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nyheder2019december19

Emotion semantics show both cultural variation and universal structure

Many human languages have words for emotions such as "anger" and "fear," yet it is not clear whether these emotions have similar meanings across languages, or why their meanings might vary. We estimate emotion semantics across a sample of 2474 spoken languages using "colexification"—a phenomenon in which languages name semantically related concepts with the same word. Analyses show significant va

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How microbes reflect the health of coral reefs

Microorganisms play important roles in the health and protection of coral reefs, yet exploring these connections can be difficult due to the lack of unspoiled reef systems throughout the global ocean.

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Computerløse borgere rådes til farlige NemID-login på offentlige computere

Offentligt tilgængelige pc'er er næsten umulige at beskytte. Især mod hardware-angreb, lyder det fra sikkerhedskonsulenter.

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Author Correction: A hippocampo-cerebellar centred network for the learning and execution of sequence-based navigation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56345-7

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Author Correction: Superconductor to resistive state switching by multiple fluctuation events in NbTiN nanostrips

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56346-6

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Author Correction: Inferring pathogen-host interactions between Leptospira interrogans and Homo sapiens using network theory

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55326-0

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Rad and random things I found this week

Random, but rad. (Revolution Cooking/) My job is to find cool stuff, so I spend hours each week scouring the web for goods that are useful, innovative, fun, or ridiculously cheap (but still quality). Often times, these choices coalesce into a guide of like items—for example, the best air purifiers , great headphones to rock or run with , or simply pizza makers . But I often stumble across awesome

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Baby dinosaurs found in Australia

Researchers have uncovered the first baby dinosaurs from Australia. The bones were discovered at several sites along the south coast of Victoria and near the outback town of Lightning Ridge in New South Wales. Some of the bones are so tiny, they likely come from animals that had died while they were still in their eggs. Slightly larger bones from Victoria come from animals that had recently hatche

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Find your next favorite podcast

So many podcasts out there, so little time… (Rawpixel via Deposit Photos/) It's a golden age for podcasting, with a plethora of top-quality, ear-catching broadcasts now available on demand from a host of sources and suppliers. Whether you're a science fan or science fiction enthusiast , or need to feed another interest, there surely is a podcast (or two) out there to suit. And you've got a wide

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Moths Flee or Face Bats Depending on Toxicity

Tiger moth species that contain bad tasting and toxic compounds are nonchalant in the presence of bats, while edible moth species evade their predators. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Moths Flee or Face Bats Depending on Toxicity

Tiger moth species that contain bad tasting and toxic compounds are nonchalant in the presence of bats, while edible moth species evade their predators. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Affordable desktop speakers that amp up your sound without taking over your desk

Small, but will do the trick. (Robert Bye via/) When you have the ability to watch movie trailers in 4K on your desktop, you really shouldn't be settling for tinny, basic stereo sound out of the built-in speakers. Adding some desktop speakers will amp up your video viewing and your gaming experience, and they are so easy to set up and install that you really have no excuse. Finding the right desk

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99 (Extra!) AI Predictions For 2020

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How We Are Going to the Moon

submitted by /u/Delicatesseract [link] [comments]

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New algorithm suggests four-level food web for gut microbes

A new computational model suggests that the food web of the human gut microbiome follows a hierarchical structure similar to that of larger-scale ecosystems. Tong Wang of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and colleagues present the model in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Analog cameras for people who want to play with photography

Not every analog camera requires a lesson to operate or $1,000 to buy. ( Chris Lawton via Unsplash/) Sometimes it's nice to take a break from the incessant tweaking and sharing of digital photography. Analog cameras are a charming way to make memories that will exist on a physical plane. Find some affordable, easy-to-navigate analog cameras below. An instant camera that makes everybody look good.

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An atomic view of the trigger for the heartbeat

Tiny pores in heart cells generate electrical signals to initiate each heart beat. Structural studies of these channels provide details on their functions, and also on their malfunction due to different inherited mutations. These include ones behind sudden death in young athletes. Information on the architecture and mechanics of cardiac sodium channels could help develop better diagnostics and med

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Advancing information processing with exceptional points and surfaces

Researchers have for the first time detected an exceptional surface based on measurements of exceptional points. These points are modes that exhibit phenomenon with possible practical applications in information processing.

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New coating hides temperature change from infrared cameras

An ultrathin coating upends a ubiquitous physics phenomenon of materials related to thermal radiation: The hotter an object gets, the brighter it glows. The new coating — engineered from samarium nickel oxide, a unique tunable material — employs a bit of temperature trickery.

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New mechanism in childhood kidney cancer

A problem in reader proteins that identify which gene is up for expression may cause normal cells to turn malignant during development.

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CB radios for hobbyists and adventurers

Stay in touch. (Garrett Parker via Unsplash/) One of the great appeals of listening to the radio on a long drive is knowing that there's someone out there at this very moment, awake and broadcasting. Syndicated radio programs, podcasts, and modern digital technology have unfortunately made that less likely on your AM/FM dial. Citizen Band (or CB) radio is a unique way both to listen in the presen

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Our Acidic Oceans Are Eating Away at Sharks' Skin

I'm Melting As the oceans grow increasingly acidic, they're claiming yet another casualty: sharks. New research shows that the acidic water, a byproduct of human-induced climate change , is damaging and destroying the tiny scales on sharks' skin, according to Newsweek . As a result, the sharks can't swim or hunt as well — and that could potentially wreak havoc on the already-fragile ecosystems in

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NASA maps inner Milky Way, sees cosmic 'candy cane'

A feature resembling a candy cane highlights this colorful composite image of our Milky Way galaxy's central zone. But this is no cosmic confection. It's part of a set of radio-emitting filaments extending 190 light-years.

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Dogs process numerical quantities in similar brain region as humans

The results of a new canine numerosity study suggests that a common neural mechanism has been deeply conserved across mammalian evolution.

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A new way to optimize sleep and light exposure can reduce jet lag and improve alertness

Researchers explain how they have developed and demonstrated a series of algorithms that can analyze biometric information recorded by a smart device and then recommend the best combination of sleep and light to help a person readjust their circadian rhythm.

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Old drug offers new hope for children with devastating disorder

A drug that once helped obese adults lose weight, withdrawn from the market due to heart risks, may be safe and effective for children with a seizure disorder called Dravet syndrome, say researchers. The drug fenfluramine was developed for pediatric use and found to decrease the number of seizures by more than half for many Dravet syndrome patients.

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Animal-assisted interventions positive for people's health

The impact of animal-assisted interventions for both patients and health services could be substantial, but more rigorous research is needed.

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America's largest public library ditches late fees

The Chicago Public Library found that a third of their economically disadvantaged members had been denied borrowing privileges due to overdue books. Overdue fines account for a tiny fraction of library funding, so the ramifications of ending them are more social than financial. Though 92% of U.S. libraries still charge late fees, the number is shrinking. None Whether we're out to quench a thirst

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Invisible Ink "Tattoos" Could Be Used to ID Vaccinated Kids

For the people overseeing nationwide vaccination initiatives in developing countries, keeping track of who had which vaccination and when can be a tough task. But researchers from MIT might have a solution: they've created an ink that can be safely embedded in the skin alongside the vaccine itself, and it's only visible using a special smartphone camera app and filter. In other words, they've fou

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Mimicking enzymes, chemists produce large, useful carbon rings

Drawing inspiration from nature, chemists have discovered an efficient way to wrangle long, snaking molecules to form large rings — rings that form the backbone of many pharmaceuticals but are difficult to produce in the lab.

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Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation

While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, a new coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems.

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Even resilient common species are not immune to environmental crisis

Researchers have found that the effective population size and genetic diversity of Singapore's Cynopterus brachyotis, believed to remain widely unaffected by urbanization, has shrunk significantly over the last 90 years – revealing that the current biodiversity crisis may be much broader than widely assumed, affecting even species thought to be common and tolerant of fragmentation and habitat loss

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What causes cells to age?

A new cell culture study points to a novel role for the DNA damage repair protein CSB in protecting cells from senescence and aging.

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Employers key to addressing lung cancer disparity in rural Kentucky

According to a University of Kentucky study, worksite intervention may be key to connecting men in rural Kentucky with critical lung cancer prevention and control resources and services.

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Antioxidant use during chemotherapy risky for breast cancer patients

Breast cancer patients who take the dietary supplements known as antioxidants, as well as iron, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids, during chemotherapy may be at increased risk of disease recurrence and death, according to new study results appearing in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Social bots tweet dodgy claims about pot, diluting solid science

A USC analysis of tens of thousands of cannabis-related posts on Twitter found that social bots regularly perpetuated bogus health claims on the platform, illustrating how false statements may drown out solid science on social media.

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Congress Approves Raising Age to 21 for E-Cigarette and Tobacco Sales

President Trump is expected to sign it into law as part of the overall spending package. Some advocates warn that more action is needed to reduce teenage vaping of e-cigarettes.

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Mimicking enzymes, chemists produce large, useful carbon rings

Drawing inspiration from nature, chemists have discovered an efficient way to wrangle long, snaking molecules to form large rings — rings that form the backbone of many pharmaceuticals but are difficult to produce in the lab.

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Court Holds Army Corps Responsible for Hurricane Harvey Flood Damage

The decision comes as the federally funded Army Corps of Engineers is under pressure to improve flood protection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Boeing's Starliner spacecraft is launching to space for the first time

Boeing's Starliner will launch to the International Space Station on 20 December. This first flight will carry cargo but the next one is expected to take passengers

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How to turn off work thoughts during your free time | Guy Winch

Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow's tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.

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'Cotton candy' planet mysteries unravel in new Hubble observations

"Super-Puffs" may sound like a new breakfast cereal. But it's actually the nickname for a unique and rare class of young exoplanets that have the density of cotton candy. Nothing like them exists in our solar system.

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Scientists link common immune cell to failure of checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer

For many lung cancer patients, the best treatment options involve checkpoint inhibitors, but the drugs only help a small subset of patients. A new study links the most abundant white blood cell to failure of checkpoint inhibitors.

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New therapeutic strategy for chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer

A Wistar study demonstrated that NAMPT, an enzyme critical for NAD+ biosynthesis, mediates selection of stem-like chemoresistant cells following cisplatin treatment.

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Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar

In a study of rats, University of Illinois scientists found that caffeine limited weight gain and cholesterol production, despite a diet that was high in fat and sugar. Lead author was U. of I. alumna Fatima J. Zapata. Co-authors were nutritional sciences professor Manabu T. Nakamura; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and animal sciences professor Jan E. N

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Hepatitis D: The mystery of the virus' life cycle revealed

A team led by INRS Professor Patrick Labonté has identified the role of a key process in the replication cycle of the hepatitis D virus, an infection that is still very difficult to cure and affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide.

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How can healthcare achieve real technology driven transformation?

Real transformation in healthcare through the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, telecommunications, and other advanced technologies could provide significant improvements in healthcare quality, productivity, and access.

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Forecast to help shellfish growers weather toxicity

The same technology that powers facial recognition and self-driving cars may soon help Maine's shellfish industry protect people from the dangerous effects of harmful algal blooms. A recent paper reports how researchers can use these deep learning algorithms to forecast shellfish toxicity, just like meteorologists forecast the weather.

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When good plants go bad

A study out of the University of Florida offers a comparison between introduced species that attempt to outcompete native plants within an ecosystem and certain native plant species that mimic that behavior to create similar undesirable results. Lyn Gettys explored this phenomenon within aquatic ecosystems to reveal the consequences of excessive aquatic plant growth, regardless of the origin of th

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Forecast to help shellfish growers weather toxicity

The same technology that powers facial recognition and self-driving cars may soon help Maine's shellfish industry protect people from the dangerous effects of harmful algal blooms. A recent paper reports how researchers can use these deep learning algorithms to forecast shellfish toxicity, just like meteorologists forecast the weather.

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When good plants go bad

A study out of the University of Florida offers a comparison between introduced species that attempt to outcompete native plants within an ecosystem and certain native plant species that mimic that behavior to create similar undesirable results. Lyn Gettys explored this phenomenon within aquatic ecosystems to reveal the consequences of excessive aquatic plant growth, regardless of the origin of th

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Scientists find iron 'snow' in Earth's core

The Earth's inner core is hot, under immense pressure and snow-capped, according to new research that could help scientists better understand forces that affect the entire planet.

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Phone Location Tracking Is Way Worse Than We Thought

Constant Surveillance If you own a phone, it's almost certainly tracking your every move and sending the information to a handful of private companies that operate with virtually no regulatory oversight. That's according to a massive investigation by the opinion desk at the New York Times , during which reporters gained access to a tiny slice of one company's massive stores of location data . The

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Conservation's hidden costs take bite out of benefits

Returning croplands to forests is a sustainability gold standard to mitigate climate change impacts and promote conservation. That is, new research shows, unless you're a poor farmer.

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Space-themed presents for anyone who has their head above the clouds

Reach for the stars. (Greg Rakozy via Unsplash/) Space enthusiasts will know that this past summer, NASA celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing on the moon. Space exploration has made monumental leaps since that first lunar stroll: Richard Branson has been pre-selling tickets aboard his space shuttle, Virgin Galactic , to the public, and Elon Musk is striving for a human colony

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Scientists find iron 'snow' in Earth's core

The Earth's inner core is hot, under immense pressure and snow-capped, according to new research that could help scientists better understand forces that affect the entire planet.

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Which is more effective for treating PTSD: Medication, or psychotherapy?

A systematic review and meta-analysis led by Jeffrey Sonis, MD, MPH, of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, finds there is insufficient evidence at present to answer that question.

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When good plants go bad

Conventional wisdom suggests that only introduced species can be considered invasive and that indigenous plant life cannot be classified as such because they belong within their native range. However, it has become increasingly clear that some native plants can grow aggressively, outcompete other native species, and form dense monocultures, resulting in the same problems associated with invasions

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Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation

While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)'s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.

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Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation

While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)'s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.

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Astronomers are struggling to study the stars without ruining Earth

Flying helps astronomers study the universe but has a damaging effect on planet Earth. (Pixabay,/) Astronomers spend much of their time pondering events that played out eons ago in galaxies many light years away. But when that pondering takes place together with colleagues overseas, or when it needs conceptual backup from detailed simulations on energy-gobbling computers, astronomical research ca

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Finally, a Smart Robot That Can Cook and Serve Us Hot Dogs

GrillBot At long last, robots have conquered one of the last bastions of human dominance: the grill. After training an artificial intelligence in a virtual reconstruction of a grill, Boston University engineers built a robot that can successfully cook and serve perfectly acceptable hot dogs to its human masters, Inverse reports . While it sounds like a minor triumph, the process of cooking and pr

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An ancient piece of chewing gum offers surprising insights into the human genome

Researchers recently uncovered a piece of chewed-on birch pitch in an archaeological dig in Denmark. Conducting a genetic analysis of the material left in the birch pitch offered a plethora of insights into the individual who last chewed it. The gum-chewer has been dubbed Lola. She lived 5,700 years ago; and she had dark skin, dark hair, and blue eyes. None Five thousand and seven hundred years a

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Your DNA is not your destiny — or a good predictor of your health

In most cases, your genes have less than five per cent to do with your risk of developing a particular disease, according to new research.

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Improved 3D nanoprinting technique to build nanoskyscrapers

Scientists have improved the 3D nanoprinting process that enables to build precise, self-stacked, tall-and-narrow nanostructures. The team also used this technique to produce transparent nanoelectrodes with high optical transmission and controllable conductivity.

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Novel 3D microscopy technique reveals new phenomena in living cells

Combining image analysis with a three-dimensional microscopy technique allows researchers to quantify new or little-understood cell biology phenomena, according to a new study. The technique is likely to help explain little-understood aspects of the behavior of cell organelles — the functional compartments within a cell.

