Search Posts

nyheder2019februar04

What's killing sea stars?

Animals The beautiful creatures are dying at an alarming rate. More than 20 species of sea stars—including the sunflower star, a keystone predator with a wide range—have been ravaged by a poorly-understood ailment known as sea star…

22min

Angry with someone online? You should (literally) hear them out.

A 2016 Pew Research survey showed that half of political discussion online leaves participants feeling worse off then when they started. Ideological opponents are less likely to be dehumanized when their voices are heard aloud vs. typing. Morally outrageous content is more likely to be shared than rational political talking points. None It's no coincidence that the increase of political polarizat

58min

Tokimeki Unfollow: A KonMari Tool for Decluttering Twitter

Designer Julius Tarng has created a web tool for unfollowing Twitter users that employs Marie Kondo's "KonMari" decision-making method.

10min

LATEST

Could germs in your gut send you into depression?

Certain bacteria dwelling in the human gut might feed depression, according to a new study that adds evidence to the theory.

5min

Is free expression online threatened?

U.S. laws regulating online speech offer broad protections for internet intermediaries. Despite this, companies typically follow a "better safe than sorry" approach to protect against legal action or loss of reputation. Silencing contentious opinions can have detrimental effects, such as social exclusion and negating reconciliation. None Megan Phelps-Roper grew up in the Westboro Baptist Church.

10min

19min

Could germs in your gut send you into depression?

Certain bacteria dwelling in the human gut might feed depression, according to a new study that adds evidence to the theory.

19min

Targeting Certain Brain Cells Can Switch Off Pain

By turning off certain brain cells, researchers were able to make mice sense painful stimuli—but not the associated discomfort. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19min

The Technology At The Border – BBC Click

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

19min

Targeting Certain Brain Cells Can Switch Off Pain

By turning off certain brain cells, researchers were able to make mice sense painful stimuli—but not the associated discomfort. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22min

Could germs in your gut send you into depression?

Certain bacteria dwelling in the human gut might feed depression, according to a new study that adds evidence to the theory.

25min

38min

Near-Earth asteroids could provide a billion tons of water resources

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

41min

Five Lessons From Seven Years of Research Into Buttons

All day every day, throughout the United States, people push buttons – on coffee makers, TV remote controls and even social media posts they “like.” For more than seven years, I’ve been trying to understand why, looking into where buttons came from, why people love them – and why people loathe them. As I researched my recent book, “Power Button: A History of Pleasure, Panic, and the Politics of Pu

53min

A Cactus Prick Likely Caused Former NHL Player's Life-Threatening Infection

Former NHL player Lyle Odelein developed a life-threatening infection after a spiky cactus pierced his leg

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Biden His Time

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, February 4. President Donald Trump has nominated acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt to lead the department. Bernhardt, an ex–oil lobbyist, will replace Ryan Zinke, who stepped down from the role in December following a year of scandals . Speaking of Nominations: Trump told The Wall Street Journal over the weekend that he prefers to have acting Cabine

1h

Egypt Unveils Dozens of Newly Discovered Mummies

Archaeologists uncovered the tomb of an elite middle-class family, 40 men, women and children who lived in the Ptolemaic era.

1h

5 ways work culture will change by 2030

submitted by /u/MIIAIIRIIK [link] [comments]

1h

SpaceX Fires Mars-Bound Raptor Engine

Those more concerned with exploring space than gridiron antics will be pleased at what Elon Musk got up to on Sunday. The post SpaceX Fires Mars-Bound Raptor Engine appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Flickr Will Start Deleting Photos From Over-Limit Accounts Tomorrow

Have a Flickr account? You might want to save your photos on a storage device ASAP: On Feb. 5, the image hosting service will start deleting photos from free accounts that are over […] The …

1h

Google parent beats Q4 estimates, stock still drops

Google parent company Alphabet beat Wall Street expectations for its fourth quarter earnings Monday, although its stock slid in after-hours trading.

1h

Poland reports case of 'mad cow disease'

An atypical case of BSE—commonly dubbed "mad cow disease"—has been discovered in Poland, though the isolated case posed no risk to human health, Poland's chief veterinarian said on Monday.

1h

Poland reports case of 'mad cow disease'

An atypical case of BSE—commonly dubbed "mad cow disease"—has been discovered in Poland, though the isolated case posed no risk to human health, Poland's chief veterinarian said on Monday.

1h

1h

Laughter may be best medicine — for brain surgery

Neuroscientists have discovered a focal pathway in the brain that when electrically stimulated causes immediate laughter, followed by a sense of calm and happiness, even during awake brain surgery. The effects of stimulation were observed in an epilepsy patient undergoing diagnostic monitoring for seizure diagnosis. These effects were then harnessed to help her complete a separate awake brain surg

1h

NW Forest Plan 25 years later: Wildfire losses up, bird populations down

Twenty-five years into a 100-year federal strategy to protect older forests in the Pacific Northwest, forest losses to wildfire are up and declines in bird populations have not been reversed, new research shows.

1h

Doctors Zapped a Woman's Brain So She Could Laugh Through 'Awake' Brain Surgery

Being awake during surgery can be terrifying, but laughing might help

1h

'Moth busters' take on unwanted residents of a 17th Century house

Moths with very expensive tastes are getting -36C "chill" time at Newhailes House.

1h

How we use Instagram to communicate microbiology to the public

How we use Instagram to communicate microbiology to the public How we use Instagram to communicate microbiology to the public, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00493-3 Social media is a powerful tool for science communication. Instagram’s image-focused model is no exception.

2h

The Milky Way is a Lot More Warped Than Scientists Thought

Galactic Warp It turns out that Milky Way galaxy looks different from the familiar image we’ve all come to know. Our galaxy still has a bright central core around which a spiraling disk orbits, but that disk isn’t quite as tidy as scientists previously thought. Instead, it’s bent and warped out of shape , according to a new 3D map of the galaxy described in research published Monday in the journa

2h

2h

2h

2h

Mindfulness and sleep can reduce exhaustion in entrepreneurs

When entrepreneurs are feeling exhausted but can't afford the time for adequate sleep, they may be able to replenish their energy with mindfulness exercises such as meditation.

2h

InSight's seismometer now has a cozy shelter on Mars

For the past several weeks, NASA's InSight lander has been making adjustments to the seismometer it set on the Martian surface on Dec. 19. Now it's reached another milestone by placing a domed shield over the seismometer to help the instrument collect accurate data. The seismometer will give scientists their first look at the deep interior of the Red Planet, helping them understand how it and othe

2h

Scans Show Women's Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning. (Image credit: Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging /Getty Images/Cultura RF)

2h

Google parent Alphabet earnings shine but market waryAlphabet Google Waymo

Google parent Alphabet reported quarterly earnings beating Wall Street expectations on Monday, but shares slipped, with investors apparently focused on rising costs at the technology giant.

2h

Dinosaur that defended itself with spiny backbone found in Patagonia

A herbivorous dinosaur that fended off predators with a row of spines running along its back and lived 140 million years ago has been found in Argentine Patagonia.

2h

Zuckerberg sees 'positive' force of Facebook despite firestormMark Zuckerberg Facebook

Mark Zuckerberg said Monday he sees Facebook as a largely "positive" force for society as the embattled social network marked its 15th anniversary.

2h

Workplace messaging startup Slack to go public

Workplace messaging startup Slack said Monday it had filed a confidential registration for an initial public offering, becoming the latest of a group of richly valued tech enterprises to look to Wall Street.

2h

Check your compass: The magnetic north pole is on the move

True north isn't quite where it used to be.

2h

From dorm to dominance: Growing pains as Facebook turns 15

Facebook, trudging through its awkward teenage years, is turning 15 on Monday.

2h

San Francisco Built a System to Track Homeless People

Big Brother San Francisco, unsurprisingly, has decided that the solution to the city’s homelessness problem is to gather and analyze personal data. Specifically, a program called ONE System is now gathering data about the approximately 7,500 homeless people in San Francisco so that the city can better coordinate its efforts to get people off the street. It’s a program with noble aspirations, but

2h

Earth's Magnetic North Pole Was Moving So Fast, Geophysicists Had to Update the Map

Now that the government shutdown is over, federal agencies have finally released an early edition of the World Magnetic Model, almost a full year before the next one was scheduled to be released.

2h

NW Forest Plan 25 years later: Wildfire losses up, bird populations down

Twenty-five years into a 100-year federal strategy to protect older forests in the Pacific Northwest, forest losses to wildfire are up and declines in bird populations have not been reversed, new research shows.

2h

CEOs profit from issuing negative news releases ahead of stock option grant dates

Some CEOs are profiting from releasing more negative news releases leading up to their executive stock option grant date, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

2h

NW Forest Plan 25 years later: Wildfire losses up, bird populations down

Twenty-five years into a 100-year federal strategy to protect older forests in the Pacific Northwest, forest losses to wildfire are up and declines in bird populations have not been reversed, new research shows.

2h

A warming world increases air pollution

Climate change is warming the ocean, but it's warming land faster and that's really bad news for air quality all over the world, says a new University of California, Riverside study.

2h

Cutting health care costs

Health care spending among the Medicare population age 65 and older has slowed dramatically since 2005, and as much as half of that reduction can be attributed to reduced spending on cardiovascular disease, a new Harvard study has found. By 2012, those reductions saved the average person nearly $3,000 a year. Across the entire elderly population, those savings add up to a whopping $120 billion, wi

2h

Study: Medicare rules increase out-of-pocket costs of MS drugs

Medicare patients with multiple sclerosis face skyrocketing out-of-pocket costs for therapies due to complicated insurance rules that force them to pick up an increasing share of the cost, according to new research. Medicare beneficiaries without low-income subsidies can expect to spend $6,894 a year out of pocket for treatment of MS.

2h

What drives patients to use medical marijuana: mostly chronic pain

A new University of Michigan study seeks to understand whether people are using medical cannabis for evidence-based reasons.

2h

In the February Health Affairs: Telemedicine in Latin America

With doctors unevenly distributed across Latin American countries and concentrated in urban areas, patients in rural and marginal suburban areas often have limited access to both primary care physicians and specialists.

2h

OxyContin reformulation to curb opioid abuse led to hepatitis C surge, study finds

Public health officials have blamed the shift from prescription opioids to injectable heroin as a cause of the rise in hepatitis C cases. A new study provides the best evidence to date that reformulation of the pain medicine OxyContin in 2010 to make it more difficult to abuse directly led to a surge in hepatitis C infections as drug abusers switched to heroin.

2h

SoftBank pumps $37m into robot dog company Boston Dynamics

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent

Arctic permafrost is thawing as the Earth warms due to climate change. In some cases, scientists predict that this thawing soil will release increasing amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, that is known to trap more heat in our planet's atmosphere.

2h

Research using atom probe tomography reveals chinks in iron crystals that can 'heal'

Like iron flowing through the blood stream, iron minerals course through the ground. These minerals are used to make steel and other metal alloys used in everything from cell phone components and cars to buildings, industrial equipment and infrastructure.

2h

FamilyTreeDNA Admits to Sharing Genetic Data With F.B.I.

The direct-to-consumer testing site quietly agreed last year to help federal investigators solve rapes and murders. The arrangement was not disclosed until last week.

2h

Q&A: Pills to Protect Against an Apocalypse

Potassium iodide offers limited protection to those exposed to a Chernobyl-type disaster.

2h

Researchers develop new method to reduce quantum noise

In a recent issue of Physical Review A, Argonne researchers reported a new method for alleviating the effects of "noise" in quantum information systems, a challenge scientists around the globe are working to meet in the race toward a new era of quantum technologies. The new method has implications for the future of quantum information science, including quantum computing and quantum sensing.

2h

Chemists harness power of light to tackle asymmetrical molecules

No, molecules do not actually have hands. But scientists refer to them in this way when looking at asymmetric molecules that are mirror images of one another and therefore are not superimposable. Whether a molecule is a "lefty" or "righty" also influences how they behave—critical information for researchers.

2h

Hon blir glad av el i hjärnan

Lisa sitter i en sjukhussäng och tittar tomt på sina händer. Ett bandage är surrat runt hennes huvud och baktill syns en härva av grå sladdar kopplade till en apparat parkerad bredvid sängen. En av läkarna i rummet trycker på en strömbrytare. Lisa lyfter blicken och spricker upp i ett leende. Hon fnissar. – Förlåt, men det är en riktigt bra känsla, säger hon. Läkaren ber henne att försöka se biste

3h

Heat waves, food insecurity due to climate change may weaken immune systems

Heat waves can reduce the body's immune response to flu, according to new research. The results have implications for how climate change may affect the future of vaccinations and nutrition. Researchers have investigated how high temperatures affect mice infected with influenza virus.

3h

Biggest ever map of human Alzheimer's brain

A study of the differences between healthy brains and those with Alzheimer's disease has produced largest dataset of its type ever. And the data is now freely available online for any scientist to use.

3h

Mapping esophageal cancer genes leads to new drug targets

Mutations that cause esophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) have been mapped in unprecedented detail — unveiling that more than half could be targeted by drugs currently in trials for other cancer types.

3h

Biotechnology to the rescue of Brussels sprouts

An international team has identified the genes that make these plants resistant to the pathogen that attacks crops belonging to the cabbage family all over the world.

3h

Chinese biotech feels chill in harsh winter for venture capital

Investment in sector slows as Beijing battles to control debt

3h

FSU chemists harness power of light to tackle asymmetrical molecules

A team of Florida State University researchers has found a way to turn a 'left-handed' molecule into a 'right-handed' one — a process that could have important implications for drug development.

3h

Argonne researchers develop new method to reduce quantum noise

New method for alleviating the effects of "noise" in quantum information systems addresses a challenge that scientists around the globe are working to meet in the race toward a new era of quantum technologies.

3h

New Star Trek-like ‘Replicator’ Prints 3D Objects With Light

Researchers from the University of California Berkeley have developed a technique that can create objects in a single step using light. They call it "The Replicator," a reference to the essentially magical technology features throughout the Star Trek series and movies. The post New Star Trek-like ‘Replicator’ Prints 3D Objects With Light appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

Climate Change Will Begin Changing the Color of the Ocean

The ocean is rich in diverse shades of blue and green. Now researchers find climate change will alter the color of the oceans by the end of the 21st century. The changes won't be dramatic, in fact, they likely won't be visible to the naked eye, but it suggests that the hue of the ocean could be an important marker for scientists watching to see how climate change will affect our seas. “Ocean color

3h

Galactic Twist: The Warped Shape of Our Milky Way's Disk

The shape of the Milky Way, usually pictured as a flat spiral, may actually be more like a warped and twisted disk. That's according to a new study of 1,339 stars whose distances could be measured with great accuracy. The resulting map reveals a tipped, uneven disk of material different from our standard picture. Mapping Pulsating Stars The 1,339 stars are all Cepheid variables, a type of pulsatin

3h

Women's Brains Are 3 Years 'Younger' Than Men's, Study Suggests

A new study suggests that, by at least one measure, women's brains are biologically younger than men's.

3h

Expert: Anti-Aging Blood Transfusions May Do More Harm Than Good

Just Say No A transfusion of blood from a young donor won’t help you live longer. In fact, it could actually put you closer to death. At least, that’s according to Marc Siegel. Siegel is a New York University professor and medical reporter. In a recent opinion piece for The Hill , the doctor warned that people undergoing “young blood” transfusions as anti-aging treatments need to keep in mind the

3h

Tesla Just Bought An “Ultracapacitor” Manufacturer

Power Play Electric car maker Tesla has purchased Maxwell , a company that makes battery components and ultracapacitors, for more than $200 million. “We are always looking for potential acquisitions that make sense for the business and support Tesla’s mission to accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy,” a Tesla spokesperson said in a statement . MK Ultracapacitor Tesla CEO Elon Mu

3h

3h

Earthquake with magnitude 7.5 in Indonesia: An unusual and steady speed

Earthquakes happen when rocks on either side of a tectonic fault shift suddenly in opposite directions. Two main seismic waves that carry shaking out of a breaking fault are "S" waves, which shear rocks and propagate at about 3.5 km/s, and "P" waves, which compress rocks and propagate faster at about 5 km/s.

3h

The web meets genomics: A DNA search engine for microbes

Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. A new search engine, called BIGSI, allows scientists to search public microbial DNA data for specific genes and mutations. This could help researchers monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and understand how bacteria and viruses evolve and adapt.

3h

CEOs profit from issuing negative news releases ahead of stock option grant dates

Notre Dame study shows the move depresses the stock price and lowers the guaranteed 'strike price,' which allows the CEO to exercise their stock option to buy a specified number of shares below market value.

3h

The Milky Way Is Totally Twisted

The Milky Way's disk bends and warps at the edges.

3h

See a Newborn Baby Humpback Whale Swim with Its Mom, Minutes After Being Born

This is what a baby whale looks like minutes after being born.

