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nyheder2019december23

Injection of virus-delivered gene silencer blocks ALS degeneration, saves motor function

Novel spinal therapy/delivery approach prevented disease onset in neurodegenerative ALS disease model in adult mice and blocked progression in animals already showing disease symptoms.

5h

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space

Farmers could soon be growing tomatoes bunched like grapes in a storage unit, on the roof of a skyscraper, or even in space. That's if a clutch of new gene-edited crops prove as fruitful as the first batch.

6h

Kritik af regeringens plan for landbrugsstøtte: »Det er simpelthen tæskedumt«

Regeringen kunne have valgt at bruge 15 procent af EU's landbrugsstøtte på grønne tiltag, men nøjes med syv procent for at være »fair over for landbrugserhvervet«. Naturfredningsforeningen og Enhedslisten finder det uforståeligt.

10h

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'Lost crops' could have fed as many as maize

Make some room in the garden, you storied three sisters: the winter squash, climbing beans and the vegetable we know as corn. Grown together, newly examined "lost crops" could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as traditionally grown maize, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

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22min

Genius Series: Why Schrödinger's cat is the ultimate reality check

Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! Buy here. In this design, we pay tribute to the ultimate reality check in physics: Schrödinger's cat! Erwin Schrödinger was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist. Other geniuses in this series include Nikola Tesla , Marie Curie and Isaac Newton . None Quantum mechanics has produced its share of weird ideas, not least

23min

Tweezers that the job done perfectly

Keep it tidy. (DepositPhotos/) When's the last time you groomed your unruly facial hair? And when's the last time the feat was painless? Be it shaping your eyebrows, plucking stray chin hairs, or even removing a splinter, a quality pair of stainless steel tweezers with precise tips will make the process much easier. It doesn't take much to make room for one of these in your grooming routine, and

33min

Infections: How do our bodies know when to retaliate?

A new study shows how our cells detect if an infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious threat and whether to mount a defence.

37min

'Lost crops' could have fed as many as maize

Grown together, newly examined 'lost crops' could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as traditionally grown maize, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

39min

Ten of our favorite DIY stories to take you into the new year

We love these stories like this child loves this pineapple. (VitalikRadko via Depositphotos/) It's been quite a year for PopSci DIY . We've published more than 300 stories on a variety of useful topics—from tech tips to full-on buildable projects. We're proud of every single one, which made it extremely difficult to pick a select few for this roundup. But if there's anything DIYers understand, it

54min

Rhino poaching rises in Botswana despite government crackdown

Thirteen rhinos have been poached in Botswana in the last two months, the tourism ministry said, as the government tries to crackdown on hunting of the endangered species.

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Can brain injury from boxing, MMA be measured?

For boxers and mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters, is there a safe level of exposure to head trauma? A new study shows different effects in the brain for younger, current fighters compared to older, retired fighters. The study is published in the December 23, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Rhino poaching rises in Botswana despite government crackdown

Thirteen rhinos have been poached in Botswana in the last two months, the tourism ministry said, as the government tries to crackdown on hunting of the endangered species.

1h

Powder, not gas: A safer, more effective way to create a star on Earth

A major issue with operating ring-shaped fusion facilities known as tokamaks is keeping the plasma that fuels fusion reactions free of impurities that could reduce the efficiency of the reactions. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found that sprinkling a type of powder into the plasma could aid in harnessing the ultra-hot gas w

1h

'Tweezer clock' may help tell time more precisely

Atomic clocks are used around the world to precisely tell time. Each "tick" of the clock depends on atomic vibrations and their effects on surrounding electromagnetic fields. Standard atomic clocks in use today, based on the atom cesium, tell time by "counting" radio frequencies. These clocks can measure time to a precision of one second per every hundreds of millions of years. Newer atomic clocks

1h

Doctors Are Giving Alzheimer's Patients LSD

Doctors dosed nearly 50 elderly Alzheimer's disease patients with low doses of LSD to see if the psychedelic drug had any impact on their cognition or balance. Psychedelic drugs like LSD are a hot topic among medical researchers — studies have indicated that it could help treat conditions like alcohol dependence and depression . The new study didn't show any signs that LSD improved Alzheimer's pa

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The Fight Over the 1619 Project Is Not About the Facts

W hen The New York Times Magazine published its 1619 Project in August, people lined up on the street in New York City to get copies. Since then, the project—a historical analysis of how slavery shaped American political, social, and economic institutions—has spawned a podcast, a high-school curriculum, and an upcoming book. For Nikole Hannah-Jones, the reporter who conceived of the project, the

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The global reef expedition: French Polynesia

Scientists have released their findings from the largest coral reef survey and mapping expedition ever conducted in French Polynesia. The Global Reef Expedition: French Polynesia Final Report provides a comprehensive summary of the research findings from the expedition, an assessment of the health and resiliency of French Polynesia's coral reefs, and recommendations for preserving French Polynesia

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First flu virus sets stage for how well we fight it later on

How successfully we fend off the flu virus depends not only on its notorious ability to change with the season, but also on the strain we first encountered during childhood, a new study shows. The findings offer an explanation for why some patients fare much worse than others when infected with the same strain of the flu virus. The results also could help inform strategies aimed at curbing the im

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For restricted eaters, a place at the table but not the meal

People with restricted diets — due to allergies, health issues or religious or cultural norms — are more likely to feel lonely when they can't share in what others are eating, new Cornell University research shows.

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Chinese Farmers: Criminals Are Using Drones to Infect Our Pigs

Deadly Drop A Chinese airport has found itself caught in the crossfire of a bizarre battle between pig farmers and criminal gangs. In October, navigations systems started to fail on flights in and out of Harbin airport while they flew over Zhaozhou county. Authorities later traced the cause of the disturbance to a farm's unauthorized anti-drone device, which it had begun using in an attempt to st

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Danske kvinder føder langt færre tvillinger end for 10 år siden

Det skyldes en målrettet indsats indenfor fertilitetsbehandling, fortæller overlæge.

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NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Phanfone's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Phanfone. In the Philippines, the storm is known locally as Ursula.

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Super-resolution at all scales with active thermal detection

A research team found the temperature increase caused by the probe beam could be utilized to generate a signal per se for detecting objects. Notably, this so-called 'active thermal detection' enables super-resolution imaging at all scales.

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Self-driving DeLorean learns how to drift

Researchers are teaching a driverless DeLorean to steer with the agility and precision of a human driver to improve how autonomous cars handle hazardous conditions. As the DeLorean rolled to a stop and the cloud of tire smoke cleared, Jon Goh peeked out the sliver of the passenger-side window to see dozens of gathered spectators cheering and high-fiving the successful test. The crowd, and anticip

1h

3D atlas of bone marrow — in single cell resolution

Stem cells located in the bone marrow generate and control the production of blood and immune cells. Researchers have now developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organization of the bone marrow at the single cell level. Using this approach the teams have identified previously unknown cell types that create specific local environments required for blood generation from stem cells. The

1h

Scientists develop gentle, microscopic hands to study tiny, soft materials

Handling very soft, delicate items without damaging them is hard enough with human hands, let alone doing it at the microscopic scale with laboratory instruments. Three new studies show how scientists have honed a technique for handling tiny, soft particles using precisely controlled fluid flows that act as gentle microscopic hands. The technique allows researchers to test the physical limits of t

1h

General Motors Wants Self-Driving Cars to Lose the Steering Wheel

No Hands! General Motors has a bold plan for testing its self-driving cars: rip out the steering wheel and let them roam on public streets. The company is currently petitioning the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for permission to begin the test, according to Reuters . And while the company seems convinced that the cars would be able to operate safely even without huma

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Hollywood Just Patched an In-Theater Movie, Cats, for the First Time in History

The Hollywood adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Cats opened in theaters last week to a bewildered cacophony of yowls and hisses from critics, some of whom objected to a two-hour unexpected staging of The Unbearable Horniness of Feline Being . No, I haven't seen the movie, but a lot — a lot — of people have been remarking on this particular aspect of the film. Now, in a completely unprecedented

1h

Nanoparticle therapeutic restores tumor suppressor, sensitizes cancer cells to treatment

Leveraging advancements in nanotechnology, investigators from the Brigham have found that restoring p53 not only delays the growth of p53-deficient liver and lung cancer cells but may also make tumors more vulnerable to cancer drugs known as mTOR inhibitors.

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Cultural evolution caused broad-scale historical declines of large mammals across China

Researchers from Aarhus University and Nanjing University have shown that cultural evolution overshadowed climate change in driving historical broad-scale megafauna dynamics across China. By mining Chinese administrative records for data on species distributions and land use alongside climate data from 2 to 1953 CE, the researchers identified the millennia-long spread of agriculture and agricultur

1h

A fast and inexpensive device to capture and identify viruses

A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University.

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Stanford study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish

Researchers combined field studies, lab experiments and modeling to figure out how whales manage to capture fish. They found that whales may avoid triggering anchovies' escape because the fish are more used to fleeing from smaller predators.

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New treatment Strategy may thwart deadly brain tumors

New research reveals a promising strategy that makes glioblastoma susceptible to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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Calcium channels play a key role in the development of diabetes

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have deciphered the diabetogenic role of a certain type of calcium channel in insulin-secreting beta cells. The researchers believe that blockade of these channels could be a potential new treatment strategy for diabetes. The study is published in the scientific journal PNAS.

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2D materials: arrangement of atoms measured in silicene

Silicene consists of a single layer of silicon atoms. In contrast to the ultra-flat material graphene, which is made of carbon, silicene shows surface irregularities that influence its electronic properties. Now, physicists from the University of Basel have been able to precisely determine this corrugated structure. As they report in the journal PNAS, their method is also suitable for analyzing ot

1h

Chimpanzees more likely to share tools, teach skills when task is complex

A new study finds that chimpanzees that use a multi-step process and complex tools to gather termites are more likely to share tools with novices. The study helps illuminate chimpanzees' capacity for prosocial — or helping — behavior, a quality that has been recognized for its potential role in the evolution of human cultural abilities.

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Cha-cha-chimp? Ape study suggests urge to dance is prehuman

Chimpanzees seen clapping, tapping and swaying along to piano rhythms in a music booth Akira stands up and sways about. Pal is big on clapping. Ai is into tapping her foot, while Gon bangs and slaps the walls. Not the latest teen band sensation, but a spectacle far more impressive: the moves of a group of chimpanzees that scientists believe shed light on the prehistoric origins of human dancing.

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Gone fishin' — for proteins

Casting lines into human cells to snag proteins, a team of researchers has solved a 20-year-old mystery of cell biology.

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Climate change not the only threat to vulnerable species, habitat matters

Though climate change is becoming one of the greatest threats to the Earth's already stressed ecosystems, it may not be the most severe threat today for all species, say authors of a new report on the effects of deforestation on two lemur species in Madagascar.

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3D atlas of bone marrow — in single cell resolution

Stem cells located in the bone marrow generate and control the production of blood and immune cells. Researchers have now developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organization of the bone marrow at the single cell level. Using this approach the teams have identified previously unknown cell types that create specific local environments required for blood generation from stem cells. The

2h

New polymer material may help batteries become self-healing, recyclable

Lithium-ion batteries are notorious for developing internal electrical shorts that can ignite a battery's liquid electrolytes, leading to explosions and fires. Engineers have developed a solid polymer-based electrolyte that can self-heal after damage — and the material can also be recycled without the use of harsh chemicals or high temperatures.

2h

The Rivian pickup's real edge over Tesla's Cybertruck isn't its battery

The electric vehicle startup's platform approach helped it raise nearly $3 billion this year.

2h

Time your chess matches with these on-the-mark game clocks

Queen to Rook 5 (Tanner Mardis via Unsplash/) Sure, you can play chess online all day long with random avatars from around the world—and sit there seething when your opponent leaves the clock running instead of resigning like a good sport. Why not play more games in person? To achieve precision gaming and chase your dream of reaching Grandmaster level "over the board," all you need is a proper ch

2h

Chimpanzees more likely to share tools, teach skills when task is complex

Teach a chimpanzee to fish for insects to eat, and you feed her for a lifetime. Teach her a better way to use tools in gathering prey, and you may change the course of evolution.