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Gene drives work faster than non-drive approaches to control problem insects

When controlling mosquitoes that spread malaria, gene drives, which force genetic changes to proliferate in a population, are faster and more efficient than simply releasing mosquitoes that are immune to the parasite, according to a new study.

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Forecast to help shellfish growers weather toxicity

The same technology that powers facial recognition and self-driving cars may soon help Maine's shellfish industry protect people from the dangerous effects of harmful algal blooms. A recent paper reports how researchers can use these deep learning algorithms to forecast shellfish toxicity, just like meteorologists forecast the weather.

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Army releases top 10 list of coolest science, technology advances

This year has had its share of science and technology advances from Army researchers. The U.S. Army CCDC Army Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory, has the mission to discover, innovate and transition science and technology to ensure dominant strategic land power.The lab's chief scientist, Dr. Alexander Kott, picked the top 10 coolest advances from 2019 to showcase how Arm

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Sick Migrant Children Are at the Whims of U.S. Border Guards

Until this week, a 7-year-old Honduran girl had been living at a makeshift refugee camp in Matamoros, Mexico, with an infected opening in her groin known as a fistula—an aperture through which excrement seeped from her colon to the surface of her skin. She was withdrawn, small for her age, and clinging to her mother, Greg Shays, a volunteer pediatrician from California who evaluated her in the ca

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The Next Big Milestone in American Spaceflight

In 2019, American astronauts were supposed to once again leave Earth from home turf. At the beginning of this year, NASA officials felt nearly sure that at least one of the private companies hired to help fly astronauts into space would succeed. American crews regularly fly back and forth to the International Space Station, but they don't get there on American vehicles, nor do they leave from Cap

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Genius Series: The defiant life of Marie Curie

Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! We're paying tribute to the first female Nobel Prize winner, Marie Curie. Select Rush or Super Rush Delivery to get your order before Christmas Day! None Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for somet

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Genomic Imprinting: A Genetic Custody Dispute for Your Brain

During this holiday season, we would do well to reflect on what we've inherited from our parents. You might have your mother's sense of humor but your father's sense of direction. You and your Ma might share the same tastes in music, but you prefer your Pa's tastes for ice cream. Although heavily influenced by […]

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As CFC Emissions Rise, the Ozone Hole Could Stick Around Longer

New pollutants are threatening the closure of the ozone hole.

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Meet YuMi: A Robot Nurse Built to Make the Rounds

As Baby Boomers get older, new tech like robotics, artificial intelligence and automation could help deliver care to more people with fewer resources.

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Some Shark Scales Could Begin to Erode as Oceans Acidify

Tiny scales, called denticles, could snap and wear away faster in oceans made more acidic by climate change.

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100,000 Supernovas Erupted in the Milky Way a Billion Years Ago

The Very Large Telescope in Chile spots signs of a massive ancient explosion at the center of the Milky Way.

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Fibroblasts involved in healing spur tumor growth in cancer

The connective tissue cells known as fibroblasts are vitally important for our recovery from injury. A new Tel Aviv University study finds that fibroblasts also play a devastating role in the development of breast cancer.

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Slanted Toilets Are the Logical Extreme of Hyperproductivity

The toilet, as a technology, has been steadily improving. Indoor plumbing is far superior to chamber pots and outhouses, and automatic-flush sensors beat pulling a grimy handle manually. But a design concept that rapidly attained online notoriety this week brazenly suggested that the way to make toilets better is to make them worse. The concept, called the StandardToilet, has a seat that's set at

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385-million-year-old forest discovered

While sifting through fossil soils in the Catskill region near Cairo, New York, researchers uncovered the extensive root system of 385-million-year-old trees that already appeared to have leaves and wood. The finding is the first piece of evidence that the transition toward forests as we know them today began earlier in the Devonian Period than typically believed.

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Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands

The Camargue area in France has considerably fewer grasshopper, cricket, locust, dragonfly, and amphibian species than 40 years ago. On the other hand, there are more birds and vascular plants, some of them considered as new and highly invasive species.

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Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon

A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey.

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Greenland ice loss is at 'worst-case' levels

Greenland is losing ice mass seven times faster than it did in the 1990s, researchers warn. That pace matches the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end warming scenario—which could expose 400 million people to coastal flooding by 2100, 40 million more than in the mid-range prediction. The alarming update comes from the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise, a project invo

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New 'tooth-on-a-chip' could lead to more personalized dentistry

A so-called "tooth-on-a-chip" could one day enable more personalized dentistry, giving dentists the ability to identify dental filling materials that work better and last longer based on a patient's own teeth and oral microbiome. The miniaturized tooth system is a thin slice of a human molar placed in between transparent rubber slides that are etched with tiny channels, through which fluids flow.

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A surprising new source of attention in the brain

Scientists find a new brain area in control of our attention skills, raising new questions in what has long been considered a settled scientific field.

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Conservation's hidden costs take bite out of benefits

Scientists show that even popular conservation programs can harbor hidden costs, often for vulnerable populations.

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Farmers Could Use Drones to Grow Better Christmas Trees

'Tis the Season Researchers at North Carolina State University are exploring the use of drones to monitor the growth of Christmas trees in the Blue Ridge Mountains. "Instead of going out and measuring individual trees, a person could fly a drone," research associate Justyna Jeziorska said in a statement . That could prove especially handy since the most popular Christmas tree species in the area,

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What is love? It depends which language you speak

Study of 2474 languages suggests emotional concepts vary by culture

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And the biggest scientific breakthrough of 2019 is …

Science chooses the top scientific achievement of the year, plus nine runners-up

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The world's largest 3D-printed boat printed in 3 days

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How Far is Too Far? | The Age of A.I.

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Neuralink And Bci

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Big Companies That Are Getting Rid of "one use Plastic" for Good

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The Plastics Pipeline: A Surge of New Production Is on the Way

submitted by /u/Koalaman21 [link] [comments]

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The majority consider themselves more environmentally friendly than others

Research shows that we tend to overestimate our personal environmental engagement. In a study with participants from Sweden, the United States, England, and India, most participants were convinced that they acted more environmentally friendly than the average person.

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Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not

A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites. Caterpillars of the diamondback moth deploy a specific gut enzyme to render the toxic substances of their host plant harmless. Without the activity of this enzyme, growth, survival and reproduction are impaired. Nevertheless, predatory lacewing larvae feed on pois

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Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation

While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)'s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.

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Advanced imaging tips T cell target recognition on its head

T cells represent a key component of our immune system, and play a critical role in protecting us against harmful pathogens like viruses and bacteria, and cancers. An Australian team of scientists has redefined what we thought we knew about T cell recognition for the past 20 years.

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Why your first battle with flu matters most

Analyzing public health records from Arizona to study how different strains of the flu virus affect people of different ages, researchers found that the first strain we encounter during childhood sets the course of how our immune system responds to exposures later in life.

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Mechanical force as a new way of starting chemical reactions

Researchers have shown mechanical force can start chemical reactions, making them cheaper, more broadly applicable, and more environmentally friendly than conventional methods.

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'Substantially human,' a good starting point for determining boundaries of what's human

Recent and rapid developments in the biosciences continually blur the lines between human beings and other living organisms, while straining the legal definitions of what is or is not human.

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Host sensor AhR commits quorum sensing espionage to fight infection

Through molecular espionage, a particular receptor (known as AhR) allows its host's immune response to stay one step ahead of infection; it achieves this by listening in on the inter-cellular transmissions that bacterial pathogens use to collectively coordinate an invasion.

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Science's 2019 breakthrough of the year: The first image of a black hole

Honoring a feat that was once considered impossible, Science has named the Event Horizon Telescope's image of a supermassive black hole as its 2019 Breakthrough of the Year.

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Words to express emotion vary greatly in their meanings across languages

Almost all humans feel the emotion of love, but does that mean the Turkish word sevgi or the Hungarian word szrelem, which both translate to love in English, convey the same feeling?

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The meaning of emotion: Cultural and biological evolution impact how humans feel feelings

Words for emotions like 'anger' and 'fear' vary in meaning across language families. By comparing colexifications — cases where one word signifies multiple semantically related concepts — of emotion words in 2,474 spoken languages, researchers found variation in emotion conceptualization and evidence of a universal structure in colexification networks.

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Imprint gives chocolate a rainbow shimmer

Researchers have made shimmering rainbow chocolates without any colorings. They created a targeted color effect by imprinting a special structure on the surface of the chocolate. There are traditional methods for coloring chocolate, but the researchers achieved the rainbow effect with what the scientists call structural color. The process is similar to a chameleon , whose skin surface modulates a

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Meet the Drake Passage | The Impossible Row | Episode 5

The Drake Passage – where the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean meet in one of the most notorious and dangerous waterways on the planet. Colin and the team hit their first rough waters, while scientists and meteorologists discuss the dangerous mission. Stream More Episodes of The Impossible Row: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-impossible-row/ About The Impossible Row: The Drake Passage is th

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Everything you thought you knew about winter tires but didn't

Winter tires actually work better when they're packed with snow. (Pirelli/) They're called "winter tires" now, not "snow tires." This is because driving in winter poses a variety of challenges to be met by tires that may or may not involve snow. This is just one of the things drivers need to understand when considering driving during cold weather. Here are some others: Ice isn't slippery. For tra

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Emotional Words Such as "Love" Mean Different Things in Different Languages

An analysis of more than 2,000 languages reveals differences in the way feelings are conceptualized among cultures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Emotional Words Such as "Love" Mean Different Things in Different Languages

An analysis of more than 2,000 languages reveals differences in the way feelings are conceptualized among cultures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why leftover Cheerios stick together

Researchers have developed a way to measure the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid, a phenomenon known as the "Cheerio effect." The effect represents an interesting fluid dynamics phenomenon that happens every morning in millions of cereal bowls. When there are just a few bits of cereal left floating on top of the milk, they tend to cluster together in

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Emotional Words Such as "Love" Mean Different Things in Different Languages

An analysis of more than 2,000 languages reveals differences in the way feelings are conceptualized among cultures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Our favorite science news stories of 2019

A selection of our most popular and well-liked articles

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True meanings of words of emotion get lost in translation, study finds

Analysis finds there may be no universal concepts for some emotions The true meaning of words may be lost in translation, according to research suggesting the way people understand terms such as "anger" or "love" differs between languages. For example, while the concept of "love" is closely linked to "like" and "want" in Indo-European languages, it is strongly linked to "pity" in Austronesian lan

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What does it mean to be human?

Biomedical law experts say changing technology may require a less stringent definition.

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A rather different storm on Jupiter

Juno finds things have changed at the south pole.

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Culture vultures may live longer

Study highlights health benefits of engaging with the arts.

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Body image a serial problem

Even in remote villages, watching TV makes people prefer thinner women.

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Support the environment. Don't mow your lawn

Biodiversity suffers when things are too perfect.

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Understanding why songbirds choose their homes

New research by University of Alberta biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest—and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns.

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Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon

It's a familiar scene to anyone who's watched footage of brown bears catching sockeye salmon in Alaska: They're standing knee-deep in a rushing river, usually near a waterfall, and grabbing passing fish with their paws or jaws.

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Understanding why songbirds choose their homes

New research by University of Alberta biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest—and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns.

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Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time

There's an interesting fluid dynamics phenomenon that happens every morning in millions of cereal bowls. When there are just a few bits of cereal left floating on top of the milk, they tend to cluster together in the middle or around the edges of the bowl, rather than dispersing across the surface.

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Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon

It's a familiar scene to anyone who's watched footage of brown bears catching sockeye salmon in Alaska: They're standing knee-deep in a rushing river, usually near a waterfall, and grabbing passing fish with their paws or jaws.

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Mimicking enzymes, chemists produce large, useful carbon rings

Drawing inspiration from nature, University of Wisconsin-Madison chemists have discovered an efficient way to wrangle long, snaking molecules to form large rings—rings that form the backbone of many pharmaceuticals but are difficult to produce in the lab.

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Gene drives work faster than non-drive approaches to control problem insects

When controlling mosquitoes that spread malaria, gene drives, which force genetic changes to proliferate in a population, are faster and more efficient than simply releasing mosquitoes that are immune to the parasite, according to a new study published December 19th in PLOS Genetics by Anthony James at University of California, Irvine and colleagues.

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Novel 3-D microscopy technique reveals new phenomena in living cells

Combining image analysis with a three-dimensional microscopy technique allows researchers to quantify new or little-understood cell biology phenomena, according to a new study publishing December 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Mathieu Frechin of the Swiss company Nanolive and colleagues. The technique is likely to help explain little-understood aspects of the behavior of cell organe

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Mathematical models provide a snapshot of the human gut microbial community

Microbial communities can be found everywhere—from lakes to the soil on the ground, they are omnipresent yet invisible to the naked eye. Within those environments there exist dynamic communities which fluctuate in response to environmental changes. One such example is the human gut microbiome, which is comprised of microbes that influence the overall landscape of the gut.

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Første glimt af menneskeart og af sort hul: Her er årets største videnskabsfund

Tidsskriftet Science og dets læsere har kåret årets videnskabelige højdepunkter.

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Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time

In a finding that could be useful in designing small aquatic robots, researchers have measured the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid — a phenomenon known as the 'Cheerios effect.'

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Bilingual children are strong, creative storytellers, study shows

Bilingual children use as many words as monolingual children when telling a story, and demonstrate high levels of cognitive flexibility, according to new research.

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Watermelon supplements bring health benefits to obese mice

Eating watermelon in the form of powdered supplements helped adult obese mice avoid some detrimental health effects of an unhealthy diet, according to a new study.

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Understanding why songbirds choose their homes

New research by biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest — and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns.

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Nearby pulsar's gamma-ray 'halo' linked to antimatter puzzle

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a faint but sprawling glow of high-energy light around a nearby pulsar. If visible to the human eye, this gamma-ray 'halo' would appear about 40 times bigger in the sky than a full Moon.

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How microbes reflect the health of coral reefs

Microorganisms play important roles in the health and protection of coral reefs, yet exploring these connections can be difficult due to the lack of unspoiled reef systems throughout the global ocean.

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New aqueous lithium-ion battery improves safety without sacrificing performance

As the lithium-ion batteries that power most phones, laptops, and electric vehicles become increasingly fast-charging and high-performing, they also grow increasingly expensive and flammable. Engineers have now demonstrated how they could — by using aqueous electrolytes instead of the typical organic electrolytes — assemble a substantially safer, cost-efficient battery that still performs well.

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A 'Jackalope' of an ancient spider fossil deemed a hoax, unmasked as a crayfish

A team used fluorescence microscopy to analyze the supposed spider and differentiate what parts of the specimen were fossilized organism, and which parts were potentially doctored.

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Fireballs: mail from space

The analysis of fireball observations in large datasets can be made much quicker with the help of a neat mathematical formula.

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Gene drives work faster than non-drive approaches to control problem insects

When controlling mosquitoes that spread malaria, gene drives, which force genetic changes to proliferate in a population, are faster and more efficient than simply releasing mosquitoes that are immune to the parasite, according to a new study published December 19th in PLOS Genetics by Anthony James at University of California, Irvine and colleagues.

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Novel 3-D microscopy technique reveals new phenomena in living cells

Combining image analysis with a three-dimensional microscopy technique allows researchers to quantify new or little-understood cell biology phenomena, according to a new study publishing December 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Mathieu Frechin of the Swiss company Nanolive and colleagues. The technique is likely to help explain little-understood aspects of the behavior of cell organe

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Mathematical models provide a snapshot of the human gut microbial community

Microbial communities can be found everywhere—from lakes to the soil on the ground, they are omnipresent yet invisible to the naked eye. Within those environments there exist dynamic communities which fluctuate in response to environmental changes. One such example is the human gut microbiome, which is comprised of microbes that influence the overall landscape of the gut.

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How big is your camera bag?

