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nyheder2019december10

Study: Water births are as safe as land births for mom, baby

A new study found that water births are no more risky than land births, and that women in the water group sustain fewer first and second-degree tears.

12h

IDA: Vi skal forbyde nye fossilbiler om to år, hvis transporten skal bidrage til klima-mål

PLUS. Et notat fra Ingeniørforeningen, IDA viser, at selv om Danmark nøjes med et beskedent bidrag til klima-reduktionerne fra transportsektoren, så skal en million fossilbiler fjernes fra vejene.

13h

Ny stor rapport: Grønland mister is syv gange hurtigere end i 1990'erne

Afsmeltningen betyder, at 40 millioner flere mennesker end hidtil anslået vil blive ramt af kystoversvømmelser i 2100.

2h

5 things a Nobel Prize winner wants you to know about science

Here are five things you ought to understand about science, according to professor of genetic medicine Gregg Semenza. This week, Semenza—along with William Kaelin Jr. and Peter Ratcliffe—will accept the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm, Sweden, for discovering the gene that controls how cells respond to low oxygen levels. In the two months since the award was announced, Sem

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Chiton mollusk provides model for new armor design

The way the scale armor works is that when in contact with a force, the scales converge inward upon one another to form a solid barrier. When not under force, they can 'move' on top of one another to provide varying amounts of flexibility dependent upon their shape and placement.

5min

'Loneliness epidemic' may be due to increasing aging population

Despite some claims that Americans are in the midst of a 'loneliness epidemic,' older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from previous generations — there just might be more of them, according to a pair of new studies.

11min

Chiton mollusk provides model for new armor design

The way the scale armor works is that when in contact with a force, the scales converge inward upon one another to form a solid barrier. When not under force, they can 'move' on top of one another to provide varying amounts of flexibility dependent upon their shape and placement.

11min

Hackers Can Mess With Voltages to Steal Intel Chips' Secrets

A new attack called Plundervolt gives attackers access to the sensitive data stored in a processor's secure enclave.

12min

The body electric: soft tissue makes electricity under stress

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03806-8 Ultrasound pulses trigger an electrifying effect in samples of Achilles tendon, heart valve and more.

12min

The hunt for ancient ice that witnessed West Antarctica's collapse

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03793-w Core from Hercules Dome site could reveal how susceptible the region's ice is to warming.

12min

Accessing medical records improve patients care — but only 10% of patients do so

Despite the numerous benefits associated with patients accessing their medical records, a new Portland State University study found only 10% of patients utilize the resource.More than 95% of patients recently discharged from a hospital had access to electronic records. But use was disproportionately low across all hospital types.

18min

Scientists Find a Shipworm That Eats, and Lives Inside, Rocks

#50 in our top science stories of 2019.

20min

To Decode the Brain, Scientists Automate the Study of Behavior

The quest to understand what's happening inside the minds and brains of animals has taken neuroscientists down many surprising paths: from peering directly into living brains, to controlling neurons with bursts of light, to building intricate contraptions and virtual reality environments. In 2013, it took the neurobiologist Bob Datta and his colleagues at Harvard Medical School to a Best Buy down

23min

Baby book app guides parents to prevent SIDS

A new mobile app, Baby be Well, offers new parents guidance on safe sleep practices to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The free app is available now for android devices, with the iOS version to follow shortly. "We focused on making the app an appealing and interactive experience to promote return visits and repeated exposure to the safe infant sleep guidelines of the Ameri

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32min

New insights into the effect of aging on cardiovascular disease

Aging adults are more likely to have – and die from – cardiovascular disease than their younger counterparts. New basic science research finds reason to link biological aging to the development of narrowed, hardened arteries, independent of other risk factors like high cholesterol.

32min

Gut feeling: A network approach towards understanding IBD

Scientists at the Earlham Institute (EI), Quadram Institute Bioscience (QIB) and the University of East Anglia (UEA), UK, have pioneered how to get very detailed transcriptomics data from gut organoids, and regulatory networks to analyse them — establishing a pipeline that can be used to explore the causes of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

32min

Self-driving microrobots

Most synthetic materials, including those in battery electrodes, polymer membranes, and catalysts, degrade over time because they don't have internal repair mechanisms. If you could distribute autonomous microrobots within these materials, then you could use the microrobots to continuously make repairs from the inside. Columbia Engineering researchers propose a strategy for microscale robots that

32min

'Marriage Story' Proves Anything on Netflix Can Be a Meme Now

Over the weekend, the internet turned the film's most tense moment into LOLs. Because of course it did.

36min

New laser technique images quantum world in a trillionth of a second

For the first time, researchers have been able to record, frame-by-frame, how an electron interacts with certain atomic vibrations in a solid. The technique captures a process that commonly causes electrical resistance in materials while, in others, can cause the absence of resistance, or superconductivity.

36min

What blocks bird flu in human cells?

Normally, bird flu viruses do not spread easily from person to person. But if this does happen, it could trigger a pandemic. Researchers have now explained what makes the leap from animals to humans less likely.

40min

Technologies and scientific advances needed to track methane levels in atmosphere

Understanding what influences the amount of methane in the atmosphere has been identified to be one of the foremost challenges in the earth sciences in the coming decades because of methane's hugely important role in meeting climate warming targets.

40min

When Human Rights Are a Cudgel to Beat Your Enemies

The horrifying numbers are still trickling in: Anywhere from 200 to more than 1,000 people dead. Seven thousand people in prison. The full human cost of Iran's recent crackdown on protests that started last month is only now coming into focus, as the demonstrations taper off and more details come out of an opaque country where authorities shut down the internet during some of the worst violence.

40min

Liberal-demokratisk islam är också politisk islam

Den indiska tänkaren Wahiduddin Khan förespråkar en liberal-demokratisk och sekulär stat med religionsfrihet, i Gandhis anda. Han tar tydligt avstånd ifrån politisk islam. Samtidigt blir hindunationalismen alltmer anti-muslimsk. En ny avhandling analyserar Khans bild av islam. Just nu pågår en politisk strid i Indien där demokrati och statens sekulära karaktär ifrågasätts av den allt starkare hin

41min

Scientists Are Planning a 1,000 Year Trip to Another Planet

Long Shot In a bid to protect humanity in case Earth becomes uninhabitable, a team of scientists is trying to pull together a bold plan to colonize a distant exoplanet . It's a long shot in every sense of the word. Scientists from the Initiative for Interstellar Studies told OneZero that the plan to send a crew to a potentially-habitable exoplanet in another solar system — perhaps Proxima Centaur

50min

Smoking cessation treatment targets adolescents

The primary focus of smoking cessation research has been adults in the past, but a new study in JAMA Pediatrics zeroed in on adolescents. This study found that while there was no significant difference between the varenicline group and the placebo group at end of treatment, those in the varenicline group quit earlier in the trial and were less likely to relapse after the trial was over. And it enc

54min

NASA's temp check on Tropical Storm Belna finds heavy rainfall potential

Cold cloud top temperatures can tell forecasters if a tropical cyclone has the potential to generate heavy rainfall, and that is exactly what NASA's Aqua satellite found when it observed the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Belna over northwestern Madagascar.

54min

University of Cincinnati research looks at side effects for pediatric medications

Dr. Jeffrey Strawn, associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and Jeffrey Mills, associate professor in the Department of Economics at the UC Lindner College of Business, published a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry looking specifically at side effects that impact

54min

Drug combination shows promise in preclinical models of triple negative breast cancer

Tumor volume in a preclinical model of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) was reduced four times more when an experimental polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitor was combined with a standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agent than when the agent was used alone. Hollings Cancer Center scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina reported these findings in PLOS ONE.

54min

Key to helping southern sea otter is in repopulating estuaries such as San Francisco Bay

California could triple the population of endangered southern sea otters by repopulating San Francisco Bay.

54min

Daily briefing: 3D-printed bunny embedded with DNA instructions to replicate itself

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03815-7 Object contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself, 'big history' puts an end to the Axial Age and a gene-based hack detangles correlation from causation in epidemiology.

56min

On a model ancient raft, seafarers are up the current without a paddle

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03780-1 A bamboo craft built to resemble prehistoric boats proves unfit for a sea voyage.

56min

Why female orcas make killer grandmas

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03797-6 Matriarch whales have a powerful effect on the lives of their grandchildren.

56min

Architecture, design and behavioural science need to get talking about sustainability

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03783-y The built environment consumes energy and produces waste, which makes it pivotal to fighting climate change. A stronger dose of research could help.

56min

European space telescope to launch new era of exoplanet science

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03800-0 CHEOPS will be the first mission designed to study — rather than find — alien worlds.

56min

Moroccan cave reveals the vastness of the 'Green Sahara'

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03786-9 Stalagmites record thousands of years of northern Africa's climate history.

56min

The U.S. Military Is Reportedly Testing Underwater Bullets

Underwater Bullets The U.S. Special Operations Command is reportedly testing bullets that can be shot underwater, according to Defense One . Regular bullets slow down significantly underwater, posing little threat, because water is eight times denser than air. The goal is to allow frogmen, naval soldiers that are trained in underwater environments, to attack boats from under the surface, or for p

1h

Open Software Means Kinder Science

Its transformative power has improved my ability to analyze data and collaborate with other researchers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Take great family photos you'll actually like

"This? Posed? Oh, no! We're a portrait-ready kind of family." (ArturVerkhovetskiy via de Deposit Photos/) The holidays are one of the best times to take family photos: everyone is free, happy, and trapped in a house, so they can't run away when you demand they all line up for a picture. But if you're going to do it, you should do it right. Here's how: Choose your tool: Smartphone or DSLR? A few y

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New Zealand Eruption: The Inherent Risk in Visiting Volcanoes

The event shows that even geologically minor eruptions can endanger people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Why doesn't deep-brain stimulation work for everyone?

Researchers have mapped nine functional networks in the deep-brain structures of 10 healthy people, an accomplishment that could lead to improvements in deep-brain stimulation therapy for severe cases of Parkinson's disease and other neurological conditions.

1h

Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected

Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s and is tracking the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end climate warming scenario, which would see 40 million more people exposed to coastal flooding by 2100.

