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nyheder2019december18

Boeing puts the brakes on 737 Max production

A TUI Group 737 Max 8 departs Renton prior to the March 2019 grounding. (Boeing/) This story originally featured on Flying Magazine . This week's announcement at Boeing's Chicago headquarters of the company's plan to halt 737 Max production in January 2020 was not much of a surprise to anyone. Despite the troubled airplane's grounding in March 2019, America's top manufacturing exporter continued

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There's No Winter Break From 'Publish or Perish'

An analysis of submissions to two top journals showed that scientists in the U.S. were highly likely to be working during holidays.

now

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The best backpacks for commuting, hiking, or just rambling

Packs for every scenario. (Nguyen Le Viet Anh via Unsplash/) Backpacks are one of the world's greatest pieces of gear. They let you carry stuff, spread the weight out evenly between your two shoulders, and provide you with a fun, "I'm so independent! I can use both hands!" feeling. But from ubiquitous names like Jansport and Herschel to hardier brands to store your smelly gym clothes, there are a

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Antibiotic over-prescription is worst for kids in low-income countries

In their first five years of life, some countries averaged 25 prescriptions. (Deposit Photos/) There are a lot of ways for little kids to get sick, and those at risk of getting the sickest are the ones in low and middle-income countries where access to healthcare might be sparse. You might think that's because there just aren't enough medications to go around. The truth is quite the opposite. Res

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DIY hot sauce kits that'll make your tongue scream with joy

Kits to spice up your meals. (Barbara Kosulin/) When Beyoncé sang about having " hot sauce in her bag, swag ," she was using the condiment as a metaphor for that special something she whips out when she needs to put someone in their place. The line contains layers of meaning, but it's also a perfect commentary on what the world loves about hot sauce. It's a surprise. It's a lasting dash of flair.

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Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition

Lunar halos like this one, captured in Mogilev, Belarus, appear only when there's substantial numbers of ice crystals in the atmosphere. Most often they're from very thin cirrus clouds hovering at or above 20,000 feet. All those hanging bits of moisture refract light from the moon (or the sun, in a solar halo), making it appear as if there's a halo around it. (Mikhail Kapychka/) If you live in th

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Author Correction: Stretchable Electrospun PVDF-HFP/Co-ZnO Nanofibers as Piezoelectric Nanogenerators

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56281-6

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Publisher Correction: A Unified Framework for Complex Networks with Degree Trichotomy Based on Markov Chains

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56285-2

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Author Correction: The impact of decellularization methods on extracellular matrix derived hydrogels

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56283-4

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Author Correction: Efficient increase of ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in tomato fruits by targeted mutagenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55119-5

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46% of U.S. homeowners want rooftop solar

submitted by /u/cake_donut [link] [comments]

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Drug that restricts overactive immune systems could help treat lupus

A drug that interferes with the body's ability to mount an immune response is only the second new one for the autoimmune condition lupus in 60 years

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Scientists find way to supercharge protein production

Researchers have found a way to increase production of proteins in bacteria up to a thousandfold, a discovery that could aid production of proteins used in the medical, food, agriculture, chemical and other industries.

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Chemical compound found in essential oils improves wound healing

Researchers have discovered that a chemical compound found in essential oils improves the healing process in mice when it is topically applied to a skin wound.

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Mentoring project deepened student learning, commitment

Pairing graduate students with professionals working in their field resulted in deeper learning and inspired passion for the work, according to new research.

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'Upgraded' CRISPR tool

Scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools.

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Scientists identify harmful bacteria based on its DNA at a very low cost

Currently, the detection of food poison outbreaks caused by bacteria takes a long time and is expensive, but this does not have to be the case in the future. Researchers have found a method for the precise identification of bacteria in just a few hours on a mobile-phone-sized device that costs about 200 times less than alternative approaches.

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Obamacare Insurance Mandate Is Struck Down by Federal Appeals Court

But the judges sent the case back to determine if other parts of the federal health care law can stand without the mandate.

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Grain traits traced to 'dark matter' of rice genome

Research finds that a sizeable amount of domestication-related changes in rice reflects selection on traits that are determined by a portion of the genome that does not transcribe proteins.

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Ice sheet melting: Estimates still uncertain

Estimates used by climate scientists to predict the rate at which the world's ice sheets will melt are still uncertain despite advancements in technology, new research shows.

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Scientists identify harmful bacteria based on its DNA at a very low cost

Currently, the detection of food poison outbreaks caused by bacteria takes a long time and is expensive, but this does not have to be the case in the future. Researchers have found a method for the precise identification of bacteria in just a few hours on a mobile-phone-sized device that costs about 200 times less than alternative approaches.

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Early-life exposure to dogs may lessen risk of developing schizophrenia

Ever since humans domesticated the dog, the faithful, obedient and protective animal has provided its owner with companionship and emotional well-being. Now, a study suggests that being around 'man's best friend' from an early age may have a health benefit as well — lessening the chance of developing schizophrenia as an adult.

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Chicken Noodle Soup Really Can Help When You're Sick

Chicken noodle soup is not just a myth. Slurping soup or sipping tea may have actual health benefits that help us heal.

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Creditors Seek to Exhume the Body of a Dead Crypto Executive

Gerry Cotten took at least $137 million to the grave when he died without giving anyone the password to his encrypted laptop.

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Close to half of US population projected to have obesity by 2030

Researchers predict a marked rise in American adults with obesity or severe obesity in ten years. Severe obesity — once a rare condition — is projected to be the most common BMI category in 10 states and in some demographic subgroups.

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Breakthrough science provides hope for disease that affects 1.5 million people in US

Today the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) publishes research led by Monash University that offers the first real hope for the treatment of lupus, a disease which affects 1.5 million people in the US and more than 5 million globally, 90% women and for which there is no cure.

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Doing the Crocodile Trot

A new study finds that many crocodile species can bound and gallop. But alligators can't. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Google just put real-time language translation in the palm of our hands

Google's real-time language translation tool, Interpreter Mode, is now accessible on mobile devices. Through easy, real-time translation, individuals will be able to better immerse themselves in new cultures and connect with others in more intimate, fulfilling ways. As the linguistic topography of the U.S. changes, Google is making it easier than ever to embrace new cultures by learning their lan

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'Upgraded' CRISPR tool

Scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools.

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Applying physics principle yields grim prediction on hurricane destruction in era of global warming

Global warming could well lead to hurricanes more powerful than meteorologists currently forecast. A physicist noticed that one of the principles of physics — phase transition — did not appear in the scientific literature of meteorology. Using 60 years of published data, he demonstrated that the destructive power of tropical hurricanes increased linearly and rapidly as water temperature increase

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Changes in the immune system explain why belly fat is bad for thinking

Researchers have found for the first time that less muscle and more body fat may affect how flexible our thinking gets as we become older, and changes in parts of the immune system could be responsible.

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Drops of liquid crystal molecules branch out into strange structures

New research published in Nature reveals that, when cooled, droplets containing chain-like liquid crystal molecules transform from spheres into complex shapes such as flowers, corals, and fibrous networks. 'It was a visually spectacular effect. We weren't expecting it at all,' says lead author Arjun Yodh. 'We were trying to make designer drops, but in the process, we saw something interesting and

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A soft robotic insect that survives being flattened by a fly swatter

Researchers have developed an ultra-light robotic insect that uses its soft artificial muscles to move at 3 cm per second across different types of terrain. It can be folded or crushed and yet continue to move.

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Plant-eating insects disrupt ecosystems and contribute to climate change

A new study shows that plant-eating insects affect forest ecosystems considerably more than previously thought. Among other things, the insects are a factor in the leaching of nutrients from soil and increased emissions of carbon dioxide. The researchers also establish that the temperature may rise as a result of an increase in the amount of plant-eating insects in some regions.

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Drops of liquid crystal molecules branch out into strange structures

New research published in Nature reveals that, when cooled, droplets containing chain-like liquid crystal molecules transform from spheres into complex shapes such as flowers, corals, and fibrous networks. 'It was a visually spectacular effect. We weren't expecting it at all,' says lead author Arjun Yodh. 'We were trying to make designer drops, but in the process, we saw something interesting and

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Fluorescence spectroscopy helps to evaluate meat quality

Scientists of Sechenov University jointly with their colleagues from Australia proposed a new, quicker and cheaper way to assess meat quality. It is based on exposing a small sample to UV light and measuring the spectrum of emission. The method proved to be precise in the classification of meat into standard quality categories. The description of the method and the results of the work were publish

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Hackers hit New Orleans city government website — are other cities at risk?

Late last week, the city of New Orleans was hit by a ransomware attack. Government offices were able to avoid the worst of it, as the result of following existing procedures. Attacks like this on city governments are more common than you'd think. On Friday, December 13, the City of New Orleans was hit by a massive phishing and ransomware attack, shutting down government websites and leading to a

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Opinion: The Best Neuroscience Books of 2019

Bury your nose in tales of neurosyphilis, gender identity, the medical mysteries of sleep disorders, and more.

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Mine's Bigger: 2021 Cadillac Escalade Gets a Curved 38-inch OLED Screen

Cadillac plans to rock the world Feb. 4 when it unveils the 2021 Escalade SUV with a curved, 38-inch OLED screen stretching across the instrument panel and center stack. It will be the largest screen among vehicles, excluding specialty automakers such as Byton, which reports it will have a 48-inch screen on its EV SUV. It's not clear about the shape or the curves, since the teaser image appears t

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Mary Mattingly Is Named Brooklyn Public Library's Artist in Residence

In 2020, the ecologically oriented artist will continue her exploration of communally held resources and spaces.

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In the Face of Climate Change, the Internet Is Unsustainable

Log Off As far as environmental damage is concerned, our increasingly-online lives incur a massive toll. If everything continues on its current course, then the internet is expected to generate about 20 percent of the world's carbon emissions by 2030, according to The New Republic . That would make its environmental impact worse than any individual country on Earth, except for the U.S., China, or

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New insights into the formation of Earth's crust

New research from Mauricio Ibanez-Mejia at the University of Rochester gives scientists better insight into the geological processes responsible for the formation of Earth's crust. Ibanez-Mejia and his colleague Francois Tissot at the California Institute of Technology, studied the isotopes of the element zirconium. They developed a tool that can help researchers gain further insights into the cha

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Texas A&M study reveals domestic horse breed has third-lowest genetic diversity

A new study by Dr. Gus Cothran, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has found that the Cleveland Bay horse breed has the third-lowest genetic variation level of domestic horses, ranking above only the notoriously inbred Friesian and Clydesdale breeds. This lack of genetic diversity puts the breed at risk for a variety of health conditions.

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China Expects Its "Artificial Sun" to Be Operational in 2020

Going Smoothly In March, Chinese researchers predicted that the nation's HL-2M tokamak — a device designed to replicate nuclear fusion, the same reaction that powers the Sun — would be built before the end of 2019. No word yet on whether that's still the case, but in November, Duan Xuru, one of the scientists working on the "artificial sun," did provide an update , saying that construction was go

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Researchers say may have found cause of mad cow disease

Researchers said Wednesday they believe they may have found the cause of mad cow disease, while stressing the need to maintain precautionary measures to avoid a potential re-emergence of the illness.

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Genius series: Nikola Tesla, the original tech superstar

Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! First up, we're paying tribute to the original tech superstar, Nikola Tesla. Select Rush or Super Rush Delivery to get your order before Christmas Day! None "I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to su

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Legalized marijuana linked to lower opioid abuse; death rates

A new study analyzed over 1.5 billion opioid prescriptions between 2011 and 2018. Researchers discovered opioid prescription reductions of 11.8 percent and 4.2 percent in states that passed recreational and medical cannabis laws. The U.S. government needs to reschedule cannabis because researchers believe it has therapeutic value. None Pain is important. It informs us of problems that need attent

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NASA's Mars 2020 rover completes its first drive

NASA's next Mars rover has passed its first driving test. A preliminary assessment of its activities on Dec. 17, 2019, found that the rover checked all the necessary boxes as it rolled forward and backward and pirouetted in a clean room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The next time the Mars 2020 rover drives, it will be rolling over Martian soil.

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Researchers say may have found cause of mad cow disease

Researchers said Wednesday they believe they may have found the cause of mad cow disease, while stressing the need to maintain precautionary measures to avoid a potential re-emergence of the illness.

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Researchers determine age for last known settlement by a direct ancestor to modern humans

An international team of researchers has determined the age of the last known settlement of the species Homo erectus, one of modern humans' direct ancestors. The site is called Ngandong, on the Indonesian island Java. The team dated animal fragments where Homo erectus remains were found and the surrounding landscape. The team determined the last existence of Homo erectus at Ngandong between 108,00

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Zika vaccine protects fetus in pregnant monkeys

An experimental vaccine against the Zika virus reduced the amount of virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and improved fetal outcomes. The work could help support development and approval of an experimental Zika DNA vaccine currently in early stage trials in humans.

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Single-molecule detection of cancer markers brings liquid biopsy closer to clinic

A fast, inexpensive yet sensitive technique to detect cancer markers is bringing researchers closer to a "liquid biopsy"—a test using a small sample of blood or serum to detect cancer, rather than the invasive tissue sampling routinely used for diagnosis.

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The delicate water lily: A rose by another name?

A new study published in Nature reports the 409-megabase genome sequence of the blue-petal water lily (Nymphaea colorata). The conclusion of the 47 coauthors is that although a rose is a rose, most flowering plants may owe their success, including employing floral scent for attracting pollinators, in part to the genetic innovations observed in the delicate water lily.

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Single-molecule detection of cancer markers brings liquid biopsy closer to clinic

A fast, inexpensive yet sensitive technique to detect cancer markers is bringing researchers closer to a "liquid biopsy"—a test using a small sample of blood or serum to detect cancer, rather than the invasive tissue sampling routinely used for diagnosis.

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The delicate water lily: A rose by another name?

A new study published in Nature reports the 409-megabase genome sequence of the blue-petal water lily (Nymphaea colorata). The conclusion of the 47 coauthors is that although a rose is a rose, most flowering plants may owe their success, including employing floral scent for attracting pollinators, in part to the genetic innovations observed in the delicate water lily.

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CRI scientists discover metabolic feature that allows melanoma cells to spread

Researchers at Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have uncovered why certain melanoma cells are more likely to spread through the body.

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Thawing permafrost affecting northern Alaska's land-to-ocean river flows

A new analysis of the changing character of runoff, river discharge and other hydrological cycle elements across the North Slope of Alaska reveals significant increases in the proportion of subsurface runoff and cold season discharge, changes the authors say are "consistent with warming and thawing permafrost."

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Science groups, senator warn Trump administration not to change publishing rules

Letters blast rumored shift to immediate open access for taxpayer-funded studies

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The delicate water lily: A rose by another name?

A new study reports the 409-megabase genome sequence of the blue-petal water lily (Nymphaea colorata). The conclusion of the 47 coauthors is that although a rose is a rose, most flowering plants may owe their success, including employing floral scent for attracting pollinators, in part to the genetic innovations observed in the delicate water lily.

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Membrane inspired by bone and cartilage efficiently produces electricity from saltwater

Inspired by membranes in the body tissues of living organisms, scientists have combined aramid nanofibers used in Kevlar with boron nitride to construct a membrane for harvesting ocean energy that is both strong like bone and suited for ion transport like cartilage. The research overcomes major design challenges for technologies that harness osmotic energy to generate an eco-friendly and widely av

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Why Are Black Leopards So Rare?

Several species of cat have members with all-black coats, but the evolutionary advantages and disadvantages are just starting to be understood

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Nanopores can identify the amino acids in proteins, the first step to sequencing

While DNA sequencing is a useful tool for determining what's going on in a cell or a person's body, it only tells part of the story. Protein sequencing could soon give researchers a wider window into a cell's workings. A new study demonstrates that nanopores can be used to identify all 20 amino acids in proteins, a major step toward protein sequencing.

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Solar power from 'the dark side' unlocked by a new formula

Most of today's solar panels capture sunlight and convert it to electricity only from the side facing the sky. If the dark underside of a solar panel could also convert sunlight reflected off the ground, even more electricity might be generated.

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Heat waves expose city dwellers to higher temperatures than forecast

Extreme heat is worse in city centres, where heat retained by roads and buildings can expose people to temperatures 1.9°C higher than forecasted during heat waves

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Startup Invents Uncomfortable Toilet to Boost Productivity

Poop Limit British startup StandardToilet has designed a toilet that's intentionally made to be uncomfortable thanks to its 13-degree slope, according to Wired . Sitting on it for more than five minutes is reportedly unbearable. The goal is to make it too uncomfortable to sit on for prolonged periods of time, motivating office workers to get off of Instagram and back to their desks, or to free up

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How To Not Get Sick While Traveling, 5G's Health Effects, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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This Plan to Mine the Ocean Floor May Erase Whole Ecosystems

Major Consequences The deepest reaches of the ocean are still mostly unexplored, and experts suspect they're teeming with never-before-seen creatures and microbes that evolved independently from the rest of the life on Earth. But it's also rich with mineral deposits that could make mining companies a fortune — and a branch of the United Nations is currently working out the legal framework that wo

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Homo erectus: Ancient humans survived longer than we thought

An ancient ancestor of modern humans survived into relatively recent times in South-East Asia.

