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nyheder2019december30

NASA sees Mauritius covered by Tropical Storm Calvinia

Tropical Cyclone Calvinia formed on Dec. 29 and by the next day, its clouds from a band of thunderstorms on its western side had blanketed the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean.

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This Was the Decade We Knew We Were Right

Everything is connected, and everything is changing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Den magnetiske nordpol på hastig rejse mod Sibirien

Ny rapport viser, at den magnetiske nordpol – der har afgørende betydning for navigation – bevæger sig hurtigere end tidligere antaget. Men der er tegn på opbremsning og måske en polvending.

10h

New membrane enables us to harvest 'osmotic' energy from water

Osmotic power plants harvest energy from the difference in pressure or salinity between salt and freshwater using a semi-permeable membrane. One of the major challenges for this kind of renewable energy, however, has been developing effective and durable membranes. Now, new research demonstrates a durable and effective membrane that could significantly improve osmotic energy collection. None By n

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Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus

Life as we know it requires phosphorus, and lots of it. But phosphorus is scarce. A new study reports that certain types of carbonate-rich lakes, which could have formed on early Earth, have the right chemistry to keep phosphorous levels high and available to organisms.

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The Biggest Whales are Yet to Come

A study of whale feeding habits found that food is the main limit to the size of ocean giants. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A fragile balance

The sea encircling Antarctica mixes water from all the ocean basins. This circulating pattern influences the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere. A study by an international research team, led by Dr. Torben Struve from the University of Oldenburg, Germany, indicates that the complex equilibrium of water masses reacts sensitively to wind conditions over the Souther

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How to maintain a buzz without getting drunk

It's pretty easy to stay tipsy, as long as you're mindful (Alasdair Elmes/) The holidays are upon us and just as we surround ourselves with loved ones, we'll probably find ourselves likewise surrounded by a sea of booze. Whether that's rum-spiked cider, pricey wines, or fancy cocktails we'd normally never have time to make, the holiday atmosphere and delectable offerings can certainly make it tem

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As robots take over warehousing, workers pushed to adapt

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Mazda claims long-range EVs are worse for the planet than diesels

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Chinese Researcher Who Created Gene-Edited Babies Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Direct-to-consumer fertility tests confuse and mislead consumers, Penn study shows

Direct-to-consumer hormone-based 'fertility testing' for women is viewed by consumers as both an alternative, empowering tool for family planning, and a confusing and misleading one, according to the results of a new study from Penn Medicine.

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The experimental demonstration of a spin quantum heat engine

The theoretical notion of a 'quantum heat engine' has been around for several decades. It was first introduced around sixty years ago by Scovil and Schulz-DuBois, two physicists at Bell Labs who drew an analogy between three-level masers and thermal machines.

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The Atlantic Daily: Our Culture Desk's Favorites of 2019 📺🎬

It's Friday, December 27. In today's issue: Memorable shows; memorable films; memorable TV moments (yes, a Game of Thrones scene made the cut). The year is coming to a close, and you know what that means: It's time for best-of-the-year lists. We're spending the remaining days of 2019 rounding up some of our editors' and writers' favorite things to watch, read, and listen to from this past year. T

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This "Stellar Engine" Would Move an Entire Solar System

Researchers across the globe are already working on ways to destroy or at least redirect any killer asteroids before they slam into the Earth. But what if scientists discover that Earth is threatened by an entire asteroid shower? Or that some other cosmic phenomenon, such as nearby star going supernova, is on track to destroy the planet? In those instances, our survival might depend not on stoppi

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Male versus female brains: persistent myth or inconvenient truth?

Neurosexism, past and present Science has been used as a tool of women's oppression at least since Darwin formulated his theory of natural selection. In addition to On the Origin of Species , Darwin wrote a volume entitled The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex , a book that attempted to explain observable differences between men and women in evolutionary terms. According to Darwin,

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Time to worry about electronic pills and privacy?

The spread of new electronic pills with built-in sensors creates both ethical and legal challenges, researchers warn. The new electronic pills can collect data, for example, on the state of the stomach and intestines, and this creates new opportunities for diagnosing diseases. The pills can also be used to monitor medication (e.g., in patients with mental disorders). Pills with built-in sensors a

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The mysterious case of the ornamented coot chicks has a surprising explanation

The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. Coot chicks, however, sport outrageously bright orange and red feathers, skin, and beaks. A new study explains how the bright coloring of coot chicks fits in with the reproductive strategy of their less colorful parents.

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The mysterious case of the ornamented coot chicks has a surprising explanation

The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. Coot chicks, however, sport outrageously bright orange and red feathers, skin, and beaks. A new study explains how the bright coloring of coot chicks fits in with the reproductive strategy of their less colorful parents.

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Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus

Life as we know it requires phosphorus. It's one of the six main chemical elements of life, it forms the backbone of DNA and RNA molecules, acts as the main currency for energy in all cells and anchors the lipids that separate cells from their surrounding environment.

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How fish fins evolved just before the transition to land

Research on fossilized fish from the late Devonian period, roughly 375 million years ago, details the evolution of fins as they began to transition into limbs fit for walking on land.

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As the Himalayas Melt, Thousands of Dangerous Floods Could Sweep Through the Mountain Range

A new study predicts that 5,000 lakes across the mountain range could one day burst into valleys below.

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Is CBD a Cure-All?

Cannabidiol was everywhere this year — but is there evidence to back the hype?