Large and clever technology keeps an eye on the world's reefs.

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The meaning of emotion: Cultural and biological evolution impact how humans feel feelings

Words for emotions like "anger" and "fear" vary in meaning across language families. Researchers have now compared colexifications of emotion words—cases where one word signifies multiple semantically related concepts. By analyzing such words in 2,474 spoken languages, they found variation in emotion conceptualization and evidence of a universal structure in colexification networks.

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Mechanical force as a new way of starting chemical reactions

Researchers have shown mechanical force can start chemical reactions, making them cheaper, more broadly applicable, and more environmentally friendly than conventional methods.

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Improving efficiency, effectiveness of security X-ray technology

The smuggling of contraband, such as explosives and drugs, is a major threat in airport security. These risks have increased in modern times with the uptick in parcel delivery, but security inspection methods have not seen any significant improvements.

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p53 makes a comeback

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VDACs are MOM's ruin

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Macrocycles made easy

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Response to Comment on "Demographic dynamics of the smallest marine vertebrates fuel coral reef ecosystem functioning"

Allgeier and Cline suggest that our model overestimates the contributions of cryptobenthic fishes to coral reef functioning. However, their 20-year model ignores the basic biological limits of population growth. If incorporated, cryptobenthic contributions to consumed fish biomass remain high (20 to 70%). Disturbance cycles and uncertainties surrounding the fate of large fishes on decadal scales

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Seeing is believing

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News at a glance

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Darkness made visible

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Runners-up

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p53 makes a comeback

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VDACs are MOM's ruin

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Macrocycles made easy

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Trees stumped

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Attending to tendons

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Inside the matrix

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Dave versus HAL 9000

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Adaptive mutability of colorectal cancers in response to targeted therapies

The emergence of drug resistance limits the efficacy of targeted therapies in human tumors. The prevalent view is that resistance is a fait accompli: when treatment is initiated, cancers already contain drug-resistant mutant cells. Bacteria exposed to antibiotics transiently increase their mutation rates (adaptive mutability), thus improving the likelihood of survival. We investigated whether hum

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Coherent vortex dynamics in a strongly interacting superfluid on a silicon chip

Quantized vortices are fundamental to the two-dimensional dynamics of superfluids, from quantum turbulence to phase transitions. However, surface effects have prevented direct observations of coherent two-dimensional vortex dynamics in strongly interacting systems. Here, we overcome this challenge by confining a thin film of superfluid helium at microscale on the atomically smooth surface of a si

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Potassium channel dysfunction in human neuronal models of Angelman syndrome

Disruptions in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A ( UBE3A ) gene cause Angelman syndrome (AS). Whereas AS model mice have associated synaptic dysfunction and altered plasticity with abnormal behavior, whether similar or other mechanisms contribute to network hyperactivity and epilepsy susceptibility in AS patients remains unclear. Using human neurons and brain organoids, we demonstrate that UBE3A s

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Intragranular three-dimensional stress tensor fields in plastically deformed polycrystals

The failure of polycrystalline materials used in infrastructure and transportation can be catastrophic. Multiscale modeling, which requires multiscale measurements of internal stress fields, is the key to predicting the deformation and failure of alloys. We determined the three-dimensional intragranular stress tensor fields in plastically deformed bulk steel using a high-energy x-ray microbeam. W

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Dissipation-induced structural instability and chiral dynamics in a quantum gas

Dissipative and unitary processes define the evolution of a many-body system. Their interplay gives rise to dynamical phase transitions and can lead to instabilities. In this study, we observe a nonstationary state of chiral nature in a synthetic many-body system with independently controllable unitary and dissipative couplings. Our experiment is based on a spinor Bose gas interacting with an opt

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Redox reactions of small organic molecules using ball milling and piezoelectric materials

Over the past decade, photoredox catalysis has harnessed light energy to accelerate bond-forming reactions. We postulated that a complementary method for the redox-activation of small organic molecules in response to applied mechanical energy could be developed through the piezoelectric effect. Here, we report that agitation of piezoelectric materials via ball milling reduces aryl diazonium salts

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Intermediate bosonic metallic state in the superconductor-insulator transition

Whether a metallic ground state exists in a two-dimensional system beyond Anderson localization remains an unresolved question. We studied how quantum phase coherence evolves across superconductor–metal–insulator transitions through magnetoconductance quantum oscillations in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films. We tuned the degree of phase coherence by varying the etching time of

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Constructive molecular configurations for surface-defect passivation of perovskite photovoltaics

Surface trap–mediated nonradiative charge recombination is a major limit to achieving high-efficiency metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics. The ionic character of perovskite lattice has enabled molecular defect passivation approaches through interaction between functional groups and defects. However, a lack of in-depth understanding of how the molecular configuration influences the passivation e

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Direct synthesis of adipic acid esters via palladium-catalyzed carbonylation of 1,3-dienes

The direct carbonylation of 1,3-butadiene offers the potential for a more cost-efficient and environmentally benign route to industrially important adipic acid derivatives. However, owing to the complex reaction network of regioisomeric carbonylation and isomerization pathways, a selective practical catalyst for this process has thus far proven elusive. Here, we report the design of a pyridyl-sub

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A class of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors recognize the underside of the antigen-presenting molecule MR1

T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and MHC class I–like molecules. We describe a diverse population of human T cells isolated from peripheral blood and tissues that exhibit autoreactivity to the monomorphic MHC-related protein 1 (MR1). The crystal structure of a TCR–MR1–antigen complex starkly contrasts with all other TCR–MHC and TCR–MHC

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Foldamer-templated catalysis of macrocycle formation

Macrocycles, compounds containing a ring of 12 or more atoms, find use in human medicine, fragrances, and biological ion sensing. The efficient preparation of macrocycles is a fundamental challenge in synthetic organic chemistry because the high entropic cost of large-ring closure allows undesired intermolecular reactions to compete. Here, we present a bioinspired strategy for macrocycle formatio

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VDAC oligomers form mitochondrial pores to release mtDNA fragments and promote lupus-like disease

Mitochondrial stress releases mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, thereby triggering the type I interferon (IFN) response. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, which is required for mtDNA release, has been extensively studied in apoptotic cells, but little is known about its role in live cells. We found that oxidatively stressed mitochondria release short mtDNA fragments via por

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New Products

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Learning to teach

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Host monitoring of quorum sensing during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

Pseudomonas aeruginosa rapidly adapts to altered conditions by quorum sensing (QS), a communication system that it uses to collectively modify its behavior through the production, release, and detection of signaling molecules. QS molecules can also be sensed by hosts, although the respective receptors and signaling pathways are poorly understood. We describe a pattern of regulation in the host by

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The biochemical basis of microRNA targeting efficacy

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act within Argonaute proteins to guide repression of messenger RNA targets. Although various approaches have provided insight into target recognition, the sparsity of miRNA-target affinity measurements has limited understanding and prediction of targeting efficacy. Here, we adapted RNA bind-n-seq to enable measurement of relative binding affinities between Argonaute-miRNA compl

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A genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of protein-coding genes in human blood cells

Blood is the predominant source for molecular analyses in humans, both in clinical and research settings. It is the target for many therapeutic strategies, emphasizing the need for comprehensive molecular maps of the cells constituting human blood. In this study, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of protein-coding genes in sorted blood immune cell populations to characterize the

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Comment on "Demographic dynamics of the smallest marine vertebrates fuel coral reef ecosystem functioning"

Brandl et al . (Reports, 21 June 2019, p. 1189) report that cryptobenthic fishes underpin coral reef ecosystem function by contributing ~60% of "consumed fish" biomass and ~20% of production. These results are artifacts of their simulation. Using their data and model, we show that cryptobenthic species contribute less than 4% to fish production, calling into question the extent to which they cont

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2020 U.S. spending bill restricts some animal research, pushes for lab animal retirement

Monkey, cat, and dog studies scrutinized at several federal agencies

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Habitat care can save rare species from certain doom

Ongoing habitat management could help prevent hurricane-driven extinctions, according to a new study. A rare Florida plant, the pineland croton, weathered the damage from Hurricane Irma better in plots that were under human management than those left alone, the researchers found. The work could have implications for management of rare species in the face of extreme conditions. Pineland croton is

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NCI-MATCH: Promising signal for nivolumab beyond colorectal cancer

The Journal of Clinical Oncology reports results for Arm Z1D of NCI-MATCH, investigating the activity of nivolumab in tumors with DNA mismatch repair deficiencies. Eighteen different cancer types were studied, mostly rare and none colorectal, with DNA repair defects. The results showed a promising signal for nivolumab beyond colorectal cancer. The 36% response rate across a range of cancers compar

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Top ESC stories in the news in 2019

Environmental and lifestyle issues were popular this year, with pick up from both ESC journals and congresses. Here is a list of the top ten ESC stories that generated the most media coverage worldwide.

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Improving efficiency, effectiveness of security X-ray technology

The smuggling of contraband is a threat in airport security and risks have increased in modern times with the uptick in parcel delivery, but security inspection methods have not seen any significant improvements. In AIP Advances, researchers propose a technique for efficient detection of contraband items. Typically, airport security uses X-ray imaging to quickly scan baggage, but this suffers limi

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Diving Into Pop Music's Hidden Depths

Like many other chaotic phenomena, one of the wildest nights in pop-music history can be traced back to the consumption of too much Hennessy. As an army of producers, journalists, and artists prepared for the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards, many of them noticed something off about Kanye West: The rapper, several people told Billboard , had arrived with a rapidly dwindling bottle of the oaky cognac.

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16 stunning photos of scientific phenomena in action

The Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition champions images that depict scientific phenomena, as captured by scientists themselves. Out of hundreds of entries, judges narrowed it down to a single winner in each of five categories along with a few runner ups. This gallery rounds them all up for a truly stunning experience.

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Trump's been impeached — here's what Harvard scholars believe will happen next

The House vote means the Senate will hold a trial to determine whether President Donald Trump is guilty of either or both of the two articles of impeachment. One article of impeachment alleges the president abused his power for personal political gain, the other alleges he obstructed Congress. The Senate is widely expected to acquit the president. None After being accused of abusing his power and

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Do you see the 'candy cane' in the Milky Way?

Deep in our Milky Way galaxy's center, what looks like a cosmic candy cane appears in a new composite image from a NASA camera. The image—which a NASA-designed and built instrument called the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer, or GISMO, captured—shows the inner part of our galaxy, which hosts the largest, densest collection of giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way. These vast,

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Scientists discover how proteins form crystals that tile a microbe's shell

Many microbes wear beautifully patterned crystalline shells, which protect them from a harsh world and can even help them reel in food. Now scientists have zoomed in on the very first step in microbial shell-building: nucleation, where squiggly proteins crystallize into sturdy building blocks. What they found helps explain how the shells assemble themselves so quickly.

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Understanding why songbirds choose their homes

New research by University of Alberta biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest — and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns.

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New study identifies last known occurrence of Homo erectus

Scientists have identified the last known occurrence of Homo erectus–in Central Java, Indonesia between 117,000 and 108,000 years ago. An ancient ancestor of modern humans that lived in the Pleistocene era, Homo erectus first appeared approximately 2 million years ago.

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Watermelon supplements bring health benefits to obese mice

Eating watermelon in the form of powdered supplements helped adult obese mice avoid some detrimental health effects of an unhealthy diet, according to a new Oregon State University study.

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Model beats Wall Street analysts in forecasting business financials

In a paper published this week in the Proceedings of ACM Sigmetrics Conference, MIT researchers describe a model for forecasting financials that uses only anonymized weekly credit card transactions and three-month earning reports. Tasked with predicting quarterly earnings of more than 30 companies, the model outperformed the combined estimates of expert Wall Street analysts on 57 percent of predic

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A new role for a triple-negative breast cancer target

A team led by Rumela Chakrabarti of the University of Pennsylvania has made new discoveries into how a key protein involved in triple-negative breast cancer functions in puberty.

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Dangerous bone marrow, organ transplant complication explained

Scientists have discovered the molecular mechanism behind how the common cytomegalovirus can wreak havoc on bone marrow and organ transplant patients, according to a paper published in the journal Cell & Host Microbe. The finding could help researchers develop better drugs to prevent related transplant complications.

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Penn researchers predict 10-year breast cancer recurrence with MRI scans

According to a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and radiomics could help to characterize the heterogeneity of cancer cells within a tumor and allow for a better understanding of the causes and progression of a person's individual disease.

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Your DNA is not your destiny — or a good predictor of your health

In most cases, your genes have less than five per cent to do with your risk of developing a particular disease, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.

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Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon

A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey.

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Bilingual children are strong, creative storytellers, study shows

Bilingual children use as many words as monolingual children when telling a story, and demonstrate high levels of cognitive flexibility, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.

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Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time

In a finding that could be useful in designing small aquatic robots, researchers have measured the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid — a phenomenon known as the 'Cheerios effect.'

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This Robotic Bug Was Designed to Survive Swatting

Strong Bug As if nature wasn't already full of pests, a team of engineers just built their own — and the little bug can take a beating. The DEAnsect is a soft robot modeled after an insect, and it's the work of engineers from Switzerland's École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and France's University of Cergy-Pontoise. After they built the bot, the engineers stomped on it, smooshed it w

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Ketamine-like drug for depression gets UK licence

Psychiatrists divided on 'game-changing' esketamine due to potential for addiction A radical ketamine-like drug has been licensed for use in the UK for severe depression, a decision that offers hope to the millions of patients for whom conventional treatments have failed. Esketamine, taken as a nasal spray, is one of the first rapid-acting drugs for depression and the first in decades that is tho

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This AI researcher is trying to ward off a reproducibility crisis

Nature, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03895-5 Joelle Pineau is leading an effort to encourage artificial-intelligence researchers to open up their code.

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The 15 Best TV Moments of 2019

As the era of too much TV lumbers on, the mystery of how to conceptualize television as a format remains. When people praise a show, are they talking about its entire run? A season? An episode? Thinking back on this year, The Atlantic 's staff gravitated toward calling out specific moments—scenes, subplots, and split seconds—that they enjoyed. So that's what they wrote up. MTV Are You the One? :

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Fermi mission links nearby pulsar's gamma-ray 'halo' to antimatter puzzle

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a faint but sprawling glow of high-energy light around a nearby pulsar. If visible to the human eye, this gamma-ray "halo" would appear about 40 times bigger in the sky than a full Moon. This structure may provide the solution to a long-standing mystery about the amount of antimatter in our neighborhood.

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A 1.7-Million-Year-Old Rhino Tooth Revises Their Family Tree

#39 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Tunge forsøg med bambusstænger

PLUS. Et omfattende studie har fastslået fordelene ved at bruge fleksible bambusstænger til at transportere tunge ting på skulderen. Måske kan denne viden udnyttes i smartere rygsække.

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Form of severe malnutrition linked to DNA modification

Researchers identified significant differences at the epigenetic level — the chemical tags in DNA that help regulate gene expression — between two clinically distinct forms of acute childhood malnutrition known as edematous severe acute malnutrition (ESAM) and non-edematous SAM (NESAM).

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NASA's Fermi Mission links nearby pulsar's gamma-ray 'halo' to antimatter puzzle

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a faint but sprawling glow of high-energy light around a nearby pulsar. If visible to the human eye, this gamma-ray 'halo' would appear about 40 times bigger in the sky than a full Moon.

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New algorithm could mean more efficient, accurate equipment for Army

Researchers working on an Army-funded project have developed an algorithm to simulate how electromagnetic waves interact with materials in devices to create equipment more efficiently and accurately. The algorithm could be used in a wide range of fields — from biology and astronomy to military applications and telecommunications.

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Addressing committed emissions in both US and China requires carbon capture and storage

While the energy systems of the two highest-emitting countries differ, each needs to develop CCS to address their committed emissions, which threaten global climate targets.