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Study reveals a role for jumping genes during times of stress

Only percent of human DNA codes for proteins, and approximately half of the rest of the genome is made up of what used to be called "junk" sequences that can copy themselves into RNA or DNA and jump from one location to another. Previous research led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) had revealed a critical role for one of these jumping genes during times of stress. In new r

2h

Study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish

Small fish are speedy and easy to scare. So how is it that a giant humpback whale, attacking at speeds about as fast as a person jogs, is able to eat enough fish to sustain itself? Combining field studies, laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling, researchers at Stanford University have found a surprising answer to this seemingly paradoxical feat: Whales capture fish using stealth and dece

2h

Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers

A team of researchers created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their 'lost years.'

2h

Scientists develop gentle, microscopic hands to study tiny, soft materials

Handling very soft, delicate items without damaging them is hard enough with human hands, let alone doing it at the microscopic scale with laboratory instruments. Three new studies show how scientists have honed a technique for handling tiny, soft particles using precisely controlled fluid flows that act as gentle microscopic hands. The technique allows researchers to test the physical limits of t

2h

A new method for boosting the learning of mathematics

How can mathematics learning in primary school be facilitated? Scientists have developed an intervention to promote the learning of math in school. Named ACE-ArithmEcole, the program is designed to help schoolchildren surpass their intuitions and rely instead on the use of arithmetic principles. More than half (50.5%) of the students who took part in the intervention were able to solve difficult p

2h

Unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels

A new study has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean.

2h

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space

Genetic editing is moving tomato crops from the field to the city skyline, or even outer space. Researchers used CRISPR gene editing to optimize tomatoes for urban agriculture.

2h

A fast and inexpensive device to capture and identify viruses

A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University.

2h

Cultural evolution caused broad-scale historical declines of large mammals across China

Cultural evolution has been the dominant driver of range contractions in megafauna taxa across China since the beginning of the Common Era, with little or no direct importance of climate. A research team led by Aarhus University along with collaborators from Nanjing University analyzed maps of megafauna distribution dynamics and societal development based on Chinese archival records alongside data

2h

Chimpanzees more likely to share tools, teach skills when task is complex

Teach a chimpanzee to fish for insects to eat, and you feed her for a lifetime. Teach her a better way to use tools in gathering prey, and you may change the course of evolution.

2h

2-D materials: Arrangement of atoms measured in silicene

Silicene consists of a single layer of silicon atoms. In contrast to the ultra-flat material graphene, which is made of carbon, silicene shows surface irregularities that influence its electronic properties. Now, physicists from the University of Basel have been able to precisely determine this corrugated structure. As they report in the journal PNAS, their method is also suitable for analyzing ot

2h

A fast and inexpensive device to capture and identify viruses

A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University.

2h

Study reveals a role for jumping genes during times of stress

Only percent of human DNA codes for proteins, and approximately half of the rest of the genome is made up of what used to be called "junk" sequences that can copy themselves into RNA or DNA and jump from one location to another. Previous research led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) had revealed a critical role for one of these jumping genes during times of stress. In new r

2h

Study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish

Small fish are speedy and easy to scare. So how is it that a giant humpback whale, attacking at speeds about as fast as a person jogs, is able to eat enough fish to sustain itself? Combining field studies, laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling, researchers at Stanford University have found a surprising answer to this seemingly paradoxical feat: Whales capture fish using stealth and dece

2h

How humpback whales sneak up on thousands of unsuspecting fish

The fish aren't prepared for a predator to be so … big

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Dancing chimpanzees may reveal how humans started to boogie

Chimps can keep the beat—but they also groove to sounds that aren't rhythmic

2h

Powder, not gas: A safer, more effective way to create a star on Earth

PPPL scientists have found that sprinkling a type of powder into fusion plasma could aid in harnessing the ultra-hot gas within a tokamak facility to produce heat to create electricity without producing greenhouse gases or long-term radioactive waste.

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What We Learned in 2019: Health and Medicine

Developments in medicine and health that we're still thinking about at year's end.

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Navy Bans TikTok, Calling It a "Cybersecurity Threat"

Hit Delete Members of the United States Navy are now banned from using shortform video app TikTok on their government-issued mobile devices. On Tuesday, the Navy issued a "Cyber Awareness Message" announcing the ban on a Facebook page serving military members, Reuters reported on Friday. The message reportedly called TikTok a "cybersecurity threat" and noted that anyone with the app installed on

2h

Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done

Immunologists from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have revealed two independent mechanisms driving self-defense molecules to trigger cell death.

2h

'Tweezer clock' may help tell time more precisely

A new optical atomic clock makes ultra-precise time measurements.

2h

Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties

Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists. The films combine exceptionally strong light absorption with good charge transport — qualities that make them ideal for applications such as photovoltaics and LEDs.

2h

Too little (or too much) water may affect older women's cognition

Not getting enough water is enough to make you feel sluggish and give you a headache, but a new study suggests for older women, too little hydration may also relate to cognitive performance. Researchers investigated whether hydration levels and water intake among older adults related to their scores on several tests designed to measure cognitive function. They found that among women, lower hydrat

2h

Whoopi the manta ray shows off super speedy healing

Whoopi the manta ray—a regular visitor to Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef—has helped scientists study manta rays' impressive ability to heal. Whoopi, who has swum with thousands of tourists in Western Australia over the years, was hit by a boat in 2015, suffering propeller cuts measuring up to 20 centimeters (almost 8 inches) to the edge of her wing. Christine Dudgeon, a research fellow at the

2h

Barring nonmedical exemptions increases vaccination rates, study finds

The first rigorously controlled study of a 2016 California law that aimed to increase childhood vaccination rates by eliminating nonmedical exemptions has found the law worked as intended, although the researchers noted a small increase in the number of medical exemptions. The study provides definitive evidence on the success of the California law, as policymakers across the United States and arou

2h

Obesity is a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer

A recent study showed that being overweight or obese was a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer, but it did not take into account related cardiac risk factors or other classic risk factors of cardiotoxicity produced by anthracycline and trastuzumab. In a study published Dec. 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine, Elisé Kaboré of Centre Georges-Fr

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California's stricter vaccine exemption policy and improved vaccination rates

California's elimination, in 2016, of non-medical vaccine exemptions from school entry requirements was associated with an estimated increase in vaccination coverage at state and county levels, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Nathan Lo of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.

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The world's first 3D-printed community is officially under construction

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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IBM's cobalt-free EV battery uses materials extracted from seawater

submitted by /u/grayola04 [link] [comments]

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This Year's 4 Most Mind-Boggling Stories About the Brain

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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r/Futurology 2020 Prediction Competition

We've never done it before, but we thought it would be fun to have a 2020 Prediction Competition where people put up their Futurology related predictions for 2020 and we vote a winner this time next year based on who gets the most right. Apart from bragging rights, we've some Reddit Gold & Silver to give away as prizes and we'll probably think up a title for the winner to use as their flair. So j

2h

Malnutrition Hits The Obese As Well As The Underfed

New research finds millions of people are getting enough calories but not enough essential nutrients. We asked leading researchers how to fix the problem. (Image credit: Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR)

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Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £400 million per year

Scientists have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK.

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The Year That Measles Returned

#27 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Ny metod hittar sönderslitna planeter

En grupp astronomer har hittat ett nytt sätt att leta efter planeter kring främmande stjärnor – exoplaneter – och på köpet får de möjlighet att studera en ganska outforskad typ av planet. Sedan tidigare har det varit känt att vissa planeter som kretsar nära sin stjärna kan förlora en del av sin atmosfär. Den nöts bort av strålning från stjärnan, eller av tidvattenkrafter som sliter i planeten. Gas

3h

Scientists learn what women know — and don't know — about breast density and cancer risk

A new study by scientists at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice conducted focus groups with women in three different states to learn what they did and did not know about breast density, in general and their own. The study found that women had varying knowledge. What they all had in common was a strong desire to learn more.

3h

How the Sagan standard can help you make better decisions

Carl Sagan famously shared the aphorism "Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Evidence." This approach can help us fight off fake information. Scientific thinkers in centuries before Carl Sagan also expressed similar sentiment. None Is there an omnipotent all-knowing entity, otherwise known as "God", ruling our daily affairs and caring enough to judge our behaviors on an individual basis? O

3h

Massive gas disk raises questions about planet formation theory

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a young star surrounded by an astonishing mass of gas. The star, called 49 Ceti, is 40 million years old and conventional theories of planet formation predict that the gas should have disappeared by that age. The enigmatically large amount of gas requests a reconsideration of our current understanding of planet formati

3h

Buckyballs release electron-positron pairs in forward directions

New research reveals the characteristics of positronium formation within football-shaped nanoparticles, C60, for the first time. At specific positron impact energies, the study shows that positronium emission dominates in the same direction as incoming positrons.

3h

Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties

Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists. The films combine exceptionally strong light absorption with good charge transport — qualities that make them ideal for applications such as photovoltaics and LEDs.

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Moms' obesity in pregnancy is linked to lag in sons' development and IQ

A mother's obesity in pregnancy can affect her child's development years down the road, according to researchers who found lagging motor skills in preschoolers and lower IQ in middle childhood for boys whose mothers were severely overweight while pregnant. At age 7, the boys whose mothers were overweight or obese in pregnancy had scores 5 or more points lower on full-scale IQ tests. No effect was

3h

This year, space stole all the headlines. Here are our favorite stories

Scientists obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. (Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration/) A lot happened above our heads this decade. NASA and other space agencies have pu

3h

Iron crystal 'snow' falls in Earth's core

The Earth's inner core is hot, under immense pressure, and snow-capped, according to new research. The findings could help scientists better understand forces that affect the entire planet. The snow is made of tiny particles of iron—much heavier than any snowflake on Earth's surface—that fall from the molten outer core and pile on top of the inner core, creating piles up to 200 miles thick that c

3h

Donald Trump Doesn't Seem to Know Anything About Wind Power

U.S. President Donald Trump is simultaneously an expert on wind power and completely baffled by it — by his own estimation, anyways. "I never understood wind," Trump said during a speech at conservative nonprofit Turning Point USA's Student Action Summit on Saturday, according to the official White House transcript . "You know, I know windmills very much. I have studied it better than anybody." B

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The link between drawing and seeing in the brain

Drawing an object and naming it engages the brain in similar ways, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The finding demonstrates the importance of the visual processing system for producing drawings of an object.

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High fat diet impairs new neuron creation in female mice

A high fat diet limits the birth and growth of new neurons in adult female, but not male, mice, according to new research published in eNeuro. Further research could inspire metabolism-based preventions and treatments for brain disorders.

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New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

Researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

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Russia's Floating Nuclear Power Plant Began Generating Electricity

Coming Online Russia's floating nuclear power plant is now operational after making the long journey across the Arctic Ocean. The power plant, Akademik Lomonosov, docked in the remote town of Pevek in September, Business Insider reports , where it's now generating electricity for the first time. Operating a nuclear plant atop a barge is a world-first, and Russia expects the twin reactors to power

4h

Development of a stretchable vibration-powered device using a liquid electret

Researchers developed a liquid electret material capable of semi-permanently retaining static electricity. They subsequently combined this material with soft electrodes to create the first bendable, stretchable vibration-powered device in the world. Because this device is highly deformable and capable of converting very subtle vibrations into electrical signals, it may be applicable to the develop

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How to Tell If Your Body Is In Ketosis

It can be harder to enter ketosis than you might think, but there are telltale signs your keto diet is working.