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These 10 discoveries got the most looks in 2019

First off, thanks to the loyal readers and the newcomers who visited Futurity in 2019. We hope you continue to find informative and entertaining research news here in 2020. Here's a countdown to our most popular story of the past year. The list reflects the unexpected mix of topics we cover each day, with discoveries ranging from sea snakes in the ocean to the cleaning system in your sleeping bra

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Mars 2020 Rover Completes First Test Drive

NASA has inched closer to completing its next Mars rover with a milestone driving test. The team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California fired up the Mars 2020 rover and allowed to to drive around the Spacecraft Assembly Facility clean room. NASA reports the rover passed the test with flying colors , signaling it's ready to drive on the red planet. The still-unnamed Mars 2020

1h

How deep roots help conifers survive drought

Computational modeling is offering clues about how some tree roots, like those of pines and junipers, may respond to drought in light of a warming world. The new research addresses a classic question in the field: When conditions are dry for long periods of time, do trees grow new roots to tap water sources to survive or rely on established roots that already go deep? The answer, at least for som

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Team nails down which neurons hold short-term memories

A population of neurons in the brain's frontal lobe contains stable short-term memory information despite dynamically-changing neural activity, researchers report. This discovery may have consequences for understanding how organisms can perform multiple mental operations simultaneously, such as remembering, paying attention , and making a decision, using a brain of limited size. In the human brai

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Bioelectric stimulation to clear skin lesions

The delivery of ultrashort pulses of electrical energy represents a promising nonthermal, nonscarring method of inducing regulated cell death in common skin lesions.

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The Last Unifying Force in Congress

Representative John Lewis had just finished delivering a heartfelt tribute to the retiring Republican Senator Johnny Isakson on the House floor last month when he looked over to his ailing fellow Georgian. "I will come over to meet you, brother," Lewis told him as he laid his remarks down on the rostrum. The two aging politicians each walked gingerly toward the center aisle of the chamber and met

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Will Prime Editors be the New CRISPR?

There's a new gene editing technique in town, called "prime editing."

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More Chinese scientists in America are going back home

A growing number of Chinese scientists working in the United States and other parts of the world are returning to their homeland, enhancing China's research productivity.In a new study, researchers found that more than 16,000 researchers have returned to China from other countries since that nation has opened up to international engagement. More than 4,500 left the United States for China in 2017

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How to Make a Self-Aware Show About a Serial Killer

This story contains spoilers for Season 2 of You . Disillusioned New Yorkers abscond to Los Angeles to escape any number of undesirables: the rats ( and raccoons ) that traverse grimy subway stations, the trains that seem to arrive with less regularity than the vermin, the puddles of icy sludge that turn crosswalks into ecological terror sites every winter. But none of these nuisances is the reas

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What School Could Be If It Were Designed for Kids With Autism

Editor's Note: In the next five years, most of America's most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic' s "On Teaching" project is crisscrossing the country to talk

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Forest ecologist helps refashion Barbie dolls as scientists

When Nalini Nadkarni was a kid, she'd run home from school, climb into one of the eight maple trees in her parents' backyard and spend an afternoon there with an apple and a book.

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More Chinese scientists in America are going back home

A growing number of Chinese scientists working in the United States and other parts of the world are returning to their homeland, enhancing China's research productivity.

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Samsung Tweets Cryptic Plans to Unveil an "Artificial Human"

Artificial Human Samsung is teasing plans to unveil what it calls an "artificial human" called NEON at the Consumer Electronics Show, which kicks off January 7. For the past couple of weeks, a series of posts from the official NEON social media accounts have asked the same question in various languages — "Have you ever met an 'ARTIFICIAL'?" — with a post shared on December 26 spelling it out that

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With purifiers and lawsuits, Pakistanis fight back against smog

For the past few months Hasan Zaidi's phone has been ringing nonstop with calls from desperate residents in Pakistan hoping to get their hands on his newly invented air purifier as smog blankets the country.

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Hundreds of flights delayed as fog engulfs northern India

Dense fog and hazardous air pollution blanketed northern India and disrupted hundreds of flights on Monday, as harsh winter weather sent temperatures plunging to near-record lows.

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2019 Seen Through the Lens of Goran Tomasevic

Goran Tomasevic has worked as a photojournalist for Reuters for more than 20 years, covering some of the biggest events and stories around the world. In 2019, Tomasevic was among a team of Reuters photographers awarded the Pulitzer Prize in the Breaking News Photography category. Throughout the past year, he traveled to locations in Europe, Africa, and South America to photograph the faces and st

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Students want climate change lessons. Schools aren't ready

Not too long ago Coral Ben-Aharon, a 15-year-old sophomore at Granada Hills Charter High School, didn't bother to use her school's recycling bins—and didn't know how plastic waste contributes to greenhouse gas emissions.

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Alligators are wearing little 'hats' in South Carolina. It's all part of a study

Gadgets that resemble little black hats are showing up on the heads of alligators in South Carolina.

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New US law requires probe of Marshall Islands nuclear dump threatened by rising seas

Congress is demanding that the Department of Energy investigate an aging, cracking U.S. nuclear waste dump threatened by climate change and rising seas in the Marshall Islands.

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Alligators are wearing little 'hats' in South Carolina. It's all part of a study

Gadgets that resemble little black hats are showing up on the heads of alligators in South Carolina.

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Measles may have emerged when large cities rose, 1500 years earlier than thought

Old museum sample of infected lung sheds light on origins of now-resurgent virus

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Don't Look Now, But Your Shadow May Be Shrinking

The view of Earth from 22,000 miles away in space helps explain what's going on.

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Træt af dårligt nyt? Her er tre gode videnskabsnyheder, der gjorde 2019 lidt bedre

Pjuskede fugleunger gør comeback, og optimister lever længere.