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NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model

An experimental Zika vaccine lowered levels of virus in pregnant monkeys and improved fetal outcomes in a rhesus macaque model of congenital Zika virus infection, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine. Scientists developed the experimental vaccine and currently are evaluating it in a Phase 2 human clinical trial. The vaccine uses a small circular piece of DNA, or plasmid, cont

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How genetics and social games drive evolution of mating systems in mammals

Traditional explanations for why some animals are monogamous and others are promiscuous or polygamous have focused on how the distribution and defensibility of resources (such as food, nest sites, or mates) determine whether, for example, one male can attract and defend multiple females.

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Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees

The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. Acorns shed by oak trees, for example, are an important source of food for wildlife, while crop trees such as citrus and pistachio nuts contribute to both human nutrition and the economy. Both oaks and citrus trees show synchronization of seed production,

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How genetics and social games drive evolution of mating systems in mammals

Traditional explanations for why some animals are monogamous and others are promiscuous or polygamous have focused on how the distribution and defensibility of resources (such as food, nest sites, or mates) determine whether, for example, one male can attract and defend multiple females.

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How microbes reflect the health of coral reefs

Microorganisms play important roles in the health and protection of coral reefs, yet exploring these connections can be difficult due to the lack of unspoiled reef systems throughout the global ocean. A collaborative study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Centro de Investigaciones Marinas—Universidad de La Habana (CIM-UH) compared seawater from 25 reefs

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Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees

The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. Acorns shed by oak trees, for example, are an important source of food for wildlife, while crop trees such as citrus and pistachio nuts contribute to both human nutrition and the economy. Both oaks and citrus trees show synchronization of seed production,

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Changing Seas Bring 'Turtle Stranding Season' to Cape Cod

As the ocean warms, an increasing number of turtles are heading farther north and getting stranded once the temperatures fall.

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How genetics and social games drive evolution of mating systems in mammals

Traditional explanations for why some animals are monogamous and others are promiscuous or polygamous have focused on how the distribution and defensibility of resources (such as food, nest sites, or mates) determine whether, for example, one male can attract and defend multiple females. A new model focuses instead on social interactions driven by genetically determined behaviors, and how competit

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Many pregnant women with HIV prescribed treatment that does not meet federal guidelines

More than 20% of pregnant women beginning anti-HIV treatment were prescribed an antiretroviral treatment that did not meet federal guidelines for use during pregnancy, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Half of America May Be Obese by 2030. Here's Why That Matters for Society.

After mapping out the last two decades of public health records, a team of scientists made a grim prediction : half of the adults in America will be obese by 2030, with half of those people falling in the "severely obese" category. To get it out of the way: it's a tired joke that Americans are too heavy. The medical community is also plagued by a disturbing trend in which doctors obsess over thei

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AI Is Biased. Here's How Scientists Are Trying to Fix It

Researchers are revising the ImageNet dataset. But algorithmic anti-bias training is harder than it seems.

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A 'Jackalope' of an ancient spider fossil deemed a hoax, unmasked as a crayfish

Earlier this year, a remarkable new fossil specimen was unearthed in the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China by area fossil hunters—possibly a huge ancient spider species, as yet unknown to science.

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World's oldest fossil trees uncovered in New York

Fossil trees, dating back 386 million years, have been found at an abandoned quarry in New York.

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Se billederne: Danske arkæologer finder 2.000 år gammel skjult storby

Den græske oldtidsby Sikyon var gemt kun én meter under jordoverfladen.

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Giant Surveillance Balloons Are Lurking at the Edge of Space

Companies are sending massive, high-altitude balloons to the stratosphere to snap images of Earth with unprecedented resolution. Say cheese\!

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Researchers apply temperature gradients to grow and move liquid crystals

Leading a double life as both solids and liquids, liquid crystals occupy center stage for creating smaller, faster and more efficient technologies. Even at the level of single particles, liquid crystals can bend light and react to external forces, like electric fields or physical pushes and pulls. And so, a tiny quantity of liquid crystals is usually enough to achieve high performance in many appl

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Daily briefing: The countries where scientists are most likely to work through the holidays

Nature, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03927-0 Scientists in Belgium, Japan and the United States are submitting when the rest of us are kipping. Plus: Finally! A solution (of sorts) to the three-body problem, and the conference that brings all the fun of science Twitter into the real world.

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New aqueous lithium-ion battery improves safety without sacrificing performance

As the lithium-ion batteries that power most phones, laptops, and electric vehicles become increasingly fast-charging and high-performing, they also grow increasingly expensive and flammable. In research published recently in Energy Storage Materials, a team of engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrated how they could — by using aqueous electrolytes instead of the typical organic

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A 'Jackalope' of an ancient spider fossil deemed a hoax, unmasked as a crayfish

A team from the University of Kansas used fluorescence microscopy to analyze the supposed spider and differentiate what parts of the specimen were fossilized organism, and which parts were potentially doctored.

5h

Number of people in need of renal replacement therapy is rising

The 2017 Annual Report of the ERA-EDTA Registry [1] reveals that only a small fraction of patients accepted for renal replacement therapy are able to start this treatment with the best available therapy, which is transplantation, — and that the number of people who are in need of renal replacement therapy is rising. This poses a major challenge to our health systems, therefore everything should b

5h

Research finds positive community action can help coral reef health

New research has found that positive community action can boost fish numbers in coral reefs and safeguard fish numbers there in the future.

5h

Tweaks behind the rebirth of nearly discarded organic solar technologies

A solar energy material that is remarkably durable and affordable is regrettably also unusable if it barely generates electricity, thus many researchers had abandoned emerging organic solar technologies. But lately, a shift in the underlying chemistry has boosted power output, and a new study has revealed counterintuitive tweaks making the new chemistry successful.

5h

Research finds positive community action can help coral reef health

New research has found that positive community action can boost fish numbers in coral reefs and safeguard fish numbers there in the future.

5h

Scientists fear surge in supersized bushfires that create their own violent thunderstorms

Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCB) storms are feared due to the violent and unpredictable conditions they create on the ground NSW and Qld fires: South Australia also faces catastrophic bushfires risk as PM apologises for holiday – live Scientists fear climate change will drive a surge in the number of supersized and dangerous bushfires that become coupled with the atmosphere and create their own violent

5h

Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought

The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows.

6h

Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought

The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows.

6h

Pollution league tables for UK urban areas reveal the expected and unexpected

The Bedfordshire town of Luton has come bottom of a league table of predicted city-wide air pollution concentrations among UK cities, according to new analysis by the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster.

6h

The World's Oldest Forest Has 385-Million-Year-Old Tree Roots

A trove of arboreal fossils pushes back the origin of modern forests and sophisticated tree roots

6h

Val Richards obituary

My wife, Val Richards, who has died aged 84, was a scholar, teacher and analytical psychotherapist. Val was born in Whetstone, north London, to Charles Feldman, an accountant, and his wife, Ivy (nee Blaker), a teacher, and attended Woodhouse school in North Finchley. Her youth, which she spent in London, was marred by the second world war; from her early years Val was a campaigner for peace, and

6h

The 'cores' of massive galaxies had already formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang

A distant galaxy more massive than our Milky Way—with more than a trillion stars—has revealed that the 'cores' of massive galaxies in the Universe had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed.

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Tweaks behind the rebirth of nearly discarded organic solar technologies

A minuscule chemical tweak is advancing an organic solar technology that was once thought unviable.

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Researchers identify potential formula for blood cancer vaccine

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a way to move precision immunotherapy forward by using genomics to inform immunotherapy for multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in December.

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Research finds positive community action can help coral reef health

A team of social scientists and ecologists have worked with two communities in Papua New Guinea to document and investigate their enduring success in managing their reefs sustainably.

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New research shows domestic animals link virus spread among humans and wildlife

New research carried out at Swansea University has highlighted the role domesticated animals — both pets and livestock — play in the spread of viruses among humans and wildlife. according to new research involving Swansea University.However, the study has revealed the patterns of how viruses are shared differs between the two major groups of RNA and DNA viruses.

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Guidelines for clinicians to address youth vaping

Physicians from Boston Medical Center and the University of Montreal have developed a set of recommendations that provide important insights about how clinicians can best screen, counsel and treat youth for vaping. Published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, the recommendations were created based on existing resources for nicotine dependence.

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Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought

The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows.The findings could have significant impacts for climate change predictions as the ability of secondary forests to soak up carbon from the atmosphere may have been over-estimated. The study, which monitored forest regrowth over two decades, shows that climate change, and the w

6h

Asteroid collisions trigger cascading formation of subfamilies, study concludes

Scientists have always thought about fission clusters as entirely distinct from collisional families. Now a study conducted by researchers affiliated with UNESP has shown that fission clusters may originate from collisional families in some cases.

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Nick Baumann Joining The Atlantic as Politics Editor

The Atlantic has hired Nick Baumann to be its politics editor, and Whitney Dangerfield as senior editor for Ideas. Both will begin in January and join The Atlantic as the newsroom continues to build up its reporting in the midst of President Trump's impeachment and ahead of the 2020 presidential election. Baumann has most recently been the senior enterprise editor at HuffPost. Prior to joining Hu

6h

Moon's Surface Could Electrocute Astronauts, Scientists Warn

ZAP! The Moon's lack of an atmosphere and magnetic field means particles from the Sun go straight to the lunar surface. That gives the Moon's surface an electric charge — and it mean future astronauts run the risk of being zapped when they visit the Moon, according to University of Southern California plasma physicist Joseph Wang's research, as Gizmodo reports . Balancing Charges Wang's team foun

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Asteroid collisions trigger cascading formation of subfamilies, study concludes

Billions of years ago, asteroid collisions resulted in the ejection of fragments hundreds of kilometers across and sharing similar orbits. The resulting groups are known as asteroid families.

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*Watchmen*'s Stars Also Wonder About Season 2

Regina King says she would do a second season of the HBO show if Damon Lindelof is onboard.

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Ozone hole recovery will probably be delayed by banned gas from China

The recovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica looks likely to be delayed at least two years by the illegal production of an ozone-destroying gas in China

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Fossil trees reveal world's oldest forest grew on New York mountains

Fossilised tree roots found in a New York quarry are 386 million years old, making them the remains of the oldest known forest yet

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As our oceans become more acidic they may corrode the skins of sharks

Ocean acidification caused by climate change could corrode parts of sharks' skin, which may impair their swimming

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Majoritet tror att de är mer miljövänliga än andra

Sorterar du sopor bättre än grannen? Köper du oftare ekologiskt än dina kollegor? Är du den som reser mest klimatsmart i vänkretsen? Ny forskning visar att människor tenderar att överskatta sitt eget miljöengagemang. Vi tror helt enkelt att vi gör mer än andra. Och det kan i sin tur leda till att vi gör mindre än vi skulle kunna. I en studie med deltagare från Sverige, USA, England och Indien var

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Jobs that need people skills are the most recession-proof

Jobs with high cognitive and people skill requirements, and cities with lots of those jobs, are generally less sensitive to recessions, according to a new study. The research is the first to provide evidence that metropolitan areas' recovery from economic downturns depends more on the skill composition—cognitive, people, or motor—of occupations in the area than on educational attainment, which is

6h

Paper-based test could diagnose Lyme disease at early stages

After a day hiking in the forest, the last thing a person wants to discover is a tick burrowing into their skin. Days after plucking off the bloodsucking insect, the hiker might develop a rash resembling a bull's-eye, a tell-tale sign of Lyme disease. Yet not everybody who contracts Lyme disease gets the rash. Now, researchers have devised a blood test that quickly and sensitively diagnoses the di

6h

Screen could offer better safety tests for new chemicals

Using specialized liver cells, researchers have created a new test that can quickly detect potentially cancer-causing DNA damage.

6h

Amazon Device Christmas Sale (2019): Fire Tablets, Kindles, Echos

Hunting for gifts? Fear not, there are still plenty of deals to be found. Some of Amazon's most popular products are on sale.

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Following scientific literature review, Imperial Brands calls for legalisation of snus in EU

Following a new literature review of the harm reduction potential of snus, Imperial Brands — owners of leading snus brand Skruf — has urged the European Union (EU) to re-examine its position on the product.

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Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not

Chemical defenses of plants not only affect the growth and development of herbivores, but also, indirectly, the next consumers in the food chain. A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites. Caterpillars of the diamondback moth deploy a specific gut enzyme to render the toxic substances of their host plant h

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Research validates new control tactic for herbicide-resistant weeds in US soybean crops

Australian growers have made significant inroads against herbicide-resistance weeds in recent years by focusing on harvest-time weed seed controls. One of the most popular strategies is the use of an impact mill that intercepts chaff as it exits the harvester. The mill destroys weed seeds and then deposits the residue on the field for moisture conservation and nutrient cycling.

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81 horses culled on Turkish island amid disease outbreak

Authorities have culled 81 horses on an island off Istanbul following an outbreak of a fatal equine disease, local officials said Thursday.

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Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not

Chemical defenses of plants not only affect the growth and development of herbivores, but also, indirectly, the next consumers in the food chain. A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites. Caterpillars of the diamondback moth deploy a specific gut enzyme to render the toxic substances of their host plant h

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Research validates new control tactic for herbicide-resistant weeds in US soybean crops

Australian growers have made significant inroads against herbicide-resistance weeds in recent years by focusing on harvest-time weed seed controls. One of the most popular strategies is the use of an impact mill that intercepts chaff as it exits the harvester. The mill destroys weed seeds and then deposits the residue on the field for moisture conservation and nutrient cycling.

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Zika vaccine shields fetus in pregnant monkeys

An experimental Zika vaccine reduced the amount of virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and improved fetal outcomes, a new study shows. The work could help support development and approval of the experimental Zika DNA vaccine VRC5283, which is currently in early stage trials in humans. The study in Science Translational Medicine marks the first test of a Zika vaccine given before conception with exp

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Study: Yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance

A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months. What did they find? Tiger motherhood involves lots of frantic running around, big meals instead of small ones, and constantly checking on the little ones.

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81 horses culled on Turkish island amid disease outbreak

Authorities have culled 81 horses on an island off Istanbul following an outbreak of a fatal equine disease, local officials said Thursday.

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Study: Yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance

A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months. What did they find? Tiger motherhood involves lots of frantic running around, big meals instead of small ones, and constantly checking on the little ones.

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Newly discovered retinal structure may enhance vision for some birds

A newly discovered retinal structure in the eyes of certain kinds of songbirds might help the animals find and track insect prey more easily.

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Even with early treatment, HIV still attacks young brains

The majority of children living with HIV are in sub-Saharan Africa. While early antiretroviral therapy has ensured less deadly outcomes for children living with and exposed to HIV, the virus still may affect the brain, disrupting neurodevelopment. Michael Boivin, director of the Psychiatry Research Program in the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine, has set out to understand exactly how HIV impact

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Preparing for extreme sea levels depends on location, time

Using historical data from tide gauges that line US coasts, researchers created an extreme sea level indicator that identifies how much of a role different major weather and ocean forces have played in affecting extreme sea levels in coastal areas around the country.

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Paper-based test could diagnose Lyme disease at early stages

After a day hiking in the forest, the last thing a person wants to discover is a tick burrowing into their skin. Days after plucking off the bloodsucking insect, the hiker might develop a rash resembling a bull's-eye, a tell-tale sign of Lyme disease. Yet not everybody who contracts Lyme disease gets the rash. Now, researchers have devised a blood test that quickly and sensitively diagnoses the di

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Artificial intelligence identifies previously unknown features associated with cancer recurrence

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors. Further, the AI identified features relevant to cancer prognosis that were not previously noted by pathologists, leading to a higher accuracy of prostate cancer recurrence compared to pathologist-based diagnosis.