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The Pentagon's AI Chief Prepares for Battle

Lt. Gen. Jack Shanahan doesn't want killer robots—but he does want artificial intelligence to occupy a central role in warfighting.

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OU study uses genetics and menthol to examine how the skin senses irritation

A new University of Oklahoma study could have implications on our understanding of how certain sensory signals are transmitted through the body. An OU experiment led by neuroscientist Christian Lemon, Ph.D., Department of Biology, set out to discover how menthol's irritant sensation is transmitted by the nervous system.

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Single-molecule detection of cancer markers brings liquid biopsy closer to clinic

A fast, inexpensive yet sensitive technique to detect cancer markers is bringing researchers closer to a 'liquid biopsy' — a test using a small sample of blood or serum to detect cancer, rather than the invasive tissue sampling routinely used for diagnosis. The method captures and counts cancer-associated microRNAs, or tiny bits of messenger molecules that are exuded from cells and can be detecte

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The delicate water lily: A rose by another name?

A new study published in Nature reports the 409-megabase genome sequence of the blue-petal water lily (Nymphaea colorata). The conclusion of the 47 coauthors is that although a rose is a rose, most flowering plants may owe their success, including employing floral scent for attracting pollinators, in part to the genetic innovations observed in the delicate water lily.

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Solar power from 'the dark side' unlocked by a new formula

Most of today's solar panels capture sunlight and convert it to electricity only from the side facing the sky. If the dark underside of a solar panel could also convert sunlight reflected off the ground, even more electricity might be generated.

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Monthly birth control pill could replace daily doses

Oral contraceptives are one of the most popular forms of birth control: In the United States, about 12 percent of women between 15 and 49 use them. However, their effectiveness depends on being taken every day, and it is estimated that about 9 percent of women taking birth control pills become pregnant each year. MIT researchers are now developing an oral contraceptive that only has to be taken o

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These 10 countries are closest to achieving gender equality

Iceland has once again held on to the top spot in the World Economic Forum's latest Global Gender Gap Index . For 11 consecutive years the Nordic nation, with a population of just over 360,000, has been the frontrunner in the index, which benchmarks countries according to how close they are to reaching gender equality. Iceland has closed almost 88% of its gender gap and increased its lead over se

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Reanalyzed Fossils Could Be Last Known Homo erectus Specimens

A mass death event claimed the hominins' lives and likely resulted from changing environmental conditions.

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Wanted: €1 billion for troubled German nuclear physics facility

Physicists hope member states will cover the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research's massive budget overrun

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Boeing's Starliner crew capsule makes space debut this week

Boeing's shiny new Starliner crew capsule makes its debut this week with a launch to the International Space Station, the company's last hurdle before flying astronauts for NASA next year.

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Oldest Known Seawall Discovered Along Submerged Mediterranean Villages

Archaeologists believe the 7,000-year-old structure was intended to protect settlements as sea levels rose

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This Spiky Patch Could Invisibly Record Vaccination History Under Skin

But the technology raise several ethical concerns that could stymie its progress

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Howard Hughes Medical Institute faces race, sex bias lawsuits by two Asian American biologists

Powerhouse funder rejects claims of women who recently lost plum awards

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Laser-linked satellites could deliver 'internet from space'

A new design could double the network capacity of future "internet from space" systems. Satellites do not yet play a major role in the world's internet infrastructure. However, this may soon be set to change. Within the next decade, a new generation of satellites could lay the foundations for an "internet from space," says Ankit Singla, professor at ETH Zurich's Network Design & Architecture Lab.

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Thawing permafrost affecting northern Alaska's land-to-ocean river flows

A new analysis of the changing character of runoff, river discharge and other hydrological cycle elements across the North Slope of Alaska reveals significant increases in the proportion of subsurface runoff and cold season discharge, changes the authors say are 'consistent with warming and thawing permafrost.' First author and lead climate modeler Michael Rawlins at UMass Amherst says warming is

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Scientists Propose a New Theory for Why Some Chimps Throw Stones at Certain Trees

Scientists suggest that chimps pick trees that make specific sounds as a possible method of communication.

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Band-Aid adhesive replacement won't ruin the planet

Researchers have created a new adhesive with sticking power, but not staying power. It's a biodegradable material made of entirely naturally derived chemical components that break down after use. One particularly important job that plastics perform every day is to make things adhere to a variety of surfaces—like the way sticky parts work on Post-it notes, Scotch tape, or even Band-Aids. At, and h

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Invisible Ink Could Reveal whether Kids Have Been Vaccinated

The technology embeds immunization records into a child's skin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A new way to optimize sleep and light exposure can reduce jet lag and improve alertness

In a series of articles, including one published today in PLOS ONE, researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute explain how they have developed and demonstrated a series of algorithms that can analyze biometric information recorded by a smart device and then recommend the best combination of sleep and light to help a person readjust their circadian rhythm.

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Cancer therapy may be aided by induced macropinocytosis, a rare form of cell death

In laboratory experiments, a metabolic inhibitor was able to kill a variety of human cancer cells of the skin, breast, lung, cervix and soft tissues through a non-apoptotic route — catastrophic macropinocytosis. In mouse xenograft studies, the inhibitor acted synergistically with a common chemotherapy drug, cyclophosphamide, to reduce tumor growth. Thus macropinocytosis, a rarely described form o

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Stevia remains the most discussed low/zero-calorie sweetener

The International Stevia Council recently unveiled data from its 2019 Online Conversation & Trends Analysis to identify and better understand the attitudes and perceptions around the sweetener stevia in English- and Spanish-speaking countries. The results: the online social conversation doubled. The association worked with Kellen, a professional services firm, to conduct the ISC Conversation & Tre

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Case Western Reserve social sciences researchers develop new tool to assess exposure to childhood violence, trauma

One in five children in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, are either exposed to, or are victims of, violence and trauma, according to a new study from the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

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Invisible Ink Could Reveal whether Kids Have Been Vaccinated

The technology embeds immunization records into a child's skin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Scientist Got Brain Surgery to Fight His Alcohol Addiction

World-renowned infectious disease specialist Frank Plummer once drank 20 ounces of whiskey every night before bed — a habit that led to chronic liver failure and an organ transplant in 2014. But even the liver transplant wasn't enough to curb Plummer's alcohol addiction, and knowing he had no chance of receiving yet another new liver, he decided to do something drastic: he let surgeons drill hole

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The Stain of Impeachment Will Last Forever

Later today, Donald Trump will become just the third president in American history to be impeached. Because this outcome has been inevitable since at least late October , and because there is no practical prospect of the Senate voting to remove Trump from office, the impeachment has come to be seen as dull, lacking in drama, or yesterday's news. This does not negate the seriousness of the charges

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Genes and family are biggest predictor of academic success, study suggests

Whether children will enjoy academic success can be now predicted at birth, a new study suggests.

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Trump nominates acting NOAA leader to be permanent chief

Neil Jacobs has doctorate in numerical weather prediction

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Together you're less alone

Alone, as a pair or in groups – the diversity in social systems of primates is interesting because it may also provide insights into human social life. A biologist from the German Primate Center together with a colleague from the University of Texas at San Antonio, investigated how different primate societies evolved. Their reconstructions showed that the evolution from a solitary way of life to g

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Alzheimer's study shows promise in protecting brain from tau

A new study published in Science Translational Medicine offers more reasons why the scientific community should be targeting tau in the search for an Alzheimer's cure.

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Genes and family are biggest predictor of academic success, study suggests

Whether children will enjoy academic success can be now predicted at birth, a new study suggests. The study, led by the University of York, found that parents' socioeconomic status and children's inherited DNA differences are powerful predictors of educational achievement.

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A soft robotic insect that survives being flattened by a fly swatter

Researchers at EPFL have developed an ultra-light robotic insect that uses its soft artificial muscles to move at 3 cm per second across different types of terrain. It can be folded or crushed and yet continue to move.

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Researchers identify possible link between cannabis use and structural changes to heart

Regular cannabis use could affect the structure and function of the heart, research led by a team at Queen Mary University of London suggests.

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Quantum dot technology invisibly records vaccination history on skin

A research team has created a microneedle platform using fluorescent quantum dots that can deliver vaccines and invisibly encode vaccination history in the skin.

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Different approaches to 'zero-sum' thinking, contribute to political divide

Voters tend to believe that one political party's gain can only be obtained at another party's expense, according to a new study.

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Caribbean settlement began in Greater Antilles, say University of Oregon researchers

A fresh, comprehensive look at archaeological data suggests that seafaring South Americans settled first on the large northernmost islands of the Greater Antilles rather than gradually moving northward from the much closer, smaller islands of the Lesser Antilles.

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Zika vaccine protects fetus in pregnant monkeys

An experimental vaccine against the Zika virus reduced the amount of virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and improved fetal outcomes. The work could help support development and approval of an experimental Zika DNA vaccine currently in early stage trials in humans.

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Storing medical information below the skin's surface

MIT researchers have developed a novel way to record a patient's vaccination history: storing the data in a pattern of quantum-dot dye, invisible to the naked eye, that is delivered under the skin at the same time as the vaccine.

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Researchers support new strategies for HIV control

The search for a cure to AIDS has partly focused on ways to eradicate infected cells. Now, research from Karolinska Institutet and the University of Pennsylvania shows that this approach may not be necessary for a functional cure. In a study focusing on a subset of HIV-positive individuals who can live with the virus without needing treatment, the researchers found that these people's lymphocytes

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Human Experience, Ranked

In 2006, Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska attempted to explain the internet to the Senate as a "series of tubes." He was talking about regulations for internet service providers, but the phrase quickly escaped its context to become one of the most enduring memes of early social media. More than a decade later, it's time to reconsider the web's building blocks. The internet can now be more accurately

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Ancient human species made 'last stand' 100,000 years ago on Indonesian island

Redating of famed 1930s excavation shows Homo erectus lingered late enough to potentially leave traces of DNA in some living people

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Famous Fluid Equations Spring a Leak

Mathematicians have suspected for years that under specific circumstances, the Euler equations fail. But they've been unable to identify an exact scenario in which this failure occurs. Until now. The equations are an idealized mathematical description of how fluids move. Within the confines of certain assumptions, they model the way ripples propagate on a pond or how molasses oozes out of a jar.

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India leads world in pollution linked deaths: study

India leads the world in pollution-linked deaths followed by China and Nigeria, according to a report published Wednesday that estimated the global impact of contaminants in the air, water and workplace.

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'Like a video game with health points,' energy budgets explain evolutionary body size

Budgeting resources isn't just a problem for humans preparing a holiday dinner, or squirrels storing up nuts for the winter.

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Reevaluating human colonization of the Caribbean using chronometric hygiene and Bayesian modeling

Human settlement of the Caribbean represents the only example in the Americas of peoples colonizing islands that were not visible from surrounding mainland areas or other islands. Unfortunately, many interpretive models have relied on radiocarbon determinations that do not meet standard criteria for reporting because they lack critical information or sufficient provenience, often leading to speci

4h

The BMP ligand Pinhead together with Admp supports the robustness of embryonic patterning

Vertebrate embryonic dorsoventral axis is robustly stable in the face of variations in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. However, the molecular mechanism behind this robustness remains uncharacterized. In this study, we show that zebrafish Pinhead, together with Admp, plays an important compensatory role in ensuring the robustness of axial patterning through fine-tuning of BMP signaling

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Direct single-molecule quantification reveals unexpectedly high mechanical stability of vinculin–talin/{alpha}-catenin linkages

The vinculin-mediated mechanosensing requires establishment of stable mechanical linkages between vinculin to integrin at focal adhesions and to cadherins at adherens junctions through associations with the respective adaptor proteins talin and α-catenin. However, the mechanical stability of these critical vinculin linkages has yet to be determined. Here, we developed a single-molecule detector a

4h

Management controls the net greenhouse gas outcomes of growing bioenergy feedstocks on marginally productive croplands

Bio-based energy is key to developing a globally sustainable low-carbon economy. Lignocellulosic feedstock production on marginally productive croplands is expected to provide substantial climate mitigation benefits, but long-term field research comparing greenhouse gas (GHG) outcomes during the production of annual versus perennial crop-based feedstocks is lacking. Here, we show that long-term (

4h

Constraint and trade-offs regulate energy expenditure during childhood

Children's metabolic energy expenditure is central to evolutionary and epidemiological frameworks for understanding variation in human phenotype and health. Nonetheless, the impact of a physically active lifestyle and heavy burden of infectious disease on child metabolism remains unclear. Using energetic, activity, and biomarker measures, we show that Shuar forager-horticulturalist children of Am

4h

Topological states from topological crystals

We present a scheme to explicitly construct and classify general topological states jointly protected by an onsite symmetry group and a spatial symmetry group. We show that all these symmetry-protected topological states can be adiabatically deformed into a special class of states we call topological crystals. A topological crystal in, for example, three dimensions is a real-space assembly of fin

4h

ATAT1-enriched vesicles promote microtubule acetylation via axonal transport

Microtubules are polymerized dimers of α- and β-tubulin that underlie a broad range of cellular activities. Acetylation of α-tubulin by the acetyltransferase ATAT1 modulates microtubule dynamics and functions in neurons. However, it remains unclear how this enzyme acetylates microtubules over long distances in axons. Here, we show that loss of ATAT1 impairs axonal transport in neurons in vivo, an

4h

The value of complementary co-workers

As individuals specialize in specific knowledge areas, a society's know-how becomes distributed across different workers. To use this distributed know-how, workers must be coordinated into teams that, collectively, can cover a wide range of expertise. This paper studies the interdependencies among co-workers that result from this process in a population-wide dataset covering educational specializ

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Genome-wide analyses reveal the role of noncoding variation in complex traits during rice domestication

Genomes carry millions of noncoding variants, and identifying the tiny fraction with functional consequences is a major challenge for genomics. We assessed the role of selection on long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) for domestication-related changes in rice grains. Among 3363 lncRNA transcripts identified in early developing panicles, 95% of those with differential expression (329 lncRNAs) between Ory

4h

Illuminating subduction zone rheological properties in the wake of a giant earthquake

Deformation associated with plate convergence at subduction zones is accommodated by a complex system involving fault slip and viscoelastic flow. These processes have proven difficult to disentangle. The 2010 M w 8.8 Maule earthquake occurred close to the Chilean coast within a dense network of continuously recording Global Positioning System stations, which provide a comprehensive history of sur

4h

Extreme Zr stable isotope fractionation during magmatic fractional crystallization

Zirconium is a commonly used elemental tracer of silicate differentiation, yet its stable isotope systematics remain poorly known. Accessory phases rich in Zr 4+ such as zircon and baddeleyite may preserve a unique record of Zr isotope behavior in magmatic environments, acting both as potential drivers of isotopic fractionation and recorders of melt compositional evolution. To test this potential

4h

Direct conversion of carlactonoic acid to orobanchol by cytochrome P450 CYP722C in strigolactone biosynthesis

Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived phytohormones and rhizosphere signaling molecules for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and root parasitic weeds. Why and how plants produce diverse SLs are unknown. Here, cytochrome P450 CYP722C is identified as a key enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of BC-ring closure leading to orobanchol, the most prevalent canonical SL. The direct conversion of carlac

4h

Blocking FcRn in humans reduces circulating IgG levels and inhibits IgG immune complex-mediated immune responses

The neonatal crystallizable fragment receptor (FcRn) functions as an intracellular protection receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG). Recently, several clinical studies have reported the lowering of circulating monomeric IgG levels through FcRn blockade for the potential treatment of autoimmune diseases. Many autoimmune diseases, however, are derived from the effects of IgG immune complexes (ICs). W

4h

Evolutionary transitions toward pair living in nonhuman primates as stepping stones toward more complex societies

Nonhuman primate societies vary tremendously in size and composition, but how and why evolutionary transitions among different states occurred remains highly controversial. In particular, how many times pair living evolved and the social states of the ancestors of pair- and group-living species remains contentious. We examined evolutionary transitions in primate social evolution by using new, ind

4h

A bifunctional ATPase drives tad pilus extension and retraction

A widespread class of prokaryotic motors powered by secretion motor adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) drives the dynamic extension and retraction of extracellular fibers, such as type IV pili (T4P). Among these, the tight adherence (tad) pili are critical for surface sensing and biofilm formation. As for most other motors belonging to this class, how tad pili retract despite lacking a dedicated

4h

The long noncoding RNA neuroLNC regulates presynaptic activity by interacting with the neurodegeneration-associated protein TDP-43

The cellular and the molecular mechanisms by which long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may regulate presynaptic function and neuronal activity are largely unexplored. Here, we established an integrated screening strategy to discover lncRNAs implicated in neurotransmitter and synaptic vesicle release. With this approach, we identified neuroLNC , a neuron-specific nuclear lncRNA conserved from rodents to

4h

Population dynamics modify urban residents exposure to extreme temperatures across the United States

Exposure to extreme temperatures is one primary cause of weather-related human mortality and morbidity. Global climate change raises the concern of public health under future extreme events, yet spatiotemporal population dynamics have been long overlooked in health risk assessments. Here, we show that the diurnal intra-urban movement alters residents' exposure to extreme temperatures during cold

4h

The politics of zero-sum thinking: The relationship between political ideology and the belief that life is a zero-sum game

The tendency to see life as zero-sum exacerbates political conflicts. Six studies ( N = 3223) examine the relationship between political ideology and zero-sum thinking: the belief that one party's gains can only be obtained at the expense of another party's losses. We find that both liberals and conservatives view life as zero-sum when it benefits them to do so. Whereas conservatives exhibit zero

4h

High-throughput evolution of near-infrared serotonin nanosensors

Imaging neuromodulation with synthetic probes is an emerging technology for studying neurotransmission. However, most synthetic probes are developed through conjugation of fluorescent signal transducers to preexisting recognition moieties such as antibodies or receptors. We introduce a generic platform to evolve synthetic molecular recognition on the surface of near-infrared fluorescent single-wa

4h

'Like a video game with health points,' energy budgets explain evolutionary body size

Budgeting resources isn't just a problem for humans preparing a holiday dinner, or squirrels storing up nuts for the winter.