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First study to compare citrus varieties with combination of metabolomics and microbiome

Citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB), is deadly, incurable, and the most significant threat to the citrus industry. Most HLB research focuses on the tree canopy, but scientists in California studied the impact of HLB on root systems. They recently published the first study to report on the response of two different varieties of citrus to the causal bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter as

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All That We've Learned About Human Origins Recently — and What We Still Want to Know

Ancient humans are far older, and were more widespread, than we thought. What else is there to learn?

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First study to compare citrus varieties with combination of metabolomics and microbiome

Citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB), is deadly, incurable, and the most significant threat to the citrus industry. Most HLB research focuses on the tree canopy, but scientists in California studied the impact of HLB on root systems. They recently published the first study to report on the response of two different varieties of citrus to the causal bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter as

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New study investigates properties of the Melotte 105 cluster

A new study recently conducted by astronomers has investigated the Melotte 105 open cluster with the aim on uncovering its fundamental properties. The research, presented in a paper published December 18 on arXiv.org, provides more accurate measurements of the cluster's distance, age and metallicity.

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Scientists have developed a new concept of mathematical modeling

A team of scientists from the Research Center "Fundamental Problems of Thermophysics and Mechanics," of Samara Polytech is engaged in the construction of new mathematical models and the search for methods for their study in relation to a wide range of local nonequilibrium transport processes in various physical systems. An innovative approach developed not so long ago is based on a modern version

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CRISPR Babies Scientist Sentenced to 3 Years in Prison

A Chinese Court jailed He Jiankui for an "illegal medical practice" in editing embryos' DNA — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists can now predict at birth who will have academic success

Researchers looked at data from 5,000 students and found 2 factors that were strongly linked to academic success. Students with genetic predisposition towards academics were much more likely to go to University. Equally important was having well-educated parents with wealth. None Will your child be a good student? A new study claims it's possible to predict how successful kids will be in academic

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Asia's hardest year for dengue fever – in pictures

More than a million cases were reported in south-east Asia last year with poorer households most at risk The global toll of dengue fever is becoming well known, with rising temperatures contributing to severe outbreaks that made 2019 the worst year on record for the disease. In 1970 only nine countries faced severe dengue outbreaks. But the disease, which is spread by mosquitoes that can only sur

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Opioid Deaths Rise When Auto Plants Close, Study Shows

Research found 85 percent more deaths among those of prime working age in places where car factories closed compared with where they stayed open.

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Individualized physical therapy reduces incontinence, pain in men after prostate surgery

For decades, therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles has been the standard treatment for men dealing with urinary incontinence after prostate surgery. But a new study suggests that may not be the best approach.

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Can blood markers show when healthy cells turn into cancer?

There may be a way to know when cancer-prone cells will turn into full-blown cancer, researchers report. It may become possible for biomarkers in blood to reveal whether mutated cells have turned a corner toward forming tumors, and how long the process—depending on the type of cancer—is likely to take. That could give patients a sense of the risk they face before they become ill. The researchers

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To grab nectar, moths rely on split-second timing

To extract nectar from flowers dancing in the wind, moths depend on precise, millisecond timing between their brain and muscles, researchers report. Researchers captured and analyzed nearly all of the brain signals sent to the wing muscles of hawk moths ( Manduca sexta ), which feed on such nectar, to show that precise timing within rapid sequences of neural signal spikes is essential to controll

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The Purest Fandom Is Telling Celebrities They're Stupid

Dua Lipa does not understand time. The 25-year-old British pop star recently tweeted two images of herself as a small child: short hair tied up in a dozen tiny scrunchies, toddler hand struggling to apply pearlescent pink lipstick with any kind of precision. She captioned it "HOW I STARTED THE DECADE." Her fans immediately lined up to gently inform her that she is— sorry, we love you! —so dumb. "

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Predictions for the next 10 – 30 years ?

What's society changes will we see ? What tech changes will we see ? What wars will come ? Will accomplishments will we have ? submitted by /u/longwaters99 [link] [comments]

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Saving Moore's Law by 3D integration with 2D materials

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How cells learn to 'count'

One of the wonders of cell biology is its symmetry. Mammalian cells have one nucleus and one cell membrane, and most humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes. Trillions of mammalian cells achieve this uniformity—but some consistently break this mold to fulfill unique functions. Now, a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found how these outliers take shape.

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Stamp collection gives rare glimpse inside North Korea

A new collection of stamps from North Korea provide a unique glimpse of the insular country. The stamps, which span from 1962 to 2018, capture a variety of scenes, settings, and characters—including explicit propaganda, traditional Korean garb, and simple depictions of wildlife. "I was very surprised," says Jee-Young Park, the Korean Studies librarian at the University of Chicago, who built the c

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How a few tweaks revived near-dead solar tech

New research reveals the counterintuitive tweaks to the chemistry of a solar cell material that have boosted its power output. A solar energy material that's remarkably durable and affordable is also regrettably unusable if it barely generates electricity, so many researchers had abandoned emerging organic solar technologies. But lately, a shift in the underlying chemistry has boosted power outpu

3h

How cells learn to 'count'

One of the wonders of cell biology is its symmetry. Mammalian cells have one nucleus and one cell membrane, and most humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes. Trillions of mammalian cells achieve this uniformity—but some consistently break this mold to fulfill unique functions. Now, a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found how these outliers take shape.

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North Atlantic Current may cease temporarily in the next century

The North Atlantic Current transports warm water from the Gulf of Mexico towards Europe, providing much of north-western Europe with a relatively mild climate. However, scientists suspect that meltwater from Greenland and excessive rainfall could interfere with this ocean current. Simulations by scientists from the University of Groningen and Utrecht University showed that it is unlikely that the

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Better anchor roots help crops grow in poor soils

A metabolite in plants that regulates the growth of anchor roots—vital for sustaining water and nutrient uptake in plants—has been identified and may have useful applications in agriculture.