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New tool reveals DNA structures that influence disease

Disruption of certain DNA structures — called topologically associating domains, or TADs — is linked with the development of disease, including some cancers. With its newly created algorithm that quickly locates and helps elucidate the complex functions of TADs, an international team of researchers is making it easier to study these important structures and help prevent disease.

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Forgetfulness might depend on time of day

Researchers have identified a gene in mice that seems to influence memory recall at different times of day and tracked how it causes mice to be more forgetful just before they normally wake up.

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Boeing is about to launch its Starliner crew spacecraft for the first time

If all goes well, NASA could have two brand-new options for sending astronauts to the International Space Station.

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The majority consider themselves more environmentally friendly than others

Research from the University of Gothenburg shows that we tend to overestimate our personal environmental engagement. In a study with participants from Sweden, the United States, England, and India, most participants were convinced that they acted more environmentally friendly than the average person.

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Fireballs: mail from space

The analysis of fireball observations in large datasets can be made much quicker with the help of a neat mathematical formula, the α-β criterion.

6h

Finding your way in the dark depends on your internal clock

Surprising results show how circadian rhythm changes the way mammals can see. Mice can accomplish a vision task better at night than during day. The researchers expected the body's internal clock to alter how strong nerve signals were at night, but discovered that the animal's behavior changed depending on the time of day instead. This opens interesting lines of inqury into how circadian rhythm ch

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Glutamine may decrease obesity-linked inflammation

Glutamine could help people with obesity reduce inflammation of fat tissue and reduce fat mass, according to a new study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of Oxford in the U.K. The researchers also show how glutamine levels can alter gene expression in several different cell types. However, more research is needed before glutamine supplementation may be recommended as a treatme

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Fossil soils reveal emergence of modern forest ecology earlier than previously thought

While sifting through fossil soils in the Catskill region near Cairo, New York, researchers uncovered the extensive root system of 385-million-year-old trees that already appeared to have leaves and wood. The finding, published Dec. 19 in the journal Current Biology, is the first piece of evidence that the transition toward forests as we know them today began earlier in the Devonian Period than ty

6h

Evaluating clinical evidence of acupuncture, acupressure for improving cancer pain?

This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined results from 14 randomized clinical trials to evaluate evidence of an association between acupuncture and acupressure for reducing pain in patients with cancer. Previous studies have had inconsistent findings.

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Scientists uncover world's oldest forest

Scientists have discovered remnants of the world's oldest fossil forest in a sandstone quarry in Cairo, N.Y.

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New gene for male infertility discovered

Investigators have found that a genetic rearrangement and variants affecting a gene known as SYCP2 are associated with low sperm count and report the first cases implicating the gene in four men with infertility.

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Study finds less-aggressive chemotherapy after initial treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer to be more beneficial

A Mayo Clinic study involving 5,540 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer finds that maintenance chemotherapy after initial treatment is more beneficial for patients whose disease is under control, compared with more aggressive treatment.

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Marine biology: Acidified oceans may corrode shark scales

Prolonged exposure to high carbon dioxide (acidified) seawater may corrode tooth-like scales (denticles) covering the skin of puffadder shysharks, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. As ocean CO2 concentrations increase due to human activity, oceans are becoming more acidic, with potential implications for marine wildlife. Although the effects of acidified water have been studied in several sp

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Modern trees emerged earlier than previously believed, new research reveals

A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has uncovered evidence that the transition toward forests as we know them today began earlier than typically believed.

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Trump picks computer scientist to lead National Science Foundation

Nature, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03924-3 White House also chooses atmospheric scientist to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

6h

CFCS: Bestyrelser uden it-sikkerhedskompetencer duer ikke

Mange bestyrelser mangler tilstrækkelig viden og kompetencer til at kunne adressere virksomhedens risici på cyberområdet, lyder det fra Center for Cybersikkerhed.

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World's oldest known fossil forest found in New York quarry

Trees would have been home to primitive insects about 150m years before dinosaurs evolved The world's oldest known fossil forest has been discovered in a sandstone quarry in New York state, offering new insights into how trees transformed the planet. The forest, found in the town of Cairo, would have spanned from New York to Pennsylvania and beyond, and has been dated to about 386m years old. It

6h

Toward a Grand Unified Theory of Snowflakes

Kenneth Libbrecht is that rare person who, in the middle of winter, gleefully leaves Southern California for a place like Fairbanks, Alaska, where wintertime temperatures rarely rise above freezing. There, he dons a parka and sits in a field with a camera and a piece of foam board, waiting for snow. Specifically, he seeks the sparkliest, sharpest, most beautiful snow crystals nature can produce.

6h

Just Embrace the Madness of Cats

When the composer Andrew Lloyd Webber first played the score of his new musical Cats for the famed theatrical director Harold Prince , Prince was confused. He tried, as he recalled to the Los Angeles Times , to figure out the deeper themes of what he'd just heard. "I … said, 'Andrew, I don't understand. Is this about English politics? [Are] those cats Queen Victoria, Gladstone and Disraeli?' He l

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Högintensiv träning bra för äldre med demens

Äldre personer med demens mår bra av högintensiv fysisk träning. Med träning förbättras balansen, samtidigt som motivation för träning ökar efter en tids träning. Det visar en ny avhandling från Umeå universitet. – Resultaten understryker att det aldrig är för sent att börja träna, säger Anna Sondell, doktorand vid Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och Rehabilitering vid Umeå universitet. I en i

7h

Robert Downey Jr launches YouTube doc featuring AI baby

The original series sets out to explain and demystify artificial intelligence technology.

7h

Slut på et årti med dimser: Stem på 10'ernes bedste gadgets

Chromecast, Tesla, selfiestang eller Raspberry Pi? Det har været et dimseårti. Vælg dine tre favoritter.

7h

Congress is putting money toward gun violence research for the first time in decades

It's time to start closing our knowledge gap. (DepositPhoto/) For the first time in more than two decades, Congress has reached a deal to fund research into gun violence . Given the scope of the problem, the amount of money it appropriated—$25 million—isn't very much, but researchers hope the historic agreement represents a new commitment to treating gun violence like what it is: a public health

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Insights into the assembly and activation of the microtubule nucleator γ-TuRC

Nature, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1896-6

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Scientists have discovered the world's oldest forest—and its radical impact on life

Fossil roots helped suck up carbon from atmosphere, fundamentally changing the climate

7h

NASA's Mars 2020 Rover Earns Its "Driver's License"

NASA's Mars 2020 rover just went on its first joyride , navigating over small ramps and rolling forward and backward inside a clean room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in California — and it's now ready for the Red Planet. "Mars 2020 has earned its driver's license," lead mobility systems engineer for Mars 2020 Rich Rieber said in a statement . "The test unambiguously proved that the rover ca

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Ocean Acidification Could Eat Away at Sharks' Teeth and Scales

The fishes' ability to swim and feed could be compromised — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Acidifying Oceans Could Eat Away at Sharks' Skin and Teeth

Researchers show that prolonged exposure to acidified water corrodes the scales that make up a shark's skin.

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Ocean Acidification Could Eat Away at Sharks' Teeth and Scales

The fishes' ability to swim and feed could be compromised — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists uncover world's oldest forest

Scientists have discovered remnants of the world's oldest fossil forest in a sandstone quarry in Cairo, New York.

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Acidified oceans may corrode shark scales

Prolonged exposure to high carbon dioxide (acidified) seawater may corrode tooth-like scales (denticles) covering the skin of puffadder shysharks, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. As ocean CO2 concentrations increase due to human activity, oceans are becoming more acidic, with potential implications for marine wildlife. Although the effects of acidified water have been studied in several sp

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Finding your way in the dark depends on your internal clock

How mammals perceive light changes between night and day. Researchers at Aalto University and the University of Helsinki discovered that mice were better at finding a dim light in pitch-darkness in experiments done at night compared to those conducted during the day. The scientists were surprised to find that this effect had very little to do with any changes in the eye itself, and was instead con

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Scientists uncover world's oldest forest

Scientists have discovered remnants of the world's oldest fossil forest in a sandstone quarry in Cairo, New York.

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Acidified oceans may corrode shark scales

Prolonged exposure to high carbon dioxide (acidified) seawater may corrode tooth-like scales (denticles) covering the skin of puffadder shysharks, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. As ocean CO2 concentrations increase due to human activity, oceans are becoming more acidic, with potential implications for marine wildlife. Although the effects of acidified water have been studied in several sp

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Finding your way in the dark depends on your internal clock

How mammals perceive light changes between night and day. Researchers at Aalto University and the University of Helsinki discovered that mice were better at finding a dim light in pitch-darkness in experiments done at night compared to those conducted during the day. The scientists were surprised to find that this effect had very little to do with any changes in the eye itself, and was instead con

7h

Study: yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance

A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months.

7h

Comparing future risks associated with gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery

Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that gastric bypass is associated with a higher risk of additional operations or other invasive procedures, compared to a gastric sleeve procedure. The study, 'Risk of Operative and Nonoperative Interventions Up to 4 Years After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass vs Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy in a National US Commercial Insurance Claims Database

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Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees

The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. A team of scientists led by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a method that can be used to model the wide range of synchronization behaviors exhibited by different tree species simply by changing the control parameters.

7h

Breakthrough innovation enabling cheaper solar energy production is one step closer to the market

While the need for renewable energy around the world is growing exponentially, Lithuanian and German researchers have come up with a novel solution for developing low-cost solar technology. Material, synthesised by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania scientists, which self-assemble to form a molecular-thick electrode layer, presents a facile way of realising highly efficient perovskit

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How civilization could destroy itself — and 4 ways we could prevent it | Nick Bostrom

Humanity is on its way to creating a "black ball": a technological breakthrough that could destroy us all, says philosopher Nick Bostrom. In this incisive, surprisingly light-hearted conversation with Head of TED Chris Anderson, Bostrom outlines the vulnerabilities we could face if (or when) our inventions spiral beyond our control — and explores how we can prevent our future demise.

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Ocean Acidification Could Eat Away at Sharks' Teeth and Scales

The fishes' ability to swim and feed could be compromised — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release

Precision medicine is becoming increasingly important, creating more efficient personalised therapies for each patient and innovative pharmacological developments. In the oncology field, for example, researchers are developing different approaches aimed at directed and controlled drug release systems, thereby diminishing toxicity to the organism.

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Global emissions slowed down in 2019, but still reached a record high

A series of studies concluded that the growth in emissions have slowed to 0.6 percent in 2019. Despite this, 2019 was another record year, with 37 gigatons of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The U.S. and E.U. actually reduced their emissions in 2019, but this was offset by the growth in emissions from the developing world. The findings highlight the importance of developing renewable energy inf

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Opinion | Twelve Million Phones, One Dataset, Zero Privacy

submitted by /u/Logiman43 [link] [comments]

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How Two Robots Learned to Grill and Serve the Perfect Hot Dog

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Will Humans Ever Walk on Exoplanets?

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

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Sunrise could come for nuclear-powered submarine tanker

submitted by /u/jimius [link] [comments]

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YouTube's series on AI with Robert Downey Jr. is finally available

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Submarine cables to offshore wind farms transformed into a seismic network

A fiber optic network in the North Sea was used to record seismicity.

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Australian desalination plant attracts fish

With growing populations and climate uncertainty, water security is a global concern. Many nations operate desalination plants, which remove salt from seawater to make it drinkable. These facilities typically discharge excess salt as hypersaline brine back into the ocean, with uncertain ecological effects. Now, researchers report that a large desalination plant in Australia has the unexpected bene

7h

Screen could offer better safety tests for new chemicals

Using specialized liver cells, researchers have created a new test that can quickly detect potentially cancer-causing DNA damage.

7h

Minska matsvinnet – 1,3 miljarder ton slängs varje år

Hushållen står för den största delen av det svenska matavfallet. Varje svensk slänger 97 kilo mat varje år. Det globala årliga matsvinnet uppgår till 1,3 miljarder ton, en tredjedel av den totala matproduktionen. Sverige har antagit en FN-resolution om att halvera matsvinnet till 2030. I en ny handlingsplan som har tagits fram av Livsmedelsverket, Naturvårdsverket och Jordbruksverket presenteras 4

7h

Höfjärilar byter färgprakt mot fruktsamhet

Höfjärilen är vackert gul orange. Men vissa höfjärilshonor är istället vita, trots att det är en nackdel under parningen. Hanar föredrar färgstarka honor. Men istället är de vita fjärilarna mer fruktsamma. Detta är ett exempel på det som inom biologin kallas trade-offs, där en art byter bort vissa positiva egenskaper för att uppnå andra fördelar. Nu tror forskarna att de vet hur detta går till. T

7h

Trump Is Forever

Updated on December 19, 2019 at 11:41 a.m. ET A Trump rally is often a miasma of misstatements and distortions, but in one unscripted aside last night at his appearance in Michigan, Donald Trump succinctly captured what living through his presidency is like. "You know, in the life of Trump, 10 months is an eternity," he said. "It's a long time." For that matter, even a single day in Trumpworld se

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Light pollution can suppress melatonin production in humans and animals

Melatonin sets the internal clock. Researchers from Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) in an international team have analyzed data on the impact of light pollution on melatonin formation in humans and vertebrates. They found that even the low light intensities of urban skyglow can suppress melatonin production.

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Towards new lithium-ion batteries that are safer and more efficient

Researchers have studied 2 types of cathodes that are very similar in their composition, but which show completely different behavior: one of them suffers from the known loss of energy density in the first charge cycle, while the other does not. This result will allow us to overcome one of the principle bottlenecks that has, until now, been met in the development of this type of technology', the r

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Scientists discover first antiferromagnetic topological quantum material

A large consortium of international and interdisciplinary research teams involving TU Dresden has discovered a new type of bulk quantum material with intrinsically magnetic and topological properties. The new material is called manganese-bismuth telluride (MnBi2Te4) and is extremely promising for application in antiferromagnetic spintronics and quantum technologies. The results of the research wor

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Type 1 Diabetes: New starting point to delay autoimmune response

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent excessive immune reactions in healthy people. In the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes, this protection is not sufficiently effective. Researchers have now deciphered a mechanism that impairs Treg differentiation and stability. In the study, when they inhibited the molecule that triggers this mechanism, an increased number of functional Tregs were formed

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A discovery helps the development of a topological quantum computer and dark matter detector

The MnBi2Te4 single crystal synthesised by the researchers can be used in developing superfast memory cells, spintronics devices, quantum computers, and even a dark matter detector.

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Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release

A new study by the UAB, the CIBER-BBN, and the Hospital de Sant Pau describes the development of a new biomaterial with sustained drug release. The results were recently published in Advanced Science and describe the creation of artificial inclusion bodies for uses in precision biotechnology and nanomedicine. The structures contain functional proteins released similarly to how human hormones are r

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Bochum team wins second place in machine-learning competition

With their algorithm for material-property prediction, Dr. Yury Lysogorskiy and Dr. Thomas Hammerschmidt of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation Icams of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) won the second place in an international competition on machine learning. The secret of their success was the combination of data analytics with physical models and with properties of the ch

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Willow-dominated wetlands of Lapland fells are resilient to reindeer grazing

A long-term study across the Finnish-Norwegian border in Lapland proved wetland vegetation to be resilient to reindeer summer grazing. The reindeer fence along the national border, built in 1950s, provided a chance to study the long-term effects of reindeer grazing. The study included also experimental fences that excluded reindeer grazing for 13 years on the Finnish side of the border. In Finland

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Willow-dominated wetlands of Lapland fells are resilient to reindeer grazing

A long-term study across the Finnish-Norwegian border in Lapland proved wetland vegetation to be resilient to reindeer summer grazing. The reindeer fence along the national border, built in 1950s, provided a chance to study the long-term effects of reindeer grazing. The study included also experimental fences that excluded reindeer grazing for 13 years on the Finnish side of the border. In Finland

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Acute leukemia patients treated with common therapy have increased risk for heart failure

Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are treated with anthracyclines are at a heightened risk of heart failure — most often within one year of exposure to the chemotherapy treatment, according to a new study. To help identify a patient's risk for heart failure following the treatment, researchers developed a risk score (0 to 21) based on clinical an

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Poor sight causes people to overstep the mark

People with vision impairment are more cautious when stepping over obstacles when walking – but increase their risk of falls, according to a new study.