4h

Researchers crack Newton's elusive three-body problem

It's been nearly 350 years since Sir Isaac Newton outlined the laws of motion, claiming "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." These laws laid the foundation to understand our solar system and, more broadly, to understand the relationship between a body of mass and the forces that act upon it. However, Newton's groundbreaking work also created a pickle that has baffled scient

5h

Perpetual predator-prey population cycles

How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? Experiments performed over a period of 10 years by researchers from McGill University and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam have now confirmed that regular oscillations in predator-prey populations can persist over very long periods

5h

Fossils From Some of the Last Homo Erectus Hint at the End of the Long-Lived Species

Homo erectus , one of the first species of the Homo genus, survived for longer than any other close human ancestor

5h

This 7000-year-old wall was the earliest known defense against rising seas. It failed

Sea wall was built as melting glaciers drowned coastal settlements across the globe

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Neuroscience group retracts Science paper

A group of neuroscientists in Switzerland have retracted a 2019 paper in Science whose first author they say falsified data in the study. The article, "Insular cortex processes aversive somatosensory information and is crucial for threat learning," came from the lab of Ralf Schneggenburger, of the Ecole Polytechniqe Federale De Lausanne (EPFL). The first author … Continue reading

5h

Java Man's last stand

Most recent Homo erectus lived more than 100,000 years ago, research finds.

5h

Need a hand with that?

If we're to trust AI, it helps if it can tell us what it's doing.

5h

Medical history that's skin deep

Special dye could allow us to carry our own vaccination details.

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Early battle with a rising sea that failed

Mediterranean seawall couldn't protect village

5h

The things animals do

Whales sing, chimps drum, meerkats dance and dogs can count.

5h

MeerKAT's view of deep space

Telescope captures galaxies never before observed in radio light.

5h

An Ancient Seawall Documents Prehistoric Settlers' Losing Battle With Rising Waters

The 7,000-year-old line of boulders in Israel only fended off damaging storm surges for so long.

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Ancient Mediterranean seawall first known defense against sea level rise and it failed

Ancient Neolithic villagers on the Carmel Coast in Israel built a seawall to protect their settlement against rising sea levels in the Mediterranean, revealing humanity's struggle against rising oceans and flooding stretches back thousands of years.

5h

Pair living as stepping stone from solitary life to complex societies: study

Alone, as a pair or in groups—the diversity in social systems of primates is interesting because it may also provide insights into human social life. An evolutionary biologist from the German Primate Center—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, together with a colleague from the University of Texas at San Antonio, investigated how different primate societies evolved and which factors may be resp

5h

Caribbean settlement began in Greater Antilles, researchers say

A fresh, comprehensive look at archaeological data suggests that seafaring South Americans settled first on the large northernmost islands of the Greater Antilles rather than gradually moving northward from the much closer, smaller islands of the Lesser Antilles.

5h

Grain traits traced to 'dark matter' of rice genome

Domesticated rice has fatter seed grains with higher starch content than its wild rice relatives—the result of many generations of preferential seed sorting and sowing. But even though rice was the first crop to be fully sequenced, scientists have only documented a few of the genetic changes that made rice into a staple food for more than half the world's population.

5h

Perpetual predator-prey population cycles

How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? Experiments performed over a period of 10 years by researchers from McGill University and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam have now confirmed that regular oscillations in predator-prey populations can persist over very long periods

5h

Pair living as stepping stone from solitary life to complex societies: study

Alone, as a pair or in groups—the diversity in social systems of primates is interesting because it may also provide insights into human social life. An evolutionary biologist from the German Primate Center—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, together with a colleague from the University of Texas at San Antonio, investigated how different primate societies evolved and which factors may be resp

5h

Grain traits traced to 'dark matter' of rice genome

Domesticated rice has fatter seed grains with higher starch content than its wild rice relatives—the result of many generations of preferential seed sorting and sowing. But even though rice was the first crop to be fully sequenced, scientists have only documented a few of the genetic changes that made rice into a staple food for more than half the world's population.

5h

Photos of the Decade: 2010–19

The past 10 years have been eventful ones, beginning with Iceland's erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, through the violent rise of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, the refugee crisis in Europe, the U.S. presidential election of 2016, the first close-up images of Pluto, the #MeToo movement, an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, and so much more

5h

BU chemists develop new biodegradable adhesive

Boston University professor Mark Grinstaff unveiled biodegradable adhesive that is made of entirely naturally derived chemical components.

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Homo erectus lived recently enough that it may have met Denisovans

Homo erectus may have survived in Indonesia until 108,000 years ago – which may have been long enough to meet a second population called the Denisovans

5h

Are herpes virus infections linked to Alzheimer's disease?

Researchers refute the link between increased levels of herpes virus and Alzheimer's disease.

5h

Hebrew U researcher cracks Newton's elusive '3-body' problem

Hebrew U. Researcher Cracks Newton's Elusive 'Three-Body' Problem. Chaos leads scientists to new understanding of centuries'-old quandary.

5h

Scientists discover a new mechanism in childhood kidney cancer

A problem in reader proteins that identify which gene is up for expression may cause normal cells to turn malignant during development.

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5h

Tiny graphene sheets can start or stop ice crystals growing in water

Graphene particles that seed ice formation in water only need to be 8 square nanometres to kick-start the freezing process – any smaller and they can stop ice forming

5h

Health impact of support between African American couples when dealing with racial discrimination

Experiences of racial discrimination are a common source of stress for African Americans, and research shows discrimination can have a damaging impact on the physical and emotional health of African American individuals.

5h

GISMO instrument maps inner Milky Way, sees cosmic 'candy cane'

A feature resembling a candy cane appears at the center of this colorful composite image of our Milky Way galaxy's central zone. But this is no cosmic confection. It spans 190 light-years and is one of a set of long, thin strands of ionized gas called filaments that emit radio waves.

5h

Dog brains process numbers a bit like ours do

Dogs process numerical quantities in a similar brain region as humans do, according to a new study. The results suggest that a common neural mechanism has been deeply conserved across mammalian evolution. "Our work not only shows that dogs use a similar part of their brain to process numbers of objects as humans do—it shows that they don't need to be trained to do it," says senior author Gregory

5h

Kan du bygge et lyssværd? Vi undersøger videnskaben i Star Wars

I anledning af den nye Star Wars film gennemgår vi fem elementer fra det berømte sci-fi-univers.

5h

Techgiganter i samarbejde: Vil gøre smarte produkter endnu smartere

Amazon, Apple og Google går sammen for at sikre, at smarte hjemmeprodukter kan tale sammen.

5h

New NASA-funded CubeSat poised to take Earth's temperature from space

All of a sudden, a tiny NASA-funded satellite, one of many passengers aboard the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, shot into the sky on a mission to prove its new technology could change the way we measure Earth, and eventually, the Moon.

5h

What's it like to install a weather station at the top of the world?

Scientists brave frozen drills, limited oxygen, and more to install sensors on Mount Everest

5h

New coating hides temperature change from infrared cameras

An ultrathin coating developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers upends a ubiquitous physics phenomenon of materials related to thermal radiation: The hotter an object gets, the brighter it glows. The new coating — engineered from samarium nickel oxide, a unique tunable material — employs a bit of temperature trickery.

5h

'Like a video game with health points,' energy budgets explain evolutionary body size

Budgeting resources isn't just a problem for humans preparing a holiday dinner, or squirrels storing up nuts for the winter.A new model of how animals budget their energy sheds light on how they live and explains why they tend to evolve toward larger body sizes. The research, published in PNAS, proposes that animal energy budgets are governed by a key mechanism: resource variation — a measure of

5h

NASA's GISMO instrument maps inner Milky Way, sees cosmic 'candy cane'

A feature resembling a candy cane highlights this colorful composite image of our Milky Way galaxy's central zone. But this is no cosmic confection. It's part of a set of radio-emitting filaments extending 190 light-years.

5h

New space image reveals cosmic 'candy cane'

Deep in our Milky Way galaxy's center, a candy cane emerges as the centerpiece of a new, colorful composite image from a NASA camera, just in time for the holidays.

5h

Health impact of support between African American couples when dealing with racial discrimination

Experiences of racial discrimination are a common source of stress for African Americans, and research shows discrimination can have a damaging impact on physical and emotional health. Family studies researchers at the University of Illinois, knowing the interdependence of individuals in close, romantic relationships, wanted to know if this link between racial discrimination and health might be di

5h

Tracking thermodynamicfundamentals

Since the end of the 19th century, physicists know that the transfer of energy from one body to another is associated with entropy. Due to its fundamental importance began its rise as a useful theoretical quantity in physics, chemistry and engineering. However, it is very difficult to measure. Physicists of Kiel University have now measured entropy in complex plasmas: In a system of charged microp

5h

Perpetual predator-prey population cycles

How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? Experiments performed over a period of 10 years by researchers from McGill University and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam have now confirmed that regular oscillations in predator-prey populations can persist over very long periods.

5h

Drops of liquid crystal molecules branch out into strange structures

New research published in Nature reveals that, when cooled, droplets containing chain-like liquid crystal molecules transform from spheres into complex shapes such as flowers, corals, and fibrous networks. 'It was a visually spectacular effect. We weren't expecting it at all,' says lead author Arjun Yodh. 'We were trying to make designer drops, but in the process, we saw something interesting and

5h

Researchers determine age for last known settlement by a direct ancestor to modern humans

An international team of researchers has determined the age of the last known settlement of the species Homo erectus, one of modern humans' direct ancestors. The site is called Ngandong, on the Indonesian island Java. The team dated animal fragments where Homo erectus remains were found and the surrounding landscape. The team determined the last existence of Homo erectus at Ngandong between 108,00

5h

First images of an 'upgraded' CRISPR tool

Columbia scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools.

5h

Topological materials for information technology offer lossless transmission of signals

New experiments with magnetically doped topological insulators at BESSY II have revealed possible ways of lossless signal transmission that involve a surprising self-organisation phenomenon. In the future, it might be possible to develop materials that display this phenomenon at room temperature and can be used as processing units in a quantum computer, for example. The study has been published in

5h

In Global South, urban sanitation crisis harms health, economy

Cities in the "global south"—densely populated urban areas that are part of low-income countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America—should phase out pit latrines, septic tanks and other on-site methods of human waste management.

5h

Research provides new design principle for water-splitting catalysts

Scientists have long known that platinum is by far the best catalyst for splitting water molecules to produce hydrogen gas. A new study by Brown University researchers shows why platinum works so well—and it's not the reason that's been assumed.

5h

Europe Launches Space Satellite to Search for Habitable Planets

There's a new space telescope orbiting Earth today, and it has a very specific mission: to assess distant planets for habitability. The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) will be the first mission to focus on small exoplanets already discovered in orbit of bright stars . That could include small gas giants, super-Earths, and even small rocky planets like Earth and Mars. CHEOPS is backed

5h

Nvidia Opens Drive to All, Unveils SoC for Self-Driving Cars, TensorRT 7

Nvidia's Jensen Huang announced some exciting autonomous vehicle news at the company's GTC keynote. First, the company is making its pre-trained Drive models publicly available for research and development. Along with that comes a set of transfer learning tools to make the models customizable and deployable. Second, a new family of automotive SoCs called ORIN is on the way. Also in the keynote, H

5h

On Farming YouTube, Emu Eggs and Hay Bales Find Loyal Fans

Some farmers have discovered that online stardom can be more lucrative than their crops or livestock.

5h

New York could ban plastic foam containers statewide under Cuomo proposal

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is proposing a statewide ban on plastic foam containers, including products like coffee cups and packing peanuts.

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The Final Days of Homo Erectus

New dating of a trove of fossils suggests our cousin hominin went extinct because of climate change. Rizal et al_Ngandong Excavations 2.jpg Excavations underway near the village of Ngandong in central Java in 2010. The site is the location of the latest known fossils of H. erectus. Image credits: Copyright Russell L. Ciochon Univ. of Iowa. Human Wednesday, December 18, 2019 – 13:00 Charles Q. Ch

5h

Frequent mutations that converge on the NFKBIZ pathway in ulcerative colitis

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1856-1 In patients with ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammation can lead to remodelling of the colorectal epithelium through positive selection of clones with mutations in genes related to IL-17 signalling, which, however, might be negatively selected during colitis-associated carcinogenesis.

5h

Long-term predator–prey cycles finally achieved in the lab

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03603-3 A combination of laboratory experiments and mathematical and statistical analysis provides an affirmative answer to a decades-old question — can a predator and its prey coexist indefinitely?

5h

Somatic inflammatory gene mutations in human ulcerative colitis epithelium

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1844-5 Whole-exome sequencing of colon organoids derived from patients with ulcerative colitis identifies somatic mutations in components of the IL-17 signalling pathway, which may confer a growth advantage to cells under inflammatory conditions.

5h

Last appearance of Homo erectus at Ngandong, Java, 117,000–108,000 years ago

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1863-2 Bayesian modelling of radiometric age estimates provides a robust chronology for Homo erectus at Ngandong (Java), confirming that this site currently represents the last known occurrence of this species.

5h

Localization and delocalization of light in photonic moiré lattices

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1851-6 A superposition of tunable photonic lattices is used to create optical moiré patterns and demonstrate the resulting localization of light waves through a mechanism based on flat-band physics.

5h

Molecular heterogeneity drives reconfigurable nematic liquid crystal drops

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1809-8 Study of droplets containing nematic liquid crystal oligomers shows that a heterogeneous distribution of chain lengths plays a key part in driving reversible shape transformations with cooling and heating.

5h

Metabolic heterogeneity confers differences in melanoma metastatic potential

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1847-2 Differences in MCT1 function among melanoma cells confer differences in oxidative stress resistance and metastatic potential.

5h

Impaired cell fate through gain-of-function mutations in a chromatin reader

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1842-7 The histone-acetylation-reader protein ENL is mutated in a paediatric kidney cancer in such a way that it clusters at target genes, increasing the recruitment of the transcriptional machinery, enhancing transcription and deregulating cell fate during development.

5h

Long-term cyclic persistence in an experimental predator–prey system

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1857-0 The potential for infinite persistence of planktonic predator and prey cycles is experimentally demonstrated and these cycles show resilience in the presence of stochastic events.

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Brain states behind exploring and hunting revealed

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03811-x The brain fluctuates between different internal states, each of which drives particular behaviours. Brain-wide imaging reveals the internal states that help zebrafish larvae to choose between exploring and hunting.

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Large magnetic gap at the Dirac point in Bi2Te3/MnBi2Te4 heterostructures

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1826-7 In theory, the anomalous quantum Hall effect is observed in edge channels of topological insulators when there is a magnetic energy gap at the Dirac point; this gap has now been observed by low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy in Mn-doped Bi2Te3.

5h

Podcast: A solution to the three-body problem, and festive fun

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03891-9 Hear this weeks' science updates, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

5h

A statistical solution to the chaotic, non-hierarchical three-body problem

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1833-8 The ergodic hypothesis is used to produce a statistical solution to the chaotic non-hierarchical three-body problem.

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Prediction and observation of an antiferromagnetic topological insulator

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1840-9 An intrinsic antiferromagnetic topological insulator, MnBi2Te4, is theoretically predicted and then realized experimentally, with implications for the study of exotic quantum phenomena.

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Cooperative elastic fluctuations provide tuning of the metal–insulator transition

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1824-9 Theoretical modelling shows that elastic fluctuations can enable the tuning of metal-to-insulator transitions, potentially also explaining the dependence of the transition temperature on cation radius in perovskite transition-metal oxides.

5h

IL-17a promotes sociability in mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1843-6 IL-17a induced by immune activation affects cortical neural activity and promotes social interaction in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

5h

Probing the critical nucleus size for ice formation with graphene oxide nanosheets

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1827-6 Nucleation experiments with water droplets containing differently sized graphene oxide nanosheets provide an experimental indication of the temperature-dependent size of the critical ice nucleus.

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Atomic-scale imaging of a 27-nuclear-spin cluster using a quantum sensor

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1834-7 An individual electron is used as a quantum sensor to realize atomic-scale magnetic resonance imaging.

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Internal state dynamics shape brainwide activity and foraging behaviour

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1858-z During foraging for live prey, zebrafish larvae alternate between persistent exploitation and exploration behavioural states that correlate with distinct patterns of neuronal activation.

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Why and where an HIV cure is needed and how it might be achieved

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1841-8 Current barriers and limitations to HIV treatments are reviewed, and suggestions for future steps to achieve an effective curative intervention are discussed.

