , unequal gender dynamics still prevail even at the very top. Nicole Votolato Montgomery and Amanda P. Co

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DNA lets stuff like buttons and glasses store data

A new method can turn nearly any object into a data storage unit, researchers report. The new method, which uses DNA as the storage medium, makes it possible to save extensive data in, say, shirt buttons, water bottles, or even the lenses of glasses, and then retrieve it years later. The technique also allows users to hide information and store it for later generations. Living beings contain thei

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Scientists Find a Weak Spot in Some Superbugs' Defenses

Treatment-resistant infections are increasingly common—and increasingly deadly. Now researchers have found a new way to attack some of those bacteria.

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Dead probiotic strain shown to reduce harmful, aging-related inflammation

Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have identified a dead probiotic that reduces age-related leaky gut in older mice. The study is published in the journal GeroScience.

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Reorganizing a computer chip: Transistors can now both process and store information

Researchers have created a more feasible way to combine transistors and memory on a chip, potentially bringing faster computing.

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CAR T-cell therapy effective for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma patients

A one-year follow-up study revealed a majority of patients with mantle cell lymphoma resistant to prior therapies may benefit from treatment with CD19-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) .

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Treatment with PD-1 prior to stem cell transplant is safe for Hodgkin lymphoma patients

A new analysis shows that a donor stem cell transplant following treatment with an immune checkpoint inhibitor is generally safe and produces good outcomes for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

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Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves

Post-menopausal killer whale grandmothers improve the chances of survival for their grand-calves, new research has found.

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Researchers identify 'Achilles' heel' of drug-resistant superbug

A deadly superbug that infects an estimated 54,500 Americans a year has a secret weapon, a protein, that allows it to defy antibiotic treatment and immune system attacks. However, the secret is out now that researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the protein that acts as a defense mechanism for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Their

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Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves

Post-menopausal killer whale grandmothers improve the chances of survival for their grand-calves, new research has found.

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New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate: study

New England has a proud tradition of commercial fishing. But will it survive as the planet warms?

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Researchers identify 'Achilles' heel' of drug-resistant superbug

A deadly superbug that infects an estimated 54,500 Americans a year has a secret weapon, a protein, that allows it to defy antibiotic treatment and immune system attacks. However, the secret is out now that researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the protein that acts as a defense mechanism for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Their

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How Big Think can better support you and how you can support Big Think

Dear readers, We're the co-founders of Big Think. First and foremost, we want to thank you for your viewership. Over the last 12 years, you have helped us take Big Think from a vision scrawled in notes on lined paper to a reality that has reached over 1 billion people with the mission of helping the world get "smarter faster". Secondly, we'd like to address how Big Think can better support you an

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Busted transport system unites neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers may have found a likely culprit behind the protein clumps in the brain that unite all neurodegenerative diseases. All neurodegenerative diseases have a common thread: the appearance of protein clumps in the brain such as amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease and alpha synuclein aggregates in Parkinson's. In a pair of studies carried out in flies and mice, the researchers discove

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Waymo Is Taking the Safety Drivers out of Its Autonomous Taxis

No Hands! Waymo, the Google-affiliated self-driving car company, has finally started to operate its self-driving taxi service without any humans sitting behind the wheel. That means passengers using the company's Uber-like Waymo One service might find themselves shuttled around Arizona in the back seat of an otherwise-empty minivan, as one reporter for The Verge did . Removing the drivers is a ma

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Scientists accidentally discover a new water mold threatening Christmas trees

Scientists in Connecticut were conducting experiments testing various methods to grow healthier Fraser trees when they accidentally discovered a new species of Phytophthora. They collected the diseased plants, isolated and grew the pathogen on artificial media, then inoculated it into healthy plants before re-isolating it to prove its pathogenicity.

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Lighting up cardiovascular problems using nanoparticles

A new nanoparticle innovation that detects unstable calcifications that can trigger heart attacks and strokes may allow doctors to pinpoint when plaque on the walls of blood vessels becomes dangerous.

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Tesla Will Begin Charging $10 Per Month for 'Premium' LTE Features

Tesla S wheel instrument panel Tesla only started making cars a few years ago, so it had the luxury of designing its features around a connected experience. All Tesla vehicles have LTE built-in, but the online features are about to get a price hike. Tesla has informed many drivers that their free LTE connectivity features will cost them $10 per month going forward. This change has been a long tim

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The True History of the Aeronauts Who Transformed Our View of the World Above

For early balloonists like James Glaisher, the sky was uncharted—and dangerous—territory

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MilliporeSigma: Western Blot Success Checklist

Turn your Western blot failures into successes! Learn more about troubleshooting your blots in the video below.

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Finding support outside the clinic — the intersection of instagram and miscarriage

An interdisciplinary team of researchers explore how women use the platform to talk openly about the emotional distress of a miscarriage and how social media can inform patient care.

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Air pollution may increase mortality risk after heart transplant

Heart transplant recipients who live in areas where particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution levels reached above national limits for clean air had a 26% higher risk of mortality due to infection, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Photos of the Week: Wayward Tee, Pollution Pod, Windy Wall

Christmas lights in New York City, fall colors in Japan, sepak takraw in the Philippines, a sandy traffic jam in Miami, continued protests in Chile, the Tactual Museum of Athens, the Sankta Lucia Festival of Light in York, a Santa run in Glasgow, and much more

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Tesla With Autopilot Engaged Rear-Ends Parked Police Car

Blind Spot Early Saturday morning, a Tesla Model 3 with Autopilot engaged slammed into the back of a parked police cruiser. The driver told police he didn't see the cruiser because he was checking on his dog in the backseat. Thankfully, no one was hurt — but the incident is just the latest example of why Tesla owners need to stop relying on Autopilot to drive their cars. No Excuse The cruiser was

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Why New Zealand's White Island Erupted Without Warning

Steam volcanic eruptions like this one can only be detected seconds or minutes in advance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Political tensions unravel plan to convert Iranian nuclear site to civilian uses

Engineers stop converting Fordow centrifuges to produce isotopes

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New software tool uses AI to help doctors identify cancer cells

UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images — giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

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The Importance of Watchmen's Latest Twist

This story contains spoilers through Episode 8 of HBO's Watchmen. Watchmen , the graphic novel, includes a statement from Doctor Manhattan's biographer clarifying a quote he once gave a reporter. "I never said 'The Superman exists and he's American,'" the writer complained. "What I said was ' God exists and he's American.'" Watchmen , the HBO adaptation from the writer Damon Lindelof, takes that

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Iran's President Wants to Build a State-Controlled Internet

State-Sanctioned Iran's President, Hassan Rouhani, announced plans to replace the country's internet with a state-run intranet, granting the government increased control over online activity. The announcement comes shortly after the Iranian government quelled mass protests by cutting off internet access across the country, CNET reports . With its own state-controlled network, Iran would be able t

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New bone healing mechanism has potential therapeutic applications

A new mechanism that contributes to adult bone maintenance and repair opens the possibility of developing therapeutic strategies for improving bone healing.

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Fossils on Mars? If They Exist, NASA's Mars 2020 Rover has a Shot at Finding Them

A recent study suggests the landing site for NASA's next Mars rover holds minerals that often preserve fossils on Earth.

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Biologists think they know why this stunning Hawaiian plant is vanishing

Silversword populations have dropped 60% in the past 30 years

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Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet

Why the treehopper developed the enlarged, three-dimensional hood ornament that distinguishes it from the rest of the insect world remains a mystery to scientists, though it's theorized that mimicry or camouflage designed to protect it from predators is a likely reason. But a study from researchers in UConn's Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, published today in the journal Nature Ecolog

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New study compares floodplain protection today to predicted future flood losses

A new study seeks to answer an important question related to flooding in the United States – pay now to protect undeveloped areas that are likely to flood in the future or allow developments to go ahead and pay for damage when it occurs.

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Large atmospheric waves in the jet stream present risk to global food production

Researchers have discovered jet stream patterns that could affect up to a quarter of global food production.

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How planets may form after dust sticks together

Scientists may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets, according to a new study that may also help to improve industrial processes.

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Demonstration of high-speed SOT-MRAM memory cell compatible with 300mm Si CMOS technology

Researchers have announced the demonstration of high-speed spin-orbit-torque magnetoresistive random access memory cell compatible with 300 mm Si CMOS technology.

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Dozens feared dead in eruption of New Zealand volcano

A volcano on a New Zealand island erupted Monday with a towering blast of ash and scalding steam as tourists were exploring the moon-like surface, killing five people and leaving perhaps two dozen others missing and presumed dead. Eighteen others were rescued, some of them severely burned.

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Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water

Researchers have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations. This effect could change the way scientists understand the properties and behavior of solutions of bi

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Storing data in everyday objects

Researchers have discovered a new method for turning nearly any object into a data storage unit. This makes it possible to save extensive data in, say, shirt buttons, water bottles or even the lenses of glasses, and then retrieve it years later. The technique also allows users to hide information and store it for later generations. It uses DNA as the storage medium.

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NASA says core stage of next Moon rocket now ready

NASA has completed the giant rocket that will take US astronauts back to the Moon, the space agency's head announced Monday, pledging the mission would take place in 2024 despite being beset by delays.

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Predicting a protein's behavior from its appearance

Proteins are the building blocks of life and play a key role in all biological processes. Understanding how they interact with their environment is therefore vital to developing effective therapeutics and the foundation for designing artificial cells.

7h

Acoustic focusing to amass microplastics in water

Microplastics are receiving a lot of attention lately due to their difficulty in removal from the environment. Sieves and filtration are currently the predominant way to capture microplastics in water. However, this is impractical because filters clog easily and regularly need to be cleaned or replaced. Another issue is that it has been impossible to collect anything smaller than 0.3 mm, the size

7h

Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity

A study by Oregon State University researchers has identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity.

7h

Predicting a protein's behavior from its appearance

Proteins are the building blocks of life and play a key role in all biological processes. Understanding how they interact with their environment is therefore vital to developing effective therapeutics and the foundation for designing artificial cells.

7h

Eating more ketones may fight against Alzheimer's disease

A ketone-supplemented diet may protect neurons from death during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.

7h

The genetic signature of memory

Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation.

7h

Superconductivity mystery turns 25

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03734-7 In 1994, an unconventional form of superconductivity was detected in strontium ruthenate. The discovery has shed light on the mechanism of unconventional superconductivity at high temperatures.

7h

Platelets have a dangerous hold over immune cells in cardiovascular disease

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03732-9 Plaques are lipid-rich structures in the blood-vessel wall that can cause heart attacks or strokes if they rupture. It now seems that blood-cell fragments called platelets alter the function of immune cells in ways that accelerate plaque formation.

7h

SpaceX: We're Working to Fix Sky-Killing Starlink Satellites

Coating Satellites SpaceX has announced it will coat one of its third batches of Starlink satellites — a planned constellation of many thousands of internet-beaming micro-sats — with a special, less reflective coating, Space News reports . The move is in response to the astronomy community repeatedly complaining that the roughly 120 existing Starlink satellites are already interfering with observ

7h

New antibiotics target the outer membrane of bacteria

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03730-x A double membrane protects certain bacteria from antibiotics, but compounds have now been generated that can overcome this obstacle, seemingly by targeting a crucial protein in the outer membrane.

7h

Vulkan gik amok på New Zealand: Her er 3 tegn, du skal reagere på

Hvis det lugter, eller der er små-jordskælv, skal du søge information hos myndighederne.

7h

A tech jewel: Converting graphene into diamond film

Can two layers of the "king of the wonder materials," i.e. graphene, be linked and converted to the thinnest diamond-like material, the "king of the crystals"? Scientists have reported the first experimental observation of such conversion.

7h

Identification of a key protein linked to aging

Aging is a dramatic public health issue in the face of the current demographic changes: the proportion of 60 and over in the world's population will almost double by 2050. In this context, a new discovery has just broadened scientific knowledge. Researchers shed light on the mechanisms of senescence, by identifying a key protein associated with aging.

7h

Tackling air pollution: Researchers present emissions inventory for Nepal

Data on emission amounts and sources have an important role to play in shaping policy on climate protection and air quality. Now, scientists have presented the first high-resolution inventory to record emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants in Nepal over an extended period of time. Their research reveals that the air pollution problem is growing at a much faster rate than the economy.

7h

Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water

Researchers have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations. This effect could change the way scientists understand the properties and behavior of solutions of bi

7h

Storing data in everyday objects

Researchers have discovered a new method for turning nearly any object into a data storage unit. This makes it possible to save extensive data in, say, shirt buttons, water bottles or even the lenses of glasses, and then retrieve it years later. The technique also allows users to hide information and store it for later generations. It uses DNA as the storage medium.

7h

Explaining the 'tiger stripes' of Saturn's moon Enceladus

Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. These fissures aren't quite like anything else in the Solar System. Researchers now think they have a model to explain them.

