Search Posts

nyheder2019december12

Shift in magnetic north throws navigators off course

Vital point on planet's surface races at unprecedented speed across Arctic

9h

Cityringen lukkes helt ned i to uger

Metroens styresystemer skal opgraderes for at kunne tage den nye linje mod Nordhavn i brug. Test af det nye system betyder, at Metroselskabet lukker Cityringen helt ned i to uger i januar.

46min

The amount of available food affects diurnal locomotor activity in migratory songbirds during stopover

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55404-3

3h

A (sorta) good news story about a songbird and climate change

University of Manitoba researchers made a recent discovery that suggests Purple Martins, unlike other long-distance migratory songbirds, show promise of being able to adapt to climate change.

2min

Teacher bias devalues math skills of girls and students of color, research finds

New USC research into how teachers evaluate the mathematical ability of students suggests that white teachers and teachers of color alike have biases that favor white and male students.

2min

Astronomers discover two new galaxy protoclusters

Using Keck Observatory in Hawaii, astronomers have detected two new protoclusters of galaxies embedded in primordial superclusters. The research paper presenting the discovery and providing basic information about the newfound objects was published December 3 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

2min

A (sorta) good news story about a songbird and climate change

University of Manitoba researchers made a recent discovery that suggests Purple Martins, unlike other long-distance migratory songbirds, show promise of being able to adapt to climate change.

2min

An upcoming ESA mission is going to remove one piece of space junk from orbit

While working at the NASA Johnson Space Center during the 1970s, astrophysicist Donald Kessler predicted that collisions of space debris would become increasingly common as the density of space debris increases in orbit around the Earth, creating a cascading effect. Since 2005, the amount of debris in orbit has followed an exponential growth curve, confirming Kessler's prediction.

2min

Utility Executives Kept Flint's Tainted Water a Secret

Email exchanges show senior employees and Flint officials knew the tap water was poisoned with lead months before the city alerted residents.

2min

A Sobering Message About the Future at AI's Biggest Party

Leaders in artificial intelligence warn that progress is slowing, big challenges remain, and simply throwing more computers at a problem isn't sustainable.

2min

The Co-Founder of Google Is Quietly Trying to Cure the Flu

Larry Page, one of Google's co-founders who recently stepped down as CEO, has been funneling millions of dollars into flu vaccine research in recent years. First, Page pumps cash into his charity, the Carl Victor Page Memorial Foundation. Then the Foundation gives it to two companies, Shoo the Flu and Flu Lab, according to TechCrunch , which traced Page's money across the organizations. While it'

4min

Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas

An Antarctic field campaign last winter led by the US and Australia has successfully extracted some of the largest samples of air dating from the 1870s until today. Researchers will use the samples to look for changes in the molecules that scrub the atmosphere of methane and other gases.

4min

Success in metabolically engineering marine algae to synthesize valuable antioxidant astaxanthin

A research group led by Professor HASUNUMA Tomohisa of Kobe University's Engineering Biology Research Center have succeeded in synthesizing the natural pigment astaxanthin using the fast-growing marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002. It is hoped that this development could be utilized to meet the demand for natural astaxanthin in the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries, amongst oth

4min

Invest in private companies: They display more reliable accounts than public ones'

Institutional investors tend to put their money largely in public companies, persuaded that market discipline makes their accounts more reliable than private ones' and most financial literature confirms their beliefs. A new study by scholars from University of Bolzano, Bocconi University, and Stern School of Business concludes on the contrary that, if you circumscribe the comparison to public and

4min

Molecular drill destroys deadly superbugs

Molecular drills can target and destroy deadly bacteria that have evolved resistance to nearly all antibiotics—and in some cases can even make the antibiotics effective again, a new study shows. Researchers showed that the motorized molecules can kill antibiotic-resistant microbes within minutes. "These superbugs could kill 10 million people a year by 2050, way overtaking cancer," says James Tour

7min

How Risso's dolphins strike a balance between holding their breath and finding food

What do marine mammals eat? It's a simple question with profound implications for marine-mammal conservation and fisheries research. But it can a be tough question for scientists to answer because they can't see what these animals are doing underwater. MBARI researcher Kelly Benoit-Bird is finding new ways to answer this question using specialized echosounders mounted on ships and undersea robots.

8min

One of Europe's worst famines likely caused by devastating floods

Europe's Great Famine of 1315–1317 is considered one of the worst population collapses in the continent's history. Historical records tell of unrelenting rain accompanied by mass crop failure, skyrocketing food prices, and even instances of cannibalism. These written records strongly suggest Europe's Great Famine was caused by several years of devastating floods that began in 1314, but they can't

8min

How Risso's dolphins strike a balance between holding their breath and finding food

What do marine mammals eat? It's a simple question with profound implications for marine-mammal conservation and fisheries research. But it can a be tough question for scientists to answer because they can't see what these animals are doing underwater. MBARI researcher Kelly Benoit-Bird is finding new ways to answer this question using specialized echosounders mounted on ships and undersea robots.

14min

Searching explanations for mysterious structures in protoplanetary disks

In the discs of dust and gasses around young stars, mysterious structures occur. Together with professor Ewine van Dishoeck, Ph.D. student Paolo Cazzoletti investigate how we can explain these forms, such as rings, spirals and holes. On 12 December, he will defend his thesis.

14min

The looming threat of rising sea levels—and what we can do about it

For more than two decades, Patricia Manuel has watched the waters rise around her.

14min

Chimpanzees may have evolved resistance to HIV precursor

Simian immunodeficiency virus, the monkey- and ape-infecting virus that HIV originated from, may have influenced the genetics of chimpanzees, finds a new UCL-led study.

14min

IU School of Medicine team learns how to predict triple negative breast cancer recurrence

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have discovered how to predict whether triple negative breast cancer will recur, and which women are likely to remain disease-free. They will present their findings on Dec. 13, 2019, at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the most influential gathering of breast cancer researchers and physicians in the world.

18min

Residual cancer burden after neoadjuvant therapy can accurately predict breast cancer survival

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported results from a pooled analysis of more than 5,100 breast cancer patients that found residual cancer burden (RCB) continuous index and classification were independently and strongly prognostic for all breast cancer phenotypes.

18min

Gardens can be havens for soil animals in towns and cities

The fifth edition of the Dutch Soil Animal Days saw earthworms almost grab top spot thanks to the wet autumn weather. But at the end of the day, woodlice once again emerged as the most-observed soil animal in Dutch gardens. Nearly 1000 'citizen scientists' sent in their observations this year. And a surprisingly high number of people tried to do something in return for the vital services these soi

18min

Chimpanzees may have evolved resistance to HIV precursor

Simian immunodeficiency virus, the monkey- and ape-infecting virus that HIV originated from, may have influenced the genetics of chimpanzees, finds a new UCL-led study.

20min

Success in metabolically engineering marine algae to synthesize valuable antioxidant astaxanthin

A research group led by Professor HASUNUMA Tomohisa of Kobe University's Engineering Biology Research Center have succeeded in synthesizing the natural pigment astaxanthin using the fast-growing marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

20min

Success in metabolically engineering marine algae to synthesize valuable antioxidant astaxanthin

A research group led by Professor HASUNUMA Tomohisa of Kobe University's Engineering Biology Research Center have succeeded in synthesizing the natural pigment astaxanthin using the fast-growing marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

20min

Illinois study proposes circular phosphorus economy for Midwest

The U.S. Midwest produces at least a third of the world's corn and soybean supply each year. Feeding the world requires a lot of fertilizer, mostly in the form of nitrogen and phosphorus. While nitrogen can literally be pulled out of the air, phosphorus has to be mined from finite phosphate rock reserves and treated to be made available to plants. Most of the world's phosphate rock is in Morocco,

20min

Slippery when wet: How does lubrication work?

In a recent paper in Science Advances, researchers from the University of Amsterdam present new experimental insight into how lubrication works. They have developed a new method using fluorescent molecules to directly observe nanometric lubrication films with a sensitivity of a single molecular layer. Their quantitative description of the relation between topography, contact pressure and lubricati

20min

Study: The human lifespan is written into our DNA

Humans have a "natural" lifespan of around 38 years, according to a new method we have developed for estimating the lifespans of different species by analyzing their DNA.

26min

Study finds educated people more likely to help a stranger

People from highly educated neighborhoods are more likely to help a stranger, according to a study by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Edith Cowan University.

26min

Ancient DNA confirms humans wiped out northern hemisphere's version of the penguin

The North Atlantic was once home to a bird that bore a remarkable similarity to penguins. The great auk, also known as "the original penguin", was a large, flightless, black and white bird, that is said to have existed in the millions. Despite its appearance, the great auk is actually a relative of razorbills and puffins, not of penguins. However, since around 1844, the northern hemisphere has bee

26min

Researchers participate in study that adds new detail to merger models

Scientists are getting better at modeling the complex tangle of physics properties at play in one of the most powerful events in the known universe: the merger of two neutron stars.

32min

Micro-RNAs keep stem cells from growing up too fast

There comes a point in every cell's life when it has to decide what it wants to be when it grows up. Young cells, so-called stem cells, take their clues to their future career primarily from the environment they find themselves in. But in a new embryo, that environment is constantly in flux; how does a cell know how long to wait before it makes an irrevocable choice?

32min

These sponge-like gels can help grow new tissue, train immune cells, and deliver medication

In 2010, Sidi Bencherif was working in a lab at Harvard University, trying to use a surgically implantable structure to train immune cells to target cancer.

32min

Study: The human lifespan is written into our DNA

Humans have a "natural" lifespan of around 38 years, according to a new method we have developed for estimating the lifespans of different species by analyzing their DNA.

32min

Ancient DNA confirms humans wiped out northern hemisphere's version of the penguin

The North Atlantic was once home to a bird that bore a remarkable similarity to penguins. The great auk, also known as "the original penguin", was a large, flightless, black and white bird, that is said to have existed in the millions. Despite its appearance, the great auk is actually a relative of razorbills and puffins, not of penguins. However, since around 1844, the northern hemisphere has bee

32min

Micro-RNAs keep stem cells from growing up too fast

There comes a point in every cell's life when it has to decide what it wants to be when it grows up. Young cells, so-called stem cells, take their clues to their future career primarily from the environment they find themselves in. But in a new embryo, that environment is constantly in flux; how does a cell know how long to wait before it makes an irrevocable choice?

32min

These sponge-like gels can help grow new tissue, train immune cells, and deliver medication

In 2010, Sidi Bencherif was working in a lab at Harvard University, trying to use a surgically implantable structure to train immune cells to target cancer.

38min

Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas

Ancient air samples from one of Antarctica's snowiest ice core sites may add a new molecule to the record of changes to Earth's atmosphere over the past century and a half, since the Industrial Revolution began burning fossil fuels on a massive scale.

38min

NASA's Juno navigators enable Jupiter cyclone discovery

Jupiter's south pole has a new cyclone. The discovery of the massive Jovian tempest occurred on Nov. 3, 2019, during the most recent data-gathering flyby of Jupiter by NASA's Juno spacecraft. It was the 22nd flyby during which the solar-powered spacecraft collected science data on the gas giant, soaring only 2,175 miles (3,500 kilometers) above its cloud tops. The flyby also marked a victory for t

38min

Patient-reported outcomes predict aromatase inhibitor adherence

If you want to predict which breast cancer patients will most likely stop taking aromatase inhibitors, check out their own responses to the health questions patients commonly answer in cancer clinical trials, according to research findings to be presented Friday, Dec. 13, 2019 at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

40min

Unearthing the mystery of the meaning of Easter Island's Moai

Rapa Nui (or Easter Island, as it is commonly known) is home to the enigmatic Moai, stone monoliths that have stood watch over the island landscape for hundreds of years. Their existence is a marvel of human ingenuity—and their meaning a source of some mystery.

44min

Fremtrædende sundhedsøkonom: I tvivl om hurtige effektiviseringer til supersygehuse var klogt

Professor Kjeld Møller Pedersen står ved de effektiviseringskrav, som han hjalp med at udregne til de nye supersygehus – også selvom de ikke er udregnet ens. Men i dag er han i tvivl, om det var klogt at forlange effektiviseringerne et år efter starten.

47min

Många rätt vid åldersbestämning med artificiell intelligens

​Användning av artificiell intelligens för åldersbedömning ger hög tillförlitlighet visar ny forskning inom tillämpad hälsoteknik vid Blekinge Tekniska Högskola. Metodens tillförlitlighet ligger på 98,1 procent för underåriga respektive 88 procent för överåriga. Forskare vid BTH, i samarbete med forskare från Karolinska Institutet, fick 2017 ett uppdrag från Socialstyrelsen att samla in bildmater

55min

The truth about activated charcoal in beauty products

That charcoal face mask isn't doing anything a regular face mask wouldn't In the past few years, activated charcoal has become a common ingredient in over-the-counter beauty and health products—not to mention it's also made an appearance in coffee, ice cream, and cookies, among other things, turning them all an elegant black. In particular, the substance has recently become a popular component in

56min

The Slow Rollout of Super-Fast 5G

AT&T launches its new next-generation wireless network, but breadth of 5G coverage in the US still lags South Korea and China.

56min

Gadget Lab Podcast: An Interview With Biologist Laura Boykin

The computational biologist collects cassava DNA with a pocket-sized device in order to fight the pathogens threatening the vital staple crop.

56min

Measles Deaths Surge Worldwide Thanks to Poverty and Anti-Vaccine Propaganda

According to recently released WHO/CDC data on worldwide measles mortality, 2018 marks the second year in a row with a significant increase since the historical low in 2016. And 2019 is shaping up to be even worse. The main reason for this is poverty and lack of access is resource poor regions.

1h

What you might have missed

The process of Earth's oxygenation, the growing number of Near-Earth asteroids and a bio-inspired gel – here are some highlights from a week in science.

1h

Image of the Day: Spotted Toad

The starry night harlequin toad was lost to science for nearly 30 years until an indigenous community in Colombia permitted conservation biologists to visit its habitat in April.

1h

SpaceX to Make Starlink Satellites Dimmer to Lessen Impact on Astronomy

Future batches of the satellite will have a special coating to reduce their reflectivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Who Gets to Decide?

One of the things I like about blogging is that it is an interactive forum. Often times the conversation in the comments dwarfs the original article in scope and depth. I use this to learn as much from my readers as they do from me, and improve my understanding of topics and ability to communicate them. Sometimes points raised in the comments deserve the treatment of a full blog post, not just an

1h

De gjorde en fuldt ud fungerende helikopter til en dødsfælde

Operatør bøjede reglerne: Helikoptertur over Manhattan endte med at alle passagerer sad fastlåst i selerne og druknede.

1h

Breast cancer patients with government insurance at higher risk of death

A retrospective study of 9800 women with breast cancer who participated in randomized clinical trials found that Medicaid/Medicare patients were less likely to participate in a clinical trial compared to their privately insured counterparts. The few who did were more likely to stop treatment early and had lower survival. The study was conducted by researchers in the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Grou

1h

Does evidence support BRCA1/2 & other genetic testing for patients with breast cancer?

Should germline genetic testing be offered to all patients with breast cancer? The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) addresses this important question in a new statement published in Genetics in Medicine, 'Points to Consider: Is There Evidence to Support BRCA1/2 and Other Inherited Breast Cancer Genetic Testing for All Breast Cancer Patients? A Statement of the American Coll

1h

Sustainable sand pulls pollutants from stormwater

UC Berkeley engineers have developed a mineral-coated sand that can soak up toxic metals like lead and cadmium from water. Along with its ability to destroy organic pollutants like bisphenol A, this material could help cities tap into stormwater, an abundant but underused water source.

1h

Researchers realize 'ideal' kagome metal electronic structure

Since 2016, a team of MIT researchers consisting of graduate students Linda Ye and Min Gu Kang, associate professor of physics Joseph G. Checkelsky, and Class of 1947 Career Development Assistant Professor of Physics Riccardo Comin has focused on exploring the electronic structure that arises when atoms of iron (Fe) and tin (Sn) combine in repeating patterns that look like Japanese kagome baskets,

1h

Mars Express tracks the phases of Phobos

ESA's Mars Express has captured detailed views of the small, scarred and irregularly shaped moon Phobos from different angles during a unique flyby.