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Structural basis of DNA targeting by a transposon-encoded CRISPR–Cas system

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1849-0 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the TniQ–Cascade complex encoded by the Vibrio cholerae Tn6677 transposon reveal the mechanistic basis of the functional association of CRISPR- and transposon-associated machineries.

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Magnetic and topological order united in a crystal

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03831-7 A material that has electrically conducting surfaces has been found to show, when cooled, a type of magnetic ordering that reduces conduction at the surfaces. Such remarkable behaviour could have practical applications.

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First human ancestors to leave Africa died out in Java, scientists say

Dating of bones from Indonesia confirm Homo erectus roamed planet for 1.8m years The last known resting place of Homo erectus , one of the most successful human ancestors and the first to walk fully upright, has been traced to a floodplain near the longest river on the Indonesian island of Java. A dozen partial skulls and two shinbones, discovered in a bonebed near the Solo river in the 1930s, bu

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One in five US high school students vaped marijuana in 2019, report says

Vaping nicotine is still more popular but vaping marijuana grew more quickly, according to survey About one out of five high school students in the US say they vaped marijuana in the past year, and its popularity has been booming faster than nicotine vaping, according to a report released Wednesday. Related: Pelosi says Democrats have 'no choice' but to impeach Trump as formal debate begins – liv

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The World of 'Watchmen' Ended Twice This Week

Two sequels to the classic comic book series came to a conclusion just days apart—one more successfully than the other.

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3D-printed 'David' is just 0.1 mm tall

A special 3D printing method has created a miniature metal version of Michelangelo's David with pure copper. The core component of the 3D printing process is a micropipette coupled to a cantilever; this makes it possible to monitor the force with which the point of the pipette touches the substrate. With this assembly, the researchers can electrochemically deposit dissolved metals onto an electri

6h

The Psychology Behind Generational Conflict

Older people have groused about younger people for millennia. Now we know why

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The International Space Station's Robot Got an Emotional Upgrade

Emotional AI CIMON, the robot assistant built to help astronauts on the International Space Station, is back in action after an upgrade to its artificial intelligence. The robot, formerly known as a bit of a brat , is now able to better detect and respond to human emotions, according to an IBM press release . Apparently, CIMON-2 will use IBM's Watson AI to better detect astronauts' tone. Long Ten

6h

Emery Brown (Harvard Med., MIT) 2: The Dynamics of the Brain under Anesthesia

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/anesthesia-brain What happens to your brain under general anesthesia? EEG recordings can measure brain dynamics of patients under general anesthesia and may inform the development of safer and more specific anesthetics. Dr. Emery Brown explains that under general anesthesia your brain is not turned off but is very dynamic. Electrical oscillations in the brain

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Emery Brown (Harvard Med., MIT) 1: Unconsciousness Under General Anesthetic is a Dynamic State

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/anesthesia-brain What happens to your brain under general anesthesia? EEG recordings can measure brain dynamics of patients under general anesthesia and may inform the development of safer and more specific anesthetics. Dr. Emery Brown explains that under general anesthesia your brain is not turned off but is very dynamic. Electrical oscillations in the brain

6h

APS tip sheet: Modeling supermarket traffic jams

Modeling supermarket layouts could help reduce aisle congestion.

6h

Research provides new design principle for water-splitting catalysts

Understanding why platinum is such a good catalyst for producing hydrogen from water could lead to new and cheaper catalysts — and could ultimately make more hydrogen available for fossil-free fuels and chemicals.

6h

Parental coaching adolescents through peer stress

During early adolescence, especially the transition to middle school, kids face a number of challenges both socially and academically. Parents can act as social 'coaches,' offering support and advice to youth as they navigate these challenges. University of Illinois researchers are finding that not all kids benefit from the same types of parental coaching because kids respond to stress differently

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First images of an 'upgraded' CRISPR tool

Columbia scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools. The team developed the tool, called INTEGRATE, after discovering a unique "jumping gene" in Vibrio cholerae bacteria that could insert large genetic payloads in the genome without introducing DNA breaks.

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First images of an 'upgraded' CRISPR tool

Columbia scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools. The team developed the tool, called INTEGRATE, after discovering a unique "jumping gene" in Vibrio cholerae bacteria that could insert large genetic payloads in the genome without introducing DNA breaks.

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Drops of liquid crystal molecules branch out into strange structures

While many scientific achievements come from long years of careful planning, once in a while researchers stumble onto something completely unexpected. "At the beginning, we were looking to create a particular effect," says graduate student Wei-Shao Wei. "Then, we observed something weird."

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Researchers determine age for last known settlement by a direct ancestor to modern humans

Homo erectus, one of modern humans' direct ancestors, was a wandering bunch. After the species dispersed from Africa about two million years ago, it colonized the ancient world, which included Asia and possibly Europe.

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Topological materials for information technology offer lossless transmission of signals

New experiments with magnetically doped topological insulators at BESSY II have revealed possible methods of lossless signal transmission that involve a surprising self-organization phenomenon. In the future, it might be possible to develop materials with such characteristics at room temperature that can be used as processing units in quantum computing, for example. The study has been published in

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Boulders Don't Just Roll. They Bounce.

Craters in a Chilean desert preserve the trajectories of giant rocks, allowing scientists to study the physics of rockslides.

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The U.S. Is Ignoring the Climate Benefits of Heat Pumps

Using the technology for building heating and cooling could substantially cut related carbon emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The New Payday Lender Looks a Lot Like the Old Payday Lender

Jonathan Raines needed money. An app promised to help. He searched online for an alternative to traditional payday lenders and came across Earnin, which offered him $100 on the spot, to be deducted from his bank account on payday. "There are no installments and no really high interest," he told me, comparing the app favorably to a payday lender. "It's better, in that sense." Earnin didn't charge

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Scientists: Tiny Silver Wires Demonstrate "Brain-Like" Properties

Neural Circuitry Scientists built a tiny, tangled circuit that they say could help them build machines with brains that behave and think like ours. The device, a mess of nanoscopic silver wires, gives off an ever-shifting pattern of electrical currents that the scientists compared to different states of neural activity such as learning, wakefulness, and sleep, according to a University of Califor

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Forty percent of people with peanut allergies can eat tree nuts but choose not to

New study showed that nearly 90% of people with peanut allergy could potentially tolerate almonds, but 33% of that group preferred strict avoidance due to fear of an allergic reaction.

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Different mutations in a single gene can wreak many types of havoc in brain cells

Mount Sinai researchers have found that different mutations in a single gene can have myriad effects on a person's health, suggesting that gene therapies may need to do more than just replenish the missing or dysfunctional protein the gene is supposed to encode, according to a study published in Nature Genetics in November 2019.

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The case against wrapping paper

Five minutes of glittery wonder. A lifetime trying to decompose in a landfill. Think about it. (amarosy via Deposit Photos/) Wrapping paper is ridiculous. It's reportedly a roughly $7 billion business in the U.S. alone, as people buy it by the sheet, roll, or carefully curated package via Etsy. It creates millions of tons of waste; estimates claim half of it ends up in landfills. While many greet

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Playing with tools—and weapons—was a 'normal' part of prehistoric childhood

Child-size spear throwers from 1700 years ago suggest ancient kids learned fast

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Earth's Magnetic Field is Doing Something Very Strange

We know that Earth's magnetic North Pole doesn't quite line up with the North Pole on a world map — it's wandered, at a glacial pace, about 1,400 miles since its first discovery in 1831, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). What scientists didn't expect, however, is that the magnetic North Pole has been wandering towards Siberia at an increasing pace, Science A

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In global south, urban sanitation crisis harms health, economy

Researchers spent a year examining 15 cities in the global south, and found that 62% of sewage and fecal sludge is unsafely managed. Their findings are detailed in a report from the World Resources Institute/Ross Center for Sustainable Cities.

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Fossils of the future to mostly consist of humans, domestic animals

In a co-authored paper published online in the journal Anthropocene, University of Illinois at Chicago paleontologist Roy Plotnick argues that the fossil record of mammals will provide a clear signal of the Anthropocene era.

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Study finds widespread misinterpretation of gene expression data

Reproducibility of research data is a major challenge in experimental biology. As data generated by genomic-scale techniques increases in complexity, this concern is becoming more and more worrisome.

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Study: Human management helps rare plants, butterflies survive hurricane

A new study from North Carolina State University shows that ongoing habitat management could help prevent hurricane-driven extinctions. The study found that a rare Florida plant, the pineland croton, weathered the damage from Hurricane Irma better in plots that were under human management than those left alone. The work could have implications for management of rare species in the face of extreme

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Study finds widespread misinterpretation of gene expression data

Reproducibility of research data is a major challenge in experimental biology. As data generated by genomic-scale techniques increases in complexity, this concern is becoming more and more worrisome.

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Trump Administration Unveils Two Proposals to Permit Drug Importation

The proposals, which are still under review, are a step toward allowing drugs to be imported from Canada and other countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study: Human management helps rare plants, butterflies survive hurricane

A new study from North Carolina State University shows that ongoing habitat management could help prevent hurricane-driven extinctions. The study found that a rare Florida plant, the pineland croton, weathered the damage from Hurricane Irma better in plots that were under human management than those left alone. The work could have implications for management of rare species in the face of extreme

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #50, 2019

Our crowdfunding campaign to complete development of the Cranky Uncle game for improving our climate cognition reached its initial goal of $15,000 in only 7 days. We've activated our first stretch goal, to port the app to Android. You can help by contributing right now while you're thinking about it! To all those who've already contributed, a massive Thank You! Pointing the finger Attributing oce

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Solving the puzzle of IgG4-related disease, the elusive autoimmune disorder

IgG4-related disease is an autoimmune disorder affecting millions and has no established cure. Previous research indicates that T cells, a major component of the immune system, and the immunoglobulin IgG4 itself are key causative factors, but the mechanism of action of these components is unclear. Now, Scientists from Tokyo University of Science have meticulously explored this pathway in their exp

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Can good sleep patterns offset genetic susceptibility to heart disease and stroke?

A pioneering new study led by Dr. Lu Qi, director of the Tulane University Obesity Research Center, found that even if people had a high genetic risk of heart disease or stroke, healthy sleep patterns could help offset that risk. The study is published in the European Heart Journal.

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Chemicals in vaping flavors cause widespread damage to lung tissue

New research appearing in the journal Scientific Reports unpacks the list of chemicals that comprise flavored e-liquids and pods used in vaping and details their harmful effects to lung tissue, including inflammation and genetic damage that could indicate long-term risk for respiratory disease and even cancer.

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Is targeting aging the future of medicine? Researchers make the case

Human life expectancy worldwide rose dramatically over the past century, but people's health spans — the period of life spent free from chronic, age-related disease or disability — have not increased accordingly. But in the latest issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America, experts demonstrate that through interventions that impact the ag

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Booze on the brain

Santa Clara University Assistant Professor Lindsay Halladay, PhD, and colleagues at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism have identified a specific circuit in the brain that could be targeted to treat compulsive drinking.

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Cirkulär ekonomi hållbar affärsmodell för biogasproduktion

Biogasproduktion skapar stora mervärden för samhället och miljön, men dessa värden är svåra att räkna på i en lönsamhetskalkyl. Hållbara affärsmodeller kan utvecklas inom svensk gårdsbaserad biogasproduktion genom att fokusera på processer som driver innovation. För att tillgodose kommande generationers behov krävs en omställning från dagens linjära ekonomiska system – som bygger på en intensiv k

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The Scientist Infographics: Editor's Picks of 2019

This year's most beautiful illustrations covered topics including the molecular underpinnings of Parkinson's disease and strategies for tracking marine organisms around the world's oceans.

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Watered down biodiversity: Sample type is critical in environmental DNA studies for biomonitoring

DNA-based biomonitoring relies on species-specific segments of organisms DNA for their taxonomic identification and is rapidly advancing for monitoring invertebrate communities across a variety of ecosystems. The analytical approaches taken vary from single-species detection to bulk environmental sample analysis, depending largely on the focus of data generation. However, for freshwater systems, t

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Air travel reduces local investment bias, benefits investors and firms, study shows

Easy access to air travel has not only flattened the world, it also has flattened the bias toward investing locally, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

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NASA's Webb telescope to search for young brown dwarfs and rogue planets

How small are the smallest celestial objects that form like stars, but don't produce their own light? How common are they compared to full-fledged stars? How about "rogue planets," which formed around stars before being tossed into interstellar space? When NASA's James Webb Space Telescope launches in 2021, it will shed light on these questions.

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New clues on dark matter from the darkest galaxies

They are called low-surface-brightness galaxies and it is thanks to them that important confirmations and new information have been obtained on one of the largest mysteries of the cosmos: dark matter. "We have found that disc galaxies can be represented by a universal relationship. In particular, in this study we analysed the so-called Low-Surface-Brightness (LSB) galaxies, a particular type of ga

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A 3D Encounter With a Violent Volcano's Underbelly

Scientists spent days aboard a helicopter with special sensors over a volcano to develop a picture of how its insides affect its frequent eruptions.

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Researchers discover how ant species uses abdomen for extra power during jumps

Researchers in the department of entomology at the University of Illinois have shown how a species of ant uses its abdomen to add speed to its jump, in a recent study published in Integrative Organismal Biology. With a name like Gigantiops destructor, one might expect this ant species to be large or aggressive, but these relatively shy ants common to South America are anything but. Compared to oth

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Researchers discover how ant species uses abdomen for extra power during jumps

Researchers in the department of entomology at the University of Illinois have shown how a species of ant uses its abdomen to add speed to its jump, in a recent study published in Integrative Organismal Biology. With a name like Gigantiops destructor, one might expect this ant species to be large or aggressive, but these relatively shy ants common to South America are anything but. Compared to oth

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Using an AI bot trained on human mod actions to moderate r/Futurology

In the spirit of r/Futurology , we are going to trial an AI bot, u/CrossModerator that will analyze comments and then based on past human mod actions, decide whether the comment must be removed or not. For initial testing purposes, the bot will likely be set to report potential rule-breaking content to the mod team. u/CrossModerator also has a specific classifier trained explicitly with r/Futurol

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Could This Estonian Robot Tank Stop a Russian Invasion?

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Researchers observe brain-like behavior in nanoscale device

submitted by /u/candiedbug [link] [comments]

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How plausible are the planets in Star Wars?

Could Star Wars really happen? Experts on planetary formation, processes, and habitability discuss the science behind the saga. Space discoveries are in the news almost every week—but they may not make as big an impression as the legend of Star Wars . December 20 marks the release of the final installment of the Skywalker saga, The Rise of Skywalker . The film raises questions about the fate of t

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Robots Decorate Trees, Perform Carols in Store's Holiday Display

Holiday Spirit Each holiday season, iconic department store Bloomingdale's window displays are among New York City's most stunning. But this year, the luxury retailer upped the ante by incorporating robots into three of the displays at its flagship 59th Street store — and the whimsical holiday scenes could foreshadow the future of retail year-round. Festively Futuristic Switzerland-based tech com

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Mentoring project deepened student learning, commitment

Pairing graduate students with professionals working in their field resulted in deeper learning and inspired passion for the work, according to new research from the University of Houston.

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Why the definition of a planet is always changing

In 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft looked back toward the sun and captured this near-sunset view of the rugged, icy mountains and flat ice plains extending to Pluto's horizon. (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/) Christopher Palma is a teaching professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . As an astronomer, the question I hear the

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Study: Human management helps rare plants, butterflies survive hurricane

Ongoing habitat management could help prevent hurricane-driven extinctions. A rare Florida plant, the pineland croton, weathered the damage from Hurricane Irma better in plots that were under human management than those left alone.

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Switching cereals in India for improved nutrition, sustainability

A new study offers India a pathway to improve nutrition, climate resilience and the environment by diversifying its crop production. And it also offers global insights into the need to consider sustainable approaches to agriculture.

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Watered down biodiversity: sample type is critical in environmental DNA studies for biomonitoring

A new study looking at macroinvertebrate diversity in shallow, open-water wetlands found that sample choice is a critical factor for a comprehensive assessment of biodiversity. This study has major impacts for informing large-scale freshwater biomonitoring projects.

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Air travel reduces local investment bias, benefits investors and firms, study shows

Easy access to air travel has not only flattened the world, it also has flattened the bias toward investing locally, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

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Yrkeslärare utmanas av digitalisering i byggbranschen

Grundläggande kunskaper om yrket i byggbranschen är en förutsättning för att göra det digitaliserat. Yrkeslärare i gymnasieskolan spelar en huvudroll för att förbereda eleverna för en bransch i snabb utveckling. Bygg-, anläggnings-, vvs- och elinstallationsbranscherna genomgår en metamorfos med ökad digitalisering. En rörläggare måste exempelvis via en app kunna läsa av tredimensionella modeller

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Why Few Vets Say Raw Dog Food is a Good Idea

There's little evidence for the benefits of raw pet food, and it increases the risk of dangerous pathogens.

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The water lily genome and the early evolution of flowering plants

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1852-5 The genome of the tropical blue-petal water lily Nymphaea colorata and the transcriptomes from 19 other Nymphaeales species provide insights into the early evolution of angiosperms.

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Tel Aviv University study finds widespread misinterpretation of gene expression data

New research by a Tel Aviv University group identifies a frequent technical bias in data generated by RNA-seq technology, one of the most widely used methods in molecular biology, which often leads to false results.