7h

Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity

Researchers have identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity.

7h

The Antarctic: Study provides data about the structure of the icy continent

The Antarctic is one of the parts of Earth that we know the least about. Due to the massive ice shield, the collection of geophysical information on site is extremely difficult and expensive. Satellite data from the European Space Agency (ESA) has now been used as the basis for new insights on the deep structure of the continent. Scientists from Kiel University (CAU) recently published their disco

7h

Why Do People With Alzheimer's Stop Eating?

The disease can make eating, and remembering to eat, difficult.

7h

British Columbia's Vaping Crackdown Could Offer a Roadmap for the Rest of the World

The provincial government has an expansive plan that ranges from limiting nicotine to raising taxes on the products — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

NASA Baffled: Asteroid Bennu Keeps Spitting Out Small Rocks

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has been orbiting asteroid Bennu since December 2018 , roughly 100 million miles from the Sun. And a recent discovery about the 1,600-foot space rock has scientists scratching their heads, Wired reports : Bennu keeps spitting out rocks, sometimes as large as several feet across, into space. As detailed in a paper published in the journal Science last week, NASA resear

7h

How to Save a Dying Language

Editor's Note: In the next five years, most of America's most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic 's "On Teaching" project is crisscrossing the country to talk

7h

A tech jewel: Converting graphene into diamond film

Can two layers of the "king of the wonder materials," i.e. graphene, be linked and converted to the thinnest diamond-like material, the "king of the crystals?" Researchers of the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have reported in Nature Nanotechnology the first experimental observation of a chemically induced conversion of

7h

Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity, researchers find

New research led by scientists from Florida Institute of Technology found that the strong and long-lasting droughts known as megadroughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland.

7h

Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity, researchers find

New research led by scientists from Florida Institute of Technology found that the strong and long-lasting droughts known as megadroughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland.

7h

Seawater Is Filled With a Sugary Feast. Here's How Sponges Eat It.

The new research helps explain how sponges, and coral reef ecosystems, survive with limited nutrients.

7h

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen is obtained from water by applying electric energy. Water electrolysis could play a key role in the energy transition if efficiency improvements can be achieved. The findings pub

7h

Daily briefing: The five best science books of 2019

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03803-x Great reads this year, how bone-marrow transplants can flummox forensics and publishers face up to ethical quandaries in China.

7h

Famous Geneticist's Dating App Would Match Users Based on DNA

Harvard geneticist George Church's long list of lofty — but very possibly attainable — goals for the future of DNA research includes resurrecting the woolly mammoth , reversing human aging, and perhaps even helping you gain superhuman powers . Also on his professional to-do list? Create a dating app that matches users based on their likelihood of not passing genetic diseases along to their offspr

7h

Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity

New research from Florida Tech found that strong and long-lasting droughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland. Findings also included evidence that recovery from some climate change-related damage is possible.

7h

If the Witnesses Could Exonerate Trump, Why Aren't They Testifying?

Speaking with George Stephanopoulos on ABC this weekend, Representative Matt Gaetz—one of President Donald Trump's most relentlessly enthusiastic congressional supporters—had an unexpected suggestion for how the president should proceed in the impeachment inquiry. Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget and acting White House chief of staff, should testify before Congre

8h

Nanowire detects Abrikosov vortices

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated the possibility of detecting Abrikosov vortices penetrating through a superconductor-ferromagnet interface. The device considered in their study, published in Scientific Reports, is a ferromagnetic nanowire

8h

New function for plant enzyme could lead to green chemistry

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered a new function in a plant enzyme that could have implications for the design of new chemical catalysts. The enzyme catalyzes, or initiates, one of the cornerstone chemical reactions needed to synthesize a wide array of organic molecules, including those found in lubricants, cosmetics, and those used as raw

8h

New function for plant enzyme could lead to green chemistry

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered a new function in a plant enzyme that could have implications for the design of new chemical catalysts. The enzyme catalyzes, or initiates, one of the cornerstone chemical reactions needed to synthesize a wide array of organic molecules, including those found in lubricants, cosmetics, and those used as raw

8h

Do everything in your browser faster

Faster browsing means more time for memes. (Glenn Carstens-Peters via Unsplash/) We spend a lot of computing time inside web browsers, which means that a couple of good productivity tips could help you get back a substantial amount of time each day. We've got the best of the bunch below, no matter what browser you use. Bring your bookmarks closer If you stash your most useful and important bookma

8h

Strategies to lower risk for violent crime and gun violence

With violent crimes and gun violence rising annually and the number of gun deaths in the U.S. surpassing all other nations, researchers at the annual meeting of The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) present a series of studies during its Study of Violent Crime and Gun Violence symposium which contributes several new frameworks that can be used toward improving laws, civilian strategies, legislation

8h

Community characteristics shape climate change discussions after extreme weather

Political affiliations, the presence of local environmental organizations and prior local media coverage of climate change play a role in how a community reacts to an extreme weather event, an article published today in Nature Climate Change concludes.

8h

European Space Agency to launch space debris clean-up in 2025

Swiss start-up ClearSpace to remove ESA's rocket from orbit

8h

Dags att sätta pris på naturens tjänster

Marknadens spelregler ger inte lantbrukare incitament att använda jordbruksmetoder som gynnar klimat och miljö på lång sikt. "Ett allvarligt marknadsmisslyckande som kräver politiska åtgärder", menar nationalekonomen Mark Brady vid SLU och Lunds universitet, som visar hur ekosystemtjänster kan ges ett ekonomiskt värde, för att få bättre skydd. Jordbruksmarken har stor betydelse för människan när

8h

Futurist Predicts "The End of the World as We Know It"

Growing Divide As jobs are automated out of existence, the division between the very wealthy and the very poor will grow — and any notion of a comfortable middle class will vanish. That's according to Roey Tzezana, a future studies researcher at Israel's Tel Aviv University, according to Haaretz . That stands in contrast to the common argument that new jobs will emerge as others vanish, painting

8h

The Antarctic: study from Kiel provides data about the structure of the icy continent

Satellite data from the European Space Agency (ESA) has now been used as the basis for new insights on the deep structure of the continent Antarctica. Scientists from Kiel University (CAU) recently published their discoveries in the 'Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth' in cooperation with scientists from the British Antarctic Survey, Great Britain, and Delft University of Technology in t

8h

New function for plant enzyme could lead to green chemistry

Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered a new function in a plant enzyme that could inspire the design of new chemical catalysts. The enzyme catalyzes, or initiates, one of the cornerstone chemical reactions needed to synthesize a wide array of organic molecules, including those found in lubricants, cosmetics, and those used as raw materials for making plastics.

8h

City research draws on Formula 1 technology for the construction of skyscrapers

Researchers City, University of London are developing new vibration-control devices based on Formula 1 technology so "needle-like" high-rise skyscrapers which still withstand high winds can be built.Current devices called tuned mass dampers (TMDs) are fitted in the top floors of tall buildings to act like heavyweight pendulums counteracting building movement caused by winds and earthquakes.

8h

How high levels of blood fat cause inflammation and damage kidneys and blood vessels

Viral and bacterial infections are not the only causes of inflammation of body tissue. It has been known for some time that certain fat molecules in our bloodstream can also trigger an inflammatory response. Patients with higher levels of these fats in their blood have a significantly greater chance of dying early from kidney damage or vascular disease. This causal link has now been clearly demons

8h

Study reveals increased cannabis use in individuals with depression

New findings published in Addiction reveal the prevalence of cannabis, or marijuana, use in the United States increased from 2005 to 2017 among persons with and without depression and was approximately twice as common among those with depression in 2017.

8h

Four-hundred-eighty-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots

Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants — they're ancient animals related to starfish, and they've been around since before the dinosaurs. Thanks to a newly-discovered 480-million-year-old fossil (named after the Greek goddess Athena for its long, skinny arms), researchers have a better idea of how sea lily arms evolved and are rewriting their family tree.

8h

The increasing pace of modern life — and how we can adapt | Kathryn Bouskill

Why does modern technology promise efficiency, but leave us constantly feeling pressed for time? Anthropologist Kathryn Bouskill explores the paradoxes of living in a fast-paced society and explains why we need to reconsider the importance of slowing down in a world that demands go, go, go.

8h

How the Icy Moon Enceladus Got 'Tiger Stripes' at its South Pole

Saturn's moon Enceladus has mysterious, evenly spaced fissures in its icy shell where water erupts into space.

8h

"Inget vanligt vulkanutbrott"

Vulkanen på White Island uppvisade aktivitet veckor före utbrottet. Trots det kunde explosionen inte förutses.

8h

Breaking Down the 2020 Golden Globe Nominations

The Golden Globes kicked off a two-month march into trophy season this morning, announcing the contenders for its film and television awards and anointing films including The Irishman , Once Upon a Time in Hollywood , Joker , and Marriage Story as presumed favorites for the upcoming Oscar race. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a small and inscrutable group that has supremely outsized impo

8h

Cities and their rising impacts on biodiversity—a global overview

The rapid expansion of cities around the world is having an enormous impact on biodiversity. To gain a clearer picture of the situation, an international group of scientists, including Professor Andrew Gonzalez from McGill's Biology Department, surveyed over 600 studies on the impacts of urban growth on biodiversity. They published their findings today in Nature Sustainability.

8h

In a split second, clothes make the man more competent in the eyes of others

People perceive a person's competence partly based on subtle economic cues emanating from the person's clothing, according to a study published in Nature Human Behaviour by Princeton University. These judgments are made in a matter of milliseconds, and are very hard to avoid.

8h

Study: Favorable environments for large hail increasing across U.S.

A group of atmospheric scientists have uncovered an environmental footprint that could help explain why the cost of hailstorm damage is rapidly increasing in the United States.

8h

Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet: study

They sport some of the most impressive headgear in the insect world, yet they're no bigger than a kernel of corn.

8h

Tackling air pollution: researchers present emissions inventory for Nepal

Data on emission amounts and sources have an important role to play in shaping policy on climate protection and air quality. Now, scientists from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, have presented the first high-resolution inventory to record emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants in Nepal over an extended period of time. Their research reveals t

8h

Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet: study

They sport some of the most impressive headgear in the insect world, yet they're no bigger than a kernel of corn.

8h

NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Belna's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Belna.

8h

Climate change and the threat to global breadbaskets

Climate change is not just resulting in a steady increase in temperatures, but also in an increased frequency and severity of extreme climatic events, like droughts, heat waves, and floods. These extreme conditions are particularly damaging for agriculture. Climate variability is responsible for at least 30% of the annual fluctuations in worldwide agricultural yield. Under "normal" climatic condit

8h

Asian water towers are world's most important and most threatened

Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet's 78 mountain glacier-based water systems. For the first time, they ranked them in order of their importance to adjacent lowland communities while assessing their vulnerability to future environmental and socioeconomic changes. These systems, known as mountain water towers, store and transport water via glaciers, snow packs, lakes and strea

8h

How planets may form after dust sticks together

Scientists may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that may also help to improve industrial processes.

8h

Volcano F is the origin of 'floating stones'

Stones do not float in water—this is a truism. But there is hardly a rule without exception. In fact, some volcanic eruptions produce a very porous type of rock with a density so low that it does float: Pumice. An unusually large amount of it is currently drifting in the Southwest Pacific towards Australia. When it was first sighted in the waters around the island state of Tonga at the beginning o

8h

480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots

Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have been around for at least 480 million years—they first evolved hundreds of millions of years before the dinosaurs. For nearly two centuries, scientists have thought about how modern sea lilies ev

8h

Tufts to Remove Sackler Name from Medical Campus

The school will not return donations from the family that made its riches on opioids, but the university will start a $3 million endowment for addiction prevention and treatment.

8h

Rethinking the Infamous Milgram Experiment in Authoritarian Times

It's usually cited as showing that people will follow dubious orders under social pressure—but a more important lesson may be that some people will refuse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

How an Icy Moon of Saturn Got Its Stripes

Scientists have developed an explanation for one of the most striking features of Enceladus, an ocean world that has the right ingredients for life.

8h

New tool to assess digital addiction in children

A new study developed and validated a tool for assessing children's overall addiction to digital devices.

8h

Cities and their rising impacts on biodiversity — a global overview

The rapid expansion of cities around the world is having an enormous impact on biodiversity. To gain a clearer picture of the situation, an international group of scientists, including Professor Andrew Gonzalez from McGill's Biology Department, surveyed over 600 studies on the impacts of urban growth on biodiversity. They published their findings today in Nature Sustainability.

8h

Community characteristics shape climate change discussions after extreme weather

Political affiliations, the presence of local environmental organizations and prior local media coverage of climate change play a role in how a community reacts to an extreme weather event,

8h

In a split second, clothes make the man more competent in the eyes of others

People make split-second judgements about a person's competency based on their own perceptions of the person's clothing, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers. If the clothes look 'rich,' the person is perceived as more competent than if the clothing looks 'poor.' These judgements are made immediately and are very hard to avoid.