1h

Water births are as safe as land births for mom, baby

A new study found that water births are no more risky than land births, and that women in the water group sustain fewer first and second-degree tears.

1h

Could dark carbon be hiding the true scale of ocean 'dead zones'?

The impact of climate change on the world's oceans is becoming increasingly known but new research suggests current computer models could be omitting a crucial piece of evidence when it comes to assessing the scale of ocean dead zones.

1h

Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life

New research conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time.

1h

Justified and unjustified movie violence evokes different brain responses

In a study, researchers find that scenes of justified and unjustified violence in movies activate different parts of the adolescent brain. The research is the first to show that when movie characters engage in violence that is seen as justified, there is a synchronized response among viewers in a part of the brain involved in moral evaluation, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, suggesting that vi

1h

Floral foam adds to microplastic pollution problem

First study to examine the environmental effects of floral foam finds the plastic material, which breaks into tiny pieces, can be eaten by a range of freshwater and marine animals and affect their health.

1h

New laser technique images quantum world in a trillionth of a second

For the first time, researchers have been able to record, frame-by-frame, how an electron interacts with certain atomic vibrations in a solid. The technique captures a process that commonly causes electrical resistance in materials while, in others, can cause the absence of resistance, or superconductivity.

1h

The ESA Is Sending a Robotic Junk Collector Into Space

Space Junk Earth's orbit has become a graveyard of past space missions. Thousands of defunct satellites and bits of old rockets are careening through the skies at speeds averaging 20,000 kilometers per hour (12,500 miles per hour) — junk that's a constant threat to new missions. Now, to address the issue, the European Space Agency has officially approved the approximately $133 million needed to f

1h

China may be just about to launch its digital currency in two cities

Real-world tests of the system are set to begin soon, according to a local news report.

1h

New Zealand Eruption: The Inherent Risk in Visiting Volcanoes

The event shows that even geologically minor eruptions can endanger people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Hastings Center Report, November-December 2019

GoFundMe urged to halt campaigns for unproven medical treatments; the case for new laws to stem the doctor burnout crisis; why sugar taxes don't undermine liberty, and more.

1h

Potentially toxic chemicals from LCDs in nearly half of household dust samples tested

Chemicals commonly used in smartphone, television, and computer displays were found to be potentially toxic and present in nearly half of dozens of samples of household dust collected by a team of toxicologists led by the University of Saskatchewan (USask). The international research team, led by USask environmental toxicologist John Giesy, is sounding the alarm about liquid crystal monomers and t

1h

Modifier gene may explain why some with cystic fibrosis are less prone to infection

People with cystic fibrosis who carry genetic variants that lower RNF5 gene expression have more mutant CFTR protein on cell surfaces. Even if the CFTR protein isn't fully functional, it's better than none, and may explain why some with cystic fibrosis are less prone to infection than others.

1h

Federal disability payments encourage more family caregiving, study finds

While it's well understood what sources of income and insurance support people who experience a disability, less is known about the mechanisms of how family support changes over the evolution of a disability. A new study finds that federal disability benefits can lead to increases in other support for beneficiaries, such as in-kind assistance from adult children.

1h

Improvements needed for hepatitis C testing in youth

A new study led by Boston Medical Center uncovered a need to improve testing rates for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in young people, specifically those with documented substance use history. In the national data sample, under 30 percent of young patients who reported using opioids, methamphetamine, and/or cocaine were tested for HCV.

1h

Blood transfusions: Fresh red blood cells no better than older ones

Findings from the ABC-PICU study on critically ill children may alter policies at hospitals where fresh red cells are preferentially used.

1h

Tiny magnetic particles enable new material to bend, twist, and grab

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and The Ohio State University has developed a soft polymer material, called magnetic shape memory polymer, that uses magnetic fields to transform into a variety of shapes. The material could enable a range of new applications from antennas that change frequencies on the fly to gripper arms for delicate or heavy objects.

1h

Lice-Filled Dinosaur Feathers Found Trapped in 100-Million-Year-Old Amber

Prehistoric insects that resemble modern lice infested animals as early as the mid-Cretaceous, living and evolving along with dinosaurs and early birds

1h

The 'Russia Hoax' Is a Hoax

If you are following mainstream news outlets, you know that in 2016, Donald Trump benefited from a Russian hacking and disinformation campaign designed to help him get elected even as he sought permission from the Russian government to build a hotel in Moscow. You know that he deflected blame from Russia for that campaign , even as he sought to benefit from it politically . You know that shortly

1h

Key to helping southern sea otter is in repopulating estuaries such as San Francisco Bay

The picture of sea otters frolicking among kelp beds and rocky shoals has become an iconic image of the California coastline. But it may be drawing attention away from the value of other habitat that could truly help the endangered species in its recovery—estuaries.

1h

Key to helping southern sea otter is in repopulating estuaries such as San Francisco Bay

The picture of sea otters frolicking among kelp beds and rocky shoals has become an iconic image of the California coastline. But it may be drawing attention away from the value of other habitat that could truly help the endangered species in its recovery—estuaries.

1h

Open Software Means Kinder Science

Its transformative power has improved my ability to analyze data and collaborate with other researchers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Stardust from red giants

Some of the Earth's building material was stardust from red giants. Astronomers can also explain why the Earth contains more of this stardust than the asteroids or the planet Mars, which are farther from the sun.

1h

Could we cool Earth with an ice-free Arctic?

The Arctic region is heating up faster than any other place on Earth, and as more and more sea ice is lost every year, we are already feeling the impacts. Researchers explored strategies for cooling down the oceans in a world without this important cooling mechanism.

1h

How to induce magnetism in graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional structure made of carbon, is a material with excellent mechanical, electronic and optical properties. However, it did not seem suitable for magnetic applications. Researchers have now succeeded in synthesizing a unique nanographene predicted in the 1970s, which conclusively demonstrates that carbon in very specific forms has magnetic properties that could permit future

1h

Lighting up cardiovascular problems using nanoparticles

A new nanoparticle innovation that detects unstable calcifications that can trigger heart attacks and strokes may allow doctors to pinpoint when plaque on the walls of blood vessels becomes dangerous.

1h

Eating more ketones may fight against Alzheimer's disease

A ketone-supplemented diet may protect neurons from death during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to research in mice.

1h

The genetic signature of memory

Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation.

1h

Creating switchable plasmons in plastics

Researchers have developed optical nanoantennas made from a conducting polymer. The antennas can be switched on and off, and will make possible a completely new type of controllable nano-optical components.

1h

Lighting up cardiovascular problems using nanoparticles

A new nanoparticle innovation that detects unstable calcifications that can trigger heart attacks and strokes may allow doctors to pinpoint when plaque on the walls of blood vessels becomes dangerous.

1h

Researchers show how opportunistic bacterium defeats competitors

The researchers discovered that Stenotrophomonas maltophilia uses a secretion system that produces a cocktail of toxins and injects them into other microorganisms with which it competes for space and food.

1h

Huntington's Disease patients need better understanding of risks

Amsterdam, NL, December 10, 2019 – For patients with Huntington's disease (HD), clinical trials can offer hope when there are no treatments available despite unknowns about whether the therapy will work or is safe. A new study in the Journal of Huntington's Disease found that although the HD community appears highly optimistic about HD research, patients are at risk for therapeutic misconception.

1h

AGA releases guideline on management of gastric intestinal metaplasia

This guideline will aid health care provider decision-making for patients who are undergoing upper endoscopy in North America

1h

Research explores how grape pests sniff out berries

A new study, published Nov. 21 in the Journal of Chemical Ecology, investigates how these pests find their target amid a sea of other plants in the landscape.

1h

Probiotic yeast may offer an effective treatment for drug-resistant fungal infections

Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) & the Central Food Technological Research Institute in India are studying the effect of probiotic yeast in preventing fungal infections.

1h

ASTRO issues new guideline on radiation therapy for basal, squamous cell skin cancers

A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides recommendations on the use of radiation therapy to treat patients diagnosed with the most common types of skin cancers. The guideline details when radiation treatments are appropriate as stand-alone therapy or following surgery for basal and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (BCC, cSCC), and it suggests dos

1h

LSU Health discovers role of 2 proteins in sight and preventing blinding eye diseases

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has discovered unique patterns of genetic activity that may lead to the development of blinding retinal diseases.

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Her kan lejerne spare penge ved at styre indeklimaet

PLUS. Det nuværende afregningssystem for varmeforbrug i lejligheder, medvirker både til overforbrug af energi og dårligt indeklima. Første resultater fra ny metode viser gode takter.

1h

Increasing food intake by swapping mitochondrial genomes

To uncover the relationship between variation in genes and phenotypic diversity, geneticists use a set of fully sequenced fruit-fly genomes. But little is known about the variation in the mitochondrial genome, for which mutations are linked to an array of diseases. Now, scientists have created a high-resolution map of mitochondrial DNA variants in the fruit fly, connecting mitochondrial genes to m

1h

Greenland lost almost 4 trillion tonnes of ice in less than 30 years

The Greenland ice sheet lost 3.8 trillion tonnes of ice between 1992 and 2018, leading to sea level rise that contributes to coastal flooding during storms

1h

To cope with anxiety, use 'safety signals'

There could be a new way to combat anxiety: When life triggers excessive fear, use a safety signal, researchers say. For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Cognitive behavioral therapy and antidepressants help about half the people suffering from anxiety, but millions of

1h

Wrapping gifts really nicely can actually backfire

How nicely do you need to wrap your gifts this holiday season? You can probably relax when giving gifts to family, research suggests, but not acquaintances. Researchers used three experiments to explore how the neatness of the wrapping affects a recipient's expectations about their gift . "Neat wrapping leads the recipient to set high expectations that are hard for the gift to meet." In the first

1h

Elizabeth Warren Announces Ocean-Protecting "Blue New Deal"

Broader Focus Elizabeth Warren just unveiled the Blue New Deal — a major package of environmental protections that focus on the ocean, offshore drilling, and coastal health. The plan is the first major environmental package focusing specifically on the ocean offered by a presidential candidate, Earther reports , and extends some of the same policy solutions in the Green New Deal specifically to o

1h

Not all oats are gluten free—here's how to be sure you're safe

Oats are part of a health breakfast, but maybe not if you have celiac (Daria Nepriakhina/Unsplash/) There's been a real uptick in gluten-free labels at the grocery store lately, including on drinks and snacks you know shouldn't have any gluten to begin with. But if you've made fun of gluten-free oats, you might want to take back that joke. Oats don't naturally contain any gluten , but research su

1h

2020 Hyundai Sonata Review: Car of the Year? (It's That Good)

The 2020 Hyundai Sonata is a strong exception to the rule that "sedans are dying." The car looks sleeker and sportier, significant safety gear comes standard, the upper trim line lets you press a key-fob button to summon your car out of the garage before you get in, blind spot detection cameras show video of approaching cars in the instrument panel, and the Level 2 self-driving feature works well

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Research revises classification of acute myeloid leukemia & myelodysplastic syndrome

Findings presented as a late-breaking abstract at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital showcase the power and potential of combining genomic and transcriptomic data.