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The coolest LEGO ® in the universe

For the first time, LEGO ® has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy — the development of quantum computing. A figure and four blocks were placed inside the most effective refrigerator in the world, capable of reaching 1.6 millidegrees above absolute zero (minus 273.15 Centigrade), which is about 200,000 times colder than room

4h

Artificial intelligence tracks down leukemia

Artificial intelligence can detect one of the most common forms of blood cancer – acute myeloid leukemia — with high reliability. Researchers at the DZNE and the University of Bonn have now shown this in a proof-of-concept study. Their approach is based on the analysis of the gene activity of cells found in the blood. Used in practice, this approach could support conventional diagnostics and poss

4h

Development of a stretchable vibration-powered device using a liquid electret

Researchers developed a liquid electret material capable of semi-permanently retaining static electricity. They subsequently combined this material with soft electrodes to create the first bendable, stretchable vibration-powered device in the world. Because this device is highly deformable and capable of converting very subtle vibrations into electrical signals, it may be applicable to the develop

4h

How fish get their shape

Researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns — also known as chevron patterns — in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually requi

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NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Phanfone's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Phanfone. In the Philippines, the storm is known locally as Ursula.

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The "Cats" Movie Was So Awful They Patched It

CGI Update The 2019 cinematic take on Frank Lloyd Webber's 1981 musical "Cats" was a catastrophe from the get-go: critics and moviegoers alike were appalled by what they saw. And now, as the movie barely survives its opening weekend , a memo obtained by The Hollywood Reporter suggests that distributor Universal has notified thousands of theaters that they'll be receiving an updated version of the

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The year's best books on the economy we live in

The year 2019 produced some evidence-based antidotes to the trendy political narratives of robot domination and the collapse of capitalism.

4h

For CRISPR, tweaking DNA fragments before inserting yields highest efficiency rates yet

University of Illinois researchers achieved the highest reported rates of inserting genes into human cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system, a necessary step for harnessing CRISPR for clinical gene-therapy applications.

4h

Computing with molecules: A big step in molecular spintronics

Spintronics or spin electronics in contrast to conventional electronics uses the spin of electrons for sensing, information storage, transport, and processing. Potential advantages are nonvolatility, increased data processing speed, decreased electric power consumption, and higher integration densities compared to conventional semiconductor devices. Molecular spintronics aims for the ultimate step

4h

Evolutionary changes in brain potentially make us more prone to anxiety

Neurochemicals such as serotonin and dopamine play crucial roles in cognitive and emotional functions of our brain. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) is one of the genes responsible for transporting neurotransmitters and regulating neuronal signaling. A research team has reconstructed ancestral VMAT1 proteins, revealing the functional changes in neurotransmitter uptake of VMAT1 throughout

4h

OU geoscientists document 300 million year old atmospheric dust

Dust plays a crucial role in the life and health of our planet. In our modern world, dust-borne nutrients traveling in great dust storms from the Saharan Desert fertilize the soil in the Amazon Rainforest and feed photosynthetic organisms like algae in the Atlantic Ocean. In turn, it is those organisms that breathe in carbon dioxide and expel oxygen.

4h

For CRISPR, tweaking DNA fragments before inserting yields highest efficiency rates yet

University of Illinois researchers achieved the highest reported rates of inserting genes into human cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system, a necessary step for harnessing CRISPR for clinical gene-therapy applications.

4h

Scientists develop gentle, microscopic hands to study tiny, soft materials

Handling very soft, delicate items without damaging them is hard enough with human hands, let alone doing it at the microscopic scale with laboratory instruments. Three new studies show how scientists have honed a technique for handling tiny, soft particles using precisely controlled fluid flows that act as gentle microscopic hands. The technique allows researchers to test the physical limits of t

4h

New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

4h

Geoscientists document the role of atmospheric dust on marine ecosystems 300 million years ago

Dust plays a crucial role in the life and health of our planet. In our modern world, dust-borne nutrients traveling in great dust storms from the Saharan Desert fertilize the soil in the Amazon Rainforest and feed photosynthetic organisms like algae in the Atlantic Ocean. In turn, it is those organisms that breathe in carbon dioxide and expel oxygen.

4h

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached—a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the nation's largest estuary.

4h

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached—a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the nation's largest estuary.

4h

How Soon is Now? (The Astronomical Mix)

Definitions of past, present, and future get confusing when you venture deep into the cosmos

4h

Brain discovery upends ideas about attention

An area in the brain's temporal lobe helps steer the spotlight of attention, new research suggests. As you read this line, you're bringing each word into clear view for a brief moment while blurring out the rest, perhaps even ignoring the roar of a leaf blower outside. It may seem like a trivial skill, but it's actually fundamental to almost everything we do. "The last time an attention controlli

4h

Disposal packets make it easier to get rid of leftover painkillers

Convenient disposal of opioids paired with tailored risk education can reduce the numbers of people keeping unused painkillers, researcher report. Most parents keep their own and their child's unused painkillers, even after they're no longer medically necessary for pain. Prompt disposal of leftover medications improves when parents receive a disposal packet at the time they receive a prescription

4h

Trump's NSF pick reflects close links between agency and White House

Sethuraman Panchanathan would succeed France Córdova if confirmed by Senate

4h

Rise of the Machines

There may be things to learn from the one known world in the universe dominated by complex machines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

For CRISPR, tweaking DNA fragments before inserting yields highest efficiency rates yet

University of Illinois researchers achieved the highest reported rates of inserting genes into human cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system, a necessary step for harnessing CRISPR for clinical gene-therapy applications. By chemically tweaking the ends of the DNA to be inserted, the new technique is up to five times more efficient than current approaches.

4h

Computing with molecules: A big step in molecular spintronics

Chemists and physicists at Kiel University joined forces with colleagues from France, and Switzerland to design, deposit and operate single molecular spin switches on surfaces. The newly developed molecules feature stable spin states and do not lose their functionality upon adsorption on surfaces. They present their results in the current issue of the renowned journal Nature Nanotechnology.

4h

New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

4h

Scientists develop gentle, microscopic hands to study tiny, soft materials

Handling very soft, delicate items without damaging them is hard enough with human hands, let alone doing it at the microscopic scale with laboratory instruments. Three new studies show how scientists have honed a technique for handling tiny, soft particles using precisely controlled fluid flows that act as gentle microscopic hands. The technique allows researchers to test the physical limits of t

4h

This Madman Built a Flying Robot Vacuum Cleaner

Gone Too Far Finally, the advance in robotics that we've all been waiting for: a robot vacuum that can fly. The flying Roomba, a creation of engineer and YouTuber Peter Sripol , isn't exactly useful, The Verge reports . But practicality doesn't seem to be the point here. Rather, the experimental robot comes across as an exercise in absurdity and — perhaps — an on-ramp to more helpful tech down th

4h

Buckyballs release electron-positron pairs in forward directions

When electrons collide with positrons, their antimatter counterparts, unstable pairs can form in which both types of particle orbit around each other. Named 'positronium,' physicists have now produced this intriguing structure using a diverse range of positron targets—from atomic gases to metal films. However, they have yet to achieve the same result from vapours of nanoparticles, whose unique pro

5h

Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears (Ursus thibetanus) exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn. From spring to summer, the energy balance is surprisingly negative. Interestingly, bears obtai

5h

Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers

A team of Florida researchers and their collaborators created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their "lost years."

5h

Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears (Ursus thibetanus) exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn. From spring to summer, the energy balance is surprisingly negative. Interestingly, bears obtai

5h

Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers

A team of Florida researchers and their collaborators created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their "lost years."

5h

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy GBP400 million per year

Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK.

5h

Why Kids Online Are Chasing 'Clout'

"Let's talk about the internet," the YouTube celebrity Drew Gooden begins, flatly, in an 11-minute commentary video titled "Arrested for Clout." "Remember, like, 1,000 years ago when they invented the internet and everyone was like, 'This is awesome. The world is changed and nothing but good will come from this'?" asks Gooden, who became famous because of a passably funny Vine in 2016. "And now p

5h

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy GBP400 million per year

Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK.

5h

Officials Identify Mysterious Bright Green Liquid That Spilled Onto Michigan Highway

Investigators say they believe the substance found on a freeway north of Detroit is groundwater mixed with a chemical called hexavalent chromium. The public safety risk is minimal, officials say. (Image credit: The Michigan Department of Transportation )

5h

2019 in Quotes

Scientists speak up about landmark drug approvals, political and environmental activism, and the redefinition of death.

5h

The Year in Physics

It emerged in April — a dark void, encircled by a luminous ring, humanity's first-ever look at a black hole. The existence of black holes had not been in doubt, of course: Astronomers have long studied stars whipped around by invisible slings, and in recent years they've even listened to the ripples of black holes' spacetime-shaking collisions . But there's something different about seeing the em

5h

5h

A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing–It Could Be a Warning

A surge in glacial ice flow that created an "ice stream" is a concern for Greenland and Antarctica as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

When Indian households gain electricity, one gender benefits more

Nature, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03929-y A power imbalance can undercut the advantages that women might reap from access to electricity.

5h

Electronics at the speed of light

A European team of researchers including physicists from the University of Konstanz has found a way of transporting electrons at times below the femtosecond range by manipulating them with light. This could have major implications for the future of data processing and computing.

5h

Could higher magnesium intake reduce fatal coronary heart disease risk in women?

A new prospective study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative found a potential inverse association between dietary magnesium and fatal coronary heart disease in postmenopausal women.

5h

Socioeconomic inequalities are decisive in the health of the elderly

Researchers at the UPV/EHU, Osakidetza and the Department of Health have reviewed scientific papers that analyse the relationship between socioeconomic inequalities and health among the elderly population in Spain. The results are useful in developing future studies and designing specific healthcare policies aimed at reducing these inequalities in health. The aspects that have been highlighted the

5h

Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties

Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists. The films combine exceptionally strong light absorption with good charge transport — qualities that make them ideal for applications such as photovoltaics and LEDs.

5h

Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn. From spring to summer, the energy balance is surprisingly negative. Interestingly, bears obtain about 80% of the

5h

Capturing CO2 from trucks and reducing their emissions by 90%

Researchers at EPFL have patented a new concept that could cut trucks' CO2 emissions by almost 90%. It involves capturing CO2 within the exhaust system, converting it into a liquid and storing it on the vehicle. The liquid CO2 would then be delivered to a service station and where it will be turned back into fuel using renewable energy.

5h

Moms' obesity in pregnancy is linked to lag in sons' development and IQ

A mother's obesity in pregnancy can affect her child's development years down the road, according to researchers who found lagging motor skills in preschoolers and lower IQ in middle childhood for boys whose mothers were severely overweight while pregnant. At age 7, the boys whose mothers were overweight or obese in pregnancy had scores 5 or more points lower on full-scale IQ tests. No effect was

5h

Buckyballs release electron-positron pairs in forward directions

New research published in EPJ D reveals the characteristics of positronium formation within football-shaped nanoparticles, C60, for the first time. At specific positron impact energies, the study shows that positronium emission dominates in the same direction as incoming positrons.

5h

Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers

A team of Florida researchers and their collaborators created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their 'lost years.'

5h

Oldest Fossil Evidence of Animal Parenting Found in Canada

309 million years ago an animal that resembled a lizard wrapped its tail around a younger member of its species. 000-fossil-parent_cropped.jpg Image credits: H. Maddin et al. Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Monday, December 23, 2019 – 11:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Bones of a reptile-like beast curled around

5h

Green Slime Oozing Onto US Highway Tracked to Illegal Waste Site

Mystery Slime On Friday, drivers were shocked to see a green slime oozing from a retaining wall along Interstate-696 in Michigan. Authorities have now identified the substance as likely being groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium. They also traced the green slime to its source: the basement of a closed local business whose owner is serving a year in prison for operating a hazardous wa

5h

58.000 gange over grænseværdi: Frøfirma stævnes for at forurene Slagelse-åer med insektgift

PLUS. Et Lolland-selskab i DLF-gruppen bejdsede blandt andet roefrø med neonikotioder og sendte sit spildevand til rensning i Slagelse uden at fortælle om indholdet af insektgift. Det hævder rensefirmaet, som kræver erstatning.