3h

Physicists create exotic electron liquid

By bombarding an ultrathin semiconductor sandwich with powerful laser pulses, physicists have created the first 'electron liquid' at room temperature. The achievement opens a pathway for development of the first practical and efficient devices to generate and detect light at terahertz wavelengths — between infrared light and microwaves. Such devices could be used in applications as diverse as com

3h

How winter salt actually works

Science With the occasional assist from beet juice and molasses. These salt solutions decrease the freezing temperature of water to around 15 F. So, unfortunately for folks facing truly frigid temps, treating with salt won’t get rid…

3h

3h

And Then There Was TheFacebook.com

There was a time when Facebook was small. After all, it only existed in one place on Earth: Harvard University, where Mark Zuckerberg was a sophomore. He lived in Kirkland House, a square of brick buildings arranged around a courtyard, one side hemmed in by JFK Street. For all the tendrils that Facebook now has snaked across the globe, it feels strange that one can pinpoint the moment it all bega

3h

Letters: ‘The P.E. I Was Exposed to Was Not Evil, Just Sad’

We Asked Readers: Was gym class a traumatizing part of school that still brings back shivers about that one particularly menacing bully? New research backs up what all too many of us already know: P.E. is kind of the worst . Tell us: What was your childhood P.E. experience like? Here’s how readers responded. A handful of readers explained how gym class creates a culture where bullying thrives: Tw

3h

Running TensorFlow at Petascale and Beyond

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

3h

Policy statements on the effects of media overlook scientific complexity

As different forms of media infuse everyday life, several organizations and associations have issued public statements about the effects of media exposure. However, a scholarly review suggests that many of these statements do not accurately reflect the available evidence, offering overly simplified or one-sided accounts of the scientific research. The findings are published in Advances in Methods

3h

NW Forest Plan 25 years later: Wildfire losses up, bird populations down

Twenty-five years into a 100-year federal strategy to protect older forests in the Pacific Northwest, forest losses to wildfire are up and declines in bird populations have not been reversed, new research shows.

3h

Rust never sleeps

PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens.

3h

Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence

An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence. The findings highlight the importance of spatial genome organization in gene regulation and t

3h

Diversity in the CD4 receptor protects chimpanzees from infection by AIDS-like viruses

Hahn's lab and an international team of collaborators, found that the CD4 surface protein, which is used by HIV and SIV as the receptor to enter immune cells, is highly variable among wild chimpanzees. Understanding how these viruses are transmitted within and between species may reveal clues for novel vaccine strategies in humans.

3h

Women's brains appear three years younger than men's

Women's brains appear to be three years younger than men's of the same age, according to a new study on brain metabolism from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could explain why women maintain their cognitive skills longer than men.

3h

Heat waves, food insecurity due to climate change may weaken immune systems

Heat waves can reduce the body's immune response to flu, according to new research in mice at the University of Tokyo. The results have implications for how climate change may affect the future of vaccinations and nutrition. University of Tokyo Associate Professor Takeshi Ichinohe and third-year doctoral student Miyu Moriyama investigated how high temperatures affect mice infected with influenza v

3h

Structure of virus that infects bacteria in hot springs is revealed

Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The discovery could lead to better targeted delivery of drugs into cells and new DNA sequencing technology, according to a study by Rutgers and other scientists in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

3h

Scaling up search for analogies could be key to innovation

Investment in research is at an all-time high, yet the rate of scientific breakthroughs isn't setting any records. To resolve this quandary, scientists are turning to artificial intelligence and crowdsourcing for help in identifying a key inspiration for innovation — the perfect analogy.

3h

Mars-robot har fået helt nyt instrument – syv år efter opsendelsen

Forskere har fundet ud af at bruge Mars Curiosity på en ny måde, så robotten også kan måle tyngdekraft.

3h

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study has created the most comprehensive collection of human intestinal bacteria to date. The new resource will help researchers worldwide to investigate how our microbiome keeps us healthy, and its role in disease.

3h

A match made in neural heaven: How a neuron grows an axon

While the neural architecture responsible for the transmission of electrical impulses has been known for more than a century, the basic biology behind how a neuron acquires its one and only axon — a fundamental component of how neurons communicate — remains a mystery. Now researchers describe the genetic switches that ignite axon formation. Their work focuses on two molecular components.

3h

Snack Attack! Chip Factory Finds WWI Grenade Packed in Potatoes

One potato, two potato, three potato … hand grenade?

3h

Rise in size of African families may be tied to less schooling

Analysis offers new explanation for mysterious “stall” in fertility rates in some countries

3h

Women’s brains are four years younger than men’s, study finds

Analysis of metabolic brain age may explain differences in cognitive decline rate Women’s brains are nearly four years younger than men’s, at least in how they burn fuel, according to scans performed by US researchers. Scientists found that healthy women have a “metabolic brain age” that is persistently younger than men’s of the same chronological age. The difference is apparent from early adulth

3h

Transforming flat elastomers into 3D shapes

Researchers have developed a method to change the shape of a flat sheet of elastomer, using actuation that is fast, reversible, controllable by an applied voltage, and reconfigurable to different shapes.

3h

Prediction tool for kidney stones

Kidney stones are a common and painful condition, with many sufferers experiencing recurrent episodes. Most people who pass an initial stone want to know their chances of future episodes, but this has not always been easy to predict. Now researchers are tracking the familiar characteristics of kidney stone formers in an online prediction tool that could help sufferers anticipate if they'll experie

3h

Yeast study prompts rethink of DNA safekeeping

DNA replication is more prone to errors at times of stress leading to mutations that could cause disease.

3h

A gut feeling for mental health

The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds.

3h

Concussion treatment: Adolescent athletes 'prescribed' aerobic exercise recovered faster

Adolescent athletes who sustained concussions while playing a sport recovered more quickly when they underwent a supervised, aerobic exercise regimen.

3h

Excess immune pruning of synapses in neural cells derived from patients with schizophrenia

Investigators have found evidence that the process of synaptic pruning, a normal part of brain development during adolescence, is excessive in individuals with schizophrenia. The study is the first to directly observe excessive synaptic pruning in cells from patients with schizophrenia.

3h

Physicists create exotic electron liquid

By bombarding an ultrathin semiconductor sandwich with powerful laser pulses, physicists have created the first 'electron liquid' at room temperature. The achievement opens a pathway for development of the first practical and efficient devices to generate and detect light at terahertz wavelengths — between infrared light and microwaves. Such devices could be used in applications as diverse as com

3h

Harvesting wild genes gives crops renewed resistance to disease

A global alliance of researchers has pioneered a new method to rapidly recruit disease-resistance genes from wild plants for transfer into domestic crops. The technique promises to revolutionize the development of disease-resistant varieties for the global food supply.

3h

Structure of virus that infects bacteria in hot springs is revealed

Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

4h

Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence

An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence.

4h

Peering under the hood of fake-news detectors

New work from MIT researchers peers under the hood of an automated fake-news detection system, revealing how machine-learning models catch subtle but consistent differences in the language of factual and false stories. The research also underscores how fake-news detectors should undergo more rigorous testing to be effective for real-world applications.

4h

Patients with facial pain report most benefit from self-care techniques

While oral appliances such as splints and bite guards are the most common treatment for facial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD), patients rate them as less helpful than self-care treatments, such as jaw exercises or warm compresses, finds a new study by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.

4h

Floating Robots Spotted a Huge Plume of Magma Under the Galápagos

The discovery could help explain why the Earth isn't a huge ball of ice.

4h

Structure of virus that infects bacteria in hot springs is revealed

Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

4h

Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence

An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence.

4h

How Facebook Has Changed Computing

To handle its massive amount of data, Facebook built new hardware and software tools, and shared them through open source.

4h

These Four Universities Are Trying to Figure Out Space Law

Space Law When it comes to space, the law is a jumbled mess . Sure, there are international agreements like the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, but for the most part there’s no single, unifying document that lays out how countries and private companies are allowed to operate off-world. That’s why a group of universities are working on what they call The Woomera Manual, a massive project that plans to ga

4h

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent

A team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes.

4h

It's all in the code: Protein production efficiency can be predicted by gene sequence

Scientists explored mRNA and protein public databases to unravel hidden meanings of the genetic code. Using a metric derived from mRNA codon composition, they found out how gene sequence choice can predict different aspects of protein synthesis, such as protein production efficiency. The study could help the development of new biotechnological applications of genes and proteins.

4h

Cost effectiveness of early cancer surveillance

New research shows how early cancer screening and surveillance in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) results in additional years of life, and is cost effective for third-party payers.

4h

Mother's age, race, weight affect hormone concentrations in pregnancy

Hormone concentrations during early fetal development — that may affect the child's development and increase the mother's risk for breast and ovarian cancer years later — are significantly affected by maternal age, body mass index and race rather than lifestyle, according to a new study.

4h

A warming world increases air pollution

The new study shows that the contrast in warming between the continents and sea, called the land-sea warming contrast, drives an increased concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere that cause air pollution.

4h

Bud Light Picks Fight With Corn Syrup in Super Bowl Ad

Responding to the company’s boast that it doesn’t brew its beer using corn syrup, a prominent corn lobbyist shared a video of himself pouring Bud Light down the drain.

4h

Why you shouldn't freak out about one rubella case at the Detroit auto show

Health Rubella isn’t as dangerous as measles, but it can cause real harm. Rubella is like measles’ little cousin: it causes the same kind of red rash, but isn’t as harmful, debilitating, or contagious. You might wonder, then, why you should be…

4h

Here’s a New Image of Russia’s Secret Uncrewed Spacecraft

Hypersonic Space Drone Russian news agency RIA Novosti revealed images today of a hypersonic uncrewed spacecraft reportedly in development by the country’s space agency. The drone would be Russia’s first foray into uncrewed spaceflight. The aircraft will be outfitted with a single Briz-M upper stage engine — a Russian space rocket that’s been in use since 2000 — and is designed to fly at altitude

4h

I Was Right About Mark Zuckerberg

Ben Mezrich clearly aspires to be the Jackie Collins of Silicon Valley. It was the summer of 2009, and I had just published my book The Accidental Billionaires , about the founding of Facebook—which Aaron Sorkin and David Fincher would soon adapt into the Oscar-winning film The Social Network . I was on my book tour, bouncing from cable-news outlet to cable-news outlet, and at nearly every stop,

4h

Twitter now lets you invite guests into Periscope live streams

Twitter today added a new feature to its Periscope live-streaming app that it says users have been asking about for years: the ability to invite guests onto a live recording. The …

4h

Chromebook Instant Tethering expands beyond Google devices and phones

A handy feature of Chrome OS, Instant Tethering allows users to connect to their Android phone and use it as a hotspot right from their Chromebook's desktop. It is convenient because once configured …

4h

Global Warming Is Changing the Oceans’ Color

Deep Water Researchers from MIT think they’ve uncovered a natural warning system for climate change: the oceans’ color. According to the researchers, we can track the effects of climate change by paying attention to the color of ocean water from space — and based on their calculations, we should expect our planet to look quite different relatively soon. “There will be a noticeable difference in t

4h

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent

A UW-led team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes.

4h

New wisdom about high cholesterol treatment for adults aged 80 and older

A team of researchers in China decided to learn more about whether current triglyceride-level guidelines make sense for people aged 80 and older. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

4h

Right exercise ‘dose’ treats teen concussions

Teen athletes who sustained concussions while playing sports recovered more quickly when they underwent a supervised, aerobic exercise regimen, according to a new study. The study is the first randomized clinical trial of a treatment in the acute phase after a sport-related concussion. “Telling a teenager to go home and basically do nothing is depressing.” The goal was to evaluate prescribed, pro

4h

Retreating snow line reveals organic molecules around young star

Astronomers using ALMA have detected various complex organic molecules around the young star V883 Ori. A sudden outburst from this star is releasing molecules from the icy compounds in the planet forming disk. The chemical composition of the disk is similar to that of comets in the modern solar system. Sensitive ALMA observations enable astronomers to reconstruct the evolution of organic molecules

4h

Antitumor protein can sometimes promote cancer

Scientists have issued a warning to cancer drug developers by revealing that p53, a protein that usually suppresses tumors, can also promote cancer.

4h

6 weeks? Moms get bad advice about sex after birth

Couples are getting the message that there’s a certain point at which they should start having sex again after having a baby, interviews show. Resuming sexual activity after pregnancy isn’t always easy, especially for mothers experiencing postpartum pain, fatigue, and stress. The findings, which come from 70 in-depth interviews with women in South Carolina, appear in the journal Culture, Health &

4h

A warming world increases air pollution

The UC Riverside-led study shows that the contrast in warming between the continents and sea, called the land-sea warming contrast, drives an increased concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere that cause air pollution.

4h

Research: Religion affects consumer choices on specialty foods

People with strong religious beliefs are more likely to buy fat-free, sugar-free or gluten-free foods than natural or organic foods, according to new research that could influence the marketing of those specialty food products.

4h

Mother's age, race, weight affect hormone concentrations in pregnancy, Rutgers study finds

Hormone concentrations during early fetal development — that may affect the child's development and increase the mother's risk for breast and ovarian cancer years later — are significantly affected by maternal age, body mass index and race rather than lifestyle, according to a Rutgers study.

4h

Can extra fuel delivery recharge aging cells?

Scientists have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery. The finding could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it. With age, cells gradually lose their ability to take in and process fuel. A cell that can’t fill its fuel tank, so to speak, can’t perform its proper functions. Researchers are interested in finding ways to boost t

5h

Women who get in vitro face higher complication risk

Women who become pregnant using infertility treatments, such as in vitro fertilization, have a slightly higher risk of a complication, according to a new study These complications can include bleeding, serious infections, and admission to the intensive care unit around the time of delivery. The rate of such severe complications in Canada is approximately 10 to 15 for every 1,000 births. Maternal

5h

New Map Shows Brain Changes Associated with Alzheimer's

The protein expression data, which are freely available online, could help identify new drug targets for the disease.

5h

Electrical activity in prostate cancer cells

Experts have carried out a series of experiments with which, for the first time, they have been able to characterize the normal electrical activity in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in real time, with a resulting low-frequency electrical pattern between 0.1 and 10 Hertz.

5h

Where do the best strawberries grow?

Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. Hedgerows and the edges of forests represent important habitats for pollinators. Scientists have investigated whether hedgerows and their proximity to forests might affect the pollination of strawberries. In fact, both the weight and the quality of strawberries increased when plants were at hedgerows or hedger

5h

Dung beetles navigate better under a full moon

Of all nocturnal animals, only dung beetles can hold their course using polarized moonlight. Researchers have now shown that the beetles can use polarized light when its signal strength is weak, which may allow them to find their bearings when artificial light from cities swamps natural moonlight.

5h

Positive findings with dasotraline for ADHD in children ages 6-12

A new study in children aged 6 to 12 years of dasotraline, a promising new treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), showed significant improvement in efficacy in the treatment of ADHD compared to placebo beginning at week 1 and continuing throughout the study.

5h

Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception

Humans, fish and, most likely, other species rely on identical visual features — color, size, orientation, and motion — to quickly search for objects.

5h

Obesity-related cancers rising in young adults in the US

A new study finds rates are increasing for six of 12 cancers related to obesity in younger adults in the United States, with steeper increases in progressively younger ages and successively younger generations.

5h

Andy Warhol’s Meta and Morbid Message Haunted the Super Bowl Ads

A man walks to an old farmhouse, his hands grazing stalks of grass, in a primal American image: something out of an Andrew Wyeth painting, or Days of Heaven . He’s greeted by his grandpa, whom he hasn’t seen in a long time. Inside the house sits a beautiful car. Is this real life? No, it is the hallucination of an office worker with a cashew blocking his airway. A colleague Heimlichs him back to

5h

China Built an AI to Detect Corruption and Officials Shut it Down

Zero Trust Since 2012, a sophisticated artificial intelligence has dug through big data to find signs of corruption in the Chinese government — but local officials in many areas are now shutting it down, according to the South China Morning Post . One researcher involved in the program, which is portentously called “Zero Trust,” told the Hong Kong newspaper that local officials might be shutting

5h

How to save and store your photos before Flickr deletes them

DIY You can upgrade to Flickr Pro or try one of these other cloud services. Flickr is limiting non-Pro accounts to 1,000 photos. Here's how to get your stuff before it gets nuked.

5h

Specific Gut Microbes Linked With Depression: Study

The research is among the first to find the connection in humans.

5h

Teens too low on sleep, activity, and too high on screen time

Only 1 in 20 U.S. adolescents is meeting national recommendations for sleeping, physical activity, and screen time, according to new research.

5h

A new approach for the fast estimation of the solar energy potential in urban environments

Researchers have developed a new approach for calculating fast and accurate the solar energy potential of surfaces in the urban environment. The new approach can significantly help architects and urban planners to incorporate photovoltaic (solar power) technology in their designs.

5h

Putting yourself in their shoes may make you less open to their beliefs

Trying to take someone else's perspective may make you less open to their opposing views, according to new findings.

5h

Researcher unearths an ice age in the African desert

A field trip to Namibia to study volcanic rocks led to an unexpected discovery by geologists.

5h

Fatal opioid-related car crashes in maryland hold steady over decade

A new approach to defining opioid-related auto fatalities provides insight into the nature and distribution of opioid-involved deaths in the state of Maryland.

5h

Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves

'Fungicides, often needed for crop protection, are routinely used during almond bloom, but in many cases growers were also adding insecticides to the mix. Our research shows that some combinations are deadly to the bees, and the simplest thing is to just take the insecticide out of the equation during almond bloom.'

5h

New study shows cost effectiveness of early cancer surveillance

New research published today in the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer shows how early cancer screening and surveillance in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) results in additional years of life, and is cost effective for third-party payers.

5h

A space rock collision may explain how this exoplanet was born

Simulations suggest a planet roughly 2,000 light-years away formed when two space rocks collided, supporting the idea that such events are universal.

5h

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human-infecting virus

A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks.

5h

Why Does Everyone Suddenly Have Fancy Fake Teeth?