1h

Video: ESA's short film, 'The Burn'

ESA's short film, The Burn, takes us into the heart of Europe's mission control during a critical moment in the life of a future mission.

1h

Image: The galactic dance of NGC 5394 and NGC 5395

"Everything is determined by forces over which we have no control… Human beings, vegetables, or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper," Albert Einstein wrote.

1h

1h

Memories Can Be Injected and Survive Amputation and Metamorphosis – Facts So Romantic

If a headless worm can grow a memory, then where is the memory stored? And, if it's not in the head but in the body, could you transfer it? Photograph by Rattiya Thongdumhyu / Shutterstock The study of memory has always been one of the stranger outposts of science. In the 1950s, an unknown psychology professor at the University of Michigan named James McConnell made headlines—and eventually becam

2h

The Next Nuclear Plants Will Be Small, Svelte, and Safer

A new generation of reactors will start producing power in the next few years. They're comparatively tiny—and may be key to hitting our climate goals.

2h

The Future of Sex Work Slams Up Against Big Tech

As influencers peddle more sexually explicit content, Big Tech's biggest platforms—Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter—are increasing restrictions.

2h

Seattle Joins the Rush to Slow Down Traffic on City Streets

The city plans to lower the speed limit on major roads to 25 mph in hopes of boosting safety, following similar moves in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston.

2h

How Facebook's Political Ad System Is Designed to Polarize

Want to reach voters across the aisle online? That'll cost extra, a new study finds.

2h

Google Assistant Can Now Translate Languages on Your Phone

Interpreter Mode comes to iOS and Android, making it easier to converse somewhat seamlessly across language barriers

2h

The Challenge of Replacing Internal Combustion with Batteries that Don't Combust

Incremental improvements in battery technology are no substitute for the major leap that's now needed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Challenge of Replacing Internal Combustion with Batteries that Don't Combust

Incremental improvements in battery technology are no substitute for the major leap that's now needed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Hubble Space Telescope snaps best view of interstellar comet Borisov

The interstellar comet Borisov is making its closest approach to the sun and Earth, giving astronomers their best look yet

2h

Enigt EU: Vi skal være CO2-neutrale i 2050

Alle EU-lande – dog på nær Polen – bakker nu op om EU Kommissionens vision om et CO2-neutralt kontinent i 2050.

2h

To Combat Climate Change, See the Forest for the Trees

As the world scrambles to combat deforestation, experts warn our efforts could have far fewer benefits than we think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Quantum computer sets new record for finding prime number factors

A relatively small quantum computer has broken a number-factoring record, which may one day threaten data encryption methods that rely on factoring large numbers

2h

Time travel without paradoxes is possible with many parallel timelines

Time travel brings up paradoxes that break the laws of physics, but multiple similar timelines running parallel to one another could get around this

2h

Mangel på medarbejdere med kompetencer inden for informationssikkerhed

På både den korte og lange bane skal kompetencerne inden for informationssikkerhed styrkes, lyder det fra flere myndigheder. Allerede nu mangler danske virksomheder og myndigheder medarbejdere med de rette kompetencer, og efterspørgslen stiger, viser analyse.

2h

PODCAST: Ure og biler ringer forgæves til 112. Radon i mange nye huse

Mange nødopkald fra smartwatches og biler med nødknap går tabt i systemet, fordi producenterne ikke søger råd hos alarmcentralen. 11 procent af husene i en ny undersøgelse ligger over det tilladte niveau af den giftige gasart radon. Nyt Cybersikkerhedsråd bliver det 18., der indsamler den samme v…

2h

What detoxifies a negative work environment?

Trust is necessary for a healthy and efficient work environment. This trust emerges when not only do we feel safe within our company, but that our leaders genuinely care about us. Establishing these relationships requires vulnerability and honesty from both leaders and their employees.

2h

Ny gigant-solcellepark uden hverken tilskud eller sponsor

Den nedlagte flyvestation Vandel ved Billund får endnu en solcellepark, der bringer den samlede kapacitet på området op på 268 MW.

2h

United States drops charges against two more scientists after Iran prisoner swap

Nature, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03856-y US President Donald Trump thanks Iran for "a very fair negotiation" as scientists on both sides walk free.

2h

Books for our time: seven classics that speak to us now

Nature, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03840-6 Leading thinkers choose past works illuminating crucial issues today.

2h

Banedanmark skrotter sit sidste alternativ til nye signaler

PLUS. Det går så godt med at bygge nye signalcomputere ind i IC3-togene, at der ikke er brug for et alternativ til det nye signalsystem, mener Banedanmark.

2h

Geminids Meteor Shower Will Peak in Night Skies

Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you're lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.

2h

Why Impeachment Is Different This Time Around

President Donald Trump is on the verge of becoming the first president to be impeached by the House in more than two decades. A lot has changed in Congress since that time, but Steve Chabot, a Republican representative from Ohio, is still around. Back then, he was one of the House Republicans tapped as an impeachment manager to prosecute the case against Bill Clinton in the Senate. Now he has bee

3h

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

One afternoon in October, Abdul Malik was sitting just inside the entrance of a New York City Probation Department building in the South Bronx when he recognized a young man coming in and beckoned him over. Like many people passing through the building, the teen had been arrested and sentenced to probation and had come for a mandatory check-in with his probation officer. But he greeted Malik warm

3h

Trump Has Successfully Gamed the Courts

At its simplest level, the impeachment of President Donald Trump looks like a collision between the legislative and executive branches of government. In that fight, each side is trying to defend its prerogatives as it sees them: For Congress (or at least the Democratic-led House), this includes the power to appropriate foreign aid, and the power to conduct oversight; for the executive branch, thi

3h

Landing a Silicon Valley Job After Learning to Code in Prison

Jesse Aguirre's workday at Slack starts with a standard engineering meeting—programmers call them "standups"—where he and his coworkers plan the day's agenda. Around the circle stand graduates from Silicon Valley's top companies and the nation's top universities. Aguirre, who is 26, did not finish high school and has so far spent most of his adulthood in prison; Slack is his first full-time emplo

3h

Gaming their way to sustainable development

Serengeti National Park is home to a breathtaking array of wild animals, from lions to elephants and migrating wildebeests. But the local people living on the fringes of the area comprise an equally important part of this ecosystem.

3h

Gaming their way to sustainable development

Serengeti National Park is home to a breathtaking array of wild animals, from lions to elephants and migrating wildebeests. But the local people living on the fringes of the area comprise an equally important part of this ecosystem.

3h

An Oncologist's Take on Refocusing the Battle Against Cancer

In "The First Cell," oncologist Azra Raza argues that the current focus of cancer research on diagnosing and treating the disease when patients are already sick is tragically misguided, and that attacking cancers far sooner in the process would be cheaper, less toxic, and decidedly more effective.

3h

The AI community needs to take responsibility for its technology and its actions

At the opening keynote of a prominent AI research conference, Celeste Kidd, a cognitive psychologist, challenged the audience to think critically about the future they want to build.

3h

EU-lande enige om klimamål: Men Polen vil ikke være med

EU bliver efter planen den første klimaneutrale region i 2050.

3h

Structural insights into ubiquitin recognition and Ufd1 interaction of Npl4

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13697-y The Lys48-linked polyubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation in yeast depends on Cdc48 and its cofactors Ufd1 and Npl4. Here, the authors present crystal structures of Npl4 bound to Lys48-linked diubiquitin and the Npl4-binding motif of Ufd1, providing insights into the reaction mechanism of the Cdc48- Uf

3h

CO2 hydrogenation to high-value products via heterogeneous catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13638-9 Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and conversion provide an alternative approach to synthesis of useful fuels and chemicals. Here, Ye et al. give a comprehensive perspective on the current state of the art and outlook of CO2 catalytic hydrogenation to the synthesis of light olefins, dimethyl ether, liquid fuels,

3h

BEN-solo factors partition active chromatin to ensure proper gene activation in Drosophila

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13558-8 The BEN-solo proteins—including Insensitive (Insv), Elba1 and Elba2—function in both transcriptional repression and chromatin insulation. Here, the authors investigate the role of these proteins in Drosophila embryos, finding that ELBA and Insv function as general insulators and partition active chromatin to

3h

Obesity and disease severity magnify disturbed microbiome-immune interactions in asthma patients

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13751-9 Here, the authors characterize immunological and microbiome alterations in a cohort of obese asthmatics, finding that disease severity negatively correlates with fecal abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, and show in a mouse model that administration of A. muciniphila reduces airway hyper-reactivity and air

3h

Rap1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell survival and affects oncogenesis and response to chemotherapy

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13082-9 Rap1 is a telomeric protein that is highly expressed in cancers. Here, the authors show that Rap1 interacts with several DNA repair proteins independent of its telomere function to enhance DNA repair and that its deficiency leads to accelerated tumorigenesis, but enhanced sensitivity to genotoxic stress.

3h

Immunity to Influenza is dependent on MHC II polymorphism: study with 2 HLA transgenic strains

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55503-1

3h

Au-PDA@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres decorated rGO modified electrode for electrochemical sensing of cefotaxime

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55517-9 Au-PDA@SiO 2 core-shell nanospheres decorated rGO modified electrode for electrochemical sensing of cefotaxime

3h

Selective synthesis of spirobiindanes, alkenyl chlorides, and monofluoroalkenes from unactivated gem-difluoroalkanes controlled by aluminum-based Lewis acids

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55206-7 Selective synthesis of spirobiindanes, alkenyl chlorides, and monofluoroalkenes from unactivated gem -difluoroalkanes controlled by aluminum-based Lewis acids

3h

Malaria resurgence after significant reduction by mass drug administration on Ngodhe Island, Kenya

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55437-8

3h

3h

3h

Collaborating constructively for sustainable biotechnology

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54331-7

3h

Cleaning Up Space Junk

The European Space Agency says a self-destructing robot will be sent into orbit in 2025 to begin work on the world's first space cleanup mission. Jan Woerner of the European Space Agency discusses.

3h

Gene therapy for progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 in a clinically relevant mouse model

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13614-3 Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 is a disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the multidrug resistance protein 3, and has limited treatment options. Here they show that adeno-associated virus mediated gene therapy prevents disease progression in a mouse disease model.

3h

Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of thioureas or thioamides

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13701-5 Alternative carbene precursors for metal-catalyzed cross coupling may expand the portfolio of methods for C-C bond construction. Here, the authors report a Suzuki−Miyaura coupling of Pd−carbene complexes formed by desulfurization of thioureas or thioamides and affording a broad array of amidinium salts and d

3h

Reactivity mapping of nanoscale defect chemistry under electrochemical reaction conditions

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13692-3 Identifying reacting species locally with nanometer precision is a major challenge in electrochemical surface science. Using operando Raman nanoscopy, authors image the reversible, concurrent formation of nanometer-spatially separated Au2O3 and Au2O species during Au nanodefect oxidation.

3h

Author Correction: Macrophage-associated wound healing contributes to African green monkey SIV pathogenesis control

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13816-9

3h

Examining multiple cellular pathways at once using multiplex hextuple luciferase assaying

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13651-y Multiplexed detection of luciferase-based sensors in the same sample is challenging and limited by the substrates' emission spectra. Here the authors establish a system based on three different luciferases and sequential detection to achieve measurements of up to six parameters within the same experiment.

3h

Functional significance of U2AF1 S34F mutations in lung adenocarcinomas

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13392-y The authors report a co-occurrence of the U2AF1 S34F splicing factor mutation and ROS1 translocations in lung adenocarcinomas and profile effects of S34F on transcriptome-wide RNA binding. They further show that U2AF1 S34F enhances invasive potential and alters splicing of ROS1 fusion transcripts

3h

Democrats' Biggest Vote of the Year Isn't Impeachment

In the eyes of history, the ballot that House Democrats cast to impeach President Donald Trump will stand as the most significant vote they take this year, and maybe in their entire careers. But in terms of whether the party can keep its House majority after 2020, impeachment may not be the most important vote the Democrats cast this month, or even this week. Policy choices—namely legislation to

4h

'Grazing fireball' skimmed Earth's atmosphere then went back to space

A space rock seen in July 2017 passed through Earth's atmosphere and back out the other side in a rare event known as a grazing fireball

4h

4h

4h

4h

4h

4h

4h

Google has performed the biggest quantum chemistry simulation ever

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

4h

Bakterier kan muligvis forebygge astma hos børn

En blanding af gavnlige bakterier til nyfødte kan måske forebygge forekomsten af astma hos børn, viser undersøgelse foretaget af Dansk BørneAstma Center (DBAC).

4h

Ledelse i kittel og træsko gør mangfoldighed til en styrke

En lægestab med 26 læger fra 18 nationer, der tilsammen mestrer 30 sprog, kan lyde som en vanskelig opgave. På afdelingen for hjerne- og nervesygdomme på Sønderborg Sygehus er mangfoldigheden vendt til en styrke, som har bidraget til at sikre afdelingen markant gode resultater på det neurologiske område.

4h

Patienter med ­sclerose ­skifter ­hyppigt ­behandling

Scleroseklinikker er presset på kapaciteten, fremgår det af årsrapport fra Sclerosebehandlingsregistret. Markant flere patienter, flere nye lægemidler, nye behandlingsguidelines og vanskelig adgang til scanninger giver vanskelige arbejdsforhold.

4h

Flere får trombolyse – færre ­indlægges på specialafsnit

En stadig større andel af danske apopleksipatienter bliver indlagt så hurtigt, at de kan få blodpropopløsende behandling med trombolyse eller trombektomi. Til gengæld bliver færre indlagt på apopleksiafsnit på hospitalerne, hvilket bekymrer styregruppe bag kvalitetsdatabase.

4h

Neurologer ønsker faglig enighed om brug af kirurgisk indgreb

Karkirurger er uenige om, hvorvidt patienter med forbigående blodpropper, der skyldes åreforkalkning i halspulsåren, bør tilbydes et kirurgisk indgreb, fremgår det af årsrapporten for Dansk Apopleksiregister.

4h

Publisher Correction: Automatic Choroid Layer Segmentation from Optical Coherence Tomography Images Using Deep Learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48368-x

4h

4h

Satans ustabile, men simple terror-bomber

PLUS. TATP-bomber, kendt som Satans mor, er mistænkt i terror-sagen herhjemme, hvor ni personer er sigtet – heraf tre for at fremstille netop TATP-bomber. Sprængstoffet trækker blodige spor gennem terror-historien, og ingredienserne findes i byggemarkeder og malerforretninger, siger ekspert.

4h

Praktiserende læger er gode til at spotte patienter med mulig lungekræft

Silkeborg Sygehus finder høj andel af lungekræfttilfælde i stadie 1 af sygdommen – og meget højere end resten af landet. Tæt samarbejde med almen praksis er en del af forklaringen.

5h

Psykiske virkninger af diabetes fylder i nye bevillinger fra Danish Diabetes Academy

Danish Diabetes Academy har bevilget over 16 mio. kr. til 13 unge diabetesforskere og tre gæsteprofessorer. Flere af projekterne handler om psykiske virkninger af diabetes, som ifølge akademiet fylder stadigt mere i dansk diabetesforskning.

5h

Årets top 10: Her er de mest læste i Dagens Medicin 2019

Opsigelser, politiske udmeldninger og en hårdtarbejdende overlæge med landets højeste løn pryder listen over de mest læste artikler i Dagens Medicin i år.

5h

5h

Bagsiden af den fine medalje

Danmarks Bedste Hospital handler om at hylde de bedste, men når vi dykker ned tallene, viser der sig også en dyster bagside.

5h

To år efter 9.000 lægers opråb: Hvor meget tillid har lægerne til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed?