8h

RNA modification: Methylation and mopping up

Researchers have discovered a novel type of chemical modification in bacterial RNAs. The modification is apparently attached to molecules only when cells are under stress, and is rapidly removed during recovery.

8h

Reducing the side-effects of prostate hormone therapy with exercise

A prescription of short-term exercise for patients with advanced prostate cancer could help to reduce the side-effects of hormone therapy, according to new research. The trial aimed to reduce the adverse side-effects of hormone therapy such as weight gain and an increased risk of heart problems. The results show that a three month programme of aerobic and resistance training intervention prevented

8h

How playing the drums changes the brain

People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a new study suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibers in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organized more efficiently.

8h

How a penalty shootout is decided in the brain

Decision-making is controlled by different nerve cells.

8h

Volcano F is the origin of pumice-rafts near Australia

Since August a large accumulation of pumice has been drifting in the Southwest Pacific towards Australia. Researchers have now identified the origin of this pumice raft. It is a so far nameless underwater volcano in Tongan waters.

8h

Separating drugs with MagLev

The composition of suspicious powders that may contain illicit drugs can be analyzed using a quick and simple method called magneto-Archimedes levitation (MagLev), according to a new study. A team of scientists has developed the MagLev method to differentiate common street drugs in dilute mixtures. The method could complement or even replace other portable drug identification techniques, the scien

8h

A neutron star with an unusual magnetic field structure

Scientists from Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI), and Pulkovo Observatory discovered a unique neutron star, the magnetic field of which is apparent only when the star is seen under a certain angle relative to the observer. Previously, all neutron stars could be grouped into two large families: the first one included obje

8h

Ultrafast stimulated emission microscopy of single nanocrystals

The ability to investigate the dynamics of single particle at the nano-scale and femtosecond level remained an unfathomed dream for years. It was not until the dawn of the 21st century that nanotechnology and femtoscience gradually merged together and the first ultrafast microscopy of individual quantum dots (QDs) and molecules was accomplished. Ultrafast microscopy studies entirely rely on detect

8h

The Cure For Ultraviolence

LONDON—In the past two weeks, the British Isles witnessed two important developments in the annals of jihadist deradicalization. The first, here in London, was a spectacular failure to deradicalize: Usman Khan, 28, feigned remorse for his participation in a 2012 terror plot and was let out of prison early. He was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation when he ducked into a lavatory, ta

8h

Rethinking the Infamous Milgram Experiment in Authoritarian Times

It's usually cited as showing that people will follow dubious orders under social pressure—but a more important lesson may be that some people will refuse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Rethinking the Infamous Milgram Experiment in Authoritarian Times

It's usually cited as showing that people will follow dubious orders under social pressure—but a more important lesson may be that some people will refuse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Poröst skum fångar in koldioxid effektivt

Den porösa, öppna strukturen ger hög förmåga att adsorbera koldioxid. Ett slags biobaserat hybridskum, med högt innehåll av så kallade zeoliter, har tagits fram av forskare från Chalmers och Stockholms universitet. Hög infångningsförmåga, hållbar sammansättning, till lägre användningskostnad är några av det nya materialets fördelar. Just nu går diskussionerna om infångning av koldioxid och utveck

8h

Scientists show point defects in cathode crystals may speed lithium absorption

Here's a case where detours speed up traffic. The result may be better batteries for transportation, electronics and solar energy storage.

8h

The Arctic atmosphere: A gathering place for dust?

The atmosphere of the central Arctic is polluted with fine dust from Siberia and North America. This was the result of a preliminary evaluation of the first lidar measurements carried out by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) during the one-year MOSAiC expedition on board the RV Polarstern. For the first time, a multi-wavelength lidar was used during polar night in the centra

8h

Aspirin's health benefits under scrutiny

Taking a baby aspirin every day to prevent a heart attack or stroke should no longer be recommended to patients who haven't already experienced one of these events, new research suggests.

8h

Genomic cut and paste using a Class 1 CRISPR system

Repairing faulty genes to prevent and cure disease is something researchers have been working towards for many years. While Class 2 CRISPR systems show great promise as gene editing tools in human cells, a research team has now demonstrated that a Cas3-based Class 1 CRISPR system may provide a more efficient and safer alternative, carrying out successful repair of a gene mutation responsible for D

8h

Proton-hydrogen collision model could impact fusion research

A new study uses new techniques to calculate the cross sections of atoms which have been excited to higher energy levels. Researchers analyzed the behavior over a wide range of impact energies.

8h

Scientists uncover structure of key pneumonia virus enzyme

A team of molecular and structural biologists have found a potential new route to disabling respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) after elucidating the structure of one of its key components.

8h

Co-addiction of meth and opioids hinders treatment

A new study found that methamphetamine use was associated with more than twice the risk for dropping out of treatment for opioid-use disorder.

8h

Deeper understanding of irregular heartbeat may lead to more effective treatment

Researchers have shown how the chaotic electrical signals underlying irregular heart rhythms lead to the failure of standard treatments.

8h

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen is obtained from water by applying electric energy. Water electrolysis could play a key role in the energy transition if efficiency improvements can be achieved. The findings offer a possible starting point for enhancing the enviro

8h

Play sports for a healthier brain

There have been many headlines in recent years about the potentially negative impacts contact sports can have on athletes' brains. But a new study shows that, in the absence of injury, athletes across a variety of sports — including football, soccer and hockey — have healthier brains than non-athletes.

8h

What's creating thousands of craters off the California coast?

Researchers have launched a fleet of underwater probes to find out

8h

We finally know how whole planets grow from tiny clumps of dust

Minuscule dust particles can clump together to form entire planets, and they seem to require help from static electricity so they don't bounce off one another

8h

3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself

A 3D-printed bunny contains tiny glass beads in which there are DNA-encoded instructions to replicate the rabbit, and they can still be read after nine months

8h

Saturn's moon Titan could be hiding underground reservoirs of methane

Titan's lakes, seas and atmosphere are full of methane, and a simulation has revealed that it might come from an underground reservoir spanning the whole moon

8h

Regional trends in overdose deaths reveal multiple opioid epidemics, according to new study

A recently published study shows the United States in the grip of several simultaneously occurring opioid epidemics, rather than just a single crisis. The epidemics came to light after the researchers analyzed county-level data on drug overdose deaths. The study highlights the importance of different policy responses to the epidemics rather than a single set of policies.

8h

Isolated, vulnerable, and apathetic

Although HIV infection rates are high among the transgender community in Russia, many transgender people know very little about the virus, as well as their own health status. In Russia's first study to examine transgender people as an at-risk social group for HIV transmission, demographers attribute these high infection rates to the community's social stigmatization and isolation, as well as a lac

8h

Detours may make batteries better

Adding atom-scale defects to battery materials may help them charge faster, theoretical models by Rice University scientists show.

8h

Aspirin may no longer be effective as cardiovascular treatment

A new paper in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, found that the widespread use of statins and cancer screening technology may have altered the benefits of aspirin use. Researchers concluded that aspirin no longer provides a net benefit as primary prevention for cardiovascular disease and cancer.

8h

Biomarker may aid in determining treatment for cancer patients

A blood test revealed the presence of a biomarker that may offer insights into the survival rates of glioblastoma patients.

8h

Techtopia #135: Overvågning er frihed

Hvordan hænger den socialdemokratiske velfærdsstat sammen med overvågning? Og er vi hyklere, når vi kritiserer Kina, samtidig med at vi selv indfører digitale overvågningssystemer?

9h

Forskerne sliber saksen: Nye værktøjer skal gøre genredigering mere sikkert

PLUS. Gensaksen Crispr deler vandene – nogle er mere begejstrede end andre. Nye værktøjer prøver at fjerne en del af bekymringerne.

9h

Why the Laws of Physics Are Inevitable

Compared to the unsolved mysteries of the universe, far less gets said about one of the most profound facts to have crystallized in physics over the past half-century: To an astonishing degree, nature is the way it is because it couldn't be any different. "There's just no freedom in the laws of physics that we have," said Daniel Baumann , a theoretical physicist at the University of Amsterdam. Si

9h

Treehoppers' Bizarre, Wondrous Helmets Use Wing Genes to Grow

The elaborate structures, which are not actually wings, can resemble thorns, leaves, ants and more

9h

NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Belna's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Belna.

9h

Aspirin's health benefits under scrutiny

Taking a baby aspirin every day to prevent a heart attack or stroke should no longer be recommended to patients who haven't already experienced one of these events.

9h

UConn study: Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet

Why the treehopper developed the enlarged, three-dimensional hood ornament that distinguishes it from the rest of the insect world remains a mystery to scientists, though it's theorized that mimicry or camouflage designed to protect it from predators is a likely reason.But a study from researchers in UConn's Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, published today in the journal Nature Ecology

9h

Identification of a key protein linked to ageing

Ageing is a dramatic public health issue in the face of the current demographic changes: the proportion of 60 and over in the world's population will almost double by 2050. In this context, a new discovery has just broadened scientific knowledge. Researchers from the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Department at the Institut Pasteur shed light on the mechanisms of senescence, by identifying a

9h

Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water

Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations. This effect could change the way scientists understand the properties and behavior of solutio

9h

Tackling air pollution: researchers present emissions inventory for Nepal

Data on emission amounts and sources have an important role to play in shaping policy on climate protection and air quality. Now, scientists from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, have presented the first high-resolution inventory to record emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants in Nepal over an extended period of time. Their research reveals t

9h

Predicting a protein's behavior from its appearance

Researchers at EPFL have developed a new way to predict a protein's interactions with other proteins and biomolecules, and its biochemical activity, merely by observing its surface. The method, published in open-source format, opens up new possibilities for artificial protein design.

9h

Climate change and the threat to global breadbaskets

Extreme climatic conditions could lead to an increased risk of unusually low agricultural harvests if more than one global breadbasket is affected by adverse climate conditions at the same time. The findings of a new IIASA study show that these breadbaskets, the geographical areas responsible for growing much of the world's food, are at risk to produce enough wheat, maize, and soybean, due to extr

9h

Asian water towers are world's most important and most threatened

Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet's 78 mountain glacier-based water systems. For the first time, they ranked them in order of their importance to adjacent lowland communities, as well as their vulnerability to future environmental and socioeconomic changes.

9h

How planets may form after dust sticks together

Scientists may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that may also help to improve industrial processes.

9h

A tech jewel: Converting graphene into diamond film

Can two layers of the "king of the wonder materials," i.e. graphene, be linked and converted to the thinnest diamond-like material, the "king of the crystals"? IBS scientists have reported the first experimental observation of such conversion.

9h

Finding the smallest genes could yield outsized benefits

A new study from the Salk Institute identified over 2,000 new, small genes–expanding the number of human genes by 10 percent. These previously unknown genes are known as small open reading frames (smORFs), and the scientists have developed a method for detecting these important genetic sequences in human cell lines.

9h

Urban growth causes more biodiversity loss outside of cities

In a rapidly urbanizing world, the conversion of natural habitats into urban areas leads to a significant loss of biodiversity in cities. However, these direct effects of urban growth seem to be much smaller than the indirect effects outside of cities.

9h

USC scientists show evolutionary principle in microbes of offshore Southern California

USC marine scientists show Red Queen evolutionary principle at work offshore Southern California.

9h

New study compares floodplain protection today to predicted future flood losses

A new study by scientists from The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the University of Bristol and flood analytics company Fathom, seeks to answer an important question related to flooding in the United States – pay now to protect undeveloped areas that are likely to flood in the future or allow developments to go ahead and pay for damage when it occurs.

9h

CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes

Scientists at UC San Francisco and UC San Diego have discovered a remarkable new strategy that some phages employ to avoid becoming the next casualty of these DNA-dicing enzymes: after they infect bacteria, these phages construct an impenetrable "safe room" inside of their host, which protects vulnerable phage DNA from antiviral enzymes. This compartment, which resembles a cell nucleus, is the mos

9h

Large atmospheric waves in the jet stream present risk to global food production

Researchers at Oxford University, together with and international colleagues, have discovered jet stream patterns that could affect up to a quarter of global food production.

9h

How Enceladus got its stripes

Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is of great interest to scientists due to its subsurface ocean, making it a prime target for those searching for life elsewhere. New research led by Carnegie's Doug Hemingway reveals the physics governing the fissures through which ocean water erupts from the moon's icy surface, giving its south pole an unusual "tiger stripe" appearance.

9h

Creating switchable plasmons in plastics

Researchers in the Organic Photonics and Nano-optics goup at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics have developed optical nanoantennas made from a conducting polymer. The antennas can be switched on and off, and will make possible a completely new type of controllable nano-optical components.