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Better anchor roots help crops grow in poor soils

A metabolite in plants that regulates the growth of anchor roots—vital for sustaining water and nutrient uptake in plants—has been identified and may have useful applications in agriculture.

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How bacteria control their cell cycle

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have demonstrated how bacteria coordinate cell division with the replication of their genetic material. In an interdisciplinary study they explain why the current concept of the bacterial cell cycle has to be rewritten. The results were published in eLife.

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Chinese Researcher Who Created Gene-Edited Babies Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison

He Jiankui announced in November 2018 that he had created the world's first gene-edited babies. Scientists are concerned about unintended side effects that could be passed down to future generations. (Image credit: Kin Cheung/AP)

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China Quietly Confirms Birth of Third Gene-Edited Baby

On Monday, Chinese state-run news agency Xinhua reported that He Jiankui, the researcher responsible for creating the world's first gene-edited babies, had been sentenced to three years in prison on the charge of illegally practicing medicine. Given that China condemned He's research almost immediately after he announced the births of the twin babies, it's not particularly surprising to hear that

4h

How bacteria control their cell cycle

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have demonstrated how bacteria coordinate cell division with the replication of their genetic material. In an interdisciplinary study they explain why the current concept of the bacterial cell cycle has to be rewritten. The results were published in eLife.

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Harnessing hot carriers for high efficiency solar cells

Two-dimensional solar materials may offer a way to extract more energy from sunlight. By tuning the structure of a 2-D perovskite solar material, researchers from KAUST and the Georgia Institute of Technology have shown they can prolong the lifetime of highly energetic hot carriers generated by light striking the material. The approach could offer a way to capture solar energy more efficiently.

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2019 was hottest year on record for Russia

This year was the hottest ever registered in Russia, the country's weather chief said on Monday, as climate change pushes global temperatures to record highs.

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Strategies to generate larger pores in metal-organic frameworks

Due to the advantages such as large specific surface area, adjustable pore size and tunable functionality, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great application potential in the fields of gas adsorption and separation, catalysis, sensing and biomedicine. However, most metal-organic frameworks have pore sizes below 2 nm and are typical microporous structures, which limits pore structure and

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Those We Lost in 2019

The scientific community said goodbye to Sydney Brenner, Paul Greengard, Patricia Bath, and a number of other leading researchers this year.

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The growing Tibetan Plateau shaped modern biodiversity

Holding particular biological resources, the Tibetan Plateau is a unique geologic-geographic-biotic interactive unit and hence plays an important role in the global biodiversity domain. The Tibetan Plateau has undergone vigorous environmental changes since the Cenozoic, and played roles as switching from "a paradise of tropical animals and plants" to "the cradle of Ice Age mammalian fauna."

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Did you solve it? 2020 in numbers

The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you the following problems: 1) How can someone born in 2020 be older than someone born in 2019? Continue reading…

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Ep. 42: Screening Illicit Drugs to Prevent Fentanyl Deaths

In this episode, join freelance journalist Zachary Siegel and podcast host Lydia Chain as they explore the harm reduction organizations testing illicit drugs with forensic lab equipment to reduce fentanyl overdoses. Like any effort to make illegal substance use safer, the mission is complex and controversial.

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NASA sees Mauritius covered by Tropical Storm Calvinia

Tropical Cyclone Calvinia formed on Dec. 29 and by the next day, its clouds from a band of thunderstorms on its western side had blanketed the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean.

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NASA tracks Tropical Storm Sarai moving away from Fiji

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean on Dec. 30 and found that Tropical Storm Sarai continued to move further away from Fiji and toward Tonga.

4h

The growing Tibetan Plateau shaped modern biodiversity

Holding particular biological resources, the Tibetan Plateau is a unique geologic-geographic-biotic interactive unit and hence plays an important role in the global biodiversity domain. The Tibetan Plateau has undergone vigorous environmental changes since the Cenozoic, and played roles as switching from "a paradise of tropical animals and plants" to "the cradle of Ice Age mammalian fauna."

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Replacing one gas with another helps efficiently extract methane from permafrost

Scientists from Skoltech and Heriot-Watt University proposed extracting methane by injecting flue gas into permafrost hydrate reservoirs. Since the flue gas contains carbon dioxide, the new technology will also contributes to reduction of this green house gas in the Arctic atmosphere. The results of their study were published in the journal Scientific Reports.

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5 Things That Went Right for Climate Action in 2019

The year saw youth leadership, feminist leadership, the Green New Deal, climate proposals from presidential candidates, and climate justice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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5 Things That Went Right for Climate Action in 2019

The year saw youth leadership, feminist leadership, the Green New Deal, climate proposals from presidential candidates, and climate justice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China Sentences Gene-Editing Scientist to Three Years in Jail

The modification of three babies' genes by He Jiankui drew widespread criticism from scientists.

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China Is Imprisoning the Scientist Who Gene-Edited Babies

Chinese researcher He Jiankui is headed to prison for creating the world's first gene-edited babies. In November 2018, He announced that he'd gene-edited human embryos and brought them to term, resulting in the birth of twin girls. He also claimed another woman was already pregnant with a third gene-edited embryo , with the birth of that baby anticipated for July 2019 . On Monday, Chinese state-r

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F.D.A. Failed to Ensure Safe Prescribing of Opioids, Documents Show

The agency, whose oversight of opioid safety has largely eluded scrutiny, did not improve flawed programs designed to reduce addiction and overdoses.