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Study reveals molecular features of anxiety in the brain

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have taken a new approach to the search, developing a rational, computationally inspired method for the preclinical study of anxiety.

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New clues on dark matter from the darkest galaxies

Low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies offered important confirmations and new information on one of the largest mysteries of the cosmos: dark matter. SISSA researchers analysed the speed at which the stars and gases that compose the galaxies rotate, noting that the LSBs also have a very homogenous behaviour. This result consolidates several clues on the presence and behaviour of dark matter, openi

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Reflecting on the year in chemistry

A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science. As 2019 draws to a close, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the year's biggest stories in chemistry, top research trends and important developments in a special issue. In addition, the magazine makes some bold predictions for chemistry in 2020.

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Saccharin derivatives give cancer cells a not-so-sweet surprise

Saccharin received a bad rap after studies in the 1970s linked consumption of large amounts of the artificial sweetener to bladder cancer in laboratory rats. Later, research revealed that these findings were not relevant to people. And in a complete turnabout, recent studies indicate that saccharin can actually kill human cancer cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemis

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Researchers discover how ant species uses abdomen for extra power during jumps

Researchers in the department of entomology at the University of Illinois have shown how a species of ant uses its abdomen to add speed to its jump, in a recent study published in Integrative Organismal Biology. The results indicate that moving their abdomens aids the ants to jump further, higher, and faster overall. This is particularly helpful to the ants as they try to navigate the detritus on

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Study suggests early-life exposure to dogs may lessen risk of developing schizophrenia

Ever since humans domesticated the dog, the faithful, obedient and protective animal has provided its owner with companionship and emotional well-being. Now, a study from Johns Hopkins Medicine suggests that being around 'man's best friend' from an early age may have a health benefit as well — lessening the chance of developing schizophrenia as an adult.

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Mentoring project deepened student learning, commitment

Pairing graduate students with professionals working in their field resulted in deeper learning and inspired passion for the work, according to new research from the University of Houston.

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Study shows risks for additional procedures after bariatric surgery

Which of the two most common bariatric surgeries — gastric sleeve or gastric bypass — has the highest subsequent risk of additional operations or procedures?

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How common are concussions not related to sports among college undergrads?

Researchers in this observational study looked at the number of concussions(both sports-related and not related to sports) experienced by undergraduate students at a large US public university over three academic years.

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Association of household with risk of first psychiatric hospitalization in Finland

National registry data for 6.2 million people in Finland from 1996 to 2014 were used to examine how household income was associated with risk for a first admission to a psychiatric hospital for treatment of a mental disorder.

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Concussions common among college students, more prevalent off the field than on

About one in 75 college students sustain a concussion each academic year, and the vast majority occur outside of organized sports, according to a new three-year study. It also found August is the peak month for concussions, and they're at least as common among females as males.

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Heart transplants from donors positive for hepatitis C

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., report in this case series on 80 patients who had heart transplants using hearts from donors positive for hepatitis C.

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Were greener areas around schools associated with lower likelihood of ADHD symptoms?

Attending schools in greener areas appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of having symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in this observational study of children in China. There were 59,754 children (ages 2 to 17) included, of whom 2,566 (4.3%) had ADHD symptoms.

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Pregnant women with HIV often not given recommended treatment

Women living with HIV who are also pregnant don't always receive recommended antiretroviral medications, according to a recent study.

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Membrane inspired by bone and cartilage efficiently produces electricity from saltwater

Inspired by membranes in the body tissues of living organisms, scientists have combined aramid nanofibers used in Kevlar with boron nitride to construct a membrane for harvesting ocean energy that is both strong like bone and suited for ion transport like cartilage. The research, published in Joule, overcomes major design challenges for technologies that harness osmotic energy to generate an eco-f

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Daily briefing: Why is ice so slippery?

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03896-4 Hint: It's not all about the water. Plus, Nature's hotly anticipated annual list of the ten people who mattered in science this year.

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New evidence points to mass graves of people killed in Tulsa's 1921 race massacre

Even century-old graves are full of clues to the events surrounding people's deaths. On May 31, 1921, one of the worst cases of racial violence in the United States erupted in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After a black man was accused of assaulting a white woman ( a charge that was later dropped ), a white mob massacred hundreds of black people and destroyed much of the city's prosperous Greenwood neighborho

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Comparing heirloom and modern wheat effects on gut health

Amid concerns about gluten sensitivity, increasing numbers of people are avoiding wheat. Most have not been diagnosed with a wheat-related medical condition, yet they seem to feel better when they don't eat gluten-containing foods. A possible explanation is that modern varieties of wheat are responsible. But now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown t

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Low back pain accounts for a third of new emergency department imaging in the US

The use of imaging for the initial evaluation of patients with low back pain in the emergency department (ED) continues to occur at a high rate — one in three new emergency visits for low back pain in the United States — according to the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Imaging utilization varied significantly by geographic region, with patients in the southern US undergoing 10% more ima

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SMU develops efficient methods to simulate how electromagnetic waves interact with devices

It takes a tremendous amount of computer simulations to create a device like an MRI scanner that can image your brain by detecting electromagnetic waves propagating through tissue. The tricky part is figuring out how electromagnetic waves will react when they come in contact with the materials in the device. SMU researchers have developed an algorithm that can be used in a wide range of fields – f

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A self-healing sweat sensor (video)

Wearable sensors that track heart rate or steps are popular fitness products. But in the future, working up a good sweat could provide useful information about a person's health. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a headband that measures electrolyte levels in sweat. And unlike many previous sweat sensors, the device can heal itself when cut or scratche

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National clinical trial provides mastectomy alternative for recurrent breast cancer

Mastectomy has historically been the standard treatment for breast cancer patients experiencing recurrence after an initial lumpectomy and whole-breast radiation. Now, a phase 2 clinical trial led by Douglas W. Arthur, M.D., chair and professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU School of Medicine, has demonstrated an effective alternative.

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Chemical compound found in essential oils improves wound healing, IU study finds

Indiana University researchers have discovered that a chemical compound found in essential oils improves the healing process in mice when it is topically applied to a skin wound.

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Study: Obesity could affect brain development in children

New research published in JAMA Pediatrics found that obese children had a thinner pre-frontal cortex than normal weight children.The thinner cortex could be factor in the decreased executive function earlier studies observed among children with higher BMI. The new study confirmed that the obese subjects in the study had poorer working memory compared with normal weight children.

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Robotic Exoskeletons, Like This One, Are Getting More Practical

When you imagine an exoskeleton, chances are it might look a bit like the Guardian XO from Sarcos Robotics. The XO is literally a robot you wear (or maybe, it wears you). The suit's powered limbs sense your movements and match their position to yours with little latency to give you effortless superstrength and endurance—lifting 200 pounds will feel like 10. A vision of robots and humankind workin

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Membrane inspired by bone and cartilage efficiently produces electricity from saltwater

Inspired by membranes in the body tissues of living organisms, scientists have combined aramid nanofibers used in Kevlar with boron nitride to construct a membrane for harvesting ocean energy that is both strong like bone and suited for ion transport like cartilage. The research, published December 18 in the journal Joule, overcomes major design challenges for technologies that harness osmotic ene

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What we're getting wrong in the fight to end hunger | Jasmine Crowe

In a world that's wasting more food than ever before, why do one in nine people still go to bed hungry each night? Social entrepreneur Jasmine Crowe calls for a radical transformation to our fight to end global hunger — challenging us to rethink our routine approaches to addressing food insecurity and sharing how we can use technology to gather unused food and deliver it directly to people in nee

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The world this year

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KAL's cartoon

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The Resistance Almost Missed Impeachment

GAITHERSBURG, Md.—By the time I arrived at the protest, the giant inflatable Trump Rat was already up and waving in the wind. A mob of people huddled together under its shadow, outside city hall here, for nearly two hours last night in a show of support for today's historic impeachment vote—just one of more than 500 rallies held simultaneously in cities and towns across America. Some members of t

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Bringing rocks back from Mars

A cosmic relay race

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A system based on AI will scan the retina for signs of Alzheimer's

And, after that, of stroke susceptibility and heart disease

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»Fantastisk«: Tyggegummi fra stenalderen kan åbne for viden om fremtidens sygdomme

PLUS. Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har haft held med at genomsekventere spyt fra et 5.700 år gammelt tyggegummi. Nu går jagten ind på mere gammel tyggegummi, der kan gøre os klogere på nutid og fremtid.

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Working women healthier even after retirement age

Study shows that women who worked consistently during their prime midlife working years had better physical health than non-working women later in life.

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Parkinson's symptoms improve with weekly regimens of both physical and cognitive exercises

Parkinson's patients' motor and non-motor symptoms were improved with a weekly exercise regimen that included physical and cognitive tasks, according to new research presented today (December 18, 2019) at The Physiological Society early career conference, Future Physiology 2019: Translating Cellular Mechanisms into Lifelong Health Strategies.

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Successful satellite launch for Graz University of Technology, Austria

The European Space Agency's OPS-SAT CubeSat, the world's first flying laboratory, will test new technologies for operational space applications. OPS-SAT was launched today at 09:54 CET from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, on board a Soyuz launcher. The mission will last at least 1 year.

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Email users should have 'more control' over post-mortem message transmission

Email users should have far more control over the transmission of their messages upon death, a new Aston Business School study suggests.

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Scientists of Samara Polytech have developed new lubricant oils with special properties

Due to gases temperatures up to 800 – 1500 °C and high turbine shaft speed, not all metal materials can stand engines rigid conditions, say nothing about lubricants. To solve the problem Samara Polytech chemists found substances that increase the thermal stability of aircraft oils.

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Global urban growth typified by suburbs, not skyscrapers

To many people, the term "urban growth" connotes shiny new high-rise buildings or towering skyscrapers. But in a new analysis of 478 cities with populations of more than 1 million people, researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES) found urban growth is seldom typified by such "upward" growth. Instead, the predominant pattern in cities across the world is outward expa

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Scientists identify harmful bacteria based on its DNA at a very low cost

A new bacterial identification method, called ON-rep-seq, examines selective, strain-specific fragments of the bacterial genome, allowing the generation of results that earlier required DNA sequencing of the entire bacterial genome or tedious approaches like pulsed field gel electrophoresis, which previously has been the gold standard for strain-level typing of microorganisms. Hence, the method ha

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State of the climate over the Three Gorges Region of the Yangtze River in 2018

The Three Gorges Project of the Yangtze River is a large-scale water conservancy project that attracts worldwide attention. Since its completion, it has brought important social and economic benefits in flood control, power generation, shipping, water resource redistribution, and other aspects. However, the advantages and disadvantages of building such a large-scale water conservancy project, as w

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Proteins as Oral Drugs: Possible, But Not Probable

I have been writing this blog for some time (!) That occurs to me on seeing this article in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery on oral dosing of peptide drugs – I say that because of this 2002 post on the very same subject, at the time directed towards the then-still-somewhat-hot topic of Judah Folkman's endostatin angiogenesis inhibitor (which was itself a peptide). I pointed out that such compounds

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Russia Desperately Wants a Quantum Computer

Big Money The Russian government just launched a new initiative to catch its quantum computing program up to those of other global powers . Over the next five years, Russia plans to pump about 50 billion roubles — that's around $790 million — into programs that, hopefully, will result in a functional quantum computer, according to Nature News . While the investment shows that the government is se

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Interfacial chemistry improves rechargeability of Zn batteries

With strong interest in environmentally benign and efficient resource utilization, green and safe battery systems are in demand, and improving rechargeability is a goal. Since the surface chemistry of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a critical factor governing the cycling life of rechargeable batteries, it is a key research focus.

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Little reason for moral panicking after #MeToo

Yes, you can still give a colleague a regular hug, even after #MeToo. The boundaries are usually a little broader than you might imagine from googling the topic.

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Scientists Print Functional Human "Mini-Livers"

A team of Brazilian researchers have succesfully bioprinted tiny organoids that perform all of the human liver's functions, Brazilian news service Agência FAPESP reports — functions including building proteins, storing vitamins and secreting bile. The researchers had to cultivate and reprogram human stem cells, and then 3D print them in layers to form tissue. While the "mini-livers" perform the f

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Hunting for New Drugs with AI

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03846-0 The pharmaceutical industry is in a drug-discovery slump. How much can AI help?

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From social media to conference social

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03853-1 Molecular biologist Oded Rechavi explains his idea for bringing the Twitter science community together at 'the Woodstock of Biology'.

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What should Peru do to improve its science?

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03844-2 Scientists say the country has many home advantages for good research, but it desperately needs more government interest.

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Wiring Minds

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03849-x Successfully applying AI to biomedicine requires innovators trained in contrasting cultures.

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How the scientific meeting has changed since Nature's founding 150 years ago

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03851-3 Charting the 1869 conference vibe and the challenges faced by today's organizers.

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Rise of Robot Radiologists

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03847-z Deep-learning algorithms are peering into MRIs and x-rays with unmatched vision, but who is to blame when they make a mistake?

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How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medicine

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03845-1

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Ways to make meetings accessible

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03852-2 Four scientists with disabilities or chronic conditions share their conference conundrums and give advice on improving accessibility.

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Can AI Fix Medical Records?

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03848-y Digitized patient charts were supposed to revolutionize medical practice. Artificial intelligence could help unlock their potential.

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The 2020 Events Guide

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03850-4 The essential reference guide to scientific events worldwide.

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Ice sheet melting: Estimates still uncertain, experts warn

Estimates used by climate scientists to predict the rate at which the world's ice sheets will melt are still uncertain despite advancements in technology, new research shows.

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Scientists identify harmful bacteria based on its DNA at a very low cost

Currently, the detection of food poison outbreaks caused by bacteria takes a long time and is expensive, but this does not have to be the case in the future. Researchers from the Department of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen have found a method for the precise identification of bacteria in just a few hours on a mobile-phone-sized device that costs about 200 times less than alternative

8h

Global urban growth typified by suburbs, not skyscrapers

A Yale analysis of 478 cities with populations of more than 1 million people finds that urban growth across the world is predominantly moving outward rather than upward, a trend that is generally considered inefficient and unsustainable.

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Pregnancy hypertension risk increased by traffic-related air pollution

A new report from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) suggests that traffic-related air pollution increases a pregnant woman's risk for dangerous increases in blood pressure, known as hypertension.

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When Schools Try to Tweak Winter Break, Families Fight Back

New York City's families started thinking about the winter holidays early this year, but they weren't exactly jolly about it. In May, just as classrooms were preparing to close for the summer, the city released its proposed K–12 calendar for the 2019–20 school year. The calendar included a tweak to the winter-break schedule that would delay its start by a day—classes would continue through Decemb

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Europe's exoplanet hunter reaches orbit around Earth

Europe's CHEOPS planet-hunting space telescope left Earth on Wednesday and moved into orbit, a day after its lift-off was delayed by a technical rocket glitch during the final countdown.

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Mangroves on the run find a more northern home

The north might no longer be as inhospitable to mangroves as it once was.

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Mangroves on the run find a more northern home

The north might no longer be as inhospitable to mangroves as it once was.

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Weather officials: 24 tornadoes hit South over 2 days

At least two dozen tornadoes hit the Southeast this week in a deadly outbreak of severe weather, assessments by the National Weather Service show.

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The Madrid climate conference's real failure was not getting a broad deal on global carbon markets

Press accounts of the Madrid climate conference that adjourned on Dec. 15 are calling it a failure in the face of inspirational calls from youth activists and others for greater ambition. But based on my 25 years following and analyzing this process together with scholars and government officials from around the world, I believe the reality is more complicated.

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Scientists find way to supercharge protein production

Medicines such as insulin for diabetes and clotting factors for hemophilia are hard to synthesize in the lab. Such drugs are based on therapeutic proteins, so scientists have engineered bacteria into tiny protein-making factories. But even with the help of bacteria or other cells, the process of producing proteins for medical or commercial applications is laborious and costly.

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Fossils of the future to mostly consist of humans, domestic animals

As the number and technology of humans has grown, their impact on the natural world now equals or exceeds those of natural processes, according to scientists.

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Researchers move one step further towards understanding how life evolved

A fundamental problem for biology is explaining how life evolved. How did we get from simple chemical reactions in the prebiotic soup, to animals and plants?

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The role of status-relevant knowledge in relationships

People are more honest when talking about topics involving high-status knowledge. A new study in behavioral economics shows that this is true even if they have a financial incentive to lie. As expertise about increasingly complex technologies becomes more difficult to verify, questions of trust are getting more and more important.

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Synchro swimmers under the microscope

Not only birds, fish and even crowds of people show collective movement patterns, motile bacteria also form currents and vortices when their cell density exceeds a certain size. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg have now been able to show how swarm behaviour affects navigation in the environment.

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Here's how you can be nudged to eat healthier, recycle and make better decisions every day

Every day, you make important choices—about whether to feast on fries or take a brisk walk, whether to spend or save your paycheck, whether to buy the sustainable option or the disposable plastic one.

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Solving a combinatorial quandary

Why do certain proteins in the body bind with some substances, but not with others?