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Most Popular Stories of the Decade, Year-by-Year

The Scientist's reporters tracked the development of CAR T cell therapies, explored the Neanderthal DNA in our genomes, and dove into a CRISPR controversy.

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Mining metagenomics: A faster and more efficient method to compare metagenomes

Microbiomes can contain thousands of bacteria species, hinting at the complex ecosystem that houses the microbiome as well as the one contained within the microbiome. Yet, until now, researchers have been limited in the tools they have to precisely compare those microbiomes.

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Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands

The Camargue in southern France is widely recognised as one of the largest and most biodiverse wetlands in the Mediterranean region.

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Mining metagenomics: A faster and more efficient method to compare metagenomes

Microbiomes can contain thousands of bacteria species, hinting at the complex ecosystem that houses the microbiome as well as the one contained within the microbiome. Yet, until now, researchers have been limited in the tools they have to precisely compare those microbiomes.

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First intrinsic magnetic topological insulator discovered

The so-called topological insulators are those materials that are insulators in bulk, i.e., those that do not allow electric currents in their volume, but that are conductors on their surfaces. Unlike the usual conductors, that is, metals, the electric current circulating in a topological insulator does not suffer any loss of energy. This property opens great possibilities for application in elect

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Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands

The Camargue in southern France is widely recognised as one of the largest and most biodiverse wetlands in the Mediterranean region.

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Science, Splendor and 'Dresden Green' to Impress a Sovereign

Dozens of ingeniously crafted objects are on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, including the world's fanciest hat pin (at 41 carats).

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YouTube's Top Earner Is an 8-Year-Old Who Reviews Toys

Still scrambling to find gifts for your younger loved ones this holiday season? You might want to visit "Ryan's World." That's the YouTube page of eight-year-old Texan Ryan Kaji, whose videos of toy reviews and other childhood shenanigans earned him a mind-boggling $26 million in 2019, according to Forbes — enough to make him YouTube's top earner for the second year in a row. Forbes considers the

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How to avoid sleep disruptions during the holiday season

With shorter daylight hours, stress and travel to different time zones, the holiday season can disrupt our circadian rhythm and create sleep difficulties. Not getting enough sleep can make it harder to avoid stress, enjoy time with family, and finally return to work. Here, Helmut Zarbl, director at the Rutgers University Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) and an expe

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A real-life deluminator for spotting exoplanets by reflected starlight

Perhaps you remember the opening scene of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" that took place on Privet Drive. A bearded man pulled a mysterious device, called a deluminator, from his dark robe and one by one the lights from the street lamps flew into it.

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Nonprofits that empower leaders of color are more apt to do something about racial inequality

The U.S. is becoming more racially diverse. Since 2010, 96% of all U.S. counties registered an increase in their percentage of nonwhite residents. Yet the people who lead nonprofits in the U.S. remain disproportionately white.

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Most people consider themselves more environmentally friendly than others

Research from the University of Gothenburg shows that we tend to overestimate our personal environmental engagement. In a study with participants from Sweden, the United States, England, and India, most participants were convinced that they acted more environmentally friendly than the average person.

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Elon Musk: $2,000 Tesla Computer Upgrade Not Worth It

Less-Than-OK Computer Starting in March 2018, any new Tesla came equipped with MCU2, an upgraded version of the vehicles' media computer. At the time, Tesla CEO Elon Musk promised that existing customers would be able to upgrade their computers at a later date. That option still hasn't materialized, but it now seems that if or when it does, Musk doesn't recommend it. A Thorny Problem On Wednesday

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Reimagining ocean conservation

A tiny Pacific Island nation is reimagining ocean conservation with guidance from Stanford researchers and international experts. In January Palau is closing 80 percent of its ocean waters to fishing, creating one of the largest marine protected areas in the world. It is the largest percentage of a country's exclusive water with a fully protected designation—an area twice the size of Mexico.

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Trump to nominate Arizona State computer scientist to lead the National Science Foundation

Sethuraman Panchanathan would succeed France Córdova in 6-year post

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Reimagining ocean conservation

A tiny Pacific Island nation is reimagining ocean conservation with guidance from Stanford researchers and international experts. In January Palau is closing 80 percent of its ocean waters to fishing, creating one of the largest marine protected areas in the world. It is the largest percentage of a country's exclusive water with a fully protected designation—an area twice the size of Mexico.

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Ap­proach to make quicker and more ex­act ana­lyses of fire­ball ob­ser­va­tions

There is not enough time for more close study of all fireballs observed in the sky. The observation of a bright phenomenon reveals that a meteoroid has entered the atmosphere from space, but does any part of it end up on Earth? Only those with the survived terminal mass will reach the earth, but unfortunately many of them remain undiscovered.

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New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England—the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.

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A Case That Should Have Been Laughed Out of Court May Kill Obamacare

In an opinion blending arrogance and cowardice in equal measure, an appeals court ruled yesterday that the Affordable Care Act contains a constitutional flaw—and that most or all of the law may have to be scrapped. But the court was coy about just how much of the law has to go, and punted that decision back to the same judge who, last December, declared the entire law invalid. What happens next i

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Yes, Democrats Have Been Itching to Impeach From the Start

When historians ask themselves why Democrats impeached President Donald Trump, they can parse the two articles of impeachment for part of the story: "abuse of power" and "obstruction of justice." Yet Republicans insist that something deeper is going on. They insist that Democrats have wanted to oust Trump from the White House ever since he was elected. They're not wrong. Trump is seen as less leg

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Why Dating Is Hard for Millennials

The landscape of modern romance is peppered with dating apps. It's how most new couples meet. In the latest episode of The Idea File , staff writer Ashley Fetters explains the social implications of online dating. "More people than ever are dating in a limitless marketplace," she says in the video. "Today's dating pool, I think, has a different skill set." For more, read two of Fetters's articles

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Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not

A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites. Caterpillars of the diamondback moth deploy a specific gut enzyme to render the toxic substances of their host plant harmless. Without the activity of this enzyme, growth, survival and reproduction are impaired. Nevertheless, predatory lacewing larvae feed on pois

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Research validates new control tactic for herbicide-resistant weeds in US soybean crops

In a recent study featured in the journal Weed Science, a team of researchers explored whether impact mills could help US growers fight Palmer amaranth and other herbicide-resistant weeds in soybean crops.

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Bacteria spread by ticks affected by humidity and mutual competition

No specific environment or temperature favourable to all of the most common pathogens borne by ticks was found in an international study, since different bacterial species thrive in different conditions. Depending on the species, bacteria found inside ticks can either compete with each other or promote each other's distribution.

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Night eating, lower diet quality during pregnancy associated with greater weight gain & retention

A study led by researchers from KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) has found evidence that pregnant women who consume more of their daily food intake after 7.00pm, and who consume lower quality diets during pregnancy, are more than three times more likely to experience postpartum weight retention of five kilogrammes or more, 18 months after giving birth.

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Skin and mucous membrane lesions as complication of pneumonia

Painful inflammatory lesions of the skin and mucous membranes may occur in children who develop bacterial pneumonia. A research group at the University Children's Hospital Zurich has recently developed a new diagnostic blood test, which reliably diagnoses bacteria as the causative pathogen at an early stage, allowing more specific treatment and prediction about prognosis.

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The Internet of Things by satellite will become increasingly accessible

Thanks to the implementation of advanced random access schemes using efficient, low complexity algorithms. According to a study published in International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networking of which one of its authors is Giuseppe Cocco, a researcher at the DTIC and at the German Aerospace Center (DLR).

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Acid reflux affects nearly a third of US adults weekly

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive disorder that causes hearburn and other uncomfortable symptoms, may affect nearly a third of US adults each week, and most of those who take certain popular medications for it still have symptoms, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.

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On-chip light source produces versatile range of wavelengths

Researchers have designed a new chip-integrated light source that can transform infrared wavelengths into visible wavelengths, which have been difficult to produce with technology based on silicon chips. This flexible approach to on-chip light generation is poised to enable highly miniaturized photonic instrumentation that is easy to manufacture and rugged enough to use outside the lab.

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Ultrashort X-ray technique to probe conditions found at the heart of planets

Combining powerful lasers and bright X-rays, Imperial and STFC researchers have demonstrated a technique that will allow new extreme experiments.

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Why people vote for politicians they know are liars

Britain recently elected a prime minister who unlawfully shut down parliament to escape democratic scrutiny and who tells blatant falsehoods whenever it suits him. Boris Johnson casually denies the presence of media in front of TV cameras and he denies core elements of his Brexit deal, such as the need for customs checks between Britain and Northern Ireland.

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How can we make residential neighborhoods more sustainable by 2050?

If the aim of a 2,000 Watt Society is to be achieved, peri-urban residential neighborhoods—where the average single-family home consumes 6.5 times more power than that target—must adapt. An EPFL thesis, which has just been awarded a scholarly distinction, explores ways of hitting the target in Vaud canton, but which could also be applied to the whole of Switzerland.

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Novel mobile app could help to reduce sexual violence in Kenya

Crime and memory experts at the University of Birmingham are working with partners in Africa who are developing a mobile phone app that could help to reduce sexual violence in poorer countries and bring its perpetrators to justice.

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How Hunters Might Help Protect the World's Rarest Turtle

A new study in Vietnam offers hope for a massive freshwater species. Swinhoe-Softshell-Turtle.jpg G.H. Ford's 1873 Illustration of what is now known as the Yangtze giant softshell turtle or Swinohe's softshell turtle. Rights information: Public Domain Creature Thursday, December 19, 2019 – 09:30 Amanda Heidt, Contributor (Inside Science) — After nearly hunting a rare turtle to extinction, hunte

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Photographs From One of the World's Most Troubled, and Least Understood, Regions

A photojournalist journeys to the Sahara-Sahel desert of remote northern Africa to catalogue the state of emergency on the ground

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What Mice Watching Orson Welles's Touch of Evil Can Teach Scientists about Vision

The findings challenge textbook ideas about how visual cortex cells process imagery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ultrashort x-ray technique will probe conditions found at the heart of planets

Combining powerful lasers and bright x-rays, Imperial and STFC researchers have demonstrated a technique that will allow new extreme experiments.

8h

Honey, I shrunk Michelangelo's David

Researchers in Zurich have reproduced Michelangelo's David as a miniature in metal. Their achievement highlights the potential of a special 3D printing method developed at ETH Zurich.

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New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England — the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.

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Mining metagenomics: A faster and more efficient method to compare metagenomes

A research team from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology reported a comprehensive comparison method for microbiomes. They focused on improving the current method of examining the so-called 'shotgun metagenomes.'

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Discovered the first intrinsic magnetic topological insulator

The results of this study are being published this week in the prestigious journal Nature, and have great potential both at fundamental level and for future technological applications.

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Fossil expands ancient fish family tree

A second ancient lungfish has been discovered in Africa, adding another piece to the jigsaw of evolving aquatic life forms more than 400 million years ago. The new fossil lungfish genus (Isityumzi mlomomde) was found about 10,000km from a previous species described in Morocco, and is of interest because it existed in a high latitude (70 degrees south) or polar environment at the time.

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Martin Rees: We will become a new species by expanding beyond Earth

Heading into deep space will lead to a new species of human evolving, says the UK Astronomer Royal – and could pave the way to immortals who can conquer the galaxy

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How Two Robots Learned to Grill and Serve the Perfect Hot Dog

The list of things robots can do seems to be growing by the week. They can play sports , help us explore outer space and the deep sea , take over some of our boring everyday tasks , and even assemble Ikea furniture . Now they can add one more accomplishment to the list: grilling and serving a hot dog. It seems like a pretty straightforward task, and as far as grilling goes, hot dogs are about as

8h

The 14 Best Movies of 2019

From 'Avengers: Endgame' to 'Knives Out,' these were the most compelling flicks to hit theaters this year.

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What Mice Watching Orson Welles's Touch of Evil Can Teach Scientists about Vision

The findings challenge textbook ideas about how visual cortex cells process imagery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Individuals find polls that favor their candidates more credible

As the 2020 U.S. presidential election approaches, the public will be barraged with opinion polls seeking to assess attitudes toward the candidates and on leading campaign issues. Of concern to researchers is how partisan biases may influence the perception of these polls and, subsequently, voting behavior. A recent study by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) and the Universi

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On-chip light source produces versatile range of wavelengths

Researchers have designed a new chip-integrated light source that can transform infrared wavelengths into visible wavelengths, which have been difficult to produce with technology based on silicon chips. This flexible approach to on-chip light generation is poised to enable highly miniaturized photonic instrumentation that is easy to manufacture and rugged enough to use outside the lab.

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Pulsars observed for the first time from South America

A team has upgraded two radio telescopes in Argentina that lay dormant for 15 years in order to study pulsars, rapidly rotating neutron stars with intense magnetic fields that emit notably in radio wavelengths.

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In breakthrough method of creating solar material, scientists prove the impossible really isn't

Scientists have achieved a technological breakthrough for solar cells previously thought impossible.

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Disruption of glycine receptors to study embryonic development and brain function

Researchers are studying glycine receptors, particularly glycine receptor alpha-4 (Glra4), during development. They demonstrated, in a new study, that Glra4 is not a brain exclusive gene, as was believed, but on the contrary, it facilitates the early embryonic development in mice.

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How vulnerable is your car to cyberattacks?

New research applies criminal justice theory to smart vehicles, revealing cracks in the current system leading to potential cyber risks.

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Study shows what factors lead to 'resilient collaboration' in community improvement efforts

Every day, people come together to address challenges facing their communities, such as homelessness, economic development or environmental protection that are not quickly or easily solved. While all are well-intentioned, and collaborations share goals of community betterment, some are more successful than others.

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A concrete step toward net-zero carbon emissions in cement production

As the most widely used construction material, concrete is indispensable in the development of infrastructure, industry and housing. It's a mixture of aggregates (sand, gravel, crushed stone), water and cement, and whose production accounts for 95 % of concrete's CO2 footprint. "Currently, the EU uses more than two tonnes of concrete per person per year, of which 325 kg is cement," according to th

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Boeing Starliner-kapsel klar til jomfrurejse mod ISS – følg med på turen

Efter flere forsinkelser er Boeing nu klar til en ubemandet test af den kapsel, som allerede næste år skal fragte astronauter til rumstationen. Se launch, docking og landing her.

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Essential oil compound boosts wound healing in mice

A chemical compound found in essential oils improves the healing process in mice when topically applied to a skin wound, a new study shows. The finding could lead to improved treatments for skin injuries in humans. Further, skin tissue treated with the chemical compound, beta-carophyllene—found in lavender, rosemary, and ylang ylang, as well as various herbs and spices such as black pepper—showed

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Impact of methamphetamine use depends on your genes

The research, published in Molecular Psychiatry found that variations in the gene known as BDNF strongly determine the effects of methamphetamine in the brain. This could potentially explain why some users develop methamphetamine-induced psychosis, which is similar to schizophrenia.

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New classification system for tumors can guide diagnosis and treatment options for cancer

Based on the largest study of cancer patients of its kind, scientists have created a new way of classifying tumours. Clinicians can use genome sequencing to assign their patients' tumours to one of sixteen groups in the new classification system, ten of which provide important information for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, like whether an individual will respond to immunotherapy.

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AI's future potential hinges on consensus: NAM report

The role of artificial intelligence, or machine learning, will be pivotal as the industry wrestles with a gargantuan amount of data that could improve — or muddle — health and cost priorities, according to a National Academy of Medicine Special Publication on the use of AI in health care.