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Meet the Rowers: Jamie Douglas-Hamilton | The Impossible Row | Episode 12

The grandson of a pilot adventurer, Jamie Douglas-Hamilton is now deep into crossing Drake Passage. He has rowed his way into the record books several times, most notably for his 5,000-mile rowing expedition from Australia to Africa. Stream More Episodes of The Impossible Row: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-impossible-row/ About The Impossible Row: The Drake Passage is the most dangerous 6

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Learning from the bears

Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal Scientific Reports, a team led by Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well.

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Children who drank whole milk had lower risk of being overweight or obese

Researchers analyzed 28 studies from seven countries that explored the relationship between children drinking cow's milk and the risk of being overweight or obese.

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Learning from the bears

Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal Scientific Reports, a team led by Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well.

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NASA tracks Tropical Storm Sarai moving away from Fiji

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean on Dec. 30, 2019 and found that Tropical Storm Sarai continued to move further away from Fiji and toward Tonga.

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Replacing one gas with another helps efficiently extract methane from permafrost

Scientists from Skoltech and Heriot-Watt University proposed extracting methane by injecting flue gas into permafrost hydrate reservoirs. Since the flue gas contains carbon dioxide, the new technology will also contributes to reduction of this greenhouse gas in the Arctic atmosphere. The results of their study were published in the journal Scientific reports.

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Findings strengthen link between vitamin A acetate and vaping-associated lung injuries

New research reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center strengthens prior findings on the link between vitamin E acetate and EVALI (E-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury).

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'Junk DNA' had a big role in domesticating rice

New research clarifies how rice went from a wild plant to domesticated crop. Domesticated rice has fatter seed grains with higher starch content than its wild rice relatives—the result of many generations of preferential seed sorting and sowing. But even though rice was the first crop to be fully sequenced, scientists have only documented a few of the genetic changes that made rice into a staple

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Correlation between the level of happiness and the Arab Spring

Researchers from HSE University have shown that the 2010 happiness level of citizens from Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and other Arab countries could provide a much more accurate forecast of the Arab Spring events than purely economic indices, such as GDP per capita and unemployment rate.

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How do conifers survive droughts? Study points to existing roots, not new growth

As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how cone-bearing trees like pines and junipers may respond to drought.

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How do conifers survive droughts? Study points to existing roots, not new growth

As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how cone-bearing trees like pines and junipers may respond to drought.

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A New Study Indicates Humans Self-Generate Misinformation

A delightful mess of Google-colored cables A new study into sources of misinformation suggests that humans self-generate it on a regular basis by misrecalling information they've previously learned in ways that fit already-existing opinions and biases. The term misinformation is specifically defined as Merriam-Webster as "incorrect or misleading information." It is distinct from terms like disinf

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How much do you know about the most notable tech stories from this decade?

The last show of the decade will test your memory of the past 10 years. (Techathlon/) You're now ten years older than when this decade started, which means your relationship with time in general has likely shifted substantially. But, the time has come to battle through those existential issues and battles with the ever-ticking clock to try and pry some technology trivia out of your increasingly u

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Long-dormant disease becomes most dominant foliar disease in New York onion crops

New York is the fifth largest producer of onion bulbs in the United States, producing over 110,000 metric tons from over 2,800 hectares. Most of these onions are grown on high organic matter soils, where foliar disease management is crucial to productivity and profitability. These foliar diseases include Botrytis leaf blight, purple blotch, downy mildew, and Stemphylium leaf blight.

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A New Year's resolution to make a difference: Help others.

Most New Year's resolutions are self-directed and enjoy a failure rate of about 80 percent. Research has shown that selfless giving can enhance happiness, improve your health, and even extend your life. Resolving to help others can help you keep your resolution this year. None Every New Year's Eve, we determine to make the next year better than the last. We promise ourselves that we'll eat health

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Arrokoth, Formerly Known as Ultima Thule, Gets a Closer Look

#8 in our top science stories of 2019.

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Long-dormant disease becomes most dominant foliar disease in New York onion crops

New York is the fifth largest producer of onion bulbs in the United States, producing over 110,000 metric tons from over 2,800 hectares. Most of these onions are grown on high organic matter soils, where foliar disease management is crucial to productivity and profitability. These foliar diseases include Botrytis leaf blight, purple blotch, downy mildew, and Stemphylium leaf blight.

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Many younger patients with stomach cancer have a distinct disease

Many people under 60 who develop stomach cancer have a 'genetically and clinically distinct' disease, new research has discovered. Compared to stomach cancer in older adults, this new, early onset form often grows and spreads more quickly, has a worse prognosis, and is more resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments, the study finds.

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Learning from the bears

Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. Researchers report on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well.

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First study to compare citrus varieties with combination of metabolomics and microbiome

Citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB), is deadly, incurable, and the most significant threat to the citrus industry. Most HLB research focuses on the tree canopy, but scientists in California studied the impact of HLB on root systems. They recently published the first study to report on the response of two different varieties of citrus to the causal bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter as

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20 "Supercharging" Tesla Stations Soon To Open on I-95 in Madison

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Fires and Flood Cap Off a Decade of U.S. Disasters

While California had some success at minimizing wildfires in 2019, much work remains to mitigate flooding — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Long-dormant disease becomes most dominant foliar disease in New York onion crops

Until recently, Stemphylium leaf blight has been considered a minor foliar disease as it has not done much damage in New York since the early 1990s. However, onion growers in New York have recently seen an increase in the dieback of their crops, and scientists at Cornell University were surprised to discover that SLB was the cause.

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How do conifers survive droughts? Study points to existing roots, not new growth

As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how coniferous forests may respond to drought. The research addresses a classic question in the field: When conditions are dry for long periods of time, do trees survive by growing new roots to tap water sources, or by relying on established roots that already go deep?