5h

New Age pioneer Baba Ram Dass dies at age 88

Ram Dass promoted LSD as path to enlightenment before undergoing spiritual rebirth detailed in the influential book Be Here Now Baba Ram Dass, who in the 1960s joined Timothy Leary in promoting psychedelic drugs as the path to inner enlightenment before undergoing a spiritual rebirth he spelled out in the influential book Be Here Now, died at home on Sunday. He was 88 years old. "With tender hear

5h

Baltimore Police Plan to Monitor the Whole City With Spy Planes

Constant Surveillance For the second half of 2020, Baltimore will be under constant police surveillance as a trio of spy planes constantly sweep the city. The plan, which CBS News reports will cover about 90 percent of the city, is meant to deter violent crime. And while police commissioner Michael Harrison says the spy planes aren't accurate enough to spot an individual's face, the monitoring pr

5h

Fifth Straight Year of Central American Drought Helping Drive Migration

Recent rains have helped, but long-term climate change is likely to significantly increase migration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Researchers to develop a theory of transients in graphene

Research group develops a theory that describes the behavior of graphene in the moment of it's transition from the state of thermal equilibrium and the process of returning to this state.

5h

Home for the holidays — But will grandpa remember me?

Home for the Holidays – But Will Grandpa Remember Me?Now there's Hope; Hebrew University Team Finds TB Vaccine Lowers Rates of Alzheimer's Disease in Cancer Patients

5h

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £400 million per year

Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK.

5h

Plant-rich diet protects mice against foodborne infection, UTSW researchers find

Mice fed a plant-rich diet are less susceptible to gastrointestinal (GI) infection from a pathogen such as the one currently under investigation for a widespread E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce, UT Southwestern researchers report.

5h

Electronics at the speed of light

A European team of researchers including physicists from the University of Konstanz has found a way of transporting electrons at times below the femtosecond range by manipulating them with light. This could have major implications for the future of data processing and computing.

5h

New nano-barrier for composites could strengthen spacecraft payloads

The University of Surrey has developed a robust multi-layed nano-barrier for ultra-lightweight and stable carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) that could be used to build high precision instrument structures for future space missions.

5h

3D atlas of the bone marrow — in single cell resolution

Stem cells located in the bone marrow generate and control the production of blood and immune cells. Researchers from EMBL, DKFZ and HI-STEM have now developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organization of the bone marrow at the single cell level. Using this approach the teams have identified previously unknown cell types that create specific local environments required for blood gen

5h

Benefits of electrification don't accrue equally for women, finds survey of homes in India

As households gain access to electricity, gender inequality persists in how energy is used. New research from Carnegie Mellon University examines the link between the sustainable development goals of energy access and gender equality.

5h

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space

Genetic editing is moving tomato crops from the field to the city skyline, or even outer space. Researchers used CRISPR gene editing to optimize tomatoes for urban agriculture.

5h

EMBL co-develops new method that could facilitate cancer diagnosis

Researchers led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have developed a cheaper and faster method to check for genetic differences in individual cells, which outperforms existing techniques with respect to the information received. This new method could become a new standard in single cell

5h

Innovative method delivers new insights into the stem cell microenvironment

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, have developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organisation of bone marrow at a single cell level. Since bone marrow harbours blood stem cells responsible for life-long blood generation, these results and the new method provides a novel scientific basis

5h

Measuring mutations in sperm may reveal risk for autism in future children

Spontaneous mutations in male sperm are linked to development of autism spectrum disorder. Researchers have created a way to measure mutations and estimate risk of ASD in future children. If developed into a clinical test, the method could be a useful predictive tool in genetic counseling.

5h

Researchers identify immune-suppressing target in glioblastoma

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a tenacious subset of immune macrophages that thwart treatment of glioblastoma with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade, elevating a new potential target for treating the almost uniformly lethal brain tumor.

5h

Looking at the good vibes of molecules

Label-free dynamic detection of biomolecules is a major challenge in live-cell microscopy. The simultaneous visualization of dynamic alterations for classes of metabolites, such as carbohydrates and lipids, was an unmet need in biomedical research. Now, a novel imaging method developed by a collaborative team from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technical University of Munich (TUM), and Heidelberg Univ

5h

Climate change not the only threat to vulnerable species, habitat matters

Though climate change is becoming one of the greatest threats to the Earth's already stressed ecosystems, it may not be the most severe threat today for all species, say authors of a new report on the effects of deforestation on two lemur species in Madagascar. Writing in Nature Climate Change, Toni Lyn Morelli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and her international team of co-authors poi

5h

Gone fishin' — for proteins

Casting lines into human cells to snag proteins, a team of Montreal researchers has solved a 20-year-old mystery of cell biology.

5h

Resurrected protein reveals structure of important enzyme

To disarm toxic substances, many organisms — including humans — possess enzymes called flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). However, the protein is too unstable to study its structure in detail. University of Groningen enzyme engineer Marco Fraaije and colleagues from Italy and Argentina reconstructed the ancestral genetic sequences for three FMO genes and subsequently studied the enzymes. T

5h

The Ganges Brims With Dangerous Bacteria

This sacred river offers clues to the spread of one of the world's most daunting health problems: germs impervious to common medicines.

5h

We've found six scorchingly hot exoplanets that are over 1100°C

Six extremely hot exoplanets have been found, with temperatures of between 1100°C and 1800°C, by studying gas in outer space

5h

Compound keeps mosquitoes from spreading malaria parasite

Researchers have developed small molecule compounds that rob mosquitoes of the ability to spread the malaria parasite, a new study shows. The malaria parasite is a mutation expert. That allows it to become resistant to all known antimalarial treatments. So far, controlling the mosquito populations that spread the parasite between humans has been the only option. Riding in the salivary glands of p

6h

Lizard-Like Fossil May Represent 306-Million-Year-Old Evidence of Animal Parenting

Shortly after transitioning from sea to land, our egg-laying ancestors may have started parenting their young

6h

As climate change melts Alaska's permafrost, roads sink, bridges tilt and greenhouse gases release

An unpaved highway runs north out of Nome, carving through more than 70 lonely miles of tundra before dead-ending at this Inupiaq village.

6h

*The Expanse* Is Sci-Fi Like TV Has Never Seen

The series embraces the true weirdness of life off planet, says showrunner Naren Shankar, making space itself a character in the drama.

6h

Your Christmas tree is lit, but how hard does it hit the environment?

The holidays have a big environmental footprint. (DepositPhoto/) Sparkling lights. Festive nights. For many revelers, Christmas just wouldn't be Christmas without a live tree. But just how much of a toll does this holiday habit take on the environment? The answer is surprisingly complicated, but let's start at the very beginning. Christmas trees are grown on about 15,000 farms in the United State

6h

300m-year-old fossil is early sign of creatures caring for their young

Fossil found in Canada suggests pair were curled up together in a den when they died Fossil hunters say they have unearthed the earliest evidence yet of four-limbed vertebrates looking after their young, after discovering the entwined remains of two lizard-like creatures preserved in an ancient plant stump. The fossil found in Nova Scotia, Canada, is thought to be the remains of an adult and youn

6h

Newfound "Ablating" Exoplanets Could Reveal Alien Geology

By probing close-in worlds, the discovery will help astronomers better understand how planets form and evolve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Gone fishin'—for proteins

Using a new microscopic "fishing" technique, scientists at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) and Université de Montréal have successfully snagged thousands of proteins key to the formation of the cell skeleton.

6h

Researchers develop new method that could facilitate cancer diagnosis

Researchers led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have developed a cheaper and faster method to check for genetic differences in individual cells. It outperforms existing techniques with respect to the information received. This new method could become a new standard in single-cell res

6h

Resurrected protein reveals structure of important enzyme

To disarm toxic substances, many organisms including humans possess enzymes called flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). Despite their importance, the structure of the enzymes has not been resolved, as the protein is too unstable to study in detail. University of Groningen enzyme engineer Marco Fraaije and colleagues from Italy and Argentina reconstructed the ancestral genetic sequences for thr

6h

Looking at the good vibes of molecules

Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are ever more common globally. In addition to genetic disposition, lifestyle contributes strongly to the prevalence of these metabolic diseases. Precise monitoring methods are needed in order to, for example, evaluate how a change in diet or exercise affects disease and its metabolic characteristics. Now, a team from the Institute of Biological and M

6h

Innovative method delivers new insights into the stem cell microenvironment

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, have developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organization of bone marrow at a single-cell level. Since bone marrow harbors blood stem cells responsible for lifelong blood generation, these results and the new method provide a novel scientific basis to

6h

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space

Farmers could soon be growing tomatoes bunched like grapes in a storage unit, on the roof of a skyscraper, or even in space. That's if a clutch of new gene-edited crops prove as fruitful as the first batch.

6h

The Year in Biology

"Look who knows so much. It just so happens that your friend here is only mostly dead," says Miracle Max in the film version of The Princess Bride . "There's a big difference between mostly dead and all dead…. Mostly dead is slightly alive." The movie can play the paradox for laughs because life and death seem like such self-evidently binary states. Yet as events in 2019 illustrated, Miracle Max

6h

Meet Angus: A Robotic Field Hand for the Autonomous Farming Revolution

The farm robot is part of Iron Ox's aim to build hyper-efficient farms in the urban centers where most food is consumed.

6h

New nano-barrier for composites could strengthen spacecraft payloads

The University of Surrey has developed a robust multi-layed nano-barrier for ultra-lightweight and stable carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) that could be used to build high precision instrument structures for future space missions.

6h

Gone fishin'—for proteins

Using a new microscopic "fishing" technique, scientists at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) and Université de Montréal have successfully snagged thousands of proteins key to the formation of the cell skeleton.

6h

Climate change not the only threat to vulnerable species, habitat matters

Though climate change is becoming one of the greatest threats to the Earth's already stressed ecosystems, it may not be the most severe threat today for all species, say authors of a new report on the effects of deforestation on two lemur species in Madagascar.

6h

Stay-at-home dads still face barriers

Fathers make an important contribution when they stay at home as primary caregiver for their children—but they continue to face major social hurdles and stigmas, according to Flinders University researchers in a new book, Men Caregiving and the Media: The Dad Dilemma, which examines why the relationship between caregiving and masculinity is seldom celebrated.

6h

Benefits of electrification don't accrue equally for women, finds survey of homes in India

Increasing access to clean and affordable energy and improving gender equality are two major sustainable development goals (SDGs) that are believed to be strongly linked. With electricity access, less time and effort in the developing world is needed for tasks related to cooking, water collection, and other housework, which are typically undertaken by women.