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Inane things with a taste of freedom

Both the USSR and the USA countries used cinematography as a weapon in their fight, trying to do as much harm to the opponent as possible. Kristina Tanis, a researcher from HSE University, investigates the battles between the two film industries. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17503132.2019.1652395

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Matthias Schott receives ERC Consolidator Grant for new approach to search for axions

Matthias Schott and his team are proposing a detailed research program using the LHC's ATLAS Experiment where they can undertake a targeted search for relatively heavy ALPs, which, once found, could solve the problem associated with the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

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Middle-income countries are hardest hit by cardiovascular disease in Europe

Middle-income countries shoulder the bulk of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Europe, according to a major report published today in European Heart Journal, the flagship journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

1h

What blocks bird flu in human cells?

Normally, bird flu viruses do not spread easily from person to person. But if this does happen, it could trigger a pandemic. Researchers from the MDC and RKI have now explained in the journal Nature Communications what makes the leap from animals to humans less likely.

1h

Oxygen shaped the evolution of the eye

The light-absorbing retina in the eye has an exceptionally high metabolic rate which must be met by adequate oxygen supply. This study shows that oxygen diffusion constrained retinal morphology of ancestral vertebrates. It further demonstrates that animals that independently evolved good vision, such as birds, fishes and mammals, concurrently evolved new mechanisms to supply oxygen to their retina

1h

Silver improves the efficiency of monograin layer solar cells

As a result of their two-year joint project, the materials researchers of Tallinn University of Technology have improved the efficiency of next generation solar cells by partial substitution of copper with silver in absorber material.

1h

Genetic breakthrough identifies heart failure risk in African and Latino Americans

Findings may inform genetic screening test for patients at risk and medically under-served.

1h

Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected

Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s and is tracking the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end climate warming scenario, which would see 40 million more people exposed to coastal flooding by 2100.

1h

Genetic variant largely found in patients of African descent associated with heart failure

A genetic variant in the gene transthyretin (TTR) — which is found in about 3% of individuals of African ancestry — is a more significant cause of heart failure than previously believed, according to a multi-institution study led by researchers at Penn Medicine. The study also revealed that a disease caused by this genetic variant, called hereditary transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy (hATTR-CM

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Fresh red blood cell transfusions do not help critically ill children more than older cells

Researchers have found that transfusions using fresh red blood cells — cells that have spent seven days or less in storage — are no more beneficial than older red blood cells in reducing the risk of organ failure or death in critically ill children. The findings, the researchers said, should reassure doctors that the standard practice of using older red cells is just as safe and effective in the

1h

Dementia study reveals how proteins interact to stop brain signals

Fresh insights into damaging proteins that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease could aid the quest for treatments.

1h

Chiton mollusk provides model for new armor design

The way the scale armor works is that when in contact with a force, the scales converge inward upon one another to form a solid barrier. When not under force, they can 'move' on top of one another to provide varying amounts of flexibility dependent upon their shape and placement.

1h

Why doesn't deep-brain stimulation work for everyone?

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have mapped nine functional networks in the deep-brain structures of 10 healthy people, an accomplishment that could lead to improvements in deep-brain stimulation therapy for severe cases of Parkinson's disease and other neurological conditions.

1h

Insects' drag-based flight mechanism could improve tiny flying robots

Thrips don't rely on lift in order to fly. Instead, the tiny insects rely on a drag-based flight mechanism, staying afloat in airflow velocities with a large ratio of force to wing size. Researchers have performed the first test of drag force on a thrip's wing under constant airflow in a bench-top wind tunnel and, drawing from microfabrication and nanomechanics, they created an experiment in which

1h

Communications device offers huge bandwidth potential

Several countries are building futuristic communication systems using higher frequency electromagnetic waves to transfer more data at faster rates, but they have lacked network components to handle these higher bandwidths. Researcher J. Gary Eden proved his new device can rapidly switch functionality to perform the varied tasks needed to support a network with carrier frequencies of over 100 gigah

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Is Solar Power Worth It? This Free Cost Benefit Estimator Has The Answers.

When it comes to the state of residential solar power in 2019, there's some good news and some bad news. The good news is that the startup costs have dropped by about 70 percent over the last ten years thanks to various government incentives and economies of scale. That means going solar has never been more affordable. And that, in theory, is great news for anybody who wants to reduce their carbo

2h

Climate change: Greenland ice melt 'is accelerating'

The ice sheet's contribution to sea-level rise is now seven times what it was in the 1990s.

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Greenland losing ice faster than expected

Polar scientists paint a grim climate-change picture.

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Near-Earth asteroid numbers grow in record year

When it comes to space rocks, there are always more to be found.

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Copy the chiton for flexi-protection

Marine mollusc may inspire better body armour for humans.

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Why I protest for climate justice | Jane Fonda

At age 81, actor and activist Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line for the planet — literally. In a video interview with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Fonda speaks about getting arrested multiple times during Fire Drill Fridays, the weekly climate demonstrations she leads in Washington, DC — and discusses why civil disobedience is becoming a new normal in the age of climate change.

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Dinosaurs had feathers ruffled by parasites, study finds

Ancient pieces of amber found to contain dinosaur feathers riddled with louse-like insects Dinosaurs may have been fearsome and intimidating creatures that dominated the prehistoric earth – but it did not stop them having their feathers ruffled by parasites, researchers have found. Scientists have discovered ancient pieces of amber, dating from about 99m years ago, that contain dinosaur feathers

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Oldest Ever Fossil Lice Discovered in Amber

The parasites were found on preserved dinosaur feathers from almost 100 million years ago. DinoLice.jpg A louse crawling on the dinosaur feathers in mid-Cretaceous amber. Image credits: Taiping Gao Creature Tuesday, December 10, 2019 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The oldest fossil lice yet unearthed have been found on dinosaur feathers encased in amber, a new study rep

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After Years of Delays, NASA Unveils Its Most Powerful Rocket

After many years of delay , NASA has finally shown off its Space Launch System (SLS), which it plans to use to ferry American astronauts to the Moon as soon as 2024. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told the public over the weekend that the rocket is "the most powerful rocket ever built," Engadget reports . Bridenstine also uploaded a video to Twitter yesterday of NASA running a test version of

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Mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet from 1992 to 2018

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1855-2

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Insects' drag-based flight mechanism could improve tiny flying robots

Thrips are tiny insects 2 millimeters long, about as long as four human hairs are thick. Thrips are known for their unwelcome ability to devour garden plants and, lately, to inform the design of microrobotics.

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Communications device offers huge bandwidth potential

Scientists at the University of Illinois have created sugar cube-sized blocks of an electromagnetic material with potential to transform communication networks.

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Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected

Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s and is tracking the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end climate warming scenario, which would see 40 million more people exposed to coastal flooding by 2100.

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Chiton mollusk provides model for new armor design

The motivations for using biology as inspiration to engineering vary based on the project, but for Ling Li, assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering, the combination of flexibility and protection seen in the chiton mollusk was all the motivation necessary.

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Even dinosaurs had lice, fossils entombed in amber reveal

100-million-year-old insects that fed on feathers are the oldest licelike fossils known

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To really recover, maybe hold the ice

Jumping into a bath shouldn't be the automatic choice after a workout, research suggests.

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Modern penguins may have evolved earlier than thought

Ancient fossils reveal an old bird with proportions close to its current-day relatives.

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The vital role of whale grandmas

Post-menopause, they help young ones survive, study shows.

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How to induce magnetism in graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional structure made of carbon, is a material with excellent mechani-cal, electronic and optical properties. However, it did not seem suitable for magnetic applica-tions. Together with international partners, Empa researchers have now succeeded in synthesiz-ing a unique nanographene predicted in the 1970s, which conclusively demonstrates that car-bon in very specific forms ha

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New findings on satiety signaling from intestine

A previously unknown mechanism that suppresses satiety signals from the small intestine is the main finding of a new study. This may explain, first, satiety disorders in obesity and diabetes and, second, the prompt health effects of gastric bypass, a form of bariatric surgery.

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A study demonstrates the efficiency of a screening strategy to detect liver diseases

Miquel Serra-Burriel, a researcher at the Centre for Research in Health Economics (CRES-UPF), co-author of the article together with researchers from the Hepatology Unit of Hospital Clínic de Barcelona and a team of international experts, have published the study in Journal of Hepatology in the framework of the LiverScreen project.

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Advertising continues to assume mothers only use knowledge for domestic caring

Magazine adverts continue to tell mothers to put caring for their families front and centre – and encourage them to devote all their knowledge to protecting and caring for them rather than for their own benefit or professional advancement.

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Technologies and scientific advances needed to track methane levels in atmosphere

Understanding what influences the amount of methane in the atmosphere has been identified by the American Geophysical Union to be one of the foremost challenges in the earth sciences in the coming decades because of methane's hugely important role in meeting climate warming targets.

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New laser technique images quantum world in a trillionth of a second

For the first time, researchers have been able to record, frame-by-frame, how an electron interacts with certain atomic vibrations in a solid. The technique captures a process that commonly causes electrical resistance in materials while, in others, can cause the exact opposite—the absence of resistance, or superconductivity.

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EU blåstempler statsstøtte for 3,2 mia. euro til batteriprojekter

EU-Kommissionen har godkendt statsstøtte for flere milliarder fra syv medlemslande, der skal støtte europæiske forsknings- og udviklingsprojekter inden for lithium-ion-batterier.