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Grøn organisation: Regnemaskinen bag vores nye veje er helt skæv

Danmark beregner værdien af nye veje og jernbaner uden at tage tilstrækkeligt hensyn til klimaet. Til gengæld vurderer vi hvert eneste sparede minut i bilen enormt højt, fremhæver rapport fra grønt råd.

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Among 412 new species finds this year – the Greta Thunberg beetle

Discoveries by Natural History Museum in 2019 include lichen, snakes and extinct dinosaurs More than 400 new species previously unknown to science have been discovered in the past year by experts at the Natural History Museum. Species described and named for the first time in 2019 include 171 beetles found around the world, one of which was named in honour of the teenage environmental activist Gr

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Scientists link La Niña climate cycle to increased diarrhea

A study in Botswana by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health scientists finds that spikes in cases of life-threatening diarrhea in young children are associated with La Niña climate conditions. The findings published in the journal Nature Communications could provide the basis for an early-warning system that would allow public health officials to prepare for periods of increased dia

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Learning from the bears

Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal 'Scientific Reports', a team led by MDC researcher Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well.

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Study: Children who drank whole milk had lower risk of being overweight or obese

Research led by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto and published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analyzed 28 studies from seven countries that explored the relationship between children drinking cow's milk and the risk of being overweight or obese.

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Unhappy revolutionaries

Researchers from HSE University have shown that the 2010 happiness level of citizens from Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and other Arab countries could provide a much more accurate forecast of the Arab Spring events than purely economic indices, such as GDP per capita and unemployment rate.

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Mars rovers and crew capsules: Your guide to 2020 in space travel

2020 will be a big year for space missions – download your cut-out-and-keep guide to everything happening in orbit and beyond

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If Aliens Existed Elsewhere in the Universe, How Would They Behave?

In a new offering from Smithsonian Books, James Trefil and Michael Summers explore the life forms that might exist on a dizzying array of exoplanets

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Hydrogel controls inflammation to speed healing

Researchers have established a baseline set of injectable hydrogels that show promise to help heal wounds, deliver drugs, and treat cancer. Critically, they've analyzed how the chemically distinct hydrogels provoke the body's inflammatory response—or not. The researchers designed the hydrogels to be injectable and create a mimic of cellular scaffolds in a desired location. They serve as placehold

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Could Having Too Much Become a Bigger Problem Than Having Too Little?

Years ago I traveled to Juarez, Mexico for work, staying across the border in El Paso, Texas and driving back and forth each day. On the Texas side, American life bustled on as usual: wide, well-maintained highways hummed with orderly traffic. Most of the cars were less than a decade old. Strip malls and recently-constructed townhouses were flanked by tidy subdivisions, their grass a vibrant gree

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It's Not Just You—Wild Swings in Extreme Weather Are Rising

As the world warms, scientists say that abrupt shifts in weather patterns, like droughts followed by severe floods, are intensifying.

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The growing Tibetan Plateau shaped the modern biodiversity

The growing Tibetan Plateau since the Cenozoic has shifted the life's history by changing the regional geography and global climate; however, little is known about the details of the process. Based on fossils discovered from the plateau, a recent paper reviewed the role of the rising Tibetan Plateau played in shaping the modern biodiversity. Three evolutionary patterns have been recognized: Local

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These 'lost crops' could have rivaled corn

The "lost crops" of goosefoot and knotweed could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as maize did for thousands of years, research suggests. But, what happened to them? There are no written or oral histories to describe them—and scientists believe the domesticated forms of the lost crops are extinct. In the Journal of Ethnobiology , Natalie Mueller, assistant professor of

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Watch Out for These Science Events in 2020

A Mars invasion, a climate meeting and human–animal hybrids are set to shape the research agenda — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chinese scientist who produced genetically altered babies sentenced to 3 years in jail

He Jiankui and two collaborators were found guilty of "illegal medical practices"

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Hollandsk universitet lammet af ransomware på syvende dag: »VIGTIGT! Brug ikke systemerne!«

Det er uvist, om angriberne har adgang til De videnskabelige data, som nu er krypterede, så universitets forskere ikke kan benytte dem.

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Kinesisk forsker får tre års fængsel for at genmanipulere babyer

Sidste år chokerede forskeren He Jiankui hele verden, da han havde ændret i tvillingers gener.

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Strategies to generate larger pores in metal-organic frameworks

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials assembled from organic ligands and metal nodes. Construction of hierarchically porous MOFs is vital to achieve the augmentation of pore size to mesopores or macropores, which can enhance the diffusion kinetics of guests and improve the capacity. Recently, researchers from Texas A&M University summarized the latest advances in MOFs wi

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How bacteria control their cell cycle

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University have demonstrated how bacteria coordinate cell division with the replication of their genetic material. In an interdisciplinary study they explain why the current concept of the bacterial cell cycle has to be rewritten. The results were published in eLife.

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Samara Polytech scientists has developed a new concept of mathematical modeling

Scientists at the Samara Polytech are developing a new area of mathematical modeling of locally nonequilibrium transfer processes and methods for their study.

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New class of crosslinker-free nanofiber biomaterials from Hydra nematocyst proteins

Nematocysts are stinging organelles of cnidarians that have remarkable mechanical properties to undergo 50 percent volume changes during explosive exocytosis (process by which cells excrete waste and large molecules), while withstanding osmotic pressures beyond 100 bar. Researchers had recently identified two novel protein components that built up the nematocyst wall in Hydra to include (1) a cnid

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Harnessing hot carriers for high efficiency solar cells

Materials that can slow the cooling of highly energetic hot carriers could capture extra energy from the Sun.

