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nyheder2019december16

31min

Degraded soils mean tropical forests may never fully recover from logging

Continually logging and re-growing tropical forests to supply timber is reducing the levels of vital nutrients in the soil, which may limit future forest growth and recovery, a new study suggests. This raises concerns about the long-term sustainability of logging in the tropics.

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Low income and work stress contribute to link between education, heart disease and stroke

Low educational levels predict an increased risk of developing or dying from heart disease and stroke according to the first nationwide study of the link between education and risk of cardiovascular disease. The study, published in the European Heart Journal, is also the first nationwide study to look at the extent to which low income and work stress plays a role in the association between educati

16min

Final 2020 spending bill is kind to U.S. research

NIH gets 7%, NSF only 2.5%, as Congress ignores Trump's proposed cuts

16min

Vaping Nicotine Linked To Increased Risk Of Chronic Lung Disease

A new study suggests the use of e-cigarettes can increase smokers' and nonsmokers' risk of developing chronic lung disease, including conditions such as COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema or asthma. (Image credit: Steve Helber/AP)

34min

Save space and money with this chop saw conversion project

It's a circular saw, but it's also a chop saw. (John Kennedy/) A good chop saw will enable you to make quick, accurate, uniform cuts. Just line up the wood and drop the blade. Bzzzt . Done. But maybe you'd rather save your cash, or you don't have a lot of space. Maybe you're just interested in a challenge. If so, there's a way to turn the circular saw you already own into a solid stationary tool.

48min

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Democrats Want to Show They Can Do More Than Impeachment

It's Monday, December 16. In today's newsletter: Should swing-state Democrats worry about how voters will react next year to how they handled impeachment this year? Plus: deconstructing Tucker Carlson. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP) Some Open Questions in a Drama Without Suspense Even though the official House vote on impeachment isn't until Wednesday, most people have braced for

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BCMA-targeted immunotherapy can lead to durable responses in multiple myeloma

An experimental, off-the-shelf immunotherapy that combines a targeted antibody and chemotherapy can lead to potentially durable responses in multiple myeloma patients whose disease has relapsed or is resistant to other standard therapies.

59min

Male scientists more likely to use language framing their research findings as 'promising,' 'novel,' 'unique'

Perception is reality, the adage goes, and it may even be true when it comes to conveying the findings of medical and life science research.

1h

N.J. Lawmakers Plan to Pass One of U.S.'s Strictest Pro-Vaccine Laws

The State Legislature was moving to end religious exemptions to vaccine requirements for all students, including in college.

1h

Author Correction: Superluminal motion of a relativistic jet in the neutron-star merger GW170817

Nature, Published online: 17 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1860-5

1h

Author Correction: Cartography of odor chemicals in the dengue vector mosquito (Aedes aegypti L., Diptera/Culicidae)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55023-y Author Correction: Cartography of odor chemicals in the dengue vector mosquito ( Aedes aegypti L ., Diptera/Culicidae)

1h

Ski masks that will protect your entire face from the cold

For a warm face on a cold mountain. ( Joshua Reddekopp via Unsplash/) When the British rode into Balaclava in the mid-1800s during the Crimean War, they used the settlement's name to describe a one-piece head, face, and neck covering. You might also know this item of clothing as a ski mask—a classic hallmark of cartoon villains and overzealous winter parenting. Fortunately, modern balaclavas are

1h

This Brain Region Lights Up When People Display Confirmation Bias

A small region of the brain responds more strongly to information that agrees with our opinions than information that contradicts us.

2h

The Largest Gathering of Humans on the Planet

In January, an estimated 120 million people gathered at the confluence of three holy rivers in India: the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the mythical Sarasvati. The occasion was the Kumbh Mela, a historic Hindu pilgrimage that occurs just once every 12 years. It is widely considered to be the largest gathering of humans on the planet (and can even be seen from space ). "The scale is really something tha

2h

An Early Flu Season, a *Flight Simulator* Revival, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

2h

Ancient events are still impacting mammals worldwide

In the first study of its kind, researchers have discovered that events from 20,000 years ago or more are still impacting the diversity and distribution of mammal species worldwide.

2h

Robot vacuums that will change you how do chores

You can have nice things. (DepositPhotos/) Cleaning your home is one of those tasks that is best done on a regular but incremental basis. If you don't, it can take hours of heavy labor to eliminate the layers of grime that accumulate. But who wants to drag out a heavy, loud vacuum every few days any time a tiny human throws a piece of cereal or your kitty rolls around in catnip? Robot vacuums are

2h

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Math equation predicts and detects liver cancer

University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers developed a math equation to predict and detect liver cancer and identified when healthy cells become cancerous.

2h

A new gene therapy strategy, courtesy of Mother Nature

Scientists have developed a new gene-therapy technique by transforming human cells into mass producers of tiny nano-sized particles full of genetic material that has the potential to reverse disease processes.

2h

Evidence suggests previously unrecognized latex allergies may play role in equine asthma

Latex exposure could be detrimental to a horse's respiratory health. That's the surprising discovery from Morris Animal Foundation-funded research at the Royal Agricultural University and University of Nottingham. While further investigation is needed, researchers say latex could be among the allergens responsible for causing severe equine asthma (sEA), a serious horse ailment with limited treatme

2h

New Study Offers First Evidence Of Vaping's Long-Term Risks

The study finds that e-cigarettes are linked to increased risk of chronic lung diseases including emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD, as well as weakened immune defenses.

2h

Standard of care chemoradiation for Stage III NSCLC is superior to two tested alternatives

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and approximately 75-80% of all cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of these, 30-40% are considered locally advanced and are categorized as either Stage IIIA or IIIB.

2h

Peer support program can help surgeons deal with adverse events that happen during surgery

Surgeons report on how the first formal surgery-specific peer support program in the U.S. was developed at Massachusetts General Hospital with the goal of helping surgeons and surgical trainees deal with not only adverse events that happen during an operation, but also catastrophic patient outcomes and long-term litigation cases.

2h

Watch a NASA spacecraft probe the mysteries of the martian atmosphere

MAVEN hopes to provide a better understanding of the Red Planet

3h

A Racing Champ Critiques Cinema's Greatest Driving Scenes

Wyatt Knox, an instructor at the Team O'Neil driving school, analyzes key scenes from *The Fast and the Furious*, *Baby Driver*, and *The Man With the Golden Gun*.

3h

How we transport water in our bodies inspires new water filtration method

A multidisciplinary group of engineers and scientists has discovered a new method for water filtration that could have implications for a variety of technologies, such as desalination plants, breathable and protective fabrics, and carbon capture in gas separations. The research team, led by Manish Kumar in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, published their fin

3h

Would a deep-Earth water cycle change our understanding of planetary evolution?

Every school child learns about the water cycle — evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and collection. But what if there were a deep Earth component of this process happening on geologic timescales that makes our planet ideal for sustaining life as we know it?

3h

Nightly sleep disturbance linked to daily risk of migraines

The team's findings generally support patients' reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

3h

Study exposes surprise billing by hospital physicians

Patients with private health insurance face a serious risk of being treated and billed by an out-of-network doctor when they receive care at in-network hospitals, according to a new study by Yale researchers. Addressing the issue could reduce health spending by 3.4% — $40 billion annually, the researchers conclude.

3h

Simple tool shows life expectancy after dementia diagnosis

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and from the Netherlands have developed a simple tool that shows the survival probability of a person with dementia disease over three years. This, they hope, will facilitate dialogue with the most seriously affected and help doctors and others plan the necessary care. The study is published today in the scientific journal Neurology.

3h

Dozens potentially exposed to toxic mercury in Houston spill

Dozens of people in Houston potentially were exposed to the toxic metal mercury after it was spilled outside a Walmart, a Sonic Drive-In and a gas station, officials said. Federal and local investigators were trying to determine if the spills were intentional. Fire Chief Sam Pena said up to 60 people were asked to take decontamination showers and a pregnant woman was taken to a hospital as a preca

3h

Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid

Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers published Dec. 16, 2019, in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

3h

Suomi NPP satellite views New South Wales fires raging on

NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the New South Wales fires in Australia on December 16, 2019 and found devastation from the ongoing fires. The New South Wales Rural Fire Service is reporting 96 fires are burning and to date the size of the area burned is 1.5 times the size of the state of Connecticut (approximately 5.3 million acres of land). These fires are largely the result of an atypi

3h

How fish oil might reduce inflammation

A recent study showed that an enriched fish oil supplement reduced inflammation by increasing certain anti-inflammatory molecules in the blood.

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Exoplanets can be made less habitable by stars' flares

Astronomers found that not all exoplanets in habitable zones will be able to maintain hospitable conditions for life. Exoplanets in close proximity to stars are subject to radiation bursts which can disrupt habitable conditions unless the exoplanet has significant atmospheric or magnetic shielding.

3h

Excessive antibiotic prescriptions for children in low-, middle-income countries

Between 2007 and 2017, children in eight low- and middle-income countries received, on average, 25 antibiotic prescriptions from birth through age 5 — up to five times higher than the already high levels observed in high-income settings. The number of antibiotic prescriptions for young children ranged from one per year for children in Senegal to 12 per year for children in Uganda.

3h

Growing carbon nanotubes with the right twist

Researchers synthetize nanotubes with a specific structure expanding previous theories on carbon nanotube growth.

3h

Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid

Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers published Dec. 16, 2019, in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

3h

A Methane Leak, Seen From Space, Proves to Be Far Larger Than Thought

The findings mark a step forward in using space technology to detect leaks of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from oil and gas sites worldwide.

3h

New methods promise to speed up development of new plant varieties

A University of Minnesota research team recently developed new methods that will make it significantly faster to produce gene-edited plants. They hope to alleviate a long-standing bottleneck in gene editing and, in the process, make it easier and faster to develop and test new crop varieties with two new approaches described in a paper recently published in Nature Biotechnology.

3h

New methods promise to speed up development of new plant varieties

A University of Minnesota research team recently developed new methods that will make it significantly faster to produce gene-edited plants. They hope to alleviate a long-standing bottleneck in gene editing and, in the process, make it easier and faster to develop and test new crop varieties with two new approaches described in a paper recently published in Nature Biotechnology.

3h

How do silt and sand differ when going with the flow?

The river may rage or gently roll, but in the end the sand and silt will have their way.

3h

Simple test could prevent fluoride-related disease

Northwestern University synthetic biologists developed a simple, inexpensive new test that can detect dangerous levels of fluoride in drinking water.

3h

Blue pigment discoverer makes key design advance for future durable, vivid pigments

An Oregon State University chemistry researcher who made history a decade ago with the accidental discovery of the first new blue inorganic pigment in more than two centuries is again pushing forward the science of color.

3h

The formula that predicts every animal's life story

Earth's species diversity is stunning, but there are a couple of battles we all face. Our response to these challenges set the course of our lives. Plug in a couple of variables, and a new formula predicts how we live, reproduce, and die. None The diversity of life on Earth is mind-boggling. What could humans, octopuses, birds, and plankton possibly have in common? Well, the truth is that all of

3h

Nanoscience breakthrough: Probing particles smaller than a billionth of a meter

Scientists developed a new methodology that allows researchers to assess the chemical composition and structure of metallic particles with a diameter of only 0.5 to 2 nm. This breakthrough in analytical techniques will enable the development and application of minuscule materials in the fields of electronics, biomedicine, chemistry, and more.

3h

Taking shape: Scientists propose new structure for shell of HIV-1 virus

The matrix shell of the HIV-1 virus may have a different shape than previously thought, and a newly proposed model has significant implications for understanding how the virus functions.

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New measures to treat mental illness and opioid use

Opioid use among psychiatric hospital patients needs to be addressed through an integrated approach to managing mental illness, pain and substance use, a new study has found.

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Waiting area entertainment and co-opetition between brick-and-mortar stores boosts profit

With the popularity of online shopping, it's no secret brick-and-mortar stores are fighting to stay relevant. Waiting area entertainment is one way they are standing out, because no one likes to wait. New research says funding entertainment is no easy task, but one way to offset the price and increase customer experience and revenue is to work with, not against competitors.

3h

3-D print a piece of Mars for the holidays

There's a galaxy of gifts out there for space nerds. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin may have just the thing to set your present apart: a model of Jezero Crater, the landing site of NASA's upcoming Mars 2020 Rover mission, that you can 3-D print yourself.

3h

The uncertain role of natural gas in the transition to clean energy

A new MIT study examines the opposing roles of natural gas in the battle against climate change—as a bridge toward a lower-emissions future, but also a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

3h

New Orleans Declares State of Emergency Due to Hackers

Government Shutdown On Friday morning, the government of New Orleans declared a state of emergency and shut down its servers in response to an onslaught of hacking attempts and ransomware. The city's infrastructure seems to have been unaffected by the attack, with many services coming back online Monday morning, according to MIT Technology Review . But successful or not, the cyberattack shows tha

3h

Mercedes Now Will Delay EQC EV from 2021 to 2022 in US

Mercedes-Benz EQC Grundträger Schnellspannbefestigung, abschließbare Kunststoff-Trägerkappen. Multifunktionale Basis für alle Mercedes-Benz Transport- und Freizeitlösungen wie Dachboxen, Fahrrad- oder Ski- und Snowboardhalter. ;EQC 400 4×4, Stromverbrauch kombiniert: 20,8 – 19,7 kWh/100 km; CO2-Emissionen kombiniert: 0 g/km* Mercedes-Benz EQC base roof carrier with quick-release fasteners. Lockin

3h

Developing next-generation biologic pacemakers

University of Houston associate professor of pharmacology Bradley McConnell is helping usher in a new age of cardiac pacemakers by using stem cells found in fat, converting them to heart cells, and reprogramming those to act as biologic pacemaker cells.

3h

Collaboration yields insights into mosquito reproduction

As carriers for diseases like dengue and Zika, mosquitoes kill more than 1 million people each year and sicken hundreds of millions more. But a better understanding of mosquito reproduction can help humans combat outbreaks of these diseases, which are worsening as the climate warms.

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Collaboration yields insights into mosquito reproduction

As carriers for diseases like dengue and Zika, mosquitoes kill more than 1 million people each year and sicken hundreds of millions more. But a better understanding of mosquito reproduction can help humans combat outbreaks of these diseases, which are worsening as the climate warms.

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Monkey mouth sounds could push the evolution of speech back by 27 million years

Baboons make sounds, but how does it relate to human speech? (Creative Wrights/Shutterstock.com/) Sound doesn't fossilize. Language doesn't either. Even when writing systems have developed , they've represented full-fledged and functional languages. Rather than preserving the first baby steps toward language, they're fully formed, made up of words, sentences, and grammar carried from one person t

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The PhD student's dilemma

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03881-x Navigating the turbulent waters of the doctoral voyage

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Discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible

Scientists have answered the fundamental question: 'Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?', by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter.

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Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean

In first-of-its-kind research, scientists used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average — with the seafood supply in the crosshairs.

4h

New photonics breakthrough

A new approach to trapping light in artificial photonic materials could lead to a tremendous boost in the transfer speed of data online.

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Saliva test shows promise for earlier and easier detection of mouth and throat cancer

Unfortunately, cancers that occur in the back of the mouth and upper throat are often not diagnosed until they become advanced. A new report describes the use of acoustofluidics, a new non-invasive method that analyzes saliva for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV)-16, the pathogenic strain associated with oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). This novel technique detected OPC in whole saliva in 4

4h

All roads lead to migraine

Dr. Samaira Younis, from the Danish Headache Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, shares her research results, which suggests there are no differences between migraine attacks clinical characteristics following administration of 2 different compounds in patients, CGRP and sildenafil, meaning they share common cellular signaling pathways.