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Natural ecosystems protect against climate change

The identification of natural carbon sinks and understanding how they work is critical if humans are to mitigate global climate change. Tropical coastal wetlands are considered important but, so far, there is little data to show the benefits. This study, led by the University of Göttingen showed that mangrove ecosystems need to be conserved and restored as part of the battle against rising carbon

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Scientists discover a novel method to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

AMPs target and kill bacteria in such variable ways that few bacteria ever become resistant to these molecules; this makes AMPs uniquely suited to treating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, also called, 'superbugs'. However, as of now, no one has been able to artificially create effective AMPs for use as an antibiotic. The researchers' discovery has found a way to overcome this limitation and has hug

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No 'clouded' judgments: Geostationary satellite an alternative to monitor land surfaces

Environmental scientists are always in search of new tools that can better characterize the Earth's surface. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, a group of researchers in the US and Japan reported that Himawari-8, a new-generation geostationary satellite, was able to acquire cloud-free observations every 4 days and capture the seasonal changes of vegetation more accurately than before.

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Stardust from red giants

Some of the Earth's building material was stardust from red giants, researchers from ETH Zurich have established. They can also explain why the Earth contains more of this stardust than the asteroids or the planet Mars, which are farther from the sun.

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Improving the accuracy of climate model projections with emergent constraints

Emergent constraints are useful for narrowing the spread of climate projections and for guiding the development of more realistic climate models. However, they are sensitive to various factors, such as the way statistical inference has been performed or how observational uncertainties have been obtained. Therefore, more consistency across emergent constraints are needed for better cross-validation

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Could we cool the Earth with an ice-free Arctic?

The Arctic region is heating up faster than any other place on Earth, and as more and more sea ice is lost every year, we are already feeling the impacts. IIASA researchers explored strategies for cooling down the oceans in a world without this important cooling mechanism.

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Scientist to lead upcoming NASA field study of East Coast snowstorms

Snowstorms can wreak havoc across the United States, but especially on the East Coast. Snow is the least-understood form of precipitation, with major snowstorms among the most difficult weather events to forecast. Yet people rely on these forecasts to stay safe, plan travel routes and decide whether to close schools or businesses.

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Could we cool the Earth with an ice-free Arctic?

The Arctic region is heating up faster than any other place on Earth, and as more and more sea ice is lost every year, we are already feeling the impacts. IIASA researchers explored strategies for cooling down the oceans in a world without this important cooling mechanism.

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Researchers discover new viral strategy to escape detection

University of Otago researchers have discovered how viruses that specifically kill bacteria can outwit the bacteria by hiding from their defences, findings which are important for the development of new antimicrobials based on viruses and provide a significant advance in biological knowledge.

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Experts puzzled as 10-foot great white shark stays a month in one spot off East Coast

Great white sharks are known for racing past the Mid-Atlantic states to get someplace else, so experts pay attention in rare cases when one not only stops, but stays put.

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Researchers discover new viral strategy to escape detection

University of Otago researchers have discovered how viruses that specifically kill bacteria can outwit the bacteria by hiding from their defences, findings which are important for the development of new antimicrobials based on viruses and provide a significant advance in biological knowledge.

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Experts puzzled as 10-foot great white shark stays a month in one spot off East Coast

Great white sharks are known for racing past the Mid-Atlantic states to get someplace else, so experts pay attention in rare cases when one not only stops, but stays put.

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E-cigaretter misstänks ha orsakat akuta skador på lungorna

Det senaste halvåret har det i USA rapporterats om ett stort antal lungskador som har gått att koppla till användning av e-cigaretter, ett bruk som kallas vejpning. Enligt den amerikanska folkhälsomyndigheten Centers of Disease Control, CDC, handlar det om 2.290 misstänkta fall, varav 47 dödsfall. Två svenska fall den senaste månaden Den 9 december gick Giftinformationscentralen i en artikel i läk

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Speech Decoded from Brain Activity in Area for Hand Control

The surprising finding comes courtesy of two study participants with implanted electrode arrays that record activity at single-neuron resolution.

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Purifying Water Through Biology

submitted by /u/TheLavinGuy [link] [comments]

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How to think about 3D printing in 2020

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Growing Human Neurons Connected to a Computer

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Did Kamala Harris's Staff Damage Her Vice-Presidential Chances?

For almost all of the current Democratic presidential candidates, Kamala Harris would, on paper, be a plausible—and in some cases, the ideal—running mate. She's a charismatic, relatively young senator who has demonstrated her skill at taking on Donald Trump's administration; she now has experience in nationally televised debates; and as a woman of color, she's an obvious demographic ticket-balanc

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TV watching is the lifestyle habit most strongly associated with obesity in children

ISGlobal team studies the role of five different lifestyle habits in the development of childhood overweight and obesity

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June rainfall in the lower Yangtze River Basin can be predicted four months ahead

A new study shows that the Met Office's operational seasonal forecasting system can predict June rainfall in the middle/lower Yangtze River basin up to four months in advance.

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Justified and unjustified movie violence evokes different brain responses, study finds

In a study, researchers find that scenes of justified and unjustified violence in movies activate different parts of the adolescent brain. The research is the first to show that when movie characters engage in violence that is seen as justified, there is a synchronized response among viewers in a part of the brain involved in moral evaluation, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, suggesting that vi

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New laser technique images quantum world in a trillionth of a second

For the first time, researchers have been able to record, frame-by-frame, how an electron interacts with certain atomic vibrations in a solid. The technique, reported in Science, captures a process that commonly causes electrical resistance in materials while, in others, can cause the absence of resistance, or superconductivity.

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New aluminium hydroxide stable at extremely high pressure

A new hydrous phase, ?-AlOOH, was observed to be stable at pressures above ?200 GPa. The stability of ?-AlOOH at extremely high pressures may affect the modelling results of the internal structure and deep water circulation of some extra-solar planets, such as terrestrial super-Earths, because the hydroxide may store water in these regions.

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UW scientist to lead upcoming NASA field study of East Coast snowstorms

To better understand large, disruptive snowstorms, a University of Washington atmospheric scientist will lead a NASA field campaign studying major East Coast snowstorms beginning Jan. 15. She will present the field campaign this week at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

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Ice in motion: Satellites capture decades of change

New time-lapse videos of Earth's glaciers and ice sheets as seen from space — some spanning nearly 50 years — are providing scientists with new insights into how the planet's frozen regions are changing.

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New stores in 'food deserts' don't change what people eat

Opening supermarkets in "food deserts" doesn't change the types of groceries people buy, research suggests. Research has shown that income is increasingly linked to health: Not only are today's richer Americans healthier than poorer ones, but the gap is wider than it was in the early 1990s. Studies have attributed this to food consumption, with better dietary quality associated with higher socioe

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How the Mandalorian Might See Through Walls

Mando's sci-fi ability might not be as crazy or outlandish as you think.

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The role of superstructure in first-cycle voltage loss in lithium-ion batteries

The 2019 Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded for the development of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. Akira Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery in 1985, and since they first entered the market in 1991, they have revolutionized our lives. Non-rechargeable batteries are based on chemical reactions that break down the electrodes. In lithium-ion cells, lithium ions flow r

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Cancer's 'addiction' could be a way to defeat it

Some cancers are hooked on particular molecules. New research with gastric cancer "organoids" lends credence to the idea that denying cancer these compounds could kill it. Elizabeth Vincan's research group was among a number to realize that some cancer cells always "switched on" specific genes that function in an ancient form of cell-to-cell communication. If researchers could find out what these

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How dust comes together to form planets

Researchers may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets. The research could also help improve industrial processes. In homes, adhesion on contact can cause fine particles to form dust bunnies. Similarly in outer space, adhesion causes dust particles to stick together. Large particles, however, can combine due to gravity—an essential process in forming asteroids and

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Sword-Covered "Ninja Bomb" Reportedly Used to Crush Terrorist

Ninja Bomb On Tuesday, jihadist leader Abu Ahmad al-Muhajir was traveling by car in Atmeh, Syria, when he was killed by a missile strike. Based on the aftermath of the attack, experts have told The Telegraph they suspect the United States military carried it out using an R9X missile — a weapon, evocatively nicknamed the "ninja bomb," that crushes its target like an anvil while slicing them up wit

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Silicon Valley's China Paradox: What It Is, and How It Will Shape the Future of Tech

Silicon Valley has long been the world leader in tech innovation. It's the cradle of startup culture, a hub for venture capital, and the home of dozens of global tech titans that are not only raking in billions of dollars, they're also influencing politics, culture, and lifestyles around the world—whether they intended to or not. The Valley's tech dominance has gone relatively unchallenged for de

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Scientists Pumped Ovarian Tissue Full of Sugar and Microwaved It. Here's Why

Though only tried in cat tissues so far, the technique could someday aid fertility preservation, wildlife conservation and more

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Porous polymers show remarkable stability at high pressure

Umeå physicists in collaboration with the Technical University of Dresden and Chalmers University are the first to show high stability of the porous nanomaterial COF-1. The study is published in Angewandte Chemie, Int. Ed.

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Randomised trials in economics: what the critics have to say

The 2019 Nobel Prize has been awarded to three scholars for pioneering recent attempts to answer microeconomic issues in development using randomised experiments.

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All Bitcoin mining should be environmentally friendly

The energy used to mine for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin is on par with the energy consumed by Ireland. Naoki Shibata reports a new blockchain algorithm, proof-of-search, that redirects the wasted energy to solve for optimization problems in fields such as medicine, space, and finance, all while preserving the anonymity and democratization of cryptocurrencies.

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Too many Canadians live with multiple chronic conditions, say UBC researchers

A lack of physical activity, a poor diet and too much stress are taking their toll on the health of Canadians, says a new UBC study.Researchers from UBC's Faculty of Medicine caution that too many Canadians live with a number of health issues that impact their ability to lead healthy lifestyles.

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Floral foam adds to microplastic pollution problem: Study

First study to examine the environmental effects of floral foam finds the plastic material, which breaks into tiny pieces, can be eaten by a range of freshwater and marine animals and affect their health.

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Spying on hippos with drones to help conservation efforts

A new UNSW study has shown that using a drone to film hippos in Africa is an effective, affordable tool for conservationists to monitor the threatened species' population from a safe distance, particularly in remote and aquatic areas.