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Short or long sleep associated with Pulmonary Fibrosis

Scientists have discovered that people who regularly sleep for more than 11 hours or less than 4 hours are 2-3 times more likely to have the incurable disease, pulmonary fibrosis, compared to those that sleep for 7 hours in a day. They attribute this association to the body clock.

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Combining neurologic and blood pressure drugs reduces breast tumor development in mice

Adding a medication used to treat epilepsy, bipolar disorder and migraines to a blood pressure medicine reversed some aspects of breast cancer in the offspring of mice at high risk of the disease because of the high fat diet fed to their mothers during pregnancy. Conversely, this treatment combination increased breast cancer development in the offspring whose mothers had not been fed a high fat di

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For painful lesions in pneumonia, a new blood test

A new diagnostic blood test could allow more specific treatment for painful inflammatory lesions of the skin and mucous membranes in children with bacterial pneumonia. The blood test makes it possible to investigate the specific immune response in blood in detail. Rapidly dying mucous membrane cells in the mouth, eye, and genital regions, and vesicles and blisters on the skin can be symptoms and

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We're on the verge of AI developed drugs becoming a reality

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Samsung To Launch 'Artificial Human' Called Neon

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Amazon employees struggle with 'nerve-racking' robot co-workers

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2020 is the year of the $1 trillion space economy

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Kina idømmer tre års fængsel for CRISPR-babyer: »Krydsede bundlinjen for videnskabelig etik«

Den kinesiske genforsker He Jiankui er sammen med kollegaer idømt fængsel for genredigering. Alt omkring sagen er nu mørkelagt.

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Better anchor roots help crops grow in poor soils

A newly discovered plant metabolite that promotes anchor root growth may prove valuable in helping crops grow in nutrient-deficient soils.

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The Dazzling Designs of Alpine Ice Formations

These swirling patterns, likely caused by heat rising from the water below, look like frozen Jackson Pollock paintings.

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This Was the Decade We Knew We Were Right

Everything is connected, and everything is changing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Alone in a Crowded Milky Way

Even a galaxy teeming with star-hopping alien civilizations should still harbor isolated, unvisited worlds—and Earth might be among them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Overcoming the Next Cannabis Vaporizer Crisis

Equipment manufacturers work to prevent additional injuries

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A Climate Change Lost Decade

It's fun and interesting to look back over the last decade and think about what has happened and how far we have come. Round years are arbitrary, but it's a sufficient trigger to take stock and hopefully gain some perspective on the medium course of history. There is a lot to say about the 2010s, and I may take the opportunity to say more, but I want to discuss in this essay what is perhaps our g

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How cells learn to 'count'

One of the wonders of cell biology is its symmetry. Mammalian cells have one nucleus and one cell membrane, and most humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes.

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How cells learn to 'count'

One of the wonders of cell biology is its symmetry. Mammalian cells have one nucleus and one cell membrane, and most humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes.

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Good News for Dogs with Cancer

New therapies for beloved pets are getting developed in hopes of treating humans as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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»Genbrugstilstand« gør din Sonos-højttaler ubrugelig. Absurd og skandaløst, siger kritikere

PLUS. Kunder får rabat på nye produkter fra Sonos, hvis de sætter deres gamle produkt i en særlig tilstand, der gør dem umulige at genbruge. Et ekstremt eksempel på planlagt forældelse, mener grøn tænketank.

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To solve global water scarcity, we need to get more serious about desalination

It's enormously expensive to transport water across vast distances, but efficient desalination processes could help. (Deposit Photos/) As the climate warms, many of Earth's arid regions will get even drier—while human populations and their water needs grow. Up to 60 percent of the global population may face severe water scarcity by 2025. Earth's H2O is 97 percent seawater, and most of the remaini

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The 19 Best Shows of a Decade That Queered Television

From themes and formats to storylines, television isn't as straight and narrow as it used to be. Welcome to the messy, vibrant age of queer TV.

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Polio eradication program faces hard choices as endgame strategy fails

"All options are on the table" to fight alarming rise in vaccine-derived outbreaks

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Good News for Dogs with Cancer

New therapies for beloved pets are getting developed in hopes of treating humans as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Enhanced Intelligence, VR Sex, and Our Cyborg Future

Recent progress in AI, many believe, makes the promise and peril of transhumanism increasingly possible.

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Electrical Field May Speed Wound Healing By Encouraging Cell Regeneration

A scientist in Wisconsin has invented a bandage that uses an electrical field to speed up the time needed for a wound to heal. It could one day lead to treatments for baldness and obesity.

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Dear Therapist: I Survived Cancer, but Now I'm Afraid My Husband Resents Me

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I both retired two years ago, after I was successfully treated for breast cancer. I'm enjoying my retirement, but he isn't. After my surgery, I had to have radiation treatment at a location that

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#3: Earth at 2° hotter will be horrific. Now here's what 4° will look like. | Top 10 2019

The third most popular video of 2019 presents a frightening truth: The best-case scenario of climate change is that world gets just 2°C hotter, which scientists call the "threshold of catastrophe". Why is that the good news? Because if humans don't change course now, the planet is on a trajectory to reach 4°C at the end of this century, which would bring $600 trillion in global climate damages, d

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Nokia 6.2 Review: Finicky Cameras Can't Sink This $249 Phone

The latest Nokia phone is cheap, but it will get Android updates far longer than many expensive flagship devices.

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Internet Deception Is Here to Stay—So What Do We Do Now?

Fake followers. Fake news. Foreign influence operations. The last decade revealed that much of what's online is not as it seems.

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Today's Cartoon: Crispr Cure

Gene editing leads to the ultimate crossover design collaboration.