Michael Apa remembers the first time a patient told him she wanted her teeth fixed because she didn’t like the way they looked in selfies. It was 2015, and Apa’s patient was Huda Kattan, who had good reason to care about her smile: Kattan has leveraged her popular beauty blog and millions of Instagram followers to build a global cosmetics brand, Huda Beauty . In the process, her path to success h

5h

The Guardian view on fracking: the end can’t come soon enough | Editorial

Launching a new fossil fuel industry was a bad idea, and a coalition of localists and environmentalists appears close to defeating it Less than four months after what was supposed to be a new beginning for fracking in England, when Cuadrilla resumed operations at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire, it appears increasingly unlikely that there is a future for this industry in the UK at all. Min

5h

Teenagers who copy each other’s risk-taking have more friends

When popular teens see each other making risky choices, they do the same. This could explain why dangerous behaviours spread among adolescent social groups

5h

Evidence mounts that gut bacteria can influence mood, prevent depression

Researchers find certain bacteria may make compounds that affect mental well-being

5h

Genetic study of impulsiveness reveals associations with psychiatric disorders

Impulsiveness and substance use share a genetic basis, according to genome-wide association studies published in JNeurosci by academic and industry researchers. With more than 20,000 participants, the research represents the largest genetic analysis of impulsive personality traits to date.

5h

Boosting glutamate reduces anxiety in monkeys

Researchers studying male and female marmosets have homed in on the primate brain circuitry responsible for individual differences in overall anxiety. Their findings, published in JNeurosci, show that increasing levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the hippocampus normalizes anxious monkeys' 'fight or flight' response.

5h

Initiative Aims to Limit Excessive Red Tape for African Science

Research organizations and universities have typically faced burdensome paperwork to convince funders their money would not be wasted.

5h

New progress toward chip-based ghost imaging

For the first time, researchers have shown that the non-conventional imaging method known as ghost imaging can be performed using a low-cost, chip-based light-illuminating device.

5h

Shared genetic marker offers new promise in targeting specific ovarian and lung cancers

Two new articles offer promise that a drug currently used to treat estrogen positive breast cancer may be effective in treating two different types of cancer, one rare and one common form.

5h

Environmental regulations may have unintended consequences in energy production

Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. Although the regulations seem to have improved preservation efforts, they may have had unintended consequences in energy production, leading to more greenhouse gas emissions.

5h

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human-infecting virus

A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks.

5h

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases

Research explains details of a biological process that supports the production of healthy cells, by removing faulty proteins as they form.

5h

Why charismatic, introduced species are so difficult to manage

Introduced and invasive species can present big problems, particularly when those species are charismatic. Some introduced species, like zebra mussels, tend to be reviled by the public, and people willingly adhere to strict management policies. However, if an animal has that elusive quality of charisma, people often don't want it to be controlled, even if it's harming the environment. Inevitably,

5h

Word order predicts a native speakers' working memory

Memory plays a crucial role in our lives, and several studies have already investigated how we store and retrieve information under different conditions. Typically, stimuli presented at the beginning and at the end of a list are recalled better than stimuli from the middle. But are these findings universal and generalizable across languages and cultures?

5h

What was socialism like in the United States during the 20th century?

While America seems like a haven for capitalists, socialism has a long and often successful electoral history here. Milwaukee had socialist mayors until 1960. Today's resurgence of interest in socialism has nothing on the red tide of 1912. None Socialist candidates are cropping up all over the country. In Texas, they are being elected to judgeships . Two of them serve in Congress , and another on

5h

Crypto Site Loses $137 Million in Dead Founder’s Encrypted Wallet

Password Manager A prominent cryptocurrency exchange is scrambling to access $137 million dollars worth of Bitcoin after its founder died and took his passwords with him. On Jan. 31, Jennifer Robertson testified to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia that her husband Gerry Cotten, the founder of crypto exchange QuadrigaCX, died in December. As a result, she said that most of the company’s funds — $1

5h

The Conversation

The Sex Recession In December, Kate Julian asked why young people are having so little sex. Julian devotes extensive space in her article to the ways in which [apps like Tinder] fail to bring people together, even for casual intimacy … But then she notes in a parenthetical that the impact has been very different in the gay and lesbian community. There, the apps have been much more successful, and

5h

The Silly Stereotypes That Elite-College Students Have About Other Campuses

Princeton is academically rigorous, but too exclusive and hierarchical. MIT has brilliant students, but it’s socially unpleasant. The University of Pennsylvania is altogether too career-minded. These are some of the opinions that researchers heard when they asked 56 Harvard and Stanford students—most of them still in school, some of them recent graduates—which colleges they applied to and how the

5h

6h

6h

Pika survival rates dry up with low moisture

Researchers sought to understand how climate change, specifically changes in snowpack and VPD, is affecting pikas. Researchers related population abundances to weather and snowpack dynamics in the North Cascades National Park Service Complex in Washington state.

6h

It's all in the code: protein production efficiency can be predicted by gene sequence

Scientists from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro explored mRNA and protein public databases to unravel hidden meanings of the genetic code. Using a metric derived from mRNA codon composition, they found out how gene sequence choice can predict different aspects of protein synthesis, such as protein production efficiency. The study, published in Nucleic Acids Research, could help the develo

6h

A reconfigurable soft actuator

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a method to change the shape of a flat sheet of elastomer, using actuation that is fast, reversible, controllable by an applied voltage, and reconfigurable to different shapes.

6h

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: January 2019

Well well well! January has come to a fun close. How did we do in this first month of 2019? Looks like we completed 25 cells, including two marathon cells with finish times of 11 hours 33 minutes and 7 hours 54 minutes! And at HQ, as you’ve seen, we’ve been busily pushing out reaping improvements and making bigger preparations for Neo. Check out the rest of the stats below! New Scouts: minimalist

6h

Environmental regulations may have unintended consequences in energy production

Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. Although the regulations seem to have improved preservation efforts, they may have had unintended consequences in energy production, leading to more greenhouse gas emissions.

6h

Pika survival rates dry up with low moisture

Although it has been ranked as the cutest creature in US National Parks, the American pika is tough, at home in loose alpine rocks in windswept mountain regions. Related to rabbits and hares, pikas live in cold, wet climates and high terrain, spending winters in snowy homes living off of stored grasses and other forage they have gathered, only venturing out for more when weather permits.

6h

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human virus

During the Zika virus outbreak of 2015-16, public health officials scrambled to contain the epidemic and curb the pathogen's devastating effects on pregnant women. At the same time, scientists around the globe tried to understand the genetics of this mysterious virus.

6h

New progress toward chip-based ghost imaging

For the first time, researchers have shown that the non-conventional imaging method known as ghost imaging can be performed using a low-cost, chip-based light-illuminating device. This important step toward chip-based ghost imaging could make the imaging method practical for applications such as chip-scale biomedical imaging, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), and internet-of-things sensing devi

6h

Pika survival rates dry up with low moisture

Although it has been ranked as the cutest creature in US National Parks, the American pika is tough, at home in loose alpine rocks in windswept mountain regions. Related to rabbits and hares, pikas live in cold, wet climates and high terrain, spending winters in snowy homes living off of stored grasses and other forage they have gathered, only venturing out for more when weather permits.

6h

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human virus

During the Zika virus outbreak of 2015-16, public health officials scrambled to contain the epidemic and curb the pathogen's devastating effects on pregnant women. At the same time, scientists around the globe tried to understand the genetics of this mysterious virus.

6h

The NFL’s Truce With Trump Wasn’t Worth It

Heading into Super Bowl Sunday, the NFL probably believed that it had Donald Trump exactly where it wanted him. Which is to say, it had him quiet. But the NFL discovered that no amount of bootlicking will control the president’s mouth. The president had mostly ceased his fiery, public rebukes of the NFL and its handling of Colin Kaepernick’s protest. Trump’s broadsides were theatrical and effecti

6h

Rookies lead the way on House science panel

Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), its new chairwoman, picks newcomers to head subcommittees

6h

Examining Nazi obsession with movement further reveals how they manufactured the idea of race

It's no accident that so much of the propaganda film, photography and artwork from the Nazi regime features automobiles, airplanes and other modes of movement.

6h

Gap between corporate earnings, non-financial measures affects forecasting

A recent study finds that the more a company's earnings diverge from its non-financial resources, the less likely it is to issue a forecast of its annual earnings. For companies that issue a forecast, the larger the disconnect between a company's earnings and its key non-financial measures, the more the company overestimates its actual performance.

6h

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases

Scientists have shed light on a biological process that helps the production of healthy cells, which may aid understanding of neurological diseases and other conditions.

6h

The North Magnetic Pole’s Mysterious Journey Across the Arctic

Scientists accelerated the update of a model of Earth’s fluctuating magnetic field, which is needed to keep navigational systems functioning. Many wondered what’s happening inside the planet’s core.

6h

Climate change will even change the color of the oceans

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

6h

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human virus

A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks.

6h

Study: Environmental regulations may have unintended consequences in energy production

Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. Although the regulations seem to have improved preservation efforts, they may have had unintended consequences in energy production, leading to more greenhouse gas emissions. That's the conclusion of a new study by a researcher at Carnegie Mellon University that appears in the journal PLOS ONE.

6h

Shared genetic marker offers new promise in targeting specific ovarian and lung cancers

Two new papers, published simultaneously in Nature Communications and led by researchers at McGill University, offer promise that a drug currently used to treat estrogen positive breast cancer may be effective in treating two different types of cancer, one rare and one common form.

6h

New progress toward chip-based ghost imaging

For the first time, researchers have shown that the non-conventional imaging method known as ghost imaging can be performed using a low-cost, chip-based light-illuminating device.

6h

Pika survival rates dry up with low moisture

A team of researchers lead by Aaron N. Johnston of the US Geological Survey sought to understand how climate change, specifically changes in snowpack and VPD, is affecting pikas. In a paper published today in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology, they related population abundances to weather and snowpack dynamics in the North Cascades National Park Service Complex in Washington stat

6h

Watch William Gibson predict internet culture way back in 1997

In 1984, science fiction author William Gibson coined the term "cyberspace" in his debut novel Neuromancer (which he wrote on a typewriter). In a 1997 interview with the BBC, he said we should respond to new technologies with "profound ambivalence." While he doesn't think his original vision of the internet has come to life, he might have been premature given the centralization of power of the di

6h

Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves

It's about time for the annual mass migration of honeybees to California, and new research is helping lower the chances the pollinators and their offspring will die while they're visiting the West Coast.

6h

Why charismatic, introduced species are so difficult to manage

Introduced and invasive species can present big problems, particularly when those species are charismatic, finds a recently published paper in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

6h

Researchers unearth an ice age in the African desert

A field trip to Namibia to study volcanic rocks led to an unexpected discovery by West Virginia University geologists Graham Andrews and Sarah Brown.

6h

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases

Scientists have shed light on a biological process that helps the production of healthy cells, which may aid understanding of neurological diseases and other conditions.

6h

Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves

It's about time for the annual mass migration of honeybees to California, and new research is helping lower the chances the pollinators and their offspring will die while they're visiting the West Coast.

6h

Why charismatic, introduced species are so difficult to manage

Introduced and invasive species can present big problems, particularly when those species are charismatic, finds a recently published paper in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

6h

Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients

New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding.

6h

UC design could revolutionize power plants

University of Cincinnati researchers say they have found a solution to one of the biggest environmental problems facing the energy industry: water consumption.

6h

Instagram’s Adam Mosseri to meet UK health secretary over suicide content concerns

The still fresh-in-post boss of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, has been asked to meet the UK’s health secretary, Matt Hancock, to discuss the social media platform’s handling of content …

6h

Turkey creates its first space agency

Turkey creates its first space agency Turkey creates its first space agency , Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00452-y A decree by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has established a national space agency, but many details are still to come.

6h

World's "Third Pole" Is Melting Away

Even if ambitious climate targets are met, Himalayan glaciers could lose a third of their volume — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Nissan sparks Brexit shockwaves through UK auto sector

Nissan's decision to axe planned production of the X-Trail SUV in the Brexit-backing city of Sunderland is a heavy blow to the British auto sector, which repeatedly warned against quitting the EU.

6h

Appalachia's Fight to Lessen the Impact of Substance Abuse

A needle-exchange program in Virginia is a good first step—but isn’t enough by itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Climate change: Warming threatens Himalayan glaciers

Rising temperatures pose a growing danger to the glaciers found in the Hindu Kush and Himalayan mountains.

6h

6h

Marks on the AI Church: “The Singularity Is Far”

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

6h

Tesla to buy battery tech firm Maxwell

Tesla agreed Monday to buy energy tech firm Maxwell Technologies for $218 million, a move that could help the electric carmaker extend the driving range for its vehicles.

6h

Drug target identified for chemotherapy-resistant ovarian, breast cancer

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may have found a path toward improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy in people with breast or ovarian cancer caused by defects in one of the BRCA genes. The researchers identified a pair of genes that operate in parallel to BRCA and may increase susceptibility to chemotherapy drugs.

6h

Mayo Clinic researchers develop prediction tool for kidney stones

Kidney stones are a common and painful condition, with many sufferers experiencing recurrent episodes. Most people who pass an initial stone want to know their chances of future episodes, but this has not always been easy to predict. Now Mayo Clinic researchers are tracking the familiar characteristics of kidney stone formers in an online prediction tool that could help sufferers anticipate if the

6h

San Francisco Is Considering a Ban on Facial Recognition

Ban Hammer Facial recognition technology is everywhere you look — from unlocking phones to shaming jaywalkers . But should corporations have the power to use it on you without consent? That’s the question the city of San Francisco is tackling right now. A member of the city’s Board of Supervisors proposed a ban on facial recognition technology for city agencies on Tuesday, Wired reports — potenti

6h

Daily briefing: American colonization contributed to the Little Ice Age

Daily briefing: American colonization contributed to the Little Ice Age Daily briefing: American colonization contributed to the Little Ice Age, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00485-3 Epidemics killed so many indigenous Americans that it changed the climate. Plus: ‘negligent’ management of Australia’s greatest rivers and the French National Research Agency’s leader tel

6h

The End of the American Chinatown

LOS ANGELES—As a new immigrant to the United States, Li Zhong Huang knew there was only one place he wanted to live: the Chinatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, where he could be surrounded by language, food, and people from his home province of Guangdong. In 2001, he found an apartment with a shared bathroom and kitchen for $390 and moved in, relishing the sunny weather and ample transportation o

6h

How a light-activated metal could destroy cancer cells

New research looks at therapy using light beams to target and kill cancer cells. The investigators think that a compound of the metal iridium could be key.

6h

Enlarged prostate could actually be stopping tumor growth, simulations show

Computer simulations show for the first time that when a patient has history of an enlarged prostate, tumors in the prostate barely grow at all.

7h

A study reveals that a large part of the population is not able to breathe properly

Muscle co-contraction is a strategy used commonly in elderly people to increase their stability. Co-contraction involves the simultaneous contraction of pairs of muscles from opposing groups to lock a joint and provide stability.

7h

Where technology and aging intersect, gerontologists chart path forward

The latest issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America contains 21 articles highlighting the state-of-the-art research regarding aging and technology, and offering guidance for the future.

7h

Let's talk about sex … after childbirth

Resuming sexual activity after pregnancy isn't always like riding a bike, especially for mothers experiencing postpartum pain, fatigue and stress. Yet, many couples are led to believe there is a hard-and-fast point at which they can restart sexual intercourse, according to 70 in-depth interviews with women in South Carolina.

7h

Appalachia's Fight to Lessen the Impact of Substance Abuse

A needle-exchange program in Virginia is a good first step—but isn’t enough by itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

7h

The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures

In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. Here, cultures that originated in Mesopotamia interacted with local hunter-gatherers, Anatolian farmers, and steppe populations from just north of the mountain ranges. Here, pastoralism was developed and technologies such as the wheeled wagon and advanced metal weapons were spread to neighbouring cultures. A

7h

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony

The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories, is partly due to poor diet, research has found.

7h

Better data (and common sense) can end police brutality

The federal government doesn't collect information about police killings in any systemic way. What this means is that we can't actually tell you, as a hard fact, how many people were killed last year. McKesson and his fellow Black Lives Matter organizers have created Mapping Police Violence to create a single-stop database with the most comprehensive data about police killings. When it comes to f

7h

There is no such thing as political neutrality

Every piece of writing has a political bent, says Amis. Thus, in his view, neutrality is a chimera — a "mythical creature." Some things are so "unshirkably ill-advised" — such as white supremacy — that Amis believes treating such views "evenhandedly," as an alternative perspective of equal moral standing to others, is ridiculous. Amis says that he doesn't have it in him to be respectful toward pe

7h

First discovered fossil feather did not belong to iconic bird Archaeopteryx

A 150-year-old fossil feather mystery has been solved. Researchers applied a novel imaging technique, laser-stimulated fluorescence, revealing the missing quill of the first fossil feather ever discovered, dethroning an icon in the process.

7h

MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

Floating seismometers dubbed MERMAIDs — Mobile Earthquake Recording in Marine Areas by Independent Divers — reveal that Galápagos volcanoes are fed by a mantle plume reaching 1,900 km deep. By letting their nine MERMAIDs float freely for two years, an international team of researchers created an artificial network of oceanic seismometers that could fill in one of the blank areas on the global ge

7h

Physicists uncover the topological origin of surface electromagnetic waves

In work that provides insights for several areas of wave physics — Maxwell electromagnetism, topological quantum states, and plasmonics/metamaterials — scientists showed that the well-known surface electromagnetic waves at interfaces between homogeneous isotropic media, obtained within classical Maxwell's electromagnetism, also have a purely topological origin, similar to quantum topological sta

7h

Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves

'Fungicides, often needed for crop protection, are routinely used during almond bloom, but in many cases growers were also adding insecticides to the mix. Our research shows that some combinations are deadly to the bees, and the simplest thing is to just take the insecticide out of the equation during almond bloom.'