4h

How mysterious circular DNA causes cancer in children

Why do children develop cancer? An international team of researchers, led by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, now reveal that mysterious rings of DNA known as extrachromosomal circular DNA can contribute to cancer development in children. Producing the first detailed map of circular DNA, the scientists have shed new unanticipated insi

4h

Researchers explore factors affecting money management skills in multiple sclerosis

The association of money management difficulties with depressive symptomatology is a new finding, according to Dr. Goverover, and further research is warranted into what may be a key predictor for these difficulties in the MS population. 'Difficulties with managing money can have serious consequences for individuals and their caregivers. Knowing the factors that underlie money management problems

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Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network produces supplemental issue of Preventive Medicine

The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN), a collaborative national network of academic centers engaged in cancer research, has produced a supplemental issue of Preventive Medicine with 12 articles that examine stakeholder-engaged implementation science and population approaches to improve equity in cancer prevention and control. The research findings reported in the supplement in

4h

PET/CT plays role in lung adenocarcinoma management

According to an article published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), FDG PET, combined with high-resolution CT, has value for predicting invasive histopathologic subtypes, but there was no significance for predicting invasive growth patterns of early lung adenocarcinoma.

4h

How do silt and sand differ when going with the flow?

Sand and silt in rivers dramatically change their means of transport at a sharp boundary between grain sizes, regardless of how fast the river flows. A universal transport algorithm developed at Rice University revealed the break and could help predict how sediments move.

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Unveiling a new map that reveals the hidden personalities of jobs

It's been long been believed that different personalities align better with different jobs. Large-scale evidence now exists of the distinctive personality profiles that occur across occupations and how, using social media, they can be matched to an individual for the perfect fit.

4h

Connecting the prehistoric past to the global future

Research on global biodiversity has long assumed that present-day biodiversity patterns reflect present-day factors, namely contemporary climate and human activities. A new study shows that climate changes and human impacts over the last 100,000 years continue to shape patterns of tropical and subtropical mammal biodiversity today — a surprising finding.

4h

Chemists glimpse the fleeting 'transition state' of a reaction

Chemists at MIT, Argonne National Laboratory, and several other institutions have devised a technique that allows them to determine the structure of the transition state of a reaction by observing the products that result from the reaction.

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Cold infections may be less frequent in people with the flu

People were less likely to catch either influenza or a common cold-causing rhinovirus if they were already infected with the other virus, a new study by scientists from the Medical Research Council-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research has found.

4h

Zooming in on brain circuits allows researchers to stop seizure activity

A team of neuroscientists have found, in animal models, that they can 'switch off' epileptic seizures. The findings provide the first evidence that while different types of seizures start in varied areas of the brain, they all can be controlled by targeting a very small set of neurons in the brain or their tendril-like neuronal axons.

4h

What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

Gold nanoparticles, which are supposed to be stable in biological environments, can be degraded inside cells. This research conducted by teams from the CNRS, l'Université de Paris, Sorbonne Université, and l'Université de Strasbourg will be published in PNAS, and reveals the ability of cells to metabolize gold, which is nevertheless not essential for their functioning. This study opens the way for

4h

I tried a bajillion new products this year. Here are 17 you should actually buy.

This isn't me, but Stock Photo dude is just as enthusiastic. (Bruce Mars Via Unsplash/) Over the past three years, I've tested, bought, returned—and somehow not break— more products than you can possibly imagine . Some days it's the coolest job in the world; other days I feel like I'm drowning in boxes. But even with all of these sweet gadgets, gizmos, and doodads filling up my sad New York City

4h

New Research Reveals Why Whales Evolved to be so Big

The study also shows why whales didn't continue getting even larger: As whales get bigger, it's harder for them to find a good meal.

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Scientists Want a Giant Folding Space Telescope to Find Earth 2.0

Hubble Who? NASA astronomers have proposed building a gigantic, folding space telescope to scan for new exoplanets. The Habitable Exoplanet Observatory — HabEx for short — would have a four-meter-wide mirror, compared to the Hubble Space Telescope's 2.4 meter one. That would grant it a greater ability to observe and spot distant Earthlike worlds, according to a press release , and better determin

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Europe is Launching a Planet-Hunting Space Telescope Tomorrow

Characterizing Exoplanets The European Space Agency is launching a space telescope called the Characterising Exoplanets Satellite (CHEOPS) on Tuesday, designed to study distant planets and learn how they formed. While larger space telescopes, like NASA's Hubble, are built for a number of tasks, CHEOPS is built specifically to study the radius and mass of distant planets. Thanks to its photometer,

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Federal Toxmap Shutters, Raising the Ire of Pollution Researchers

With little explanation, the National Library of Medicine announced that it would be "retiring" the Toxmap website on Dec. 16, 2019. The decision has raised concerns among researchers and environmental data advocates who say the loss inhibits public access to essential data about environmental hazards.

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Dating app based on genetic matching not eugenics, scientist says

A Harvard academic says the app he designed can prevent rare, hereditary diseases – and sinister interpretations are 'ridiculous' A Harvard academic who designed a dating app based on gene-matching has said it was "ridiculous" to compare it to eugenics. George Church's dating app proposes to match users based on their DNA in an attempt to eliminate genetic diseases. In a 60 Minutes episode from 9

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Celebrated ancient Egyptian woman physician likely never existed

For decades, an ancient Egyptian known as Merit Ptah has been celebrated as the first female physician and a role model for women entering medicine. Yet a researcher now says she never existed and is an example of how misconceptions can spread.

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Origins of neurodegenerative disease

New research has shed light on the origins of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and demonstrates effective new therapeutic pathways for SCA7 and the more than 40 other types of spinocerebellar ataxia.

4h

How we transport water in our bodies inspires new water filtration method

A multidisciplinary group of engineers and scientists has discovered a new method for water filtration that could have implications for a variety of technologies, such as desalination plants, breathable and protective fabrics, and carbon capture in gas separations.

4h

Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid

Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a new study.

4h

Artificial intelligence may help scientists make spray-on solar cells

Artificial Intelligence may be just the thing to accelerate spray-on solar cell technology, which could revolutionize how consumers use energy. A research team has used Machine Learning, aka Artificial Intelligence to optimize the materials used to make perovskite solar cells (PSC). The Organic-Inorganic halide perovskites material used in PSC converts photovoltaic power into consumable energy.

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Scientists Mapped Water on Mars and Found it Buried Just Inches Deep

Across much of Mars, future astronauts could simply scratch the Red Planet's surface and harvest water.

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Tesla Owner's Dashcam Footage Proves Cop Wrong

On the Record In June, a police officer in Indiana cited a Tesla Model 3 owner for failing to use their turn signal. As soon as the Tesla owner knew they were being pulled over, they pushed the button to engage their vehicle's TeslaCam feature. That prompted the system to save the last 10 minutes' worth of dashcam footage — and five months later, that footage has led to the dismissal of the ticke

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Under Trump, the U.S. Has Become a Leading Source of Global Instability

The end of the year brings myriad rankings: the best books, movies, and so on. In Washington, D.C., the lists tend to be of a more … sobering variety. For years, the Council on Foreign Relations has asked hundreds of U.S. government officials and foreign-policy experts to rate the potential security crises that could most threaten the United States in the coming year. Typically the respondents

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​Is psychopathy untreatable? Why researchers are starting to change their minds.

Psychopathic individuals generally show impairments in several brain regions, a finding that's helped to promote the view that psychopathy is virtually untreatable. Still, there's been no concrete evidence to support this view. New treatments show some promising signs that psychopathy is treatable, even if it's not curable. None Treating psychopathy has long seemed like a lost cause to many foren

4h

What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

Gold nanoparticles, which are supposed to be stable in biological environments, can be degraded inside cells. This research, conducted by teams from the CNRS, l'Université de Paris, Sorbonne Université, and l'Université de Strasbourg, will be published in PNAS on December 16, 2019, and reveals the ability of cells to metabolize gold, which is not essential for their functioning. This study opens t

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Hard as a rock? Maybe not, say bacteria that help form soil

Research published this week by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists shows how bacteria can degrade solid bedrock, jump-starting a long process of alteration that creates the mineral portion of soil.

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Resident orcas' appetite likely reason for decline of big Chinook salmon

Killer whales prefer to eat only the biggest, juiciest Chinook salmon they can find. The larger the fish, the more energy a whale can get for its meal.

4h

Chemists glimpse the fleeting 'transition state' of a reaction

During a chemical reaction, the molecules involved in the reaction gain energy until they reach a "point of no return" known as a transition state.

4h

Connecting the prehistoric past to the global future

Research on global biodiversity has long assumed that present-day biodiversity patterns reflect present-day factors, namely contemporary climate and human activities. A new study shows that climate changes and human impacts over the last 100,000 years continue to shape patterns of tropical and subtropical mammal biodiversity today—a surprising finding.

4h

The Final Preparations | The Impossible Row | Episode 4

Colin and his crew make their final preparations in Punta Arenas, Chile for the upcoming expedition across Drake Passage. They meticulously pack the rowboat and conduct a capsize test to ensure the boat is ready for the perilous journey. Stream More Episodes of The Impossible Row: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-impossible-row/ About The Impossible Row: The Drake Passage is the most dangero

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Bird migratory patterns changing with the climate

But scientists question whether it's enough.

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Bivalves explained

The mathematical and mechanical mystery of interlocking shells.

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Fold me a machine

Researchers continue the quest for technology inspired by kirigami.

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Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life

New research allows comparisons among distantly related lineages.

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Vaping increases risk of lung disease, study finds

When combined with tobacco use, it's even worse.

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HAWK-I peers through the dust

New image of Milky Way finds evidence of a burst of star formation.

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Resident orcas' appetite likely reason for decline of big Chinook salmon

Killer whales prefer to eat only the biggest, juiciest Chinook salmon they can find. The larger the fish, the more energy a whale can get for its meal.

4h

Smart intersections could cut autonomous car congestion

Researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets of the future, reduce congestion and minimize accidents.

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The Top Retractions of 2019

A journal is forced to remove a record-breaking number of papers–and all in one go.

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Watchmen Gives Its Heroes a True Ending

This story contains spoilers through Episode 9 of HBO's Watchmen. Superhero stories don't tend to end. In the pages of comic books, their deaths rarely stick , they never run out of villains to face, and their backstories prove malleable . On-screen, those qualities have translated into the proliferation of both universes and crossovers, and as a result, most films and TV seasons in the superhero

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The Most 2019 Photos Ever

Not necessarily the top photos of the year, or the most heart-wrenching or emotional images, but a collection of photographs that are just so 2019—from "Old Town Road" to "Storm Area 51," from a fast-food banquet at the White House to Tesla's Cybertruck, from virtual reality for dairy cows to "30–50 feral hogs," and much more. This is 2019.

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A shell and 'hair' enhance perovskite durability

Researchers have come up with a new way to address the durability of perovskite nanocrystals. Perovskite nanocrystals hold promise for improving a wide variety of optoelectronic devices—from lasers to light emitting diodes (LEDs)—but their durability problems limit their broad commercial use. To solve the problem, researchers encased the perovskite inside a double-layer protection system made fro

4h

Radiation breaks connections in the brain

One of the potentially life-altering side effects that patients experience after cranial radiotherapy for brain cancer is cognitive impairment. Researchers now believe that they have pinpointed why this occurs and these findings could point the way for new therapies to protect the brain from the damage caused by radiation.

4h

Blue pigment discoverer makes key design advance for future durable, vivid pigments

A chemistry researcher who made history a decade ago with the accidental discovery of the first new blue inorganic pigment in more than two centuries is again pushing forward the science of color.

4h

Smart intersections could cut autonomous car congestion

A new study by Cornell researchers developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets of the future, reduce congestion and minimize accidents.

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Uncertain role of natural gas in the transition to clean energy

A new study examines the opposing roles of natural gas in the battle against climate change — as a bridge toward a lower-emissions future, but also a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

5h

Everything you need to get started in pyrography

Beautiful wood art. (DepositPhotos/) If you've ever thought it would be satisfying to take a flaming hot poker and emblazon your signature in wood, then you should get into pyrography. All you need to get started in this centuries-old art are a few tools, a few pieces of instruction, and inspiration. A scorching start. (Amazon/) This woodburning pen is a relatively low-cost way to see if pyrograp

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Uncertain role of natural gas in the transition to clean energy

A new study examines the opposing roles of natural gas in the battle against climate change — as a bridge toward a lower-emissions future, but also a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

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Scientists show how tiny, mutated neuron antennae impair brain connectivity

Axons are the long thread-like extensions of neurons that send electrical signals to other brain cells. Thanks to axonal connectivity, our brains and bodies can do all necessary tasks. Even before we're born, we need axons to grow in tracts throughout gray matter and connect properly as our brains develop. Researchers have now found a key reason why connectivity goes awry and leads to rare but deb

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Success in metabolically engineering marine algae to synthesize valuable antioxidant astaxanthin

Scientists have succeeded in synthesizing the natural pigment astaxanthin using the fast-growing marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002. It is hoped that this development could be utilized to meet the demand for natural astaxanthin in the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries, amongst others, in the future.

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Finding a non-invasive way to predict effectiveness of cancer therapy

Researchers have taken a critical step toward developing a non-invasive nuclear medicine technique that can predict the effectiveness of therapy for cancerous tumors, allowing for personalized, precision treatment.

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High-tech method for uniquely targeted gene therapy developed

Neuroscientists have developed new technology that engineers the shell of a virus to deliver gene therapy to the exact cell type in the body that needs to be treated. The researchers believe that the new technology can be likened to dramatically accelerating evolution from millions of years to weeks.

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Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels

The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research.

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How muscles talk to brain to regulate feeding behavior

A study sheds light on the mechanisms governing feeding behavior in fruit flies and how skeletal muscle communicates energy needs to the brain.

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Astronomers May Have Been Wrong About The Milky Way's History

Rewriting History A new image of the center of the Milky Way has astronomers rewriting the history of our galaxy. That's because the image, which reveals new information about 700,000 stars near the galaxy's core, contradicts scientists' assumption that new stars are constantly forming in that region, CNET reports . Rather, it suggests that star formation in the galactic center occurred mostly in

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Celebrated ancient Egyptian woman physician likely never existed, says researcher

For decades, an ancient Egyptian known as Merit Ptah has been celebrated as the first female physician and a role model for women entering medicine. Yet a researcher from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus now says she never existed and is an example of how misconceptions can spread.

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Collaboration yields insights into mosquito reproduction

As carriers for diseases like dengue and Zika, mosquitoes kill more than 1 million people each year and sicken hundreds of millions more. But a better understanding of mosquito reproduction can help humans combat outbreaks of these diseases, which are worsening as the climate warms.

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New study sheds light into origins of neurodegenerative disease

New research has shed light on the origins of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and demonstrates effective new therapeutic pathways for SCA7 and the more than 40 other types of spinocerebellar ataxia.

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Consumption of chili pepper cuts down the risk of death from a heart or cerebral attack

Chili pepper is a common guest in Italians kitchens, and over the centuries it has been praised for its supposed therapeutic virtues. Now an Italian research shows that people who consume it on a regular basis have a mortality risk for every cause reduced by 23% compared to those who do not like it.