9h

Scientists show thin metal mesh loaded with T cells shrinks solid tumors

Within weeks, CAR T cells targeting ovarian cancer cleared tumors in 70% of treated mice, shows study in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

9h

Potential therapy discovered for deadly breast cancer that has few treatment options

Mount Sinai researchers have designed an innovative experimental therapy that may be able to stop the growth of triple-negative breast cancer, the deadliest type of breast cancer, which has few effective treatment options, according to a study published in Nature Chemical Biology in December.

9h

Secret behind diabetes drug's benefits revealed

Researchers went into this study with the idea that metformin might communicate with other tissues in the body by causing the secretion of a protein from the liver. They were totally surprised they we found out that metformin caused the secretion of GDF15, a protein which is known to suppress appetite.

9h

UCLA study shows inhibition of gene helps overcome resistance to immunotherapy

A new study helps explain why some people with advanced cancer may not respond to one of the leading immunotherapies, PD-1 blockade, and how a new combination approach may help overcome resistance to the immunotherapy drug.

9h

Increasing food intake by swapping mitochondrial genomes

To uncover the relationship between variation in genes and phenotypic diversity, geneticists use a set of fully sequenced fruit-fly genomes. But little is known about the variation in the mitochondrial genome, for which mutations are linked to an array of diseases. Now, EPFL scientists have created a high-resolution map of mitochondrial DNA variants in the fruit fly, connecting mitochondrial genes

9h

Newly identified jet-stream pattern could imperil global food supplies, says study

Scientists have identified systematic meanders in the globe-circling northern jet stream that have caused simultaneous crop-damaging heat waves in widely separated breadbasket regions-a previously unquantified threat to global food production that, they say, could worsen with global warming.

9h

Explaining the tiger stripes of enceladus

Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. These fissures aren't quite like anything else in the Solar System. Researchers now think they have a model to explain them.

9h

Storing data in everyday objects

ETH Zurich researchers and an Israeli scientist have discovered a new method for turning nearly any object into a data storage unit. This makes it possible to save extensive data in, say, shirt buttons, water bottles or even the lenses of glasses, and then retrieve it years later. The technique also allows users to hide information and store it for later generations. It uses DNA as the storage med

9h

MMR vaccine-eligible children traveling abroad fail to get vaccinated

Nearly 60 percent of eligible young travelers did not receive MMR vaccine during pretravel consultation.

9h

Migratory birds are shrinking as the world heats up

In what appears to be a response to climate change, migratory birds in North America have been shrinking, report researchers. Their wings have also gotten a bit longer over the past four decades. The study involves a dataset of some 70,000 North American migratory birds from 52 species that died when they collided with buildings in Chicago. Since 1978, Field Museum personnel and volunteers have r

9h

Superstructure control of first-cycle voltage hysteresis in O-redox cathodes

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1854-3

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Importance and vulnerability of the world's water towers

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1822-y

9h

A bacteriophage nucleus-like compartment shields DNA from CRISPR nucleases

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1786-y The jumbo phage ΦKZ constructs a proteinaceous nucleus-like compartment around its genome that protects phage DNA from degradation by DNA-targeting immune effectors of the host, including CRISPR–Cas and restriction enzymes.

9h

These Plastic Bunnies Got a DNA Upgrade. Next up, the World?

Scientists infused a 3D-printed rabbit with genetic material, the first step toward a potential "DNA of things" where biology makes gadgets smarter.

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The Bunny Identity

3D model printed using data stored inside itself.

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The importance and vulnerability of water towers

Scientists assess climate change and other factors that threaten the world's glacier-based mountain water resources. The news is not so good.

9h

How Enceladus got its stripes

New research suggests it's all about the physics of fissures.

9h

Less ploughing leads to higher crop yields

Satellite data confirms importance of leaving soil alone.

9h

Climate change: 1.9 billion people rely on natural 'water towers'

A new study ranks the importance and vulnerability of high-mountain stores of water.

9h

Step inside the workshop of one of the country's finest traditional bow makers

This story originally featured on Field & Stream . Read to end of the article for the full photo gallery. Fifteen years ago, James "Big Jim" Babcock hunted with a stickbow for the first time—and was hooked. Today, he crafts some of the finest laminated-limb recurves and longbows in the country. We paid a visit to Babcock earlier this year at his custom-bow shop in Albany, Georgia While the big bo

9h

CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes

Bacteria and the viruses that infect them are engaged in a molecular arms race as ancient as life itself. Evolution has equipped bacteria with an arsenal of immune enzymes, including CRISPR-Cas systems, that target and destroy viral DNA. But bacteria-killing viruses, also known as phages, have devised their own tools to help them outmaneuver even the most formidable of these bacterial defenses.

9h

How Enceladus got its stripes

Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is of great interest to scientists due to its subsurface ocean, making it a prime target for those searching for life elsewhere. New research led by Carnegie's Doug Hemingway reveals the physics governing the fissures through which oceanwater erupts from the moon's icy surface, giving its south pole an unusual "tiger stripe" appearance.

9h

Conductive polymer nanoantennas for dynamic organic plasmonics

Researchers in the Organic Photonics and Nano-optics goup at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics have developed optical nanoantennas made from a conducting polymer. The antennas can be switched on and off, and will make possible a completely new type of controllable nano-optical components.

9h

Finding the smallest genes could yield outsized benefits

While scientists know of about 25,000 genes that code for biologically important proteins, additional, smaller genes hiding in our DNA may be just as important. But these tiny lines of genetic code have proven tough to track down.

9h

New study compares floodplain protection today to predicted future flood losses

A new study by scientists from The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the University of Bristol and flood analytics company Fathom, seeks to answer an important question related to flooding in the United States—pay now to protect undeveloped areas that are likely to flood in the future or allow developments to go ahead and pay for damage when it occurs.

9h

Scientists show evolutionary principle in microbes of offshore Southern California

In the waves offshore of Southern California, germ warfare occurs in a struggle as old as life itself.

9h

Newly identified jet-stream pattern could imperil global food supplies, says study

Scientists have identified systematic meanders in the globe-circling northern jet stream that have caused simultaneous crop-damaging heat waves in widely separated breadbasket regions-a previously unquantified threat to global food production that, they say, could worsen with global warming. The research shows that certain kinds of waves in the atmospheric circulation can become amplified and then

9h

CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes

Bacteria and the viruses that infect them are engaged in a molecular arms race as ancient as life itself. Evolution has equipped bacteria with an arsenal of immune enzymes, including CRISPR-Cas systems, that target and destroy viral DNA. But bacteria-killing viruses, also known as phages, have devised their own tools to help them outmaneuver even the most formidable of these bacterial defenses.

9h

Finding the smallest genes could yield outsized benefits

While scientists know of about 25,000 genes that code for biologically important proteins, additional, smaller genes hiding in our DNA may be just as important. But these tiny lines of genetic code have proven tough to track down.

9h

Scientists show evolutionary principle in microbes of offshore Southern California

In the waves offshore of Southern California, germ warfare occurs in a struggle as old as life itself.

9h

Deaths at New Zealand's White Island Show the Dangers of Volcano Tourism

Visiting volcanoes can be dangerous, especially ones that are persistently restless. The deaths at White Island are a chilling example.

9h

Sport-related concussions

Concussions are a regular occurrence in sport but more so in contact sports such as American football, ice hockey or soccer. The problem of diagnosing concussion is often complicated if the collision happens during a competition or training. Dr. Ingo Helmich's current study suggests clear markers for a diagnostic criterion. Helmich has been able to show that nonverbal hand movements differ between

9h

Separating drugs with MagLev

The composition of suspicious powders that may contain illicit drugs can be analyzed using a quick and simple method called magneto-Archimedes levitation (MagLev), according to a new study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. A team of scientists at Harvard University, USA, has developed the MagLev method to differentiate common street drugs in dilute mixtures. The method could complement o

9h

Medicaid expansion doubled access to primary care, increased attention to health risks

When Michigan expanded its Medicaid program to cover more low-income residents, its leaders built in special features to encourage enrollees to understand their health risks, and incentivize them to prevent future health problems, or find them early. According to two new studies, that effort has paid off. The percentage of enrollees who saw a primary care doctor doubled, and many of those visits i

9h

Volcano F is the origin of the floating stones

Since August a large accumulation of pumice has been drifting in the Southwest Pacific towards Australia. Researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, together with colleagues from Canada and Australia, have now identified the origin of this pumice raft. It is a so far nameless underwater volcano in Tongan waters. The study has been published online in the international Jour

9h

Microcapsules for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

A team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University together with their colleagues developed a method of targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The discovery is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells and microcapsules made of polymeric compounds. The results were published in the Biomaterials Science journal. In the future the discovery may secure more precise trea

9h

Russian astrophysicists discovered a neutron star with an unusual magnetic field structure

Russian scientists discovered a unique neutron star, the magnetic field of which is apparent only when the star is seen under a certain angle relative to the observer. The neutron star GRO J2058+42 studied by the researchers offers an insight into the internal structure of neutron star's magnetic field only at a certain phase of its rotational period.

9h

Things go pear-shaped when you split the atom

Physicists solve a longstanding mystery about nuclear fission.

9h

Welcome to supernova central

NGC 5468 has seen some action over the years.

9h

An artist, a farmer and a scientist walked into a bar

How an unlikely collaboration redefined a physicist's approach to climate change.

9h

Chronic Pain Is an Impossible Problem

Gabapentin was supposed to be the answer. Chronic pain afflicts about a fifth of American adults, and for years, doctors thought it could be treated with prescription painkillers like Oxycontin. But as the drugs began killing the equivalent of three planeloads of Americans every week, opioid prescriptions fell off precipitously. Many doctors embraced gabapentin, an anticonvulsant drug traditional

9h

Has physics ever been deterministic?

Researchers have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers. This new study challenges the traditional view of classical physics as deterministic.

9h

How centipedes navigate through land and water

Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. Researchers have, for the first time, decoded the flexible motor control mechanism underlying amphibious locomotion, or the ability to walk on land and to swim in water, in centipedes.

9h

Reducing the side-effects of prostate hormone therapy with exercise

A prescription of short-term exercise for patients with advanced prostate cancer could help to reduce the side-effects of hormone therapy, according to new research.The trial aimed to reduce the adverse side-effects of hormone therapy such as weight gain and an increased risk of heart problems. The results show that a three month programme of aerobic and resistance training intervention prevented

9h

How a penalty shootout is decided in the brain

Decision-making is controlled by different nerve cells.

9h

RNA modification — Methylation and mopping up

Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have discovered a novel type of chemical modification in bacterial RNAs. The modification is apparently attached to molecules only when cells are under stress, and is rapidly removed during recovery.

9h

How playing the drums changes the brain

People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a study by researchers from Bochum suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibres in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organised more efficiently.

9h

Ultrafast stimulated emission microscopy of single nanocrystals in Science

ICFO researchers report on a new ultrafast stimulated emission microscopy technique that allows imaging of nano-objects and investigating their dynamics.

9h

Combination therapy more effective than chemotherapy alone for many newly diagnosed leukemia patients

A Phase II study pairing azacitidine with enasidenib boosts complete remission in patients with AML with IDH2 mutations.

9h

Strategies to lower risk for violent crime and gun violence

Researchers at the annual meeting of The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) present a series of studies during its Study of Violent Crime and Gun Violence symposium which contributes several new frameworks that can be used toward improving laws, civilian strategies, legislation and police response, as well as the overall study of risk in society. The Symposium will occur on Monday, Dec. 9 at 10:30 at

9h

Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible

For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles.

9h

Elon Musk Drives Cybertruck to Restaurant, Hits Traffic Cone

Roadbump Tesla CEO Elon Musk took his shiny Cybertruck for a joyride to a restaurant in Malibu, California on Saturday night — but his evening hit a bump when the entrepreneur crushed a traffic cone while exiting the restaurant's parking lot, video captured by gossip site TMZ shows. The truck has garnered a lot of attention — and not only for its extremely divisive design . Experts, including the

10h

Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible

For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles.

10h

At Least 5 Dead After Volcano Erupts Off New Zealand's Coast

Fewer than 50 people are believed to have been on or near White Island. Officials say some are still unaccounted for and that it remains too dangerous for emergency services to access White Island. (Image credit: George Novak/AP)

10h

Helping plant nurseries reduce runoff

You may have heard how excess nutrients, such as phosphorus, can run off of crop fields. This can cause harm when the nutrients end up in rivers and lakes. However, there are other sources of excess nutrients you might not think of, such as the pots nursery plants come in.