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Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands

The Camargue area in France has considerably fewer grasshopper, cricket, locust, dragonfly, and amphibian species than 40 years ago. On the other hand, there are more birds and vascular plants, some of them considered as new and highly invasive species.

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Scientists discover medicinal cannabis substitute for treating Parkinson's disease

A drug that provides the benefits obtained from medicinal cannabis without the 'high' or other side effects may help to unlock a new treatment for Parkinson's disease.

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Extending Medicare Part D rebates to beneficiaries would save seniors $29 billion over 7 years

A new assessment of the Medicare Part D program based on a proposal from the West Health Policy Center finds that Medicare beneficiaries would save $29 billion if drug manufacturer rebates were used to reduce their out-of-pocket costs at the pharmacy counter through the Part D benefit — as long as these rebate savings are not also used to reduce Part D manufacturer liability.

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Only 1 in 10 suicide prevention apps cover full guidelines, NTU Singapore study finds

Most (93%) mobile apps for suicide prevention and depression management do not provide all the six suicide prevention strategies that are commonly recommended in international clinical guidelines, a study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.

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Mealworms safely consume toxic additive-containing plastic

Mealworms are not only able to eat various forms of plastic, as previous research has shown, they can consume potentially toxic plastic additives in Styrofoam with no ill effects, a new Stanford study shows. The worms can then be used as a safe, protein-rich feed supplement.

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Grupptillhörighet viktigare än sanning

Sanningssökande och vetgirighet sägs vara unikt mänskliga särdrag. Men grupptillhörighet är långt mer viktigt och det gör att vi slutar lyssna på fakta om den äventyrar vår plats i gruppen. Det menar professor Mikael Klintman vid Lunds universitet. I en ny bok om kunskapsresistens hävdar han att det är hög tid att uppdatera den rådande uppfattningen om vilka funktioner som kunskap fyller för männ

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Photoconversion mechanism of phytochromes

New research provides insight into how proteins called phytochromes sense light and contribute to how plants grow. Biologists used sophisticated techniques to structurally define the sequence of events that support the transition between light- and dark-adapted states.

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Differentiating amino acids

Researchers develop the foundation for direct sequencing of individual proteins.

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New twist to fight against autoimmune diseases

Scientists an entirely new molecular process in mice that triggers T cell-driven inflammation and causes different auto-immune diseases. New research has implications for multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease. It also will help efforts to find better treatments for autoimmune disease, still an urgent need in medicine.

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Brain waves in mice change based on memory age

Researchers have discovered signatures in brain activity that allow them to tell old and new memories apart. The team analyzed recordings from mouse brains using a machine-leaning algorithm, which was able to accurately classify memories as recent or remote. They also found robust communication between a frontal brain region and the hippocampus, a link which may form a concrete mechanism that trac

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Cancer research: Molecular machinery critical for cell's ability to move identified

Two specific proteins take apart the cell's actin filaments at one end and return the building blocks to the other end for a new round of polymerization. The structure of this machinery driving cell motility may open new opportunities for developing therapeutics to inhibit cell migration in cancer.

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New health insurance insights

Economists analyze how patients and health care providers value Medicaid.

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A climate change double whammy in the US Corn Belt

The United States Corn Belt includes western Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, eastern Nebraska, and eastern Kansas. The region has dominated corn production in the U.S. since the 1850s, accounting for more than a third of the global supply of corn. It is also the world's largest source of soybeans. New research led by atmospheric scientist Mingfang Ting from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty

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A fresh look at the demise of an ancient human species over 100,000 years ago

Imagine your child asked you "When did grandma die?" and you could only respond "It was probably a while ago, but it could have been quite recently." Most likely your child would be unsatisfied with the reply.

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Global study unearths myriad meanings for 'nature' in different cultures

A study involving researchers from 30 countries across the globe underlines the extent to which "nature" means different things to different cultures, which highlights why framing unified environmental and conservation policies is so hard.

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Global study unearths myriad meanings for 'nature' in different cultures

A study involving researchers from 30 countries across the globe underlines the extent to which "nature" means different things to different cultures, which highlights why framing unified environmental and conservation policies is so hard.

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Iron selenide quantum dots for in vivo multiphoton biomedical imaging

Photoluminescent probes with high biocompatibility, quantum yield and multiphoton absorption performance are of significant interest in biomedical imaging, expected to achieve improved penetration depth and spatial resolution. Iron selenide (FeSe) quantum dots (QDs) are reported to meet these criteria based on a new report published in Science Advances by J. Kwon and a team of researchers in the i

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Cameradactyl is a 35mm panoramic camera you can build yourself

Ethan Moses of Cameradactyl loves a wacky camera—he has been building his own for years now. Thanks to the accessibility of 3D printing, his creations include foldable 4×5 field cameras, a 4×5 hand camera , a medium format shooter, and a number of plastic 3D printed photographic accessories like grips and film holders. His most recent creation is a 35mm panoramic camera that he is calling the Bra

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Your car could be at risk for cyber attacks

There are cracks in smart car cybersecurity that leave them open to potential attack, according to new research that looks at the issue through a criminal justice lens. "Automotive cybersecurity is an area we don't understand well in the social sciences. While there are groups of computer scientists and engineers digging into some of the issues, the social aspects are extremely relevant and under

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Origin story: Rewriting human history through DNA

For most of our evolutionary history—for most of the time anatomically modern humans have been on Earth—we've shared the planet with other species of humans. It's only been in the last 30,000 years, the mere blink of an evolutionary eye, that modern humans have occupied the planet as the sole representative of the hominin lineage.

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According to study, money doesn't buy happiness—or spur generosity

In this season of giving, who is more likely to give and why?

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Addressing committed emissions in both US and China requires carbon capture and storage

Stabilizing global temperatures will require deep reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions worldwide. Recent integrated assessments of global climate change show that CO2 emissions must approach net-zero by mid-century to avoid exceeding the 1.5°C climate target. However, "committed emissions," those emissions projected from existing fossil fuel infrastructure operating as they have historical

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Study explores the density of the tectonic plates and why they sink in the Earth's mantle

A fast collision rate between tectonic plates and a young age (millions of years) are two factors that favour the sinking of the lithosphere in the mantle, according to a new study made by researchers at the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the Spanish National Research Council (ICTJA-CSIC). The study has been published recently in Scientific Reports.

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Modified cancer drug effective against multi-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly the source of deadly infections. Scientists have now modified an approved cancer drug to develop an active agent against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

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Agricultural parasite avoids evolutionary arms race, shuts down genes of host plants

A parasitic plant has found a way to circumvent an evolutionary arms race with its hosts, allowing the parasite to thrive on a variety of agriculturally important plants.

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Spreading the seeds of Indigenous knowledge

Indigenous wisdom and modern science are helping to bring a highly nutritious seed to the world's attention.

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Assessing heat wave risk in cities as global warming continues

A trio of researchers with the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the University of Alabama in Huntsville and Arizona State University has shown that commuters traveling from the suburbs to cities in the future are going to encounter hotter than expected weather when in they reach their destination. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Jiachuan Yang, Leiqiu Hu and

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Groundbreaking astronaut glove for exploring the moon and Mars

NTNU students have developed a smart glove for astronauts that can be used while exploring other planets. NASA partners recently conducted successful testing of the glove at the Haughton Mars Project research station.

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Spreading the seeds of Indigenous knowledge

Indigenous wisdom and modern science are helping to bring a highly nutritious seed to the world's attention.

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Artificial Intelligence can now predict long-term risks of heart attack and cardiac death

A new study in Cardiovascular Research finds that machine learning, the patterns and inferences computers use to learn to perform tasks, can predict the long-term risk of heart attack and cardiac death. Indeed, machine learning appears to be better at predicting heart attacks and cardiac deaths than the standard clinical risk assessment used by cardiologists.

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Adulthood with autism

The independence that comes with growing up can be scary for any teenager, but for young adults with autism spectrum disorder and their caregivers, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can seem particularly daunting. Tasks such as managing one's own health insurance or applying for a car loan can be especially challenging for individuals with developmental disabilities.

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Pollution league tables for UK urban areas reveal the expected and unexpected

The Bedfordshire town of Luton has come bottom of a league table of predicted city-wide air pollution concentrations among UK cities, according to new analysis by the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster.

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Astronomers reveal new image of candy cane-shaped feature in the center of our galaxy

A team of astronomers has produced a new image of an 'candy cane'-like object in the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The feature covers an enormous region of some 160 light-years.

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Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

The more TV we watch the more we prefer thinner female bodies, according to a new comprehensive study on body image.

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When it's story time, animated books are better for learning

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that digital storybooks that animate upon a child's vocalization offer beneficial learning opportunities, especially for children with less developed attention regulation.

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Improved 3D nanoprinting technique to build nanoskyscrapers

IBS scientists have improved the 3D nanoprinting process that enables to build precise, self-stacked, tall-and-narrow nanostructures. As shown in their latest publication in Nano Letters, the team also used this technique to produce transparent nanoelectrodes with high optical transmission and controllable conductivity.

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The 'cores' of massive galaxies had already formed 1.5 billion years after the big bang

A distant galaxy more massive than our Milky Way — with more than a trillion stars – has revealed that the 'cores' of massive galaxies in the Universe had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed.

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Power-to-X-anlæg i Skive og Fredericia får energilagrings-millioner

PLUS. En brintfabrik i Fredericia og en metanol-fabrik i Skive løb med de 128 mio. kroner i en pulje til energilagring. Dermed kommer der nu for alvor gang i demonstration af power-to-x-teknologier.

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This is why binge-watching is no longer in fashion

A leading TV academic believes binge-watching has now finally fallen out of fashion.

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WISE1013+6112 is one of the most luminous infrared galaxies, study finds

Using the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), astronomers have investigated the infrared galaxy WISE J101326.25+611220.1 (or WISE1013+6112 for short). The researchers report that WISE1013+6112 is one of the most luminous infrared galaxies known to date. The finding is reported in a paper published December 12 on arXiv.org.

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Delaware firefly, Gulf Coast bee move toward endangered species protection

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it will move forward with considering Endangered Species Act protection for the Bethany Beach firefly and Gulf Coast solitary bee.

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Getting a read on low literacy scores

New results from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), an exam given to teenagers around the world every three years, revealed that reading scores among U.S. 15-year-olds have remained stagnant over the past two decades and the gap between high and low performers has widened.

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How to deal with holiday loneliness and isolation

For many, the "most wonderful time of the year" feels fraught with the possibility of loneliness and disappointment. And while common around major holidays, social isolation—seasonal or otherwise—should not be taken lightly, according to research by professor Michelle Munson of the New York University Silver School of Social Work and colleagues. "You may be alone and not lonely or feel quite isol

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Ny strategi mot hiv: hämma i stället för döda

Jakten på ett botemedel för Aids har delvis fokuserat på att utrota infekterade celler. Men en ny studie av en liten grupp hiv-smittade, som lever med viruset utan behov av behandling, visar hur deras T-celler håller tillbaka viruset utan att döda infekterade celler. Immunbristsjukdomen aids är ett pågående globalt hälsoproblem utan existerande vaccin eller botemedel. Vid en hiv-infektion angripe

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Trängselskatt eller höjda parkeringsavgifter bra i medelstora städer

I medelstora svenska städer kan trängselskatter eller ökade parkeringsavgifter ge ökad samhällsnytta, till exempel genom bättre framkomlighet eller skattesänkning. Det visar en ny forskningsstudie från VTI. I studien har forskarna Disa Asplund och Roger Pyddoke analyserat samhällsekonomiskt optimala trängselskatter och parkeringsavgifter i en modell av Uppsala. Metoden bygger på beräkningar av re

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Healthy diet could save $50 billion in health care costs

Investigators analyzed the impact of 10 dietary factors — including consumption of fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, processed meats and more — and estimated the annual CMD costs of suboptimal diet habits.

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Researchers uncover genetic mystery of infertility in fruit flies

Researchers have discovered a novel parasitic gene in fruit flies that is responsible for destroying the eggs in the ovaries of their daughters.

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Red-winged blackbird nestlings go silent when predators are near

If you're a predator that eats baby birds — say, an American crow — eavesdropping on the begging calls of nestlings can be an easy way to find your next meal. Few studies have investigated whether nestlings react to the sounds of predators, but new research shows that when their parents are away, baby red-winged blackbirds beg less often and stop begging sooner if they hear recordings of predato

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Delaware firefly, Gulf Coast bee move toward endangered species protection

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it will move forward with considering Endangered Species Act protection for the Bethany Beach firefly and Gulf Coast solitary bee.

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Understanding what makes black pigment black

Scientists have for the first time "unmixed" the black pigment that colors our skin and gives bananas their spots.

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Research participation goes virtual with new online platform

Two recent Queen's University graduates are addressing a problem that has plagued clinical researchers for years—how to make it easy and convenient for members of the public to get involved in research. Luc Pelletier and Brooke Resendes are co-founders of Research Stream, an online platform that aims to connect the two groups.

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10 Gifts for People Who Just Need Some Sleep

Great sleep masks, white noise, and other bedtime aids for the finicky sleeper in your life.

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Seriously, Stop Trying to Teach Toddlers How to Code

There are other, more important lessons to impart to your preschooler.

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Researchers apply temperature gradients to grow and move liquid crystals

In a new study, Texas A&M University researchers have discovered that applying a small difference in temperature to a watered-down mixture of a compound called zirconium phosphate initiates its liquid crystallization. As zirconium phosphate particles move toward warmer temperatures, they start aligning themselves with each other and eventually turn into pure liquid crystals, the researchers said.

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Study finds racial/ethnic disparities in pain treatment by emergency responders

Whether or not a patient receives pain treatment when seeking emergency medical services may depend, in part, on their race or ethnicity, according to a new study by Portland State researchers.

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New method captures real-time movement of millions of molecules in 3D

Despite massive strides in understanding HIV, there are still important gaps. A new study shows a method interferometry to capture extremely high-resolution visualizations of millions of molecules moving across viscous gels or a plasma membrane.

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Hand anatomy has no influence on emotional reactions during stone tool handling

Within the framework of electrodermography studies applied to cognitive archaeology, the Paleoneurology team of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), led by Emiliano Bruner, has published an article in the American Journal of Human Biology on the influence of the anatomy of the hand on haptic (or tactile) perception while handling stone tools

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How to Break the Bonds of Opioids

Many chronic pain patients can be slowly tapered from the drugs without increasing misery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hand anatomy has no influence on emotional reactions during stone tool handling

Within the framework of electrodermography studies applied to cognitive archaeology, the Paleoneurology team of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), led by Emiliano Bruner, has published an article in the American Journal of Human Biology on the influence of the anatomy of the hand on haptic (or tactile) perception while handling stone tools

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Natural causes are the key driver of change in Athabasca Delta flood patterns, research shows

Natural environmental processes—not upstream energy projects—are the primary cause of changing flood patterns in Alberta's Athabasca Delta, new research shows.

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Southern California city presses forward on climate lawsuit against fossil fuel companies

The state of New York may have suffered an emphatic defeat in a legal battle against ExxonMobil last week, but that has not deterred the city of Imperial Beach from pursuing its own lawsuit looking to force 18 energy companies in the oil and coal sectors to pay for damages associated with rising sea levels.

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Ski tourism may disappear if climate commitments not met

As the longest United Nations climate talks on record end with a compromise in Madrid, new research from the University of Waterloo has found that higher emission reduction pledges consistent with the Paris Climate Agreement are needed to preserve ski tourism in Eastern Canada and the U.S.

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Researchers print rainbow colorants on shimmering chocolate

ETH researchers are making chocolates shimmer in rainbow colors without the addition of colorants. They have found a way to imprint a special structure on the surface of the chocolate to create a targeted color effect.