6h

Researchers develop new method that could facilitate cancer diagnosis

Researchers led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have developed a cheaper and faster method to check for genetic differences in individual cells. It outperforms existing techniques with respect to the information received. This new method could become a new standard in single-cell res

6h

Resurrected protein reveals structure of important enzyme

To disarm toxic substances, many organisms including humans possess enzymes called flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). Despite their importance, the structure of the enzymes has not been resolved, as the protein is too unstable to study in detail. University of Groningen enzyme engineer Marco Fraaije and colleagues from Italy and Argentina reconstructed the ancestral genetic sequences for thr

6h

Looking at the good vibes of molecules

Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are ever more common globally. In addition to genetic disposition, lifestyle contributes strongly to the prevalence of these metabolic diseases. Precise monitoring methods are needed in order to, for example, evaluate how a change in diet or exercise affects disease and its metabolic characteristics. Now, a team from the Institute of Biological and M

6h

Innovative method delivers new insights into the stem cell microenvironment

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, have developed new methods to reveal the three-dimensional organization of bone marrow at a single-cell level. Since bone marrow harbors blood stem cells responsible for lifelong blood generation, these results and the new method provide a novel scientific basis to

6h

Newfound "Ablating" Exoplanets Could Reveal Alien Geology

By probing close-in worlds, the discovery will help astronomers better understand how planets form and evolve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The beautiful balance between courage and fear | Cara E. Yar Khan

After being diagnosed with a rare genetic condition that deteriorates muscle, Cara E. Yar Khan was told she'd have to limit her career ambitions and dial down her dreams. She ignored that advice and instead continued to pursue her biggest ambitions. In this powerful, moving talk, she shares her philosophy for working on the projects that matter to her most — while letting courage and fear coexist

6h

Watch a Self-Driving DeLorean Burn Rubber on a Stunt Course

Great Scott! Engineers at Stanford's Dynamic Design Lab have taught a self-driving DeLorean — the iconic early 80s sports car of "Back to the Future" fame — how to drift around a complex, kilometer-long track that even human drivers would struggle with. The vehicle, lovingly dubbed MARTY after the protagonist of "Back to the Future," completed a full circuit without any hiccups on its very first

6h

Sleuths Are Haunted by the Cold Case of Julie Doe

In September 1988, a man looking for cypress wood discovered a body in the marshy forests of Florida. The body was too decomposed to be recognizable, but police made note of what they could: a denim skirt, manicured nails, long dyed-blond hair, breast implants. A prominent forensic anthropologist noticed pitting in the pelvic bones, which he attributed to hormonal changes from childbirth. He proc

6h

Podcast Extra: From climate lawyer to climate activist

Nature, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03900-x After three decades of climate advocacy, renowned IPCC lawyer Farhana Yamin decided to join Extinction Rebellion – she tells us why.

6h

'Sneaky' underwater robot spent 18 days recording sea creatures—and noisy humans

For 18 days, an underwater robot dived and surfaced and dived and surfaced—some 402 times in all—listening to the ocean's depths as it traveled hundreds of miles along the continental shelf off the Washington and Oregon coastline.

6h

New polymer material may help batteries become self-healing, recyclable

Lithium-ion batteries are notorious for developing internal electrical shorts that can ignite a battery's liquid electrolytes, leading to explosions and fires. Engineers at the University of Illinois have developed a solid polymer-based electrolyte that can self-heal after damage—and the material can also be recycled without the use of harsh chemicals or high temperatures.

6h

Development of a stretchable vibration-powered device using a liquid electret

NIMS and AIST developed a liquid electret material capable of semi-permanently retaining static electricity. They subsequently combined this material with soft electrodes to create the first bendable, stretchable vibration-powered device in the world. Because this device is highly deformable and capable of converting very subtle vibrations into electrical signals, it may be applicable to the devel

6h

A new method for boosting the learning of mathematics

How can mathematics learning in primary school be facilitated? A recent study conducted by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, had shown that our everyday knowledge strongly influences our ability to solve problems, sometimes leading us into making errors. This is why UNIGE, in collaboration with four research teams in France, has now developed an intervention to promote the learning of

6h

Ancient wasp-mimicking fly from South Korea named after PSY's 'Gangnam Style'

Russian and South Korean paleontologists discovered a new species of extinct pollinating flies, which lived during the first half of the Cretaceous period, about 110 million years ago, when the angiosperm radiation occurred. As evident from their long proboscis, these insects were nectar feeders and probably fed on the first flowers or cones of entomophilous gymnosperms. Like many modern flower-vi

6h

Don't push 'on' button of irreversible change: top climate scientist

Johan Rockstrom, Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), is a Big Picture scientist who strives to see how all the pieces of our planet's complex climate system fit together.

6h

New polymer material may help batteries become self-healing, recyclable

Lithium-ion batteries are notorious for developing internal electrical shorts that can ignite a battery's liquid electrolytes, leading to explosions and fires. Engineers at the University of Illinois have developed a solid polymer-based electrolyte that can self-heal after damage — and the material can also be recycled without the use of harsh chemicals or high temperatures.

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Delivery of healthy donor cells key to correcting bone disorder, UConn researchers find

n the journal STEM CELLS, research group of Dr. Ivo Kalajzic, lead investigator and professor, presents a study with potential for new treatments to address the root cause of weak and brittle bones.

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People think marketing and political campaigns use psychology to influence their behaviors

A new study has shown that whilst people think advertising and political campaigns exploit psychological research to control their unconscious behaviors, ultimately they feel the choices they make are still their own.

6h

A new method for boosting the learning of mathematics

How can mathematics learning in primary school be facilitated? UNIGE has developed an intervention to promote the learning of math in school. Named ACE-ArithmEcole, the program is designed to help schoolchildren surpass their intuitions and rely instead on the use of arithmetic principles. More than half (50.5%) of the students who took part in the intervention were able to solve difficult problem

6h

Florida boaters killed a record number of manatees in 2019, report says

Despite an ongoing campaign to protect the gentle manatee—which has included a 38-years-long Save the Manatee Club effort from popular singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett—Florida boaters killed a record number of manatees in 2019.

7h

Potatoes engineered to harm a major pest but leave other insects safe

Biologists have used a gene silencing approach to engineer potatoes to be lethal to a major pest called the Colorado potato beetle but harmless to other species

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Florida boaters killed a record number of manatees in 2019, report says

Despite an ongoing campaign to protect the gentle manatee—which has included a 38-years-long Save the Manatee Club effort from popular singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett—Florida boaters killed a record number of manatees in 2019.

7h

The Year in Math and Computer Science

For mathematicians and computer scientists, this was often a year of double takes and closer looks. Some reexamined foundational principles, while others found shockingly simple proofs, new techniques or unexpected insights in long-standing problems. Some of these advances have broad applications in physics and other scientific disciplines. Others are purely for the sake of gaining new knowledge

7h

What families should know about childhood obesity

For parents and caregivers of children with obesity or at risk of obesity, the information on the issue can be overwhelming. Is it a dietary problem? Is it genetics? Or does your kid simply need more exercise? In truth, pediatric obesity is far more complicated than any single problem or solution. Children's brains aren't fully developed, so methods that may help adults rarely apply to kids. In a

7h

The Serious Silliness of Impeachment

"Why do we keep calling this a solemn occasion?" Doug Collins, the ranking Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, demanded to know during the House debate in advance of President Donald Trump's impeachment. He had a point: For all the robotic insistence of Democrats that impeachment was "sad," "prayerful," and "somber," the debate devolved into bathos almost from the start. Republican Repre

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Super Bowl python hunt 'glorifies' slaughter of snakes, should be canceled, PETA says

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) wants the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee to cancel the 2020 Python Bowl, saying the hunt glorifies "the slaughter of snakes."

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Super Bowl python hunt 'glorifies' slaughter of snakes, should be canceled, PETA says

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) wants the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee to cancel the 2020 Python Bowl, saying the hunt glorifies "the slaughter of snakes."

7h

How to tell if a brain is awake

A Michigan Medicine team was able to demonstrate, using rats, that the EEG doesn't always track with being awake. Their study raises questions about what it means to be conscious.

7h

Massive gas disk raises questions about planet formation theory

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a young star surrounded by an astonishing mass of gas. The star, called 49 Ceti, is 40 million years old and conventional theories of planet formation predict that the gas should have disappeared by that age. The enigmatically large amount of gas requests a reconsideration of our current understanding of planet formati

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SFU research points to unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels

A new study led by Simon Fraser University's Dean of Science, Professor Paul Kench, has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean.

7h

The birds and the bees and the bearded dragons

Though sex itself is widespread among lifeforms, the mechanisms determining an individual's sex vary spectacularly across organisms. How these systems evolve and transition from one to the next across evolutionary time is slowly being revealed. A novel method provides new insight into the evolution of sex determination systems in bearded dragons.

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Fewer fats over the festive season may be the perfect formula for men's fertility

A diet low in fat and high in egg whites could be the key to boosting male fertility according to a new pilot study.

7h

Super-resolution at all scales with active thermal detection

IBS research team found the temperature increase caused by the probe beam could be utilized to generate a signal per se for detecting objects. Notably, this so-called 'active thermal detection' enables super-resolution imaging at all scales.

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Evolutionary changes in brain potentially make us more prone to anxiety

Neurochemicals such as serotonin and dopamine play crucial roles in cognitive and emotional functions of our brain. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) is one of the genes responsible for transporting neurotransmitters and regulating neuronal signaling. A research team led by Tohoku University has reconstructed ancestral VMAT1 proteins, revealing the functional changes in neurotransmitter up

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NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape

NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns — also known as chevron patterns — in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemica

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Apps help with breastfeeding — at a cost

Mobile phone apps are increasingly being used to support breastfeeding decisions – sometimes at a cost, a Flinders University study indicates. Most infant feeding (IF) apps give mothers a perception of greater control, confidence and efficiency however, with more than 100 such apps available, the mobile content can also make new moms feeling overwhelmed by the information, concerns about over-reli

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Science Explains Why We Should All Work Shorter Hours in Winter

People tend to get gloomy when night comes early and cold weather descends. But adjusting our workday to the season could lift our mood.

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This Year's 4 Most Mind-Boggling Stories About the Brain

2019 was nuts for neuroscience. I said this last year too, but that's the nature of accelerating technologies: the advances just keep coming. There're the theoretical showdowns: a mano a mano battle of where consciousness arises in the brain, wildly creative theories of why our brains are so powerful, and the first complete brain wiring diagram of any species. This year also saw the the birth of

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Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties

Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists.

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Deaf people at risk of being 'excluded from astronomy'

The deaf community risks being excluded from aspects of modern science because the number of new advances is outpacing the development of sign language to explain them, a leading researcher says.

7h

Moving toward sustainable energy in New York City

,Over the past few years, a variety of laws have been enacted in New York State and New York City as we accelerate our transition to a more efficient and decarbonized energy system. One new rule that is bound to attract attention is a new system of grading and then displaying the energy efficiency rating of large buildings. Just as restaurants must display the grade they receive evaluating the cle

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Virginia seeing sudden surge in deaths of oak trees, foresters say

Around mid- to late summer, Adam Downing started receiving about double the number of calls he usually does about oak trees dying.

7h

Ancient secret of stone circles revealed

New evidence of a massive lightning strike at the center of a hidden stone circle in the Outer Hebrides may help shed light on why these monuments were created thousands of years ago.

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Astronomer probes 'DNA' of twin stars to reveal family history of the Milky Way

Twin stars appear to share chemical "DNA" that could help scientists map the history of the Milky Way galaxy, according to new research by astronomer Keith Hawkins of The University of Texas at Austin accepted for publication in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Development of a stretchable vibration-powered device using a liquid electret

NIMS and AIST developed a liquid electret material capable of semi-permanently retaining static electricity. They subsequently combined this material with soft electrodes to create the first bendable, stretchable vibration-powered device in the world. Because this device is highly deformable and capable of converting very subtle vibrations into electrical signals, it may be applicable to the devel

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Ancient wasp-mimicking fly from South Korea named after PSY's 'Gangnam Style'

Russian and South Korean paleontologists discovered a new species of extinct pollinating flies, which lived during the first half of the Cretaceous period, about 110 million years ago, when the angiosperm radiation occurred. As evident from their long proboscis, these insects were nectar feeders and probably fed on the first flowers or cones of entomophilous gymnosperms. Like many modern flower-vi

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Big tech data abuse capped off Silicon Valley's decade-long fall

With record fines dished out over tech firms' use of personal data, and their public images becoming increasingly tarnished, 2019 was the year the world started to turn against its tech giants, says Donna Lu

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An approach for constructing non-Hermitian topological invariants in real space

In physics, non-Hermitian systems are systems that cannot be described by standard (i.e., Hermitian) laws of quantum mechanics, or more precisely, that can only be described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Non-Hermitian systems are ubiquitous in nature. Many open systems, i.e., systems that are not fully isolated from the rest of the world, belong to this class. The topology of these systems (i.e.,

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The case for public research spending

Innovation results from the complex interplay between state, companies and market

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Physicists find ways to overcome signal loss in magnonic circuits

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, and N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University have demonstrated that the coupling elements in magnonic logic circuits are so crucial that a poorly selected waveguide can lead to signal loss. The physicists developed a parametric model for predicting the waveguide configurat

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Printing wirelessly rechargeable solid-state supercapacitors for soft, smart contact lenses

Recent advances in smart contact lenses can assist biomedical engineers to realize medical applications and vision imaging for augmented reality with wireless communication systems. Previous research on smart contact lenses were driven by a wireless system or wireless power transfer with temporal and spatial restrictions. Such power sources can limit their continuous use and require energy storage

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Digitale briller på spring til at erstatte håndholdte tablets i produktionen

PLUS. Fire nye smartglasses er målrettet augmented reality i industrien, så CAD-filer kan hentes op foran en maskine, uden at du skal bruge hænderne.