10h

Flytten går mot stan – de som stannar blir dubbla förlorare

När fabriken i den lilla orten läggs ned, försvinner jobben och huspriserna faller. Kvar blir "dubbla förlorare" – och växande högerpopulism. – Inflyttandet till städerna går inte att stoppa. Istället måste vi göra det enklare att flytta och pendla, säger Peter Gladoic Håkansson, docent vid Malmö universitet. Över hela världen går flyttlassen till städerna. I en ny bok som Peter Gladoic Håkansson

10h

Corals survive to tell the tale of Earth's newest island eruption

Scientists say coral reefs on a tiny island in the South Pacific have shown incredible resilience and recovery from a recent but very severe disturbance: a volcanic eruption that created a new island.

10h

New discovery to fight citrus exocortis viroid

What's a viroid like you doing in a ribosome like this? This is the question set out by a team from the Institute for Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP, in Spanish), a joint center of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC, in Spanish). The answer opens a door, unknown until now, to fight viroids. These pathogens have great infectious powe

10h

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen is obtained from water by applying electric energy. Water electrolysis could play a key role in the energy transition if efficiency improvements can be achieved. The findings pub

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10h

Nanowire detects Abrikosov vortices

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated the possibility of detecting Abrikosov vortices penetrating through a superconductor-ferromagnet interface. The device considered in their study is a ferromagnetic nanowire with superconductive electrodes c

10h

Acoustic focusing to amass microplastics in water

Microplastics suspended in water can be gathered using acoustic forces in microchannels. The bulk acoustic wave (BAW) device can be customized to gather microplastic fibers and particles of different sizes. When run in series and parallels, the device can successfully concentrate free floating microplastics in large amounts of water into very manageable quantities. This is a promising new techniqu

10h

Scientists find further evidence for a population of dark matter deficient dwarf galaxies

Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC), Peking University and Tsinghua University have found a special population of dwarf galaxies that could mainly consist baryons within radii of up to tens of thousands of light-years. This contrasts with the normal expectation that such regions should instead be dominated by dark matter.

10h

Rhythmic perception in humans has strong evolutionary roots

So suggests a study that compares the behaviour of rodents and humans with respect to the detection rhythm, published in Journal of Comparative Psychology by Alexandre Celma-Miralles and Juan Manuel Toro, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition.

10h

Demonstration of high-speed SOT-MRAM memory cell compatible with 300mm Si CMOS technology

Researchers have announced the demonstration of high-speed spin-orbit-torque magnetoresistive random access memory cell compatible with 300 mm Si CMOS technology.

10h

Breakthrough made in detecting carbon impurities in gallium nitride crystals via light

Carbon impurity has long hindered efficiency in nitride-based electronic and optical devices. But Researchers at Tohoku University, have discovered a method that can quickly detect carbon impurity using light.

10h

New discovery to fight citrus exocortis viroid

What's a viroid like you doing in a ribosome like this? This is the question set out by a team from the Institute for Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP, in Spanish), a joint center of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC, in Spanish). The answer opens a door, unknown until now, to fight viroids. These pathogens have great infectious powe

10h

The suburbs can help cities in the fight against climate change

The edges of cities around the world are being devastated by fires and floods. It's drawing attention to suburban residents and the role they're playing in exacerbating their exposure to climate change risks. But instead of focusing on the suburban way of life alone, planners and policy-makers need to focus their attention and actions on what holds it all together: the "brutalscape," which is comp

10h

Preventing forest decline in Germany

Summers in Central Europe are becoming hotter, summer rainfall less and droughts longer and more frequent. Climate change is altering weather patterns and having an impact on woodlands in the process. Where water supply is at present still good, climate change is expected to lead to only a moderate shift in species composition towards varieties that can cope better with drought in the medium term.

10h

Proton-hydrogen collision model could impact fusion research

The motions of plasmas may be notoriously difficult to model, but they can be better understood by analysing what happens when protons are scattered by atoms of hydrogen. In itself, this property is characterised by the size of a particular area surrounding the atom, known as its 'cross section.' In new research published in EPJ D, Anthony Leung and Tom Kirchner at York University in Canada used n

10h

Electronics integrated to the muscle via 'Kirigami'

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and EIIRIS at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a donut-shaped kirigami device for EMG recordings. The proposed device reduces device displacement on a large deformable muscle surface. Accurate and robust EMG recordings offer EMG signal-based human-machine interfaces that allow prosthesis control

10h

Laser scanning leads to 3-D rendering of Robber's Cave

As bits of Robber's Cave history fade to folklore, the thousands of engravings that crowd its Dakota sandstone walls like graffiti are likewise disintegrating, imperceptibly but inevitably, into miniature dunes at the base of the walls.

10h

The tips of a plant design its whole shape

Plants grow throughout their entire life. This is due to a small structure at the tip of the plant's shoots known as the meristem. This is the control center for the maintenance of stem cells—which can be converted into any cell type—and for the creation of plant organs such as side shoots and leaves. Although all plants have to carry out these basic tasks, the meristem is different in shape and s

10h

By leap of faith? How to regain trust in science and expertise

Fake news? Post-truth? Populism? In the current environment of growing scepticism about political institutions and a dismissal of journalism and scientific facts, public trust in expertise is seen as eroding. Such trends are often associated with a changing digital communication landscape where new responses and mechanisms are required to find common ground in public discourse and decision-making.

10h

Methylation and mopping up

LMU researchers have discovered a novel type of chemical modification in bacterial RNAs. The modification is apparently attached to molecules only when cells are under stress, and is rapidly removed during recovery.

10h

A University's Betrayal of Historical Truth

On the eve of Thanksgiving, the University of North Carolina Board of Governors agreed to settle a lawsuit filed by the North Carolina division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) over a Confederate monument that had stood for more than a century on the university's flagship campus, in Chapel Hill, before demonstrators toppled it in August 2018. The settlement might, at first glance, appear

10h

Dozens of States Are Trying to Stay in the Paris Agreement. Is That Working?

In the haze of the Trump administration's otherwise abysmal climate policy, the states are supposed to be a bright spot. Even though President Donald Trump has pulled out of the Paris Agreement, dozens of states—and hundreds of cities and companies—are "still in." "We have to fight the despair that some people feel because of the Trump administration's climate denial and lack of planning," Washin

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Opioid relapse is more likely when risks seem OK

People in treatment for opioid addiction are more likely to relapse when they become more tolerant of risks, according to a new study. The findings can help clinicians better predict which patients are most vulnerable. In the study, researchers followed 70 people during their first seven months of treatment for opioid addiction—the period associated with the highest relapse and overdose risk. Dur

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Læring i fokus

Den nye epikrise-vejledning – hvor både klinikere, driftsherrer og PLO sad med om bordet – er et godt eksempel på, hvordan vi øger læringen i sundhedsvæsnet. Og den slags projekter skal vi have flere af, skriver Anne-Marie Vangsted.

10h

The tips of a plant design its whole shape

Plants grow throughout their entire life. This is due to a small structure at the tip of the plant's shoots known as the meristem. This is the control center for the maintenance of stem cells—which can be converted into any cell type—and for the creation of plant organs such as side shoots and leaves. Although all plants have to carry out these basic tasks, the meristem is different in shape and s

10h

Methylation and mopping up

LMU researchers have discovered a novel type of chemical modification in bacterial RNAs. The modification is apparently attached to molecules only when cells are under stress, and is rapidly removed during recovery.

10h

What makes wine dry? It's easy to taste, but much harder to measure

When you take a sip of wine at a family meal or celebration, what do you notice?

10h

Researchers find new evidence that a fungus can be hard to find

A team of experts have discovered that a common fungus that infects humans can not only predict an imminent attack from the immune system, it will even change its appearance to hide from it.

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Will Cultured Bacon Be Delicious? A Dutch Startup Is Developing the First Lab-Grown Pork

The food chain has always worked roughly like this: sunlight feeds plants. Plants feed insects. Insects and plants feed animals. Plants and animals feed people. Then eventually—not to get too morbid here—people feed the Earth. Nothing like the circle of life, eh? But the traditional food chain's getting shaken up. For starters, more and more people are opting to go vegetarian or vegan, both for h

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Researchers find new evidence that a fungus can be hard to find

A team of experts have discovered that a common fungus that infects humans can not only predict an imminent attack from the immune system, it will even change its appearance to hide from it.

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Secrets of orangutan language revealed

"Climb on me", "climb on you" and "resume play" are among the requests wild orangutans make to each other, researchers say.

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Secrets of orangutan language revealed

"Climb on me", "climb on you" and "resume play" are among the requests wild orangutans make to each other, researchers say.

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How to design a forest fit to heal the planet

Reforestation has enormous potential as a cheap and natural way of sucking heat-absorbing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and restoring the degraded natural world, while supporting local livelihoods at the same time. But there is more than one way to plant a tree—and some of the most widely used techniques aren't up to scratch. Here's how to do it the right way.

10h

HydroAtlas maps Earth's river and catchment systems to enhance understanding and protection

Two friends from opposite ends of the Earth have created a world-first high spatial resolution atlas that maps the environmental characteristics of all the globe's rivers and catchments.

10h

Study calls 200-year-old law about gas mixtures into question

According to a new study led by a team from The University of New Mexico, centuries-old laws about the behavior of gas mixtures do not apply in the presence of shock waves.

10h

Chemists develop paper-based sensor to detect potent nerve toxins

A new, paper-based sensor developed by University of Alberta chemists can detect two potent nerve toxins that have reportedly been used in chemical warfare.

10h

Proton-hydrogen collision model could impact fusion research

A new study published in EPJ D uses new techniques to calculate the cross sections of atoms which have been excited to higher energy levels. They analysed the behaviour over a wide range of impact energies.

10h

Genomic cut and paste using a Class 1 CRISPR system

Repairing faulty genes to prevent and cure disease is something researchers have been working towards for many years. While Class 2 CRISPR systems show great promise as gene editing tools in human cells, a research team led by Osaka University has now demonstrated that a Cas3-based Class 1 CRISPR system may provide a more efficient and safer alternative, carrying out successful repair of a gene mu

10h

NTU scientists uncover structure of key pneumonia virus enzyme

A team of molecular and structural biologists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have found a potential new route to disabling respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) after elucidating the structure of one of its key components.

10h

Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible

For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles. The researchers published their results on October 17 in ACS Photonics, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Electronics integrated to the muscle via 'Kirigami'

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a donut-shaped kirigami device for electromyography (EMG) recordings. The proposed device reduces device displacement on a large deformable muscle surface. Accurate and robust EMG record

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The Pentagon Wants to Control Drones With Soldiers' Brain Waves

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

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Can Underwater Turbines Solve Our Energy Problems?

submitted by /u/mynameisalex1 [link] [comments]

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'Spin waves' could keep your phone from overheating

A new way of using "spin waves" could lead to faster electronics and keep devices like your phone from overheating, researchers report. Modern computer memory encodes information by switching magnetic bits within devices. The new method can switch magnetization at room temperature for more energy-efficient spin memory and logic devices. Traditional electronic chips suffer from substantial "Joule

10h

Platsen avgör om kvävegödsel gör nytta eller skada

Kvävegödsling höjer skördarna och binder mer kol i marken. Men samtidigt bidrar den till övergödning och utsläpp av växthusgaser. En ny avhandling visar den optimala mängden kväve varierar beroende på var grödan odlas. Och det som är bäst för klimatet kanske inte bäst för Östersjön. Användningen av kvävegödsel i växtodling bidrar till utsläpp av växthusgaser och övergödning i havsmiljöer. Samtidi

10h

SN Now: The final installment of SCaN Now

NASA satellites, no matter the destination, have to communicate their data to mission control and scientists on Earth. These missions capture extraordinary data that make communications an essential part of each mission: pictures of galaxies, critical information on solar flares and much more. An interactive online tool now shows live data transmissions from each of NASA's three space communicatio

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Image: Hubble spots galaxy's dramatic details

Some of the most dramatic events in the universe occur when certain stars die—and explode catastrophically in the process.

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Imec shows excellent performance in ultra-scaled FETs with 2-D-material channel

At this year's IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (Dec 7-11 2019), imec reports an in-depth study of scaled transistors with MoS2 and demonstrates best device performance to date for such materials.

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A more collective understanding of coastal systems dynamics and evolution

With water covering more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface, it's no wonder our planet is nicknamed the Blue Marble. Seen from outer space, our marble is interwoven with swirls of clouds and splotches of land defined by coastlines—372,000 miles worth.

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Granen gör vattnet brunare

Sveriges vattenverk måste lägga mer och mer pengar på att få vårt dricksvatten klart. Vattnet blir nämligen sakta men säkert brunare, eftersom halterna av järn och organiskt kol har stigit. Brunt vatten kan smaka mindre friskt och gör att bakterier växer till snabbare i vattenledningarna. Det ökar även transporten av metaller till havet, och dessutom befaras ett mörkare vatten skapa problem för må

10h

Sustainable new material for carbon dioxide capture

Scientists have developed a new material for capturing carbon dioxide. The new material offers many benefits — it is sustainable, has a high capture rate, and has low operating costs.