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"Den Gamle Dame" har fløjet for sidste gang

Efter mere end 75 år på vingerne har DC3'eren med registrering OY-BPB sat hjulene på landingsbanen for sidste gang og er kørt i hangar. Foreningen bag mangler penge til to ny motorer.

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Scientists are designing accelerators that one day could help clean the environment

It's been 30 years since a pilot project in Miami-Dade County found that blasting wastewater with electrons could clean it up, removing all kinds of nasty stuff, from mircroorganisms to harsh chemicals.

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New research tracing the development of the world's vital non-living nature

The health and wellbeing of humans is underpinned by the natural world. Living nature in the form of ecosystems and biodiversity is the world's life support system. It is crucial, but under threat.

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Liquid crystal monomers used in LCDs found to be potentially persistent and bio-accumulative

A team of researchers from China and Canada has found that liquid crystal monomers (LCMs) used in LCDs could potentially be persistent and bioaccumulative. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their survey on industry products that have LCMs and what they found.

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The dark side of plant-based food—it's more about money than you may think

If you were to believe newspapers and dietary advice leaflets, you'd probably think that doctors and nutritionists are the people guiding us through the thicket of what to believe when it comes to food. But food trends are far more political – and economically motivated—than it seems.

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A mobile phone for Christmas doesn't mean less family time for teenagers

Phones, tablets and laptops are usually at the top of many teenage wish lists at Christmas. But parents often worry that giving their children a mobile phone might mean they never see them again. Will they stay locked away in their room for the whole Christmas break? It turns out that might not be such a bad thing.

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How to induce magnetism in graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional structure made of carbon, is a material with excellent mechanical, electronic and optical properties. However, it did not seem suitable for magnetic applications. Together with international partners, Empa researchers have now succeeded in synthesizing a unique nanographene predicted in the 1970s, which conclusively demonstrates that carbon in very specific forms has ma

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Studying the wake of reflected shockwaves reveals the cascade of chemical reactions involved in combustion

The hot, sometimes high-pressure, yet smooth conditions behind reflected shockwaves are the ideal environment for studying the chemical complexities of combustion.

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Bridge protection in catastrophic earthquakes

Bridges are the most vulnerable parts of a transport network when earthquakes occur, obstructing emergency response, search and rescue missions and aid delivery, increasing potential fatalities.

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Brain function abnormal in children with Type 1 diabetes, Stanford-led study finds

Children with Type 1 diabetes show subtle but important differences in brain function compared with those who don't have the disease, a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown.

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Study gathers the first observation of leptonic decay D+→τ+ντ

The Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) collaboration, a large team of researchers from universities worldwide conducting particle physics studies has recently reported the first observation of the leptonic decay D+→τ+ντ. This observation, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, opens up the possibility of additional tests of mu/tau universality in D decays.

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Banedanmark starter undersøgelse: Hvordan klarer vi os uden Roundup?

Hvis bevoksningen ikke skal overtage de danske skinner, skal Banedanmark enten fortsætte bruge sprøjtemidlet glyphosat eller finde en afløser. Banelegemerne tager i dag imod 82 pct. af det offentlige forbrug af sprøjtemidlet.

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Floral foam adds to microplastic pollution problem

As the cut flower industry hits one of its busiest periods, new research has shown that the water-absorbing green floral foam used by florists is contributing to the world's microplastic problem.

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Benefits and risks for marine life from carbon dioxide removal approaches

A new IMAS study has identified potential benefits and risks for marine ecosystems from two of the key approaches for carbon removal proposed to cut atmospheric carbon levels and slow climate change.

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Machine learning can help us understand conversations about death

Researchers have used machine learning and natural language processing to better understand what end-of-life conversations look like. Borrowing techniques used to study fiction, where machine learning algorithms analyze manuscripts to identify story types, the researchers identified several common elements in these conversations. That knowledge could eventually help healthcare practitioners unders

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Computer game may help to predict reuse of opioids

A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03733-8 How Nature reported a boost for research into human intestinal protozoa in 1919, and a European celebration of conservation in 1969.

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Researchers discover mysterious holes in the seafloor off Central California

During a recent survey of the deep seafloor off Big Sur, MBARI researchers discovered thousands of mysterious holes or pits in the seafloor. Scientists and resource managers want to understand how these pits formed because this area is the site of a proposed wind-energy farm. Researchers Eve Lundsten and Charles Paull describe their discovery this week at the Fall 2019 meeting of the American Geop

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Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life

New research from Michigan State University conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time.

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Loneliness may be due to increasing aging population

Despite some claims that Americans are in the midst of a 'loneliness epidemic,' older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from previous generations — there just might be more of them, according to a pair of studies published by the American Psychological Association.

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Otago researchers discover new viral strategy to escape detection

University of Otago researchers have discovered how viruses that specifically kill bacteria can outwit bacteria by hiding from their defences, findings which are important for the development of new antimicrobials based on viruses and provide a significant advance in biological knowledge.

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So-called junk DNA hides useful compounds

Bio-Protection Research Centre scientists and collaborators have made a discovery that potentially opens the door to new medicines and biological pesticides.

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So-called junk DNA hides useful compounds

Bio-Protection Research Centre scientists and collaborators have made a discovery that potentially opens the door to new medicines and biological pesticides.

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A Man Saved Hundreds of Lives. Then He Was Vilified for It.

To Clint Eastwood, heroism is a heavy load. As a movie star, he is best known for playing antiheroes such as the Man With No Name and Dirty Harry—characters who stalked across the screen with grim menace, as if burdened by the good they had to do in a dark and angry world. As a director, Eastwood has had a long and varied career, but of late, he's been captivated by real-life American champions,

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Scientists Create Bone-Inspired Structure for Stronger 3D Printing

Most people will break at least one bone in their lifetimes, but just think about all the stress your bones experience without breaking. Scientists from Cornell University, Purdue University, and Case Western Reserve University have taken inspiration from bone to create more durable 3D-printed structures. This could eventually make 3D printing viable for high-stakes applications like construction

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Stretchy and squeezy soft sensors one step closer thanks to new bonding method

Bioengineers have found a way to create stretchy and squeezy soft sensing devices by bonding rubber to electrical components.

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Study: Most American do not believe less discrimination against blacks means more against whites

A pair of researchers at Brock University in Canada has found evidence showing that most Americans do not believe less discrimination against black people means more against white people. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, Megan Earle and Gordon Hodson describe how they looked at issues related to racial discrimination in the U.S. and what they found.

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Ice in motion: Satellites view decades of change

New time-lapse videos of Earth's glaciers and ice sheets as seen from space—some spanning nearly 50 years—are providing scientists with new insights into how the planet's frozen regions are changing.

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Physicists image electrons flowing like water for the first time

Physicists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have imaged electrons flowing viscously through a nanodevice, just like water flowing through a pipe. Long predicted but only now visualized for the first time, this curious new behavior for electrons has important implications for future electronic devices.

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Traveling back in time through smart archaeology

The British explorer George Dennis once wrote, "Vulci is a city whose very name … was scarcely remembered, but which now, for the enormous treasures of antiquity it has yielded, is exalted above every other city of the ancient world." He's correct in assuming that most people do not know where or what Vulci is, but for explorers and historians—including Duke's Bass Connections team Smart Archaeolo

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3 theories why asteroid Bennu is spewing bits

There are three possible explanations for the particles that asteroid Bennu is tossing into space, say scientists behind NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. Shortly after OSIRIS-REx arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space. The ongoing examination of Bennu and the sample

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Industry Must Team up With Government to Keep America on Top

The Federal government takes on early investment risks that venture capital won't take, underwriting industry and the future.

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To save koalas from fire, we need to start putting their genetic material on ice

Thousands of koalas may have died in fires burning through New South Wales but expert evidence to a state parliamentary inquiry on Monday said we are unlikely to ever know the real numbers.

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The problem with transport models is political abuse, not their use in planning

Transport models are often singled out as a barrier to providing more sustainable and equitable transport services. However, abandoning transport models would most likely weaken planning, not enhance it. But getting the best out of such modelling requires transparency to overcome the increasing problem of its misuse to justify predetermined political decisions.

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To save koalas from fire, we need to start putting their genetic material on ice

Thousands of koalas may have died in fires burning through New South Wales but expert evidence to a state parliamentary inquiry on Monday said we are unlikely to ever know the real numbers.

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The Hype Problem

This paper is right, and it says things that need to be said. I wonder, though, if saying them will do any good. Let me explain what the heck I'm talking about! The paper is titled " Blocking the Hype-Hypocrisy-Falsification-Fakery Pathway is Needed to Safeguard Science ", and I don't see how anyone can really disagree. When do the exuberant joy human beings naturally feel in a discovery, and the

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Why were tourists allowed on White Island?

The official death toll remains at five, and eight people are still missing, presumed to have died in yesterday's volcanic eruption at Whakaari/White Island.

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Game theory experiment exposes trust issues in political campaigning

Despite the public debate about trust in politics, a new economics study reveals that candidates who say one thing on the campaign trail and do another when in office may have a greater chance of getting elected.

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Laser beams in plasma clarify path toward fusion

New research addresses one of the challenges in the longstanding quest to achieve fusion. The work will enhance the accuracy of computer models used in simulations of laser-driven implosions. In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as those conducted at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), short beams consisting of intense pulses of ligh

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Research explores state of migrant worker protections

Federal protections lacking in clarity, accessibility and enforcement are leaving thousands of migrant workers across Canada open to exploitation, and in some cases putting their health and lives at risk to maintain employment, according to a Western researcher.

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New aluminum hydroxide stable at extremely high pressure

A new hydrous phase, ε-AlOOH, was observed to be stable at pressures above 200 GPa. The stability of ε-AlOOH at extremely high pressures may affect the modeling results of the internal structure and deep water circulation of some extra-solar planets, such as terrestrial super-Earths, because the hydroxide may store water in these regions.

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Scientists develop a truck to produce biofertilizer

Organic fertilizers could hold the key to transforming Europe´s agriculture forever. A new EU-funded project now aims to build a production plant on a truck to give every farmer the opportunity to easily access natural fertilizers. The researchers of the initiative—NOMAD—want to use fermentation residue, or digestate, a by-product of energy production in a biogas plant. This will allow them to rec

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Digital economy's environmental footprint is threatening the planet

Modern society has given significant attention to the promises of the digital economy over the past decade. But it has given little attention to its negative environmental footprint.