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Scientists find way to supercharge protein production

Medicines such as insulin for diabetes and clotting factors for hemophilia are hard to synthesize in the lab. Such drugs are based on therapeutic proteins, so scientists have engineered bacteria into tiny protein-making factories. But even with the help of bacteria or other cells, the process of producing proteins for medical or commercial applications is laborious and costly.

9h

Researchers move one step further towards understanding how life evolved

A fundamental problem for biology is explaining how life evolved. How did we get from simple chemical reactions in the prebiotic soup, to animals and plants?

9h

Synchro swimmers under the microscope

Not only birds, fish and even crowds of people show collective movement patterns, motile bacteria also form currents and vortices when their cell density exceeds a certain size. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg have now been able to show how swarm behaviour affects navigation in the environment.

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Solving a combinatorial quandary

Why do certain proteins in the body bind with some substances, but not with others?

9h

The Psychedelic Beauty of Destroyed CDs

Photographer Rus Khasanov scorches, bleaches, freezes, and rips apart old discs. His images give dead-end technology new life.

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Mysterious monarch migrations may be triggered by the angle of the Sun

Massive volunteer effort helps scientists analyze migration patterns

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Check Out This Hypnotic Array of Colossal Storms on Jupiter

Trypophobia Even putting its Great Red Spot aside for the moment, Jupiter is a bizarre place covered in gigantic, swirling storms. NASA recently discovered another storm — this one the size of the United States — on the planet's south pole, joining an array of six others that were already swirling around in a beautiful hexagonal pattern, according to an agency press release . Credit: NASA/JPL-Cal

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How gardeners are reclaiming agriculture from industry, one seed at a time

Agriculture has changed significantly in the past century. Bigger machines, bigger farms and bigger budgets allow fewer farmers to produce more food. Changes in science and policy have also resulted in an industry in which power over what we grow and eat is increasingly held by very few.

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How gardeners are reclaiming agriculture from industry, one seed at a time

Agriculture has changed significantly in the past century. Bigger machines, bigger farms and bigger budgets allow fewer farmers to produce more food. Changes in science and policy have also resulted in an industry in which power over what we grow and eat is increasingly held by very few.

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Social sciences researchers develop new tool to assess exposure to childhood violence, trauma

One in five children in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, are either exposed to, or are victims of, violence and trauma, according to a new study from the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

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Fågelarter dör ut mycket snabbare än vi trott

Utdöendet av fågelarter sker fem gånger snabbare än tidigare beräkningar visat. Det har ett forskarlag från Umeå universitet kunnat räkna ut, genom en bättre skattning av hur fort fågelarter dör ut. Medan människan tar en allt större del av jordens resurser i anspråk, dör arter ut i hög takt. Men precis hur fort arter dör ut har varit svårt att bestämma. Det skattas till exempel att 187 av världe

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A more intuitive online banking service would reinforce its use among the over-55s

The very nature of online banking is the cause of the reticence of the over-55s to use it as they do not feel comfortable navigating the 'digital world'. To combat this situation, the experts recommend developing more intuitive applications with appropriate signposting and instructions to help avoid errors.

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Majority of children with allergies needlessly avoid common antibiotics

Eight in 10 children who reported being allergic to common classes of antibiotics used to treat respiratory, skin and intestinal infections were not truly allergic to it, a new study shows.

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New gel boosts cell survival in damaged brain tissue

A novel way to transplant cells using a hydrogel offers new hope for people with brain injuries, Parkinson's disease and stroke patients, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) and Deakin University.

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Ice sheet melting: estimates still uncertain, experts warn

Estimates used by climate scientists to predict the rate at which the world's ice sheets will melt are still uncertain despite advancements in technology, new research shows.

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Climate change is hurting farmers – even seeds are under threat

Climate change is already affecting the amount of food that farmers can produce. For example, crop sowing in the UK was delayed in autumn 2019 and some emerging crops were damaged because of wet weather. Meanwhile in Australia, considerable drought has been immensely damaging.

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Sydney's desalination discharge boosts fish life in time of climate uncertainty

In a time of global climate uncertainty and growing populations, reliance on alternative sources of drinking waters is ever-increasing. New research, led by Southern Cross University, has found an unexpected benefit at the Sydney Desalination Plant: the excess salty water discharge attracts lots of fish.

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New gel boosts cell survival in damaged brain tissue

A novel way to transplant cells using a hydrogel offers new hope for people with brain injuries, Parkinson's disease and stroke patients, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) and Deakin University.

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Climate change is hurting farmers – even seeds are under threat

Climate change is already affecting the amount of food that farmers can produce. For example, crop sowing in the UK was delayed in autumn 2019 and some emerging crops were damaged because of wet weather. Meanwhile in Australia, considerable drought has been immensely damaging.

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An AI Is Completing Beethoven's Unfinished Symphony

Finish Him When Ludwig van Beethoven died in 1827, the famous German composer left behind a few musical fragments of what would have been his 10th symphony. Now, a group of musicologists and computer programmers is developing an artificial intelligence to finish the composition — and in April, a full symphony orchestra will perform it live in Beethoven's birthplace of Bonn, Germany. It's Learning

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Kenyan wildlife policies must extend beyond protected areas

At least 15% of the world's surface is governed by laws to protect its living species, including plants, animals and fungi. But this is not enough. The most recent estimates suggest that an additional 30% of the planet's surface needs further conservation attention. Without this additional protection the world will continue to lose large numbers of species.

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That public playground is good for your kids and your wallet

If you live near a public playground it can be a convenient outdoor destination for short excursions and a life-saving source of pressure relief when the kids are too surly to bear inside the house. But in research, published in the Journal of Urban Landscape and Planning, we found having a playground nearby can also add value to your property.

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What conspiracy theories have in common with fiction – and why it makes them compelling stories

In an era dominated by "fake news" and disinformation, conspiracy theories are coming to play an increasingly influential role in modern politics. During the recent impeachment hearings in the US, for example, former National Security Council official Fiona Hill warned that "fictional narratives" pushed by Russia were undermining American security.

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Kenyan wildlife policies must extend beyond protected areas

At least 15% of the world's surface is governed by laws to protect its living species, including plants, animals and fungi. But this is not enough. The most recent estimates suggest that an additional 30% of the planet's surface needs further conservation attention. Without this additional protection the world will continue to lose large numbers of species.

9h

Travel to shopping and leisure activities causes more air pollution than commuting

Data analysis work conducted at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) reveals that Bristol car travel to shopping and leisure activities contributes more air pollution than through commuting and business travel. It has also found that men contribute more road emissions than women.

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Farmers most trusted part of UK food chain, says new consumer research

armers have been voted the most trusted part of the food production chain according to a new survey of more than 11,000 European consumers including the UK.

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Deprivation strongly linked to hospital admissions

People who live in areas of higher than average deprivation are more likely to be admitted to hospital and to spend longer in hospital, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The difference was particularly pronounced among manual workers and those with lower education level.

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If the world can capture carbon, there's capacity to store it

Humankind will need to harness carbon capture and storage technologies to help keep global warming to 2 degrees C or less. New research shows that there's plenty of room to store captured CO2 — in offshore geologic rock formations.

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Little reason for moral panicking after #MeToo

Men and women generally agree on what constitutes sexual harassment.

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Interfacial chemistry improves rechargeability of Zn batteries

Prof. CUI Guanglei's group from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has proposed new concepts concerning in situ formed and artificial SEIs as a means of fundamentally modulating the electrochemical characteristics of Zn.

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Scientists find way to supercharge protein production

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found a way to increase production of proteins in bacteria up to a thousandfold, a discovery that could aid production of proteins used in the medical, food, agriculture, chemical and other industries.

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Stone throwing chimps appear to like the sound when it hits a tree

A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology and Aix-Marseille University has found evidence that suggests a group of chimpanzees who throw stones at trees appear to do so for the acoustical effect. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with stone throwing and trees and what they learned from th

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A fundamental shortcoming in air pollution models

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a surprising phenomenon in a process by which certain gas molecules produce harmful particles. The impact of this phenomenon is likely to increase in urban areas as pollution decreases. This knowledge can serve to help politicians adopt better measures to combat air pollution and contribute to improve climate models.

9h

Stone throwing chimps appear to like the sound when it hits a tree

A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology and Aix-Marseille University has found evidence that suggests a group of chimpanzees who throw stones at trees appear to do so for the acoustical effect. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with stone throwing and trees and what they learned from th

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Rising rape cases, a broken criminal justice system and the 'digital strip search'

New rape statistics have highlighted what many people already know: the UK's criminal justice system is broken. Rape allegations are at a record high, but the number of cases progressing through from charging to prosecution have significantly dropped.

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Air pollution linked to increased risk of depression and suicide

An analysis of 25 studies suggests there is a link between air pollution and depression and suicide, but it isn't clear yet whether pollution is a direct cause of these

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2019's best camera gear

The cameras, lenses, and accessories that impressed us this past year. (Pop Photo Staff/) In 2019 we saw nearly every camera company bet on mirrorless cameras, but there were plenty of other camera tech advancements that wowed us over the past twelve months. Read on to learn more about the products that blew us away this year. P30 Pro by Huawei A vertically mounted zoom lens lets the P30 pro reac

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Google launches Wildlife Insights to help manage the world's wildlife

Google Inc. has launched a beta version of an online portal called Wildlife Insights—its purpose is to help wildlife managers around the globe manage the wildlife in their part of the planet. The AI-based application lets researchers upload pictures of wildlife captured in their native habitats using camera traps and have them automatically labeled and entered into a global database that anyone ca

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Chemicals produced by soil microbes hold promise as drugs and research tools

Charles Boone first set foot in Japan fresh out of undergrad in 1983 when he lived and worked with a local family on a rice farm in Chiba prefecture, just outside Tokyo. There he fell in love with many things Japanese, not least its cuisine which owes much of its flavors to fermenting microorganisms.

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Research reveals a singular moment: When a bubble breaks free

Understanding how a drop or bubble suspended in a larger mass of fluid divides into multiple pieces is invaluable for engineers designing chemical reactors, engines and ships, as well as for geoscientists studying interactions of oceans and the atmosphere. But the difficult math underlying the phenomenon has forced scientists to rely on idealized systems that lack real-world nuance. Now, researche

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New turtle genus and species that sheds light on the evolution of its modern relatives

Paleontologists in Alabama have announced the discovery of a new genus and species of fossil sea turtle that may fill an important gap in the evolution of sea turtles.

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Research: A way of life in peril as inland lakes and rivers fail to freeze

Melting glaciers and rising sea levels are common examples of the effects of climate change. However, there has been far less research on how a warmer world affects people who need freshwater ice on lakes and rivers. What is known is that ice cover for freshwaters in the Northern Hemisphere has steadily declined for the last 150 years, putting people's cultural and spiritual practices at risk—and

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Google launches Wildlife Insights to help manage the world's wildlife

Google Inc. has launched a beta version of an online portal called Wildlife Insights—its purpose is to help wildlife managers around the globe manage the wildlife in their part of the planet. The AI-based application lets researchers upload pictures of wildlife captured in their native habitats using camera traps and have them automatically labeled and entered into a global database that anyone ca

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Chemicals produced by soil microbes hold promise as drugs and research tools

Charles Boone first set foot in Japan fresh out of undergrad in 1983 when he lived and worked with a local family on a rice farm in Chiba prefecture, just outside Tokyo. There he fell in love with many things Japanese, not least its cuisine which owes much of its flavors to fermenting microorganisms.

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New turtle genus and species that sheds light on the evolution of its modern relatives

Paleontologists in Alabama have announced the discovery of a new genus and species of fossil sea turtle that may fill an important gap in the evolution of sea turtles.

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We Must Stop the Executive Branch from Suppressing Science

A new report shows how Congress can restore trust in essential federal research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Clues of tuberculosis spread between cows and badgers

Tuberculosis in cattle and badgers passes between members of the same species at least twice as often than between cow and badger, a study has found.

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Clues of tuberculosis spread between cows and badgers

Tuberculosis in cattle and badgers passes between members of the same species at least twice as often than between cow and badger, a study has found.

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Ecological fertilizer from wastewater nutrients

Wastewaters contain large amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen, which are valuable nutrients. Aalto University's NPHarvest process enables recovery of these nutrients as clean ammonium sulfate and sludge containing phosphorus and calcium, which can be used as ecological fertilizers. The process produces ecological fertilizer as an end-product and, at the same time, saves energy and natural resources

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Undersea volcanism may explain medieval year of darkness

Starting in 536 A.D., the sky went dark for more than a year. In some parts of Europe and Asia, the sun only shone for about four hours a day, and "accounts say the sun gave no more light than the moon," says Dallas Abbott, who studies paleoclimate and extraterrestrial impacts at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. The mysterious dimming of the sun brought on global cooling, fa

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A skin-like 2-D pixelized full-color quantum dot photodetector

Full-color photodetectors that can convert light to electric signals without sophisticated color filters and interferometric optics have gained considerable attention for widespread applications. However, technical challenges have impeded scientists from combining multispectral semiconductors and improving photon-transfer efficiency to form high-performance optoelectronic devices in practice. In a

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State of the climate over the Three Gorges Region of the Yangtze River in 2018

The publication of the annual climate report in 2018 will help people better understand the climate conditions in the region around the Three Gorges over the Yangtze River.

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Investment in medical and health R&D not keeping up with needs of nation

Total US investment in medical and health research and development (R&D) grew by 6.4% from 2017 to 2018, reaching $194.2 billion. For the third straight year, the growth-rate of medical and health R&D investment outpaced the growth-rate of overall health spending.

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Depression and suicide risk linked to air pollution

People exposed to higher levels of air pollution are more likely to experience depression or die by suicide, finds a new analysis led by UCL, published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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High lipoprotein(a) levels in type 1 diabetes linked to cardiovascular disease

High blood levels of the lipid lipoprotein(a) in people with type 1 diabetes add to the already elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper published in the prestigious journal Diabetes Care. Lipoprotein(a) levels should therefore be measured in patients with type 1 diabetes and form part of the total risk assessment, say t

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Old drug offers new hope for children with devastating disorder

A drug that once helped obese adults lose weight, withdrawn from the market due to heart risks, may be safe and effective for children with a seizure disorder called Dravet syndrome, say researchers from UCSF Benioff Children's treatment centers. The drug fenfluramine was developed for pediatric use and found to decrease the number of seizures by more than half for many Dravet syndrome patients.

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Stand out from the herd: How cows commoonicate through their lives

Research has for the first time shown that cows maintain individual vocalisation throughout their lives. PhD candidate Alexandra Green from the University of Sydney explains why farmers should take note to improve animal welfare and dairy production.

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Veterans with TBI have more than 2X higher risk of suicide

Veterans with a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury are more than twice as likely as those without a TBI to commit suicide, researchers report. Additionally, veterans with a moderate or severe TBI are at a higher risk of dying by suicide with a firearm. Experts call traumatic brain injury (TBI) the "signature injury" of combat veterans returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. As many a

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Cerrado loses an area the size of London every three months

New data from the Brazilian government shows that the loss of vegetation cover in the Cerrado from August 2018 to July 2019 was 648,400 hectares, maintaining the worrying levels of recent years.

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How breastfeeding sparked population growth in ancient cities

Historians down the ages have examined the ebb and flow of populations in ancient societies. But most of these examinations have tended to focus on male dominated events—the wars, the politics and the money. But there is another side to the past that struggles to be heard over the clashing of swords. It is this unreported history that our new research focuses on.

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This Week, Boeing Will Try to Dock Its Space Taxi With the ISS

Ready for Liftoff NASA is sending aerospace giant Boeing's Starliner passenger spacecraft to the International Space Station early Friday morning from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The ship is already sitting atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at Complex 41. The only passenger on Friday will be "Rosie the Astronaut," a flight test dummy that is outfitted with a host of sensors to measure cri

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Vindtunnel afslører: Blæsten var stærk nok til at vælte ulåst sættevogn

Trækforsøg og forsøg i vindtunnel har klargjort, at en vindhastighed på 20 meter i sekundet er tilstrækkelig til at vælte en sættevogn, hvis den ikke er låst.

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It's tough to grow a Christmas tree. Can drones help?

Drones will soon help Christmas tree growers better measure and manage their crop. Researchers will begin work in January on a two-year project in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina to test techniques for monitoring Christmas trees using drones , otherwise known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs. UAVs are a common tool for collecting highly detailed, 3D imagery of landscapes, and they h

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Analysis: Post-9/11 wars may have killed twice as many Americans at home as in battle

An analysis by a Vanderbilt economist whose research focuses on fatality risks finds that the post-9/11 wars may have resulted in more than twice as many indirect deaths back home as were lost in battle. These indirect deaths are due to the diversion of war costs from the U.S. economy and the subsequent impact on the nation's health.

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Geoengineering's Gender Problem Could Put the Planet at Risk

A lack of diversity among scientists may skew how the public perceives the idea of hacking the climate.

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Could a Tragedy Like White Island Happen in the U.S.?

The tragedy at White Island has brought the risk of visiting volcanoes to the headlines. How safe are U.S. volcanoes?

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Submarine cables to offshore wind farms transformed into a seismic network

A fiber optic network in the North Sea was used to record seismicity.

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Animal-assisted interventions positive for people's health but more research is needed

The impact of animal-assisted interventions for both patients and health services could be substantial, but more rigorous research is needed, says Dr. Elena Ratschen and Professor Trevor Sheldon from the University of York.