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Ingeniører scorer fire pct: Får igen pænt reallønshop

PLUS. Privatansatte ingeniører holder lønstigningstakten. IDA glæder sig over en markant og fornuftig udvikling, men ikke alle inge­niører genkender billedet.

10h

The First *Wonder Woman 1984* Trailer Is Here

It's pretty epic. Oh, and after it's over, you might want to watch Ryan Reynolds in *Free Guy* too.

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Navigating navigating land and water

Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water.Researchers at Tohoku University, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, University of Ottawa, and Hokkaido University with the support of the Human Frontier Science Program have, for the first time, decoded the flexible motor control mechanism underlying amphibious locomotion, or the ability to walk on land and to swim in water,

10h

Has physics ever been deterministic?

Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna and the University of Geneva, have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers. This new study challenges the traditional view of classical physics as deterministic.

10h

Corals survive to tell the tale of Earth's newest island eruption

Coral reefs on a tiny island in the South Pacific have shown incredible resilience and recovery from a recent but very severe disturbance: a volcanic eruption that created a new island.

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You create your own false information, study finds

Along with partisan news outlets and political blogs, there's another surprising source of misinformation on controversial topics — it's you. A new study found that people given accurate statistics on a controversial issue tended to misremember those numbers to fit commonly held beliefs.

11h

Shape-programmable dielectric liquid crystal elastomer actuators

Materials scientists aim to use bioinspired soft robots to carry out advanced interactions between humans and robots, but the associated technology remains to be developed. For example, soft actuators must perform quickly with force to deliver programmable shape changes and the devices should be easy to fabricate and energy efficient for untethered applications. In a new report on Science Advances

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How well do you remember the best tech from the past 32 years?

Best of What's New has been around long enough that it had this logo when it looked new. (Pop Sci/) December is a great time to look back and reflect on the year gone by. It's a period of rebirth—and it's also a lot easier than coming up with new content because we're all kinda tired. Here at PopSci, that year-end fatigue comes from the massive effort we put into our Best of What's New list. For

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Opinion: Why all children must learn code

Across the world, the conversion of information into a digital format—also called "digitalization"—has increased productivity in the public and private sectors. As a result, virtually every country in the world is working towards a digital economy.

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Palbociclib is safe for women with advanced breast cancer who have unique gene alteration

When FDA approved palbociclib (Ibrance ®), there was very little data about the safety of this drug in people with benign ethnic neutropenia (BEN), which is common in women of color. Some of these women didn't qualify for the clinical trials because of the required blood count, which is lower in women with BEN. Dr. Lynce initiated this study to make sure women of color can safely receive this impo

11h

Co-addiction of meth and opioids hinders treatment

A study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment found that methamphetamine use was associated with more than twice the risk for dropping out of treatment for opioid-use disorder.

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Researchers discover the origin and evolution of a famous concept of the brain

Eye-opening research by neurosurgeons from Barrow Neurological Institute and Montreal Neurological Institute has produced the foremost investigation of the origin and evolution of perhaps the most famous concept devised in neurobiology–the homunculus of neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield.

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Peatlands release more methane when disturbed by roads

Roads built through acidic wetlands may make greenhouse gas emissions from the wetlands spike by damming natural water flow, according to a new study.

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Breakthrough made in detecting carbon impurities in gallium nitride crystals via light

Carbon impurity has long hindered efficiency in nitride-based electronic and optical devices. But Researchers at Tohoku University, have discovered a method that can quickly detect carbon impurity using light.

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Research lifts the lid on the influence of pornography

Society needs a more critical, nuanced, and gendered understanding of pornography in the digital age, says Samantha Keene, who graduates with a Ph.D. in Criminology from Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington this week.

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IRAS 18379–1707 is a metal-poor high-velocity star, observations find

Astronomers have conducted high-resolution spectroscopic observations of IRAS 18379–1707 (or LS 5112), a candidate post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star in the Milky Way galaxy. Results of the observations provide more details about the properties of this object, revealing that it is a metal-poor, high-velocity star. The findings are detailed in a paper published November 28 on arXiv.org.

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More advanced remote-sensing technology needed for weed detection, management

Remote sensing provides an alternative to ground-based manual scouting for weeds in agriculture fields. And, while many advances have been made, many are still needed in the area of weed detection and differentiation, according to Texas A&M AgriLife researchers.

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Quake rattles Tuscany, no injuries reported

An earthquake struck Tuscany north of Florence on Monday, sending frightened people into the street in the middle of the night, opening up cracks in walls and damaging a church.

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More advanced remote-sensing technology needed for weed detection, management

Remote sensing provides an alternative to ground-based manual scouting for weeds in agriculture fields. And, while many advances have been made, many are still needed in the area of weed detection and differentiation, according to Texas A&M AgriLife researchers.

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Navigating land and water: How centipedes walk and swim

Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water.

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Star Wars News: No, Finn and Poe Aren't Dating, Sorry

Also, there's a new Star Wars game show coming to Disney+ next year.

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Lessons From a Teenage Cyborg

Kai Landre shows how technology can be both intimate and humane.

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Why health care premiums are higher in rural places

Small risk pools may contribute to rural areas' challenges with private insurance plans, but risk reinsurance, or insurance for the insurer, could be a potential policy solution, according to a new study. A health insurance risk pool is a group of individuals whose medical costs are combined to calculate premiums. "A lot of our prior work on market-based insurance has shown that premiums tend to

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Navigating land and water: How centipedes walk and swim

Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water.

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Organic packaging to protect enzymes

As soon as you take medication, your body is already working on removing it from your body. According to UT Ph.D. student Robin Klem, encapsulins—a kind of hollow protein ball—have the potential to protect enzymes and other proteins that are used as medicines until they reach their destination. For his Ph.D. research, Robin studied the properties of encapsulins and their interactions with cells. H

11h

New biomass map to take stock of the world's carbon

The first of a series of global maps aimed at quantifying change in carbon stored as biomass across the world's forests and shrublands has been released today by ESA's Climate Change Initiative at COP25—the United Nation Climate Change Conference currently taking place in Madrid.

11h

Understanding color at a nanoscale

Some of the most vibrantly colored creatures in the animal kingdom don't owe their amazing colors to pigment. Instead, they cover themselves with microscopic structures that fine tune the way they reflect light.

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Genomic cut and paste using a class 1 CRISPR system

Almost from the moment DNA was discovered, the ability to fix or remove disease-causing genes in affected patients has been something of a holy grail of medicine. Now that this goal is within reach, researchers are working to fine-tune the technology to ensure safe and effective gene editing with no unwanted downstream effects.

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Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water

Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations. This effect could change the way scientists understand the properties and behavior of solutio

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Seat presser elbils-prisen ned: Kan blive starten på »folkeligt gennembrud«

Med en pris på 149.990 kroner har VW-ejede Seat sat danmarksrekord for elbiler, når det gælder pris. FDM tror, at det bliver elbilernes folkelige gennembrud.

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Genomic cut and paste using a class 1 CRISPR system

Almost from the moment DNA was discovered, the ability to fix or remove disease-causing genes in affected patients has been something of a holy grail of medicine. Now that this goal is within reach, researchers are working to fine-tune the technology to ensure safe and effective gene editing with no unwanted downstream effects.

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Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish

Personalised blood vessel testing kit could unravel causes and treatments for heart attack, stroke and vascular dementia, find scientists.

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Spin on perovskite research advances potential for quantum computing

The next generation of information technology could take advantage of spintronics—electronics that use the minuscule magnetic fields emanating from spinning electrons as well as the electric charges of the electrons themselves—for faster, smaller electronic devices that use less energy.

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In surprise breakthrough, scientists create quantum states in everyday electronics

After decades of miniaturization, the electronic components we've relied on for computers and modern technologies are now starting to reach fundamental limits. Faced with this challenge, engineers and scientists around the world are turning toward a radically new paradigm: quantum information technologies.

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Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish

Personalised blood vessel testing kit could unravel causes and treatments for heart attack, stroke and vascular dementia, find scientists.

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Satellites key to '10 Insights in Climate Science' report

A new easy-to-read guide, '10 New Insights in Climate Science' has been presented to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's Executive Secretary, Patricia Espinosa, at the COP25 climate conference.

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New reentry CubeSat in orbit

ESA's latest space mission has reached orbit. The Qarman CubeSat flew to space aboard SpaceX's Dragon launched from Florida, U.S., on Thursday 5 December, ahead of a planned rendezvous with the International Space Station on Sunday 8 December. From there, Qarman—seen here during plasma wind tunnel testing—will be deployed into space in late January 2020.

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Gamla vattenprover avslöjar varför vattnet blir brunt

En unik dataserie av nästan dagliga vattenprover, tagna i samma å från 1940 och framåt, avslöjar orsaken till att vattendrag och sjöar blivit allt brunare. Huvudförklaringen är en ökad mängd granskog, men även nederbörd och svavel i marken påverkar färgen på vattnet. Forskare i Lund har undersökt hur färgen på vattnet i Lyckebyån i Blekinge har förändrats de senaste 79 åren, genom att analysera v

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Scientists uncover structure of key pneumonia virus enzyme, suggesting a route for new antiviral treatments

A team of molecular and structural biologists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), has found a potential new route to disabling respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) after elucidating the structure of one of its key components.

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Scientists uncover structure of key pneumonia virus enzyme, suggesting a route for new antiviral treatments

A team of molecular and structural biologists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), has found a potential new route to disabling respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) after elucidating the structure of one of its key components.

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European Space Agency to launch space debris collector in 2025

Robotic junk collector will be first mission to remove item of debris from orbit A four-armed robotic junk collector will be launched into space by the European Space Agency in what it says will be the first mission to remove an item of debris from orbit. The ClearSpace-1 mission, scheduled for launch in 2025, will cost €120m and will grab a single piece of junk. But the agency hopes the mission

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NASA's Parker probe reveals new solar oddities

The closest-ever look inside the sun's corona has unveiled an unexpectedly chaotic world, according to researchers from NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission. That world includes rogue plasma waves, flipping magnetic fields, and distant solar winds under the thrall of the sun's rotation. The findings, part of the first wave of results from the spacecraft that launched in August 2018, provide importan

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Researchers develop new method to remove dust on solar panels

Taking a cue from the self-cleaning properties of the lotus leaf, researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have shed new light on microscopic forces and mechanisms that can be optimized to remove dust from solar panels to maintain efficiency and light absorption. The new technique removed 98 percent of dust particles.

12h

A sustainable new material for carbon dioxide capture

In a joint research study from Sweden, scientists from Chalmers University of Technology and Stockholm University have developed a new material for capturing carbon dioxide. The new material offers many benefits—it is sustainable, has a high capture rate, and has low operating costs. The research has been published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences describe 71 new species in 2019

From geckos to goblin spiders, flowering plants, and Mediterranean ants — spanning five continents and three oceans — these 71 new species described by Academy scientists grow Earth's tree of life.

12h

Beyond Physicalism

Philosopher Hedda Hassel Mørch defends the idea that consciousness pervades the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What crabs can tell us about brain 'building blocks'

A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become "out of whack," which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such

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How history and status shape what you eat

History, industry, the quest for social status, and our changing ideas about health all inform what we eat and why, according a new book. The book, Food Fights: How History Matters to Contemporary Food Debates (UNC Press, 2019), looks at a wide range of issues that relate to our dining habits—and highlight just how complex (and interesting) the world of food can be. Here, co-editors Chad Ludingto

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You create your own false information, study finds

Along with partisan news outlets and political blogs, there's another surprising source of misinformation on controversial topics—it's you.

12h

It's Coders Versus Human Pilots in This Drone Race

A drone directed by artificial intelligence takes on a leading pro racer, in a contest that may help shape future humanitarian efforts.

12h

9 Lazy-Ass Gifts for Couch Potatoes (2019): Blankets, Socks, and More

From weighted blankets to Roku streaming boxes, these gifts will ensure couch potatoes won't change their habits.

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Something funky happens to metal melting point under pressure

Something unexpected happens to the melting point of metals under extremely high pressure, a new study suggests. Generally speaking, a metal's melting point tends to increase with pressure, says Axel van de Walle, a professor in the School of Engineering at Brown University who oversaw the new research. But there's been growing evidence that in alkali metals (a group that includes sodium and lith

12h

White dwarf star spotted nibbling on the atmosphere of a nearby icy planet

Astronomers have spied small rocky asteroids orbiting white dwarf stars, but never a large planet. (ESO/M. Kornmesser /) Someday, our sun will swell into a red giant and scorch everything in its path before collapsing into a white-hot dwarf star. In solar systems with stars like our own, this apocalypse tends to wipe out any inner planets. But whatever survives has a shot at enjoying a second act

12h

Image of the Day: Melanoma Neural Network

A deep neural network can help determine how likely cancer cells are to metastasize.