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New Year honours data breach may lead to less government transparency

The UK government posted online the private addresses of more than 1000 individuals, including celebrities and former members of the UK security service

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Four great waves of animals have spread out from the tropics

The tropics are the most biodiverse regions on Earth. Now there is evidence that they are also the main source of evolutionary innovation and diversity

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Some types of endometriosis may be present from birth

A new understanding of the origins of endometriosis suggests that there may be different subtypes of the condition that could benefit from different treatments

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Wearing shoes from a young age makes your ankles less flexible

People who habitually wear shoes have longer ankle bones, giving them less flexible ankle joints, compared with people who mostly go barefoot

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A massive optical computer being built could outpace quantum computers

A machine made of a 5 kilometre-long coil of fibre optic cable squeezed into a box a few metres across could give quantum computers a run for their money on certain tasks

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Low-Income Baltimore Blocks Host Bigger, More Dangerous Mosquitoes

Tiger mosquitoes thrive in abandoned urban buildings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientist behind world's first gene-edited babies sentenced to prison

He Jiankui, the scientist who used CRISPR to create two gene-edited girls born in 2018, has been handed a three-year jail term by a court in Shenzen, China

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The Slow Death of Colombia's Peace Movement

Editor's Note: This article is part of our "Democracy Undone" series , about the erosion of liberal democracy around the world. EL CARMEN DE BOLÍVAR, Colombia—The sun hadn't yet risen when Yirley Velasco heard her daughter scream. The girl had woken to use the bathroom, but a noise at the entrance to the family's one-story home pulled her instead to the front door. Wedged underneath it was a whit

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The Rust Belt Didn't Have to Happen

The long list of decaying Rust Belt communities gives the impression that their decline must have been inevitable. Detroit's fall is often discussed as merely the most famous example of a regional rule. But the story of a small Midwest manufacturing city that didn't rust shows that they didn't all have to go this way. Vice President Mike Pence's hometown of Columbus, Indiana, thrived while other

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'A satisfactory explanation was not provided': Physicists in India lose third paper

A team of physicists in India has notched their third retraction for problematic images and other issues that also have prompted at least four corrections of their work. The authors, Sk. Shahenoor Basha, of the Solid State Ionics Laboratory at KL University in Guntur, and M.C. Rao, of Andhra Loyola College in Vijayawada, have lost … Continue reading

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An Afterlife So Perilous, You Needed a Guidebook

Archaeologists unearthed the remains of a 4,000-year-old "Book of Two Ways" — a guide to the Egyptian underworld, and the earliest copy of the first illustrated book.

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Bushfires reach Melbourne as heatwave fans Australia blazes

Around 100,000 people were urged to flee five Melbourne suburbs on Monday evening as Australia's spiralling bushfire crisis killed a volunteer firefighter battling a separate blaze in the countryside.

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BoE chief calls for faster action on climate change

Bank of England head Mark Carney, soon to become UN special envoy on climate action and finance, urged companies on Monday to move faster on helping to cut carbon emissions.

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Bank of England chief issues climate change warning

Mark Carney said the financial sector had begun to curb investment in fossil fuels. but slowly.

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Banedanmark: »Ingeniørfirmaer leverer meget dårlig kvalitet«

De rådgivende ingeniører lover mere end de kan holde, og deres arbejde er for dårligt, lyder det fra Banedanmark. Brancheforening afviser.

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Misunderstanding the vulva may be leading to pain after labiaplasties

A more detailed understanding of genital nerves may explain why some people experience pain and loss of sensation after having vulval surgery

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North Atlantic Current may cease temporarily in the next century

The North Atlantic Current transports warm water from the Gulf of Mexico towards Europe, providing much of north-western Europe with a relatively mild climate. However, scientists suspect that meltwater from Greenland and excessive rainfall could interfere with this ocean current. Simulations by scientists from the University of Groningen and Utrecht University showed that there is a 15 percent li

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A space for contemplation

Nature, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03915-4 Paul Nurse, director of the Francis Crick Institute in London, likes to think amid the hustle and bustle of the institute's bright and lively atrium.

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A toast to the error detectors

Nature, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03909-2 Let 2020 be the year in which we value those who ensure that science is self-correcting.

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Farmer typology to understand differentiated climate change adaptation in Himalaya

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56931-9

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Optimized nitrogen management enhances lodging resistance of rice and its morpho-anatomical, mechanical, and molecular mechanisms

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56620-7

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Chaos theory discloses triggers and drivers of plankton dynamics in stable environment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56851-8

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Host exposure history modulates the within-host advantage of virulence in a songbird-bacterium system

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56540-6

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Rivaroxaban after Thrombolysis in Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: A Randomized, Open-labeled, Multicenter Trial

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56887-w

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Amyloidophilic Molecule Interactions on the Surface of Insulin Fibrils: Cooperative Binding and Fluorescence Quenching

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56788-y

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Molecular mechanisms underlying nuchal hump formation in dolphin cichlid, Cyrtocara moorii

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56771-7

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'Evidence-Based Medicine' and the Expulsion of Peter Gøtzsche

In fall of 2018, the Danish physician was voted out of Cochrane, an organization he co-founded and helped make a global force. The expulsion revitalized debates on the pharmaceutical industry's influence on medicine, the research community's tolerance of dissent, and the proper role of data in the clinic.

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In Indonesia, Outlaw Gold Miners Poison Themselves to Survive

One large mining company is trying to shut illegal operations, which use mercury. The small-scale miners say there's no other way to earn a living.

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Kriminalteknikernes mareridt: Mand skiftede dna efter transplantation

Efter tre måneder var dna'et i en mands blod skiftet ud med sin donors. Fire år efter var det samme sket med hans sæd.

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