Hvor langt er vi nået, siden 9.000 læger stillede et mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed? En ankemulighed for læger lyser op som en af løsningerne på et stort problem, skriver overlæge Joachim Hoffmann-Petersen.

5h

Fighting climate change, protecting nature go hand in hand

The preservation of Earth's pristine wildernesses and oceans, long treated as a separate issue to curbing climate change, is taking on more importance as scientists say they really need to go hand in hand.

5h

Fracking leaves heavy footprint in Argentina's Patagonia

Pumpjack oil wells peck like giant birds at the ground, plumes of yellow flames flare from gas pipelines, lakes accumulate contaminated waste—Patagonia and its indigenous people are paying a heavy price for Argentina's economic progress.

5h

UN talks struggle to stave off climate chaos

United Nations climate negotiations in Madrid were set to wrap up Friday with even the best-case outcome likely to fall well short of what science says is needed to avert a future ravaged by global warming.

5h

How cetaceans got so large

A whale of a story

5h

Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels

The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting in Belfast today.

5h

Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels

The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting in Belfast today.

5h

Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest, ancient plant fossil record shows

The heady aroma of magnolia blossoms and lotus flowers might have wafted to your nostrils if you had gone for a walk 56 million years ago in the lush green forest which covered Canada's northernmost islands.

6h

Tacka de gamla grekerna för lussebullens arom

Någon gång mellan år 1600 och 350 f.Kr. upptäckte en krokusodlare i närheten av Aten en blomma som var lite annorlunda. Det röda pistillmärket var längre än vanligt, och mörkare i färgen. Dessutom var aromen starkare. Antagligen användes redan saffran som krydda, men den nya blomman var något alldeles speciellt. Sedan dess har en och samma växt förökats med sidoknölar på nedersta delen av stammen.

6h

Will Corbynism Survive Jeremy Corbyn's Defeat?

Minutes after last night's exit poll indicated that Boris Johnson's Conservatives would win an 86-seat majority, a friend turned to me and said: "The Tories just won the 2024 election." This was not merely a defeat for Labour and its leftwing leader Jeremy Corbyn—it was an annihilation. The party, which has been in opposition since 2010, now faces another decade out of government. When Corbyn was

6h

7h

It's Boris Johnson's Britain Now

The Britain that has emerged today is different from the one that came before, its old political map erased, its economic model upended, its prospects uncertain—even its very unity in doubt. The Britain built by Tony Blair is gone, fatally undermined by David Cameron's Brexit referendum and, now, swept away in a provincial tide of support for Boris Johnson's Conservatives. To understand the scale

7h

Skum fångar koldioxid både billigare och mer hållbart

I dag avslutas klimatmötet i Madrid, där en stor fråga har varit hur mycket vi kan förlita oss på tekniken att fånga in och lagra koldioxid. FN:s klimatpanel IPCC räknar med att infångning av koldioxid ska stå för 13 procent av utsläppsminskningarna som krävs till 2050. Både politiker, företag och organisationer har uttryckt tvekan till om detta är realistiskt, med tanke på att de här så kallade C

7h

Hul i lovgivningen: Uautoriseret behandling udløser også offentligt tilskud

Loven har et åbenlyst hul, når borgere kan få tilskud til sundhedsbehandling på det sociale område, hvor der ikke er krav om autorisation, siger lektor i sundhedsjura og fagforeningsformand. Autorisationen er afgørende, siger Diabetesforeningen.

7h

7h

7h

Hubble Captures Incredible Photos of Comet Borisov as It Speeds Past Our Sun

Our closest look yet at the strange little visitor.

7h

8h

Vi stoppede ozonhullet: Nu kommer samme lov klimaet til gode

Vi havde udledt en tredjedel mere CO2 i dag, hvis vi ikke havde fået Montreal-protokollen.

8h

Study shows novel protein plays role in bacterial vaginosis

Women with bacterial vaginosis exhibit elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory protein, IL-36y, according to a new collaborative study led by the University of Arizona College of Medicine — Phoenix.

8h

Saliva test shows promise for earlier and easier detection of mouth and throat cancer

Unfortunately, cancers that occur in the back of the mouth and upper throat are often not diagnosed until they become advanced. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes the use of acoustofluidics, a new non-invasive method that analyzes saliva for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV)-16, the pathogenic strain associated with oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). This novel techniq

8h

NTM infections on the rise nationally; women and elderly most affected

The number of people newly infected each year and the number of people living with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease appears to be increasing, especially among women and those 65 and older, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

8h

Pioneering ketamine treatments: depression – Science Weekly podcast

Ketamine might sound like an unlikely candidate for treating addiction and depression. But a growing number of scientists believe the drug could help. In the second part of this Science Weekly mini series, Hannah Devlin speaks to another expert using ketamine in their work: a physiatrist who has been conducting research on the use of ketamine for treating depression for several years Continue rea

8h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 13. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

8h

Pioneering ketamine treatments: depression – Science Weekly podcast

Ketamine might sound like an unlikely candidate for treating addiction and depression. But a growing number of scientists believe the drug could help. In the second part of this Science Weekly mini series, Hannah Devlin speaks to another expert using ketamine in their work: a physiatrist who has been conducting research on the use of ketamine for treating depression for several years. Help support

9h

I 10 år har de løbet hurtigere, mens opgaven er vokset – nu skal de øge tempoet med 8 pct.

10 år med produktivitetskrav og et nyt hospital med bl.a. længere afstande presser lægerne på Aarhus Universitetshospital. Overlæge frygter, at øget arbejdspres og det nye 8-procents effektiviseringskrav vil blæse afdelingen omkuld. Vi lytter, men lægerne må vænne sig til længere afstande, siger ledende overlæge.

9h

Læger på AUH: Forskning og ­uddannelse ­forsømmes

Uddannelsen og forskningen er offer for effektiviseringskravet på Aarhus Universitetshospital, siger overlæger og yngre læger på hospitalet.

9h

100 millioner afsat til forskning: »AI udfordrer ikke demokratiet stille og roligt, men rammer det som jordskælv«

Vurderinger truffet af machine learning er svære at gennemskue. Selv for dem, der skal træffe vigtige beslutninger på baggrund af dem, lyder det fra Velux-fonden, der har afsat 100 millioner til forskning i området.

9h

Hospitaler har fået opgjort effektiviseringskrav forskelligt

Sundhedsministeriet har igen givet forkerte oplysninger om krav om milliardeffektiviseringer til de nye supersygehuse. Fejlene giver indtryk af, at effektiviseringerne rammer tilfældigt, vurderer sundhedsøkonom. Beklageligt, siger minister.

9h

9h

A Switch in the Brain for Compulsive Drinking

Most of us have drunk some form of alcohol in our lives. Many of us drink alcohol often. But we might know of only a few people who are pathologically addicted to alcohol. Are we, individually, differently prone to compulsive alcohol use? A recent paper, published in Science, attempts to answer this question using rodents. […]

10h

10h

Will the Air Force's F-35 Soon Get a Laser Gun?

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

This $6 million electric fire engine is coming to the US – Electrek

submitted by /u/cake_donut [link] [comments]

10h

10h

Human Brains Have Tiny Bits of Magnetic Material

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

Hemineglect – moving objects in 3D space?

submitted by /u/Robosidd [link] [comments]

10h

10h

Sådan finder vi de bedste til behandling af hjernesygdomme

Ranglisten over Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af sclerose, apopleksi, forbigående blodprop og demens er baseret på data fra kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser, og speciallæger har vægtet betydningen af kvalitetsindikatorerne.

10h

'Marsquakes' reveal red planet's hidden geology

Nature, Published online: 13 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03796-7 NASA's Mars InSight lander has detected more than 300 quakes and traced some back to their source.

11h

Hurtig udredning øger risiko for ­forkerte diagnoser

Landets demensklinikker har stor spredning i, hvor lang tid der går med at udrede og diagnosticere patienter med demens. Men udredningstiden må heller ikke blive så kort, at det går ud over kvaliteten, påpeger styregruppen bag kvalitetsdatabasen for demens.

11h

12h

Breast cancer patients to be evaluated for genetic testing

The guidance from the ACMG differs from a consensus guideline issued in February by the American Society of Breast Surgeons, which recommended genetic testing for all newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer. The ACMG recommends evaluations before genetic testing.

12h

Give yourself the gift of self care with these relaxing beauty masks

Self-care gift. (DepositPhotos /) When holiday stress runs high, it's always better to address it than let it fester. There are plenty of ways to relieve stress without spending money, like going for a run, cooking your favorite meal, confiding in a friend, screeching into a pillow, and more. But sometimes, it is easier and more fun to spend money on a frivolous face mask. From minimalist to comp

13h

13h

New Zealand Seeks Human Skin to Treat Volcano Burn Victims

The country's need highlights a little-known type of organ donation.

13h

Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels

The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting in Belfast today.

13h

Baby boys born small for gestational age have increased risk of infertility in adulthood

Baby boys who are born small for their gestational age are at increased risk of having fertility problems in adulthood, according to research published in Human Reproduction.

13h

Humans 'sole culprits' in US parrot extinction

A study of North America's only native parrot confirms its disappearance was down to humans alone.

14h

Climate change: Stalemate at UN talks as splits re-appear

Talks in Madrid enter their final day with serious divisions between large emitting countries and small island states

14h

14h

Certain ZIP Codes Pick Losers

People in certain ZIP codes are more likely to purchase products that flop, buy homes that are poor investments, and pick political candidates who lose. Christopher Intagliata reports.

14h

Trouble for Chinese AI Unicorns, Physics of a Kung Fu Master's Jump, and More News.

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

14h

Is ivermectin safe during pregnancy?

Is it safe to give ivermectin to pregnant women? To answer this question, researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that reported cases of accidental exposure to the drug among pregnant women. The conclusion of the analysis, published in The Lancet Global Health, is that

14h

Federal Watchdog Questions Billions of Dollars Paid to Private Medicare Plans

A new report from the inspector general's office criticized insurers for overstating patients' illnesses without adequate documentation to obtain more federal money.

14h

Certain ZIP Codes Pick Losers

People in certain ZIP codes are more likely to purchase products that flop, buy homes that are poor investments, and pick political candidates who lose. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Certain ZIP Codes Pick Losers

People in certain ZIP codes are more likely to purchase products that flop, buy homes that are poor investments, and pick political candidates who lose. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: What Separates the Left From the Left

It's Thursday, December 12. House Judiciary Committee members continued to spar over final tweaks to the articles of impeachment, moving closer to a final vote. In today's newsletter: To the left of the left. Plus, Anne Applebaum on the false romance of Russia. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP) To the Left of the Left The left knows it wants to kick President Donald Trump out of the

15h

Giant New Cyclone Discovered at Jupiter's South Pole

NASA's Juno spacecraft picked out a hexagon of storms hidden beneath the top layer of Jupiter's clouds.

15h

Unlock a treasure trove of royalty-free vector graphics for under $35 today

StockUnlimited offers a premium vector graphics library including over 500,000 designs. All graphics are royalty-free and can be used in any design project. A lifetime subscription is now $34.99, over 90% off the regular price. None Using graphics in a website or online presentation isn't always so simple. Have you ever tried to take a regular jpeg or gif and blow it up beyond its original size?

15h

Winter camping is a great way to see more nature and fewer people

Nothing says peace and quiet more than a vast, frozen expanse. (Colby Thomas via Unsplash/) The trails are devoid of human life, animals wander freely through the woods , and snow falls soundlessly on the treetops—it's wintertime in the great outdoors. But despite the sparkling vistas, uncrowded trails, and the beauty nature offers to hikers in this time of the year, many never experience the won

15h

Porsche Taycan Slapped With Disappointing 201-Mile EPA Range Estimate

Photography: Christoph Bauer Postproduction: Wagnerchic – www.wagnerchic.com For the last few years, Tesla has owned the high-performance electric vehicle market. Even the company's mid-range Tesla Model 3 has better acceleration and a higher top speed than some more expensive gasoline-powered sports cars. Porsche, not accustomed to being outperformed by a cheaper car, is preparing to release the

15h

Geneticist Says His DNA Dating App Isn't *Really* Eugenics

FAQs Answered After Harvard geneticist George Church told "60 Minutes" that he was developing a dating app that matches users based on their DNA, critics quickly took to the internet to decry the plan. Many compared the app, which we now know is called Digid8 , to the eugenics movement, which advocates selective breeding based on genes. In response, Church published an FAQ page about Digid8 on We

15h

10-year results of NRG Oncology/NSABP B-42 trial

In the updated results from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-42 trial through 10 years of observation, extending letrozole therapy for additional five years after five years of adjuvant endocrine therapy resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer.

15h

Greta Thunberg, climate change activist, wins Time Person of the Year

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate change activist, has been named Time 's Person of the Year. The award is given to "the person or persons who most affected the news and our lives, for good or ill, and embodied what was important about the year, for better or for worse." Considering the magnitude of directly inspired protest movements and real-world impacts she has had, the award se

16h

Sweet potato can warn neighbors of insect attacks

Breeding potatoes that produce chemical compound could provide an all-natural pest defense

16h

The place where dead eagles are given a new life

Colorado's National Eagle Repository is the only one of its kind in the world.

16h

Spacewatch: ESA awards first junk clean-up contract

Space agency commissions €100m ClearSpace project after competitive bid process ClearSpace-1 is planned for launch in 2025 and will be the first mission to remove an item of space debris from orbit. After a competitive bid process, the European Space Agency has awarded a service contract to a consortium led by the Swiss startup company ClearSpace, which is staffed by space debris experts from the

16h

NASA Releases "Treasure Map" for Water Ice on Mars

Buried Treasure When NASA astronauts visit Mars, they'll probably need to harvest the planet's water ice for drinking water and fuel. It makes sense, then, for the space agency to target a landing spot near easily accessible ice — and they now have a "treasure map" detailing where that ice exists to make the process that much easier. "You wouldn't need a backhoe to dig up this ice," NASA research

16h

Comprehensive background check policies effective in Oregon but not in Washington

Updated comprehensive background check policies were associated with an 18% increase in pre-firearm-sale checks in Oregon and a 4% increase in Washington state.

16h

People willing to risk near-certain death for an HIV cure

; protecting individuals and families in genetic and psychiatric research, considerations for including pregnant women in research.

16h

Study highlights high cost of fossil fuel pollution on children's health

A new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health is the first to compile the estimated per-case costs of 6 childhood health conditions linked to air pollution — estimates that can be incorporated into benefits assessments of air pollution regulations and climate change mitigation policies. Results appear in t

16h

Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest: Ancient plant fossil record shows

Canada's northernmost islands, Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands in Nunavut, were home to a vibrant, temperate forest 56 million years ago, according to fossil research just published by University of Saskatchewan (USask) scientists.

16h

Scientists Discover "Dark River" Under Greenland

Radar Maps Scientists mapping the bedrock beneath Greenland believe they've uncovered a vast, thousand-mile-long river hiding underground. While updating spotty radar maps, Hokkaido University researchers revealed a vast underground network that likely drains melted glacier ice from the center of the massive island to the sea, according to Live Science . And since the river would run for hundreds

16h

When Dieting Should We Be Fasting Or Grazing?

When and how to eat is the cornerstone of many diets. But the advice often conflicts.

16h

Deadly 'superbugs' destroyed by molecular drills

Molecular drills have gained the ability to target and destroy deadly bacteria that have evolved resistance to nearly all antibiotics. In some cases, the drills make the antibiotics effective once again.

16h

Why Climate Change Threats Don't Trigger An Immediate Response From Human Brains

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert about why the human brain doesn't respond to threats posed by climate change as quickly or proactively as seems warranted.

16h

Boeing's crew capsule declared ready for 1st space flight

Boeing's Starliner crew capsule finally has a launch date for its first test flight to the International Space Station.

16h

Eastern EU states opposed to 2050 zero-emissions goal

Eastern EU members Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary have opposed the bloc's target of zero net carbon emissions by 2050.