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Dana-Farber scientists present promising findings in multiple myeloma at ASH Annual Meeting

Results of studies on a novel agent to treat multiple myeloma and a combination therapy aimed at slowing the progression of a precursor myeloma condition are among reports being presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators at the ASH Annual Meeting.

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Treading thoughtfully

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03760-5 Mona Nemer seeks out common ground in shaping Canada's national science policy.

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Hundra procent solenergi

Tokelau, ett land som jag inte hört talas om tidigare, har gått i täten och blivit det första land i världen som täcker hundra procent av sitt energibehov med solenergi. Det finns flera sevärda sidor på Internet om detta, men börja gärna här.

12h

'Universal Lego Sorter' Uses AI to Recognize Any Lego Brick

Scientists around the world have used neural networks to train self-driving cars, diagnose disease, and search for exoplanets. Now, someone is finally leveraging this technology to do something useful: sorting Lego bricks . On YouTube, you can learn how one man created a Lego sorting machine using AI, motors, and of course, Lego bricks. When you look at a pile of Lego blocks, your brain knows how

12h

Konfliktsituation när läkaren själv blir patient

Ett möte med en svårt sjuk cancerpatient, en läkare i 30-årsåldern, berörde för några år sedan dåvarande läkarstudenten Jonatan Wistrand starkt. Den 29 november disputerar han vid Lunds universitet med avhandlingen "Läkaren som patient – dokumentära och litterära vittnesmål under 1900- och 2000-tal".

12h

Reddy vs JBC

Pittsburgh associate professor Raju Reddy and a colleague sue JBC over a retraction. I suggest here more Reddy papers for the chop.

13h

You create your own false information, study finds

Along with partisan news outlets and political blogs, there's another surprising source of misinformation on controversial topics — it's you.A new study found that people given accurate statistics on a controversial issue tended to misremember those numbers to fit commonly held beliefs.

13h

Russian supply ship docks with International Space Station

An unmanned Russian ship carrying tons of supplies successfully docked Monday with the International Space Station.

13h

Boy oh boy! Twin male pandas charm Berlin zoo

The cuteness level at Berlin Zoo doubled on Monday when a pair of twin panda cubs made their public debut, with the zoo revealing the cuddly bundles of fur were both boys.

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Boy oh boy! Twin male pandas charm Berlin zoo

The cuteness level at Berlin Zoo doubled on Monday when a pair of twin panda cubs made their public debut, with the zoo revealing the cuddly bundles of fur were both boys.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #49

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Dec 1 through Sat, Dec 7, 2019 Editor's Pick Should Climate Scientists Be Climate Activists? One Tells Us 'We Can't Wait Any Longer' For Action Twila Moon, at left, and Maria Caffrey at the CPR News studios Friday Nov. 15 2019. The two are climate scientists who discussed the

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Dear Therapist: My Son Is Angry About the Way He Was Treated Last Christmas

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, About 10 months ago, my young adult son returned home, appearing distraught over a broken relationship. Before this, he had moved back to his university city to be with his girlfriend, who was entering her fin

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Charlize Theron Knows a Monster When She Sees One

Arinze Stanley C harlize Theron received the script for Bombshell , the new drama about the women who exposed sexual harassment at Fox News and brought down Roger Ailes , in the summer of 2017. Two months later, the first Harvey Weinstein story broke. In certain Hollywood circles, people had been aware that a Weinstein investigation might finally make it into print, but nobody could have foreseen

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Classical guitars for every playing style

Classical guitars are easy on the fingers. (Kenny Luo via Unsplash/) There's a reason that classical guitars are a popular choice for new students of guitar, and the reason may not be what you think. Strip away the "classical" designation from this instrument and what you're left with is a guitar with wide, comfortable fret and string spacing, easy-to-play nylon strings that are soft to the touch

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Lap desks for people who work from home

It's hard to spend all day at a desk. Sometimes you need a change in scenery. (Christian Bouvier via Unsplash/) When you've been given the green light to ditch the office for the comfort of working at home, you're pumped. Finally, you can get stuff done without interruptions from coworkers, in your coziest clothes, with your pup curled up at your feet. In reality, couches, beds, and armchairs qui

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The Runaway Train of Cognitive Enhancement

How far can we "improve" our mind before we lose our sense of identity and authenticity? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Runaway Train of Cognitive Enhancement

How far can we "improve" our mind before we lose our sense of identity and authenticity? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Today's Cartoon: Conference Calls

This video conference is going in circles.

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For Tech Jobs, the Rich Cities Are Getting Richer

Five coastal cities—San Francisco, San Jose, Seattle, San Diego, and Boston—gained the lion's share of lucrative "innovation industry" jobs from 2005 to 2017.

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AI is helping tackle one of the biggest unsolved problems in maths

Machine-learning algorithms are being used to tackle the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture, one of the fiendishly difficult Millennium Prize Problems

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The Runaway Train of Cognitive Enhancement

How far can we "improve" our mind before we lose our sense of identity and authenticity? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Authors retract two studies on high blood pressure and supplements after realizing they'd made a common error

A group of researchers from Iran, Italy and the UK have retracted two meta-analyses on supplements and high blood pressure after making what a statistics expert calls a common error. Both papers were originally published in the Journal of Human Hypertension. Here's the retraction notice for "Elevated blood pressure reduction after α-lipoic acid supplementation: a … Continue reading

13h

Klimalov: Udvidet klimaråd sikrer eksperter stor indflydelse

PLUS. Klimarådet, som blev nedsat af SR-regeringen tilbage i 2015, skal hvert år vurdere, om regeringen er på rette klima-kurs eller om der skal gøres mere.

13h

Sluk mikrofonen og bloker kameraet: FBI kommer med råd mod udspionerende smart-tv og IoT-enheder

'Dæk kameraet til på dit smart-tv, og lad ikke din bærbare og dit køleskab være på det samme netværk' lyder rådene blandt andet.

13h

Evidence of New X17 Particle Reported, but Scientists Are Wary

Could the mysterious particle be our window into studying dark matter? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Evidence of New X17 Particle Reported, but Scientists Are Wary

Could the mysterious particle be our window into studying dark matter? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

How did supermassive black holes grow so fast?

Black holes in the early universe pose a bit of a problem. Based on observations from telescopes on Earth and in space, we know that some black holes grew to be a billion times the mass of the sun just one billion years after the Big Bang. Our current models of black hole growth, however, can't explain this speed of growth. So how did these supermassive black holes come about?

14h

The Environmental Catastrophe in Your Joint

On a cold morning this fall, I was clinging to a paracord line, descending through heavy brush on what felt like a near-vertical hill in Shasta-Trinity National Forest, in front of me a team of influential ecologists, behind me a team of affable, heavily armed law-enforcement agents. We were deep enough into the forest—bushwhacking into vegetation, miles and miles down a fire road—that anything h

14h

The Right's Time in Court Is Now

In the 1969 Monty Python sketch "Dead Parrot," the outraged customer John Cleese complains to the pet-shop owner Michael Palin about a parrot he sold. "What's wrong with it?" Palin asks. "'E's dead, that's what's wrong with it!" Palin responds that the parrot, motionless in its cage, is just resting, or stunned, or "pinin' for the fjords" of its native Norway. Cleese explodes: 'E's not pinin'! 'E

14h

Rudy Giuliani Is Living the Dream

It can sometimes seem as if Donald Trump has outsourced the defense of his presidency to an erratic buffoon. Rudy Giuliani is the self-styled security expert who can't stop butt-dialing . He is the trusted attorney whom journalists routinely bait into damning admissions. The man once hailed as America's mayor is now widely viewed as a walking gaffe. In the pages of Adam Schiff's impeachment repor

14h

When Mental Illness Becomes a Jail Sentence

Derrick Clay walked into a restaurant in Colorado, one afternoon in January 2017, to get a bite to eat. His card was declined. Clay, who has been diagnosed with psychosis and probable bipolar disorder, grabbed another customer's order—a hamburger and French fries worth $11. Somebody called the police. When they got there, Clay was "acting very irrationally," talking about how the streetlights had

14h

At least five dead after White Island volcano eruption in New Zealand

A volcanic island in New Zealand has erupted, killing at least five people with dozens more missing

14h

Skulle rives ned om få dage: Danmarks største rundtømmerbro styrtet sammen

En træbro over Gudenåen var efter kun otte år så angrebet af råd, at den skulle fjernes. Men i løbet af weekenden styrtede den sammen. Nu skal den i stedet fiskes op af vandet

14h

How does criticism affect popular culture?

Popularity has a funny way of correcting or reversing itself, says journalist and film critic A.O. Scott. It's a weird and fickle index—never identical to quality, though it can coincide with it. Movies like Avatar that are capitalist consumer hits can fade over time. Meanwhile works that were initially passed over can be dredged out of forgotten corners to glory many years later. Moby Dick is an

14h

Lost in the house of tomorrow: Berlin's newest museum

Nature, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03756-1 The Futurium needs a bolder vision to show that we, technology and nature are one. By Stephen Cave

14h

Forskere finder genetiske markører for sjælden form for hudkræft

Hudkræftformen mycosis fungoides kan være svær at diagnosticere. Nu har danske forskere fundet to genetiske markører, som kan associeres med sygdommen.

14h

Biomarkører kan identificere høj risiko for aggressiv udvikling af follikulært lymfom

Dansk forskning peger på, at opregulering af to enzymer kan forudsige, om follikulært lymfom er i høj risiko for at udvikle sig aggressivt og forværre patientens prognose.

14h

Unge Hodgkins-overlevere får flere børn end baggrundsbefolkningen

Ny dansk forskning viser, at unge overlevere efter Hodgkins lymfom gennemsnitligt får flere børn end andre. En solstrålehistorie, siger forsker.

14h

ASCL1 is a MYCN- and LMO1-dependent member of the adrenergic neuroblastoma core regulatory circuitry

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13515-5 Polymorphisms in LMO1 are associated with increased susceptibility to develop neuroblastoma. Here, the authors show that LMO1 directly induces the transcription factor ASCL1, which regulates the differentiation of neurons, demonstrating that ASCL1 is part of the adrenergic neuroblastoma core regulatory circu

15h

Vibronic coherence evolution in multidimensional ultrafast photochemical processes

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13503-9 Energy transfer in light harvesting complexes involves electronic, vibrational, and vibronic couplings which are challenging to resolve. Here the authors observe the time-evolution of vibronic coherences driving charge transfer in a photoexcited solvated transition metal complex by two- and three-dimensional

15h

Direct observation of imploded core heating via fast electrons with super-penetration scheme

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13574-8 Fast ignition is an interesting scheme for nuclear fusion reaction. Here the authors show electron generation using intense short laser pulses and energy transport by coupling the laser energy to the imploded plasma core as in the ICF conditions.

15h

Solution structure of human myeloid-derived growth factor suggests a conserved function in the endoplasmic reticulum

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13577-5 Myeloid-derived growth factor (MYDGF) is an endoplasmic reticulum protein of therapeutic interest because it promotes tissue repair in a murine model of myocardial infarction. Here the authors present the NMR structure of human MYDGF and attribute function to a set of residues conserved in MYDGFs but not the

15h

A tug-of-war over the mid-latitudes

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13714-0 The amplified warming of the Arctic in recent decades has been related to extreme weather events over the mid-latitudes, but its relative importance compared to other influences is not yet well understood. A Nature Research collection highlights evidence from theoretical and observational studies, as well as

15h

Quantum nanophotonics with group IV defects in diamond

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13332-w Diamond colour centres have applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and other important technologies. Bradac et al. survey the progress made in using group IV defect centres, which are anticipated to have practical advantages over the more commonly-used nitrogen vacancy centres.

15h

Tailoring heterogeneities in high-entropy alloys to promote strength–ductility synergy

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13311-1 High entropy alloys are a departure from conventional alloy design. In this review, the authors examine how combinations of hetererogeneities specific to high entropy alloys can overcome the strength–ductility trade-off inherent to traditional alloys.

15h

Coupling chemical mutagenesis to next generation sequencing for the identification of drug resistance mutations in Leishmania

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13344-6 Here, Bhattacharya et al. chemically mutagenize Leishmania and identify genes associated with resistance to miltefosine and paromomycin by next generation sequencing. The study shows that a protein kinase (CDPK1) can mediate resistance to paromomycin by affecting translation.

15h

Treating more than just the heart is critical for geriatric patients

Geriatric conditions such as frailty, cognitive impairment, taking multiple medications and having multiple medical conditions complicate care for older people with acute cardiovascular diseases.Most research on how to treat acute cardiovascular conditions was conducted with younger people and may not apply to older patients.

15h

Ny stor rapport: Ilten forsvinder fra verdens oceaner

Omfanget af iltfri områder i verdenshavene er firedoblet på 50 år, og generelt faldende iltniveauer rammer især store dyr som sværdfisk, tun og hajer.