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The Doom Of Homo Erectus: Mass Death Marks End Of Species

Indonesian site suggests archaic humans perished about 110,000 years ago

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Instant cameras to immortalize your greatest moments

Snap and enjoy. (Eniko Kis via Unsplash/) Instant cameras are back, and for good reason: not only can you immediately hold a physical copy of the image, but the likeness is all but impossible to replicate, making the moment and object that much more precious. Instant photography feels a bit younger and more spontaneous, too—and some prints effectively blur our imperfections, making everybody look

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NIH Considering New Recommendations on Sexual Harassment Policies

A working group has put forth suggestions for cracking down on misconduct, such as requiring grant applicants to disclose sexual harassment findings.

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Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing

Researchers test a sampling of synthetic, biocompatible hydrogels to see how tuning them influences the body's inflammatory response. The hydrogels are being developed to help heal wounds, deliver drugs and treat cancer.

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The FBI Needs to Be Reformed

Inspector General Michael Horowitz's report last week told a complex story about extraordinary events related to the investigation of officials in Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign. Its publication predictably ignited a contest between Democrats and Republicans to extract from the 429-page opus what was most serviceable in the construction of competing political "narratives." But there is

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NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite views New South Wales fires raging on

NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the New South Wales fires in Australia on December 16, 2019 and found devastation from the ongoing fires.

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Leafcutter ants accelerate the cutting and transport of leaves during stormy weather

A study by researchers at the University of São Paulo's Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ-USP) in Brazil shows that leafcutter ants are capable of predicting adverse weather by sensing changes in atmospheric pressure.

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New health insurance insights

MIT economists analyze how patients and health care providers value Medicaid.

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Gaming mice to take your play to the next level

You game? ( Emmanuel via Unsplash/) Regular desktop mice won't cut it for gamers who want more control, responsiveness, and customizable settings. Gaming mice are designed to hold up through hours of Call of Duty, with ergonomic grips, buttons that can be pre-programmed with complex combinations, mice sensitivity (DPI) you can adjust to your needs, fully designable color schemes, and extra respon

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Creating a nanoscale on-off switch for heat

Researchers create a polymer thermal regulator that can quickly transform from a conductor to an insulator, and back again. This control of heat flow at the nanoscale opens up new possibilities in developing switchable thermal devices, solid-state refrigeration, waste heat scavenging, thermal circuits, and computing. This is the first time that this work has been demonstrated experimentally.

5h

Planetary boundaries: Interactions in Earth system amplify human impacts

Transgressing one planetary boundary can amplify human impacts on another one. For the first time, an international team of scientists now quantified some of the planetary-scale interactions in the Earth system. These biophysical interactions have in fact almost doubled direct human impacts on the nine planetary boundaries, from climate change to freshwater use. This insight can now be applied in

5h

Neutrons optimize high efficiency catalyst for greener approach to biofuel synthesis

Researchers used neutron scattering in the development of a catalyst that converts biomass into liquid fuel with remarkably high efficiency and provides new possibilities for manufacturing renewable energy-related materials.

5h

Women need professional emotional support during high-risk pregnancies, study finds

Little is known about how women manage emotional distress during high-risk pregnancies, but researchers learned that without psychosocial support, many women struggle with fears and tears while feeling isolated and worried.

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New tool uses AI to flag fake news for media fact-checkers

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool could help social media networks and news organizations weed out false stories. The tool uses deep-learning AI algorithms to determine if claims made in posts or stories are supported by other posts and stories on the same subject.

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Big step in producing carbon-neutral fuel: Silver diphosphide

A new chemical process does in the lab what trees do in nature — it converts carbon dioxide into usable chemicals or fuels.

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Cultural variables influence consumer demand for private-label brands

Consumer attitudes toward private-label store brands might be driven more by social variables than price, says new research.

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Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing

Researchers test a sampling of synthetic, biocompatible hydrogels to see how tuning them influences the body's inflammatory response. The hydrogels are being developed to help heal wounds, deliver drugs and treat cancer.

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Families Sue Tech Giants for Deaths of Children in Cobalt Mines

Cobalt is essential to making rechargeable lithium-ion batteries , which means the corporations selling everything from smartphones to electric cars need a steady supply of the metal — and that supply chain typically starts in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The poor central African nation currently exports more than 60 percent of the world's cobalt, and its use of child labor to mine

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75,000 people call on Congress to ban on facial recognition tech

submitted by /u/nnnarbz [link] [comments]

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Waters Off California Acidifying Faster Than Rest of Oceans, Study Shows

The ocean off California is acidifying faster than the rest of the ocean, a new study shows.

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Europe's Cheops telescope will profile distant planets

The Cheops space mission will get beyond just counting worlds to start describing their properties.

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MDMA's social and addictive effects aren't the same

New research in mice distinguishes the molecular pathway responsible for MDMA's abuse potential from the one behind its propensity to make people feel sociable. The discovery could lead to novel treatments for psychiatric disorders marked by social awkwardness and withdrawal. Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine—better known by its acronym, MDMA, or its street name, ecstasy—is a mind-altering drug that

5h

Posture correctors to help your aching spine

Spend less than 9 hours a day slumping. (Alejandro Escamilla via Unsplash/) Bad posture can strain your spine, sure, but also your muscles and joints. Chronic poor posture makes your balance worse and even compresses your insides, making it harder for your lungs and intestines to their thing. Though flawless, unbroken posture isn't necessary, many Americans have lots of room for improvement . If

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Six toilet upgrades that could very well change your life

Some people (who lurk on Reddit) believe that Japanese toilets should be a basic human right. In Japan, 81 percent of households have bidets—commonly called washlets—which means that most of the population has extremely strong anal hygiene game. Upgrade your toilet with this range of bidets, from budget options to baller status. If you opt to spring for a washlet, you could also stop buying toile

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Can Mysticism Help Us Solve the Mind-Body Problem?

A freewheeling symposium explores experiences, theories and philosophies that challenge conventional materialist science. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Here's Why Venezuela Is Giving Retirees Free Altcoins

Merry Christmas! Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro plans to give a whole bunch of citizens some free crypto, in the form of the state-backed "petro" altcoin . The offer could be read a nationalized holiday bonus, or a push to get people to use the country's official altcoin at all. It's available to public employees, retirees, and the military, according to CoinDesk, and with other attempts to

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Scientists show how tiny, mutated neuron antennae impair brain connectivity

Axons are the long thread-like extensions of neurons that send electrical signals to other brain cells. Thanks to axonal connectivity, our brains and bodies can do all necessary tasks. Even before we're born, we need axons to grow in tracts throughout gray matter and connect properly as our brains develop. UNC School of Medicine researchers have now found a key reason why connectivity goes awry an

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Combination of chemo and diabetes drugs shows potential for treating Ewing sarcoma

Houston Methodist researchers propose a combination of two well-known drugs as a new treatment option for Ewing sarcoma — one of them typically used to treat diabetes.

6h

The uncertain role of natural gas in the transition to clean energy

A new MIT study examines the opposing roles of natural gas in the battle against climate change — as a bridge toward a lower-emissions future, but also a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

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Everything that happened at COP25, a potentially world-changing climate conference

Time is running out to cut our emissions. (DepositPhoto/) COP25 was full of protesting citizens and slow-acting leaders. As a setup for next year's meeting, where all of the countries that signed the 2015 Paris Agreement (the "Parties" in "Conference of the Parties") will need to dramatically revise their greenhouse gas emission goals , it was a mixed bag. But this year's conference showed the po

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Comfortable office chairs that'll make your coworkers very jealous

If you don't buy into the whole standing desk lifestyle, make sure your time at the office is as comfortable as possible. If you're going to spend up to 40 hours a week sitting down, a cushion-y, ergonomic, adjustable seat can make all the difference. While you don't have to fork over handfuls of cash for a sweet spot for your behind, sometimes the materials and adjustability make the upgrade wor

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Whiteboard calendars that'll help you get your life together

Reusable calendars for project planning, meal prepping, appointment wrangling, and more. (Mille Sanders via Unsplash/) Though apps, lists, binders, a complicated set of inbox folders, and other productivity systems are great for organizing some things in your life, there's little that will get your time cataloged as effectively as a planner. While notebooks or paper calendars are excellent portab

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The best sound bars

More than a year ago I realized my regular TV speakers weren't cutting it. My hours spent watching Battlestar Galactica and X-Files were dulled by muddled dialog and blaring musical overtures. I was priced-out of multi-speaker surround-sound systems and had been burned by inexpensive speakers before, but I remained optimistic that contemporary technology could provide clear, crisp sound for us le

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Having a psychotic disorder may increase decline of some areas of cognition over adulthood

A new study has shown that relative to participants without a psychotic disorder, those diagnosed with a disorder were consistently impaired across all areas of cognitive (memory and thinking) ability measured. The comparison also suggested that declines in some cognitive areas might worsen with age. This was as part of a cross- sectional comparison 20-years after diagnosis of their first psychoti

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Creating a nanoscale on-off switch for heat

Researchers create a polymer thermal regulator that can quickly transform from a conductor to an insulator, and back again. This control of heat flow at the nanoscale opens up new possibilities in developing switchable thermal devices, solid-state refrigeration, waste heat scavenging, thermal circuits, and computing. This is the first time that this work has been demonstrated experimentally.

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Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid

Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers published Dec. 16, 2019, in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

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How we transport water in our bodies inspires new water filtration method

A multidisciplinary group of engineers and scientists has discovered a new method for water filtration that could have implications for a variety of technologies, such as desalination plants, breathable and protective fabrics, and carbon capture in gas separations. The research team, led by Manish Kumar in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, published their fin

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New review study shows that egg-industry-funded research downplays danger of cholesterol

Controversial headlines claiming that eggs don't raise cholesterol levels could be the product of faulty industry-funded research, according to a new review published in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.

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Simple test could prevent fluoride-related disease

Northwestern University synthetic biologists developed a simple, inexpensive new test that can detect dangerous levels of fluoride in drinking water.

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The effect of taking antidepressants during pregnancy

Exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy and the first weeks of life can alter sensory processing well into adulthood, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro.

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2019 Broke Multiple Records for the Wettest Year Ever

#43 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Black teens experience daily racial discrimination

Black teenagers experience daily racial discrimination—most often online—that can lead to negative mental health effects, a study finds. The study in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology , examines how often black teens experience racial discrimination each day, either personally or vicariously and online or offline. The researchers surveyed 101 black youth between ages 13 and 17 from

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Women's hiking boots for your next outdoor adventure

Get out there. (Lucija Ros via Unsplash/) There's a lot to consider when it comes to choosing the right hiking boot. A few hours on a footpath requires something very different than six months on the Appalachian Trail. You'll also want to consider weight, ankle support, waterproofing, breathability, and so much more. Here are some we recommend based on these considerations. A hiking shoe fit for

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Research brief: New methods promise to speed up development of new plant varieties

University of Minnesota researchers developed new methods that will make it significantly faster to produce gene-edited plants.

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Study finds African Americans with cancer at higher risk for blood clots

African-Americans are at higher risk for cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE) as compared with patients from other races.

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Oldest Fossil Fungi Hints at Early 'Modern' Life

#44 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Women's hiking boots for your next outdoor adventure

Get out there. (Lucija Ros via Unsplash/) There's a lot to consider when it comes to choosing the right hiking boot. A few hours on a footpath requires something very different than six months on the Appalachian Trail. You'll also want to consider weight, ankle support, waterproofing, breathability, and so much more. Here are some we recommend based on these considerations. A hiking shoe fit for

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Nature's top ten books of 2019

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03876-8 Reviews of the essential science reads this year.

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Rwanda climate change: Kigali homes built near wetlands are destroyed

Kigali residents demand compensation as hundreds of houses vulnerable to flooding are knocked down.

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As coral reefs suffer around the world, those in French Polynesia are thriving

Survey finds these South Pacific islands have healthy coral and fish populations

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Earth's First Continents Appeared Surprisingly Early

#46 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Neutrons optimize high efficiency catalyst for greener approach to biofuel synthesis

Researchers led by the University of Manchester have designed a catalyst that converts biomass into fuel sources with remarkably high efficiency and offers new possibilities for manufacturing advanced renewable materials.

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Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing

Hydrogels for healing, synthesized from the molecules up by Rice University bioengineers, are a few steps closer to the clinic.

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Artificial intelligence may help scientists make spray-on solar cells

Artificial Intelligence may be just the thing to accelerate spray-on solar cell technology, which could revolutionize how consumers use energy.

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Neutrons optimize high efficiency catalyst for greener approach to biofuel synthesis

Researchers led by the University of Manchester used neutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the development of a catalyst that converts biomass into liquid fuel with remarkably high efficiency and provides new possibilities for manufacturing renewable energy-related materials.

6h

Planetary boundaries: Interactions in the Earth system amplify human impacts

Transgressing one planetary boundary can amplify human impacts on another one. For the first time, an international team of scientists now quantified some of the planetary-scale interactions in the Earth system. These biophysical interactions have in fact almost doubled direct human impacts on the nine planetary boundaries, from climate change to freshwater use. This insight can now be applied in

6h

Women need professional emotional support during high-risk pregnancies, study finds

Little is known about how women manage emotional distress during high-risk pregnancies, but Rutgers researchers learned that without psychosocial support, women struggle with fears and tears while feeling isolated and worried.

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Women with a low desire to avoid pregnancy still use contraception

A new study challenges assumptions that women with the highest preference against pregnancy use more effective contraceptive methods and that women who might welcome pregnancy do not use contraception. Overall, women with a stronger preference to avoid pregnancy were far more likely to use any contraceptive method. Still, over half of the women studied who reported low preference to avoid pregnanc

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Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm

A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that small insects like mosquitos become perceptible to bats when they gather in large swarms. The findings could provide new insights into the evolution of bat echolocation and may affect technology in the defense industry.

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Survey shows link between psychological safety and use of infection prevention practices

Hospitals reporting high levels of psychological safety are more likely to have comprehensive infection prevention and control (IPC) programs, according to the results of a survey appearing in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), published by Elsevier.

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November 2019: Earth's Second Warmest November on Record

2019 is very likely to be Earth's second warmest year on record, behind 2016 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cultural variables influence consumer demand for private-label brands

New research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in consumer behavior and global marketing explores why certain segments of consumers prefer national or global brands over their less-pricey private-label equivalents, and the managerial and marketing implications of those choices.

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Discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible

In an article published in Physical Review Letters, Bristol scientists have answered the fundamental question: "Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?", by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter.

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Leptons help in tracking new physics

Electrons with 'colleagues'—other leptons—are one of many products of collisions observed in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. According to theorists, some of these particles may be created in processes that extend beyond standard physics. The latest analysis verifies these predictions.

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New 'netherworldly' freshwater fish named for Thai conservation visionary

At first glance, Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who's gone one too many rounds. But the deep gash in its forehead studded with blue spikes is a natural feature whose function remains a mystery.

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Evolutionarily novel genes at work in tumors

A team of scientists from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) studied the evolutionary ages of human genes and identified a new class of them expressed in tumors—tumor specifically expressed, evolutionarily novel (TSEEN) genes. This confirms the team's earlier theory about the evolutionary role of neoplasms.