7h

Study: Fatal opioid-related car crashes in Maryland hold steady over decade

A new approach to defining opioid-related auto fatalities provides insight into the nature and distribution of opioid-involved deaths in the state of Maryland, say the authors of a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

7h

WVU researcher unearths an ice age in the African desert

A field trip to Namibia to study volcanic rocks led to an unexpected discovery by West Virginia University geologists Graham Andrews and Sarah Brown.

7h

Putting yourself in their shoes may make you less open to their beliefs

Trying to take someone else's perspective may make you less open to their opposing views, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

7h

Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients

New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding.

7h

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases

Research explains details of a biological process that supports the production of healthy cells, by removing faulty proteins as they form.

7h

Examining Nazi obsession with movement further reveals how they manufactured the idea of race

In a recent article in the journal American Historical Review, Denning argues that by paying attention to the Nazis' obsession with mobility, we can deepen our understanding of how they manufactured and exploited the idea of race.

7h

A new approach for the fast estimation of the solar energy potential in urban environments

TU Delft researchers have developed a new approach for calculating fast and accurate the solar energy potential of surfaces in the urban environment. The new approach can significantly help architects and urban planners to incorporate photovoltaic (solar power) technology in their designs. The findings were presented on Feb. 4 in Nature Energy.

7h

Word order predicts a native speakers' working memory

Memory plays a crucial role in our lives, and several studies have already investigated how we store and retrieve information under different conditions. Typically, stimuli presented at the beginning and at the end of a list are recalled better than stimuli from the middle. But are these findings universal and generalizable across languages and cultures? An international research team, led by Fede

7h

VR kan blive en helt ny slags efteruddannelse

PLUS. VR-softwaren Craftio skal lære maskiningeniørstuderende korrekt brug af farlige maskiner. Men softwaren har også potentiale til efteruddannelse af ingeniører, siger opfinderne.

7h

Here’s a Roundup of All the Super Bowl Ads About Robots and AI

Bowl Bots Super Bowl LIII may have been low on sports excitement , but it had plenty of robots and artificial intelligences — in the commercials, anyways. Ad after ad featured bots and AIs — mostly for laughs, but sometimes with ominous overtones about the future. Here’s our roundup. The Robo Roundup Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, aired a spot featuring “Robochild,” a humanoid robot that laments

7h

How easy will it be to build a Moon base?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Henrietta Leavitt, the Woman Who Gave Us a Ruler to Measure the Universe

Gazing up at the sky, it's hard not to imagine the sun, moon, stars, and planets as part of an inverted bowl over our heads, even if we know that's an antiquated way of viewing the heavens. These days, we understand it’s the Earth that’s spinning, spinning daily like a ballerina while also circling the sun on its yearly journey. But the bowl imagery was and remains a reasonable way of envisioning

7h

Links between gut microbes and depression strengthened

Links between gut microbes and depression strengthened Links between gut microbes and depression strengthened, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00483-5 The once-wild idea that intestinal bacteria influence mental health has transformed into a major research pursuit.

7h

Volkswagen will use Tesla batteries at its charging stations

Volkswagen announced today that it will be using Tesla Powerpack battery storage units on more than 100 of its Electrify America charging stations in the US, according to Reuters. The …

7h

Samsung pulls the plug on ‘Supreme’ collaboration

When Samsung announced a collaboration with Supreme at an event back in December, it didn’t go over great. It wasn’t that people weren’t excited about the potential of rocking a Supreme-branded …

7h

Why charismatic, introduced species are so difficult to manage

Introduced and invasive species can present big problems, particularly when those species are charismatic. Some introduced species, like zebra mussels, tend to be reviled by the public, and people willingly adhere to strict management policies. However, if an animal has that elusive quality of charisma, people often don't want it to be controlled, even if it's harming the environment. Inevitably,

7h

Balloon-guided catheters provide better blood flow following stroke interventions

Patients who have experienced a stroke as a result of blockages of the arteries in the brain have better outcomes with the use of balloon-guided catheter surgery as compared to having a conventional guided catheter procedure.

7h

Research shows teens too low on sleep, activity, and too high on screen time

Only 1 in 20 U.S. adolescents is meeting national recommendations for sleeping, physical activity, and screen time, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

7h

Researchers report positive findings with dasotraline for ADHD in children ages 6-12

A new study in children aged 6 to 12 years of dasotraline, a promising new treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), showed significant improvement in efficacy in the treatment of ADHD compared to placebo beginning at week 1 and continuing throughout the study.

7h

Dung beetles navigate better under a full moon

Of all nocturnal animals, only dung beetles can hold their course using polarized moonlight. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that the beetles can use polarized light when its signal strength is weak,which may allow them to find their bearings when artificial light from cities swamps natural moonlight.

7h

Demand for long-acting contraception rose sharply after 2016 election

A new, robust study conducted by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that rates of long-acting, reversible contraception went up by 21.6 percent in the 30 days after the presidential election compared to rates at the same time of year in 2015.

7h

Retreating snow line reveals organic molecules around young star

Astronomers using ALMA have detected various complex organic molecules around the young star V883 Ori. A sudden outburst from this star is releasing molecules from the icy compounds in the planet forming disk. The chemical composition of the disk is similar to that of comets in the modern solar system. Sensitive ALMA observations enable astronomers to reconstruct the evolution of organic molecules

7h

Large-scale study reveals genetic risk of diabetes in the Japanese population

Researchers at Osaka University, the University of Tokyo, RIKEN, and others performed a meta-analysis using data on over 36,000 Japanese sufferers of type 2 diabetes (T2D) from four genome-wide association studies to identify genetic factors linked to this disease. Findings revealed 88 associated genomic loci, including 28 novel ones. Several mutations linked to T2D for the Japanese population in

7h

Mapping oesophageal cancer genes leads to new drug targets

Mutations that cause oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) have been mapped in unprecedented detail — unveiling that more than half could be targeted by drugs currently in trials for other cancer types.

7h

The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes

Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. A new search engine, called BIGSI, allows scientists to search public microbial DNA data for specific genes and mutations. This could help researchers monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and understand how bacteria and viruses evolve and adapt.

7h

Earthquake with magnitude 7.5 in Indonesia : an unusual and steady speed

4,1 km/s along 150 km : this is the propagation speed of the 7.5 magnitude earthquake which occurred in Indonesia in September 2018. This speed has just been determined by an international team of researchers from the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France), Université Côte d'Azur, University of California Los Angeles and California Institute of Technology. The

7h

Gerontologists find functional status after TAVR, SAVR linked to pre-op fragility

Patients' frailty index scores prior to undergoing valve replacement procedures helped predict patients' chances of improvement, stability or decline. Post-operative delirium and major complications were also linked to declines in functional status following the procedures.

7h

New study seeks to guide clinical treatment for older patients with aortic stenosis

With recent advances in surgical techniques, more patients are undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) to treat aortic stenosis. However, this study shows that serious risks of functional decline associated with surgery in older patients may well outweigh the benefits, and in particular, may not meet an individual's goals for treatment.

7h

Study examines women, men and brain marker of Alzheimer's disease

Growing evidence suggests women may be at increased risk of certain physiological changes associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). This study examined nearly 300 clinically normal adults (average age 74) for deposits in the brain of the protein tau, a marker of AD, as measured by positron emission tomography. Women showed more tau in a region of the brain than men, which was associated with individ

7h

Did use of long-acting reversible contraceptives increase after 2016 election?

Insertions of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods increased in the 30 business days after the 2016 presidential election based on an analysis of data for a large group of commercially insured women. Industry and media reports after the 2016 election of Donald Trump described an increase in the utilization of LARC methods; one proposed reason was that women were concerned about acce

7h

A match made in neural heaven: How a neuron grows an axon

While the neural architecture responsible for the transmission of electrical impulses has been known for more than a century, the basic biology behind how a neuron acquires its one and only axon — a fundamental component of how neurons communicate — remains a mystery. In a new paper, a researcher at the University of California, Riverside, and his colleagues describe the genetic switches that ig

7h

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators has created the most comprehensive collection of human intestinal bacteria to date. Reported today (Feb. 4) in Nature Biotechnology, the new resource will help researchers worldwide to

7h

The Milky Way in a twist

Our Milky Way galaxy's disk of stars is anything but stable and flat. Instead, it becomes increasingly 'warped' and twisted far away from the Milky Way's center, according to astronomers from National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

7h

The Milky Way is warped

The first accurate 3D map of our galaxy reveals its true shape: warped and twisted. Astronomers from Macquarie University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have used 1,339 'standard' stars to map the real shape of our home galaxy in a paper published in Nature Astronomy today. They found the Milky Way's disc of stars becomes increasingly 'warped' and twisted the further away the stars are from t

7h

Harvesting wild genes gives crops renewed resistance to disease

A global alliance of researchers has pioneered a new method to rapidly recruit disease-resistance genes from wild plants for transfer into domestic crops. The technique promises to revolutionize the development of disease-resistant varieties for the global food supply.

7h

UC Riverside physicists create exotic electron liquid

By bombarding an ultrathin semiconductor sandwich with powerful laser pulses, physicists at the University of California, Riverside, have created the first 'electron liquid' at room temperature. The achievement opens a pathway for development of the first practical and efficient devices to generate and detect light at terahertz wavelengths — between infrared light and microwaves. Such devices cou

7h

Excess immune pruning of synapses in neural cells derived from patients with schizophrenia

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds evidence that the process of synaptic pruning, a normal part of brain development during adolescence, is excessive in individuals with schizophrenia. The study is the first to directly observe excessive synaptic pruning in cells from patients with schizophrenia.

7h

Rapid gene cloning technique will transform crop disease protection

Researchers have pioneered a new method which allows them to rapidly recruit disease resistance genes from wild plants and transfer them into domestic crops.

7h

A gut feeling for mental health

The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven) and his team published these results today in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology.

7h

Concussion treatment: Adolescent athletes 'prescribed' aerobic exercise recovered faster

Adolescent athletes who sustained concussions while playing a sport recovered more quickly when they underwent a supervised, aerobic exercise regimen, a study published Feb. 4 in JAMA Pediatrics has found.

7h

Yeast study prompts rethink of DNA safekeeping

DNA replication is more prone to errors at times of stress leading to mutations that could cause disease.

7h

The New 'Toy Story 4' Trailer Will Delight You

So will the new 'Captain Marvel' footage and this news about Goop. (Maybe.)

7h

Waveguide-coupled single collective excitation of atomic arrays

Waveguide-coupled single collective excitation of atomic arrays Waveguide-coupled single collective excitation of atomic arrays, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0902-3 Waveguide quantum electrodynamics is used to couple a single collective excitation of an atomic array to a nanoscale waveguide; the excitation is stored and later read out, generating guided single photon

7h

CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors

CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0908-x CRISPR–CasX represents a distinct RNA-guided platform that is functionally separate from Cas9 and Cas12a and is active for bacterial and human genome modification.

7h

Study links protein, clusterin, to cardiac and metabolic diseases

During a study spanning nearly a decade, researchers have linked the protein clusterin — for the first time — to many different facets of cardiometabolic syndrome risk through its actions in the liver. Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) is a cluster of conditions occurring together that increase a person's risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

7h

People with depression are less likely to have certain gut bacteria

People who lack certain bacteria are more likely to have depression, according to the largest study yet to find a link between the microbiome and mental health

7h

Seismic boom may explain why 2018 Palu earthquake was so devastating

More than 2000 people died when an earthquake and tsunami hit Indonesia last year. A seismic boom may explain why it was unusually devastating

7h

7h

According to pagans, spring is springing

The ancient holiday of Imbolc celebrates the imminent return of the sun in Spring. The holiday also commemorates either goddess Bhrigid or St, Brigid, who may or may not be the same person. Good weather on Imbolc means more winter to come. None Happy Imbolc! As it tends to be with pagan holidays, Celtic and Irish Imbolc is different things to different people and at different times. "Imbolc" is f

7h

The Problem With Big DNA

In 2015, scientists discovered a pig in China that would set off a frantic, worldwide search. The pig carried bacteria resistant to colistin , a drug used to cure infections when almost all other drugs have failed. Colistin is an old antibiotic with sometimes severe side effects in humans. Chinese doctors didn’t even prescribe it for human patients; instead, farmers were relying on literal tons o

7h

The Patriots’ Super Bowl Victory Was Boring—Yet Inimitable

During the buildup to Super Bowl 53, the football world was in a retrospective mood. The nature of the New England Patriots’ nearly two-decade run since the arrival of Bill Belichick and Tom Brady in 2000 meant there were the basic totals to tally. With his ninth Super Bowl appearance, Brady eclipsed the number of times any other franchise had made it to the championship game, and with another vi

7h

Milky Way is warped and twisted, not flat

Scientists in Australia and China create 3D map revealing the true shape of the galaxy The Milky Way is warped and twisted rather than flat like a celestial pancake, according to the most accurate 3D map of the galaxy yet. Related: Nearby galaxy set to collide with Milky Way, say scientists Continue reading…

7h

Gut bacteria may have impact on mental health, study says

Research opens door to possible treatments for depression based on probiotics Microbes that set up home in the gut may have an impact on mental health, according to a major study into wellbeing and the bacteria that live inside us. Researchers in Belgium found that people with depression had consistently low levels of bacteria known as Coprococcus and Dialister whether they took antidepressants o

7h

Melting glaciers reveal ancient landscapes, thawing mummies, and long-dead diseases

Environment Climate change is unraveling the fabric of time. As ice melts, ancient landscapes, frozen histories, and ancient diseases are revealed. Here are just a few ways climate change is unraveling the fabric of time.

7h

Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 4, 2019

ORNL story tips: Oak Ridge National Laboratory used machine learning to generate high-resolution map of vegetation growing in Alaskan tundra; ORNL used machine learning to better predict home-to-work commuting patterns; Univ of South Carolina investigates oxygen-reducing perovskites in fuel cells using ORNL neutrons; decades of data showed salt purity trends leading to inconsistent corrosion of al

7h

Gap between corporate earnings, non-financial measures affects forecasting

A recent study finds that the more a company's earnings diverge from its non-financial resources, the less likely it is to issue a forecast of its annual earnings. For companies that issue a forecast, the larger the disconnect between a company's earnings and its key non-financial measures, the more the company overestimates its actual performance.

7h

Where do the best strawberries grow?

Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. Hedgerows and the edges of forests represent important habitats for pollinators. A team from the University of Göttingen investigated whether hedgerows and their proximity to forests might affect the pollination of strawberries. In fact, both the weight and the quality of strawberries increased when plants wer

7h

Revealed: what caused Indonesia’s devastating tsunami

Uncommon seismic events combined to produce a rare and devastating result. Natalie Parletta reports.

7h

Finding disease-resistant genes the key to safeguarding global crops

New technique aims to use wild plants to bolster resistance in food harvests. Samantha page reports.

7h

Rapid gene cloning technique will transform crop disease protection

Researchers have pioneered a new method which allows them to rapidly recruit disease resistance genes from wild plants and transfer them into domestic crops.

8h

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute, has created the most comprehensive collection of human intestinal bacteria to date. This will help researc

8h

Yeast study prompts rethink of DNA safekeeping

DNA replication is more prone to errors at times of stress leading to mutations that could cause disease.

8h

The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes

Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have combined their knowledge of bacterial genetics and web search algorithms to build a DNA search engine for microbial data. The search engine, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, could enable researchers and public health agencies to use genome sequencing data to monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance ge

8h

Physicists create exotic electron liquid

By bombarding an ultrathin semiconductor sandwich with powerful laser pulses, physicists at the University of California, Riverside, have created the first "electron liquid" at room temperature.

8h

Rapid gene cloning technique will transform crop disease protection

Researchers have pioneered a new method which allows them to rapidly recruit disease resistance genes from wild plants and transfer them into domestic crops.

8h

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute, has created the most comprehensive collection of human intestinal bacteria to date. This will help researc

8h

Earthquake with magnitude 7.5 in Indonesia—an unusual and steady speed

An international team of researchers from the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France), Université Côte d"Azur, University of California Los Angeles and California Institute of Technology has determined the propagation speed of the 7.5 magnitude earthquake which occurred in Indonesia in September 2018: 4.1 km/s along 150 km. The results, which also shed light on

8h

The Milky Way is warped

The Milky Way galaxy's disk of stars is anything but stable and flat. Instead, it becomes increasingly warped and twisted far away from the Milky Way's center, according to astronomers from National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC).

8h

Yeast study prompts rethink of DNA safekeeping

DNA replication is more prone to errors at times of stress leading to mutations that could cause disease.

8h

Spotlight on Space Station science

hough all ESA astronauts are back on Earth, European science on the International Space Station is ongoing. Explore a few experiments underway right now in celebration of science at ESA.

8h

The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes

Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have combined their knowledge of bacterial genetics and web search algorithms to build a DNA search engine for microbial data. The search engine, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, could enable researchers and public health agencies to use genome sequencing data to monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance ge

8h

Equity firm buys Ultimate Software for $11 billion

A Florida software company is being purchased by a California private equity firm for $11 billion.

8h

Graphene biosensor could provide early lung cancer diagnosis

The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis.