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Parkes radio telescope observations shed more light on the mode switching phenomenon in PSR J0614+2229

Using Parkes radio telescope in Australia, Chinese astronomers have conducted a multifrequency study of the pulsar PSR J0614+2229 (also known as B0611+22). The new research, presented in a paper published December 9 on arXiv.org, provides insight into the mode switching phenomenon occurring in this pulsar.

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Study shows integrated organic crop and livestock production systems can conform to food safety standards

Experiments involving the integration of cattle into crop rotations in organic food production showed such systems performed well in keeping pathogens out of meat, according to a recently published study.

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What the 19th-century fad for antislavery sugar can teach us about ethical Christmas gifts

With shopping days to Christmas fast running out, how many of us are thinking about the ethics behind what we buy? This can be a difficult area to understand, since data on ethical consumption is very thin on the ground. One indicator, the Ethical Consumer Markets Report 2018, points to good news and bad news in the recent past.

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"Marsquakes" Reveal Red Planet's Hidden Geology

NASA's Mars InSight lander has detected more than 300 quakes and traced some back to their source — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cars Are Secretly Spying on Us

Spy Car Your car is likely capturing hundreds of data points about you and your driving, and secretly sending it to the manufacturer. Hacking into a 2017 Chevrolet for The Washington Post , tech writer Geoffrey Fowler learned that the car had been tracking his location, monitoring activity on the cell phone he had connected, and collecting other data points that it sent straight to General Motors

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Stand out from the herd: How cows communicate through their lives

Farmers might finally be able to answer the question: How now brown cow?

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Nearly half of Finnish pastors have a positive attitude towards euthanasia

One in five pastors would approve of euthanasia as part of Finnish health care, and up to half of pastors have a positive attitude towards it, a new Ph.D. thesis from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

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Stand out from the herd: How cows communicate through their lives

Farmers might finally be able to answer the question: How now brown cow?

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A warm space station welcome for cool new hardware

Astronaut Christina Koch recently gave a warm welcome to a very cool arrival to the International Space Station: a new piece of hardware for the Cold Atom Lab, an experimental physics facility that chills atoms to almost absolute zero, or minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 273 degrees Celsius). That's colder than any known place in the universe.

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Sustainable adhesives of the future won't stick around

For the health of the planet and our own bodies, plastics of the future ideally should not be made of plastics at all but should still be able to function like plastics. One particularly important job that plastics perform every day is to make things adhere to a variety of surfaces—like the way sticky parts work on Post-it notes, Scotch tape, or even Band-Aids. At Boston University, Mark Grinstaff

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Rotating cattle and crops can be OK for food safety

Rotating organic crops and cattle on the same land can avoid significant food safety risks, research finds. The study involved three experimental organic farming systems on which crops rotated with cattle. Researchers found no traces of common strains of E. coli or salmonella on the meat produced in the experiments, and pathogens detected in feed, fecal, and hide samples remained below thresholds

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Europe powers up for third and fourth Orion spacecraft

Europe will power the NASA spacecraft that take astronauts to a new international outpost and forward to the moon, following decisions made by ESA Member States at Space19+ in Seville, Spain.

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Mammals still deal with what ancient humans did

Events from 20,000 years ago or more still have an effect on the diversity and distribution of mammals around the world, research finds. "Our study shows that mammal biodiversity in the tropics and subtropics today is still being shaped by ancient human events and climate changes," says lead author John Rowan of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "In some cases, we found that ancient climat

10h

Why some planets eat their own skies

For many years, for all we knew, our solar system was alone in the universe. Then better telescopes began to reveal a treasure trove of planets circling distant stars.

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Taking an X-ray of an atomic bond

Understanding the behavior of materials at their interfaces—where they connect to and interact with other materials—is central to engineering a variety of devices used to process, store and transfer information. Devices such as transistors, magnetic memory and lasers could all improve as researchers delve into the nature of these bonds, which affect the materials' properties of conductivity and ma

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Thousand-author papers, lab outbreaks and a prisoner exchange

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03837-1 The latest science news, in brief.

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Sometimes you end up where you are

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03820-w A trip back home for Christmas.

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Proof of a decades-old theory hides in the thinnest of materials

By layering two-dimensional (2-D) materials, scientists as The University of Manchester and Cornell University have confirmed electrochemical phenomena based on theory established in the 1950s.

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Bite marks in fossils reveal demise of our early relatives

New fossil data show that our fishy ancestors may have risen to dominance by becoming predators of their ancient jawless cousins.

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Methane leak visible from space

Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite revealed that an explosion in a natural gas well in Ohio in February 2018 released more than 50 000 tons of methane into the atmosphere. The blowout leaked more of this potent greenhouse gas in 20 days than the majority of many European nations do in a year from their oil and gas industries.

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Short story collection to entangle readers in the quantum world

Are you ready to get entangled in the science of the very small? That's the thread running through a new anthology, Quantum Shorts: Collected Flash Fiction Inspired by Quantum Physics.

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Two-year Ellipsys data featured at annual Controversies in Dialysis Access (CiDA) Meeting

A landmark two-year follow-up study on the Ellipsys® Vascular Access System was highlighted at the annual Controversies in Dialysis Access (CiDA) meeting, one of the premier dialysis access medical conferences in the world.

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Rates of depression and substance use higher for pregnant teens, study finds

Researchers from Lawson Health Research Institute and Brescia University College in London, Ontario, Canada found that teenage pregnant women are more likely to live in poverty, have poorer mental health and have higher rates of substance use.

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Paper-based test could diagnose Lyme disease at early stages

After a day hiking in the forest, the last thing a person wants to discover is a tick burrowing into their skin. Days after plucking off the bloodsucking insect, the hiker might develop a rash resembling a bull's-eye, a tell-tale sign of Lyme disease. Yet not everybody who contracts Lyme disease gets the rash. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have devised a blood test that quickly and sensit

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Australian desalination plant attracts fish

With growing populations and climate uncertainty, water security is a global concern. Many nations operate desalination plants, which remove salt from seawater to make it drinkable. These facilities typically discharge excess salt as hypersaline brine back into the ocean, with uncertain ecological effects. Now, researchers in Environmental Science & Technology report that a large desalination plan

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Seruminstituttets direktør fritaget for tjeneste: Følsomme persondata kan være sendt til USA

Sundheds- og ældreministeriets DPO har fundet uregelmæssigheder i overførsel af persondata til udlandet fra Statens Serum Institut. Direktøren er nu fritaget fra tjeneste, mens Kammeradvokaten undersøger sagen.

10h

More body fat may hamper thinking as you age

Having less muscle and more body fat may affect how flexible our thinking gets as we become older, according to a new study. Researchers also found that changes in parts of the immune system could be responsible for the effect. These findings could lead to new treatments that help maintain mental flexibility in aging adults with obesity, sedentary lifestyles, or muscle loss that naturally happens

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Kasserede lithium-ion-batterier udgør brandfare: »Det kan hurtigt blive ret voldsomt«

PLUS. Stigende mængder af lithium-ion-batterier afleveret til genanvendelse udgør en voksende brandfare, og i Danmark er Stena Recycling blandt dem, der har mærket problemet. De har oplevet flere små brande forårsaget af selvantændte lithium-ion-batterier på deres sorteringsanlæg.

10h

Want a Tax Credit for Buying an Electric Vehicle? Move Fast

Congress declines to extend the EV credit program beyond January 1—meaning Tesla buyers won't be eligible for credits for the first time since 2009.

11h

The Story of How Humans Came to the Americas Is Constantly Evolving

Surprising new clues point to the arrival taking place thousands of years earlier than previously believed

11h

Image of the Day: Hair Strength

Thin strands tend to be stronger than thick ones.

11h

Paper-based test could diagnose Lyme disease at early stages

After a day hiking in the forest, the last thing a person wants to discover is a tick burrowing into their skin. Days after plucking off the bloodsucking insect, the hiker might develop a rash resembling a bull's-eye, a tell-tale sign of Lyme disease. Yet not everybody who contracts Lyme disease gets the rash. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have devised a blood test that quickly and sensit

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SSI-direktør fritaget for tjeneste

Sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke vil have undersøgt Statens Serum Instituts administration af patentaftaler, og har i den forbindelse fritaget adm. direktør Mads Melbye for tjeneste

11h

The 14 Best Music Moments of 2019

Like our list of the best albums of this year , The Atlantic 's roundup of 2019's notable songs results from some combination of our writers' personal obsessions and a sense of what mattered in popular culture. We've taken a yearbook-superlatives approach to describe what sounds will come to mind when we think back on these 12 months. Best Bad Single: Taylor Swift, "You Need to Calm Down" This so

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Vanligt med juverinflammationer hos mjölkkor i Rwanda

Både antalet kor och deras mjölkproduktion ökar i Rwanda idag. Merparten av mjölken i Rwanda produceras av småbönder med enstaka kor. Bristande hygien, dålig juverhälsa och penicillinresistenta bakterier är stora problem. Till stor del beror ökningen på åtgärder inom nationella program som bygger på mjölkens stora betydelse för de små barnens näringsstatus och deras tillväxt och kognitiva utveckl

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Recent screening rose among people under 50 after release of new colorectal guidelines

Recent colorectal cancer screening rates more than doubled among people ages 45 to 49 in the months after the release of updated American Cancer Society guidelines recommending screening in that age group.

11h

A Tale of Three Nobels

It's unfortunate that some of the most exciting frontiers in modern astrophysics were initially ridiculed as a waste of time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Decision Against Spelling to Communicate – A Small Victory for Science

Spelling to Communicate is just another form a facilitated communication, an invalid technique that was disproved decades ago but refuses to die.

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History's Largest Mining Operation Is About to Begin

U nless you are given to chronic anxiety or suffer from nihilistic despair, you probably haven't spent much time contemplating the bottom of the ocean. Many people imagine the seabed to be a vast expanse of sand, but it's a jagged and dynamic landscape with as much variation as any place onshore. Mountains surge from underwater plains, canyons slice miles deep, hot springs billow through fissures

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Embattled cancer researcher loses legal bid to be reinstated as department chair at OSU

Carlo Croce, a cancer researcher at The Ohio State University who has waged legal battles against those he feels have wronged him, has lost another of those fights. A judge in Franklin County, Ohio, ruled against Croce in a case he brought against OSU to stop them from removing him as chair of his department. … Continue reading

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Meet Cliff Stoll, the Mad Scientist Who Invented the Art of Hunting Hackers

Thirty years ago, Cliff Stoll published The Cuckoo's Egg, a book about his cat-and-mouse game with a KGB-sponsored hacker. Today, the internet is a far darker place—and Stoll has become a cybersecurity icon.

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20 Last-Minute Christmas Gift Ideas (2019): Kindles, Coffee Machines, and More

If you've just woken up from a months-long coma, here are some gifts you can grab real quick.

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Traveling for the Holidays? Here's How to Not Get Sick

Airplanes may seem like the perfect place to catch a cold or flu, but the real threat isn't in the sky. It's on the ground.

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Worried About 5G's Health Effects? Don't Be

There's little reason to think 5G frequencies are any more harmful than other types of electromagnetic radiation, like visible light.

12h

Miljögifter i mammans blod påverkar bebisens vikt

Perfluorerade ämnen, PFAS, är miljögifter som lagras i kroppen hos människor och djur. De används bland annat i brandskum, impregneringsmedel och snabbmatförpackningar. PFAS-ämnena har kopplats till flera hälsorisker varav en är låg födelsevikt. Nu visar en ny studie starkare samband mellan PFAS och låg födelsevikt än vad som konstaterats tidigare. − Vi ser med oro på de här resultaten. De 1.500 g

12h

A Tale of Three Nobels

It's unfortunate that some of the most exciting frontiers in modern astrophysics were initially ridiculed as a waste of time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Atomrörelser tycks ligga bakom hur proteiner får sin 3d-struktur

Stora proteinmolekyler veckar ihop sig till en tredimensionell struktur. Men hur det går till är okänt. Nu har forskare gjort röntgenstudier med terahertz-strålning som visar att vågrörelser i atomer verkar bestämma vilken struktur som är möjlig i proteiner. Proteiner är som små maskiner i den mänskliga kroppen. Med många funktioner. Till skillnad från våra vardagliga maskiner, som konstrueras me

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Sällsynta djur och växter organiserar sig i getton för att överleva

I likhet med hur vi människor organiserar oss i städer har djur- och växtsamhällen getton eller etniska områden, där sällsynta arter förbättrar sin överlevnad mot mer konkurrenskraftiga arter. Ett ekologiskt mönster som överraskar forskarna bakom en internationell studie om biologisk mångfald i konkurrensutsatta miljöer. – Denna organisation i form av getton skulle kunna ligga till grund för säll

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We need a science of the night

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03836-2 Understanding what happens in cities after sunset is crucial to global sustainable development, argues Michele Acuto.

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Silkeborg opdager lungekræft før alle andre: Lokal lægepraksis undrer sig over manglende interesse

Silkeborg finder igen i år dobbelt så mange lungekræftpatienter i tidlige stadier sammenlignet med resten af landet. Ingen kan svare præcis på, hvorfor Silkeborg er så gode, og det vækker kritik fra praksislæge og Kræftens Bekæmpelse.

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European exoplanet mission will scrutinize known worlds

The Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite will resolve debates over exoplanet sizes

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Researchers create functional mini-liver by 3-D bioprinting

Using human blood cells, Brazilian researchers have obtained hepatic organoids ("mini-livers") that perform all of the liver's typical functions, such as producing vital proteins, storing vitamins and secreting bile, among many others. The innovation permits the production of hepatic tissue in the laboratory in only 90 days and may in the future become an alternative to organ transplantation. The

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Genomic insights: How female butterflies alter investment in attractiveness vs. fecundity

Have you ever wondered why and how butterflies exhibit such beautiful and diverse colors? Scientists have, particularly butterflies in the genus Colias. In most Colias butterflies, all males and most females are an orange or yellow color, but some females are white. These white forms, called Alba, are commonly found in every generation, making up 5 percent to 30 percent of females. This is unexpec

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Switching to Renewables Can Hurt Vulnerable Groups–Unless Utilities Plan Ahead

Charging more for electricity during peak hours could strain finances and negatively affect health for some disadvantaged populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers create functional mini-liver by 3-D bioprinting

Using human blood cells, Brazilian researchers have obtained hepatic organoids ("mini-livers") that perform all of the liver's typical functions, such as producing vital proteins, storing vitamins and secreting bile, among many others. The innovation permits the production of hepatic tissue in the laboratory in only 90 days and may in the future become an alternative to organ transplantation. The

12h

Submarine cables: billions of potential seismic sensors

Scientists have for the first time shown that it is possible to detect the propagation of seismic waves on the seafloor using submarine telecommunications cables. According to their observations, this existing infrastructure could be used to detect earthquakes, as well as swell and underwater noise. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications on December 18, 2019, by researchers

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Genomic insights: How female butterflies alter investment in attractiveness vs. fecundity

Have you ever wondered why and how butterflies exhibit such beautiful and diverse colors? Scientists have, particularly butterflies in the genus Colias. In most Colias butterflies, all males and most females are an orange or yellow color, but some females are white. These white forms, called Alba, are commonly found in every generation, making up 5 percent to 30 percent of females. This is unexpec

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Switching to Renewables Can Hurt Vulnerable Groups–Unless Utilities Plan Ahead

Charging more for electricity during peak hours could strain finances and negatively affect health for some disadvantaged populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cheops satellite lifts off to study planets beyond solar system

Successful launch from French Guiana of European project comes day late after glitch Europe's Cheops planet-hunting satellite has left Earth a day after its lift-off was delayed by a technical rocket glitch during the final countdown. A 30cm telescope aboard has been designed to measure the density, composition and size of numerous exoplanets, which orbit stars beyond our solar system. Continue r

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Danskernes foretrukne bredbåndsforbindelse: Kabel-tv overhaler kobber

PLUS. Kabel-tv-nettet er for første gang den bredbåndsinfrastruktur, som flest danskere får fastnet-bredbånd over, mens bredbånd via fiber fortsat vokser mest.

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$5bn fund unveiled for climate-friendly shipping

Ship owners announce plans for a $5bn fund to design zero-emissions vessels.

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When Is a Protest Too Late?

When Narendra Modi was reelected prime minister of India in a landslide victory in May, some wondered what he might do with his new mandate. Half a year later, the answer is: a lot. He has continued his quest of enhancing Hindu nationalism —including backing the construction of a Hindu temple on a contested holy site where a mosque once stood before it was destroyed by right-wing mobs. He revoked

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A Stunning Vote Reversal in a Controversial First Amendment Case

Updated at 10:10 a.m. ET on Wednesday, December 18, 2019. "In America, political uprisings, from peaceful picketing to lawless riots, have marked our history from the beginning—indeed, from before the beginning," wrote Judge Don R. Willett of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in a remarkable opinion issued Monday. "The Sons of Liberty were dumping tea into Boston Harbor almost two centuries befo

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Can an AI Fact-Checker Solve India's Fake News Problem?

With more than half a billion Indians online, the Indian government and social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp now struggle to contain the misinformation and disinformation epidemics. MetaFact, a local startup, says it has found solutions in a type of artificial intelligence.