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Newly Discovered Blinking Space Lights Could Be Signs of Aliens

Flashing Lights With rare exception, stars die in one of two ways: they either slowly transition into white dwarfs or quickly explode as supernovae. But some stars appear to temporarily die without a whimper or a bang — they just disappear from the night sky and then appear again later — and the scientists behind a newly published study believe this strange phenomenon could have one of two explan

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How to unsend an email in any app

Did you just send that email to your boss? Yes, yes you did. (Feedough via Depositphotos/) Our emails aren't always as well thought out, as accurately typed, or as succinct as we would like them to be—and that's before you consider problems like sending emails without a required attachment, or typing the wrong person's address altogether. If this happens to you often, you must know the "undo send

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New 'netherworldly' freshwater fish named for Thai conservation visionary

At first glance, Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who's gone one too many rounds. But the deep gash in its forehead studded with blue spikes is a natural feature whose function remains a mystery.

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Evolutionarily novel genes at work in tumors

A team of scientists from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) studied the evolutionary ages of human genes and identified a new class of them expressed in tumors—tumor specifically expressed, evolutionarily novel (TSEEN) genes. This confirms the team's earlier theory about the evolutionary role of neoplasms.

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Big beaks help puffins keep their cool

Tufted puffins can regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search of food, researchers report. For a new study in the Journal of Experimental Biology , the researchers used thermal imaging cameras to measure heat dissipation off the bodies and beaks of wild tufted puffins in the minutes after f

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Feral Pigs Roam the South. Now Even Northern States Aren't Safe.

The swine have established themselves in Canada and are encroaching on border states like Montana and North Dakota.

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Anti-ageing drug rejuvenates the mouths and oral microbiome of mice

In the first treatment shown to rejuvenate oral health, a drug used for organ transplants has regenerated the bone in which teeth are embedded in mice

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A Former NASA Astronaut Is Building a Plasma-Powered Mars Rocket

Mars Race Space agencies are locked in a hotly-contested race to send a crew to Mars, with NASA and SpaceX both working on vehicles to reach the Red Planet. But it may be a third group, Ad Astra — no relation to the Brad Pitt movie — that pulls ahead, thanks to the plasma rocket technology it's working on, according to CBC . If it pans out, the plasma engine would enable a larger crew to reach Ma

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Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing

Researchers test a sampling of synthetic, biocompatible hydrogels to see how tuning them influences the body's inflammatory response. The hydrogels are being developed to help heal wounds, deliver drugs and treat cancer.

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Hospital patient portals lack specific and informative instructions for patients

Regenstrief Institute research scientists Joy Lee, PhD, and Michael Weiner, M.D., MPH, conducted a study of hospital patient portals, the secure online websites that give patients access to their personal health information. Among their findings: over half of the 200 patient portals they studied lacked specific instructions on how the portals should be used.

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Paper: Cultural variables influence consumer demand for private-label brands

Consumer attitudes toward private-label store brands might be driven more by social variables than price, says new research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois.

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Artificial intelligence may help scientists make spray-on solar cells

Artificial Intelligence may be just the thing to accelerate spray-on solar cell technology, which could revolutionize how consumers use energy.A research team at the University of Central Florida used Machine Learning, aka Artificial Intelligence to optimize the materials used to make perovskite solar cells (PSC). The Organic-Inorganic halide perovskites material used in PSC converts photovoltaic

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Did you solve it? The club sandwich problem

The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set the following two puzzles about number sandwiches. 1) A number sandwich is a line of digits such that there is one digit sandwiched between the 1s, two digits sandwiched between the 2's, three digits sandwiched between the 3's, and so on. For example, 312132 is a number sandwich with the digits 1,2 and 3 Continue reading…

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Scientists on the Move

They're willing to relocate for the best opportunities—and North America is where international researches would most like to go — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Daily briefing: Quantum fluctuations cause heat transfer in a previously unknown way

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03878-6 Physicists observe heat transferred across a vacuum by phonons. Plus: 10 remarkable papers from 2019 and climate agreements limp forward at COP25.

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The Big Untold Story of Impeachment? It's Incredibly Popular.

The cynical read on the impeachment of President Donald Trump is that it hasn't changed anything: Here we are, weeks into the process and on the eve of a House floor vote, and there's scant movement in public and elite opinion to show for it. Notwithstanding the mountain of new evidence uncovered by the House Intelligence Committee, the battle lines remain the same: Most Democratic House members

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4 ways to ditch your phone this holiday season

With our phones continuously tugging at our attention, being fully present with friends and family during the holidays can prove challenging. According to research by Adrian Ward, an assistant professor at the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin, and coauthors, the urge to constantly check your phone is actually your brain's way of solving a significant problem. "We ca

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The sympathetic nervous system can inhibit the defense cells in autoimmune disease

Using an experimental model of multiple sclerosis, the scientists found that the sympathetic nervous system can limit the generation of effector responses by inhibiting the action of the cells that attack an antigen taken as a threat by the immune system.

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Children allergic to cow's milk smaller and lighter

Children allergic to cow's milk are smaller and weigh less, according to the first published study to characterize growth trajectories from early childhood to adolescence in children with persistent food allergies.

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Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible

In an article published in Physical Review Letters, Bristol scientists have answered the fundamental question: 'Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?', by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter.

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New system transmits high-speed unrepeated signal over 520 kilometers

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have partnered up with engineers from Corning Inc., US, and T8, Russia, and developed a system for high-throughput data transfer over great distances without the need for signal repeating along the way. Systems of this kind could be used to provide internet connection and other communication services in remote communities.

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Scientists on the Move

They're willing to relocate for the best opportunities—and North America is where international researches would most like to go — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Change of shifts at the north pole

After exchanging research teams and crewmembers, the greatest expedition to the Central Arctic of all time is now entering the next phase, during which urgently needed research into the Arctic climate system will be conducted. In the following paragraphs, the team from the first leg of the journey, which was dominated by thin sea ice, review the mission so far: despite extremely challenging condit

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How Jack Antonoff Helped Define Pop in 2019

The sound of pop in 2019 was multifaceted , but one creative force connected a surprising number of those facets. Jack Antonoff, who achieved rock-stardom in the early 2010s as a member of the bands Fun and Bleachers, produced and/or co-wrote the majority of Taylor Swift's Lover , all of Lana Del Rey's Norman Fucking Rockwell , and almost all of the Brockhampton rapper Kevin Abstract's Arizona Ba

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New tool uses AI to flag fake news for media fact-checkers

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool could help social media networks and news organizations weed out false stories. The tool, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses deep-learning AI algorithms to determine if claims made in posts or stories are supported by other posts and stories on the same subject.

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New 'netherworldly' freshwater fish named for Thai conservation visionary

Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who's gone one too many rounds. The species makes its home in the fast-flowing, rocky streams of Western Thailand, a region that its namesake, the late conservationist Surin Binnan, devoted himself to protecting.

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Physics of Living Systems: How cells muster and march out

Many of the cell types in our bodies are constantly on the move. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have developed a mathematical model that describes, for the first time, how single-cell migration can coalesce into coordinated movements of cohorts of cells.

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U.N. Climate Talks Limp to a Disappointing Close

Lethargic, inconclusive negotiations on matters like carbon trading contrasted with fervent protests on the streets outside — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more common, particularly in North America.

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Cozy pajamas meant for lounging

Somebody hit the nog a little hard. (Crystal Z. Shi via Unsplash/) There's never a bad time to invest in quality pajamas, but certainly as the temperatures drop and your weekends become more stay-at-home-in-fuzzy-socks types of affairs, your cozy night clothes assume a bigger role in your life. With snow days around the horizon, make sure you've got a comfortable matching set on hand. Here, a lis

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Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more common, particularly in North America.

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Function of new microRNAs identified in Salmonella and Shigella infections

Discovering them earned their discoverers a Nobel Prize in the 1990s—microRNAs are small RNA molecules that do not code for proteins, however, they take care of an essential function: they act as regulators in gene expression, and so they have become a focus of attention for medical science. Despite there being thousands of different sequences of this genetic material, the individual role that eac

8h

Function of new microRNAs identified in Salmonella and Shigella infections

Discovering them earned their discoverers a Nobel Prize in the 1990s—microRNAs are small RNA molecules that do not code for proteins, however, they take care of an essential function: they act as regulators in gene expression, and so they have become a focus of attention for medical science. Despite there being thousands of different sequences of this genetic material, the individual role that eac

8h

Hopes rise for statue of pioneering fossil hunter Mary Anning

Mother's fundraising campaign in Lyme Regis has been backed by likes of David Attenborough Evie Swire was nine years old when she first heard the story of a woman who had lived near her home in Dorset and, in her own way, changed the world. Mary Anning was born into a humble family in Lyme Regis in 1799 and grew up hunting for fossils in the area's cliffs to supplement their meagre income. When s

8h

Japan will build the world's largest neutrino detector

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03874-w Cabinet greenlights US$600-million Hyper-Kamiokande experiment, which scientists hope will bring revolutionary discoveries.

8h

Podcast: How to save coral reefs as the world warms

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03810-y Listen to an audio version of our feature article by Amber Dance.

8h

Big step in producing carbon-neutral fuel: Silver diphosphide

A new chemical process described in the journal Nature Communications does in the lab what trees do in nature — it converts carbon dioxide into usable chemicals or fuels.

8h

Leptons help in tracking new physics

Electrons with 'colleagues' — other leptons – are one of many products of collisions observed in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. According to theorists, some of these particles may be created in processes that extend beyond standard physics. The latest analysis verifies these predictions.

8h

Evolutionarily novel genes work in tumors

A team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University studied the evolutionary ages of human genes and identified a new class of them expressed in tumors — tumor specifically expressed, evolutionarily novel (TSEEN) genes. This confirms the team's earlier theory about the evolutionary role of neoplasms.

8h

Strength of conviction won't help to persuade when people disagree

If you disagree with someone, it might not make any difference how certain they say they are, as during disagreement your brain's sensitivity to the strength of people's beliefs is reduced, finds a study led by UCL and City, University of London and published in Nature Neuroscience.

8h

Oil-catching sponge could soak up residue from offshore drilling

An oil-catching sponge, developed at the University of Toronto and Imperial, could help thwart water contamination from offshore oil drilling.

8h

Limiting the loss of nature

With only about half of Earth's terrestrial surface remaining as natural vegetation, a University of Queensland-led team has proposed an international goal to halt its continued loss. The team, led by Professor Martine Maron, examined how a global goal of 'no net loss' of natural ecosystems could work, where some nations seek net increases in over-depleted natural vegetation, while recognising tha

8h

Penn researchers uncover defective sperm epigenome that leads to male infertility

One out of eight couples has trouble conceiving, with a quarter of those cases caused by unexplained male infertility. Research has linked that to defective sperm that fail to 'evict' proteins called histones from DNA during development. However, the mechanisms behind that eviction and where this is happening has remained unclear. Now, researchers show, using newer genome-wide DNA sequencing tools

8h

Bird migration timing skewed by climate, new research finds

Armed with 24 years of radar data from NOAA, researchers found that birds migrating in the spring were likely to pass certain stops earlier now than they would have 20 years ago.

8h

Heat or eat? How one energy conservation strategy may hurt vulnerable populations

Any economic and conservation benefits associated with time-of-use electricity billing could be achieved at the expense of some of the most vulnerable citizens in our society: people with disabilities and the elderly, new research suggests.

8h

ESO telescope images stunning central region of Milky Way, finds ancient star burst

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has observed the central part of the Milky Way with spectacular resolution and uncovered new details about the history of star birth in our galaxy. Thanks to the new observations, astronomers have found evidence for a dramatic event in the life of the Milky Way: a burst of star formation so intense that it resulted in over a 100,000 supernova explosions.

8h

Collective memory shapes the construction of personal memories

For sociologists, our individual memories are shaped by the collective memory of our community. Until now, this phenomenon had never been studied at the neurobiological level. Inserm researchers Pierre Gagnepain and Francis Eustache studied the collective representations of WWII in France, using brain imaging to show how collective memory shapes individual memory. Their findings have been publishe

8h

Birds' seasonal migrations shift earlier as climate changes, new research shows

In what the authors believe is one of the first studies to examine climate change impact on the timing of bird migration on a continental scale, researchers report that spring migrants were likely to pass certain stops earlier now than they would have 20 years ago. Also, temperature and migration timing were closely aligned, with the greatest changes in migration timing occurring in the regions wa

8h

From cancer medication to antibiotic

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly the source of deadly infections. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Center for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig have now modified an approved cancer drug to develop an active agent against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

8h

Plastic biosensor finds sweet success

Medical diagnostic device extracts energy from sugars naturally present in the body to drive its glucose-sensing circuitry.

8h

Visual neurons don't work the way scientists thought, study finds

A new survey of the activity of nearly 60,000 neurons in the mouse visual system reveals how far we have to go to understand how the brain computes. Published in Nature Neuroscience, the analysis by Allen Institute scientists reveals that more than 90% of neurons in the visual cortex, the part of the brain that process our visual world, don't work the way scientists thought — and it's not yet cle

8h

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean

In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average — with the seafood supply in the crosshairs.

8h

New way to make biomedical devices from silk yields better products with tunable qualities

Researchers have developed a novel, significantly more efficient fabrication method for silk that allows them to heat and mold the material into solid forms for a wide range of applications, including medical devices. The physical properties of the end products can be 'tuned' for specific needs, and can be functionally modified with bioactive molecules, such as antibiotics and enzymes. The thermal

8h

Turning to genetics to treat little hearts

Researchers makes a breakthrough in understanding the mechanisms of a common congenital heart disease.

8h

Researchers discover when it's good to get the blues

Contrary to common belief, blue light may not be as disruptive to our sleep patterns as originally thought — according to University of Manchester scientists. According to the team, using dim, cooler, lights in the evening and bright warmer lights in the day may be more beneficial to our health.

8h

Review of studies on cigarette smoking, multiple sclerosis

Researchers conducted a literature review of studies to summarize outcomes in patients with multiple sclerosis who smoke cigarettes and who are exposed to smoke.

8h

Opioid prescribing patterns, overdose risk in teens, young adults

Researchers used a private insurance claims database in the US to examine opioid prescribing patterns and how they were associated with overdose risk among 2.7 million adolescents and young adults without cancer.

8h

New estimates of neonatal abstinence syndrome, associated costs

Neonatal abstinence syndrome is withdrawal that happens in infants who were exposed to opioids in utero during pregnancy. This study gives new national estimates of neonatal abstinence syndrome and associated health care costs.

8h

Exploring associations between ultraprocessed food consumption, type 2 diabetes

Associations between consumption of ultraprocessed foods and risk of type 2 diabetes were explored among a large group of participants in a web-based study cohort in France.

8h

Opioid overdose risk factors for teens, college-aged youth same as adults

Older teens may have similar risk factors for prescription opioid overdose as adults, a new study suggests.