16h

Why Ring Doorbells Perfectly Exemplify the IoT Security Crisis

A new wave of reports about the home surveillance cameras getting hijacked by creeps is painfully familiar.

16h

16h

In the End, the NFL Proved Colin Kaepernick Right

When the NFL commissioner, Roger Goodell, declared yesterday that the league had "moved on" from the embattled quarterback Colin Kaepernick, the finality of Goodell's tone answered the question about whether Kaepernick would ever play professional football again. Kaepernick became persona non grata in the National Football League after the 2016 season, during which he protested police violence ag

16h

Tiny quantum sensors watch materials transform under pressure

Since their invention more than 60 years ago, diamond anvil cells have made it possible for scientists to recreate extreme phenomena—such as the crushing pressures deep inside the Earth's mantle—or to enable chemical reactions that can only be triggered by intense pressure, all within the confines of a laboratory apparatus that you can safely hold in the palm of your hand.

16h

Research reveals how muscles talk to the brain to regulate feeding behavior

A study from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital sheds light on the mechanisms governing feeding behavior in fruit flies and how skeletal muscle communicates energy needs to the brain.

16h

Hubble watches interstellar comet Borisov speed past the sun

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has once again captured comet 2I/Borisov streaking through our solar system on its way back into interstellar space. At a breathtaking speed of over 175 000 kilometres per hour, Borisov is one of the fastest comets ever seen. It is only the second interstellar object known to have passed through the Solar System.

16h

A galactic dance

Galaxies lead a graceful existence on cosmic timescales. Over millions of years, they can engage in elaborate dances that produce some of Nature's most exquisite and striking grand designs. Few are as captivating as the galactic duo known as NGC 5394/5, sometimes nicknamed the Heron Galaxy.

16h

Caribou migration linked to climate cycles and insect pests

Caribou, the North American cousin of reindeer, migrate farther than any terrestrial animal. They can cover thousands of miles as they move between winter feeding grounds and summer calving grounds. But many caribou herds are in decline as the warming climate changes much of the landscape they depend on. Inedible shrubs are rapidly encroaching on the tundra, and more frequent forest fires and dise

16h

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage

Safe nuclear waste storage, new ways of generating and storing hydrogen, and technologies for capturing and reusing greenhouse gases are all potential spinoffs of a new study by University of Guelph researchers.

16h

Here's what police know about digital evidence

In today's criminal justice system, a Play Station and iPhone are just as important pieces of evidence as eyewitness accounts. Yet, there isn't a strong understanding as to how police officers identify digital evidence—everything from a laptop to a smart television—in the field.

16h

Caribou migration linked to climate cycles and insect pests

Caribou, the North American cousin of reindeer, migrate farther than any terrestrial animal. They can cover thousands of miles as they move between winter feeding grounds and summer calving grounds. But many caribou herds are in decline as the warming climate changes much of the landscape they depend on. Inedible shrubs are rapidly encroaching on the tundra, and more frequent forest fires and dise

16h

Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm

Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms. Arjan Boonman of Tel-Aviv University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

16h

Beyond 'shovelomics': Growing cassava in the air helps study the plant's mysterious roots

The normal way to study cassava roots is digging up the plant. Unfortunately, that tends to kill the plant, causing serious complications for researchers who are interested in learning more about how cassava grows. To solve this, scientists at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture grew cassava in the air—using a technique called aeroponics—and in doing so removed an obstacle for resear

16h

Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm

Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms. Arjan Boonman of Tel-Aviv University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

16h

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict

New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate. Vinil Chackochan and Vittorio Sanguineti of the University of Genoa, Italy, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

16h

Beyond 'shovelomics': Growing cassava in the air helps study the plant's mysterious roots

The normal way to study cassava roots is digging up the plant. Unfortunately, that tends to kill the plant, causing serious complications for researchers who are interested in learning more about how cassava grows. To solve this, scientists at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture grew cassava in the air—using a technique called aeroponics—and in doing so removed an obstacle for resear

16h

Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov swings past sun

When astronomers see something in the universe that at first glance seems like one-of-a-kind, it's bound to stir up a lot of excitement and attention. Enter comet 2I/Borisov. This mysterious visitor from the depths of space is the first identified comet to arrive here from another star. We don't know from where or when the comet started heading toward our Sun, but it won't hang around for long. Th

16h

Climate cycles and insect pests drive migration timing of reindeer's North American cousin

Biologists have discovered two unexpected drivers for migration timing that dispute long-held assumptions and provide insight into potential future effects of climate change on caribou. First, the start of migration is synchronized across North America and tied to large-scale, ocean-driven climate cycles. Second, warm, windless summers that favored insect pests lead to poorer maternal health and d

17h

When flowers reached Australia

University of Melbourne research has established when and where flowering plants first took a foothold.

17h

Tour 10 of the Closest Black Holes to Earth

Black holes should be common in our Milky Way galaxy, but their dark nature means only dozens have been discovered to date. Here are a few nearby black holes astronomers know a little about.

17h

How Whales Got So Large — And Why They Aren't Even Bigger

The bigger the whale, the tougher it is to find a decent meal. Whale_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Seb c'est bien/Shutterstock Creature Thursday, December 12, 2019 – 15:45 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — Giant, krill-eating whales could grow even bigger if the size and availability of their prey could keep up, a new study finds. Whales are the heaviest animals to have ever lived on

17h

Greta Thunberg Blasts 'Creative PR' in Her Climate Speech

In her latest talk at a major climate change conference, the Swedish activist accused politicians and big business of misleading the public.

17h

To help solve global problems, look to developing countries | Bright Simons

To address the problem of counterfeit goods, African entrepreneurs like Bright Simons have come up with innovative and effective ways to confirm products are genuine. Now he asks: Why aren't these solutions everywhere? From password-protected medicines to digitally certified crops, Simons demonstrates the power of local ideas — and calls on the rest of the world to listen up.

17h

What Elephants Teach Us About Consumption and Extinction

A new exhibition places the human-elephant relationship in the context of American history

17h

Deadly 'superbugs' destroyed by molecular drills

Motorized molecules activated by light target and drill through highly antibiotic resistant bacteria and kill them within minutes. The molecules can open bacteria to attack by drugs they previously resisted. The strategy could be applied to bacterial infections or diseases on the skin, in the lungs or in the gastrointestinal tract.

17h

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage

Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometers, scientists prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste — important for Canadi

17h

Airtaxies are actually becoming a thing

submitted by /u/Tramagust [link] [comments]

17h

17h

This robot that walked me to my gate at Seoul Incheon Airport

submitted by /u/dick_inspector [link] [comments]

17h

17h

17h

17h

17h

17h

17h

17h

Scientists find cheaper way to make hydrogen energy out of water

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

17h

A.I. Fuels Inequality and Climate Change, a New Report Warns

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17h

17h

Our Attempts to Kill Rats Are Making Them Evolve at Super Speed

Sickly or Super? Efforts to control urban rat populations rarely — if ever — result in the complete eradication of the pests. Most of the time, the goal is to simply reduce rodent numbers enough to minimize the spread of disease or damage to property. But according to Jonathan Richardson , an assistant professor of biology at the University of Richmond, letting some rats slip through the cracks c

17h

First identified comet to visit our solar system from another star

Comet 2I/Borisov is a mysterious visitor from the depths of space — the first identified comet to arrive here from another star. Hubble images capture the comet streaking though our solar system and on its way back to interstellar space. It's only the second interstellar object known to have passed through the solar system.

17h

To the brain, straight from the vein: IV treatment for TBI

A team of researchers has found that neural exosomes — 'cargo' molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.

17h

Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm

Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms.

17h

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict

New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate.

17h

For controlling tsetse flies, fabric color matters

Researchers report that they have engineered an improved colored fabric for the insecticide-treated targets used to control tsetse, based on an understanding of how flies see color.

17h

New drug targets to treat Nipah virus

Nipah virus, which is transmitted to humans from bats and pigs, has a high mortality rate and there are no licensed drugs against it. Now, researchers have used information on the structure of the Nipah virus to identified 150 possible inhibitors of the virus.

17h

Insight into the neglected tropical disease sleeping sickness

Researchers have shed light on how the parasite which causes sleeping sickness multiples inside its host. Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, only occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa where an estimated 60 million people in 36 countries are at risk. The infection attacks the central nervous system and is fatal without treatment. Researchers have found that the parasite's cell division diff

17h

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage

Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometers, scientists prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste — important for Canadi

17h

Metabolic adaptation ensures survival of colon cancer cells

Colon cancer cells deficient in p53, one of the most important control proteins in cell growth, activate a particular metabolic pathway to adapt to the lack of oxygen and nutrients inside the tumor. Statins, which are often prescribed to lower cholesterol, block this metabolic pathway and cause the cancer cells to die, as scientists have now discovered. The researchers now intend to investigate th

17h

Studying the human gaze could transform breast reconstruction surgery

Which part of the human breast do viewers fixate on the most? The answer might have something to do with inherent mammalian instincts. (Paolo Gallo Modena/)(DepositPhotos/) What does the most attractive human body look like? Depending on who you are, you'll have a different answer—and it's probably not a bad thing, given that there's no one perfect form. But when it comes to plastic surgery, espe

17h

To Adapt to Climate Change, Vulnerable Areas Need Better Forecasts

Failures to predict drought and other weather extremes put people in African and small island nations at particular risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

The 'Impossible' Molecules That Only Appear In Space

Compounds with noble gases don't form naturally on Earth. But in the interstellar medium, they are helping scientists probe the history of the universe.

17h

Middle Eastern Nation First to Buy Drone Armed With Machine Gun

Before the end of the year, Turkey will become the first nation to get its hands on a brand new military drone equipped with a machine gun. It's called the Songar, and it can carry 200 rounds of ammunition. A New Scientist story notes that the drone is accurate enough to hit a human target with every bullet fired from 200 meters (656 feet) away — a devastating level of accuracy in the already tro

17h

Here's what police know about digital evidence

In today's criminal justice system, a Play Station and iPhone are just as important pieces of evidence as eyewitness accounts. Thomas Holt, professor of criminal justice at Michigan State University, is among the first researchers to capture how well police officers recognize digital evidence, as well as what to do with it.

17h

NASA's MAVEN maps winds in the martian upper atmosphere

Researchers have created the first map of wind circulation in the upper atmosphere of a planet besides Earth.

17h

Climate cycles and insect pests drive migration timing of reindeer's North American cousin

A new study led by a University of Maryland biologist discovered two unexpected drivers for migration timing that dispute long-held assumptions and provide insight into potential future effects of climate change on caribou. First, the start of migration is synchronized across North America and tied to large-scale, ocean-driven climate cycles. Second, warm, windless summers that favored insect pest

17h

Revolt\! Scientists Say They're Sick of Quantum Computing's Hype

A Twitter account called Quantum Bullshit Detector reflects some researchers' angst about overhyped claims and other troubling trends.

17h

How Worms Avoid Eating Bad Bacteria and Warn Their Offspring Too

A small RNA in Pseudomonas triggers an avoidance response in C. elegans that can be passed on to the next generation, according to research presented at this week's meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology.

17h

Gene Editing Makes Cells Evade Immune Attack In Vitro

To advance the possibility of off-the-shelf cardiac cell therapies, scientists devise an engineered cardiac stem cell that avoids stimulating a detrimental immune attack.

18h

Is This Indonesian Cave Painting the Earliest Portrayal of a Mythical Story?

Archaeologists have dated the image to at least 43,900 years ago, but their interpretation has met with doubt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Tesla's Top Lawyers Keep Leaving

Revolving Door Tesla just lost its top lawyer for the third time in 2019 alone. Jonathan Chang, the company's general counsel, left the company last Friday, according to Bloomberg . Now, Chang will take the same position at the artificial intelligence company SambaNova Systems, bookending a tumultuous year of high-profile employees deciding to leave the electric car company. Turbulent Tenure Chan

18h

Deadly 'superbugs' destroyed by molecular drills

Motorized molecules activated by light target and drill through highly antibiotic resistant bacteria and kill them within minutes. The molecules can open bacteria to attack by drugs they previously resisted. The strategy could be applied to bacterial infections or diseases on the skin, in the lungs or in the gastrointestinal tract.

18h

Ocean microbes: Novel study underscores microbial individuality

A single drop of seawater can contain a wide representation of ocean microbes from around the world — revealing novel insights into the ecology, evolution and biotechnology potential of the global microbiome.

18h

Scientists say you can change your personality

A review of recent research in personality science points to the possibility that personality traits can change through persistent intervention and major life events.

18h

Speech could be older than we thought

The theory of the 'descended larynx' has stated that before speech can emerge, the larynx must be in a low position to produce differentiated vowels. Researcher show the production of differentiated vocalizations is not a question of anatomical variants but of control of articulators. This work leads us to think that speech could have emerged before the 200,000 years ago.

18h

New technique to determine protein structures may solve biomedical puzzles

Researchers have now demonstrated a powerful 'experimental evolution' method to discover details of protein shape and function, and the method may find uses across a very broad spectrum of biomedical research.

18h

Your genes aren't the only factor dictating Alzheimer's risk

In the first study published about Alzheimer's disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed Alzheimer's while one did not.

18h

Is This Indonesian Cave Painting the Earliest Portrayal of a Mythical Story?

Archaeologists have dated the image to at least 43,900 years ago, but their interpretation has met with doubt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

When flowers reached Australia

University of Melbourne research has established when and where flowering plants first took a foothold.

18h

Beyond 'shovelomics': Growing cassava in the air helps study the plant's mysterious roots

Scientists at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture grew cassava in the air — using a technique called aeroponics — to better understand the root growth of one of the world's hardiest staple crops.

18h

Focus on food security and sustainability

The number of malnourished people is increasing worldwide. More than two billion people suffer from a lack of micronutrients. Infant mortality rates are unacceptably high. Against this background, there is a need for the global pooling of research efforts, more research funding and an international body for food security and agriculture that prepares policy decisions.

18h

Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form

What could Azteca ants in coffee farms in Mexico have in common with leopards' spots and zebras' stripes?

18h

Immune outposts inside kidney tumors predict post-surgery outcomes

Patients with well-supported immune cells in their tumors are more likely to control their cancers' growth for a longer time, an observation that could guide treatment decisions after surgery for kidney cancer. In addition, the findings could help researchers expand the dramatic but sparse benefits of cancer immunotherapy to more people.

18h

Virtual reality and drones help to predict and protect koala habitat

Researchers have used a combination of virtual reality (VR), aerial thermal-imaging and ground surveys to build a better statistical model for predicting the location of koalas and, ultimately, protecting their habitat.

18h

Mars 2020 will hunt for 'microfossils', signs of ancient alien life

The Jerezo crater is likely home to hydrated silica, a material which on Earth is especially good at preserving signs of life. Mars 2020 is set to land on the planet crater in February 2021. NASA's Curiosity rover is currently the only rover operating on Mars. The discovery of past life on Mars would be revolutionary, at least in science and philosophy. None The Mars 2020 rover is set to search f

18h

Older blood is just as good for kids needing transfusion

For critically ill children needing blood transfusions, older red blood cells are just as effective and safe as fresh ones, a new study shows. Researchers compared fresh blood stored for up to seven days to older red blood cells stored for nearly four weeks. Children who suffer from traumatic blood loss, cancer, or sickle cell disease, often require red blood cell transfusions . However, until no

18h

A digital approach to proteins and cancer

What if scientists could create more effective drugs to treat cancers and other diseases by better targeting specific sites on proteins in the body?

18h

Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis

A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed.

18h

Tropical flower offers potential new route for treating pancreatic cancer

An international team of scientists have made drug-like molecules inspired by a chemical found in a tropical flower, that they hope could in the future help to treat deadly pancreatic cancer.