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Would it have been possible to predict the New Zealand volcano eruption?

The agency that monitors geological activity in New Zealand, GeoNet, had issued warnings that a volcano off the country's North Island was showing signs of "moderate volcanic unrest" but it might not have been possible to predict that it would suddenly erupt on Monday, according to Daniel Douglass, a geologist at Northeastern.

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Study debunks the myth that an imposed floor on alcohol prices would punish the poor

There is no evidence that a minimum unit price on alcohol as a deterrent against binge drinking would effectively make the poor poorer, an ARC-funded UNSW study has found.

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The X17 factor: A particle new to physics might solve the dark matter mystery

A team of scientists in Hungary recently published a paper that hints at the existence of a previously unknown subatomic particle. The team first reported finding traces of the particle in 2016, and they now report more traces in a different experiment.

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Expert discusses the global carbon budget

The Global Carbon Project recently released its 2019 annual report, giving decision-makers access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain is among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with Jain about this year's findings.

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It's time to stop viewing dating apps as a risk, experts report

Australians using online dating apps understand the risks involved and are sharing new skills for pursuing safe interactions, an Australia-wide report has found.

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New understanding of charge transport reveals an exotic quantum mechanical regime

In work that may have broad implications for the development of new materials for electronics, Caltech scientists for the first time have developed a way to predict how electrons interacting strongly with atomic motions will flow through a complex material. To do so, they relied only on principles from quantum mechanics and developed an accurate new computational method.

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How are local dry lakes impacting air quality and human health?

The Great Salt Lake reached historic low levels in recent years and continues to dry as a result of drought and water diversions. As water levels decrease, the exposed area of dry lakebed increases, creating major sources of mineral dust. Declining water levels are a major concern for scientists and the general public alike, but air quality is often overlooked as one of the potentially harmful con

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New tool predicts three-dimensional organization of human chromosomes

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a computational tool that can accurately predict the three-dimensional interactions between regions of human chromosomes.

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Lithium can now be recycled

Lithium from Norwegian electric car batteries isn't recycled that often. Instead, it ends up as waste when other metals it's mixed with are recycled. But this may change.

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Spying on hippos with drones to help conservation efforts

A new UNSW study has shown that using a drone to film hippos in Africa is an effective, affordable tool for conservationists to monitor the threatened species' population from a safe distance, particularly in remote and aquatic areas.

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In a war perceived as just, many Americans excuse war criminals

Almost half of the American public believes that soldiers who have killed innocent people should not be put in prison if they are fighting for a just cause, Stanford political scientist Scott Sagan finds.

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Sailing stone track discovered 'hiding in plain sight' in dinosaur fossil

A sandstone slab prized for its detailed dinosaur footprints may also contain the track of a sailing stone or "walking rock." Paleontologist Paul Olsen from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory announced this discovery in a presentation at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union on Monday. He and his colleagues think the trail of the walking rock is evidence of a brief freezing event in the trop

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A new way to regulate gene expression

Sometimes, unexpected research results are simply due to experimental error. Other times, it's the opposite—the scientists have uncovered a new phenomenon that reveals an even more accurate portrayal of our bodies and our universe, overturning well-established assumptions. Indeed, many great biological discoveries are made when results defy expectation.

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New tool predicts three-dimensional organization of human chromosomes

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a computational tool that can accurately predict the three-dimensional interactions between regions of human chromosomes.

4h

Spying on hippos with drones to help conservation efforts

A new UNSW study has shown that using a drone to film hippos in Africa is an effective, affordable tool for conservationists to monitor the threatened species' population from a safe distance, particularly in remote and aquatic areas.

4h

A new way to regulate gene expression

Sometimes, unexpected research results are simply due to experimental error. Other times, it's the opposite—the scientists have uncovered a new phenomenon that reveals an even more accurate portrayal of our bodies and our universe, overturning well-established assumptions. Indeed, many great biological discoveries are made when results defy expectation.

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Brain patterns can predict speech of words and syllables

Neurons in the brain's motor cortex previously thought of as active mainly during hand and arm movements also light up during speech in a way that is similar to patterns of brain activity linked to these movements, suggest new findings published today in eLife.

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Raising research quality will require collective action

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03750-7 Institutions must act together to reform research culture, says Marcus Munafò.

4h

Better estimating snowfall depth remotely

Precipitation that falls on the ground in liquid form can be measured with relatively high accuracy. As soon as it turns to snowfall, however, various difficulties arise. For mountain regions, the amount of snow is an important piece of information. It serves to estimate the danger of avalanches, to plan road clearance or to determine meltwater quantities that have a major influence on hydro-elect

5h

Stardust from red giants

Some of the Earth's building material was stardust from red giants, researchers from ETH Zurich have established. They have also explained why the Earth contains more of this stardust than the asteroids or the planet Mars, which are farther from the sun.

5h

It's time to start paying attention to Nipah virus

Fruit bats are the natural hosts for the virus, but humans can pass it to one another. We've known about Nipah virus—and that it could cause a global pandemic—for twenty years. But we're still in the first stages of fighting it. There's "currently no specific drugs or vaccines for Nipah virus infection," Linfa Wang, a bat-borne virus expert at Duke University's Global Health Institute and confere

5h

De skapar styrbara plasmoner i plast

Forskare vid Linköpings universitet har tagit fram optiska nanoantenner i en ledande polymer. Antennerna som kan stängas av och sättas på öppnar för en helt ny typ av styrbar nanooptik. Plasmoner uppkommer när ljus interagerar med metalliska nanopartiklar. Det infallande ljuset startar en kollektiv oscillation, gemensam rörelse fram och tillbaka, av elektronerna i partiklarna. Det är den kollekti

5h

Muscle weakness after sepsis linked to mitochondrial dysfunction

Damage to energy-producing mitochondria may underlie prolonged muscle weakness following a sepsis-like condition in mice, according to a new study published today in eLife.

5h

Image of the Day: Bespectacled Mantis

Insects wearing 3-D glasses detect computer-generated prey.

5h

Watching a drug in action: Precise action anti-cancer drugs in the cell clarified

Scientists from Utrecht University have applied advanced microscopy to visualize the activity of the widely used drug Taxol. Taxol is often used in cancer chemotherapy. A better understanding of the precise action of the drug offers starting points for less toxic therapies. The scientists, together with international colleagues, have published their findings in Nature Materials.

5h

Ny bog: Læger skal klædes bedre på til at ændre folks adfærd

Langt de fleste patienter ved allerede, hvad der er det rigtige at gøre og bliver ikke raske af, at lægen blot gentager de sunde budskaber. Speciallæge i almen medicin Imran Rashid mener, at læger bør klædes på med bevidsthedsforskning og adfærdsdesign, så de kan hjælpe patienterne i stedet for blot at skabe skyld og skam.

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Lost Ethiopian town comes from an ancient empire that rivalled Rome

The buried town of Beta Samati in Ethiopia was once part of the Empire of Aksum, which dominated East Africa for centuries and traded with the Roman Empire

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Plant 'conductor genes' guide growing roots

New research lifts the veil on the "conductor" plant root stem cell gene. The gene helps orchestrate and coordinate stem cell division of different root stem cell types, ensuring the harmonic communication necessary for plant growth and maintenance. Corresponding author Ross Sozzani, an associate professor of plant and microbial biology at North Carolina State University, says that the conductor

5h

Immunotherapy drug improves outcomes for some children with relapsed leukemia

New findings from a clinical trial show that treatment with the immunotherapy drug blinatumomab is superior to standard chemotherapy for children and young adults with high- or intermediate-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that has relapsed. Those treated with blinatumomab had longer survival, experienced fewer severe side effects, had a higher rate of undetectable residual disease

5h

Därför får fiskar vitaminbrist

Fiskarna i Östersjön har periodvis drabbats av brist på vitamin B1 (tiamin), med neurologiska skador och död som följd. Varför är fortfarande okänt. Nu har forskare undersökt bakteriers och växtplanktons roll i dramat. Alla organismer behöver vitamin B1, eller tiamin. I havsmiljön produceras tiamin av bakterier och växtplankton och förs sedan vidare via djurplankton till mindre fiskar och slutlig

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Paraidrottare – dubbel kamp mot skador och sjukdomar

Parasporten växer sig allt starkare världen över. Men bakom det Paralympics vi ser från tv-sofforna finns större utmaningar än de rent resultatmässiga. En ny avhandling från Lunds universitet visar hur paraidrottare både löper risk att skadas av den hårda träningen i sig och att drabbas av skador och sjukdomar på grund av funktionsnedsättningen.

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The gene-based hack that is revolutionizing epidemiology

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03754-3 Mendelian randomization offers a simple way to distinguish causation from correlation. But are scientists overusing it?

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Nyt forskningsprojekt skal fortælle De små Antillers indbyrdes historie

I historiebøgerne er øerne i det østlige Caribien, De små Antiller, blevet set som…

6h

Our Predictions About the Internet Are Probably Wrong

Alex Merto N ot long ago , I stopped by the Morgan Library, in Manhattan, to pay a visit to the Gutenberg Bible on display within a cube of glass in the Morgan's tower­ing East Room. Gutenberg Bibles are among the rarest of printed books—about 50 copies are scattered around the world. At the time of their production, in Mainz in the 1450s, Gutenberg Bibles were of course the most common printed b

6h

Don't Panic about AI

Instead, focus on making artificial intelligence controllable and responsive to human needs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Apple MacBook Pro Review (2019, 16-Inch): A Return to Form

The new MacBook Pro is a little boring, but after years of misfires in Apple's laptop lineup, the machine reliably gets the job done.

6h

The FCC's Push to Purge Huawei From US Networks

The rural carriers who rely on Huawei are wary of a costly "rip and replace" effort.

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Amazon, Google, Microsoft: Here's Who Has the Greenest Cloud

A WIRED report card on the top three cloud providers shows how their environmental claims stack up.