8h

Nilotinib appears safe in Parkinson's trial; drug thought to allow dopamine replenishment

A clinical trial investigating the repurposed cancer drug nilotinib in people with Parkinson's disease finds that it is reasonably safe and well tolerated. Researchers also report finding an increase in dopamine, the chemical lost as a result of neuronal destruction, and a decrease in neurotoxic proteins in the brain among study participants. Finally, they say nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibito

8h

A Shopper's Guide to Dinosaur Gifts

Tips from experts at the National Museum of Natural History to help you buy scientifically accurate dinosaur gifts for your loved one

8h

Child asthma flare-ups coincide with microbiome changes

New research suggests a link between the bacteria that live in the upper airway and the severity of asthma symptoms among children with mild to moderate asthma. The research paves the way for future studies to discover whether altering the types of bacteria that live in the upper airway could help patients with asthma. "There is an urgent need to develop better asthma therapies for these patients

8h

Sleeping Brain Waves Draw a Healthy Bath for Neurons

When you sink into a deep sleep, a cycle of activity starts behind your closed eyelids. First, a slow electrical wave pulses through the brain. A few seconds later, the amount of blood within the brain drops. Then a wave of cerebrospinal fluid reverses its usual direction of flow and moves upward through large cavities in the lower and central portions of the brain. The pattern repeats about thre

8h

How the gut microbes you're born with affect your lifelong health | Henna-Maria Uusitupa

Your lifelong health may have been decided the day you were born, says microbiome researcher Henna-Maria Uusitupa. In this fascinating talk, she shows how the gut microbes you acquire during birth and as an infant impact your health into adulthood — and discusses new microbiome research that could help tackle problems like obesity and diabetes.

8h

Denmark's best wine is made from cherries

Sour cherries at one of Frederiksdal's orchards. (Courtesy of Frederiksdal/) This story originally featured on Saveur "It sounds like the type of drink that should be consumed at a bachelorette party," laughs Morten Brink Iwersen, co-founder of Frederiksdal . He's referring to cherry wine, or kirsebaervin , a Danish product that has a terrible reputation in its home country—one he has been trying

8h

Endnu en lukning venter for Cityringens passagerer

Det bliver ikke sidste gang, når metroselskabet til januar lukker Cityringen i to uger, fordi it-systemerne skal opgraderes for at tilkoble en afgrening mod Nordhavn. Det vil ske igen, når strækningen mod Sydhavn skal kobles på i 2024.

8h

We have a winner! Team picks Bennu sample collection spot

After a year scoping out asteroid Bennu's boulder-scattered surface, researchers leading NASA's first asteroid sample return mission have officially selected a sample collection site. The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-Rex, mission team says a site designated "Nightingale"—located in a crater high in Bennu's northern hemisphere—is

8h

NASA Asteroid Hunter Chooses Landing Site on Boulder-Strewn Space Rock

OSIRIS-REx probe will attempt to sample rocks and soil from crater in asteroid Bennu's northern hemisphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Limiting the loss of nature

With only about half of Earth's terrestrial surface remaining as natural vegetation, a University of Queensland-led team has proposed an international goal to halt its continued loss.

8h

Bird migration timing skewed by climate, new research finds

Life cycles for birds, insects and trees are shifting in this current era of a rapidly changing climate. How migration patterns, in particular, are changing and whether birds can track climate change is an open question.

8h

Very Large Telescope images stunning central region of Milky Way, finds ancient star burst

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has observed the central part of the Milky Way with spectacular resolution and uncovered new details about the history of star birth in our galaxy. Thanks to the new observations, astronomers have found evidence for a dramatic event in the life of the Milky Way: a burst of star formation so intense that it resulted in over a hundred thousand supernova explosions.

8h

New way to make biomedical devices from silk yields better products with tunable qualities

Researchers led by engineers at Tufts University have developed a novel, significantly more efficient fabrication method for silk that allows them to heat and mold the material into solid forms for a wide range of applications, including medical devices. The end products have superior strength compared to other materials, have physical properties that can be "tuned" for specific needs, and can be

8h

Plastic glucose-powered biosensor finds sweet success

An electronic biosensor powered using glucose in bodily fluids has been developed by KAUST researchers. The device pairs an electron-transporting polymer with an enzyme that extracts electrons from its reaction with glucose to drive its circuitry. The plastic biosensor could act as a continuous monitor of key health indicators, such as blood sugar levels in diabetes patients.

8h

Modified cancer drug effective against multi-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly the source of deadly infections. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Center for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig have now modified an approved cancer drug to develop an active agent against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

8h

Oil-catching sponge could soak up residue from offshore drilling

Drilling and fracking for oil under the seabed produces 100 billion barrels of oil-contaminated wastewater every year by releasing tiny oil droplets into surrounding water.

8h

Researchers uncover defective sperm epigenome that leads to male infertility

One out of eight couples has trouble conceiving, with nearly a quarter of those cases caused by unexplained male infertility. For the past decade, research has linked that infertility to defective sperm that fail to "evict" proteins called histones from DNA during development. However, the mechanisms behind that eviction and where this is happening in the sperm DNA has remained both controversial

8h

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean

In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average—with the seafood supply in the crosshairs.

8h

Researchers uncover defective sperm epigenome that leads to male infertility

One out of eight couples has trouble conceiving, with nearly a quarter of those cases caused by unexplained male infertility. For the past decade, research has linked that infertility to defective sperm that fail to "evict" proteins called histones from DNA during development. However, the mechanisms behind that eviction and where this is happening in the sperm DNA has remained both controversial

8h

Scientist breaks down chemistry in iconic cartoons: SpongeBob SquarePants and Popeye

Are bananas actually that slippery? Could spinach give you superhuman strength? And what the heck is Toon Acid? This week, watch some cartoons alongside our writer and host, Sam Jones, and learn whether their chemistry checks out.

8h

New heat model may help electronic devices last longer

A University of Illinois-based team of engineers has found that the model currently used to predict heat loss in a common semiconductor material does not apply in all situations. By testing the thermal properties of gallium nitride semiconductors fabricated using four popular methods, the team discovered that some techniques produce materials that perform better than others. This new understanding

8h

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

Princeton University-led researchers studied annual outbreaks of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in one of the first examinations of how climate change could affect diseases transmitted directly from person to person. They found that while outbreaks of RSV could become generally less severe, infections may become more common, which could leave people more vulnerable to the virus over the long te

8h

Modified cancer drug effective against multi-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly the source of deadly infections. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Center for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig have now modified an approved cancer drug to develop an active agent against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

8h

They Might Dig Up Body of Bitcoin CEO to See If He's Really Dead

Crypto Exhumation 30-year-old CEO of Vancouver-based cryptocurrency exchange QuadrigaCX Gerald Cotten passed away in late 2018 — taking to the grave the passwords to crypto holdings worth about $137 million and which belonged to 115,000 QuadrigaCX users. The incident sparked numerous conspiracy theories: did the CEO fake his own death and run with the money? Now, it looks like the flap could lead

8h

Researchers combine quantum dot 'atoms' and create new 'molecules'

Are you ready for the future? Back in 1869, Russia's Dmitri Mendeleev began to classify the elements according to their chemical properties, giving rise to the Periodical Table of Elements. "I saw in a dream a table where all elements fell into place as required. Awakening, I immediately wrote it down on a piece of paper," Mendeleev recalled.

8h

Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy finds clogged blood vessels

200 years ago, a doctor from France used a stethoscope for the first time. Countless efforts to observe the human body have been made since then. Up to now, the best tool that provides anatomical, functional, and molecular information about humans and animals is the photoacoustic microscope. Super-resolution localization photoacoustic microscopy, which is 500 times faster than conventional photoac

8h

There's No Fun Like Mandatory Office Holiday Fun

In exchange for a salary, office workers do a great many dreadful things: sit through meetings, make the trek to and from work each day, feign enthusiasm for their employer's particular vision. Come holiday season, they also—compelled by a strange mix of perceived obligation and genuine holiday spirit—sometimes exchange gifts with one another. One common, and frequently awkward, form of this year

8h

Study highlights high cost of fossil fuel pollution on children's health

A new study has compiled the estimated per-case costs of 6 childhood health conditions linked to air pollution — estimates that can be incorporated into benefits assessments of air pollution regulations and climate change mitigation policies.

8h

Hydration may affect cognitive function in some older adults

Among women, lower hydration levels were associated with lower scores on a task designed to measure motor speed, sustained attention, and working memory. They did not find the same result for men.

8h

With novel technique, new study is first to definitively map the early development of PTSD

Only 23 percent of people who experience trauma develop PTSD. New research offers new clues on identifying which trauma victims will develop the disorder and suggests potential interventions. Researchers used a mobile phone app to gather information from patients in the critical 30 days after the trauma event – when symptoms interact to create the full blown disorder – the first time such extensiv

8h

Having to defend one's sexuality increases fear of childbirth

In order to help people with fear of childbirth, there must be trust between the patient and the healthcare staff. But for many lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people, this trust never develops. These are the results of a study in the journal Midwifery from researchers at Linköping University.

8h

The function of new microRNAs are identified in Salmonella and Shigella infections

The research, published in Nature Microbiology, could help the search for more effective medicine and delves deeper into understanding the role of microRNAs in gene expression.

8h

Test your knowledge of 2019′s biggest tech stories

Check out the latest episode using the player, below. (Techathlon/) Technology news moves absurdly fast. Trying to keep up with all the new gadgets, security issues, business scandals, Congressional hearings, firmware updates, and whatever the heck Elon Musk is up to at the moment can get overwhelming, fast. That's why the Techathlon podcast exists. Listen in the player above or subscribe on: App

8h

What publishing as a lead author has taught me

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03842-4 Four scientists reveal their key lessons from the publication process.

9h

ESA is about to launch a space telescope to study how planets are made

The CHEOPS mission, a space telescope designed to look at exoplanets we've already discovered and find out what they're made of, launches on 17 December

9h

'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Scene Debuts on 'Fortnite'

The clip appeared in-game on Saturday. Watch it here.

9h

Warming climate will impact dead zones in Chesapeake Bay

In recent years, scientists have projected increasingly large summer dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay, areas where there is little or no oxygen for living things like crabs and fish to thrive, even as long-term efforts to reduce nutrient pollution continue. Researchers warn that climate may also have significant impact that could change the equation for nutrient reduction goals.

9h

Din ordföljd eller ordföljden din

Svenska språket var friare på medeltiden än vad det är idag. I alla fall om man studerar användningen av verb och objekt och hur de förhåller dig till varandra. En bok har köpt och har köpt en bok var båda helt godtagbara varianter. Språkforskaren Adrian Sangfelt har undersökt ordföljdens utveckling i svenska språkets historia fram till dagens svenska. Hans avhandling vid Uppsala universitet visa

9h

Study Uncovers Genetic Links Between Psychiatric Disorders

Psychiatric disorders affect 25 percent of the population in any given year. But despite their prevalence, researchers still don't know what causes many mental health issues, and that can make treating them incredibly difficult. But now, a new study has identified more than a hundred gene variants that can affect a person's risk of developing multiple psychiatric disorders — a biological clue tha

9h

UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants

Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects—some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found.

9h

Southern white rhinos are threatened by incest and habitat fragmentation

The fragmentation of natural habitats by fences and human settlements is threatening the survival of the white rhinoceros. It prevents dispersal from the family group and leads to mating among close relatives. Additionally female rhinoceros favour individual males for mating over others and sire several offspring with the same partner over consecutive breeding periods. These factors lead to a high

9h

Carbon cocoons surround growing galaxies—ALMA spots earliest environment pollution in the universe

Researchers have discovered gigantic clouds of gaseous carbon spanning more than a radius of 30,000 light-years around young galaxies using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). This is the first confirmation that carbon atoms produced inside of stars in the early universe have spread beyond galaxies. No theoretical studies have predicted such huge carbon cocoons around growing

9h

New heat model may help electronic devices last longer

A University of Illinois-based team of engineers has found that the model currently used to predict heat loss in a common semiconductor material does not apply in all situations. By testing the thermal properties of gallium nitride semiconductors fabricated using four popular methods, the team discovered that some techniques produce materials that perform better than others. This new understanding

9h

Big step in producing carbon-neutral fuel: silver diphosphide

A new chemical process described in the journal Nature Communications does in the lab what trees do in nature—it converts carbon dioxide into usable chemicals or fuels.

9h

Shedding light in the dark: radar satellites lead the way

Spare a thought this Christmas for researchers hunkered down on their Polarstern icebreaker, adrift in the frozen Arctic Ocean. Subjected to temperatures as low as –45°C and the perpetual darkness of the polar winter, they are willing participants in MOSAiC – the world's largest and longest polar research expedition. Despite the darkness, however, the researchers and crew remain aware of what is h

9h

Opinion: Why and how to debate climate change

What's the best way to debate a problem as big and complex as climate change? In his new book, Professor Mike Hulme from the Department of Geography argues that students need to develop their own well-informed position on the difficult questions raised by climate change without being told what to think.

9h

UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants

Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects—some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found.

9h

Southern white rhinos are threatened by incest and habitat fragmentation

The fragmentation of natural habitats by fences and human settlements is threatening the survival of the white rhinoceros. It prevents dispersal from the family group and leads to mating among close relatives. Additionally female rhinoceros favour individual males for mating over others and sire several offspring with the same partner over consecutive breeding periods. These factors lead to a high

9h

Laser-based prototype probes cold atom dynamics

By tracking the motions of cold atom clouds, astronomers can learn much about the physical processes which play out in the depths of space. To make these measurements, researchers currently use instruments named 'cold atom inertial sensors' which, so far, have largely been operated inside the lab. In new work published in EPJ D, a team of physicists at Muquans and LNE-SYRTE (the French national me

9h

Equations show what all animals have in common

A new set of equations describes and predicts commonalities across life despite its enormous diversity, researchers report. "Our study develops a general theory to study the extraordinary diversity of life using simple rules common to all species. We can further apply these rules to predict specific traits of species that we might know a lot less about," says lead author Joseph "Robbie" Burger, a

9h

Carbon cocoons surround growing galaxies

Researchers have discovered gigantic clouds of gaseous carbon spanning more than a radius of 30,000 light-years around young galaxies using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). This is the first confirmation that carbon atoms produced inside of stars in the early Universe have spread beyond galaxies. No theoretical studies have predicted such huge carbon cocoons around growing

9h

Young adults experiencing homelessness are not seeking medical care after rape

Nearly three-fourths of young adults experiencing homelessness who are raped do not seek post-sexual assault medical care, missing an opportunity to greatly reduce their risk of contracting HIV, according to a survey led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

9h

Apple's Employee "Wellness" Program Includes Free DNA Tests

Apple has reportedly started a new employee wellness program that grants its Silicon Valley staff access to free DNA tests that screen for conditions like cancer or heart disease. The tests are available through a prescription DNA test company called Color, but the tests themselves are administered at Apple-owned clinics, CNBC reports . That means that the tech giant will theoretically have acces

9h

The best science images of the year: 2019 in pictures

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03839-z A black hole's perilous edge, anti-poaching warriors, whisky webs and more.

9h

Impeachment Could End Badly

I don't have the courage of my convictions. President Donald Trump deserves to be impeached for trying to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political opponents. With every week, he says or does something worse than what he already said or did. But to say Trump deserves impeachment is different from saying that impeachment is good for the country. It might, in fact, turn out quite badly. Most of

9h

This Year's Flu Season Is Off to a Weird (and Early) Start

According to the CDC's latest influenza update, both the timing and the strain are highly unusual.

9h

Welcome

Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell spent three days photographing the small town known for its proximity to the infamous Air Force test facility.