15h

EU unveils €3bn research fund to develop batteries

Seven member states to invest in the project which is set to run until 2031

15h

Genome investigations show host adaptation and transmission of LA-MRSA CC398 from pigs into Danish healthcare institutions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55086-x

15h

The effect of orbital-lattice coupling on the electrical resistivity of YBaCuFeO5 investigated by X-ray absorption

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54772-0 The effect of orbital-lattice coupling on the electrical resistivity of YBaCuFeO 5 investigated by X-ray absorption

15h

Control of the polarization direction of isolated attosecond pulses using inhomogeneous two-color fields

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54984-4

15h

Variable Selection in the Regularized Simultaneous Component Analysis Method for Multi-Source Data Integration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54673-2

15h

MEK inhibition enhances the response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54901-9

15h

Electrospray patterning of yeast cells for applications in alcoholic fermentation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55225-4

15h

Prey capture analyses in the carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L., Droseraceae)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54857-w Prey capture analyses in the carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant ( Aldrovanda vesiculosa L., Droseraceae)

15h

Curie-Weiss behavior of liquid structure and ideal glass state

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54758-y

15h

Ny kemikalie-app varnar för farliga ämnen

Varje dag utsätts vi i vår vardag för farliga kemikalier som bland annat kommer från prylarna vi köper. Det handlar bland annat om ämnen som kan öka risken för sjukdomar som cancer, beteendestörningar eller påverka vår förmåga att få barn, skriver Kemikalieinspektionen i ett pressmeddelande.

15h

Medical Advice From a Bot: The Unproven Promise of Babylon Health

Speedy deployment has raised serious concerns among experts who say Babylon Health rushed to market without adequate proof that its AI-driven products work. So far, there are no peer-reviewed, randomized control studies — the gold standard — showing how the AI performs in the real world on real patients.

15h

Inderne bliver kvalt i partikler: Se partiklernes verdenskort

PLUS. Luften i Indiens hovedstad, Delhi, er fyldt med ekstreme mængder af partikler. I Danmark kan vi roligt trække vejret … de fleste steder. Flere online-værktøjer giver dig et overblik over partikler verden over.

16h

Play sports for a healthier brain

There have been many headlines in recent years about the potentially negative impacts contact sports can have on athletes' brains. But a new Northwestern University study shows that, in the absence of injury, athletes across a variety of sports — including football, soccer and hockey — have healthier brains than non-athletes.

16h

Svend Lings ekskluderes af Lægeforeningen

Som den første siden 2. Verdenskrig ekskluderes Svend Lings nu af Lægeforeningen.

16h

Flowcytometri kan forudsige prognose for patienter med BCP-ALL

Minimal residual disease er det vigtigste målepunkt for, om en kræftbehandling mod akut lymfoblastær leukæmi virker. Danske forskere viser, at minimal residual disease kan måles med flowcytometri blandt patienter med B-celle precursor akut lymfoblastær leukæmi.

16h

Road salt pollutes lake in one of the largest US protected areas, new study shows

New research shows road salt runoff into Mirror Lake in Adirondack Park prevents natural water turnover and therefore poses a risk to the balance of its ecology.

17h

Spinning a negative acupuncture study: Same as it ever was

Investigators at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center reported the results of a trial of acupuncture for xerostomia (dry mouth) secondary to radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. It was a negative trial, but investigators still tried to spin it as positive, but with a twist. There was a large difference between results found at M.D. Anderson and the second site in China. What could be going on?

17h

Beleaguered DR Congo rainforest attacked on all sides

Lush rainforest covers millions of hectares of the Democratic Republic of Congo, a central part of Earth's natural defence against global warming—but it is under severe threat from a perfect storm of mismanagement and corruption.

17h

Indian Ocean island Mayotte lifts cyclone red alert

Officials on the small Indian Ocean island of Mayotte said Sunday they had lifted the red alert in place for Cyclone Belna, after it brushed past the French territory.

17h

One dead, tourists stranded as New Zealand volcano erupts

A volcano that erupted without warning on a New Zealand island popular with tourists killed one person and stranded at least two dozen more Monday, with rescues too dangerous to attempt and police warning the death toll will likely rise.

17h

Which fields/industries would you predict are most likely to transform in the next 5-10 years due to further advancements in robotics?

I see a lot of discussions on the long term transition of robotics, artificial intelligence, etc… Sorry if this has been done already. I'm hoping to foster interesting ideas and possibilities regarding the NEAR future of robotics, and have something to look back on and compare to the realities in the coming decade. I also didn't tag this as in-depth intentionally – short and long responses enco

17h

In the Age of AI (full film) | FRONTLINE

submitted by /u/The_Morning_Star7 [link] [comments]

17h

The Future of Work: A VICE News Special Report

submitted by /u/The_Morning_Star7 [link] [comments]

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Pig-Monkey Chimeras Have Been Brought to Term For The First Time

This is a big milestone for the future of lab-grown organs.

19h

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Machine learning can help us understand conversations about death

Researchers at the University of Vermont's Vermont Conversation Lab have used machine learning and natural language processing to better understand what end-of-life conversations look like. Borrowing techniques used to study fiction, where machine learning algorithms analyze manuscripts to identify story types, the researchers identified several common elements in these conversations. That knowled

19h

Cityringen efter skinneslibning: Hver tredje støjramte nabo er stadig generet

PLUS. Metroselskabet har taget kontakt til 300 personer, som klagede over støj. Omkring halvdelen af de 100, der har svaret, oplever slet ingen forskel.

19h

Northern Ireland Offers a Warning That Few Are Hearing

BELFAST—I'm driving across Europe's most divided city, where politics is existential and fear often only a few streets away. We're heading west toward the River Lagan from the largely Protestant east, the flags of illegal paramilitary groups hanging limply from lampposts. Sitting beside me in the car is someone who describes himself as "an active loyalist"—loyal to the British Crown and state and

19h

Derfor skal de rige lande punge ud: Her er 3 steder, som kan blive ruineret af klimaforandringerne

Ulande har ikke fået de klima-milliarder, som de blev lovet for ti år siden.

20h

Exercise yields some cardiovascular benefits in children with excess weight

Eight months of daily, afterschool physical activity in previously inactive 8- to 11-year-olds with obesity and overweight improved key measures of their cardiovascular health like good cholesterol levels, aerobic fitness and percent body fat, but didn't improve others like arterial stiffness, an early indicator of cardiovascular risk, Medical College of Georgia investigators report.

20h

Ben-Gurion University researchers develop new method to remove dust on solar panels

Particle removal increased from 41% on hydrophilic smooth Si wafers to 98% on superhydrophobic Si-based nanotextured surfaces. The researchers confirmed these results by measuring the adhesion of a micron-sized particle to the flat and nanotextured substrate using an atomic force microscope. They found that the adhesion in water is reduced by a factor of 30.

20h

Three-day intensive crisis intervention is associated with reduced suicidality in adolescents

In what appears to be the first study of its kind and recently published in the journal Child and Adolescent Mental Health, clinicians and researchers at Nationwide Children's have shown that ICI is a promising alternative to lengthy hospitalization. Findings also revealed significant reductions in suicidal ideation at the 3-month follow-up.

20h

A sustainable new material for carbon dioxide capture

In a joint research study from Sweden, scientists from Chalmers University of Technology and Stockholm University have developed a new material for capturing carbon dioxide. The new material offers many benefits — it is sustainable, has a high capture rate, and has low operating costs. The research has been published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

20h

Deeper understanding of irregular heartbeat may lead to more effective treatment

Researchers at Imperial have shown how the chaotic electrical signals underlying irregular heart rhythms lead to the failure of standard treatments.

20h

Have your health and eat meat too

Barbecued, stir-fried or roasted, there's no doubt that Aussies love their meat. Consuming on average nearly 100 kilograms of meat per person per year, Australians are among the top meat consumers worldwide. But with statistics showing that most Australians suffer from a poor diet, and red meat production adding to greenhouse-gas emissions, finding a balance between taste preferences, environmenta

20h

Even light alcohol consumption linked to higher cancer risk in Japan

In a new Cancer study conducted in Japan, even light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with elevated cancer risks.

20h

Road salt pollutes lake in one of the largest US protected areas, new study shows

New research shows road salt runoff into Mirror Lake in Adirondack Park prevents natural water turnover and therefore poses a risk to the balance of its ecology.

20h

Prescribing anticoagulants in the ED for atrial fibrillation increases long-term use by 30%

Patients prescribed anticoagulants after a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in the emergency department are more likely to continue long-term use of medications to treat the condition, according to research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

20h

Humans Already Slowed The Climate Crisis Once, New Research Shows

The Montreal Protocol worked, and we can do it again.

20h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 9. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

20h

20h

CPR-kontor: Årelang uberettiget overførsel af CPR-oplysninger kan ikke undgås

På trods af gamle eksempler og ny kritik af dårlig håndtering af borgeres CPR-oplysninger, mener CPR-kontoret, at det vil være for stor en administrativ byrde, hvis myndigheder og virksomheder løbende skal tage stilling til, om de har brug for den givne borgers oplysninger.

20h

Biotech companies defend prices of one-off gene therapy

Latest treatments with price tags as high as $2m require new financing models

21h

Regenerative medicine at a critical juncture

Margaret Hamburg on the intersection of science and responsibility

21h

Organoid innovation offers potential for cancer research

Mini-organs grown from human stem cells can test drug effectiveness

21h

Pioneering facility catapults UK to forefront of cell and gene therapy

Industry cluster aims to get inventions commercialised at home rather than in US

21h

FT Health: Regenerative Medicine

Rapid advances in technology from bioelectronics to gene therapy offer new ways to treat many illnesses. But medical breakthroughs bring with them new questions of pricing, access and scientific responsibility

21h

Science fiction becomes science fact

'Neural laces' linking the brain to computers offer new scope for treatments

21h

3D printing could build human organs from scratch

Replacement skin, livers and bladders on horizon

21h

Gene editing heralds new era of animal-to-human transplants

Biotechs race to serve patients stuck on waiting lists for organs

21h

Gene therapy offers new vision to battle blindness

Single treatment using advanced microsurgery can cure condition for life

21h

Don't mess around with a bad ice scraper for your windshield

The original defrosters. ( Anastasia Vityukova via U/) We've all been there, unsuccessfully trying to scrape the remnants of snow, sleet, and ice from last night's storm off our cars. While it's often a dreaded task, it's necessary before you can safely—and legally— hit the road. Put on your warmest gloves, your favorite parka, and use one of these scrapers to chip that frost off. The Mallory's s

21h

The best reusable bags for toting your groceries

Pack your cucumbers without the plastic. (Nikos Kavvadas via Unsplash/) The plastic bags we use everyday are eroding the only planet on which we can live. Plastic bags pollute our water, clog our storm drains (potentially leading to flooding), and choke our wildlife. That's all on top of the waste from a natural resources perspective. A plastic bag can take between 400 to 1,000 years to break dow

22h

Four tiger foetuses found in Indonesian 'poacher' arrests

Sumatran tigers are critically endangered – with fewer than 400 believed to be left in the wild.

22h

Madrid climate talks will set the tone for Glasgow 2020

The outcome of the COP25 UN climate conference in Spain will influence the event in Scotland next year.

22h

23h

AGU 2019

Another year, another AGU. Back in San Francisco for the first time in 3 years, and with a massive assortment of talks, events and workshops. For those not able to go, there is an increasing, though not yet exhaustive, availability of streaming and online content. Notably, the AGU GO service is streaming 15 sessions live on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with the ability to ask questions and int

23h

Study finds decrease in eye exposures from household cleaners; experts urge proper storage

A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data regarding eye exposures associated with household cleaning products from 2000 through 2016 and found a decrease in the number of exposures during this period. However, the number of these exposures among young children remains high.

1d

Too few hospitals have clinical decision support tools to calculate nutrition in NICU

Most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) participating in the Children's Hospitals Neonatal Consortium are unable to reliably and consistently monitor caloric intake delivered to critically ill infants at risk for growth failure, according to a study published in the Journal of Perinatology.

1d

Brian Cox: Why I've been exploring our scientific past

The science broadcaster explains why he's been delving into the lives of some extraordinary scientists.

1d

Polluting firms 'will be hit by climate policies'

Which business sectors will be winners and losers when, and if, climate change policies take affect?

1d

Climate change: UN negotiators 'playing politics' amid global crisis

Political posturing is harming attempts to address key issues at the UN climate talks, participants say.

1d

Probiotics and prebiotics work differently in girls and boys according to piglet study

Baby boy's and girl's immune systems respond differently to prebiotics and probiotics, according to new research. The paper published in Frontiers in Immunology today [9 December] suggests that differences in male and female immunity begin much earlier than previously thought.

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An Underwater Grid – Is a subsea power grid the next frontier?

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Real-Life Telepathy Is Closer Than You Think

submitted by /u/Tao_Dragon [link] [comments]

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