8h

Indonesian earthquake broke a geologic speed limit

“Supershear” earthquake on a common kind of fault could raise hazard risks

8h

Demolition derby: Planet crashes explain different densities

Research sheds light on the violence of exoplanet formation. Lauren Fuge reports.

8h

Alexa, give me nostalgia: Choose Your Own Adventure skill debuts from Audible

Two titles are available so far, but more will come.

8h

Here's how we could turn an asteroid into a space station

Building a space station inside a rotating asteroid would make it easier to mine precious resources – but it might not happen for decades

8h

Solving global challenges starts with open data – new report launched today

Better incentives for researchers and fewer barriers between technological systems are key to kickstarting a revolution in open data, according to Realising Potential, a report released today by the Open Research Data Task Force (ORDTF) – a group of senior professors and UK higher education and research organisations and Chaired by Professor Pam Thomas, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research at the Univ

8h

Laser scientists just tripled their record fusion power yield

submitted by /u/abhiccc1 [link] [comments]

8h

How do we learn to work with intelligent machines? | Matt Beane

The path to skill around the globe has been the same for thousands of years: train under an expert and take on small, easy tasks before progressing to riskier, harder ones. But right now, we're handling AI in a way that blocks that path — and sacrificing learning in our quest for productivity, says organizational ethnographer Matt Beane. What can be done? Beane shares a vision that flips the curr

8h

Are sharks being attacked by killer whales off Cape Town's coast?

Large, predatory sharks occupy the top of ocean food chains, where they play important roles in maintaining diverse and healthy ecosystems. The loss of these predators can therefore have significant impacts on ecosystems.

8h

Are sharks being attacked by killer whales off Cape Town's coast?

Large, predatory sharks occupy the top of ocean food chains, where they play important roles in maintaining diverse and healthy ecosystems. The loss of these predators can therefore have significant impacts on ecosystems.

8h

Broad regional accents are a barrier to social mobility, research finds

Many people aspire to improve their lives through gaining promotion at work, new qualifications or starting a new career. However, research by academics from The University of Manchester and the University of Bath has found that broad regional accents can be a barrier to social mobility, as they are less favoured by some people.

8h

Image: Eberswalde crater delta – 3-D

This intricate structure of an ancient river delta once carried liquid water across the surface of Mars.

8h

The Second Coming of Nancy Pelosi

Perhaps it’s because as a child she practiced her penmanship by logging the favors owed to and from her powerful politician father in a record book so they’d never get lost. Perhaps it’s because she gave birth to five children in six years. Perhaps it’s because she first ran for public office at age 47, when her youngest kid was a senior in high school and she knew herself, and her mind, and what

8h

New clues discovered to lung transplant rejection

Researchers have discovered clues to a particularly deadly form of rejection that can follow lung transplantation. Called antibody-mediated rejection, the condition remains impervious to available treatments and difficult to diagnose. The researchers have identified, in mice, a process that may prevent the condition and lead to possible therapies to treat it.

8h

Engineers harvest heart's energy to power life-saving devices

The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge life-saving devices, according to new research. Using a dime-sized invention, the heart's energy can be harnessed to power implantable devices, according to the study. Creating an energy source within the body could save millions of people who rely on pacemakers and other implantable devices from having to undergo surgery to replace batteries.

8h

No overall increased risk of cancer in children born after fertility treatment

Children born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) do not appear to be at greater risk of developing cancer than other children, according to the first study to look at the long-term cancer risk in ART children compared to those in the general population or who were naturally conceived by subfertile women.

8h

Simply shining light on 'dinosaur metal' compound kills cancer cells

A new compound based on iridium, a rare metal which landed in the Gulf of Mexico 66 million years ago, hooked onto albumin, a protein in blood, can attack the nucleus of cancerous cells when switched on by light, researchers have found.

8h

Infertility treatment linked with slightly higher risk of pregnancy complications

Women who have undergone infertility treatment, such as in vitro fertilization, are more likely to experience severe pregnancy complications, according to new research.

8h

Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century

Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems.

8h

Rise in overdoses from opioids in diarrhea drug

A new study has uncovered a new threat in the opiate epidemic: overdoses of loperamide, an over-the-counter diarrhea medication, have been steadily increasing in number and severity nationwide over five years.

8h

Electrical activity in prostate cancer cells

Experts from the universities of Bath and Seville have carried out a series of experiments with which, for the first time, they have been able to characterize the normal electrical activity in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in real time, with a resulting low-frequency electrical pattern between 0.1 and 10 Hertz.

8h

Biotechnology to the rescue of Brussels sprouts

An international team has identified the genes that make these plants resistant to the pathogen that attacks crops belonging to the cabbage family all over the world.

8h

How private households can stall economic growth

How quickly the economy recovers after an economic shock also depends on the behavior of private households. Using a complex theoretical model, economist Professor Dr. Christian Bayer from the University of Bonn and his team demonstrated that growing income uncertainty among private households can lead to an economic downturn. The model can also be used to identify the government's options for act

8h

Watch SpaceX Test-Fire the Starship Engine for the First Time

Blast Off SpaceX’s next generation Raptor engine roared into action at its test site in McGregor, Texas, in a video CEO Elon Musk posted on Twitter Sunday night. This particular iteration of SpaceX’s Raptor engine will be used to launch the space company’s gigantic stainless steel Starship into space — and eventually to the Moon and beyond. To Infinity The new engine design will be responsible fo

8h

Better fish welfare using 'sensor fish'

After many decades of salmon farming, recent years have seen studies into fish welfare in connection with issues such as how fish are treated in their cages. In particular, the fish farming sector is looking for better approaches to delousing.

8h

The real problem with posting about your kids online

In a recent essay published in The Washington Post, a mother explained her decision to continue writing essays and blog posts about her daughter even after the girl had protested. The woman said that while she felt bad, she was "not done exploring my motherhood in my writing."

8h

Better fish welfare using 'sensor fish'

After many decades of salmon farming, recent years have seen studies into fish welfare in connection with issues such as how fish are treated in their cages. In particular, the fish farming sector is looking for better approaches to delousing.

8h

NanoTemper Technologies Brings Speed to Drug Discovery Screening, Launches Dianthus System

NanoTemper Technologies, maker of life science tools for protein characterization, launches its newest system, Dianthus, at the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS2019) conference in Washington, DC.

8h

8h

Squid shed light on how bacteria-filled organs evolved

By examining symbiotic organs in cephalopods (octopuses and their kin), researchers have discovered that there may be many evolutionary paths towards the current forms of organs that host symbiotic microbes. Many animals have specialized symbiotic organs. In humans, the appendix may even be one example, serving to safeguard beneficial bacteria when the gastrointestinal tract is out of balance. Fo

8h

Americans say they're worried about climate change – so why don't they vote that way?

According to a January public opinion survey, "Record numbers of Americans say they care about global warming."

8h

Larsen ice shelf: Mission to explore uncovered Antarctic ecosystem

Scientists want to reach a section of Antarctic sea-floor exposed by the world's biggest iceberg.

8h

Tesla to buy battery tech firm Maxwell

Tesla agreed Monday to buy energy tech firm Maxwell Technologies for $218 million, a move that could help the electric carmaker extend the driving range for its vehicles.

8h

8h

Engineers harvest heart's energy to power life-saving devices

The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge devices that save our lives, according to new research from Dartmouth College.

8h

8h

Four reasons to switch from iOS to Android (and vice versa)

DIY Read this before making your choice. Do the differences between iPhones and Android phones still matter? Yes, yes they do.

8h

Biggest ever map of human Alzheimer's brain published

A study of the differences between healthy brains and those with Alzheimer's disease has produced largest dataset of its type ever. And the data, developed by a team of researchers led by Dr. Richard Unwin at the University of Manchester, is now freely available online for any scientist to use.

8h

EU project identifies obstacles to transnational research access to large prospective cohorts

A four-year EU infrastructure project BBMRI-LPC analyzed the gaps and needs involved in the transnational access provision to large human research sample cohorts in Europe. The results show that there still are substantial obstacles for sample and data transfer in Europe.

8h

Educated migrants bring wages closer together in regions

Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that domestic migration increases the speed at which Russia's regions approach one another in terms of salary levels. Further, the impact of migration on this process depends on migrants' education level. The results of the HSE study were published in the jour-nal Issues in Economics (Voprosy ekonomiki). https://voprecotest.elpub.ru/jour/

8h

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Humans are in a constant arms race with infectious bacteria. To kill these disease microbes, we develop powerful antibiotics; and in turn, the bacteria develop resistance against these drugs. So we enhance our antibiotics, and the bacteria enhance themselves accordingly—resulting in so-called superbugs. Increasingly, medications fail to eliminate these highly adapted bacteria, leaving our bodies d

8h

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Humans are in a constant arms race with infectious bacteria. To kill these disease microbes, we develop powerful antibiotics; and in turn, the bacteria develop resistance against these drugs. So we enhance our antibiotics, and the bacteria enhance themselves accordingly—resulting in so-called superbugs. Increasingly, medications fail to eliminate these highly adapted bacteria, leaving our bodies d

8h

More people are overdosing on this diarrhea med

There’s a new threat in the opiate epidemic: an over-the-counter diarrhea medication. Overdoses of loperamide, commonly known as Imodium, have been steadily increasing in number and severity nationwide over five years, report researchers. Misuse of the drug is particularly alarming because non-prescription drugs like loperamide are inexpensive, readily available online and in retail stores, undet

8h

Is your VPN secure?

About a quarter of internet users use a virtual private network, a software setup that creates a secure, encrypted data connection between their own computer and another one elsewhere on the internet. Many people use them to protect their privacy when using Wi-Fi hotspots, or to connect securely to workplace networks while traveling. Other users are concerned about surveillance from governments an

8h

Controls on nitrogen nutrient availability in the Arctic tundra

Near the top of the world, plants grow on soil that rests atop permafrost, or permanently frozen soil. Just like plants in warmer regions, these need nitrogen to grow. The unique aspects of the permafrost environment create new challenges for representing plant-nitrogen interactions. Scientists measured how nitrogen availability to plants varies spatially and temporally in the Arctic tundra. They

8h

Senator Sanders to ask why drug, once free, now costs $375k

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

8h

Copyright just lifted on lots of neat stuff

Works from 1923 have entered the public domain after a 20-year extension on copyright protections. The Penn Libraries, which hold more than 9,000 works from 1923, have embarked on a year-long project to digitize and share selected books through a partnership with the HathiTrust , an online collection of millions of titles from libraries around the world freely available to the public. University

8h

Metro-entreprenør fik trecifret millionbeløb for at genoptage arbejdet

Metroselskabet har igen måttet betale ekstra til sin entreprenør med italienske Salini i spidsen for at undgå en forsinkelse af Cityringen. Selskabet regner dog med at få pengene tilbage.

8h

Researchers develop customizable microfluidic nozzles for generating complex emulsions

Droplets or emulsions are widely employed in the fields of drug delivery, chemical analysis, biological assays and material synthesis. Emulsions can be created using a microfluidic device that allows generation of droplets of one phase dispersed in an immiscible phase. Unlike bulk emulsification process, microfluidic devices allow for controlled generation of droplets with high monodispersity.

8h

Where does this contamination come from?

When bodies of water become polluted, it is important to find the cause as quickly and as economically as possible. To this end, TU Wien has now developed a new, DNA-based rapid testing procedure.

8h

Study shows that fluctuating income uncertainty can lead to a downturn

How quickly the economy recovers after an economic shock also depends on the behavior of private households. Using a complex theoretical model, economist Prof. Dr. Christian Bayer from the University of Bonn and his team demonstrated that growing income uncertainty among private households can lead to an economic downturn. The model can also be used to identify the government's options for action

8h

Using AI to develop new flavor experiences

McCormick & Company, a pioneer in flavor and food innovation, and my team at IBM Research have created a novel AI system to help product developers more efficiently and effectively create new flavor experiences. This year, we will celebrate a milestone in our ongoing collaboration that's been four years in the making: Our first AI-enabled retail products will be available on grocer's shelves.

8h

An Astrophysicist Who Maps the Universe’s Terra Incognita

Priyamvada Natarajan is a leader in the effort to map the universe’s invisible contents, which is to say, almost everything. Ninety-five percent of all stuff takes mysterious, nonluminous forms dubbed dark matter and dark energy, which betray their presence in the cosmos by attracting and repulsing, respectively, the 5 percent of stuff that’s visible. Even that 5 percent is increasingly slipping

8h

The Way Superman Picks Up a Building Is a Physics Travesty

Superman is more than welcome to use his superpowers to pick up a building. But we really need to talk about his technique.

8h

Swiss museum laments Facebook ban of images of naked statues

A Geneva art museum says Facebook has banned using images of a nearly-naked Venus statue and a nude, kneeling man that it had hoped to post on the social media platform to promote an upcoming exhibit.

9h

Tech giants respond more quickly to hate speech: EU

Internet giants have more than doubled the rate at which they fight hate speech online than when they joined the European Union's voluntary approach in 2016, EU officials said Monday.

9h

When extreme weather wipes out wildlife, the fallout can last for years

The recent heatwaves have proved deadly to many Australian animals, from feral horses to flying foxes.

9h

The humble spade flower moonlights as the 'love shrub'

If you are observant enough in the Australian bush, you may be able to spot the spade flower, a member of the violet family. Spade flowers grow under the semi-shade of open eucalypt forest, among other little green herbaceous plants.

9h

When extreme weather wipes out wildlife, the fallout can last for years

The recent heatwaves have proved deadly to many Australian animals, from feral horses to flying foxes.

9h

The humble spade flower moonlights as the 'love shrub'

If you are observant enough in the Australian bush, you may be able to spot the spade flower, a member of the violet family. Spade flowers grow under the semi-shade of open eucalypt forest, among other little green herbaceous plants.

9h

Visualization of regions of electromagnetic wave-plasma interactions surrounding the Earth

The researchers investigated wave-particle interactions between energetic electrons and chorus waves evolving in the space surrounding the Earth, using the scientific satellite Arase and, simultaneously, transient auroral flashes by the ground-based global observation network. The investigation visualized asymmetric spatial development of wave-particle interaction regions on the order of sub-secon

9h

Quality of overall diet is key to lowering type 2 diabetes risk

Consistent with studies in other populations, findings from the first local study, The Singapore Chinese Health Study, conducted by researchers in the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Duke-NUS Medical School, have shown that a high-quality diet defined by low intake of animal foods such as red meat, and high intake of plant foods such as vegetables

9h

Nyt landspatientregister får varm modtagelse

Tre regioner overgik til den nye version af Landspatientregisteret i weekenden. Det betød håndskrevne noter, en efterregistreringspukkel og nye arbejdsgange for klinikerne.

9h

DNA from extinct red wolves lives on in some mysterious Texas coyotes

Mystery canids on Texas’ Galveston Island carry red wolf DNA, thought to be extinct in the wild for 40 years.

9h

New Robot Is “On The Path to Machine Self-Awareness,” Says Creator

Know Thyself Researchers at Columbia University say they’ve built a robot arm that can construct a self-image from scratch — a capability they frame, provocatively, as a step toward machines that are truly self-aware. “This is perhaps what a newborn child does in its crib, as it learns what it is,” said Hod Lipson, a professor of mechanical engineering who worked on the robot, in a press release

9h

Neuroscientists Just Found a Way to Image the Brain 1,000 Times Faster Than Ever Before

You know those stories of scientific breakthroughs, in which the lone genius scientist struggles for years until his “eureka!” moment? Yeah, that’s a lie. With the big data revolution well under way, today scientific discoveries are the result of massive collaborations. Case in point? Last week, 18 institutions teamed up and devised a method to image entire brains 1,000 times faster than anything

9h

Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception

Humans, fish and, most likely, other species rely on identical visual features—color, size, orientation, and motion—to quickly search for objects, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU).

9h

Astronomers study star formation and gas flows in the galaxy NGC 1365

Using European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have investigated the galaxy NGC 1365. The study, presented in a paper published January 18 on the arXiv.org pre-print server, reveals essential insights about star formation processes and gas flows in this galaxy.

9h

USA Today owner rejects bid from hedge fund-backed newspaper rival

USA Today publisher Gannett said Monday its board unanimously rejected a $1.4 billion takeover offer from rival Digital First Media that would merge two of the largest US newspaper groups.

9h

Two-thirds of Himalayan glaciers could melt, study warns

Two-thirds of Himalayan glaciers, the world's "Third Pole", could melt by 2100 if global emissions are not reduced, scientists warned in a major new study issued on Monday.

9h

Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception

Humans, fish and, most likely, other species rely on identical visual features—color, size, orientation, and motion—to quickly search for objects, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU).

9h

9h

What we learned when our map of southern Africa's rivers went viral

Can you name the river closest to where you live? Have you ever seen that river on a map? How would you react if you saw that river, and others near you, in a map unlike others you have seen before?

9h

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) – longer wavelengths can improve imaging depths

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging technique currently used in clinical diagnostics to examine organs in vivo. The technique uses interferometry; in which light reflected from an examined object combines with reference light that does not encounter the object to generate interference patterns that form 2-D and 3-D OCT images. It is possible to use longer wavelengths of lig

9h

Is there only one way to be a man? Rethinking masculinity in the age of gender fluidity

How to be a "real man": Shake hands. Bump shoulders. Gimme five. Up high. Down low. Bulk up. Try out. Make gains. Make the team. Pump iron. Don't iron that. Talk hockey. Talk a lot. Not about feelings. Get angry. Put them in their place. Don't get emotional. Don't do drama. Wear black. Wear blue. Not light blue. Explain things. Keep it straight. Be a man. Don't be a girl. Got it?