9h

A New Anti-Aging Therapy Is Starting Its First Human Trial—and It Costs $1 Million

Recent research on longevity is making the idea of an elixir of life sound increasingly plausible. But a startup that's started selling a $1 m illion anti-aging treatment is most likely jumping the gun. Libella Gene Therapeutic s says it will administer volunteers with a gene therapy that it claims can reverse aging by up to 20 years, according to OneZero . Despite the fact that this is the first

9h

Skepsis efter stor AI-konference: Al lærer snævert og begår stadig »stupid mistakes«

Efter flere års hype er forventningerne til AI på nogle områder ved at køle ned.

9h

Personalized medicine for atrial fibrillation

The study, published in Europace, uses signals from implantable devices — pacemakers and defibrillators — to analyze electrical signals in the heart during episodes of atrial fibrillation.

9h

UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants

Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects — some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found.

9h

Southern white rhinos are threatened by incest and habitat fragmentation

The fragmentation of natural habitats by fences and human settlements is threatening the survival of the white rhinoceros. It prevents dispersal from the family group and leads to mating among close relatives. Additionally female rhinoceros favour individual males for mating over others and sire several offspring with the same partner over consecutive breeding periods. The results come from the la

9h

Laser-based prototype probes cold atom dynamics

In new work published in EPJ D, a team of physicists in France presents an innovative prototype for a new industrial laser system. Their design paves the way for the development of cold atom inertial sensors in space.

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9h

Følg opsendelsen live: ESA skyder sit første planet-rumteleskop af sted

Tirsdag kl. 9.54 dansk tid sender ESA Cheops-teleskopet afsted, som fra 700 km højde skal kigge efter exoplaneter.

9h

A general theory on explosions that happen against deformable objects

In line with current international research about the interaction of matter with high energies, the University of Seville researcher Alfonso M. Gañán Calvo has studied the explosive behavior of matter subjected to the highest known energy densities produced by humans on the Earth. As a result, he has developed a general theory and the first predictive analytical model of a three-dimensional violen

9h

Researchers establish how insects take advantage of the carrion left behind by carnivores

A multidisciplinary team of Spanish researchers, including members of the Ecology Department of the Miguel Hernández University (UMH), has provided the first data on how scavenger insects and vertebrates share the carcasses of wild carnivore mammals.

9h

The Remedy for Mitch McConnell

Senator Lindsey Graham put it crisply . "This thing will come to the Senate, and it will die quickly, and I will do everything I can to make it die quickly," he said. "I am trying to give a pretty clear signal I have made up my mind. I'm not trying to pretend to be a fair juror here." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaking to Fox News, was even more explicit . "Everything I do during th

9h

Researchers establish how insects take advantage of the carrion left behind by carnivores

A multidisciplinary team of Spanish researchers, including members of the Ecology Department of the Miguel Hernández University (UMH), has provided the first data on how scavenger insects and vertebrates share the carcasses of wild carnivore mammals.

9h

The Smithsonian's Ten Splashiest New Acquisitions of 2019

This year marks the arrival of a brilliant diamond, a hybrid space rocket, exciting paintings and two darling clouded leopard cubs

9h

How cells muster and march out

Many of the cell types in our bodies are constantly on the move. LMU physicists have developed a mathematical model that describes, for the first time, how single-cell migration can coalesce into coordinated movements of cohorts of cells.

9h

Pine trees with larger resin ducts better able to survive mountain pine beetle attack

Not all pine trees are created equal when it comes to fending off their mortal enemy, the mountain pine beetle.

9h

Global mountain gorilla population grows to 1,063

Survey results released today from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda, and the contiguous Sarambwe Nature Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo, have confirmed that the mountain gorilla population in the forest has grown to 459, providing further evidence that conservation efforts to protect the planet's greatest apes are working. This brings the global number of confirmed mountain

9h

How cells muster and march out

Many of the cell types in our bodies are constantly on the move. LMU physicists have developed a mathematical model that describes, for the first time, how single-cell migration can coalesce into coordinated movements of cohorts of cells.

9h

Transgender homeless Americans find few protections in the law

Ben Carson, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, made news earlier this year for his statements about transgender people.

9h

Pine trees with larger resin ducts better able to survive mountain pine beetle attack

Not all pine trees are created equal when it comes to fending off their mortal enemy, the mountain pine beetle.

9h

Global mountain gorilla population grows to 1,063

Survey results released today from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda, and the contiguous Sarambwe Nature Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo, have confirmed that the mountain gorilla population in the forest has grown to 459, providing further evidence that conservation efforts to protect the planet's greatest apes are working. This brings the global number of confirmed mountain

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Commentary: It's not too late to save the birds of North America

Over three weeks starting Saturday, thousands of birders in the Western Hemisphere will take part in the annual, 119-year-old Audubon Christmas Bird Count. These tallies are conducted in prearranged circles within a seven-mile radius of a central point. At least 30 such circles exist in Southern California, and counts in each are held during a planned 24-hour period, rain or shine.

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Plasma ionization-based 3-D titania nanofiber-like webs to enhance bioreactivity and osteoconductivity of biomaterials

In a new study published on Scientific Reports, Mohammad-Hossein Beigi and a research team in the departments of Engineering and Applied Science and Cellular Biotechnology in Canada and Iran described a new method to form biocompatible biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. They engineered web-like, three-dimensional (3-D) Titania nanofibrous coatings using high intensity laser-induced reverse

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Commentary: It's not too late to save the birds of North America

Over three weeks starting Saturday, thousands of birders in the Western Hemisphere will take part in the annual, 119-year-old Audubon Christmas Bird Count. These tallies are conducted in prearranged circles within a seven-mile radius of a central point. At least 30 such circles exist in Southern California, and counts in each are held during a planned 24-hour period, rain or shine.

9h

Brains of children with type 1 diabetes work differently

Children with Type 1 diabetes show subtle but important differences in brain function compared with kids who don't have the disease, according to new research. The study in PLOS Medicine is the first to evaluate what happens in the brains of children with diabetes during a cognitive task. On functional magnetic resonance imaging scans, when their brains were at work, children with diabetes displa

10h

More efficient risk assessment for nanomaterials

Nanotechnology is booming, but risk assessment for these tiny particles is a laborious process that presents significant challenges to the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). To find more efficient test methods, researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in cooperation with BfR scientists took a closer look at the biological effects. Their results have bee

10h

A flaky option boosts organic solar cells

Tungsten disulfide helps to channel charge in flexible photovoltaics.

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It's always a good hair day for Leptothrix cholodnii

A team led by researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that tiny hair-like structures, called nanofibrils, grown by aquatic bacterium Leptothrix cholodnii are essential for surface attachment and the formation of long bacterial filaments. These nanofibrils also trap free metals, making the bacteria prime candidates for use in the bioremediation and extraction of heavy and precious metals f

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Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy finds clogged blood vessels

Professor Chulhong Kim and his research team suggested a super-resolution localization photoacoustic microscopy using red blood cells as contrast absorbers.

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Warming climate will impact dead zones in Chesapeake Bay

In recent years, scientists have projected increasingly large summer dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay, areas where there is little or no oxygen for living things like crabs and fish to thrive, even as long-term efforts to reduce nutrient pollution continue. Researchers from University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science factored in local impacts of climate change to make projections of wh

10h

The rare genetic disorder identified in only 3 people worldwide

A team of South Australian researchers has cracked a rare gene variant for a disorder that causes severe neurodegeneration in infants.

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Our favorite Science photos of 2019

A selection of the most stunning pictures of the year

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Rödbetor stoppar mygg

Ämnet geosmin är mycket effektivt mot mygg, men extremt dyrt och sällsynt. Nu har forskare från Sverige och USA upptäckt att ämnet även finns i saften från rödbetsskal. Det är ett billigt, naturligt och miljömässigt hållbart sätt att bekämpa myggor. Marcus Stensmyr och Nadia Melo vid Lunds universitet har tillsammans med kollegor vid University of Washington och Florida International University i

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Lägre konsumtion vittnar om lågkonjunktur på gång

Forskare ser flera tecken i den svenska konsumtionen som tyder på att en lågkonjunktur är på gång. Centrum för Konsumtionsvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet har släppt sin årliga konsumtionsrapport. – Årets rapport heter "Orosmoln" och visar att sötebrödsdagarna är över och att svångremmen börjat dras åt i Sverige, säger John Magnus Roos, forskare vid Göteborgs universitet. Forskningsrapporten ä

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Dendritic cells may cause autoimmune drug side effects

Some drugs for autoimmune disorders, a class of biologics called TNF inhibitors, carry a risk of serious infections and even cancer. New research shows why. The findings could also lead to better treatments in the future. Autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis , psoriasis , and Crohn's disease plague tens of millions of Americans and are the result of the body's immune system, whose ro

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Polymer-based optical fiber for visualization of material stress

Fiber-optic strain sensing is known for its ability to monitor large areas. However, most types of fiber-optic strain sensors require spectrum analysis instruments, which drastically increases the overall cost of sensor systems. In contrast, fiber-optic strain sensors such as Bragg-grating or Brillouin optical time domain reflectometers, have reliable structures that are commercially available. Ho

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How to use entanglement for long-distance or free-space quantum communication

Entanglement, once called "spooky action at a distance" by Einstein, is the phenomenon in which the quantum states of separated particles cannot be described independently. This puzzling phenomenon is widely exploited in the quantum physicist's toolbox, and is a key resource for applications in secure quantum communication over long distances and quantum cryptography protocols. Unfortunately, enta

10h

Researchers develop in-silico model of solar storms toward early warning system

A research group from Graz investigated how solar storms can be simulated in order to enable a more accurate prediction of their effects on the Earth. Their work has furnished a more accurate model for simulating solar storms in real time.

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Uranium chemistry and geological disposal of radioactive waste

A new paper to be published on 16 December provides a significant new insight into our understanding of uranium biogeochemistry and could help with the UK's nuclear legacy.

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Study finds flirting among coworkers can reduce stress

Casual flirting with colleagues at work is relatively harmless and can even be beneficial, new research from Washington State University shows.

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A unique perspective on (pre)historical migration using linguistics

Migration is not only reflected in DNA, but also in language. By tracing changes in language, we learn more about the lifestyle of the people that speak it. University lecturer Tijmen Pronk (40) conducts linguistic research into (pre)historical migration.

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Small-scale atlatl artifacts suggest children were taught how to use them

A pair of researchers with the University of Alberta has found evidence that suggests early Native American adults taught children how to use an atlatl by making a smaller version of the dart-throwing device. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, Robert Losey and Emily Hull describe the artifacts they studied from the Par-Tee burial site in Oregon and what they learned about them.

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Physicist proposes a new approach in modeling the evolution of the universe

A physicist from RUDN University has proposed a new theoretical model for the interaction of spinor and gravitational fields. He considered the evolution of the universe within one of the variants of the widespread Bianchi cosmological model. In this case, a change in the calculated field parameters led to changes in the evolution of the universe under consideration. Upon reaching certain values,

10h

Polymer thermal regulator transforms from conductor to insulator and back again

Polymers are used to develop various materials, such as plastics, nylons and rubbers. In their most basic form, they are made up of many of identical molecules joined together repeatedly, like a chain. Engineering molecules to join together in specific ways can dictate the characteristics of the resulting polymer.

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Chemists improve method of extracting natural antioxidants from bay leaves

A chemist from RUDN University and his colleagues have proposed using residues from processing bay leaves as raw material for the production of chemically active substances, in particular, antioxidants. The researchers have developed a mechanochemical method for the extraction of antioxidants, which reduces processing time by a factor of 10. The work was published in the journal Industrial Crops a

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Chemists improve method of extracting natural antioxidants from bay leaves

A chemist from RUDN University and his colleagues have proposed using residues from processing bay leaves as raw material for the production of chemically active substances, in particular, antioxidants. The researchers have developed a mechanochemical method for the extraction of antioxidants, which reduces processing time by a factor of 10. The work was published in the journal Industrial Crops a

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Get ready for a new periodic table

! Researchers at Hebrew university combine quantum dot 'atoms' and create new 'molecules.'

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Excerpts from an unfinished manuscript by Gloria Naylor published for the first time

Excerpts from acclaimed author Gloria Naylor's unfinished manuscript 'Sapphira Wade' have been published for the first time. The largely unknown manuscript — part of the author's archives — is a draft of the opening chapter of a prequel to Naylor's critically-acclaimed novel Mama Day

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How minds make meaning

Meaning is central to language. But how do we combine the building blocks of thought and language to compose meaning? A special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, edited by Andrea E. Martin from the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics and Giosuè Baggio from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, brings together fifteen contributions from the fields o

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Study finds flirting among coworkers can reduce stress

Casual flirting with colleagues at work is relatively harmless and can even be beneficial, according to the study led by Washington State University Assistant Professor Leah Sheppard. The research focuses on the little studied area of positively experienced social sexual behavior, drawing a clear distinction between these interactions and the persistent, unwelcome acts of sexual harassment.

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Fish consumption and mercury exposure in pregnant women in coastal Florida

A study of pregnant women in coastal Florida found that hair mercury concentration was associated with consumption of locally caught seafood and all seafood, a higher level of education, and first pregnancy. The highest concentrations were in women over 33 with the highest levels in Asian women. Pregnant women who ate seafood three times a week had the highest concentration – almost four times as

10h

High-calorie food is more tempting when time is ticking down

When people see the valuable resource of time counting down, they are more tempted to compensate by consuming a different resource: calories.

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2017 meteor was a 'grazing fireball'

A team of researchers at Curtin University in Australia reports that a meteor that streaked across the Australian sky back in 2017 was a rare "grazing fireball." The group has written a paper describing their observations and findings and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

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Astronomers present a concept for the next NASA flagship mission

Astronomers are making the case for a new mission to search for Earth-like planets outside our solar system.

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New collection of maps and datascapes capturing the spatial consequences of climate change

In September of 1962, President John F. Kennedy delivered a speech urging that the United States should "go to the moon … not because it is easy, but because it is hard." In the early 1960s, none of the technology required to make the journey even existed, but in 1969 the U.S. succeeded in putting a man on the moon. It's in this spirit of goal-driven innovation and a renewed, activist public secto

10h

A new tool tidies up molecules at the nano level

Tidying up. Not an idea associated with living cells on the nanoscale. But just as a mismash of IKEA bits scattered throughout your bedroom is less useful than a neatly-assembled dresser, synthetic biologists wish to have tools to organize "scattered" components inside living cells.

10h

Halting climate change means a world without fossil fuels—not merely curbing emissions

A new study by two University of Toronto researchers is proposing a different way to think about tackling climate change—one that shifts focus away from emissions reductions in favor of eliminating fossil fuel energy altogether.

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'Chicken-and-egg' relationship between mantle-located superplumes and surface-located supercontinents

Curtin University researchers suggest a "chicken-and-egg" relationship exists between the Earth's mantle-located superplumes and surface-located supercontinents, adding their findings to a scientific community divided on what is happening deep inside the planet's surface.

10h

New Australian shrimp species scales waterfalls, changes gender and eats using 'nets'

Researchers have described an unusual species of shrimp found in north Queensland, which scales 100-meter high waterfalls, changes gender, and uses nets on its front legs to eat.

10h

Germany agrees CO2 pricing deal after gruelling debate

Lawmakers in Germany reached a hard-fought compromise on carbon pricing early on Monday, breaking a parliamentary deadlock on the government's much-disputed climate policy reforms.

10h

Why you should think twice before buying that new TV set

Planning to buy a new TV set as a Christmas family gift? Your decision would probably be based on a series of technical characteristics, such as size or screen resolution. Yet at some point you might ask yourself: can I really afford this?