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Endelig rapport om Storebæltsulykke: Sættevognen var ikke låst ordentligt fast

Otte personer mistede livet, og 16 blev kvæstet – heraf fire alvorligt – da et lyntog fra DSB 2. januar blev ramt af en trailer fra et godstog.

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The scientific events that shaped the decade

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03857-x The 2010s have seen breakthroughs in frontiers from gene editing to gravitational waves. The coming one must focus on climate change.

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The tech effect on mental health: Are we getting it wrong?

Fringe groups are fusing together via social media. The result? People with world views that are founded on a myriad of conspiracy beliefs. In Jesse Walker's The United States of Paranoia he classifies four different types of paranoid thinking that have occurred throughout America's history: Enemies outside, enemies within, enemies above, and enemies below. We need to be picky about our sources o

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Årets top 10: De mest læste artikler om almen praksis

Personnære artikler med praksislæger, der siger stop eller rykker videre, præger listen over de mest læste artikler om almen praksis i 2019.

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Preparing for extreme sea levels depends on location, time, UCF study finds

Using historical data from tide gauges that line US coasts, University of Central Florida researchers created an extreme sea level indicator that identifies how much of a role different major weather and ocean forces have played in affecting extreme sea levels in coastal areas around the country.

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Submarine cables: billions of potential seismic sensors!

Scientists have for the first time shown that it is possible to detect the propagation of seismic waves on the seafloor using submarine telecommunications cables. According to their observations, this existing infrastructure could be used to detect earthquakes, as well as swell and underwater noise.

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When cells cycle fast, cancer gets a jumpstart

Yale researchers have now identified another bit of cellular chicanery that jumpstarts cancer. In at least one form of blood cancer, they report Dec. 18 in the journal Nature Communications, cells with cancer-causing gene lesions can remain normal and healthy — until cell division, or cycling, speeds up.

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Pattern of heavy alcohol drinking may damage heart tissue

A pattern of heavy/harmful alcohol drinking increases levels of blood biomarkers that indicate heart tissue damage. Compared to no drinking or light drinking, a pattern of heavy/harmful alcohol drinking can damage the structure and function of the heart before symptoms occur. Public health researchers and health care providers need to consider the cardio-toxic effects of heavy/harmful alcohol cons

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Artificial intelligence identifies previously unknown features associated with cancer recurrence

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developed by the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) in Japan has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors. Further, the AI identified features relevant to cancer prognosis that were not previously noted by pathologists, leading to a higher accur

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Forgetfulness might depend on time of day

Can't remember something? Try waiting until later in the day. Many memory researchers study how new memories are made. The biology of forgetting is more complicated to study because of the difficulties of distinguishing between not knowing and not recalling. UTokyo researchers identified a gene in mice that seems to influence memory recall at different times of day and tracked how it causes mice t

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Automated acquisition of explainable knowledge from unannotated histopathology images

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13647-8 Technologies for acquiring explainable features from medical images need further development. Here, the authors report a deep learning based automated acquisition of explainable features from pathology images, and show a higher accuracy of their method as compared to pathologist based diagnosis of prostate c

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MLL-AF9 initiates transformation from fast-proliferating myeloid progenitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13666-5 Not all mutated cells become malignant, suggesting additional requirements for transformation. Here, the authors track blood progenitors from normal to malignancy driven by MLL-AF9, revealing a subset of myeloid progenitors predisposed to transformation dependent on their normal cycling state.

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Distributed sensing of earthquakes and ocean-solid Earth interactions on seafloor telecom cables

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13793-z Existing fibers beneath the world's oceans can in principle be used as seismic sensors, but the full potential of this possibility has yet to be explored. Here, the authors demonstrate the feasibility of distributed acoustic sensing in a coastal fiber as a sensor for earthquakes and wave phenomena.

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CD8+ T cell-mediated endotheliopathy is a targetable mechanism of neuro-inflammation in Susac syndrome

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13593-5 Susac syndrome is an inflammatory pathology of the brain endothelium. Here the authors show that the pathology is driven by CD8 T cells attacking the endothelium, and that blocking T cell-endothelial adhesion ameliorates the disease in a mouse model, and associates with improved clinical score in 4 patients.

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Genetic correlations of psychiatric traits with body composition and glycemic traits are sex- and age-dependent

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13544-0 Psychiatric disorders are often accompanied by alterations in BMI and body composition due to changes in eating behaviour and physical activity. Here, Hübel et al. study the genetic overlap between these traits and find that genetic correlations between psychiatric disorders and body composition are sex-spec

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A short translational ramp determines the efficiency of protein synthesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13810-1 Several factors contribute to the efficiency of protein expression. Here the authors show that the identity of amino acids encoded by codons at position 3–5 significantly impact translation efficiency and protein expression levels.

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Stress sensitization among severely neglected children and protection by social enrichment

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13622-3 Early adversity may sensitize people to the effects of later stress, amplifying psychopathology risk. Here, the authors show this stress sensitization effect for adolescents who experienced prolonged institutional deprivation in childhood, but not those assigned to foster care intervention.

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Human muscle-derived CLEC14A-positive cells regenerate muscle independent of PAX7

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13650-z Skeletal muscle stem cells express the transcription factor Pax7. Here, the authors isolate, from human muscle, cells that are positive for the endothelial marker CLEC14A and show that despite not expressing pax7, these cells regenerate muscle and contribute to the muscle stem cell niche when transplanted in

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Agreement and Precision Analyses of Various Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Formulae in Cancer Patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55833-0

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Ultrastructural modeling of small angle scattering from photosynthetic membranes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55423-0

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A Long Short-Term Memory neural network for the detection of epileptiform spikes and high frequency oscillations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55861-w

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PPIP5K2 and PCSK1 are Candidate Genetic Contributors to Familial Keratoconus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55866-5

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A network pharmacology approach to reveal the protective mechanism of Salvia miltiorrhiza-Dalbergia odorifera coupled-herbs on coronary heart disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56050-5 A network pharmacology approach to reveal the protective mechanism of Salvia miltiorrhiza – Dalbergia odorifera coupled-herbs on coronary heart disease

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Mens Europa gør klar til mere overvågning: Massevis af amerikanske byer forbyder ansigtsgenkendelse

Europæiske politistyrker deler ikke den amerikanke skepsis over for ansigtsgenkendelse, som i skrivende stund forbydes af stadig flere amerikanske byer.

13h

How one city hopes language monitoring can help it defeat hate

Chattanooga, Tennessee, has the state's worst record for racially motivated incidents. Now the city has called in the experts to monitor what is being said—and perhaps turn things around.

13h

Preparing for extreme sea levels depends on location, time, study finds

Sometimes to understand the present, it takes looking to the past. That's the approach University of Central Florida coastal researchers are taking to pinpoint the causes of extreme sea level changes.

14h

ABBA-fans blir väl beresta

ABBA-fans är beredda att resa, ibland långt och ofta, för att ägna sig åt sitt intresse. Men de flesta är så unga att de aldrig sett en live-konsert. Det är några av slutsatserna i en studie från Mittuniversitetet. Forskarna har analyserat svar från 1 300 slumpvis utvalda fans och sammanställningen ger en inblick i ABBA-turismens utbredning och fansens hängivenhet. − För det första kan vi konstat

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The science news events that shaped 2019

Nature, Published online: 18 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03838-0 Climate strikes, marsquakes and gaming AIs are among the year's top stories.

14h

European planet-studying mission launches from South America

A European spacecraft launched from South America Wednesday on a three-year mission to study planets in other solar systems.

14h

Videnskabens Top-5: Bjerge giver livet mangfoldighed

PLUS. Uden bjerge ville Jordens liv rumme meget mindre biodiversitet, forklarer danske forskere, der påpeger det afgørende samspil mellem geologi og biologi. Deres resultater var blandt de nominerede til årets bedste forskningsresultat.

14h

Få högskoleutbildade satsar på eget företag

Sedan mitten av 1990-talet har EU uppmuntrat egenföretagande. Högskoleutbildade och kvinnor är grupper som enligt EUs policyer har särskilt hög potential att starta eget. Men enligt en studie är den utvecklingen osannolik. Skälet är att EU har hämtat sina idéer från USA, vars samhällsstruktur skiljer sig mycket från bland annat Sveriges. EU jobbar för att fler ska starta företag eftersom det ses

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Immune to influence

A University of Konstanz study examining vaccine-related attitudes reveals that our beliefs are so resilient that we effectively immunize ourselves to the opinions of others.

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There's a new way to tame language AI so it doesn't embarrass you

Models can now be steered to generate text based on the topic or sentiment of your choosing.

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Indonesian volcano debris litters seabed after tsunami: study

Huge chunks of an Indonesian volcano litter the seabed after its eruption and subsequent collapse last year sparked a deadly tsunami, according to new research.

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Online hate speech could be contained like a computer virus, say Cambridge researchers

Artificial intelligence is being developed that will allow advisory "quarantining" of hate speech in a manner akin to malware filters – offering users a way to control exposure to "hateful content" without resorting to censorship.

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Europe's exoplanet hunter set for blast-off from Earth

Europe's CHEOPS planet-hunting satellite was set to leave Earth Wednesday a day after its lift-off was delayed by a technical rocket glitch during the final countdown.

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Boeing sends first crew capsule to ISS this week

Boeing is all set to launch its Starliner spacecraft for the first time to the International Space Station at the end of this week, a key mission as NASA looks to resume crewed flight by 2020.

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Search finds possible graves of Tulsa Race Massacre victims

Scientists surveying a cemetery and a homeless camp in Tulsa, Oklahoma, found pits holding possible remains of black residents killed nearly 100 years ago in a race massacre, investigators have revealed.

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Australia has its hottest day on record

Australia this week experienced its hottest day on record and the heatwave is expected to worsen, exacerbating an already unprecedented bushfire season, authorities said Wednesday.

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Star fruit could be the new 'star' of Florida agriculture

It's not just oranges that grow in Florida. Carambola, or star fruit as most in the United States call it, is gaining popularity. One researcher from Florida International University is researching how cover crops can help the sustainability of star fruit farms.

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Ældgammelt "tyggegummi" giver indblik i fortidens mennesker og bakterier

Det er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet for første gang at udtrække et komplet…

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Star fruit could be the new 'star' of Florida agriculture

It's not just oranges that grow in Florida. Carambola, or star fruit as most in the United States call it, is gaining popularity. One researcher from Florida International University is researching how cover crops can help the sustainability of star fruit farms.

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Shifting the balance of growth vs. defense boosts crop yield

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists are figuring out how to pack more kernels onto a corn cob. One way to boost the productivity of a plant, they say, is to redirect some of its resources away from maintaining an overprepared immune system and into enhanced seed production. Now, a team led by CSHL Professor David Jackson has found a gene that could help them tweak that balance.

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'Locally grown' broccoli looks, tastes better to consumers

In blind tests conducted by Cornell University researchers, consumers rated a California broccoli tastier and better-looking than a pair of varieties grown in New York.

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There is no 'I' in team—or is there?

There is no I in Team—as the saying goes. But new research suggests it is important for individuals to feel personal ownership towards a team project in order to be more creative.

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Air quality tests need simplifying to help reduce dangerous emissions

New methods of testing and simulating air quality should be considered in order to help policy makers have a more accurate understanding of how emissions affect air pollution levels, new research suggests.

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Shifting the balance of growth vs. defense boosts crop yield

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists are figuring out how to pack more kernels onto a corn cob. One way to boost the productivity of a plant, they say, is to redirect some of its resources away from maintaining an overprepared immune system and into enhanced seed production. Now, a team led by CSHL Professor David Jackson has found a gene that could help them tweak that balance.

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Nu skjuts Cheops upp i rymden – för att studera nya planeter

I dag klockan 9.54 sköts planetteleskopet Cheops upp från Europas rymdbas Kourou i Franska Guyana i Sydamerika. – Nu går vi ifrån att bara upptäcka planeter till att studera dem i detalj, säger Carina Persson som är astrofysiker vid Chalmers i Göteborg och arbetar med Cheops.

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The Most Incoherent Star Wars Movie Ever Made

In one of the very few moments in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker where the action slows down for a second, the beloved droid C-3PO pauses to appreciate the heroic ensemble. "I'm just taking one last look at my friends," he says. That kind of naked nostalgia is on display for every frantic minute of J. J. Abrams's new film, the ninth and supposedly conclusive entry in the newly dubbed "Skywalker

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How will humanity inevitably deal with abandoning towns and cities to shifting climate?

The world changes. Whether you're talking about melting glaciers, rising sea levels, desertification, or on much larger scale, the shifting of continents and our planet's spin axis…the longer a timeline you look at the greater the changes. So my question is in two parts: In the short-term, how do you see humanity dealing with forced migration b/c of climate change and the abandonment of towns a

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'Women have been woefully neglected': does medical science have a gender problem?

Women's symptoms are ignored and their health problems are under-researched. What's going wrong? When Lynn Enright had a hysteroscopy to examine the inside of the womb, her searing pain was dismissed by medical professionals. She only understood why when she started working on her book on female anatomy, Vagina: A Re-education. She was looking for research on pain and women's health, only to be s

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NASA Just Observed a Totally New Kind of Magnetic Eruption on The Sun

They might be happening more often than we know.

18h

Star fruit could be the new 'star' of Florida agriculture

Cover crops may increase sustainability of carambola groves.

18h

Vaping of marijuana on the rise among teens

Findings from the 2019 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey demonstrate the appeal of vaping to teens, as seen in the increased prevalence of marijuana use as well as nicotine vaping. Results from the 45th annual MTF survey, a nationally representative sample of eighth, 10th and 12th graders in hundreds of US schools, were announced today by the director of NIDA, part of NIH, along with the Universi

18h

Getting a good night's sleep complicated by menopause

The value of a good night's sleep can't be underestimated. Unfortunately, sleep complaints are common during the menopause transition. A new study from Canada compared sleep quality, sleep duration, and sleep disorders between postmenopausal and pre/perimenopausal women and documented increased sleep problems postmenopause. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The

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Marijuana use in e-cigarettes increases among US students 2017-2018

Marijuana use in electronic cigarettes increased among US middle and high school students from 2017 to 2018. This observational study analyzed responses from 38,000 students in the sixth to 12th grades on the National Youth Tobacco Survey.

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Marijuana vaping increases among US teens 2018-2019

Marijuana vaping reported by US adolescents increased from 2018 to 2019. This observational study used annual Monitoring the Future surveys from a nationally representative group of eighth, 10th and 12th graders to examine changes in marijuana vaping among adolescents.

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Even with early treatment, HIV still attacks young brains, says MSU study

The majority of children living with HIV are in sub-Saharan Africa. While early antiretroviral therapy has ensured less deadly outcomes for children living with and exposed to HIV, the virus still may affect the brain, disrupting neurodevelopment. Michael Boivin, director of the Psychiatry Research Program in the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine, has set out to understand exactly how HIV impact

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Children with HIV score below HIV-negative peers in cognitive, motor function tests

Children who acquired HIV in utero or during birth or breastfeeding did not perform as well as their peers who do not have HIV on tests measuring cognitive ability, motor function and attention, according to a report published online today in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The observational study included neuropsychological evaluations of 611 children in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Search for Habitable World Joined by New European Space Telescope

The Cheops orbiter will give a closer examination to stars already known to host exoplanets.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 18. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Glemt koden til din Bitlocker? Måske kan Bitleaker hjælpe

Bitleaker blev præsenteret på Black Hat-konferencen i London. Exploitet gør det muligt at tilgå Windows-kryptering uden kodeord.

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Metroselskabet om Cityringens støj: Entreprenør har skadet skinnerne med »uhensigtsmæssige køretøjer«

PLUS. Hovedentreprenøren Copenhagen Metro Team afviser ansvaret og peger videre til Hitachi Rail STS, som havde kontrollen over tunnelerne i byggeriets sidste år.

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5 tools every entrepreneur should have, all on sale now

These tools can help businesses improve their planning, presentations and online presence. Each of these offers comes with a lifetime subscription. All five deals are currently over 95% off. None Having a great business idea often isn't enough. Sure, a rock solid concept can go a long way toward getting a successful business off the ground. But, without the right approach to developing, nurturing

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5 tools every entrepreneur should have, all on sale now

These tools can help businesses improve their planning, presentations and online presence. Each of these offers comes with a lifetime subscription. All five deals are currently over 95% off. None Having a great business idea often isn't enough. Sure, a rock solid concept can go a long way toward getting a successful business off the ground. But, without the right approach to developing, nurturing

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Suction cups that don't fall off

The aquatic larvae of the net-winged midge have the unique ability to move around at ease on rocks in torrential rivers using super-strong suction organs. Powerful modern imaging techniques have now revealed the structure of these organs in intricate detail, providing an insight into how they work so reliably. The findings, reported in the journal BMC Zoology, may inform the development of better

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New tool reveals DNA structures that influence disease

Disruption of certain DNA structures — called topologically associating domains, or TADs — is linked with the development of disease, including some cancers. With its newly created algorithm that quickly locates and helps elucidate the complex functions of TADs, an international team of researchers is making it easier to study these important structures and help prevent disease.

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Researchers create functional mini-liver by 3D bioprinting

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Malnutrition and obesity now a global problem, say experts

submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

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Depositing olivine on beaches to sequester carbon.

submitted by /u/bolloxtheboar [link] [comments]

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