6h

Don't Panic about AI

Instead, focus on making artificial intelligence controllable and responsive to human needs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

IT-Universitetet udvider: Skal have plads til flere studerende

Universitetet lejer lokaler hos naboerne i DR Byen.

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»Øget aktivitet« siden oktober: Newzealandsk vulkan gav små advarsler om muligt udbrud

Vulkanologer kalder typen af vulkanudbrud på den newzealandske ø mandag for almindelig, men den er også meget svær at forudsige.

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DNA site GEDmatch sold to firm helping US police solve crime

One of the world's biggest genealogy websites has been bought by a company that provides law enforcement agencies with genomic sequencing technology for forensic DNA work

6h

A nanotube material conducts heat in just one direction

Asymmetric conductors could revolutionize cooling systems for computers and other devices.

6h

Rundspørge: Ventilationen er for ringe i mere end hver anden daginstitution

Mange børn opholder sig i institutioner, hvor der ikke er tilstrækkelig ventilation til at sikre et godt indeklima. Forældre bør presse kommunerne, mener boligminister Kaare Dybvad.

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If Ukraine Is Impeachable, What's Afghanistan?

As the House Judiciary Committee drafts articles of impeachment intended to remove President Donald Trump from office, let us pause to reflect on the subject of relative malfeasance. Allow me to stipulate that Trump is unfit for office. He is a coarse, vulgar, and dishonest demagogue. Yet I want to suggest that his transgressions, while notable, pale in comparison with a far greater crime that un

6h

Trayvon Martin's Killer Has a Financial Grievance

In the latest turn in a long, ugly saga, George Zimmerman, the volunteer neighborhood watchman who was acquitted of second-degree murder after shooting Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012, recently filed a lawsuit in which he presents himself as the victim of injustice and seeks recompense for his losses. The killing of Trayvon, who was 17, led to a national outpouring of anger—over Florida's "stan

6h

The 18 Best Albums of 2019

Though Kanye West hovered over 2019 like a sentient burial shroud, other artists took a less self-hagiographic approach to their projects and personas. This has been a year of longing, unease, and collective reaches toward a more hopeful future. So perhaps fittingly, our three music writers' picks on this best-albums list shift between total doom and quiet optimism. Young turks FKA Twigs, Magdale

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Triggered by Donald Trump Jr.

When Donald Trump Jr.'s book, Triggered , leapt to the top of The New York Times ' best-seller list a few weeks ago, alert observers noticed something odd—odder even than the thought of Donald Trump Jr. writing a book. Next to the listed title was the image of a dagger. What it signified was unclear. Was it a sly commentary by the Times' obsessively Trumpophobic editorial staff? I had read the bo

6h

The Millennials-Versus-Boomers Fight Divides the Democratic Party

The United States is a fortress of gerontocracy besieged by a youth rebellion. America's leaders are old—very old. The average age in Congress has never been higher , and our national leaders are all approaching 80. Nancy Pelosi was born in 1940, Mitch McConnell came along in 1942, and Donald Trump, the baby of this power trio, followed in 1946, making him several weeks older than his predecessor

6h

Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment

Scientists report progress using gene therapy to treat sickle cell disease, a common and devastating genetic blood disorder.

7h

Cops see an encryption problem. Spyware makers see an opportunity.

The Trump administration is once again pushing for access to encrypted data. But some intelligence companies are selling a sneakier route around protection.

7h

Why the 'Queen of Shitty Robots' Renounced Her Crown

YouTuber Simone Giertz gave up wildly popular but barely functioning machines and confronted her fears of imperfection (while facing her own mortality and making an awesome Truckla EV).

7h

'Soulmates do not exist': the surprising rise of wedding therapy

In our new era of 'romantic realism', more and more couples are seeking out counselling before they get married, rather than waiting for impossible problems to arise When Thomas and Jenny approached a couples therapist before their wedding, they weren't expecting it to become a long-term commitment. "Initially we decided to see a counsellor due to some trust issues in our relationship," he says. "

7h

'Exceptionally silly mistakes': PLOS ONE flags two papers by Cambridge researcher for image issues

A researcher at the University of Cambridge has had two papers subjected to expressions of concern by the editors of PLOS ONE for image problems. The expressions of concern for "The Coordination of Cell Growth during Fission Yeast Mating Requires Ras1-GTP Hydrolysis" and "The Role of the RACK1 Ortholog Cpc2p in Modulating Pheromone-Induced Cell Cycle … Continue reading

7h

Lost Ethiopian town comes from a forgotten empire that rivalled Rome

The buried town of Beta Samati in Ethiopia was once part of the Empire of Aksum, which dominated east Africa for centuries and traded with the Roman Empire

7h

To Boost Mental Health, Spend Time in 'Blue' Spaces

In recent years, researchers have increasingly realized that spending time in green spaces like parks and forests can improve psychological well-being and increase social engagement. Now, it's time for "blue" spaces — water settings like lakes, waterfronts, and even urban fountains — to get their due.

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Heat Exposure and Global Air Conditioning

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Minister lader politiet efterforske bombesager med dna fra forskningsdatabase

PLUS. Efter sommerens bombeanslag mod Skattestyrelsen vil regeringen nu sikre, at sprængninger mod offentlige bygninger bliver omfattet af terrorloven. Det åbner for, at politiet vil kunne bruge Nationalt Genom Centers database til at efterforske lignende sager.

7h

Ultrakalla molekyler avslöjar sin dolda förening

Kemister vet vad som går in i en kemisk reaktion, och vad som kommer ut – men det som händer precis i övergången när nya molekyler bildas är oftast som en svart låda som inte går att se in i. En amerikansk forskargrupp har nu lyckats följa en kemisk reaktion och urskilja mellantillståndet på vägen från det ursprungliga ämnet till slutlig produkt.

7h

Lande planter falske hacking-beviser: »En false flag-teknik behøver ikke være perfekt for at være effektiv«

Vi vil se en tendens, hvor flere lande forsøger at få det til at se ud, som om nogle andre står bag et cyberangreb, mener sikkerhedsforsker.

7h

Is Earth Getting Bigger Over Time?

The planet is a magnet for stuff: space dust, dead leaves, old refrigerators. Is all that mass adding up?

7h

Evaluating Italy's ranking boom

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03808-6

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A heliocentric epic, volcanic viniculture, and cartoon chemistry: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03757-0 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

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Research group takes down controversial Indonesia fire analysis

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03771-2 The government had criticized the claim that more than 1.6 million hectares were burnt this year.

7h

Air pollution — don't dismiss proven protection

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03809-5

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Supremacy is for racists — use 'quantum advantage'

Nature, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03781-0

7h

Carfilzomib forlænger tiden til tilbagefald for patienter med myelomatose

Behandling med Carfilzomib inden anden omgang højdosis melphalan med stamcelletransplantation til patienter med myelomatose forlænger tiden indtil andet tilbagefald, viser ny dansk forskning.

7h

MRD kan guide lægers behandling af patienter med CLL

Ny dansk forskning viser, at læger kan benytte målinger af MRD til hele tiden at holde fingeren på pulsen i forhold til behandling af patienter med tilbagevendt eller behandlingsgenstridig CLL.

7h

Deciphering protein evolution and fitness landscapes with latent space models

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13633-0 Multiple sequence alignments of proteins carry information about evolution, the protein's fitness landscape and its stability in the face of mutations. Here, the authors demonstrate the utility of latent space models learned using variational autoencoders to infer these properties from sequences.

8h

Author Correction: Economic value of protected areas via visitor mental health

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13619-y

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In vivo pressure gradient heterogeneity increases flow contribution of small diameter vessels in grapevine

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13673-6 Plants require long-distance water transport to avoid desiccation. Here, via μCT and MRI of grapevine stem, Bouda et al. show evidence of pressure gradient heterogeneity and flow redirection from wide to narrow vessels that suggests narrow vessels contribute more to xylem sap flow than previously appreciated

8h

TRPML1 links lysosomal calcium to autophagosome biogenesis through the activation of the CaMKKβ/VPS34 pathway

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13572-w It was known that prolonged TRMPL1 activation induces TFEB translocation and upregulates autophagic gene regulation. Here, the authors show that acute TRMPL1 activation also induces autophagy through VPS34 and by lysosomal calcium release independent of TFEB.

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Sensory innervation in porous endplates by Netrin-1 from osteoclasts mediates PGE2-induced spinal hypersensitivity in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13476-9 Spinal pain is a major clinical problem. Here the authors show that osteoclasts create porous area of endplates of the vertebrae and sensory innervation of porous endplates by Netrin-1 release from osteoclasts mediates PGE2-induced spinal hypersensitivity in mice.

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Metabolic balancing by miR-276 shapes the mosquito reproductive cycle and Plasmodium falciparum development

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13627-y Plasmodium growth is adapted to the reproductive cycle of mosquitoes, but underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, Lampe et al. show that the blood-meal induced miR-276 balances the termination of the mosquito amino acid catabolism and egg development, providing nutrients for Plasmodium sporozoite developmen

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Leptin induces TNFα-dependent inflammation in acquired generalized lipodystrophy and combined Crohn's disease

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13559-7 The adipokine leptin modulates intestinal inflammation in mice. Here the authors describe a patient with inflammatory bowel disease and lipodystrophy, providing evidence that leptin aggravates intestinal inflammation with proinflammatory effects on leukocytes that are reversible by TNFα blockade.

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Atlas of quantitative single-base-resolution N6-methyl-adenine methylomes

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13561-z N6-methyladenosine (m6A) and N6,2′-O-dimethyladenosine (m6Am) are eukaryotic mRNA modifications. Here the authors develop m6A-Crosslinking-Exonuclease-sequencing to map quantitative methylome changes at single-base-resolution after individually knocking out each known methyltransferase or demethylase.

8h

SpaceX will test making Starlink satellites less shiny to appease angry astronomers

After facing complaints from scientists about its satellites ruining the night sky, SpaceX wants to experiment with a new coating to make them less bright.