10h

New Australian shrimp species scales waterfalls, changes gender and eats using 'nets'

Researchers have described an unusual species of shrimp found in north Queensland, which scales 100-meter high waterfalls, changes gender, and uses nets on its front legs to eat.

10h

How to save olives from destructive diseases

Plant pathogens, or disease-causing viruses, bacteria and fungi could lead to significant losses in agricultural yields, and threaten food security and ecosystem integrity. Between 2012 and 2017, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) severely damaged large orchards covering 538 km2, equivalent to about 6.5 million olive trees in Apulia, southern Italy, according to data by the European Commission'

10h

Conspiracy theories: How belief is rooted in evolution, not ignorance

Despite creative efforts to tackle it, belief in conspiracy theories, alternative facts and fake news show no sign of abating. This is clearly a huge problem, as seen when it comes to climate change, vaccines and expertise in general—with anti-scientific attitudes increasingly influencing politics.

10h

Researchers isolate antibody that blocks bird flu

Despite efforts to contain it, bird flu remains a serious menace to public health.

10h

Darker skin color makes being a migrant much harder

South Africa is becoming infamous on the world stage for its violent, even deadly, xenophobia. Attacks periodically erupt. Often the targets are African foreign nationals as well as Bangladeshis and Pakistanis.

10h

How to save olives from destructive diseases

Plant pathogens, or disease-causing viruses, bacteria and fungi could lead to significant losses in agricultural yields, and threaten food security and ecosystem integrity. Between 2012 and 2017, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) severely damaged large orchards covering 538 km2, equivalent to about 6.5 million olive trees in Apulia, southern Italy, according to data by the European Commission'

10h

It's always a good hair day for Leptothrix cholodnii

When you're only one of trillions, it can be hard to get ahead. That's the problem faced by aquatic bacterium Leptothrix cholodnii, which is often found in the slime-like microbial mats common to mineral-rich bodies of water. Therefore, to establish itself in these communities, L. cholodnii forms long, rigid filaments that become an integral part of the structure of the microbial mat.

10h

More efficient risk assessment for nanomaterials

Nanotechnology is booming, but risk assessment for these tiny particles is a laborious process that presents significant challenges to the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). To find more efficient test methods, researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in cooperation with BfR scientists took a closer look at the biological effects. Their results have bee

10h

Conspiracy theories: How belief is rooted in evolution, not ignorance

Despite creative efforts to tackle it, belief in conspiracy theories, alternative facts and fake news show no sign of abating. This is clearly a huge problem, as seen when it comes to climate change, vaccines and expertise in general—with anti-scientific attitudes increasingly influencing politics.

10h

Researchers isolate antibody that blocks bird flu

Despite efforts to contain it, bird flu remains a serious menace to public health.

10h

A new antiseizure target?

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy with focal seizures, and about one-third of individuals with TLE experience seizures that do not respond to medical treatment.

10h

A new antiseizure target?

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy with focal seizures, and about one-third of individuals with TLE experience seizures that do not respond to medical treatment.

10h

Accidental invention could lead to easier methods of screening drugs and toxins

Almost every cell in the bodies of humans and other living organisms contains DNA, which encodes genetic instructions. Damage to DNA from toxins can have serious effects on health, while other chemicals can facilitate DNA stability and repair. Information on the interactions between DNA and other chemicals could help scientists develop new preventative measures and treatments for diseases such as

10h

Image: Hubble's celestial peanut

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows NGC 1175, a galaxy with an intriguing and distinctive shape.

10h

Satnav watching over rugby players

As France's top rugby players scrum, run and tackle they are being tracked by more than just TV cameras and the watching eyes of the crowd. Satnav-based tracking devices between their shoulder blades are keeping tabs on their position and performance—and helping to safeguard their health.

10h

Planetary nebula NGC 3132 investigated with MUSE

Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, European astronomers have taken a closer look at the planetary nebula NGC 3132. MUSE observations have delivered crucial data regarding the nebula's physical and chemical properties. The new study is detailed in a paper published December 5 on arXiv.org.

10h

ISIS Is Now Harder to Track Online—but That's Good News

Booted from Telegram, the terrorist group no longer has a main home on the web. ISIS might be harder to find, but it's also harder for members to unify and recruit.

10h

Accidental invention could lead to easier methods of screening drugs and toxins

Almost every cell in the bodies of humans and other living organisms contains DNA, which encodes genetic instructions. Damage to DNA from toxins can have serious effects on health, while other chemicals can facilitate DNA stability and repair. Information on the interactions between DNA and other chemicals could help scientists develop new preventative measures and treatments for diseases such as

10h

Self-Driving Cars Roll Up Slowly

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Welcome to the Era of 'Robotic Blacksmithing'

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Danske patienter tilbydes kortlægning af arvemassen

Nationalt Genom Center er klar til at starte med de første helgenomsekventeringer efter nytår. Supercomputeren og infrastrukturen er klar, og man mangler kun at udvælge de første patientgrupper.

10h

New open release from CERN streamlines interactions with theoretical physicists

What if you could test a new theory against data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)? Better yet, what if the expert knowledge needed to do this was captured in a convenient format? This tall order is now on its way from the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN, with the first open release of full analysis likelihoods from an LHC experiment.

10h

Growing carbon nanotubes with the right twist

In a recently published paper in Science Advances, Feng Ding of the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials and colleagues have achieved the creation of a specific type of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a selectivity of 90 percent, and expanded the current theory that explains the synthesis of these promising nanocylinders.

11h

Sygehus melder tidligere ansat til politiet for svindel – flere personer indblandet

Sygehus Lillebælt har politianmeldt en tidligere betroet medarbejder for mistanke om svindel på op til 1,5 mio. kr. Politiet har i dag sigtet flere personer i sagen.

11h

Bone scans: Why do giant pandas have teeny-tiny babies?

Some of the current theories about why giant panda cubs are so much smaller than their parents don't hold up, according to a new study of bones across 10 species of bears and other animals. Born pink, blind, and helpless, giant pandas typically weigh about 100 grams at birth—the equivalent of a stick of butter. Their mothers are 900 times more massive than that. This unusual size difference has l

11h

Skeptiske politikere har for første gang i signal-skandalen sat foden ned

Transportordførerne er bange for at blive fyldt med sniksnak i stedet for sandheden om problemerne for Danmarks nye togsignaler. Derfor har de krævet flere oplysninger, inden de skrotter alternativerne.

11h

European Space Telescope to Launch New Era of Exoplanet Science

CHEOPS will be the first mission designed to study—rather than find—alien worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

11 Best Cheap Laptops We Actually Like Using ($300 – $800)

We reviewed and tested a bunch of affordable Windows and Chromebook laptops and 2-in-1 tablets. You don't have to spend a fortune to get a good notebook.

11h

Will AI Take Your Job—or Make It Better?

Governments need to plan now for the day automation makes many workplace skills obsolete.

11h

Facial Recognition Laws Are (Literally) All Over the Map

From Portland to Plano, local governments are placing different limits on the use of biometric data. That's a good thing.

11h

Indoor carbon dioxide can make us dumber, and that will get worse with climate change

It will become harder to concentrate the more we fill our atmosphere with carbon dioxide. (Ben Mullins/Unsplash/) The unwavering rise of carbon in the atmosphere is impacting our health in many ways. Heat-related illnesses are more common, the ranges of some infectious diseases have expanded, and dangerous extreme storms are increasingly putting us in harm's way. Warming temperatures even boost t

11h

Image of the Day: Inflamed Mouse Follicles

Normal hair growth can lead to infection during cancer treatment.

11h

An Airbnb for the Formerly Incarcerated

Jesse Vasquez first heard about the Homecoming Project while working as the editor of the San Quentin News , an inmate-run newspaper in California's San Quentin State Prison. Impact Justice, an organization focused on criminal-justice reform, had set up a small program that was recruiting homeowners to open up a room in their house to someone coming out of prison—like Airbnb, but for people who h

11h

Smartphones, AI, and Disease Management

As new technologies come online they often reverberate in other industries in unanticipated ways. New technologies may offer possibilities that did not previously exist. The smartphone is perhaps the best recent example of this. This was designed to be primarily a phone, including texting and video capabilities, but with access to the internet. So it is also a handheld computer. But it didn't tak

11h

COP25 skuffede på fire punkter

Det blev desværre ikke en god måde at fejre 25 års jubilæet på. Selvom mødet blev forlænget til søndag ved 14 tiden, endte klimatopmødet i Madrid med at skubbe de svære knaster videre til Glasgow om lille års tid.

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People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer

These tiny pests adapt so successfully to changing conditions that they have become humankind's deadliest predator. We might soon be able to eradicate them – but should we? By Timothy Winegard • Read the text version here Continue reading…

12h

Dear Therapist: My Mother Wants Me to Cut My Fiancé Out of My Daughter's Life

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I was married for five years and had a daughter during that time. My divorce became a family crisis for my parents; they'd been married for 29 years and they did not approve of my pursuing a divorce. After I g

12h

How Africa will be affected by climate change

The African continent is more vulnerable than any other region to the world's changing weather patterns.

12h

Reclaiming Control in the Face of Parkinson's

Exercise, including Qigong and Tai Chi, can produce impressive results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Keynes was wrong. Gen Z will have it worse.

Instead of never-ending progress, today's kids face a world on the edge of collapse. What next?

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Today's Cartoon: Retro Phones

Everything old is new again.

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Reclaiming Control in the Face of Parkinson's

Exercise, including Qigong and Tai Chi, can produce impressive results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Smartlås kan ikke opdateres – vil for altid være åben for angreb

Bekvemmelighed kommer altid på bekostning af sikkerheden, mener F-Secure.

12h

Vinder af VIDENSKABENS TOP 5: Hydrogen og methanol uden energifrås

Ved at erstatte en energislugende metode med elektrisk opvarmning har Haldor Topsøe i samarbejde med forskere taget et afgørende skridt mod elektrificeringen af den kemiske industri. Det er efter Ingeniørens opfattelse årets største danske forskningsresultat.

13h

Award-winning researcher in India retracts two papers, corrects three

Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy Balaji, a professor at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, has retracted two papers and corrected three for duplication of images. Balaji, who won the 2011 Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize from India's Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR) "for outstanding contributions to science and technology," is last author of the five … Continue reading

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COP25 climate summit ends in 'staggering failure of leadership'

The UK faces the task of breaking the deadlock on international climate negotiations next year, after the COP25 talks ended with little progress in Madrid yesterday

13h

Yann Martel: 'Transgression is central to art'

Man Booker Prize-winning writer Yann Martel, a Canadian man, has written from the perspectives of a man with AIDS, a body-switching woman, an Indian boy, and 20th-century Portuguese widowers. Is it acceptable to write from the perspective of someone who is completely unlike you? Martel believes these transgressions put empathetic imagination into practice, allowing your mind to go where your body

13h

Why Is the Young Left Out to Get Buttigieg? Here Are Four Theories.

Young progressives on the internet don't seem to like Pete Buttigieg very much. They've called him " the most obnoxious type of Millennial " and " a Boomer wrapped up in a Millennial's clothing "; a " Build-a-Bear for middling Democrats " and " a candidate seemingly dreamed up by some Democratic National Committee algorithm "; a " baggie full of uncut special interest talking points " and a " gra

13h

How Artists Build the Spirit of a Town

During our travels to towns around the U.S., Jim Fallows and I have come across several artist-in-residence programs, for example in Ajo, Arizona ; Eastport, Maine ; and Tulsa, Oklahoma . Here is the report from one of those artists, Richelle Gribble, on her experience of being an artist in a new place, how it fits into her practice of art, and how she sees her role in the community. There is a s

13h

The Senate Impeachment Trial Could Use a Little Secrecy

Former Senator Jeff Flake caused a minor stir earlier this fall when he stated that " at least 35 " Republican senators would vote to remove President Donald Trump from office—if they could do so in secret. Those 35 votes would almost certainly put the total tally well above the two-thirds mark required for an impeachment conviction. Despite this math, most observers assume that President Trump's

13h

The War Vet, the Dating Site, and the Phone Call From Hell

Jared Johns found out too late that swapping messages with the pretty girl from a dating site would mean serious trouble. If only he had known who she really was.

13h

To Save the Redwoods, Scientists Debate Burning and Logging

Many of the world's forest agencies say active management will encourage the regrowth and preservation of forests in the aftermath of clear-cutting and in the modern era of climate change. And yet, a century of forest management still hasn't made clear if this is true for redwoods. Should they be left alone?

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Nuclear Energy

Can someone explain to me why isn't nuclear energy more common? I know it has a really bad image but is that the only reason we don't see it more reactors? It seems a way better way to generate clean energy. Besides the fact that it seems the only way forward in the long term(Fusion Energy). Also due to the fact it's much cheaper than "renewable energy", also I think that the general public turn

14h

A person today is exposed to as much information in a single day than someone in the 15th century would be in their entire lifetime

Saw a post from a few years back asking about a source for this. I researched this when I was doing a book on a different topic Here is my explanation, would love to hear comments. There are even claims that the average person of today will be exposed to more information in a single day than the average person of a century ago would have been in an entire year. This oft-cited, apocryphal example

14h

Colloidal silver diphosphide (AgP2) nanocrystals as low overpotential catalysts for CO2 reduction to tunable syngas

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13388-8 Conversion of CO2 into value-added chemicals by use of renewable energy is promising to achieve a carbon-neutral energy cycle. Here, the authors show that AgP2 is a stable, selective and efficient syngas catalyst for solar-to-fuel conversion with a 3-fold lower overpotential compared to the benchmark Ag cata

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Recurrent PTPRT/JAK2 mutations in lung adenocarcinoma among African Americans

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13732-y Lung cancer etiology has largely been studied in homogenous populations of European descent. Here, targeted sequencing in African American lung adenocarcinomas finds significantly higher prevalence of PTPRTand JAK2 mutations, validated independently by whole exome sequencing, highlighting potentially clinica

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T4SS-dependent TLR5 activation by Helicobacter pylori infection

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13506-6 Toll-like receptor TLR5 recognizes a domain, D1, that is present in flagellins of several pathogenic bacteria but not in Helicobacter pylori. Here, the authors show that TLR5 can be activated independently of flagellin by a component of the H. pylori type IV secretion system that contains a D1-like motif.

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Millimetre-long transport of photogenerated carriers in topological insulators

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13711-3 Exciton condensation may emerge at room temperature in topological materials with strong Coulomb interactions and vanishing electron effective mass. Here, Hou et al. report the formation of excitons in Bi2-xSbxSe3 nanoribbons, which can transport over hundreds of micrometres before recombination up to 40 K,

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A unified form of low-energy nodal electronic interactions in hole-doped cuprate superconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13497-4 The normal state of hole-doped, high-temperature superconductors is a currently-unexplained "strange metal" with exotic electronic behaviour. Here, the authors show that a doping-dependent power law ansatz for the electronic scattering phenomenologically captures ARPES, transport and optics observations.