9h

First discovered fossil feather did not belong to iconic bird Archaeopteryx

A 150-year-old fossil feather mystery has been solved by an international research team including Dr. Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong. Dr. Pittman and his colleagues applied a novel imaging technique, laser-stimulated fluorescence (LSF), revealing the missing quill of the first fossil feather ever discovered, dethroning an icon in the process.

9h

Physicists uncover the topological origin of surface electromagnetic waves

In work that provides insights for several areas of wave physics, including Maxwell electromagnetism, topological quantum states, and plasmonics/metamaterials, scientists have shown that the well-known surface electromagnetic waves at interfaces between homogeneous isotropic media, obtained within classical Maxwell's electromagnetism, also have a purely topological origin, similar to quantum topol

9h

The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures

An international research team coordinated by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Eurasia Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) in Berlin is the first to carry out systematic genetic investigations in the Caucasus region. The study, published in Nature Communications, is based on analyses of genome-wide data from 45 individuals in the stepp

9h

9h

Lunar Lander Reports Colder-Than-Expected Temps

According to the China National Space Administration (CNSA), Chang'e-4 has found the moon to be more frigid than expected. Hopefully, it packed a blanket. The post Lunar Lander Reports Colder-Than-Expected Temps appeared first on ExtremeTech .

9h

Want a successful Super Bowl ad? Don't make people think

What makes TV ads most likable? UC Davis marketing professor Prasad Naik says those that tell a story and don't make you think.

9h

Researchers synthesize renewable oils for use in lubricants

Engine gears, plane thrusters, refrigerator compressors, wind turbines—the list of important industrial machinery, agricultural equipment, transportation vessels, and home applications that depend on lubricants might be endless. These slick substances quite literally keep the world turning, touching nearly every facet of modern life and comprising a global industry worth more than $60 billion doll

9h

Monthly wages are an important step towards economic development

Across developing economies, most workers and agricultural producers are paid are paid on a daily basis. This has a negative impact on their ability to generate savings for large expenses. Researchers from UZH show dairy farmers and agricultural workers prefer to be paid once at the end of the month, rather then daily, because monthly payments schemes are an efficient tool to increase saving.

9h

These strange fossils are closely related to sea urchins

Just a few centimeters long, these animals thrived in the ocean roughly half a billion years ago. Because of their odd morphology, scientists have long struggled to find their branch on the tree of life.

9h

Carbon, climate, and North America's oldest boreal trees

In an age of unprecedented high atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, the question of whether or not plants and trees can utilize excess carbon through photosynthesis is one of paramount importance. Researchers have observed what has been called the CO2 fertilization effect, whereby plants' rates of photosynthesis increase in response to higher levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, although this is though

9h

People admit they trust news stories that contradict their views – for a price

When it comes to news, we believe what we want to believe – even though deep down we may know better.

9h

Study finds Muslim-majority countries lack, but hold surprising potential for, religious freedom

In his newest research, Daniel Philpott, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, examines conditions in 47 Muslim-majority countries and considers a question at the center of intense public debate: Is Islam hostile to religious freedom?

9h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er der issøjler i fuglebadet?

En læser undrer sig over pudsige isspyd i venners fuglebade og spørger Fagfolket om hjælp til at få forløst sin undren. Seniorklimatolog samt pensioneret DMI-meteorolog har set på sagerne.

9h

Ramp walking helps diagnose lameness in dogs

Gait analysis, pressure walkways, and angled walking are popular techniques used in human medicine. Their use has improved prosthetics, rehabilitation, medicine and more. But, while this research has a long history in human diagnostics, it is relatively new in veterinary medicine.

9h

Breaching the horizons: Universal spreading laws confirmed

The universal laws governing the dynamics of interacting quantum particles are yet to be fully revealed to the scientific community. A team of researchers at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems (PCS), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS in Daejeon, South Korea) have proposed to use an innovative toolbox that enables them to obtain simulation data of equivalent to 60 years

9h

Ramp walking helps diagnose lameness in dogs

Gait analysis, pressure walkways, and angled walking are popular techniques used in human medicine. Their use has improved prosthetics, rehabilitation, medicine and more. But, while this research has a long history in human diagnostics, it is relatively new in veterinary medicine.

9h

Kite-blown Antarctic explorers make most southerly Galileo positioning fix

A kite-blown science expedition to the interior of Antarctica has made the most southerly positioning fixes yet made with Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system.

9h

Dear Therapist: I Looked Through My Daughter’s Phone, and I Didn’t Like What I Saw

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, We recently moved to a new country and my daughter quickly made some friends who make me uncomfortable. Specifically, there is one boy who used spectacularly sexually explicit language with her in a text, whic

9h

Regioner juleshoppede medicin

Regionerne har indkøb betydeligt mere medicin i 2018’s sidste to måneder, end de sædvanligvis gør. Derfor ender medicinudgifter i 2018 præcis som forventet.

9h

Henrik Vilsner er ny ledende overlæge

Henrik Vilsner tiltrådte 1. februar som ny ledende overlæge på ortopædkirurgisk afdeling på Næstved, Slagelse og Ringsted sygehuse.

9h

Sygehus sparede brystundersøgelser væk

Baggrunden for de mangelfulde brystundersøgelse på Ringsted Sygehus var at spare lægetid og undersøgelsestid, skriver overlæge til styrelse.

9h

Google Releases Live Transcribe, Sound Amplifier to Help With Hearing

Whether you have serious hearing loss or a slight impairment, Google's new hearing assist applications may prove helpful if you have a phone that can run them. The post Google Releases Live …

9h

YouTube is trying to prevent angry mobs from abusing “dislike” button

Could the thumbs-down button disappear from YouTube entirely?

9h

9h

Revealing the path of a metallodrug in a breast cancer cell

Some types of cancer cannot be treated with classical chemotherapy. Scientists from Inserm, CNRS, Sorbonne University, PSL university, University Grenoble Alpes and ESRF, the European Synchrotron, are working on a metallorganic molecule as an antitumor drug. Their research has produced thorough insights into its mechanism in attacking cancer cells. This study is published in Angewandte Chemie.

9h

This Elon Musk interview reveals whether he prefers Nikola Tesla to Thomas Edison

In 2008, Elon Musk told an interviewer about his role models. His father had less of an influence than has been reported. Musk was a fan of both Edison and Tesla but preferred Edison. None Who was the greater genius — Thomas Edison or Nikola Tesla? As the founder of Tesla Motors, you'd expect Elon Musk to be on the side of Tesla, but you wouldn't be fully right. As he explains in a 2008 interview

9h

Bird bone streaming

A new website for viewing 3-D bird bones aims to make bird bones in museums more accessible for research and teaching.

9h

Bird bone streaming

A new website for viewing 3-D bird bones aims to make bird bones in museums more accessible for research and teaching.

9h

Report shows public authorities must take climate change risk seriously

The tragic recent events on the Darling River, and the political and policy furore around them, have again highlighted the severe financial and environmental consequences of mismanaging climate risks. The Murray-Darling Royal Commission demonstrates how closely boards of public sector corporate bodies can be scrutinised for their management of these risks.

9h

Radio frequency energy heats up interest in low-temperature nanocatalysts

Worldwide, the chemical industry uses catalysts—substances that facilitate chemical reactions—in about 90% of all chemical manufacturing processes as a means of optimizing energy use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The sheer scope of the catalysis sector suggests that any reductions in energy consumption for certain chemical processes could have substantial economic and environmental impact

9h

Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception — Ben-Gurion U.

'The experiments tested archerfish performance in visual-search tasks where a target was defined by color, size, orientation, or motion,' says Professor Ronen Segev, head of the BGU Neural Code Lab, and a member of the Department of Life Sciences and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience. 'We found, for the first time, that archerfish process these four features in much the same way humans identify a

9h

Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says

When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

9h

There really is value in having a primary care doctor

The first study to directly compare the quality and experience of outpatient care between adults with or without primary care finds that Americans with primary care received significantly more high-value healthcare. Those with primary care also reported better patient experience and overall healthcare access, compared to those who don’t have primary care. The United States health care system gene

9h

2018 Drug Approvals: A Closer Look

Let’s have a look at the recent new drug approvals. 2018 was quite a year, by the numbers. C&E News has a comprehensive roundup : 59 approvals (versus 46 in 2017, which was already a record by itself), and about two-thirds of those small molecules. There are some very interesting molecules in the list, and I always recommend that medicinal chemists sit down every so often and look over the struct

9h

Arctic scientists iced out by US–India radar mission

Arctic scientists iced out by US–India radar mission Arctic scientists iced out by US–India radar mission, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00278-8 Managers’ decision to focus their satellite on the Antarctic has upset some researchers who study ice around the northern pole.

9h

Choose your champion for this year’s ‘Dance Your Ph.D.’ contest!

Vote early (but not often) for the 2018 Audience Choice winner

9h

Sved i kontrolrummet på Aarhus Universitet: Lever vores satellit?

I december sendte Aarhus Universitet en cubesat til rumstationen, men siden den blev sluppet løs, har der ikke været skyggen af kontakt.

9h

Butterflies thrive in grasslands surrounded by forest

For pollinating butterflies, it is more important to be close to forests than to agricultural fields, according to a study of 32,000 butterflies by researchers at Linköping University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala. The results provide important knowledge about how to plan and manage the landscape to ensure the survival of butterflies.

9h

Disasters and disagreements: Climate change collides with Trump's border wall

Recent news surrounding climate change and its consequences has been grim lately.

9h

Virtually reality: Future factories run by digital twins

A*STAR has built a testbed for digital twins, the virtual counterparts of real manufacturing equipment. These factory innovations could help companies save huge amounts of time and money by predicting and adjusting for their partner machine's condition on the go.

9h

Investigating glare: How bright is your office?

If you work in an office building in Australia, particularly one rated 'green' for its energy efficiency, QUT researchers want your help.

9h

Invisible tags: Physicists write, read and erase using light

A team of physicists headed by Professor Sebastian Reineke of TU Dresden has developed a new method of storing information in fully transparent plastic foils. Their innovative idea has been published in Science Advances.

9h

Butterflies thrive in grasslands surrounded by forest

For pollinating butterflies, it is more important to be close to forests than to agricultural fields, according to a study of 32,000 butterflies by researchers at Linköping University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala. The results provide important knowledge about how to plan and manage the landscape to ensure the survival of butterflies.

9h

'Oumuamua could be the debris cloud of a disintegrated interstellar comet

Since it was first detected hurling through our solar system, the interstellar object known as 'Oumuamua has been a source of immense scientific interest. Aside from being extrasolar in origin, the fact that it has managed to defy classification time and again has led to some pretty interesting theories. While some have suggested that it is a comet or an asteroid, there has even been the suggestio

9h

Revealing the path of a metallodrug in a breast cancer cell

Some types of cancer cannot be treated with classical chemotherapy. Scientists from Inserm, CNRS, Sorbonne University, PSL university, University Grenoble Alpes and ESRF, the European Synchrotron, are working on a metallorganic molecule as an antitumor drug. Their research has produced thorough insights into its mechanism in attacking cancer cells. This study is published in Angewandte Chemie.

9h

Star Wars News: Why Is It Oh So Quiet?

Probably because the next 'Star Wars' movie is still 10 months away … but we've gleaned a few morsels.

9h

Android Apps for the Deaf: Live Transcribe and Sound Amplifier

Two new assistive apps coming to Android provide audio boosting and near-real-time text-to-speech translation to the deaf and hard of hearing.

9h

Statlig information en blandprodukt redan på sextiotalet

Fredrik Norén, Umeå universitet, har skrivit en avhandling om 1960- och 1970-talets motsvarighet till nudging: samhällsinformationen. Flera av periodens debatter, utredningar och kampanjer kom att forma samhällsinformationens utveckling – ända in i vår tid. Norén belyser bland detta genom att analysera Socialstyrelsens hälsokampanjer och omläggningen till högertrafik. – Min avhandling fokuserar p

9h

9h

Scientists exploit gel polymer electrolyte for high performance magnesium batteries

A research team led by Prof. CUI Guanglei from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences exploited a novel rigid-fexible coupling gel polymer electrolyte (PTB@GF-GPE) that coupled with significantly improved overall performance.

9h

Research shows most online consumer contracts are incomprehensible, but still legally binding

Most of us will have entered into consumer contracts with large companies and ticked a box to confirm we understand the terms and conditions – without bothering to read the fine print.

10h

Religion affects consumer choices on specialty foods

People with strong religious beliefs are more likely to buy fat-free, sugar-free or gluten-free foods than natural or organic foods, according to new research that could influence the marketing of those specialty food products.

10h

Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says

When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

10h

2019 Neo Update

Apical dendrites automatically reconstructed from a test cortical MICrONS dataset / Seung Lab, Princeton University If you play Eyewire, you’ve probably heard us talk about Neo for what seems like years and years and years. It’s a long time coming here, too! Yet none have been idle. Reconstructions in Neo will cover all 6 layers of cortex (gray matter) and a bit of axonal fibers (white matter) /

10h

Flares hint at another way black holes eat and grow

Astrophysicists have discovered a new class of flares associated with supermassive black holes. Scientists have believed that supermassive black holes—the type at the centers of galaxies millions or billions times the mass of the sun—eat and grow in only two ways: either by ripping apart a star in a Tidal Disruption Event (TDE) or by nearly continuous accretion from a disk of material as scientis

10h

#56 Fosterrettigheder

Stetoskopet fortæller den embryologiske skabelsesberetning fra en mikroskopisk befrugtet ægcelle til de tidligste fosteranlæg og undersøger, hvorfor abortgrænsen er sat, som den er.

10h

Warby Parker’s latest tool lets shoppers try on glasses using augmented reality

It superimposes computer-generated images onto real-world imagery.

10h

First discovered fossil feather did not belong to iconic bird Archaeopteryx

A 150-year-old fossil feather mystery has been solved by an international research team including Dr. Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong. Dr. …

10h

New insights into plant cell organelle and molecule movement

Michigan State University scientists have identified a new protein, called TGNap1 (TGN associated protein 1), that they found at a poorly understood plant cell organelle, the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN).

10h

How plants cope with iron deficiency

Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, animals and also for humans. It is needed for a diverse range of metabolic processes, for example, for photosynthesis and for respiration. If a person is lacking iron, this leads to a major negative impact on health. Millions of people around the globe suffer from iron deficiency each year. Iron enters the human food chain through plants, either directly o

10h

10h

How drought affects freshwater fish

When we think of a river, dark, cool rushing water —full of energy and life —comes to mind. Yet, in the face of climate change we are frequently witnessing almost entirely dry river beds with barely enough water to support fish and other aquatic life.

10h

Glass fibers and light offer new control over atomic fluorescence

Electrons inside an atom whip around the nucleus like satellites around the Earth, occupying orbits determined by quantum physics. Light can boost an electron to a different, more energetic orbit, but that high doesn't last forever. At some point the excited electron will relax back to its original orbit, causing the atom to spontaneously emit light that scientists call fluorescence.

10h

New insights into plant cell organelle and molecule movement

Michigan State University scientists have identified a new protein, called TGNap1 (TGN associated protein 1), that they found at a poorly understood plant cell organelle, the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN).

10h

How plants cope with iron deficiency

Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, animals and also for humans. It is needed for a diverse range of metabolic processes, for example, for photosynthesis and for respiration. If a person is lacking iron, this leads to a major negative impact on health. Millions of people around the globe suffer from iron deficiency each year. Iron enters the human food chain through plants, either directly o

10h

New study confirms what scientists already know: Basic research is under-valued

In our fast-paced modern world there is an expectation that scientific breakthroughs occur quickly and efficiently.

10h

10h

10h

This is how AI bias really happens—and why it’s so hard to fix

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

10h

Spatial scientists use satellite technology to detect and—eventually—prevent genocide

After graduating from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1997, Andrew Marx worked with NATO, using satellite technology to help prevent genocide in Serbia. He was 22 years old. It was his first job.

10h

No race or gender bias seen in initial NIH grant reviews, according to study

Examinations of National Institutes of Health grants in the last 15 years have shown that white scientists are more likely to be successful in securing funding from the agency than their black peers.

10h

Study evaluates China's progress in establishing accounting measures to reinforce its Paris pledge

The latest round of United Nations climate talks in Poland in December sought to get the world on track to meet the 2015 Paris Agreement's long-term goal of keeping global warming well below two degrees Celsius. Toward that end, negotiators from the agreement's nearly 200 signatory nations were asked to report on their country or region's progress toward fulfilling its Paris pledge, or Nationally

10h

ESA plans mission to smallest asteroid ever visited

ESA's planet-defending Hera mission will set a new record in space. The asteroid investigator will not only be the first spacecraft to explore a binary asteroid system – the Didymos pair – but the smaller of these two worldlets, comparable in size to Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza, will become the smallest asteroid ever visited.

10h

New clues discovered to lung transplant rejection

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered clues to a particularly deadly form of rejection that can follow lung transplantation. Called antibody-mediated rejection, the condition remains impervious to available treatments and difficult to diagnose. The researchers have identified, in mice, a process that may prevent the condition and lead to possible ther

10h

10h

Black Saturday bushfires: Have we fixed a flawed system?

The Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria, which claimed 173 lives and destroyed 2,133 homes, were the worst bushfire disaster in Australian history. After the devastation, a Royal Commission was called to investigate how the fires occurred and caused so much destruction.