7h

Can Science Rule Out God?

We must understand the laws of nature before we can deduce their origins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production

Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could be

7h

Flexible thinking on silicon solar cells

Combining silicon with a highly elastic polymer backing produces solar cells that have record-breaking stretchability and high efficiency.

7h

Compliance with ID rules in recreational cannabis stores

A new study finds that recreational cannabis stores in Colorado and Washington state, both of which legalized adult recreational use in 2012, show high levels of compliance with rules preventing underage purchase of cannabis. The study also shows that there is more than can be done to reach full compliance.

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The birds and the bees and the bearded dragons: Evolution of a sex determination system

Sex is an ancient and widespread phenomenon, with over 99 percent of eukaryotes (cells with nuclei) partaking in some form of sexual reproduction, at least occasionally. Given the relative ubiquity and presumed importance of sex, it is perhaps surprising that the mechanisms that determine an individual's sex vary so spectacularly across organisms. Mechanisms for sex determination can depend on env

7h

Efterretningstjeneste kræver beskyttelse mod mail-fusk i hele staten

Center for Cybersikkerhed under Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste stiller krav til, at alle statens domæner til sommer skal være have en såkaldt DMARC-politik, der beskytter mod phishing-mails.

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Conservation biologist says the time to act for the Amazon is now

The critical tipping point for the Amazon rainforest has arrived, and an ecological disaster could be in the making if drastic actions aren't taken immediately.

7h

The birds and the bees and the bearded dragons: Evolution of a sex determination system

Sex is an ancient and widespread phenomenon, with over 99 percent of eukaryotes (cells with nuclei) partaking in some form of sexual reproduction, at least occasionally. Given the relative ubiquity and presumed importance of sex, it is perhaps surprising that the mechanisms that determine an individual's sex vary so spectacularly across organisms. Mechanisms for sex determination can depend on env

7h

Chemist develops a way to produce new materials for solar panels

A chemist from RUDN University has synthesized new types of optically active materials with the structure of the mineral perovskite. He proposed an environmentally friendly, fast, and easily reproducible mechanochemical method, which allows obtaining hybrid materials of high purity, promising for the creation of solar cells. The article was published in the journal Nanoscale.

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Researchers claim to have evidence of 500-million-year old fossilized arthropod brain

A team of researchers at Harvard University has found what they believe to be evidence of a fossilized arthropod brain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the evidence they found and why they believe it is fossilized neural matter.

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Identifying a plant cell barrier to breeding more nutritious crops

What if we could grow plants that are larger and also have higher nutritional content? Michigan State University scientists have identified a protein that could be a major roadblock to growing such plants.

8h

The history of candy canes and why they taste so cool

Candy canes are an iconic symbol of Christmas. Their red and white stripes adorn trees and homes during the holidays while their minty flavor delights taste buds.

8h

Massive gas disk raises questions about planet formation theory

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a young star surrounded by an astonishing mass of gas. The star, called 49 Ceti, is 40 million years old and conventional theories of planet formation predict that the gas should have disappeared by that age. The enigmatically large amount of gas requests a reconsideration of our current understanding of planet formati

8h

Identifying a plant cell barrier to breeding more nutritious crops

What if we could grow plants that are larger and also have higher nutritional content? Michigan State University scientists have identified a protein that could be a major roadblock to growing such plants.

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Endangered rays may have secret nursery in Mexican waters

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays entangled in fishing nets along Mexico's Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters.

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Star Wars News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' and Everything After

The finale of the saga has come and gone. So what happens now?

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Endangered rays may have secret nursery in Mexican waters

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays entangled in fishing nets along Mexico's Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters.

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Great Lakes waters at risk from buried contaminants and new threats

Nickle Beach, Copper Harbor, Silver Bay. These places, all situated on the shores of the Laurentian Great Lakes, evoke the legacy of mining connected with the region.

8h

Extending food shelf life with nanomaterials

When was the last time you were tempted by luscious cherries at your supermarket or saw that your favorite brand of packaged bread was on sale and you greedily bought too much? You likely had to throw away most of them because they had gone off. What if the shelf lives of such products could be extended? The EU-funded NanoPack has done exactly that. Its nanotechnology-based packaging solution was

8h

Fishing for novel cellulose degraders

One of the most vital pieces of equipment for fly fishing is a boxful of lures. Designed with feathers or wires to mimic an insect or a particular movement, each of these lures are the bait designed to attract specific catches. A similar technique has been developed by researchers led by Tanja Woyke at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User F

8h

Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production

Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published December 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could

8h

Astronomers study peculiar kinematics of multiple stellar populations in Messier 80

Using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), astronomers have investigated one of the Milky Way's globular clusters, Messier 80. The new study concentrated on peculiar kinematics of Messier 80's multiple stellar population and provides important information about the cluster's formation and evolution. The research was published December 12 on arXiv.org.

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Fishing for novel cellulose degraders

One of the most vital pieces of equipment for fly fishing is a boxful of lures. Designed with feathers or wires to mimic an insect or a particular movement, each of these lures are the bait designed to attract specific catches. A similar technique has been developed by researchers led by Tanja Woyke at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User F

8h

Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production

Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published December 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could

8h

Weatherproof sheep? How to enhance animal resilience to climate change

Adverse impacts of climate change are increasingly felt across the world, with weather variability posing a serious threat to both crop and livestock production. Recognising the urgent need to address these challenges, the EU-funded iSAGE project continues developing strategies to enhance animal resilience and adaptability.

8h

What Happens to White Christmases as the World Warms?

Although more winter precipitation will fall as rain because of climate change, don't say goodbye to snow just yet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Can Science Rule Out God?

We must understand the laws of nature before we can deduce their origins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

What Happens to White Christmases as the World Warms?

Although more winter precipitation will fall as rain because of climate change, don't say goodbye to snow just yet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Weatherproof sheep? How to enhance animal resilience to climate change

Adverse impacts of climate change are increasingly felt across the world, with weather variability posing a serious threat to both crop and livestock production. Recognising the urgent need to address these challenges, the EU-funded iSAGE project continues developing strategies to enhance animal resilience and adaptability.

8h

Arctic sea spray aerosols mimic those in California

The Arctic is warming faster than any other place on Earth, leading to the formation of sea spray aerosols similar to what researchers see in California appearing during the Arctic winter, according to a new study. Summertime Arctic sea ice cover is the second lowest on record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center's Arctic report card 2019, continuing a rapid decline over the past s

8h

Fossil research unveils new turtle species and hints at intercontinental migrations

A multi-institution research team working with fossils archived at the Arlington Archosaur Site (AAS) of Texas has described four extinct turtle species, including a new river turtle named after AAS paleontologist Dr. Derek Main and the oldest side-necked turtle in North America. These new turtles include an intriguing combination of native North American forms alongside Asian and Southern Hemisph

8h

Researchers uncover how fish get their shape

The diverse colours, shapes and patterns of fish are captivating. Despite such diversity, a general feature that we can observe in fish such as salmon or tuna once they are served in a dish like sushi, is the distinct V patterns in their meat. While this appears to be genetically observed in the muscle arrangement of most fish species, how such a generic V pattern arises is puzzling.

9h

Evolutionary changes in brain potentially make us more prone to anxiety

Neurochemicals such as serotonin and dopamine play crucial roles in cognitive and emotional functions of our brain. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) is one of the genes responsible for transporting neurotransmitters and regulating neuronal signaling. A research team led by Tohoku University has reconstructed ancestral VMAT1 proteins, revealing the functional changes in neurotransmitter up

9h

Researchers uncover how fish get their shape

The diverse colours, shapes and patterns of fish are captivating. Despite such diversity, a general feature that we can observe in fish such as salmon or tuna once they are served in a dish like sushi, is the distinct V patterns in their meat. While this appears to be genetically observed in the muscle arrangement of most fish species, how such a generic V pattern arises is puzzling.

9h

Evolutionary changes in brain potentially make us more prone to anxiety

Neurochemicals such as serotonin and dopamine play crucial roles in cognitive and emotional functions of our brain. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) is one of the genes responsible for transporting neurotransmitters and regulating neuronal signaling. A research team led by Tohoku University has reconstructed ancestral VMAT1 proteins, revealing the functional changes in neurotransmitter up

9h

Super-resolution at all scales with active thermal detection

When you search your lost keys with a flash lamp, when bats detect obstacles during their night flight, or when car radars locate other cars on the road, the very same physical principle works. Be it light, sound, or an electromagnetic wave in general, a probe beam is sent ahead, and a reflected wave of the same kind carries the relevant information back to the detector.

9h

Supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy may have a friend

Do supermassive black holes have friends? The nature of galaxy formation suggests that the answer is yes, and in fact, pairs of supermassive black holes should be common in the universe.

9h

After eBay improved its translation software, international commerce increased sharply

A new study co-authored by an MIT economist shows that improved translation software can significantly boost international trade online—a notable case of machine learning having a clear impact on economic activity.

9h

Book looks at how landscape design helps solve water issues

North America's inland watersheds hold and provide 95% of the continent's fresh water and 20% of the world's fresh water, but the infrastructure used to manage those water systems has led to problems that include soil and water degradation.

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Space-time metasurface makes light reflect only in one direction

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Russia's Military Is Writing an Armed-Robot Playbook

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Emotions may be universal, but they aren't easy to translate

When it comes to language, feelings are a tricky business. In the English language, "love" is a pretty important word. It describes one of our most powerful feelings, so it's no surprise that plenty of other languages have words for this emotion too, from the French amour to the Turkish word sevgi. At the very least these words all seem to capture the same emotion. But when it comes to language,

9h

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

The police went nuts for DNA, the vaping wars heated up, and a black hole pic grabbed the internet: These were some of 2019's standout themes.

9h

12 Science Books You Should Read Right Now

Snuggle up with these 2019 books on the so-called language of God, dirty drugmakers, and the future of food and booze.

9h

Why Big Data Has Been (Mostly) Good for Music

The explosion of metrics and algorithms isn't just reflecting what's happening in the music industry. It's transforming it.

9h

Fossil research unveils new turtle species, hints at intercontinental migrations

The Arlington Archosaur Site (AAS) of Texas preserves remnants of an ancient Late Cretaceous river delta that once existed in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Known for discoveries of fossil crocodiles and dinosaurs, a multi-institution research team has described four extinct turtle species, including a new river turtle named after AAS paleontologist Dr. Derek Main and the oldest side-necked turtle in

9h

Growth of craft beer linked to record number of US states harvesting hops

Tasting terroir, or a sense of place, isn't only reserved for wine lovers drinking a glass of burgundy or champagne from France.

9h

New method to 3-D print metal scavenging filters to selectively separate noble metals from waste electronic equipment

oday's extensive use of high-tech metals has led to increased supply pressure toward metal sources. This has fueled interest in developing new metal scavenging and separation techniques. In his dissertation at the University of Jyväskylä M.Sc. Elmeri Lahtinen has studied and developed a new metal separation technique that uses selective laser sintering 3-D printing as a fabrication method.

9h

Turning DNA into Drugs

Life's master molecule has been transformed into therapies that tackle the roots of human illness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Camera traps show coyotes on the doorstep of South America

Once again, Panama, home of the narrow land bridge that connects North and South America, could play an outsized role in mammal history.