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Fossil expands ancient fish family tree

A second ancient lungfish has been discovered in Africa, adding another piece to the jigsaw of evolving aquatic life forms more than 400 million years ago.

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Math model helps rangers protect national parks despite tight budgets

Mathematics can help reduce poaching and illegal logging in national parks, researchers have found.

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1 ranch, 26 wolves killed: Fight over endangered predators divides ranchers and conservationists

When Washington ranchers find that gray wolves have attacked their cattle, they can call the state wildlife agency, which has killed 31 of the protected predators since 2012 under a program intended to save vulnerable livestock.

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Math model helps rangers protect national parks despite tight budgets

Mathematics can help reduce poaching and illegal logging in national parks, researchers have found.

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1 ranch, 26 wolves killed: Fight over endangered predators divides ranchers and conservationists

When Washington ranchers find that gray wolves have attacked their cattle, they can call the state wildlife agency, which has killed 31 of the protected predators since 2012 under a program intended to save vulnerable livestock.

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Can a special diet save the endangered southern corroboree frog?

A University of Wollongong-led research team has released 115 southern corroboree frogs into a remote part of Kosciusko National Park. They are studying whether frogs fed dietary carotenoids in captivity have improved rates of survival and reproduction once released into the wild.

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Can a special diet save the endangered southern corroboree frog?

A University of Wollongong-led research team has released 115 southern corroboree frogs into a remote part of Kosciusko National Park. They are studying whether frogs fed dietary carotenoids in captivity have improved rates of survival and reproduction once released into the wild.

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Partnervåld ökar med löneskillnader

Partnervåld är svårt att mäta, anmälningsbenägenheten varierar och mörkertalen är stora. Nationalekonomen Sanna Ericsson vid Lunds universitet har därför undersökt partnervåld via sjukhusregister. Siffrorna över kvinnor som söker sjukhusvård för misshandel kan ge ett relativt bra mått på det grövre partnervåldet. För att kunna fånga det våld som sker i hemmet har hon uteslutit misshandel på allmän

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Healthy sleep may offset genetic heart disease risk

People with a high genetic risk of heart disease or stroke may be able to offset that risk with healthy sleep patterns, according to new research. The researchers looked at genetic variations known as SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) that scientists have already linked to the development of heart disease and stroke. They analyzed the SNPs from blood samples taken from more than 385,000 heal

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What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

Gold nanoparticles, which are supposed to be stable in biological environments, can be degraded inside cells.

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The chemicals that flavor vape liquid damage DNA

New research unpacks the list of chemicals that comprise flavored e-liquids and pods for vaping and details their harmful effects to lung tissue. These effects include inflammation and genetic damage that could indicate long-term risk for respiratory disease and even cancer . "While names like mango, cucumber, and mint give the impression that the flavors in e-juices are benign, the reality is th

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Walking and cycling to work linked with fewer heart attacks

Walking and cycling to work were associated with fewer heart attacks across 43 million adults in England, according to a new national study.

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Thawing permafrost affecting northern Alaska's land-to-ocean river flows

A new analysis of the changing character of runoff, river discharge and other hydrological cycle elements across the North Slope of Alaska reveals significant increases in the proportion of subsurface runoff and cold season discharge, changes the authors say are 'consistent with warming and thawing permafrost.'

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Watered down biodiversity: Sample type is critical in environmental DNA studies for biomonitoring

A new study looking at macroinvertebrate diversity in shallow, open-water wetlands found that sample choice is a critical factor for a comprehensive assessment of biodiversity. This study has major impacts for informing large-scale freshwater biomonitoring projects.

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Tracking thermodynamic fundamentals

Since the end of the 19th century, physicists know that the transfer of energy from one body to another is associated with entropy. Due to its fundamental importance began its rise as a useful theoretical quantity in physics, chemistry and engineering. However, it is very difficult to measure. Physicists have now measured entropy in complex plasmas: In a system of charged microparticles they could

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New method captures real-time movement of millions of molecules in 3-D

The human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, wages war in our bodies using a strategy evolved over millions of years that turns our own cellular machines against themselves. Despite massive strides in understanding the disease, there are still important gaps. For years, scientists at the University of Utah wished there was a way to visualize how the virus and its molecules interact with human cells i

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Mealworms provide plastic solution

Tiny mealworms may hold part of the solution to our giant plastics problem. Not only are they able to consume various forms of plastic, as previous Stanford research has shown, they can eat Styrofoam containing a common toxic chemical additive and still be safely used as protein-rich feedstock for other animals, according to a new Stanford study published in Environmental Science & Technology.

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The Supply and Demand That's Driving Climate Change

International efforts, including the Paris agreement, may not be able to solve the climate change crisis on their own. Tree_topandteaser.jpg Image credits: Photobank gallery/Shutterstock Earth Wednesday, December 18, 2019 – 15:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The latest UN Emissions Gap report gave a bleak outlook for the future of the planet's climate . In 2018, global greenhouse g

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What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

Gold nanoparticles, which are supposed to be stable in biological environments, can be degraded inside cells.

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New algorithm reveals many previously unknown potential antibiotics in the human gut

We typically think about antibiotics as drugs that our doctors prescribe. But they are actually molecular bullets that bacteria use to kill each other—humans merely borrowed and adapted these bioactive compounds to fight infections. Since many bacteria produce bioactive compounds the question arises whether ≈1000 bacterial species inhabiting our gut also produce antibiotics. If yes, does the conti

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Scientists are one step closer to solving the mystery of MLB's home run surge

Pitchers like Justin Verlander are adamant that something about Major League baseballs has changed in recent years. (David Lee/) "Major League Baseball's turning this game into a joke." These harsh but not entirely surprising words came from veteran standout Houston Astros pitcher Justin Verlander during baseball's annual All-Star Break this year, and they crystallized a certain frustration that

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New algorithm reveals many previously unknown potential antibiotics in the human gut

We typically think about antibiotics as drugs that our doctors prescribe. But they are actually molecular bullets that bacteria use to kill each other—humans merely borrowed and adapted these bioactive compounds to fight infections. Since many bacteria produce bioactive compounds the question arises whether ≈1000 bacterial species inhabiting our gut also produce antibiotics. If yes, does the conti

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Soil From a Northern Ireland Graveyard May Lead Scientists to a Powerful New Antibiotic

An ancient legend could provide a new weapon in the fight against deadly bacteria

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'Two-faced' solar cells generate a lot more power

A new thermodynamic formula reveals that bifacial solar cells in double-sided panels generate on average 15 to 20% more sunlight to electricity than the today's one-sided solar panels. Most of today's solar panels capture sunlight and convert it to electricity only from the side facing the sky. If the dark underside of a solar panel could also convert sunlight reflected off the ground, the panels

10h

Share Now Is the Latest Car-Share Service to Fold

The Daimler- and BMW-owned service says it will leave North America as part of an ongoing shakeout in the industry.

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Improved 3-D nanoprinting technique to build nanoskyscrapers

Nanowalls, nanobridges, nano "jungle gyms": It could seem like the description of a Lilliputian village, but these are actual 3-D-printed components with potential applications in nanoelectronics, smart materials and biomedical devices. Researchers at the Center for Soft and Living Matter (CSLM), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have improved a 3-D nanoprinting process tha

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Image of the Day: Black Cats

Melanism in felines is both helpful and harmful.

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A platform to prepare fluorescently tagged proteins and simulate their native environment

All cells have a lipid membrane that encircles their internal components—forming a protective barrier to control what gets in and what stays out. The proteins embedded in these membranes are essential for life; they help facilitate nutrient transport, energy conversion and storage, and cellular communication. They are also important in human disease, and represent around 60 percent of approved dru

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Mitonuclear interactions in the control of life history

Mitonuclear interactions are believed to play an important role in the so-called "life history" of Eukaryotic organisms. Unfortunately, no one has come up with any sort of general concrete theory that can predict or even describe these interactions. A recent thematic issue of Philosophical Transaction of the Royal Society comprises a series of articles that attempt the formidable task of linking m

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A platform to prepare fluorescently tagged proteins and simulate their native environment

All cells have a lipid membrane that encircles their internal components—forming a protective barrier to control what gets in and what stays out. The proteins embedded in these membranes are essential for life; they help facilitate nutrient transport, energy conversion and storage, and cellular communication. They are also important in human disease, and represent around 60 percent of approved dru

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Smelly, poisonous molecule may be a sure-fire sign of extraterrestrial life

Phosphine is among the stinkiest, most toxic gases on Earth, found in some of the foulest of places, including penguin dung heaps, the depths of swamps and bogs, and even in the bowels of some badgers and fish. This putrid "swamp gas" is also highly flammable and reactive with particles in our atmosphere.

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Researchers develop new materials theory relevant to ultrafast electronics, batteries and more

Phase transitions have long been of crucial importance to scientific research. The change from water to ice or steam is a simple example. A phase transition important to pioneering research today is that from metal to insulator in materials referred to as "correlated oxides." Scientists have reaped many insights into phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism by studying what happens when a co

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Researchers report MRI on the atomic scale

Researchers at QuTech, a collaboration of TU Delft and TNO, have developed a new magnetic quantum sensing technology that can image samples with atomic-scale resolution. It opens the door towards imaging individual molecules, like proteins and other complex systems, atom by atom. The team reports on their results in Nature on the 18th of December.

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Fluorescence spectroscopy helps to evaluate meat quality

Scientists of Sechenov University with colleagues from Australia have proposed a quicker and cheaper way to assess meat quality. It is based on exposing a small sample to UV light and measuring the spectrum of emission. The method proved to be precise in the classification of meat into standard quality categories. The description of the method and the results of the work were published in Journal

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Mitonuclear interactions in the control of life history

Mitonuclear interactions are believed to play an important role in the so-called "life history" of Eukaryotic organisms. Unfortunately, no one has come up with any sort of general concrete theory that can predict or even describe these interactions. A recent thematic issue of Philosophical Transaction of the Royal Society comprises a series of articles that attempt the formidable task of linking m

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African swine fever kills nearly 30,000 pigs in Indonesia

Tens of thousands of pigs have died from African swine fever in Indonesia's North Sumatra province, officials said Thursday, the first time the virus has been detected in the country.

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Physicists determine the barely-measurable property entropy for the first time in complex plasmas

Since the end of the 19th century, physicists have known that the transfer of energy from one body to another is associated with entropy. It quickly became clear that this quantity is of fundamental importance, and so began its triumphant rise as a useful theoretical quantity in physics, chemistry and engineering. However, it is often very difficult to measure. Professor Dietmar Block and Frank Wi

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Swiss to vote on setting climate goals in constitution

Swiss environmental activists collected enough signatures to force a referendum on setting specific goals for combating climate change in the country's constitution, authorities said Thursday.

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African swine fever kills nearly 30,000 pigs in Indonesia

Tens of thousands of pigs have died from African swine fever in Indonesia's North Sumatra province, officials said Thursday, the first time the virus has been detected in the country.

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Chef for Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste advarer mod øget overvågning: »Vi er jo ikke en bananrepublik«

Yderligere overvågning vil ødelægge danske borgeres mulighed for at leve frit og uforstyrret ifølge Lars Findsen, chef for Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste.

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En grönare jul på faten

Julmust är okej men köttbullarna ligger risigt till, när det gäller klimatavtryck. Dagens julbord är grönare och mer individuellt. För det går att äta julbord och rädda klimatet samtidigt – särskilt på restaurang där vi är mindre traditionsbundna. När vi sätter oss till bords på julafton vill vi ha det som det alltid varit, julbordet ska digna av rätter som nedärvts i generationer. Det ska vara s

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How to parent like a comedian, Gaffigan style

Sometimes if we bring our own point of view into someone else's act, it's not funny. It's funny through their vantage point. Although Jeannie Gaffigan can channel her husband Jim Gaffigan in writing content for his standup act, she sometimes disagrees with his point of view — even though she knows it's funny. Similarly to their differing styles of comedy — Jeannie is more of an essayist, Jim is m

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Reducing mouse allergens may improve lung growth in asthmatic children

Lowering exposure to allergens from mice may lead to improved lung growth for children with asthma living in low-income neighborhoods, helping them avoid lung ailments and possibly live longer, according to newly published research in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Affordable Care Act led to improved treatment of colorectal cancer among young adults

An Affordable Care Act provision that allowed young adults to be covered under their parents' insurance led to a shift to earlier-stage diagnosis and more timely receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy among young colorectal cancer patients, according to a new American Cancer Society study. The study appears in JNCI.

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Where Is My Mind? – Issue 79: Catalysts

In 1976, Francis Crick arrived at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, overlooking a Pacific Shangri-La with cotton candy skies and a beaming, blue-green sea. He had already won the Nobel Prize for co-discovering the double-helix structure of DNA, revealing the basis of life to be a purely physical, not a mystical, process. He hoped to do the same thing for consciousness. If matter was str

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The Eccentric Seer of Supernovas – Issue 79: Catalysts

There was little expectation that anything important would occur at the 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society, which began on December 15 in the main lecture room of the physics department at Stanford University. Forty papers were presented to an audience of only 60, an indication of how modest the session was expected to be. The subject that produced the most research was cosmic radiatio

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How to Discover a Galaxy with a Telephoto Lens – Issue 79: Catalysts

Like countless so-crazy-it-just-might-work schemes, this one began with a gripe session. In the fall of 2011, Roberto Abraham and Pieter van Dokkum were commiserating at a Nepalese restaurant in Toronto. Over curry and rice—and a generous quantity of beer—the old friends bemoaned a problem they'd discussed many times before. As observational cosmologists, they shared a professional interest in ho

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Cool It, Krugman

Kelsey Dake S trangely, and unexpectedly , the big reveal in Paul Krugman's new anthology comes right at the end. All through the book, the reader wonders how so talented and fortunate an author came to develop such a furious and bitter voice. What drives a dazzling academic—the winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in economics, no less—to turn his New York Times column into an undiscriminating guillot

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Sequestered Life

Researchers may (and I emphasize "may") have found life in isolated underground pockets of water in South African mines. What makes this potential find interesting is that this water has been isolated for about 2 billion years. Scanning electron microscopes have found what researchers believe may be a dividing bacterium. If this is confirmed it will be an exciting discovery for a few reasons. But

10h

Kunskapsbrist om skaderisk inom paraidrott

Kristina Fagher, doktorand i Rehabiliteringsmedicin vid Lunds universitet, har disputerat med en avhandling om skador och sjukdomar som drabbar paraidrottare. Denna grupp av elitidrottare har olika typer av antingen medfödda eller förvärvade funktionsnedsättningar, skador eller sjukdomar.

11h

Julens många dofter väcker känslor

Saffransbullar, hyacint, kryddnejlikor, glögg och gran. Julens dofter är många. Och doftminnen kan vara starka och förflytta oss i minnet på en sekund. En som forskar om just luktsinnet är Mattias Alenius som är professor på Institutionen för molekylärbiologi.Här berättar han mer om dofter och minnen. Luktorganet hos människan är stort som ett frimärke och är en komplicerad molekyldetektor med 65

11h

How classroom technology is holding students back

Educators love digital devices, but there's little evidence they help children—especially those who most need help.

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Go figure: salary drives researchers to move to new countries

Nature, Published online: 19 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03890-w More than two-thirds of scientists polled in a survey say that they would move for the 'right academic job — if the pay suits.

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What Climate Change Tells Us about Being Human

The crisis requires us to face hard limits set by nature while also reimagining the stories we tell ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the scramble for sand is destroying the Mekong

The Mekong river is being damaged by sand extraction, adding to calls for limits on sand usage.

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How Online Grocery Delivery Could Help Alleviate Food Deserts

Delivery service could make it easier to access fresh, healthy food in these areas, a study finds. It lends support to a pilot program that lets people pay for these groceries with food stamps. (Image credit: svetikd/Getty Images)

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