18h

The songwriter is creative — the singer, not so much

Country music songwriters must perform a careful dance when they work with famous singers who may be less talented at writing songs but bring the needed star power to attract fans — and, importantly, to get the song recorded in the first place, research suggests. A study of 39 successful country-music songwriters found that they use two strategies to navigate creative collaboration with more famo

18h

New research seeks to improve safety equipment for pregnant women

As technology advances in the things we use every day, it's generally accepted they also become safer. But according to one engineer, that may not be true for a large portion of the population. New research has developed a innovative model to map the impact of trauma on a pregnant woman and her uterus if she were involved in an accident — with the hopes of making everything from airbags to seatbe

18h

Scales offer insight into chronic stress of fish

Aquatic researchers have long sought an easy way to determine when wild fish are under stress. Now, researchers have shown for the first time that cortisol, a key stress hormone, accumulates in fish scales slowly and remains there for weeks.

18h

Blood transfusions: Fresh red blood cells no better than older ones

Findings from the ABC-PICU study on critically ill children may alter policies at hospitals where fresh red cells are preferentially used.

18h

Geneticists identify small molecules that are potential indicators for disease

Researchers identified hundreds of metabolites that might serve as intermediates to translate variation in the genome to variation in complex traits. Findings could someday facilitate early or more accurate diagnosis of illnesses detected by metabolite variation.

18h

Fast tandställning bäst och billigast

En fast tandställning är bästa och billigaste alternativet, och mest pengar finns att spara om behandlingen görs av specialisttandläkare.

18h

Aerial view of forest chemistry adds to climate fallout models

Researchers have used remote sensing to measure plant biodiversity from the Amazon basin to the Andes Mountains in Peru to better understand how tropical forests will respond to climate change. The researchers used Arizona State University's Global Airborne Observatory, or GAO, to show that combining traditional on-the-ground field measurements of carbon with aerial measurements of plant chemistr

18h

Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm

Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms. Arjan Boonman of Tel-Aviv University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

18h

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage

Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometres, the University of Guelph team prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste — i

18h

Running away from exercise: The curious case of migraine

In spite of the widespread recommendation for regular physical activity as a strategy to manage migraine, for some patients, exercise can instead trigger migraine attacks. Here, Samantha et al found that anxiety sensitivity mediates intentional avoidance of both moderate and vigorous physical activity.

18h

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict

New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate. Vinil Chackochan and Vittorio Sanguineti of the University of Genoa, Italy, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

18h

New drugs more likely to be approved if backed up by genetics

A new drug candidate is more likely to be approved for use if it targets a gene known to be linked to the disease; a finding that can help pharmaceutical companies to focus their drug development efforts. Emily King and colleagues from AbbVie report these findings in a new study published Dec. 12 in PLOS Genetics.

18h

Tiny quantum sensors watch materials transform under pressure

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have converted diamonds' atomic flaws into atomic sensors that could lead to a new generation of smart materials.

18h

Unique polymer fibres: Light, strong, and tough

Strong and tough yet as light as a feather – materials with this exceptional combination of properties are urgently needed in many industrial sectors and in medicine, as well as being of great interest for scientific research. A research team from the University of Bayreuth has developed polymer fibres with precisely these properties. Together with partners in Germany, China and Switzerland, the p

18h

Scientists map a planet's global wind patterns for the first time, and it's not Earth

A paper in Science documents the global wind patterns on any planet for the first time. Remote repogramming of the MAVEN spacecraft and its NGIMS instrument enabled the data collection. The results reveal seasonal stability in circulation patterns on Mars, but high short-term volatility in wind direction and speed. The data also allow researchers to infer the topography below based on waves create

18h

Knee-jerk vaping bans will fail public health, experts argue

Bans and other policies restricting e-cigarette sales could do more public harm than good, according to a group of public-health, tobacco-policy and ethics experts.

18h

For the first time: Mapping the winds of mars' upper atmosphere with MAVEN

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft has allowed researchers to map the winds that blow high above the red planet's surface, reports a new study, which measures the global circulation of Mars' upper atmosphere for the first time.

18h

Why whales are so big, but not bigger

Whales' large bodies help them consume their prey at high efficiencies, a more than decade-long study of around 300 tagged whales now shows, but their gigantism is limited by prey availability and foraging efficiency.

18h

Insight into the neglected tropical disease sleeping sickness

Researchers have shed light on how the parasite which causes sleeping sickness multiples inside its host. Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, only occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa where an estimated 60 million people in 36 countries are at risk. The infection attacks the central nervous system and is fatal without treatment. Lancaster University researchers have found that the parasite

18h

Significant potential demonstrated by digital agricultural advice

2019 Economics Nobel Laureate co-publishes paper demonstrating the potential for digital agricultural advice to 'sustainably' raise 'agricultural productivity' at low cost for 2 billion smallholder farming families.

18h

Transformative change can save humans and nature

Human impacts on life on Earth are unprecedented, requiring transformative action to address root economic, social and technological causes.

18h

The limits of ocean heavyweights: Prey curb whales' gigantic size

Scientists collected data from hundreds of feeding whales, allowing them to determine how much energy species of different sizes invest to capture their prey and which of these species reap the greatest rewards for their efforts. Their findings reveal that body size in all whales is limited by the availability of their prey, but only filter-feeding whales have evolved a feeding strategy that drive

18h

Study pinpoints new drug targets to treat Nipah virus

Nipah virus, which is transmitted to humans from bats and pigs, has a high mortality rate and there are no licensed drugs against it. Now, researchers have used information on the structure of the Nipah virus to identified 150 possible inhibitors of the virus. The results are published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

18h

Women and men face gender-related challenges in treatment for neglected tropical diseases

Around the world, women and girls suffer a greater burden of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) compared to men. Now, through a series of focus groups and interviews, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have probed exactly why women in Ethiopia might not seek care, or might delay care seeking for NTDs. They also looked into gender-related challenges men might face when access

18h

For controlling tsetse flies, fabric color matters

This week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers report that they have engineered an improved colored fabric for the insecticide-treated targets used to control tsetse, based on an understanding of how flies see color.

18h

With Climate Change, Evergreen Trees May Begin to Take Over America's Forests

Higher levels of carbon in the atmosphere might give evergreen trees an advantage.

18h

18h

NASA picks challenging landing site for its asteroid-sampling robot

"Nightingale" site, on Bennu's northern flank, could preserve organics

18h

Depletion of microbiome-derived molecules in the host using Clostridium genetics

The gut microbiota produce hundreds of molecules that are present at high concentrations in the host circulation. Unraveling the contribution of each molecule to host biology remains difficult. We developed a system for constructing clean deletions in Clostridium spp., the source of many molecules from the gut microbiome. By applying this method to the model commensal organism Clostridium sporoge

18h

18h

News at a glance

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

Foods of the future

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

The biology of big

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

Diamond-based sensors

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

The time is now

[no content]

18h

Mobile farming advice

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

Fisherman's friends

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

Lubricating cell fate

[no content]

18h

Stepwise Earth oxygenation is an inherent property of global biogeochemical cycling

Oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans occurred across three major steps during the Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Paleozoic eras, with each increase having profound consequences for the biosphere. Biological or tectonic revolutions have been proposed to explain each of these stepwise increases in oxygen, but the principal driver of each event remains unclear. Here we show, using a t

18h

DNA loop extrusion by human cohesin

Eukaryotic genomes are folded into loops and topologically associating domains, which contribute to chromatin structure, gene regulation, and gene recombination. These structures depend on cohesin, a ring-shaped DNA-entrapping adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) complex that has been proposed to form loops by extrusion. Such an activity has been observed for condensin, which forms loops in mitosis,

18h

Human cohesin compacts DNA by loop extrusion

Cohesin is a chromosome-bound, multisubunit adenosine triphosphatase complex. After loading onto chromosomes, it generates loops to regulate chromosome functions. It has been suggested that cohesin organizes the genome through loop extrusion, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we used single-molecule imaging to show that the recombinant human cohesin-NIPBL complex compacts both naked and nucle

18h

Imaging stress and magnetism at high pressures using a nanoscale quantum sensor

Pressure alters the physical, chemical, and electronic properties of matter. The diamond anvil cell enables tabletop experiments to investigate a diverse landscape of high-pressure phenomena. Here, we introduce and use a nanoscale sensing platform that integrates nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers directly into the culet of diamond anvils. We demonstrate the versatility of this platform by perfo

18h

Measuring magnetic field texture in correlated electron systems under extreme conditions

Pressure is a clean, continuous, and systematic tuning parameter among the competing ground states in strongly correlated electron systems such as superconductivity and magnetism. However, owing to the restricted access to samples enclosed in high-pressure devices, compatible magnetic field sensors with sufficient sensitivity are rare. We used nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond as a spatially re

18h

Magnetic measurements on micrometer-sized samples under high pressure using designed NV centers

Pressure can be used to tune the interplay among structural, electronic, and magnetic interactions in materials. High pressures are usually applied in the diamond anvil cell, making it difficult to study the magnetic properties of a micrometer-sized sample. We report a method for spatially resolved optical magnetometry based on imaging a layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers created at the surfa

18h

Global circulation of Mars upper atmosphere

The thermosphere of Mars is the interface through which the planet is continuously losing its reservoir of atmospheric volatiles to space. The structure and dynamics of the thermosphere is driven by a global circulation that redistributes the incident energy from the Sun. We report mapping of the global circulation in the thermosphere of Mars with the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN

18h

Why whales are big but not bigger: Physiological drivers and ecological limits in the age of ocean giants

The largest animals are marine filter feeders, but the underlying mechanism of their large size remains unexplained. We measured feeding performance and prey quality to demonstrate how whale gigantism is driven by the interplay of prey abundance and harvesting mechanisms that increase prey capture rates and energy intake. The foraging efficiency of toothed whales that feed on single prey is const

18h

Cryo-electron microscopy structures of human oligosaccharyltransferase complexes OST-A and OST-B

Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of a high-mannose glycan onto secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mammals express two distinct OST complexes that act in a cotranslational (OST-A) or posttranslocational (OST-B) manner. Here, we present high-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structures of human OST-A and OST-B. Although they have similar overall architectures,

18h

High strength in combination with high toughness in robust and sustainable polymeric materials

In materials science, there is an intrinsic conflict between high strength and high toughness, which can be resolved for different materials only through the use of innovative design principles. Advanced materials must be highly resistant to both deformation and fracture. We overcome this conflict in man-made polymer fibers and show multifibrillar polyacrylonitrile yarn with a toughness of 137 ±

18h

Wafer-scale synthesis of monolayer two-dimensional porphyrin polymers for hybrid superlattices

The large-scale synthesis of high-quality thin films with extensive tunability derived from molecular building blocks will advance the development of artificial solids with designed functionalities. We report the synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) porphyrin polymer films with wafer-scale homogeneity in the ultimate limit of monolayer thickness by growing films at a sharp pentane/water interface, w

18h

Sensory coding mechanisms revealed by optical tagging of physiologically defined neuronal types

Neural circuit analysis relies on having molecular markers for specific cell types. However, for a cell type identified only by its circuit function, the process of identifying markers remains laborious. We developed physiological optical tagging sequencing (PhOTseq), a technique for tagging and expression profiling of cells on the basis of their functional properties. PhOTseq was capable of sele

18h

New Products

[no content]

18h

Turning a blind eye

[no content]

18h

p27 allosterically activates cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and antagonizes palbociclib inhibition

The p27 protein is a canonical negative regulator of cell proliferation and acts primarily by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Under some circumstances, p27 is associated with active CDK4, but no mechanism for activation has been described. We found that p27, when phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases, allosterically activated CDK4 in complex with cyclin D1 (CDK4-CycD1). Structural and bi

18h

Realizing the potential of digital development: The case of agricultural advice

The rapid spread of mobile phones creates potential for sustainably raising agricultural productivity for the 2 billion people living in smallholder farming households. Meta-analyses suggest that providing agricultural information via digital technologies increased yields by 4% and the odds of adopting recommended inputs by 22%. Benefits likely exceed the cost of information transmission by an or

18h

Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earth points to the need for transformative change

The human impact on life on Earth has increased sharply since the 1970s, driven by the demands of a growing population with rising average per capita income. Nature is currently supplying more materials than ever before, but this has come at the high cost of unprecedented global declines in the extent and integrity of ecosystems, distinctness of local ecological communities, abundance and number

18h

A metagenomic strategy for harnessing the chemical repertoire of the human microbiome

Extensive progress has been made in determining the effects of the microbiome on human physiology and disease, but the underlying molecules and mechanisms governing these effects remain largely unexplored. Here, we combine a new computational algorithm with synthetic biology to access biologically active small molecules encoded directly in human microbiome–derived metagenomic sequencing data. We

18h

Measuring the success of climate change adaptation and mitigation in terrestrial ecosystems

Natural and seminatural ecosystems must be at the forefront of efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. In the urgency of current circumstances, ecosystem restoration represents a range of available, efficient, and effective solutions to cut net greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change. Although mitigation success can be measured by monitoring changing fluxes of greenhouse gas

18h

The utopian 1920s scheme for five global superstates

Unity is strength: This 1920s map divides the world among just five superstates. The map was produced by count Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi, who devoted his life to European unity. This utopian map may have inspired George Orwell's dystopian world in 1984 . Geopolitical dreams If the geopolitical dreams of a 20th-century Austro-Japanese aristocrat had come true, this is what the map of the worl

18h

How to train computers faster for 'extreme' datasets

A new approach could make it easier to train computer for "extreme classification problems" like speech translation and answering general questions, researchers say. The divide-and-conquer approach to machine learning can slash the time and computational resources required. Online shoppers typically string together a few words to search for the product they want, but in a world with millions of p

18h

Using mobile technology to understand the impact potential of agricultural interventions

The near ubiquitous penetration of mobile phones among smallholder farmers in developing countries has enabled a powerful new tool for dispensing agricultural advice to farmers. Low acquisition and marginal costs make digital extension scalable at low cost when compared to traditional in person extension practices.

18h

Transformative change can save humans and nature

The survival of Earth's life is not a battle of humans versus nature. In this week's Science, an independent group of international experts, including one from Michigan State University (MSU), deliver a sweeping assessment of nature, concluding victory needs both humans and nature to thrive.

18h

Researchers discover unique multifibrillar fibres

Strong and tough yet as light as a feather—materials with this exceptional combination of properties are urgently needed in many industrial sectors and in medicine, as well as being of great interest for scientific research. A research team from the University of Bayreuth has now developed polymer fibres with precisely these properties. Together with partners in Germany, China and Switzerland, the

18h

The limits of ocean heavyweights: Prey curb whales' gigantic size

At 100 feet long and weighing more than 100 tons, blue whales are the largest creatures to have evolved on the planet. Other whales, like killer whales, are larger than most terrestrial animals but pale in comparison to the size of blue whales. What sets these two weight classes of whales apart? And what is stopping the biggest whales from growing even bigger?

18h

Scientists map Mars' global wind patterns for the first time

Today, a paper published in Science documents for the first time the global wind circulation patterns in the upper atmosphere of a planet, 120 to 300 kilometers above the surface. The findings are based on local observations, rather than indirect measurements, unlike many prior measurements taken on Earth's upper atmosphere. But it didn't happen on Earth: it happened on Mars. On top of that, all t

18h

18h

18h

18h

Diamond-based sensors

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

The time is now

[no content]

18h

Mobile farming advice

[no content]

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

The limits of ocean heavyweights: Prey curb whales' gigantic size

At 100 feet long and weighing more than 100 tons, blue whales are the largest creatures to have evolved on the planet. Other whales, like killer whales, are larger than most terrestrial animals but pale in comparison to the size of blue whales. What sets these two weight classes of whales apart? And what is stopping the biggest whales from growing even bigger?

19h

A Visit From Krampus—Saint Nick's Dark Companion

While tales of Saint Nicholas feature him bringing gifts to good boys and girls, ancient folklore in Europe's Alpine region also speaks of Krampus, a frightening beastlike creature who emerges during the Yule season, looking for naughty children to punish in horrible ways—or possibly to drag back to his lair in a sack. Krampus associations in villages hold parades without Saint Nick, frightening

19h

Was Earth's oxygenation a gradual process?