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Chaperone biomarkers of lifespan and penetrance track the dosages of many other proteins

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13664-7 In C. elegans the chaperone hsp-16.2 predicts the penetrance of mutations and lifespan after heat shock, but it is not known why cells express different amounts of hsp-16.2. Here the authors show hsp-16.2 tracks differences in global gene expression capacity, rather than differences in signaling or intrinsic

14h

Insights into malaria susceptibility using genome-wide data on 17,000 individuals from Africa, Asia and Oceania

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13480-z Four genome-wide associated loci are currently known for malaria susceptibility. Here, the authors expand on earlier work by combining data from 11 malaria-endemic countries and additional population sequencing informing an African-enriched imputation reference panel, with findings including a previously unr

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SAM-VI riboswitch structure and signature for ligand discrimination

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13600-9 Riboswitches are conserved RNA domains located in the non-coding region of mRNA that recognize cellular metabolites and, in turn, regulate gene expression. Here the authors report the structure of the recently identified SAM-VI riboswitch and provide insight into its mechanism of ligand discrimination.

14h

Influensamedicin gör störst nytta hos svårt sjuka och äldre

Äldre och allvarligt sjuka influensapatienter blir friska i genomsnitt två-tre dagar tidigare om de får antiviralt influensaläkemedel. Övriga tillfrisknar i snitt en dag tidigare vid samma behandling. Det framgår av en europeisk studie som gjorts under tre influensasäsonger. – Äldre, sjukare och patienter med andra samtidiga sjukdomar hade störst nytta av behandlingen, säger Pär-Daniel Sundvall,

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Undervisningsministeren: Skolerne er blevet for begejstrede for iPads

KL, lærerne og it-leverandørerne til skolerne bliver af undervisningsministeren indkald ttil en snak om balancen i brugen af bøger versus digitale læringsmidler.

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Mayo Clinic researchers look at post menopause as key factor in endometrial cancer

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the US and the fourth most common cancer among women. In addition, endometrial cancer incidence rates are on the rise in the western world, suggesting that alterations in environmental factors such as diet, lifestyle, and the vaginal microbiome may be important drivers in its cause.

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Asthma severity linked to microbiome of upper airway

A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests there is a link between bacteria that live in the upper airway and the severity of asthma symptoms among children with mild to moderate asthma.

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Free tool simplifies cancer research

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new method for identifying which proteins are affected by specific drugs. The tool and the results it has already generated have been made freely available online. The method is described in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

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New CRISPR-based system targets amplified antibiotic-resistant genes

A research team at UC San Diego has developed a new CRISPR-based gene-drive system that dramatically increases the efficiency of inactivating a gene rendering bacteria antibiotic-resistant. The new system leverages technology developed by UC San Diego biologists in insects and mammals that biases genetic inheritance of preferred traits called 'active genetics.'

14h

Fossil shells reveal both global mercury contamination and warming when dinosaurs perished

The impact of an asteroid or comet is acknowledged as the principal cause of the mass extinction that killed off most dinosaurs and about three-quarters of the planet's plant and animal species 66 million years ago.

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Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke

Eating a heart-healthy dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, vegetable oils and nuts, which is also limits salt, red and processed meats, refined-carbohydrates and added sugars, is relatively low in dietary cholesterol and supports healthy levels of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol.

14h

Signal-skandale blokerer for at udnytte milliard-ombygning af Næstved-bane

PLUS. Jernbanen mellem Næstved og Køge blev opgraderet for en milliard kroner for at kunne køre tog direkte til København. Det kommer dog tidligst til at ske i 2023, og årsagen er det forsinkede signal-system.

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Noninvasive measures of physiological stress are confounded by exposure

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55715-5

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Analysis of 1.2 million foot scans from North America, Europe and Asia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55432-z

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Structural basis for the activation and inhibition of Sirtuin 6 by quercetin and its derivatives

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55654-1

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Parameters Influencing Cavitation Within Vials Subjected to Drop Shock

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55668-9

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Spatially Adjusted Time-varying Reproductive Numbers: Understanding the Geographical Expansion of Urban Dengue Outbreaks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55574-0

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Schisandrin A protects intestinal epithelial cells from deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative damage and inflammation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55821-4

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Tailored modern GERD therapy – steps towards the development of an aid to guide personalized anti-reflux surgery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55510-2

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Scientific truth doesn't exist – but we must still strive for answers

Even in physics, there is no such thing as truth. We should carry on trying to categorise the world, though, providing we realise that it sometimes resists such efforts

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"What It Means to Be a Man"—In The Atlantic's January/February issue, Peggy Orenstein reports on the miseducation of the American boy

In " The Miseducation of the American Boy ," appearing as the cover of The Atlantic's January/February issue, Peggy Orenstein delves into the personal lives of young men, and finds them trapped in a strange doublethink. They've read the headlines about toxic masculinity, sexual harassment, mass shootings, and campus rape. But in interviews with more than 100 college or college-bound boys, Orenste

14h

A quest to save frogs

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03843-3 Powering through floods, exhaustion and tick bites is all in a day's work for Jodi Rowley.

14h

Sociala medier ger afasi-drabbade makt över sitt språk

Personer som har drabbats av den språkliga funktionsnedsättningen afasi får sällan själva komma till tals när de beskrivs i svenska tidningsartiklar. När deras röster trots allt hörs dominerar framgångssagor, inte berättelser om kaos och frustration som många personer med afasi känner. Sociala medier ger ökad makt över sina egna berättelser. Helena Taubner, doktor i hälsa och livsstil med inriktn

14h

New CRISPR-based system targets amplified antibiotic-resistant genes

Taking advantage of powerful advances in CRISPR gene editing, scientists at the University of California San Diego have set their sights on one of society's most formidable threats to human health.

14h

New CRISPR-based system targets amplified antibiotic-resistant genes

Taking advantage of powerful advances in CRISPR gene editing, scientists at the University of California San Diego have set their sights on one of society's most formidable threats to human health.

14h

Fossil shells reveal both global mercury contamination and warming when dinosaurs perished

The impact of an asteroid or comet is acknowledged as the principal cause of the mass extinction that killed off most dinosaurs and about three-quarters of the planet's plant and animal species 66 million years ago.

14h

Wildfires have changed. It's time the science did too.

Inside the quest to produce a bigger, better way to predict how the world's deadliest blazes will behave.

14h

Forsvaret: Terrorgruppers droner udfordrer vores dominans i luften

PLUS. Den nemme adgang til egen luftkapacitet ændrer trusselsbilledet og spillereglerne.

14h

Tiny machines made of DNA origami may make antibiotics work better

Miniature devices made from intricately folded DNA strings can boost the potency of antibacterial chemicals by bringing individual molecules into direct contact with the microbes

14h

Mystery over 'female' remains found on male-only Greek mountain

Discovery of remains in all-male monastic community in northern Greece poses questions Laura Wynn-Antikas specialises in bringing bones to life. Decades spent studying skeletal remains across Greece, in subterranean vaults, tombs, chapels and archaeological sites , have yielded a host of unexpected discoveries. "You never know what you are going to find," the American-born anthropologist said. "B

15h

The physics of ice skating

Nature, Published online: 16 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03833-5 The slipperiness of ice is poorly understood at a microscopic level. Experiments that probe how the surface of ice melts and flows in response to wear help to explain the exceptionally low friction that underpins winter sports.

15h

Tandlossning ökar risken för hjärtsjukdomar

Det finns ett tydligt samband mellan tandlossning, åderförkalkning i halspulsådern och hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar. Därför måste tandvård och sjukvård samverka mer. Det visar en ny avhandling av Viveca Wallin Bengtsson vid Malmö universitet.

15h

COP25, the UN climate talks in Madrid, ends in a sad splutter

No agreement on international carbon markets; only weak commitments to more drastic cuts in emissions

15h

NCCIH surveys physicians on their recommendation of "complementary health approaches," with depressing results

The NCCIH recently published a study examining the percentage of US physicians who had recommended "complementary health approaches" to their patients in the last year. The percentages are far higher than they should be.

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Elektroniske piller kan forbedre vores sundhed men skaber etiske og juridiske udfordringer

I fremtiden vil den medicin du tager ikke kun være en sag mellem dig og din læge. Piller med…

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Toxic Sydney bushfire haze a 'public health emergency'

Australia's biggest city is facing a "public health emergency" over the bushfire smoke that has choked Sydney for weeks, leading doctors warned Monday after hospitals reported a dramatic spike in casualty department visits.

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Styrbar nanoantenn kan ge smart fönster

Ljus går att böja med hjälp av glaslinser. Men den klassiska optiken har sina begränsningar. Bland annat går det inte att se mindre detaljer än några hundra nanometer. Det är däremot möjligt med nanooptik som öppnar för nya sätt att utnyttja ljus. En komponent inom nanooptiken är fenomenet plasmon – en förstärkning av vissa ljusvåglängder som träffar nanopartiklar av metall. Ofta används guld elle

16h

Fremtidens danske juletræ er mere bæredygtigt og drysser ikke

Et mildere klima gør det nu muligt at dyrke sølvgranen som juletræ i Danmark. En sølvgran…

16h

Scientists find that unappetizing moths make less effort to escape attacking bats

You might think that prey would invariably flee in terror from a predator. But what if an animal was apathetic in the face of danger?

16h

Scientists find that unappetizing moths make less effort to escape attacking bats

You might think that prey would invariably flee in terror from a predator. But what if an animal was apathetic in the face of danger?

16h

Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows

A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

16h

Can you solve it? The club sandwich problem

A multi-layered brain snack UPDATE: The solutions are now posted here. Here are two puzzles I ordered on room service. 1) A number sandwich is a line of digits such that there is one digit sandwiched between the 1s, two digits sandwiched between the 2's, three digits sandwiched between the 3's, and so on. For example, 312132 is a number sandwich with the digits 1,2 and 3 Continue reading…

17h

Uranium chemistry and geological disposal of radioactive waste

A new paper to be published on Dec. 16 provides a significant new insight into our understanding of uranium biogeochemistry and could help with the UK's nuclear legacy. The recent study is the first time that researchers have shown that a uranium-sulfide complex can form under conditions representative of a deep underground environment. This complex then transforms further into highly immobile ura

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Britain's Political Center Has Caved In

Britain's next Parliament will look a lot different than the one that preceded it. It will boast a sizable Conservative majority, ensuring the party's dominance not just for the next five years, but for the foreseeable future. It will look more diverse , with one in every 10 lawmakers of an ethnic-minority background, and more female members of Parliament than ever before. It will also be increas

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New Discovery Just Changed Our Understanding of The Source of Easter Island's Moai

"When we got the chemistry results back, I did a double take."

18h

Droner i hobetal er på vej – men vi mangler forsvar mod ondsindet brug

PLUS. Antallet af mellemstore droner er tidoblet herhjemme på få år. Men myndigheder og lufthavne er knap kommet i gang med overvågning. Og angreb er der intet forsvar imod.

18h

Sidemandens appetit kan smitte dig: Sådan undgår du at overspise i julen

Du skal slukke for fjernsynet og mærke efter i maven, lyder et af rådene.

19h

Brazilian food delivery app iFood looks to grow in retail in 2020

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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How Machine Learning Drives the Deceptive World of Deepfakes

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Black teens face racial discrimination multiple times daily, suffer depressive symptoms

Black teenagers experience daily racial discrimination, most frequently online, which can lead to negative mental health effects, according to a Rutgers researcher.

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E-cigarettes significantly raise risk of chronic lung disease, first long-term study finds

E-cigarette use significantly increases a person's risk of developing chronic lung diseases, according to new UC San Francisco research, the first longitudinal study linking e-cigarettes to respiratory illness in a sample representative of the entire US adult population. The study also found that people who used e-cigarettes and also smoked tobacco — by far the most common pattern among adult e-c

19h

Three quarters of teens who vape report using nicotine, marijuana, or multiple substances

More teens who vape are using addictive or mind-altering substances than previously believed, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. The data paint a different picture than previous research because of the significantly higher proportion (75%) of teens who vape using nicotine, marijuana, or multiple substances and not just flavoring. These f

19h

Lazy moths taste disgusting

Researchers have noticed that some moths are nonchalant when attacked by predatory bats. Their new study illuminates the reasons for this counterintuitive behavior. Research revealed that less appetizing moths are more nonchalant when attacked by bats, whereas more palatable moths employ midair evasive maneuvers. By estimating the palatability of moth species, the researchers could predict their e

19h

Study examines causes of death in US breast cancer survivors

Most women who survive beyond 10 years die of non-cancer causes.

19h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 16. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

19h

Bad taste in the moth: study reveals insect's chemical defence

Unsavoury flavour may explain why certain species do not flee from predators, scientist says It might seem like they are being lazy but some moths do not bother to flee from predators because they make themselves taste disgusting. That is the case for a certain species of tiger moth, which researchers have found displays a nonchalant approach when faced with potential predators, on account of its

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Housekeeping

Holiday-season travel is cutting into valuable blogging time around here! I'll see everyone on Wednesday, but of course after this week things are going to go slow-to-irregular for the rest of the year, anyway. . . In the meantime, though, let me throw the floor open in the comments. What topics haven't been covered around here recently that you feel should get more attention? Any stories that ne

20h

Trods misbrug: Ingen planer om at advare borgere ved hackingforsøg mod NemID

En simpel SMS eller mail kunne have reddet ung dansker for svindel for 270.000 kroner. Men en sådan advarsel må ofre for nøglekort-angreb fortsat tænke sig til.

20h

Colliding molecules and antiparticles

A new theoretical study of the interaction between positrons and simple tetrahedral and octahedral molecules agrees with experimental work and could have useful implications for PET scanning techniques.

22h

Leaving home is beneficial for male squirrels but not for females, study shows

In the world of squirrels, moving away from your home turf has better outcomes for males than for females, according to a new study.

22h

How a protein in your brain could protect against Alzheimer's disease

Research shows that white blood cells in the human brain are regulated by a protein called CD33–a finding with important implications in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

22h

Colliding molecules and antiparticles

A new theoretical study of the interaction between positrons and simple tetrahedral and octahedral molecules agrees with experimental work and could have useful implications for PET scanning techniques.

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Air pollution is breaking our hearts: Human and marine health is affected in similar ways

Research published today in The Journal of Physiology by researchers at The University of Manchester shows that the knowledge we have about how pollution harms the hearts of marine species can be applied to humans, as the underlying mechanisms are similar.

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Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows

A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

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Anak Krakatau: Giant blocks of rock litter ocean floor

Landslide debris from the collapsed Anak Krakatau volcano is pictured on the seabed for the first time.

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More than 1 in 3 low- and middle-income countries face both extremes of malnutrition

Being undernourished or overweight are no longer separate public health issues. The first paper in a four-paper report to be published in The Lancet details how more than one in three low- and middle-income countries face both extremes of malnutrition — a reality driven by the modern food system.

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The Lancet: More than one in three low- and middle-income countries face both extremes of malnutrition

A new approach is needed to help reduce undernutrition and obesity at the same time, as the issues become increasingly connected due to rapid changes in countries' food systems. This is especially important in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new four-paper report published in The Lancet.

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Salman Rushie: 'Write for readers, not for critics'

Booker Prize-winning author Salman Rushdie recounts his evolution as a writer who has grown more aware of the reader and less aware of the critic. Literary reviews, famously the Times Literary Supplement, were once anonymous—and brutal. Once the Times started publishing bylines with reviews, critics suddenly got much nicer. Anonymity, especially online, is a double-edged sword. In authoritarian s

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #50

Story of the Week… Opinion of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… UN climate talks end with limited progress on emissions targets Partial agreement at COP25 that countries must be more ambitious to fulfil Paris goals Activists dump manure outside the COP25 climate talks congress in Mad

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