8h

Macrophage Mannose Receptor CD206 Predicts Prognosis in Community-acquired Pneumonia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55289-2

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Manually curated genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network of Bacillus megaterium DSM319

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55041-w

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Selective Effects of Thioridazine on Self-Renewal of Basal-Like Breast Cancer Cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55145-3

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The effects of surface albedo and initial lignin concentration on photodegradation of two varieties of Sorghum bicolor litter

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55272-x

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Major sources and monthly variations in the release of land-derived marine debris from the Greater Jakarta area, Indonesia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55065-2

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Ambiguity Processing Bias Induced by Depressed Mood Is Associated with Diminished Pleasantness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55277-6

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The 'slow earthquakes' that we cannot feel may help protect against the devastating ones

Earthquakes are sudden and their shaking can be devastating. But about 20 years ago, a new type of earthquake was discovered. We cannot feel them, and geologists still know very little about them, such as how often they occur.

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White Island: A look inside New Zealand's most active volcano

New Zealand's White Island exploded suddenly on Monday and almost instantly became the scene of unimaginable horror, but as the country's most active volcano a disaster was not entirely unexpected.

8h

Bayer targets climate-neutral business by 2030

German chemical and pharmaceutical giant Bayer said Tuesday it aims to become "climate-neutral" by 2030, slashing or compensating all of its greenhouse gas emissions.

8h

Wheelchairs On Planes: Why Can't Passengers Use Their Own Onboard?

Many buses and vans can safely accommodate and restrain a passenger's wheelchair, but airline passengers are required to transfer to the plane's standard seat. A grassroots group hopes to change that. (Image credit: Jon Hicks/Getty Images)

8h

Risikoen for asparaginase-induceret pankreatit stiger efter femårsalderen

Asparaginase kan redde ALL-patienters liv, men det er balancering på et knivsæg for de ptienter, som udvikler asparaginase-relateret pankreatit. Ny forskning viser, hvem der er i størst risiko.

8h

God overlevelse for patienter med sjælden kræftsygdom

En diagnose med Burtkitt lymfom er ikke ensbetydende med en dødsdom. Specielt unge patienter har gode muligheder for at overleve sygdomme.

8h

We need to wake up to the potential threat from microplastics

The 8 billion tonnes of plastic we have manufactured over the past century or so will break up but not biodegrade – with possible implications for our health

8h

Selvforsynende sensor skal opdage rustne betonarmeringer

PLUS. Forskere fra Aarhus Universitet udvikler ny ultralydssensor, der opdager korrosion i det armeringstål, som holder sammen på store betonbroer. Udfordringen er at udvikle en sensor med en levetid på over 100 år.

9h

Revered by Aztecs, Mexican hairless dog in style again in hipster era

At a stately museum in Mexico City, priceless paintings by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera share pride of place with an unruly pack of hairless black dogs: Mexico's prized xoloitzcuintle.

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Revered by Aztecs, Mexican hairless dog in style again in hipster era

At a stately museum in Mexico City, priceless paintings by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera share pride of place with an unruly pack of hairless black dogs: Mexico's prized xoloitzcuintle.

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Toxic bushfire haze blankets eastern Australia

Toxic haze blanketed Sydney Tuesday triggering a chorus of smoke alarms to ring across the city, as "severe" weather conditions fuelled deadly bush blazes.

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Brazil milks deadly snakes for their life-saving venom

Gripping the deadly snake behind its jaws, Fabiola de Souza massages its venom glands to squeeze out drops that will save lives around Brazil where thousands of people are bitten every year.

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Brazil milks deadly snakes for their life-saving venom

Gripping the deadly snake behind its jaws, Fabiola de Souza massages its venom glands to squeeze out drops that will save lives around Brazil where thousands of people are bitten every year.

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In Sweden's Arctic, global warming threatens reindeer herds

Thick reindeer fur boots and a fur hat covering most of his face shielded Niila Inga from minus 20-degree Celsius (minus 4-degree Fahrenheit) winds as he raced his snowmobile up to a mountain top overlooking his reindeer in the Swedish arctic.

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Could dark carbon be hiding the true scale of ocean 'dead zones'?

Dead zones within the world's oceans—where there is almost no oxygen to sustain life—could be expanding far quicker than currently thought, a new study suggests.

10h

Supplements with Multiple Ingredients, Many with No Apparent Rationale

Dietary. supplements frequently have multiple ingredients, often mixtures of vitamins, minerals, and herbs. The rationale for including each ingredient is questionable, to say the least.

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Stretchy and squeezy soft sensors one step closer thanks to new bonding method

Imperial College London bioengineers have found a way to create stretchy and squeezy soft sensing devices by bonding rubber to electrical components.

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Consider soil in fall-applied ammonia rates, study says

Fall-applied anhydrous ammonia may not fulfill as much of corn's nitrogen needs as previously assumed. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the effectiveness of the practice depends on the soil.

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Research shows ramping up carbon capture could be key to mitigating climate change

As the world gathers in Madrid to discuss how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a newly released study makes the case that trapping emissions underground could go a long way toward solving the problem.

10h

One-third of Americans use news sources they consider less reliable

One-third of Americans rely on news platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly social media and peers. The other two-thirds of the public consider their primary news sources trustworthy, mainly print news and broadcast television, according to a new RAND Corporation report.

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Stretchy and squeezy soft sensors one step closer thanks to new bonding method

Imperial College London bioengineers have found a way to create stretchy and squeezy soft sensing devices by bonding rubber to electrical components.

10h

Seafloor scar of Bikini A-bomb test still visible

Seventy-three years after the first underwater nuclear explosion, scientists return to map the site.

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Whakaari / White Island's Disaster Reminds Us of the Dangers of Active Volcanoes

A relatively small eruption on a New Zealand island volcano created an outsized tragedy. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Do You Know When It's Time to Break Up? Here's The Research

Christmas is a time for giving… and breaking up.

11h

Lyme disease claim lines increased 117% from 2007 to 2018

From 2007 to 2018, claim lines with diagnoses of Lyme disease increased nationally 117%. The new FAIR Health Study Uncovers Geographic, Age and Gender Variation, among Other Notable Statistics. Comparing Lyme disease to other tick-borne diseases, the study draws on data from FAIR Health's comprehensive repository of over 29 billion private healthcare claim records — the largest in the country.

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Why British Jews Are Worried by Jeremy Corbyn

It is an astonishing statistic: Some 87 percent of British Jews believe that Jeremy Corbyn—one of two men who could be prime minister in a few days' time—is anti-Semitic. How did we get here? Corbyn's party, Labour, has strong connections with the Jewish community, dating back to its earliest days. Yet a deep distrust has developed between the two since he became Labour leader in 2015, and the is

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Clemson geneticists identify small molecules that are potential indicators for disease

Clemson researchers identified hundreds of metabolites that might serve as intermediates to translate variation in the genome to variation in complex traits. Findings could someday facilitate early or more accurate diagnosis of illnesses detected by metabolite variation.

12h

Could dark carbon be hiding the true scale of ocean 'dead zones'?

The impact of climate change on the world's oceans is becoming increasingly known but new research suggests current computer models could be omitting a crucial piece of evidence when it comes to assessing the scale of ocean dead zones.

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One-third of Americans use news sources they consider less reliable

One-third of Americans rely on news platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly social media and peers. The other two-thirds of the public consider their primary news sources trustworthy, mainly print news and broadcast television, according to a new RAND Corporation report.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 10. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Jobs of the future are clustering in a handful of U.S. cities, study finds

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New tech can see through walls, ID people by the way they walk

submitted by /u/TobySomething [link] [comments]

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Common genetic link between autism and Tourette's impairs brain communication

Scientists have discovered how a genetic alteration that increases the risk of developing Autism and Tourette's impacts on the brain.Their research also suggests that ketamine, or related drugs, may be a useful treatment for both of these disorders.Deletion of the Neurexin1 gene affects brain areas involved in Autism and Tourette's including the thalamus, a collection of brain regions that play a

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Become a speed-reading machine: Read dozens of books next year

Speed reading training can double, or even triple your reading speed in 30 days. Results can be seen with just minutes of practice each day. Training also focuses on memory retention and skill acquisition. None It's all about what you know. Unless you've got the voice of an angel or can drain jumpers like Steph Curry, your path to a lucrative, satisfying career will likely come from knowing more

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Promising travel translation devices you can buy right now

Communicate better on your travels. (Erik Odiinv/) In a perfect world, we would all speak every language known to humanity and could wander the world with little communication difficulties. Even two or three languages would do, really. If you're heading to foreign country and need to brush up on the local language (or are just somebody who loves learning new languages), travel translators and tra

14h

Five things to get you started scrapbooking

Scrapbooks are photo albums gilded with personal details. They're truly a labor of love. (Vladimir Proskurovskiy/) When you have friends or family over to visit, it's easy enough to pull out your phone or laptop to share photos of recent events or trips. But do you have all of your photos organized into albums with locations tagged? Many of us don't—and that's a great reason to start scrapbooking

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Healthy dog treats your best friend will love

So good! (Marek Szturc via Unsplash/) You love your dog. Your dog loves treats—especially nibbles made from real ingredients like meat or peanut butter, without unnecessary filler ingredients or extra calories. These treats give your dog a little morsel of happiness without sacrificing their health. Slow-roasted jerky treats that break into bites. (Amazon/) These jerky treats look and smell so go

14h

When the Bellbird Calls You Know It

The white bellbird of the Amazon may be the loudest bird in the world.

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The best plugins for home music production

Create that album at last. (Dhe Haivan via Unsplash/) Producing an album at home is now easier than ever thanks to a host of eager software developers and their versatile plugins. Racks of heavy recording and mixing equipment are now represented faithfully in software form, giving anybody with a laptop access to a personal recording studio. There are literally thousands of music production plugin

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When the Bellbird Calls You Know It

The white bellbird of the Amazon may be the loudest bird in the world. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When the Bellbird Calls You Know It

The white bellbird of the Amazon may be the loudest bird in the world. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Orca grandmothers babysit young whales, study finds

Research on 378 killer whales finds those with grandmothers live longer and the older females help them when food is scarce Doting killer whale grandmothers help their grand calves survive, particularly in times of food scarcity, scientists reported in a paper that sheds new light on the evolutionary role of menopause. Orca females stop reproducing in their thirties or forties but can continue to

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A DNA Firm That Caters to Police Just Bought a Genealogy Site

In 2018, GEDmatch played a key role in reopening the 40-year-old Golden State Killer case. Now Verogen, a company that serves law enforcement, is gobbling it up.

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