Modelling suggests a string of major events wasn't necessary.

19h

So that's what it's like beneath Antarctica's ice sheet

New high-precision map reveals all the bumps and hollows.

19h

Life clock ticking

Study suggests genetics can predict a species' maximum lifespan.

19h

What to make of the X17 factor

A particle new to physics might solve the dark matter mystery.

19h

'Fingerprinting' cells to speed up analysis

New method could improve diagnosis, researchers say.

19h

Anti-Vape Laws Could Do More Harm Than Good

Banning vaping just might drive teens to the black market—and send adult smokers back to their cancer sticks.

19h

NASA asteroid hunter chooses landing site on boulder-strewn space rock

Nature, Published online: 12 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03795-8 OSIRIS-REx probe will attempt to sample rocks and soil from crater in asteroid Bennu's northern hemisphere.

19h

Hidden in plain sight

ALMA spots most distant dusty galaxy.

19h

China is beating the US when it comes to quantum security

Quantum key distribution is being touted as the future of cybersecurity, and China has gone all in.

19h

Water From A Mine in South Africa Might Contain Life Isolated for 2 Billion Years

The water contains bacteria-like shapes that researchers plan to test for DNA.

19h

NASA's Osiris-Rex Selects Target Asteroid Landing Site

The spacecraft spent a year mapping Bennu's rugged terrain, and next year it will touch down on the surface to collect a sample.

19h

Water From A Mine in South Africa Might Contain Life Isolated for 2 Billion Years

The water contains bacteria-like shapes that researchers plan to test for DNA.

19h

Hackers Dupe Facial Recognition Systems With Creepy Mask

Duped Researchers at the AI firm Kneron were able to easily fool facial recognition systems at a variety of high security locations — including banks, border crossing checkpoints, and airports — using a high quality mask, Fortune reports . They suggest that anybody with the capability of creating such a mask could easily fool these systems as well — a grave reality check for widespread facial rec

19h

New NASA image provides more details about first observed interstellar comet

A new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope provides important new details about the first interstellar comet astronomers have seen in our solar system. 'Data from the Hubble Space Telescope give us the best measure of the size of comet 2I/Borisov's nucleus, which is the really important part of the comet,' said David Jewitt, a UCLA professor of planetary science and astronomy who analyzed and

19h

Scientists say you can change your personality

A review of recent research in personality science points to the possibility that personality traits can change through persistent intervention and major life events.

19h

Invasive earthworms are burrowing into boreal forests worldwide

African night crawlers (MarvinBikolano/) An organism we rarely see is transforming the Earth. Invasive earthworms, native to Europe, have burrowed into temperate and tropical soils worldwide, and are now beginning to encroach on colder habitats. A new research project, presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting this week, documents these critters' spread across Alaska. Their prolife

19h

Tracking lab-grown tissue with light

Someday, doctors would like to grow limbs and other body tissue for soldiers who have lost arms in battle, children who need a new heart or liver, and many other people with critical needs. Scientists are supporting this field of research by developing a promising new kind of light-based sensor to study tissue growth in the lab.

19h

Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible

For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles.

19h

The War on Polio Just Entered Its Most Dangerous Phase

Though victory is close, the eradication campaign is on some very fragile ground.

19h

Daily briefing: How to make research better

Nature, Published online: 12 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03860-2 Cooperation and collective action. Plus: humanity's oldest story, and the top ten countries for chemistry.

19h

Interstellar comet 2I — Borisov swings past sun

Comet 2I/Borisov is a mysterious visitor from the depths of space — the first identified comet to arrive here from another star. Hubble images capture the comet streaking though our solar system and on its way back to interstellar space. It's only the second interstellar object known to have passed through the solar system.

19h

Demonstration of ultrafast and energy-efficient all-optical switching with graphene and plasmonic waveguides

Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation and Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated an ultrafast all-optical switching operation with the lowest energy consumption ever reported for all-optical switching at less than one picosecond (one trillionth of a second). The current achievement combines an ultrasmall optical waveguide with a height and width of a few dozen nanometers, called a pl

19h

As epilepsy drugs fail nearly one-third of patients, scientists seek root causes of seizures

Leaps in gene sequencing and better animal models are changing how doctors understand, study, and sometimes treat epilepsy

19h

Want to avoid the holiday blues? New report suggests skipping the sweet treats

A new study from a team of clinical psychologists suggests eating added sugars — common in so many holiday foods — can trigger metabolic, inflammatory and neurobiological processes tied to depressive illness.

19h

Which Mac Pro will professionals actually buy? It's not the $52,000 version.

The Apple Mac Pro comes in many flavors. (Stan Horac/) Do a quick web search for the new Mac Pro and you'd be justified to think that Apple's powerful desktop costs roughly $52,000—more if you include the $400(!) wheels that let you roll it around your fancy studio. In reality, however, the Mac Pro starts at $5,999. That $52,000 number only comes into play if you max out every spec to its ridicul

19h

Watch Terrifying Creeps Hack Ring Cameras and Spy on Families

Growing Trend This week alone, there were four high-profile cases of creeps hacking into Amazon Ring cameras that families had installed inside their homes and using them to harass or spy on them. In one, a man used the camera's speaker to harass a family with racist comments and by triggering their alarm, according to The Cut . In others, predators spied on and communicated with children through

19h

Folket har talt: Ny viden om neandertalernes fjerne slægtninge er årets største videnskabelige nyhed

PLUS. Det er tid til at kåre årets videnskabelige højdepunkter både internationalt og nationalt. Det videnskabelige tidsskrift Science offentliggør Breakthrough of the Year i næste uge. Ingeniøren gør det samme i magasinet Året Rundt, der udkommer 13. december. Læs her om Sciences kandidater og Ingeniø…

19h

Things are looking dire for Gulf Coast coral reefs

Without a rapid and dramatic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, fragile coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico—like those around the world—could face catastrophe, researchers warn. That could be bad for us all, says Sylvia Dee, an assistant professor of earth, environmental, and planetary sciences at Rice University. She and colleagues drew evidence from an extensive analysis of stressors on coral

20h

Breast cancer cells swallow a 'free lunch' of dietary fat particles from the bloodstream

A research team at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center has previously shown that fatty particles from the bloodstream may boost the growth of breast cancer cells. They now show that through an unexpected mechanism not previously described in cancer cells, the fat particles bind to the breast cancer cell surface and are then taken into the cell, providing a large supply of fuel that drives prol

20h

Deadly 'superbugs' destroyed by molecular drills

Motorized molecules activated by light target and drill through highly antibiotic resistant bacteria and kill them within minutes. The molecules can open bacteria to attack by drugs they previously resisted. The strategy could be applied to bacterial infections or diseases on the skin, in the lungs or in the gastrointestinal tract.

20h

Water From South African Mine May Contain Life That Was Isolated for 2 Billion Years

The water contains bacterialike shapes that researchers plan to test for DNA. dividing-cell_cropped.gif This scanning electron microscope image shows material taken from an ancient water deposit. Researchers believe the peanut-shaped object in the middle may be a cell dividing. Image credits: Tullis Onstott and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials Imaging & Analysi

20h

Chemists' calculations may advance cancer prediction

A computational study by chemists showed the dynamics of tumor formation don't necessarily correlate with clinical data on lifetime cancer risks. It suggests biomarkers may someday be able to help predict when mutations in cells will turn cancer-prone cells into full-blown cancer.

20h

Scientists discover key neural circuit regulating alcohol consumption

New research pinpoints a specific neural circuit that when altered caused animal models to drink less alcohol.

20h

Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining

Scientists have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem from deforestation. The research could point toward ways to mitigate the worst effects of mercury poisoning in regions already experiencing elevated mercury levels caused by small-scale gold mining practices, such as those in the Peruvian Amazon.

20h

Zika vaccine protects both mom and fetus, but mom needs a higher dose when pregnant

Researchers showed, for the first time, that a single, higher dose of vaccination to a pregnant mouse safely protects both her and her fetus from the Zika virus. The researchers found that a single, less potent dose was not enough to protect the fetus.

20h

High-precision map of Antarctic ice sheet bed topography

Glaciologists have unveiled the most accurate portrait yet of the contours of the land beneath Antarctica's ice sheet — and, by doing so, have helped identify which regions of the continent are going to be most vulnerable to the impact of future climate warming.

20h

Bovine kobuvirus in US

A virus that afflicts cattle that was first discovered in Japan in 2003 has made its way to the US, researchers report.

20h

Virus multiplication in 3D

Vaccinia viruses serve as a vaccine against human smallpox and as the basis of new cancer therapies. Two studies now provide fascinating insights into their unusual propagation strategy at the atomic level.

20h

Tracking lab-grown tissue with light

Someday, doctors would like to grow limbs and other body tissue for soldiers who have lost arms in battle, children who need a new heart or liver, and many other people with critical needs. Scientists are supporting this field of research by developing a promising new kind of light-based sensor to study tissue growth in the lab.

20h

MIT: Dark Matter At Our Galaxy's Core May Be Blasting Gamma Rays

Cold Case Physicists think they've found something unusual at the core of our galaxy: a vast, turbulent cloud of dark matter that's creating powerful blasts of cosmic radiation. Back in 2015, scientists from MIT and Princeton ruled out dark matter as the source of the gamma rays, pointing instead to highly-active neutron stars, according to an MIT press release . But after uncovering flaws in the

20h

Brazil's Amazon rainforest and development at a crossroads

Night falls in Brazil's Amazon and two logging trucks without license plates emerge from the jungle. They rumble over dirt roads that lead away from a national forest, carrying trunks of trees hundreds of years old.

20h

20h

To help protect research, experts agree on a definition of predatory publishing

Leading scholars and publishers from The Ottawa Hospital's Centre for Journalology, the University of Ottawa's Telfer School of Management, and other institutions from around the world have agreed on a consensus definition of predatory publishing.

20h

To the brain, straight from the vein: IV treatment for TBI

A team of researchers from the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes — 'cargo' molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.

20h

Hydration may affect cognitive function in some older adults

Among women, lower hydration levels were associated with lower scores on a task designed to measure motor speed, sustained attention, and working memory. They did not find the same result for men.

20h

The 7 Most Defining #MeToo Moments of 2019

When Tarana Burke's movement became a mass phenomenon in the fall of 2017, #MeToo's expansion led to both exhilaration and anxiety: Was this reckoning sustainable? Would it lead to backlash? Two years later, the answer to both questions is yes. Below are a series of moments that demonstrate the ways #MeToo has woven itself into American culture this year. The list is not comprehensive. It is a co

20h

New technology improves gravitational wave detectors by cutting quantum noise

Physicists have successfully developed a new instrument that significantly reduces quantum-level noise that has thus far limited experiments' ability to spot gravitational waves. Collisions between massive black holes and stars are thought to generate these ripples in space-time that were first detected in 2015. In all, about 11 detections have been fully confirmed so far.

20h

Minecraft diamond challenge leaves AI creators stumped

Humans usually take minutes to learn how to find diamonds in the game, but AI agents struggled.

20h

Depression may slow young people's recovery after hip surgery

Clinical depression and anxiety can have a negative impact on outcomes following hip surgery, such as pain, slower recoveries, and inadequate return to activity, according to new research. In one of the first large studies to focus on mental health effects associated with hip pain, the researchers analyzed data gathered in 12 smaller studies conducted since 2014. The results suggest it may be adv

20h

How vitamin A plays a role in monarch migration

New research links the monarch butterfly's uncanny ability to sense the changes in day length to circadian clock genes and clock-regulated molecular pathways. Day length, or photoperiod, is an environmental cue that signals them to migrate and triggers the reproductive dormancy they exhibit in the process. The finding establishes a clear connection between clock genes and the vitamin A pathway wi

20h

Chemists' calculations may advance cancer prediction

When do cancer-prone cells turn into full-blown cancer? A Rice University scientist and his colleague believe there's a way to know.

20h

Virus multiplication in 3-D

For viruses to multiply, they usually need the support of the cells they infect. In many cases, only in their host's nucleus can they find the machines, enzymes and building blocks with which they can multiply their genetic material before infecting other cells. But not all viruses find their way into the cell nucleus. Some remain in the cytoplasm and thus must be able to multiply their genetic ma

20h

Virus multiplication in 3-D

For viruses to multiply, they usually need the support of the cells they infect. In many cases, only in their host's nucleus can they find the machines, enzymes and building blocks with which they can multiply their genetic material before infecting other cells. But not all viruses find their way into the cell nucleus. Some remain in the cytoplasm and thus must be able to multiply their genetic ma

20h

DNA may hold clues to extinct animal lifespan

Scientists calculate the lifespans of long-lost species, including ancient human relatives.

20h

New diagnostic methods to monitor blood disorders enabled by bio-rad's droplet digital PCR technology showcased at 2019 Ash Annual Meeting

Scientists will present more than 40 abstracts highlighting research driven in part by Bio-Rad Laboratories' Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) technology at the 2019 American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting in Orlando Florida, December 7-10.

20h

Chemists' calculations may advance cancer prediction

When do cancer-prone cells turn into full-blown cancer? A Rice University scientist and his colleague believe there's a way to know.

20h

The mathematics of prey detection in spider orb-webs

Spider webs are one of nature's most fascinating manifestations. Many spiders extrude proteinaceous silk to weave sticky webs that ensnare unsuspecting prey who venture into their threads. Despite their elasticity, these webs possess incredible tensile strength. In recent years, scientists have expressed increased interest in the spider orb-web as a biological-mechanical system. The web's sensory

20h

Novel e-skin achieves self-powered hippocampal neural stimulation

Chinese scientists recently developed a flexible electronic skin (e-skin) capable of self-powered neural stimulation and inducing a neural response. The technology will be useful in characterizing synaptic plasticity.

20h

Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining

Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem by deforestation and small-scale gold mining.

20h

'Rediscovered' toad was known to Colombian locals for decades

The starry night toad has been documented by biologists for the first time since 1991 in Colombia. But unlike other such stories of rediscovered species, we never really lost it

20h

Team finds bovine kobuvirus in US

A virus that afflicts cattle that was first discovered in Japan in 2003 has made its way to the U.S., researchers report in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

20h

Model simulation experiments give scientists a clearer understanding of factors that influence monsoon behavior

Monsoons can have a significant impact on human populations all around the world, bringing heavy rainfall associated with flooding, and mudslides that can damage crops and pose a health and safety risk. In countries such as India, monsoons also provide a vital source of water needed for growing crops. Being able to accurately forecast monsoons, as well as predict climate changes that drive these e

20h

Team finds bovine kobuvirus in US

A virus that afflicts cattle that was first discovered in Japan in 2003 has made its way to the U.S., researchers report in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

20h

Zika vaccine protects both mom and fetus, but mom needs a higher dose when pregnant

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed, for the first time, that a single, higher dose of vaccination to a pregnant mouse safely protects both her and her fetus from the Zika virus.The researchers found that a single, less potent dose was not enough to protect the fetus. The findings are currently available in Nature Communications.

20h

Researchers identify novel biomarkers to accurately measure dietary intake of key bioactives

Recent studies published in Nature Scientific Reports:Identify new biomarkers for measuring the intake of flavanols and procyanidins, key bioactives in apples, blueberries, grapes, pears and cocoa. Validate — based on rigorously established criteria – the utility of these new biomarkers. Provide researchers with a path forward to accurately assess bioactive nutrient intake in large populations.