9h

Inventing sign language for space

British sign language is receiving an astronomical update thanks to a unique collaboration between a space scientist and a group of deaf astronomers.

9h

Game theory expert expands method to incorporate new categories

If economics is a game, Tarun Sabarwal would make a worthy opponent.

9h

Camera traps show coyotes on the doorstep of South America

Once again, Panama, home of the narrow land bridge that connects North and South America, could play an outsized role in mammal history.

9h

Researchers break the geometric limitations of moiré pattern in graphene heterostructures

Researchers at the University of Manchester have uncovered interesting phenomena when multiple two-dimensional materials are combined into van der Waals heterostructures (layered "sandwiches" of different materials).

9h

From 3-D to 2-D and back: reversible conversion of lipid spheres into ultra-thin sheets

Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and the University of Tokyo have developed a technique for the reversible conversion of 3-D lipid vesicles into 2-D ultra-thin nanosheets. Both the stable nanosheets and the reversible 2-D-3-D conversion process can find various applications in the pharmaceutical, bioengineering, food, and cosmetic sciences.

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Venstrefløj undsiger aftale om firmabiler: Fradrag til plugin-hybrider giver ingen mening

PLUS. Enhedslisten og Alternativet vil fjerne fradraget til pluginhybrider som firmabiler, som de ellers har været med til at aftale. Erfaringer fra andre lande viser nemlig, at pluginhybriderne sjældent bliver opladet og derfor ikke er specielt grønne.

9h

Can You Change for Climate Change?

Probably, but research shows that most people need behavioral "nudges" to do so; just the facts aren't enough — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Dear Therapist: I Cut My Volatile Brother Out of My Life. But My Parents Haven't.

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, A couple of months ago, I had to cut off communication with my 30-year-old brother. We have had a volatile relationship for many years, in part because he is a recovering addict. When he was drinking or using,

10h

Greta Gerwig's Little Women Gives Amy March Her Due

Greta Gerwig had just encountered a problem that the characters in her film Little Women never would have: a deluge of messages on her iPhone. As we sat inside the Boxwood restaurant in West Hollywood in November, Gerwig struggled to sort past the new ones. Swipe. Swipe. Swipe. Pause. Tap. Swipe . "Oh God ," the writer-director groaned. "I have inbox a million ." There was an email she wanted to

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9 Extremely Last-Minute Gift Ideas for Procrastinators

If your Christmas tree is missing a present, these gifts—and excuses—will keep you on the nice list.

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The Worst Hacks of the Decade

It's been a rough 10 years in cybersecurity—and it's only getting worse.

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Today's Cartoon: Privacy Claus

'Tis the season to be COPPA compliant.

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Video games are dividing South Korea

Arguments over whether game addiction is real have led to feuds between government departments and a national debate over policy.

10h

Can You Change for Climate Change?

Probably, but research shows that most people need behavioral "nudges" to do so; just the facts aren't enough — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Forskere efter amerikansk ulykke: Globalt metanudslip kan være voldsomt undervurderet

Enorme mængder af metan lækker, når der sker ulykker på olie- og gasfelter, viser satellitmålinger fra en ulykke i Ohio.

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The Brain Senses Touch beyond the Body

You detect a tool's contact with an object as if you placed your own finger on it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Brain Senses Touch beyond the Body

You detect a tool's contact with an object as if you placed your own finger on it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Australian biobank repatriates hundreds of 'legacy' Indigenous blood samples

Nature, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03906-5 The return is part of a groundbreaking approach that could inspire other institutions grappling with how to use historical samples ethically in research.

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The Brain Senses Touch beyond the Body

You detect a tool's contact with an object as if you placed your own finger on it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cell injection could train the body not to reject organ transplants

A one-off injection of cells could be a solution to the longstanding problem of the body rejecting an organ transplant

10h

Lewis stone circle has star-shaped lightning strike

The discovery was made by scientists at a 4,000-year-old archaeological site in the Hebrides.

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Facebook lukker falske konti med ansigter genereret af kunstig intelligens

Falske brugerkonto udgav sig for at være rigtige amerikanske borgere, som støttede Trump. Deres budskaber nåede ud til flere end 55 millioner.

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These artificial proteins have a firm grasp on metal

A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has developed a library of artificial proteins or "peptoids" that effectively "chelate" or bind to lanthanides and actinides, heavy metals that make up the so-called f-block elements at the bottom of the periodic table.

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Endocrinology researcher in South Korea scores four retractions in a year

Hueng-Sik Choi, a researcher at Chonnam National University in Gwangju in South Korea, is up to four retractions for image manipulation. The latest retraction for Choi, for a 2006 paper titled "Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 induces zinc finger protein GIOT-1 gene expression, and GIOT-1 acts as a novel corepressor of orphan nuclear receptor SF-1 via … Continue reading

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#10: Become an intellectual explorer | Top 10 2019

Big Think's #10 most popular video of 2019 will teach you how to expand your intellect through the art of insightful conversation. First up: What is a great conversation? They are the ones that leave us feeling smarter or more curious, with a sense that we have discovered something, understood something about another person, or have been challenged. Emily Chamlee-Wright, president and CEO of the

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The Dying American Prisoner

John Jay Roach was serving a 14-year sentence at Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego when he felt a knot in his gut that wouldn't go away. "Bellyaches, bellyaches, bellyaches," he later recalled. According to Roach, he went to the doctor, who said he was fine. Roach disagreed and kept returning for exams, eventually filing an appeal for more thorough testing. The following sprin

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Why Latinx Can't Catch On

Why hasn't the term Latinx caught on the way African American did in the late 1980s? African American became a cherished replacement for black right around when Jesse Jackson embraced it at a news conference , in 1988. Latinx , fashioned to get past the gender distinction encoded in Latino and Latina , has not replicated that success since its introduction, in 2014. It has been celebrated by inte

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Three Theories for Why You Have No Time

One of the truisms of modern life is that nobody has any time. Everybody is busy, burned out, swamped, overwhelmed . So let's try a simple thought experiment. Imagine that you came into possession of a magical new set of technologies that could automate or expedite every single part of your job. What would you do with the extra time? Maybe you'd pick up a hobby, or have more children, or learn to

11h

The Left-Right Divide Isn't the One That Matters

Locked in a close race for first place in both Iowa and New Hampshire with only weeks to go before Democratic presidential-primary voting begins, Pete Buttigieg, along with his advisers, is talking about bringing people together. In a recent New Yorker profile , Benjamin Wallace-Wells quoted Buttigieg as welcoming "future former Republicans" into "our movement" and pledging to "unify the American

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A Portrait of Public Libraries

Since Jim Fallows and I began traveling the country for American Futures and Our Towns nearly seven years ago, there has been one beat that began as a surprise to me and grew into the most heartening story I've witnessed of American resilience. That is the story of public libraries and how they have responded to the challenges facing American towns. If you haven't been in a public library lately,

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What Happens When Japan Stops Looking 'Japanese'?

The Kurdish 21-year-old arrived in Japan when he was 8. He learned Japanese, played baseball with classmates, and eventually fell in love with a Vietnamese girl at school. The pair sat together when I visited his parents' apartment outside Tokyo, speaking Japanese in hushed tones, their pinky toes just barely touching. Dinner was Kurdish-style yogurt and lamb, with chopsticks next to each plate.

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Little Narrows

No lie, look here—so Little, so narrow, it's got No middle, a matchstick inlet, A little shuttle to get Across it, so long, hello. Make that so little, so Narrow, bet your shadow Beats us to it, better not Fidget or you'll miss it, no Kidding, kiddo. Narrows, not shallows: no Little bridge over it, no Long way around it, so Here's the two-bit ferryboat About to spirit us straight Into the narrow

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The Woman Who Made Modern Journalism

Clemens Habicht O nce upon a time, during a period of great technological innovation but also great economic inequality, journalism was striving to define its role in a fractious democracy. Divisions between conservatives and progressives were stark—and angry—and social anxiety about racial injustice and the rise of women was acute. The behemoth size of some corporations stirred alarm. So did the

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The Commons

General Chaos In November, Mark Bowden reported on what top military officers really think about President Donald Trump. There is a common misconception, which Mark Bowden repeats, that a military officer swears to obey all orders that descend to him or her from the president as commander in chief. Military officers are not so sworn. The only completely binding oath of office taken by an officer

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Clogging the System: The Feud Over Flushable Wipes

Cities scramble to deal with clogged sewer systems and congealed masses of flushed items known as fatbergs. Now, the wastewater industry is conducting research to test the flushability of bathroom wipes that manufacturers of personal care and cleaning products claim are flushable on their packages.

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Magnetic levitation device could help police identify illegal drugs

A new forensics technique separates mixtures of drugs using magnetic levitation, helping police identify them more easily

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We live in testing times, but there are many reasons to be optimistic

As a new decade dawns, we should embrace a cautious optimism, rooted in facts and belief in human ingenuity

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The coolest LEGO ® in the universe

For the first time, LEGO ® has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy — the development of quantum computing. A figure and four blocks were placed inside the most effective refrigerator in the world, capable of reaching 1.6 millidegrees above absolute zero (minus 273.15 Centigrade), which is about 200,000 times colder than room

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Will the United States Lose the Universe?

For more than a century, American astronomers have held bragging rights as observers of the cosmos. But that dominance may soon slip away.

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Earth Science Has a Whiteness Problem

Barely 10 percent of doctoral degrees in the geosciences go to recipients of color. The lack of diversity limits the quality of research, many scientists say.

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Angiotensin-Receptor-Associated Protein Modulates Ca2+ Signals in Photoreceptor and Mossy Fiber cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55380-8 Angiotensin-Receptor-Associated Protein Modulates Ca 2+ Signals in Photoreceptor and Mossy Fiber cells

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LEGO® Block Structures as a Sub-Kelvin Thermal Insulator

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55616-7

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An Effect of Chronic Stress on Prospective Memory via Alteration of Resting-State Hippocampal Subregion Functional Connectivity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56111-9

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Sulfur isotope analysis for representative regional background atmospheric aerosols collected at Mt. Lulin, Taiwan

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56048-z

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Caveolin-1 gene therapy inhibits inflammasome activation to protect from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55819-y

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Semi-quantized Spin Pumping and Spin-Orbit Torques in Topological Dirac Semimetals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55802-7

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The Most Powerful Scene in Bombshell

The best scene of Bombshell , the based-on-a-true-story dramatization of sexual harassment at Fox News, is one that never really happened . In it, Kayla, a young and ambitious producer at the network, gets an opportunity that doubles as currency at Fox News: a private meeting with Roger Ailes, the chairman and CEO. Knowing that he has the power to make her career in journalism—less aware, at the

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The biggest technology failures of 2019

Autopilot run amok, bogus agriculture bots, and genetic gaydar all made our list of the worst technologies of the year.

12h

The coolest LEGO in the universe

For the first time, LEGO has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy.

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In 2019 the public woke up to the climate crisis. When will the politicians? | Stephen Buranyi

Poll after poll shows that people now want action. But at the international level progress is being deliberately stymied In 1988, Time magazine selected "The Endangered Earth" as its person of the year. This December, 31 years later, the honour went to Greta Thunberg . The point of the Time exercise is to take a complex issue and locate a person through whom we can better understand it. Twenty yea

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Ecuador says Galapagos fuel spill 'under control'

Ecuador officials announced Sunday that a fuel spill in the Galapagos Islands, caused when a barge sank carrying 600 gallons of diesel fuel, was "under control."

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sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® predicts need for organ support in general ICU patient population

Data from more than 2,000 patients enrolled in the FROG-ICU study demonstrate that high levels of bioactive adrenomedullin (bio-ADM®) predict the need for organ support, ionotropes, and vasopressors in the general patient population at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU).

12h

Japan Wants to Dump Nuclear Plant's Tainted Water. Fishermen Fear the Worst.