10h

Explaining a universe composed of matter

The universe consists of a massive imbalance between matter and antimatter. Antimatter and matter are actually the same, but have opposite charges, but there's hardly any antimatter in the observable universe, including the stars and other galaxies. In theory, there should be large amounts of antimatter, but the observable universe is mostly matter

10h

Supercomputing helps study two-dimensional materials

Materials scientists study and understand the physics of interacting atoms in solids to find ways to improve materials we use in every aspect of daily life. The frontier of this research lies not in trial and error, though; to better understand and improve materials today, researchers must be able to study material properties at the atomic scale and under extreme conditions. As a result, researche

10h

Speltid avgörande när unga lär sig engelska framför skärmen

Drygt 1000 ungdomar i åldern 15-15 har deltagit i studien om språkinlärning och kommersiella datorspel. Pia Sundqvist, forskare vid Karlstads universitet och Universitetet i Oslo är något förvånad över resultaten. Speltid viktigare än själva spelet – Tidigare småskaliga studier, inte bara i Skandinavien, visar att de som spelar vanliga, kommersiella dataspel kan fler engelska ord än ungdomar som

10h

Researchers determine the performance of multi-dimensional bits

What kinds of computers would be conceivable if physics worked differently? Quantum physicists Marius Krumm from the University of Vienna and Markus Müller from the Viennese Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW) are speculating about theoretical properties of future computers to offer interesting insights into quantum computing.

10h

Simulating meteorite impacts in the lab

A U.S.-German research team has simulated meteorite impacts in the lab and followed the resulting structural changes in two feldspar minerals with X-rays as they happened. The results of the experiments at DESY and at Argonne National Laboratory in the US show that structural changes can occur at very different pressures, depending on the compression rate. The findings, published in the 1 February

10h

Polymer power potential

The mantra 'reduce, reuse, recycle' is increasingly pertinent. Every year, vast amounts of energy that could be captured and reused are lost through waste heat. Now, A*STAR scientists have demonstrated, through theoretical calculations, that it may be possible to fabricate thermoelectric organic polymers that can convert heat into electrical energy with high efficiency.

10h

Wrinkles take the heat

Single atomic sheets of black phosphorus are attracting attention for their potential in future electronics applications. A*STAR researchers have now completed experiments at the nanoscale to unlock the secret of this material's remarkable directional heat transport properties.

10h

Ceramic holds promise for greener optical devices

A lead-free ceramic that could be used in applications ranging from optical sensors and switches to creams for protecting against ultraviolet (UV) light has been developed by A*STAR researchers.

10h

Online trolling used to be funny, but now the term refers to something far more sinister

It seems like internet trolling happens everywhere online these days – and it's showing no signs of slowing down.

10h

Crystal clear solvent filtration

Covalent organic materials with well-ordered porous microstructures could provide the membranes needed for technology to meet increasingly stringent environmental controls and be cost effective to produce.

10h

Marine sensor gets to grips with salt

A flexible, lightweight and robust salinity sensor that can be attached to aquatic animals for long-term monitoring of their habitat has been developed by a multidisciplinary team at KAUST. The team created a sensor that accurately records salinity even after long-term submersion. The sensor can form the basis of a marine animal monitoring device that records multiple underwater habitat parameters

10h

10h

An end to gridlock? How AI could get London moving again

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

UN Study: China, US, Japan Lead World AI Development

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

IBM and McCormick rely on AI to cook up tastier foods

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

Powering Implantable Devices

As our electronic and computer technology advances, the technology of implantable medical devices is opening up. Things like pacemakers are already old established tech, but ambitious researchers are looking at much more than just pacing the heart. There is potential for brain-machine interfaces, spinal cord stimulators, cochlear implants, and even replacement organs. One major technological limi

10h

Rising Temperatures Could Melt Most Himalayan Glaciers by 2100

If current climate change trends continue, the Himalayas could heat up by 8 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century, researchers said.

10h

There’s More at Stake Than Ralph Northam’s Career

A little more than a year ago, the Democrat Ralph Northam handily defeated his Republican rival, Ed Gillespie, in Virginia’s gubernatorial election. After a brutal campaign in which Gillespie, a longtime Washington lobbyist once seen as a moderate, sought victory by echoing the tone and tactics of President Donald Trump, Northam said the result was a repudiation of bigotry. “Virginia has told us

10h

Facebook: Where Friendships Go to Never Quite Die

In the world of Harry Potter, drinking the blood of a unicorn will keep anyone alive, “even if you are an inch from death.” But survival comes at a terrible price: “You will have but a half-life, a cursed life, from the moment the blood touches your lips,” the centaur Firenze explains to Harry. Facebook is unicorn blood, and it has touched the metaphorical lips of billions of relationships. Of la

10h

Why Ford Hired a Furniture Maker as CEO

Todd St. John If, as Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “an institution is the lengthened shadow of one man,” the story of the American economy can be told by the types of people who run its corporations. The early days of mass production belonged to mechanically minded men such as Henry Ford. The creation of mass markets called forth salesmen such as Thomas Watson Sr., whose faithful troops sang “Ever on

10h

Världscancerdagen 2019

Cancerfonden tror på en fördubbling av cancerfallen de närmaste tjugofem åren. Därför är det viktigt att fortsätta att forska på hur cancer uppkommer, hur vi kan diagnosticera den tidigt och hur vi kan behandla den på ett framgångsrikt sätt. Vi vill uppmärksamma all den cancerforskning som bedrivs vid Lunds universitet, Malmö universitet och Region Skåne.

10h

Fasting boosts metabolism and fights aging

A new study measures metabolic changes associated with fasting. The authors conclude that caloric restriction enhances metabolism and could slow aging.

10h

Warby Parker's AR App Lets You Try on Glasses Using Your iPhone

Warby Parker’s new AR app for trying on its eyewear is another example of how companies are exploiting face-mapping tech to help you buy their stuff.

10h

The squirrels that are secretly bright pink

Accidental ultraviolet exposure reveals some North American species are candy coloured. Tanya Loos reports.

10h

The oldest jewellery in Europe

Excavations in Russia add details to the lives of mysterious Denisovans.

10h

Image of the Day: Gut Reaction

Immune cells in the mouse gut help recognize damaging compounds and prompt intestinal stem cells to repair DNA.

11h

Game Brain Science: How Your Super Bowl Team Plays Can Sway What You Eat

For serious fans, it's not just bragging rights on the line: Waistlines are too. Research suggests whether our team wins or loses can alter how we enjoy food, and how much we eat, even the day after. (Image credit: Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr)

11h

People with a well developed cortex find quinine less bitter, study finds

Australian research holds promise for new approaches to eating disorders. Andrew Masterson reports.

11h

Climate change: Blue planet will get even bluer as Earth warms

The oceans will become more blue thanks to rising temperatures in coming decades, say scientists.

11h

11h

The ‘miracle mineral’ the world needs

submitted by /u/Ebadd [link] [comments]

11h

Bitcoin for the biological literature

Bitcoin for the biological literature Bitcoin for the biological literature, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00447-9 Scientific publishing is increasingly adopting the technology underlying cryptocurrencies.

11h

The Emotional Toll of Grad School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

15 Moments That Defined Facebook's First 15 Years

A lot has changed since Mark Zuckerberg launched TheFacebook in 2004. Here are some of the milestones that mattered most.

11h

AG Nominee William Barr Is No Friend of Telecom Competition

A likely shoo-in to be the next attorney general, William Barr spent much of his career helping phone companies reassemble the old Bell System monopoly.

11h

The World Might Actually Run Out of People

The United Nations predicts that the global population will soon explode. In *Empty Planet*, John Ibbitson and Darrell Bricker argue they're dead wrong.

11h

15 Years of Facebook in 4 Charts

The social network is growing fastest in Asia, is insanely profitable, makes most of its money from mobile ads, and has rewarded investors richly.

11h

Ny rapport varnar för smälta glaciärer i Himalaya

En global uppvärmning på 1,5 grader kan leda till att en tredjedel av Himalayas glaciärer smälter, vilket kan innebära svåra konsekvenser för en tredjedel av jordens befolkning. Det är en av slutsatserna i en ny rapport om bergsregionen som kallas den tredje polen och som drabbats hårt av klimatförändringarna.

11h

Indian government to boost stipend for early-career scientists

Indian government to boost stipend for early-career scientists Indian government to boost stipend for early-career scientists, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00477-3 But researchers say the 25% increase is not enough to meet living costs.

12h

12h

12h

The Emotional Toll of Grad School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Tiny Organs in Orbit

Cultured human lung, heart and kidney cells flying aboard the International Space Station could reveal much about aging and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Comet-Blasted Star May Be a Rerun of the Solar System's Birth

Far beyond our sun, astronomers have discovered comets bombarding a young solar-type star—and possibly its inner planets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Comet-Blasted Star May Be a Rerun of the Solar System's Birth

Far beyond our sun, astronomers have discovered comets bombarding a young solar-type star—and possibly its inner planets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Engineers harvest heart's energy to power life-saving devices

The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge life-saving devices, according to new research from Dartmouth.Using a dime-sized invention developed by engineers at Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering, the heart's energy can be harnessed to power implantable devices, according to the study. Creating an energy source within the body could save millions of people who rely on pacemakers a

12h

My son’s life depends on this cystic fibrosis drug. And ministers stand in the way | Christina Walker

The government could make the drug Orkambi affordable for the NHS. Until then, people will suffer unduly Luis was three weeks old when we found out he had cystic fibrosis . Neither my husband nor I had heard of the condition before, but we knew very quickly our lives were about to change for ever from that moment. Of all of the stats thrown at you when you hear the diagnosis, one sticks out more t

12h

Hjælp os: Hvad sker der i IDA?

Ingeniørforeningen holder repræsentantskabsvalg i foråret. Fortæl os, hvad du gerne vil vide, før du sætter dit kryds. Så spørger vi dem, du kan stemme på.

12h

Super-Earth Smackdowns May Explain Diverse Worlds

Crashing a giant space rock into a young planet can strip off some or all of its atmosphere, creating a wealth of different types of worlds.

12h

Why Alexander the Great May Have Been Declared Dead Prematurely (It's Pretty Gruesome)

A rare neurological condition may have led to the mistaken declaration of death of the king of Macedonia.

12h

This 210-Million-Year-Old 'Dragon' Ate Bones (and Its Own Teeth) for Breakfast

The 210-million-year-old T. rex relative known as Smok wawelski had a habit of gnashing up animal bones (and swallowing its own teeth), a new study of poop fossil reveals.

12h

In Photos: Mysterious Stone Structures in the Sahara

Photos of the amazing stone structures, dating back thousands of years, that were discovered in the Western Sahara.

12h

Hundreds of Mysterious Stone Structures Discovered in Western Sahara

The structures seem to come in all sizes and shapes, and archaeologists aren't sure what many of then were used for or when they were created.

12h

Obesity-Related Cancer Rates Are Rising Among Millennials

The increases may be related to the obesity epidemic.

12h

Policing Big Pharma’s Influence Over Doctors’ Treatment Guidelines

It's no secret that pharmaceutical companies pay doctors to hype their products to others. But even when physicians work to shun such payments, they may unwittingly be influenced simply by following clinical practice guidelines written by colleagues with financial conflicts of interest.

12h

Time parents spend with children key to academic success

The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce.

12h

Better data (and common sense) can end police brutality

The federal government doesn't collect information about police killings in any systemic way. What this means is that we can't actually tell you, as a hard fact, how many people were killed last year. McKesson and his fellow Black Lives Matter organizers have created Mapping Police Violence to create a single-stop database with the most comprehensive data about police killings. When it comes to f

12h

Four steps to food security for swelling cities

Four steps to food security for swelling cities Four steps to food security for swelling cities, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00407-3 Combine pockets of rural land, reduce food waste, improve farming and encourage urbanites to eat less meat, urge Baojing Gu and colleagues.

12h

This is how AI bias really happens—and why it’s so hard to fix

Bias can creep in at many stages of the deep-learning process, and the standard practices in computer science aren’t designed to detect it.

12h

Democrats Overplay Their Hand on Abortion

In New York and Virginia, Democratic state governments are working to loosen restrictions on abortion late in pregnancy, far past the stages at which fetuses can survive after birth. The controversy over this expansion of abortion rights presents an opportunity for the anti-abortion movement to make the point that every abortion—no matter when it is performed—ends a human life. Already, the Democ

12h

Biden’s Anguished Search for a Path to Victory

Joe Biden reliably blows through every public and private deadline for making a decision about running for president. But he’s giving everyone he’s seen in recent weeks the feeling that he’s very close to saying yes. The urgency of Biden’s planning has stepped up since the beginning of the year and serves as a window into the complexity of this moment in American politics, with Donald Trump halfw

12h

Ralph Northam’s Mistake

On Friday, faced with a photo on his medical-school yearbook page featuring one person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan robe, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam apologized. By Saturday, he said he’d never taken the photo, never seen the yearbook, and didn’t even go to the party where it was taken, adding that a mix-up in the yearbook’s production must have created an error. Over the s

12h

How to Soak the Rich

With the 2020 primary already under way and the House back in Democratic hands, the left has proposed a number of spending programs aimed at ending poverty and boosting the middle class: a jobs guarantee , a Green New Deal , a massive expansion of the earned-income tax credit , Medicare for All , a universal child allowance , and on and on. Democrats do not want to talk about how to pay for each

12h

These Preachers Perform Mass Exorcisms—And Live-Stream Them

TISSISAT, Ethiopia—“What do you expect from me?” a monk roared into a microphone onstage. Young men shuffled toward him, kneeling in rows. One scratched his arms frantically, his head rolling backwards and forwards to the sound of drumming. Women wrapped in white shawls wailed and gnashed their teeth. “What do you want?” the monk asked again, his voice rising over the screams and chants of the au

12h

Columbus' ankomst til Amerika fik verdens temperatur til at falde

Udryddelsen af 55 mio. indianere og andre naturfolk i kølvandet på Christoffer Columbus' ankomst til Amerika bidrog i udbredt grad til 'den lille istid'.

12h

Techtopia #90: Tordenvejr er big data

Hvad har supermarkeder, formel 1-racere og kvinder med langt hår til fælles? Vejret har en afgørende indflydelse på deres liv. Og hvis de får bedre vejrudsigter, så klarer de også dagens udfordringer bedre.

12h

2,7 milliarder er ikke nok: It-system til ejendomsvurderinger bliver dyrere

I et hidtil fortroligt aktstykke beder skatteministeren om 81,7 millioner kroner mere til milliardprojektet.

12h

Time parents spend with children key to academic success

The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach.

12h

Carlo Croce loses a round in legal bid to be reinstated as dep’t chair

Carlo Croce, a professor at The Ohio State University in Columbus who has faced multiple investigations into misconduct allegations, has been denied a temporary restraining order that he sought in order to be reinstated as chair of his department. Croce was forced to step down from the post last year. Magistrate Jennifer D. Hunt, of … Continue reading Carlo Croce loses a round in legal bid to be r

12h

13h

‘The Human Element’ makes the impacts of climate change feel real

Photographer James Balog puts a human face on the impacts of climate change in the documentary The Human Element.

13h

Jack Dorsey: Twitter Mulling Short Window to Edit Tweets

Twitter is still considering adding an edit button, according to co-founder Jack Dorsey. In an interview with Joe Rogan, Dorsey addressed the possibility of a short window during which users …

13h

WhatsApp can be locked with TouchID or FaceID to protect private conversations

An important update has made its way into WhatsApp Messenger for iOS. Users are now able to restrict access to the app as a means of protecting private conversations with the help of FaceID …

13h

Undervurderer energiforbruget: Intelligente bygninger er ikke kloge nok

PLUS. Moderne energirigtige bygninger er spækket med sensorer, men smarte bygninger har stort set altid højere energiforbrug end beregnet.

13h

Brazil dam collapse: The crucial questions

The full story of the Brumadinho dam disaster could take many months to emerge, the BBC's David Shukman says.

13h

Nissan cancels investment plan for UK plant

Japanese car manufacturer Nissan announced Sunday it was cancelling plans to build its X-Trail SUV at its plant in northeast England despite Brexit assurances from the government.