20h

Study finds differences in energy use by immune cells in ME/CFS

New findings published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggest that specific immune T cells from people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) show disruptions in the way they produce energy. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

20h

Taking Sex Differences in Personality Seriously

New approaches are shedding light on the magnitude of sex differences in personality and the results are so strong and pervasive that they can no longer be ignored. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

The Next Vaping

Updated at 5:58 p.m. ET on December 12, 2019 A glass-walled bastion of minimalism in a retail mall in Atlanta is the first of its kind in the United States. It looks like an Apple Store, but with a bouncer. You have to be 21 or older to enter. If you want to buy what's inside, you must be a cigarette smoker. Or at least, you must tell the salesperson that you're a cigarette smoker. The store's pr

20h

Elon Musk Might Send a Tesla Cybertruck to Space

Starship Payload On Tuesday, Twitter user @justpaulinelol shared an animation of a SpaceX rocket launching a Tesla Cybertruck into space. "Cybertruck for the next Falcon Heavy payload @elonmusk?" they wrote alongside the clip — and then received a reply from Musk. "Maybe on Starship?" he mused . "It's def got the payload capacity…" Not so Crazy The idea might sound ridiculous, but it wouldn't be

20h

Cyrus Chothia obituary

Biochemist whose work was at the cutting edge of the understanding of protein structures, their function and evolution Taxonomy – the classification of objects according to their relationships to one another – conjures up images of 19th-century amateur naturalists measuring fossils or counting the stamens of flowering plants. The biochemist Cyrus Chothia, who has died aged 77, took a taxonomic ap

20h

Why Trump's Executive Order on Anti-Semitism Touched Off a Firestorm

What are Jews? Members of a religious group? A race or an ethnicity? A nation? Some mixture of them all, or something else entirely? As a debate among the Jews, this question may be academically interesting or, depending on your point of view, incredibly tedious. But as a legal question, it matters a great deal. American antidiscrimination law covers certain protected categories. Title VI of the

21h

A Couples Therapist Analyzes the Marriage in Marriage Story

This article contains spoilers about Marriage Story. It's a rare achievement for an intimate, quietly heartbreaking film about the dissolution of a relationship to light up social-media feeds with impassioned debate. But Noah Baumbach's Marriage Story , released this past weekend on Netflix, has done just that . In the days since its release, several aspects of Noah Baumbach's semiautobiographica

21h

A developmental landscape of 3D-cultured human pre-gastrulation embryos

Nature, Published online: 12 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1875-y

21h

Rogue stem-cell salesman Davide Vannoni dies

Nature, Published online: 12 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03823-7 The unproven bone-marrow-based procedure he developed was banned by Italian health authorities.

21h

Robot Bartender Developer Wants to Pay the Humans It Replaces

Consolation Prize Makr Shakr, the robotics firm behind the robo-bartender Toni, has announced plans to distribute monthly stipends to the human bartenders that it threatens to automate out of a job. It's an unusual twist on the concept of basic income : the company directly responsible for putting people out of work is also the one extending them some sort of lifeline. Details on the program are

21h

The Tale of WeWork Is Being Made Into a TV Show

*Succession* star Nicholas Braun, aka Cousin Greg, is set to star as WeWork's founder Adam Neumann.

21h

Rude paper reviews are pervasive and sometimes harmful, study finds

Researchers of color particularly vulnerable to "unprofessional" comments

21h

Chemists' calculations may advance cancer prediction

A computational study by Rice University chemists showed the dynamics of tumor formation don't necessarily correlate with clinical data on lifetime cancer risks. It suggests biomarkers may someday be able to help predict when mutations in cells will turn cancer-prone cells into full-blown cancer.

21h

Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining

Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem from deforestation. The research could point toward ways to mitigate the worst effects of mercury poisoning in regions already experiencing elevated mercury levels caused by small-scale gold mining practices, such as those in the Peruvian Amazon.

21h

Newfound Martian aurora actually the most common; sheds light on Mars' changing climate

A type of Martian aurora first identified by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft in 2016 is actually the most common form of aurora occurring on the Red Planet, according to new results from the mission. The aurora is known as a proton aurora and can help scientists track water loss from Mars' atmosphere.

21h

Experts review evidence yoga is good for the brain

Scientists have known for decades that aerobic exercise strengthens the brain and contributes to the growth of new neurons, but few studies have examined how yoga affects the brain. A review of the science finds evidence that yoga enhances many of the same brain structures and functions that benefit from aerobic exercise.

21h

Running research: Heel-toe or toe-heel?

New research suggests there is no evidence that changing a runner's strike pattern will help prevent injuries or give them a speed boost.

21h

How humans learned to dance: From the chimpanzee conga line

Two chimpanzees housed in a zoo in the US have sparked the question about how human dance evolved after being observed performing a duo dance-like behavior, similar to a human conga line.

21h

Supporting structures of wind turbines contribute to wind farm blockage effect

Much about the aerodynamic effects of larger wind farms remains poorly understood. New work looks to provide more insight in how the structures necessary for wind farms affect air flow. Using a two-scale coupled momentum balance method, researchers theoretically and computationally reconstructed conditions that large wind farms might face in the future, including the dampening effect that comes wi

21h

Herpes's Achilles heel

Scientists have used the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 to disrupt both latent reservoirs of the herpes simplex virus and actively replicating virus in human fibroblast cells. Experiments pinpoint weak spot that can make the virus susceptible to gene editing.

21h

Novel study underscores microbial individuality

A single drop of seawater can contain a wide representation of ocean microbes from around the world—revealing novel insights into the ecology, evolution and biotechnology potential of the global microbiome. A new publication in Cell reports a staggering degree of biological diversity that defies contemporary definitions of microbial species, illuminates reasons behind challenges in metagenomic stu

21h

Novel study underscores microbial individuality

A single drop of seawater can contain a wide representation of ocean microbes from around the world—revealing novel insights into the ecology, evolution and biotechnology potential of the global microbiome. A new publication in Cell reports a staggering degree of biological diversity that defies contemporary definitions of microbial species, illuminates reasons behind challenges in metagenomic stu

21h

NASA's NICER delivers best-ever pulsar measurements, first surface map

Astrophysicists are redrawing the textbook image of pulsars, the dense, whirling remains of exploded stars, thanks to NASA's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), an X-ray telescope aboard the International Space Station. Using NICER data, scientists have obtained the first precise and dependable measurements of both a pulsar's size and its mass, as well as the first-ever map of hot

21h

Tracking lab-grown tissue with light

Someday, doctors would like to grow limbs and other body tissue for soldiers who have lost arms in battle, children who need a new heart or liver, and many other people with critical needs. Today, medical professionals can graft cells from a patient, deposit them onto a tissue scaffold, and insert the scaffold into the body to encourage the growth of bone, cartilage and other specialized tissue. B

21h

Short-lived light sources discovered in the sky

A project lead by an international team of researchers use publicly available data with images of the sky dating as far back as the 1950s to try to detect and analyse objects that have disappeared over time. In the project "Vanishing & Appearing Sources during a Century of Observations" (VASCO), they have particularly looked for objects that may have existed in old military sky catalogues from the

21h

Metabolic adaptation ensures survival of colon cancer cells

Colon cancer cells deficient in p53, one of the most important control proteins in cell growth, activate a particular metabolic pathway to adapt to the lack of oxygen and nutrients inside the tumor. Statins, which are often prescribed to lower cholesterol, block this metabolic pathway and cause the cancer cells to die, as scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now discovered

21h

Want to avoid the holiday blues? New report suggests skipping the sweet treats

A new study from a team of clinical psychologists at the University of Kansas suggests eating added sugars — common in so many holiday foods — can trigger metabolic, inflammatory and neurobiological processes tied to depressive illness.

21h

How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga

Psychologist observing two chimpanzees in a zoo have discovered that they performed a behaviour hitherto never seen, they coordinated together in a rhythmic social ritual.

21h

Harnessing nature's defences against tsunamis

As sea levels rise and adverse weather events become more common, vulnerable coastal communities are at increasing risk of devastation from storm surges and tsunamis. The death toll from tsunamis, at 260,000 during the past century, was higher than that from any other natural hazard. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now compared the effects of man-made and ecos

21h

How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga

Psychologist observing two chimpanzees in a zoo have discovered that they performed a behaviour hitherto never seen, they coordinated together in a rhythmic social ritual.

21h

Abra-Cadaver! Lab-Made Blood Vessels Come to Life

#48 in our top science stories of 2019.

21h

Chinese trade in hides has led to global donkey massacre

Surging demand for ejiao , a traditional Chinese medicine, sends populations crashing

21h

Robot speeds up polymer creation for better medical devices

An automated way to produce polymers makes it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health, researchers report. The work is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications such as drugs and regenerative medicine through tissue engineering. Whil

21h

The Elderly in Japan are Using Exoskeletons to Delay Retirement

Exoskeletons aren't just for super soldiers , automotive assembly workers and the paralyzed — they can assist the elderly in everyday tasks as well. Now, New Scientist reports that older folks in Japan are using exoskeletons to help them do their jobs as they spend more of their lives in the workforce . Japan currently has one of the oldest populations int he world. According to the U.S. Populati

21h

NASA's NICER delivers best-ever pulsar measurements, 1st surface map

Astrophysicists are redrawing the textbook image of pulsars (the dense, whirling remains of exploded stars) thanks to NICER, an X-ray telescope aboard the International Space Station. NICER data has provided the first precise and dependable measurements of both a pulsar's size and its mass, and the first-ever map of hot spots on its surface.

21h

Statement advising caution on interpretation of recent paper on cancer risk & hyperthyroidism issued

Caution is advised in interpreting the findings of the recent JAMA Internal Medicine publication1 on radioactive iodine treatment for hyperthyroid patients and cancer mortality. The paper's conclusion that 'in RAI-treated patients with hyperthyroidism, greater organabsorbed doses appeared to be modestly positively associated with risk of death from solid cancer, including breast cancer', has raise

21h

Team finds bovine kobuvirus in US

A virus that afflicts cattle that was first discovered in Japan in 2003 has made its way to the US, researchers report in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

21h

Novel study underscores microbial individuality

A single drop of seawater can contain a wide representation of ocean microbes from around the world — revealing novel insights into the ecology, evolution and biotechnology potential of the global microbiome. A new publication in Cell reports a staggering degree of biological diversity that defies contemporary definitions of microbial species, illuminates reasons behind challenges in metagenomic

21h

Virus multiplication in 3D

Vaccinia viruses serve as a vaccine against human smallpox and as the basis of new cancer therapies. Two studies now provide fascinating insights into their unusual propagation strategy at the atomic level.

21h

University of Miami team investigates why candidates for cochlear implants rarely get them

University of Miami researchers published a study in JAMA Oncology-Head and Neck Surgery that examines why adult candidates for cochlear implants rarely get them.

21h

New algorithm detects even the smallest cancer metastases across the entire mous

Teams at Helmholtz Zentrum München, LMU Munich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new algorithm that enables automated detection of metastases at the level of single disseminated cancer cells in whole mice.

21h

Biology: Genetic 'clock' predicts lifespan in vertebrates

A model that uses genetic markers to accurately estimate the lifespans of different vertebrate species is presented in a study in Scientific Reports this week. The 'lifespan clock' screens 42 selected genes for CpG sites, short pieces of DNA whose density is correlated with lifespan, to predict how long members of a given vertebrate species may live.

21h

UCI-led team releases high-precision map of Antarctic ice sheet bed topography

A University of California, Irvine-led team of glaciologists has unveiled the most accurate portrait yet of the contours of the land beneath Antarctica's ice sheet — and, by doing so, has helped identify which regions of the continent are going to be most vulnerable to the impact of future climate warming.

21h

Largest study of its kind reveals that many psychiatric disorders arise from common genes

In the largest-ever study of its kind, published in the journal Cell, researchers identified more than 100 genetic variants that affect the risk for more than one mental health condition.

21h

Carolina parakeet extinction was driven by human causes, DNA sequencing reveals

Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology, a joint institute of the Pompeu Fabra University and the Spanish National Research Council, and the Globe Institute (University of Copenhagen), have unveiled the genome of the Carolina parakeet, extinct at the beginning of the 20th century. Researchers explored the genome for signs found in endangered species but did not find them, suggesting

21h

Denman Glacier: Deepest point on land found in Antarctica

Denman Glacier reaches down to more than 3,500m below sea level. Only ocean trenches go deeper.

21h

A genomic predictor of lifespan in vertebrates

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54447-w

21h

Training for the Drake | The Impossible Row | Episode 3

Colin reveals an unorthodox training regimen designed to prepare him, both physically and mentally, for the worst possible conditions. As the other team members pack in their last rounds of training, the crew is nearly ready to take on Drake Passage. Stream More Episodes of The Impossible Row: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-impossible-row/ About The Impossible Row: The Drake Passage is the

21h

AI genome scanner says Denisovans could live until 38 years old

Artificial intelligence may be able to work out the maximum lifespans of extinct species and early humans. The technique relies on analysing specific regions of DNA that are linked to ageing

21h

A guide to collaborative leadership | Lorna Davis

What's the difference between heroes and leaders? In this insightful talk, Lorna Davis explains how our idolization of heroes is holding us back from solving big problems — and shows why we need "radical interdependence" to make real change happen.

21h

We're finally figuring out how to forecast the flu—and this season isn't looking good

Results of a plaque assay, a test that enables CDC officials to quantify flu viruses (CDC/) If you've seen one flu season, you've seen one flu season—that's how the adage goes. Supposedly the flu varies so much from year to year, it's practically unpredictable. But over the past six years the Centers for Disease Control has been trying to forecast each flu season in advance. And their models aren

21h

Bacteria change may vaccinate against gut diseases

A new way to alter the intestinal microbiota could decrease the ability of a bacteria called flagellin to cause inflammation and also protect against an array of chronic inflammatory diseases, according to a study in mice. The findings suggest the approach offers a way to vaccinate against diseases associated with chronic inflammation of the digestive tract, a group of diseases that includes infl

22h

To help protect research, experts agree on a definition of predatory publishing

Leading scholars and publishers from The Ottawa Hospital's Centre for Journalology, the University of Ottawa's Telfer School of Management, and other institutions from around the world have agreed on a consensus definition of predatory publishing.

22h

Computerised CBT could reduce waiting lists for treatment of depression in adolescents

Using a computerised version of cognitive-behavioural therapy to treat depression in children and young adults has the potential to improve access to psychological therapies and reduce waiting lists, a new study suggests.

22h

Experts review evidence yoga is good for the brain

Scientists have known for decades that aerobic exercise strengthens the brain and contributes to the growth of new neurons, but few studies have examined how yoga affects the brain. A review of the science finds evidence that yoga enhances many of the same brain structures and functions that benefit from aerobic exercise.

22h

With novel technique, new study is first to definitively map the early development of PTSD

Only 23 percent of people who experience trauma develop PTSD. New research offers new clues on identifying which trauma victims will develop the disorder and suggests potential interventions. Researchers used a mobile phone app to gather information from patients in the critical 30 days after the trauma event – when symptoms interact to create the full blown disorder – the first time such extensiv

22h

Out-of-network costs soar for non-emergency hospitalizations

Researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed claims from more than 22 million enrollees in private insurance plans and found that out-of-pocket costs for non-emergency out-of-network hospital care nearly doubled in five years.

22h

Scientists discover key neural circuit regulating alcohol consumption

Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, UNC-Chapel Hill research pinpoints a specific neural circuit that when altered caused animal models to drink less alcohol.

22h

Tracking lab-grown tissue with light

Someday, doctors would like to grow limbs and other body tissue for soldiers who have lost arms in battle, children who need a new heart or liver, and many other people with critical needs. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are supporting this field of research by developing a promising new kind of light-based sensor to study tissue growth in the lab.

22h

Short-lived light sources discovered in the sky

Roughly a hundred of very red, star-like sources that have appeared and vanished in short period of time have been discovered by a team of researchers when reviewing catalogue data, according to a new paper published in the Astronomical Journal. While most likely to be natural astrophysical sources the researchers are also taking extra-terrestrial sources into account.

22h

How can you help your organization's expatriates succeed?

SIOP publishes white paper that explores how to promote your overseas workers' productivity and well-being. This white paper provides an overview of the experiences and challenges encountered by people who live and work outside of their home societies and introduces some of the solutions currently available to meet these challenges based on I-O psychology research.