The water from the Fukushima disaster is more radioactive than the authorities have previously publicized, raising doubts about government assurances that it will be made safe.

13h

Time-to-death of Roman emperors followed distinct pattern

Roman emperors faced a high risk of violent death in their first year of rule, but the risk slowly declined over the next seven years, according to an article published in the open access journal Palgrave Communications. When statistically modelled, the length of time from the beginning of their reign until their death followed a set pattern, similar to that seen in reliability engineering, interd

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"Natural health" and the antivaccine movement: The case of Dr. Joseph Mercola

Dr. Joseph Mercola has been selling quackery for over two decades. It turns out that he also promotes antivaccine pseudoscience, as a new report from The Washington Post shows.

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World 'faces 80% calorie increase by end of century'

The amount of food needed to feed the world's population by the end of the century could increase by almost 80%, a study suggests.

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Minister: Statiker-kaos skyldes byggerådgivernes »sendrægtighed«

PLUS. Ifølge boligminister Kaare Dybvad Bek er en sløv byggebranche selv skyld i, at kun 17 statikere er certificeret til at kunne overtage kommunernes byggesagsbehandling. Det besked får dog rådgivernes direktør til at holde tasten med de store bogstaver nede.

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Klar til gigantisk mad-orgie? Sådan forbereder du maven til and, sovs og risalamande

Sæt gang i tarmsystemet med motion og væske, så er kroppen helt forberedt til julemaden.

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Science snapshots from Berkeley Lab

This edition of Science Snapshots highlights an investigational cancer drug that targets tumors caused by mutations in the KRAS gene, a new library of artificial proteins that could accelerate the design of new materials, and the natural toughening mechanism behind adult tooth enamel.

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Parents: Turkey makes great leftovers — opioids do not

Leftover prescription opioids pose big risks to kids, yet most parents keep their own and their child's unused painkillers even after they're no longer medically necessary for pain.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 23. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2019. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Bedre internet til danske togpassagerer udskudt – kun halvdelen af senderne er i drift

PLUS. Det lykkedes ikke for Banedanmark, DSB og mobilselskaberne at blive færdige med at udrulle bedre internet til de danske passagerer inden udgangen af 2019 som lovet. Udstyret inde i togene er dog på plads.

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Time-to-death of Roman emperors followed distinct pattern

Roman emperors faced a high risk of violent death in their first year of rule, but the risk slowly declined over the next seven years, according to an article published in the open access journal Palgrave Communications. When statistically modelled, the length of time from the beginning of their reign until their death followed a set pattern, similar to that seen in reliability engineering, interd

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #51

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Claim Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… Rich Nations, After Driving Climate Disaster, Block All Progress At U.N. Talks Empty chairs of the delegations are pictured during the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP25 in Madrid, on Dec. 13, 2019. Photo: Cris

21h

Uninstall ToTok, an Alleged Emirati Spy App, From Your Phone Now

A messaging app called ToTok had scores of positive reviews, particularly from users in the UAE. US intelligent officials say it may be spying for that government instead.

21h

Genetic variation gives mussels a chance to adapt to climate change

Existing genetic variation in natural populations of Mediterranean mussels allows them to adapt to declining pH levels in seawater caused by carbon emissions. Biologists show that mussels raised in a low pH experimental environment grew smaller shells than those grown at normal pH levels, but the overall survival rate of mussels grown under both conditions was the same.

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Free of Heavy Metals, New Battery Design Could Alleviate Environmental Concerns

submitted by /u/Hank_hill_repping [link] [comments]

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Earthships: self-sustaining homes for a post apocalyptic land?

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Predictions for 2020s: what will technology be like by 2030?

With 2020 upon us, I am starting to get very excited about what this new decade will bring. Here are some of my predictions: Artificial Intelligence Perhaps it is the optimist in me, but I very strongly believe we are going to make unprecedented advances in artificial intelligence, especially as more research is conducted in quantum computing. Perhaps this is very optimistic, but I see the very f

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UK visa numbers to be raised in science research push

New government to increase eligible fellowships for fast-track approval

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Scientists Find the Universe's First Molecule

#29 in our top science stories of 2019.

23h

Cheers! Scientists take big step towards making the perfect head of beer

Drinkers will soon be cheering all the way to the bar thanks to a team of scientists who have taken a big step forward in solving the puzzle of how to make the perfect head of beer. Researchers say the findings solve a long-standing mystery related to the lifetime of foams.

23h

From 3D to 2D and back: Reversible conversion of lipid spheres into ultra-thin sheets

Scientists have developed a technique for the reversible conversion of 3D lipid vesicles into 2D ultra-thin nanosheets. Both the stable nanosheets and the reversible 2D-3D conversion process can find various applications in the pharmaceutical, bioengineering, food, and cosmetic sciences.

23h

Cheers! Scientists take big step towards making the perfect head of beer

Drinkers will soon be cheering all the way to the bar thanks to a team of scientists who have taken a big step forward in solving the puzzle of how to make the perfect head of beer. Researchers say the findings solve a long-standing mystery related to the lifetime of foams.

23h

Organic crop practices affect long-term soil health

Prior organic farming practices and plantings can have lasting outcomes for future soil health, weeds and crop yields, according to new research.

23h

Nightside barrier gently brakes 'bursty' plasma bubbles

Space plasma physicists develop algorithms to measure the buoyancy waves that appear in thin filaments of magnetic flux on Earth's nightside.

23h

From 3D to 2D and back: Reversible conversion of lipid spheres into ultra-thin sheets

Scientists have developed a technique for the reversible conversion of 3D lipid vesicles into 2D ultra-thin nanosheets. Both the stable nanosheets and the reversible 2D-3D conversion process can find various applications in the pharmaceutical, bioengineering, food, and cosmetic sciences.

23h

Understanding the adolescent brain

New research from neuroscientists shows that the brains of adolescents struggling with mental-health issues may be wired differently from those of their healthy peers.

23h

Using a material's 'memory' to encode unique physical properties

As materials age, they 'remember' prior stresses and external forces, which scientists and engineers can then use to create new materials with unique properties.

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Immune mystery solved in mice points to better protection from rotavirus in humans

Researchers have discovered how a brief disruption to a molecular pathway in the guts of mice before they are born can compromise adult immunity to a common and often deadly intestinal virus.

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Using a material's 'memory' to encode unique physical properties

As materials age, they 'remember' prior stresses and external forces, which scientists and engineers can then use to create new materials with unique properties.

23h

Berlin's bright sky isn't a bat's thing

People can hardly imagine a city without night-time street lighting. But how do nocturnal animals such as bats respond to the illuminated urban landscape? In a recent study, scientists equipped common noctule bats (Nyctalus noctula) with mini GPS transmitters and recorded their trajectories in the sky above Berlin. They show that common noctules avoid brightly lit, built-up areas.

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Bark beetles control pathogenic fungi

Pathogens can drive the evolution of social behavior in insects.

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Chronobiology: 'We'll be in later'

Students attending a high school in Germany can decide whether to begin the schoolday at the normal early time or an hour later. According to chronobiologists, the measure has had a positive effect on both their sleep and learning experience.

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Improvements in vaccines against meningitis

New research could lead to an improved vaccine to protect against the bacterium, Neisseria meningitides that causes sepsis and meningitis.

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Neurons responsible for rapid eye movements/REM during sleep

Why do we move our eyes fast in the paradoxical sleep — in that sleep phase, in which most dreams take place? The secret is not yet fully aired, but we are on his track: A team has identified the nerve cells behind this curious phenomenon.

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Popular gyms undermining health with tanning beds

Popular gym chains across the country capitalize on the broad desire to get healthy in the New Year with persuasive post-holiday marketing campaigns, but they're also undermining public health warnings about the dangers of indoor tanning, according to a new study.

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Starwatch: brilliant Venus outshines the young moon

The "evening star" blazes near the south-west horizon, joined by a tiny crescent moon Venus continues to shine brightly as the "evening star" this week. It is the third brightest celestial object in the sky, beaten only by the sun and the moon. A good south-western horizon will be needed as the planet is not very high in the sky at the moment, but it is well worth searching for. Seen blazing bril

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Researchers produce first laser ultrasound images of humans

Engineers have come up with an alternative to conventional ultrasound that doesn't require contact with the body to see inside a patient. The new laser ultrasound technique leverages an eye- and skin-safe laser system to remotely image the inside of a person.

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Universal method for measuring light power

Always on the lookout for better ways to measure all kinds of things, researchers have published a detailed study suggesting an "elegant" improved definition for the standard unit of light power, the optical watt. The proposed definition promises a more precise, less expensive and more portable method for measuring this important quantity for science, technology, manufacturing, commerce and nation

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Could every country have a Green New Deal? Report charts paths for 143 countries

Researchers offer an updated vision of the steps that 143 countries around the world can take to attain 100% clean, renewable energy by the year 2050. The new roadmaps project that transitioning to clean, renewable energy could reduce worldwide energy needs by 57%, create 28.6 million more jobs than are lost, and reduce energy, health, and climate costs by 91% compared with a business-as-usual ana

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Men think they're better liars

Men are twice as likely as women to consider themselves to be good at lying and at getting away with it, new research has found.

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An algorithm for large-scale genomic analysis

The examination of Haplotypes makes it possible to understand the heritability of certain complex traits. However, genome analysis of family members is usually necessary, a tedious and expensive process. Researchers have developed SHAPEIT4, a powerful computer algorithm that allows the haplotypes of hundreds of thousands of unrelated individuals to be identified very quickly. Results are as detail

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Falcons see prey at speed of Formula 1 car

Extremely acute vision and the ability to rapidly process different visual impressions — these 2 factors are crucial when a peregrine falcon bears down on its prey at a speed that easily matches that of a Formula 1 racing car: Over 350 kilometers per hour.

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Ecological impacts of palm stearin spill to the coastal ecosystem

In August 2017, a marine accident occurred in the Pearl River Estuary where a cargo vessel accidentally released about 1,000 tons of palm stearin into the sea, where over 200 tons reached the southwest coasts of Hong Kong. Subsequently a research team launched an 18-month investigation on the degradation, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of the palm stearin through bother field- and laboratory-based

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Plant scientists identify new strategy to enhance rice grain yield

Rice provides a daily subsistence for about three billion people worldwide and its output must keep pace with a growing global population. In light of this, the identification of genes that enhance grain yield and composition is much desired. Findings from a research project have provided a new strategy to enhance grain yield in rice by increasing grain size and weight.

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2019 most controversial: Don't believe the keto hype

Big Think's most controversial video of 2019 stirs the pot of the keto diet debate with fitness and nutrition expert Jillian Michaels, who asks: Are keto diet advocates selling people a false—or at least a selective—message? The keto diet increases fat and protein intake while dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake to about 20 grams a day or about 80 calories worth of carbs out of what could b

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RIP Jerome L. Singer, "The Father of Daydreaming" (1924-2019)

A seminal psychologist who explored the positive, creative and productive aspects of daydreaming has passed away at the age of 95 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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RIP Jerome L. Singer, "The Father of Daydreaming" (1924-2019)

A seminal psychologist who explored the positive, creative and productive aspects of daydreaming has passed away at the age of 95 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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4 simple ways to make your holiday season more sustainable

For many people around the world, the holiday season is a time to eat, drink and be merry with family and friends. But between unwanted gifts, energy use and all the travel, the celebrations can create problems for the planet. Here are four things you can do to make your holiday festivities more sustainable. 1. Buy a real tree Here's some good news for those who prefer real Christmas trees. Becau

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How One Atlantic Editor Is Spending Her Holidays This Year

Last week, Vogue published an article detailing how some of its editors are spending Christmas this year. It was a wonderful opportunity for the denizens of the internet to gawk at unselfconscious proclamations of wealth and access and taste. Just another example of how " rich people are the worst ." The extremely relatable holiday destinations for these Vogue editors included "a seven-day detox

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