13h

Engineered microbial biofuel production and recovery under supercritical carbon dioxide

Engineered microbial biofuel production and recovery under supercritical carbon dioxide Engineered microbial biofuel production and recovery under supercritical carbon dioxide, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08486-6 End-product toxicity, culture contamination, and energy efficient product recovery are long-standing issues in bioprocessing. Here, the authors address the

13h

Immune modulation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells by melittin nanoparticles suppresses liver metastasis

Immune modulation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells by melittin nanoparticles suppresses liver metastasis Immune modulation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells by melittin nanoparticles suppresses liver metastasis, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08538-x Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are known to promote immune tolerance in liver. Here, the authors target the

13h

Higher energy and safer sodium ion batteries via an electrochemically made disordered Na3V2(PO4)2F3 material

Higher energy and safer sodium ion batteries via an electrochemically made disordered Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 material Higher energy and safer sodium ion batteries via an electrochemically made disordered Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 material, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08359-y Na3V2(PO4)2F3 is a promising cathode material for Na-ion batteries, although its third sodium i

13h

The CENP-A centromere targeting domain facilitates H4K20 monomethylation in the nucleosome by structural polymorphism

The CENP-A centromere targeting domain facilitates H4K20 monomethylation in the nucleosome by structural polymorphism The CENP-A centromere targeting domain facilitates H4K20 monomethylation in the nucleosome by structural polymorphism, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08314-x Kinetochore function depends on H4K20 monomethylation in centromeric nucleosomes but the underl

13h

SMARCA4 loss is synthetic lethal with CDK4/6 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer

SMARCA4 loss is synthetic lethal with CDK4/6 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer SMARCA4 loss is synthetic lethal with CDK4/6 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08380-1 Non-small cell lung cancers with inactivating SMARCA4 mutations are currently undruggable. Here, the authors show that the absence of SMARCA4/2 reduces chromat

13h

The meiotic TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN complex tethers telomeres to the nuclear envelope

The meiotic TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN complex tethers telomeres to the nuclear envelope The meiotic TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN complex tethers telomeres to the nuclear envelope, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08437-1 The TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN complex mediates the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Here the authors present the crystal structures of the human TERB1-TERB2 and TE

13h

Large orbital polarization in nickelate-cuprate heterostructures by dimensional control of oxygen coordination

Large orbital polarization in nickelate-cuprate heterostructures by dimensional control of oxygen coordination Large orbital polarization in nickelate-cuprate heterostructures by dimensional control of oxygen coordination, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08472-y In correlated materials, physical properties depend on orbital occupancy and polarization. Here, a way to con

13h

Topological non-Hermitian origin of surface Maxwell waves

Topological non-Hermitian origin of surface Maxwell waves Topological non-Hermitian origin of surface Maxwell waves, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08397-6 Electromagnetic surface waves, derived from Maxwell theory, underpin many optical effects and applications. Here, Bliokh et al. show that surface waves at interfaces between isotropic media have a topological origin

13h

MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

Floating seismometers dubbed MERMAIDs — Mobile Earthquake Recording in Marine Areas by Independent Divers — reveal that Galápagos volcanoes are fed by a mantle plume reaching 1,900 km deep. By letting their nine MERMAIDs float freely for two years, an international team of researchers created an artificial network of oceanic seismometers that could fill in one of the blank areas on the global ge

13h

Higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death among African Americans may be associated with income and education disparities

African Americans have a much higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death than whites, especially among women. The lifetime risk was double overall and three times higher in African American women compared to white women. Disparities in income and education, as well as hypertension, diabetes, and other risk factors, accounted for much of the difference in risk.

13h

The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures

In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. Here, cultures that originated in Mesopotamia interacted with local hunter-gatherers, Anatolian farmers, and steppe populations from just north of the mountain ranges. Here, pastoralism was developed and technologies such as the wheeled wagon and advanced metal weapons were spread to neighbouring cultures. A

13h

Physicists uncover the topological origin of surface electromagnetic waves

In work that provides insights for several areas of wave physics — Maxwell electromagnetism, topological quantum states, and plasmonics/metamaterials — scientists showed that the well-known surface electromagnetic waves at interfaces between homogeneous isotropic media, obtained within classical Maxwell's electromagnetism, also have a purely topological origin, similar to quantum topological sta

13h

First discovered fossil feather did not belong to iconic bird Archaeopteryx

A 150-year-old fossil feather mystery has been solved by an international research team including Dr. Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong. Dr. Pittman and his colleagues applied a novel imaging technique, laser-stimulated fluorescence, revealing the missing quill of the first fossil feather ever discovered, dethroning an icon in the process.

13h

Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century

Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems.

13h

13h

13h

Ligand-induced conformational switch in an artificial bidomain protein scaffold

Ligand-induced conformational switch in an artificial bidomain protein scaffold Ligand-induced conformational switch in an artificial bidomain protein scaffold, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37256-5 Ligand-induced conformational switch in an artificial bidomain protein scaffold

13h

Combining attentional bias modification with dorsolateral prefrontal rTMS does not attenuate maladaptive attentional processing

Combining attentional bias modification with dorsolateral prefrontal rTMS does not attenuate maladaptive attentional processing Combining attentional bias modification with dorsolateral prefrontal rTMS does not attenuate maladaptive attentional processing, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37308-w Combining attentional bias modification with dorsolateral prefrontal rTMS d

13h

Supplementation with rumen-protected proteins induces resistance to Haemonchus contortus in goats

Supplementation with rumen-protected proteins induces resistance to Haemonchus contortus in goats Supplementation with rumen-protected proteins induces resistance to Haemonchus contortus in goats, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37800-3 Supplementation with rumen-protected proteins induces resistance to Haemonchus contortus in goats

13h

Hydrogen gas distribution in organs after inhalation: Real-time monitoring of tissue hydrogen concentration in rat

Hydrogen gas distribution in organs after inhalation: Real-time monitoring of tissue hydrogen concentration in rat Hydrogen gas distribution in organs after inhalation: Real-time monitoring of tissue hydrogen concentration in rat, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38180-4 Hydrogen gas distribution in organs after inhalation: Real-time monitoring of tissue hydrogen concent

13h

Evolution and functional divergence of MADS-box genes in Pyrus

Evolution and functional divergence of MADS-box genes in Pyrus Evolution and functional divergence of MADS-box genes in Pyrus , Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37897-6 Evolution and functional divergence of MADS-box genes in Pyrus

13h

Original association of ion transporters mediates the ECM-induced breast cancer cell survival: Kv10.1-Orai1-SPCA2 partnership

Original association of ion transporters mediates the ECM-induced breast cancer cell survival: Kv10.1-Orai1-SPCA2 partnership Original association of ion transporters mediates the ECM-induced breast cancer cell survival: Kv10.1-Orai1-SPCA2 partnership, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37602-7 Original association of ion transporters mediates the ECM-induced breast cancer

13h

Combining MALDI-TOF and genomics in the study of methicillin resistant and multidrug resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in New Zealand

Combining MALDI-TOF and genomics in the study of methicillin resistant and multidrug resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in New Zealand Combining MALDI-TOF and genomics in the study of methicillin resistant and multidrug resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in New Zealand, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37503-9 Combining MALDI-TOF and genomics in the study o

13h

Activity induced delocalization and freezing in self-propelled systems

Activity induced delocalization and freezing in self-propelled systems Activity induced delocalization and freezing in self-propelled systems, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36824-z Activity induced delocalization and freezing in self-propelled systems

13h

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed

Physicians have been taught to look for signs of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation to help them diagnose depression. But anger as a depression symptom is less often noticed or addressed. (Image credit: Ariel Davis for NPR)

13h

Trail of feathers to the Neanderthal mind

Trail of feathers to the Neanderthal mind Trail of feathers to the Neanderthal mind, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00445-x Bernard Wood explores a claim that our nearest cousins were our cognitive equals — and that birds had a part to play in that.

13h

EU-dom kan tvinge Danmark til at begrænse nitratindhold i grundvandet

PLUS. EU-Kommissionen er allerede kommet efter Tyskland for at undlade at begrænse nitratindhold i grundvand, selvom Danmark forsøgte påvirke sagen til fordel for Tyskland.

13h

Daily briefing: Evolution from soup to nuts

Daily briefing: Evolution from soup to nuts Daily briefing: Evolution from soup to nuts, Published online: 01 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00454-w An ambitious experiment to illuminate the full process of evolution by natural selection in a wild population, a 3D printer creates an entire object at once and how to master editing an anthology.

14h

MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

Seismologists use waves generated by earthquakes to scan the interior of our planet, much like doctors image their patients using medical tomography. Earth imaging has helped us track down the deep origins of volcanic islands such as Hawaii, and identify the source zones of deep earthquakes.

14h

Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century: study

Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems.

14h

Amazon Prime Video's X-Ray feature finally comes to Apple TV

Believe it or not, Amazon Prime Video's X-Ray feature hasn't been available on Apple TV. While it hasn't been a huge inconvenience, it's a conspicuous omission …

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

Are medical errors really the third most common cause of death in the U.S.? (2019 edition)

The claim that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the US always rested on very shaky evidence; yet it's become commonly wisdom that is cited as though everyone accepts it. But if estimates of 250,000 to 400,000 deaths due to medical error are way too high, what is the real number? A study published last month suggests that it's almost certainly a lot lower and has been modestly

14h

Italiensk opfinder: Nu er jeg klar til at levere varmeanlæg baseret på kold fusion

Er produkter baseret low energy nuclear reactions svaret på verdens energiproblemer, eller er det fup? Vi blev ikke meget klogere efter en produktpræsentation, men Andrea Rossi erklærer sig klar til nu at sælge billig varme som en tjenesteydelse.

14h

Hulu teams with world record Instagram egg on a mental health ad

The world-record Instagram egg, now with 10 million followers and liked over 52 million times, has used its fame for good. After teaming with Hulu, it appeared in a Super Bowl ad promoting …

15h

The future of male contraceptives? A layered cocktail.

Scientist propose a layered cocktail as a future male contraceptive. Chemical layers block the flow of sperm and can be dissolved with near-infrared light. Tiny umbrella not included. None Layered drinks are definitely a thing. Whether it's a Paradise Cocktail for grownups or a California Adventure Infinity Fizz for kids, these colorful comestibles have been around a while — they first appeared a

15h

Lung tumours swell when prodded by airway microbes

Lung tumours swell when prodded by airway microbes Lung tumours swell when prodded by airway microbes, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00357-w Respiratory-tract bacteria stimulate immune cells, which encourages tumour cells to multiply.

15h

Simply shining light on dinosaur metal compound kills cancer cells

A new compound based on Iridium, a rare metal which landed in the Gulf of Mexico 66 M years ago, hooked onto albumin, a protein in blood, can attack the nucleus of cancerous cells when switched on by light, University of Warwick researchers have found.

16h

Fighting 'all you can eat' waste and waistlines

The UN wants to cut down on food waste amid rising concerns about obesity. Here's how one hotel is helping out.

16h

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony

The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs), is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found.

16h

Graphene biosensor could provide early lung cancer diagnosis, research shows

The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis.

16h

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony

The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs), is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found.

16h

Simply shining light on dinosaur metal compound kills cancer cells

A new compound based on Iridium, a rare metal which landed in the Gulf of Mexico 66 M years ago, hooked onto albumin, a protein in blood, can attack the nucleus of cancerous cells when switched on by light, University of Warwick researchers have found.

16h

Operator of Tonga's internet cable can't rule out sabotage

A director at the operator of Tonga's undersea internet cable said Monday he can't rule out sabotage as the reason the cable broke and plunged the Pacific nation into virtual darkness for almost two weeks.

16h

Nissan poised to propose Ghosn replacement on board: report

The board of Japanese car giant Nissan is poised to suggest a replacement for jailed former chairman Carlos Ghosn at a meeting in Tokyo on Tuesday, according to local media.

16h

Revealing the path of a metallodrug in a breast cancer cell

Some types of cancer cannot be treated with classical chemotherapy. Scientists from Inserm, CNRS, Sorbonne University, PSL university, University Grenoble Alpes and ESRF, the European Synchrotron, are working on a metallorganic molecule as an antitumor drug. Their research has given thorough insights into its mechanism in attacking cancer cells. This study is published in Angewandte Chemie.

16h

16h

17h

Japans regering ”hacker” befolkningen

200 millioner digitale dimser skal undersøges for usikre brugernavne og kodeord.

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

18h

Graphene biosensor could provide early lung cancer diagnosis, research shows

The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis.

18h

Ohio State-led study links protein, clusterin, to cardiac and metabolic diseases

During a study spanning nearly a decade, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Cancer Center have linked the protein clusterin — for the first time — to many different facets of cardiometabolic syndrome risk through its actions in the liver. Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) is a cluster of conditions occurring toget

18h

Rutgers study finds rise in overdoses from opioids in diarrhea drug

A Rutgers study has uncovered a new threat in the opiate epidemic: overdoses of loperamide, an over-the-counter diarrhea medication, have been steadily increasing in number and severity nationwide over five years.

18h

Obesity-related cancers rising in young adults in the US

A new study finds rates are increasing for six of 12 cancers related to obesity in younger adults in the United States, with steeper increases in progressively younger ages and successively younger generations.

18h

Infertility treatment linked with slightly higher risk of pregnancy complications

Women who have undergone infertility treatment, such as in vitro fertilization, are more likely to experience severe pregnancy complications, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

18h

The Emotional Toll of Grad School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Tiny Organs in Orbit

Cultured human lung, heart and kidney cells flying onboard the International Space Station could reveal much about aging and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

The Microbiome: Your Inner Ecosystem

We harbor roughly the same number of microbes as we have cells. This complex ecosystem is crucial to our health, affecting many processes including immunity, child development and bone density… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

‘Game of Thrones’ Makes Surprise Appearance in Bud Light’s Super Bowl Ad

It wasn’t the Season 8 trailer that most fans were anticipating, but the Game of Thrones surprise “hijacking” of a Bud Light commercial during Super Bowl LIII seemed enough …

19h

19h

19h

Gladsaxes dataovervågning af børnefamilier overtræder persondata-lov

Der mangler information til borgere, hvis data benyttes til optræning af algoritme, samt en juridisk analyse af konsekvenser, mener jurister. Arbejdet med modellen sker alene på statistisk niveau, hævder kommunen.

19h

19h

What do you think about these 2020 predictions made in 2014?

submitted by /u/Tenacious_Dad [link] [comments]

19h

19h

Maroon 5’s Halftime Show Felt Designed to Be Forgotten

Possibly the most distinctive voice in Maroon 5’s halftime show was Drake’s, prerecorded and piped in, praising Xanax as a sleep aid. The most recognizable face was that of SpongeBob SquarePants, who popped up on viewers’ screens just before a cartoon comet hit Maroon 5’s set, sending it into polite spouts of patio-furniture flames. The apocalypse, the implication seemed to be, will be tepid. How

19h

20h

Best 2019 Super Bowl Ads, From Chance’s Doritos to 2 Chainz’ Expenses

While some brands have opted out of football's biggest night, plenty of others were willing to pony up for 30 seconds of persuasion.

20h

21h

Mars trip could mess with ‘rookie’ immune systems

Long-term spaceflights—like those to Mars—could harm certain cells in astronaut immune systems, especially for those traveling to space for the first time, researchers warn. “What NASA and other space agencies are concerned about is whether or not the immune system is going to be compromised during very prolonged spaceflight missions,” says Richard Simpson, associate professor of nutritional scie

21h

The bigger big data gets, the bigger the risks it poses

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

22h

‘Mini quantum collider’ may lead to better spintronics

Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can turn certain particle interactions on and off. The new method could potentially pave the way for advances in spintronics. Spin transport electronics have the potential to revolutionize electronic devices as we know them, especially when it comes to computing. While standard electronics use an electron’s charge to

22h

SpongeBob SquarePants barely shows up at Super Bowl 2019 halftime show – CNET

Some fans are happy the cartoon character gets acknowledged, others think it's not enough.

22h

Some Inbox Features Could Be Ported Over To Gmail

Several years ago, Google’s Gmail team launched a new email platform called Inbox. The idea with Inbox was to help users achieve inbox zero, where all emails would be sorted and cleared from …

22h

22h

T-Mobile Super Bowl 2019 ad goes for your stomach with vow of free tacos – CNET

The company's trying to win you over by partnering with Taco Bell.

22h

22h

Super Bowl-inspired future technology idea

Today, millions will watch the Super Bowl, but only tens of thousands will be able to watch it in person. There are numerous college and professional stadiums sitting idle today. Suppose that holographic technology will advance in the future to the point where a live event can be recorded and replayed in these stadiums holographically on the field, with at most only a momentary delay. This would

23h

23h

AI can generate fake faces now. Here’s how to spot them.

submitted by /u/Swankishesque [link] [comments]

23h

Simply shining light on dinosaur metal compound kills cancer cells

A new compound based on iridium, a rare metal which landed in the Gulf of Mexico 66 million years ago, hooked onto albumin, a protein in blood, can attack the nucleus of cancerous cells when switched on by light, University of Warwick researchers have found.

23h

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony

The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories, is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found.

23h

No overall increased risk of cancer in children born after fertility treatment

Children born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) do not appear to be at greater risk of developing cancer than other children, according to the first study to look at the long-term cancer risk in ART children compared to those in the general population or who were naturally conceived by subfertile women. The research is published in Human Reproduction.

23h

Spotted handfish: Saving Tasmania's unusual 'walking' species

The spotted handfish is critically endangered and found only in a small area of Tasmania.

23h

Ray Kurzweil on humanity's nanobot-filled future

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

1d

Xbox Live could soon be coming to iOS, Android and the Nintendo Switch

Playing games between an Xbox and Nintendo Switch may soon go beyond just "Fortnite" and "Rocket League."

1d

1d

Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions

Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions, Published online: 04 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-08220-8 The Caucasus mountain range has impacted on the culture and genetics of the wider region. Here, the autho

1d

Does anyone else find predictions about the far future, IE; more than 25 years into the future to be completely irrelevant?

Whenever there is an article posted suggesting that etc thing will happen at any time beyond the next 25 years that isn't literally astronomical in nature it seems odd that people can view it as anything more than a wild guess. Yet here, there are dozens of articles that fit these parameters. submitted by /u/Throwawayforstuff207 [link] [comments]

1d

Jordan Peele's new Us trailer on Reddit makes our inner demons the monsters – CNET

Peele posts new, short trailer on Reddit before the Super Bowl that reveals what happens when we are our worst enemy.

1d

1d

1d

Automation threatens different demographics

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

1d

Game-playing AI is 10 times faster than Google's DeepMind

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

1d

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #5

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… Toon of the Week… SkS in the News… Coming Soon on SkS… Poster of the Week… SkS Week in Review… Story of the Week… The devastation of human life is in view’: what a burning world tells us about climate change I was wilfully deluded until I began covering global warming, says David Wallace-Wells. But extreme heat could transform the planet b

1d