22h

Newfound Martian aurora actually the most common; sheds light on Mars' changing climate

A type of Martian aurora first identified by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft in 2016 is actually the most common form of aurora occurring on the Red Planet, according to new results from the mission. The aurora is known as a proton aurora and can help scientists track water loss from Mars' atmosphere.

22h

Astronomers Find Black Holes Stirring Up the Biggest Galaxies

When the Hitomi space telescope successfully reached orbit in early 2016, astronomers thought their string of bad luck was over. A predecessor, launched in 2000, had crashed into the ocean. A follow-up mission leaked helium; full operations lasted only a few weeks. Hitomi, an X-ray satellite with the unique ability to sort some of the universe's most energetic photons by energy, represented astro

22h

A 'Mic Drop' on a Theory of Language Evolution

Put your fingertips against your throat and say "abracadabra." (Don't whisper; it won't work. Feign a phone call if you have to.) You should feel a buzzing—that's your vocal folds vibrating inside your larynx. The larynx, also called the voice box, is where the trouble begins: Its location is, or was, supposed to be the key to language. Scientists have agreed for a while that the organ is lower d

22h

Scientists devise 'lifespan clock'

An Australian research team say they have come up with a "lifespan clock" which provides accurate maximum age estimates for vertebrates, a key variable in the study of both living and extinct animals.

22h

Team releases high-precision map of Antarctic ice sheet bed topography

A University of California, Irvine-led team of glaciologists has unveiled the most accurate portrait yet of the contours of the land beneath Antarctica's ice sheet—and, by doing so, has helped identify which regions of the continent are going to be more, or less, vulnerable to future climate warming.

22h

Carolina parakeet extinction was driven by human causes, DNA sequencing reveals

Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE, a joint institute of the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) in Barcelona and the Globe Institute at the University of Copenhagen have unveiled the genome of the Carolina parakeet, declared extinct at the beginning of the 20th century. Researchers explored the genome for signs found in endanger

22h

Politics this week

[no content]

22h

Business this week

[no content]

22h

KAL's cartoon

[no content]

22h

Scientists devise 'lifespan clock'

An Australian research team say they have come up with a "lifespan clock" which provides accurate maximum age estimates for vertebrates, a key variable in the study of both living and extinct animals.

22h

Carolina parakeet extinction was driven by human causes, DNA sequencing reveals

Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE, a joint institute of the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) in Barcelona and the Globe Institute at the University of Copenhagen have unveiled the genome of the Carolina parakeet, declared extinct at the beginning of the 20th century. Researchers explored the genome for signs found in endanger

22h

Tuberculosis kills more people than any other pathogenic illness

New drugs, vaccines and tests offer hope, though

22h

DNA could be used to embed useful information into everyday objects

They could then be recreated from internally held information

22h

Transparent solar cells could be used to glaze office blocks

The absorb about the same amount of light as tinted windows

22h

The world's oldest picture gallery

Is in a cave in Indonesia

22h

Telehealth increases primary care physicians' accurate diagnosis of skin conditions

Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine conducted a two-year study of the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) telehealth program in Missouri and found the program provided participating PCPs with expert recommendations that benefited nearly 84% of adult cases and 72% of pediatric cases.

22h

First-ever quality measures aim to reduce diabetes complications

The Endocrine Society and Avalere Health introduced the first-ever quality measures to help healthcare providers assess how well they identify and care for older adults at greater risk of hypoglycemia — low blood sugar that can be a dangerous complication of diabetes treatment.

22h

The danger behind certain biologics

A research team led by Michigan Medicine may have discovered why certain biologic drugs can lead to deadly infections. Their study, which appears in the journal Science Advances, reveals a previously unknown function of a specific type of immune cell called dendritic cells.

22h

The Case of a Man With Two Sets of DNA Raises More Questions

A crime lab studied a patient's response to a bone marrow transplant. Readers requested more information about the perplexing findings.

22h

Scandinavians' little linguistic hat trick

Linguist Dave Kush at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's Department of Language and Literature has been studying a phenomenon in which Norwegian, Swedish and Danish stand out.

22h

Martian aurora offers climate change clues, research reports

A newly published study, presented on Dec. 12 at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting, reveals that a type of Martian aurora originally detected by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft is in fact the most common aurora on the Red Planet, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said.

22h

Does tapping your can of beer really keep it from fizzing all over you?

A team of researchers at the University of Denmark has tested the popular notion that tapping a can of beer after it has been shaken will prevent it from spraying when it is opened. Their paper describes a trial they carried out along with their conclusions, and is available on the arXiv preprint server.

22h

Researchers design polymer that can kill drug-resistant bacteria

Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have designed an antimicrobial polymer that can kill bacteria resistant to commonly used antibiotics, including the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The breakthrough can pave the way for the development of medicine to whi

22h

Estimates of ecosystem carbon mitigation improved toward the goal of the Paris agreement

Approximately 30 percent of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere by human activities, mainly through the use of fossil fuels and deforestation, is taken up by terrestrial ecosystems such as forests and grasslands. Recent reports from the IPCC concluded that new land-use options to enhance this terrestrial carbon sink are needed to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate. Masayuki Kondo, an assis

22h

Fundamental discoveries for future nanotools: Chemists distinguish multiple weak forces

The process of building a tiny cube has revealed some of the fundamental mysteries of how molecules bind together in natural environments. Researchers hope to apply this knowledge to future projects designing complex structures that can mimic life.

22h

Comparison of climate simulations with proxies suggests Arctic sea ice could vanish in summer sooner than expected

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea and one from the U.S. has found evidence that Arctic sea ice in the summer could vanish sooner than climate models suggest. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes comparing their simulations with real-world proxies and what they found.

22h

Biologist develops new model for analyzing photosynthesis in vivo

A RUDN University biologist has developed a model for the analysis of photosynthesis in vivo. This method calculates the absorption coefficient of light by chlorophyll based on its reflectivity. Analysis of light absorption is important for assessing ecosystem productivity, which affects the state of the biosphere and the global climate. The article is published in the journal Remote Sensing of En

22h

Daylight saving time does not misalign human cycles

A study from Universidad de Sevilla describes the role of latitude and urges the European Commission to rethink its policy on summertime arrangements

22h

Harnessing nature's defenses against tsunamis

As sea levels rise and adverse weather events become more common, vulnerable coastal communities are at increasing risk of devastation from storm surges and tsunamis. The death toll from tsunamis was 260,000 during the past century. A research team led by the University of Göttingen has now compared the effects of man-made and ecosystem protection to propose an approach including mangroves and cor

22h

How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga

Two chimpanzees housed in a zoo in the US have sparked the question about how human dance evolved after being observed performing a duo dance-like behaviour, similar to a human conga-line.

22h

Supporting structures of wind turbines contribute to wind farm blockage effect

Much about the aerodynamic effects of larger wind farms remains poorly understood. New work in this week's Journal of Renewable and Sustainably Energy looks to provide more insight in how the structures necessary for wind farms affect air flow. Using a two-scale coupled momentum balance method, researchers theoretically and computationally reconstructed conditions that large wind farms might face

22h

Scandinavians' little linguistic hat trick

Moving a word to the beginning of a sentence is a useful trick to draw attention to the most important topic you want to relay. The researchers of a new study have found that the Scandinavian languages are unique in their use of this technique.

22h

Martian aurora offers climate change clues, Embry-Riddle reports

A newly published study reveals that a type of Martian aurora originally detected by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft is in fact the most common aurora on the Red Planet, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said. The research suggests a way to track water loss and better understand how the Martian climate has changed over time.

22h

Ultrasound blasts potent glioblastoma drug into brain tumor

A potent drug for glioblastoma can't be used in patients. It can't reach its target because it's blocked by the blood-brain barrier, and the conventional formulation for this drug is toxic to the brain. But now scientists have used a novel technology for opening the blood-brain barrier with an implantable ultrasound, and delivered the powerful drug to the tumor in mice. Scientists also identified

22h

Chinese team makes nanoscopy breakthrough

A Chinese research team has developed an advanced imaging technique to achieve super-resolution microscopy at unprecedented speeds and with many fewer images. The new method should make it possible to capture processes in living cells at speeds not previously possible.

22h

The mathematics of prey detection in spider orb-webs

Spider webs are one of nature's most fascinating manifestations. Many spiders extrude proteinaceous silk to weave sticky webs that ensnare unsuspecting prey who venture into their threads. Despite their elasticity, these webs possess incredible tensile strength. In an article publishing this week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, Alexandre Kawano and Antonino Morassi present a theoretica

22h

Ghost imaging speeds up super-resolution microscopy

Researchers have used advanced imaging approaches to achieve super-resolution microscopy at unprecedented speeds. The new method should make it possible to capture the details of processes occurring in living cells at speeds not previously possible.

22h

Black/white breast cancer subtype incidence in men differs from trends in women

Incidence rates for hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancers are considerably higher in black men than white men, in stark contrast to lower incidence rates of those cancer subtypes in black versus white women.

22h

How the Loss of the Landline Is Changing Family Life

My tween will never know the sound of me calling her name from another room after the phone rings. She'll never sit on our kitchen floor, refrigerator humming in the background, twisting a cord around her finger while talking to her best friend. I'll get it , He's not here right now , and It's for you are all phrases that are on their way out of the modern domestic vernacular. According to the fe

22h

Informed Consent & Data Protection

What are you saying yes to? Scientific research need data, biological human data in order to make scientific progress. The more the scientific community know, the more diseases we are able to cure, prevent or treat and the more diseases and disorders they want to study. Future scientific breakthroughs depend upon our will to give researchers access to biological and personal data. But how can we

22h

Kortsigtet hovsa-lov om biobrændstoffer på vej gennem Folketinget

PLUS. Ny lov skal i sidste sekund gøre Danmark klar til at overholde EU 2020-krav til transporten billigst muligt. Spild af penge, der ikke forhindrer palmeolie i danske biler, mener kritikere.

22h

Nurses sleep 83 fewer minutes before work days

Nurses sleep nearly an hour and a half less before work days compared to days off, according to a new study which suggests tired nurses may hurt patient care and safety. "Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," says Amy Witkoski Stimpfel, assistant professor at New York University's Rory Me

22h

Research group confirm planet-mass objects in extragalactic systems

A University of Oklahoma research group is reporting the detection of extragalactic planet-mass objects in a second and third galaxy beyond the Milky Way after the first detection in 2018. With the existing observational resources, it is impossible to directly detect planet-mass objects beyond the Milky Way and to measure its rogue planetary population.

22h

Planet-mass objects in extragalactic systems

A research group is reporting the detection of extragalactic planet-mass objects in a second and third galaxy beyond the Milky Way after the first detection in 2018. With the existing observational resources, it is impossible to directly detect planet-mass objects beyond the Milky Way and to measure its rogue planetary population.

22h

Take long naps? Sleep more than nine hours a night? Your stroke risk may be higher

People who take long naps during the day or sleep nine or more hours at night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study.

22h

A Kung Fu Master's Leap Breaks the Internet—but Not Physics

A viral video appears to show a man jumping off water. What's really going on here?

22h

Here's How to Survive Sitting in the Bleachers This Winter

Our favorite gear to fend off the cold if you're braving the elements to see a football game this season—socks, gloves, hand warmers, and more.

22h

Ghost imaging speeds up super-resolution microscopy

Researchers have used advanced imaging approaches to achieve super-resolution microscopy at unprecedented speeds. The new method should make it possible to capture the details of processes occurring in living cells at speeds not previously possible.

23h

Secure data backup of medical records using secret sharing and secure communications

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Kochi Health Science Center and collaborating teams have developed a secure data backup system in an 800 km network connecting the data servers in Kochi, Osaka, Nagoya, Otemachi and Koganei, Japan, using secret sharing and secure communications technologies, and demonstrated distributed storage of medical records and promp

23h

Combining science and design to measure our exposure to light

Daylight plays an essential role in sleep, alertness and hormone regulation. EPFL has joined forces with Geneva School of Art and Design (HEAD – Genève) to develop a wearable sensor that measures how much light an individual is exposed to along with the spectral resolution of that light.

23h

Speech could be older than we thought

The theory of the 'descended larynx' has stated that before speech can emerge, the larynx must be in a low position to produce differentiated vowels. Researcher show the production of differentiated vocalizations is not a question of anatomical variants but of control of articulators. This work leads us to think that speech could have emerged before the 200,000 years ago.

23h

APS tip sheet: Dark matter's galactic emissions and game theory of vaccination

The APS Tip Sheet highlights noteworthy research recently published in the Physical Review Journals. Unless otherwise noted, Physical Review papers are not embargoed. Please contact media@aps.org for media inquiries and complimentary access to the journals.

23h

Mass Tourism Is Destroying the Planet

Last year, 1.4 billion people traveled the world. That's up from just 25 million in 1950. In China alone, overseas trips have risen from 10 million to 150 million in less than two decades. This dramatic surge in mass tourism can be attributed to the emergence of the global middle class, and in some ways, it's a good thing. But the consequences are grave—particularly for the planet. In a new episo

23h

The Two Players Who Are Breaking the 'No-Fun League'

"The No-Fun League" isn't a new phrase. It has hung around the NFL for decades, mobilized whenever the structures and strictures of the league tip too far toward dourness. Historically, it's been brought up most often in relation to the NFL's disciplining of on-field celebration , but lately it seems to resonate more generally. For the better part of this century, following pro football hasn't be

23h

How Far Are We from (Accurately and Safely) Editing Human Embryos?

We can already edit genes in human embryos. We can even do it in a way to pass the edits down generations, fundamentally changing a family's genetic makeup. Doing it well, however, is far more difficult. It's impossible to talk about human germline genome editing without bringing up the CRISPR baby fiasco . Over a year ago, a rogue Chinese scientist performed an edit on fertilized human embryos t

23h

Make your own light-up holiday sweater

This sweater is LIT. (Barry Abrams/) People use ugly sweater parties as opportunities to get creative: Some may find tacky sweaters while rummaging through their parents' closets and browsing in thrift shops; others may craft their own with felt and a hot glue gun. Coming up with a ridiculous sweater is part of the fun. Still, you'll find sweaters that are intentionally ugly. If you go to Amazon,

23h

Greenland Rocks Suggest Earth's Magnetic Field Is Older Than We Thought

Analysis finds that the planet's protective shield was in place by at least 3.7 billion years ago, as early life arose — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Smart doorbells may be fun, but we don't know who is using your face

Training facial recognition algorithms requires masses of data, and big tech companies can go to extreme lengths to get that, says Annalee Newitz

23h

23h

23h

23h

23h

Survey Finds That Water Is Common Around Exoplanets

Yeah, Got That Water After surveying 19 exoplanets, a University of Cambridge-led research team found 14 had water vapor in their atmospheres — more than they'd expected. The amount of water vapor, meanwhile? Less than they'd anticipated. Yet: These new insights could go a long way toward narrowing our hunt for extraterrestrial life. It's important to know about even the most remote presence of w

23h

How people with dementia can best enjoy the holidays

Family caregivers and people with dementia or Alzheimer's disease are at risk for increased stress during the holidays—but holiday visits can be a joyous time with adjusted expectations and careful planning. "Music—especially singing songs together—is a wonderful way to share an experience." Mary Catherine Lundquist is program director of Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care's Care2Caregiver

23h

8 chemists toast the periodic table's 150th birthday

2019 marks the 150th anniversary of the periodic table. Chemical elements make up everything around us. Reading this on a cell phone? Your phone contains at least 30 different naturally-occurring elements, including lithium. Or maybe you're drinking seltzer—a compound of two elements (carbon and oxygen in the form of carbon dioxide) dissolved in another two elements (hydrogen and oxygen in the fo

23h

Democrats Have Failed to Prove Their Case Against Trump

The House Judiciary Committee has published articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Though potentially damning, the particular charges—abuse of power in connection with Ukraine and the 2020 election, and obstruction of Congress—face an unusual evidentiary problem compared with impeachments past. Because there is a plausible legitimate governmental justification for each of the all

23h