Search Posts

nyheder2019februar06

Measles Epidemic Rocks Madagascar

The outbreak has infected 50,000 people and killed 300, most of them children, since cases began to crop up in October 2018.

2h

Study shows unusual microbes hold clues to early life

A new study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, according to a recent paper in The ISME Journal. Researchers used cutting-edge molecular methods to study these microbes, which thrive in the hot, oxygen-free fluids that flow through Earth's crust.

7h

400.000 københavnere drikker vand med rester af nyopdaget stof

Nedbrydningsproduktet DMS findes i vandhanen hos fire ud af ti indbyggere i hovedstaden og udgør dermed den værste forurening af drikkevandet nogensinde.

18h

Instagram thinks you want IGTV previews in your home feed

If you can’t beat or join them…force feed ’em? That appears to be Instagram’s latest strategy for IGTV, which is now being shoved right into Instagram’s main feed, …

now

Burpees are hard to define, and that's what makes them good

Health One of the most flexible exercises is also one of the most controversial. The burpee is a brutally efficient exercise, but how do you do it right?

8min

10min

Putting Mosquitoes On A Diet Might Help Stop Them From Biting Humans

New research finds that feeding mosquitoes human diet drugs causes them to lose their taste for human blood for days. The researchers hope this could be used to reduce the spread of disease.

24min

25min

Why Don't We Have Nuclear Fusion Power Yet?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

25min

Open-access satellite data allows tracking of seasonal population movements

A massive release of passive-surveillance satellite data of nighttime lights could help researchers in fields ranging from agriculture to epidemiology.

28min

What happens when sand fleas burrow in your skin?

Tungiasis, a tropical disease associated with poverty, is caused by the penetration of female sand fleas into a person's skin, usually in their toes or feet. Researchers report five cases of severe tungiasis to illustrate how the disease may develop into a life-threatening condition.

28min

Study examines aspirin use to prevent colorectal cancer

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps, which are a major risk factor. To explore whether high risk patients are adhering to USPSTF guidelines, researchers analyzed data from structured interviews with 84 patients and found that less than half (42.9 percent) reported taking a

28min

Circular RNA holds promise as cancer biomarker

Researchers have cataloged circular RNA in multiple cancers and conducted initial research that suggests these stable structures could serve as cancer biomarkers in blood or urine.

28min

Gallery: Eyewire Art, 2018

By player request, here’s a gallery featuring all the Eyewire art from 2018! 2018 Versus Art 2018 Competition Weeks Every other month Eyewire hosts a week-long series of special events. Special competitions include Accuracy Happy Hours, Trivia, Hunt or Evil Cubes, special Versus, Marathon, and a closing ceremony. Thanks to player @susi, we are able to give away free swag from our society6 shop to

39min

The Millennial Era of Climate Politics Has Arrived

Long ago, in a distant geological era—when Donald Trump hosted a reality show, when Senator Barack Obama doubted whether Hillary Clinton could be president, when the Earth was one-third of a degree Celsius cooler—Al Gore made a prediction . When Americans understood what climate change would mean for their children and grandchildren, the former Vice President warned, “they will demand that whoeve

41min

NIH asks federal watchdog to investigate 12 allegations related to foreign influence

Most involve possible failure to disclose foreign ties on grant applications

42min

Smoking weed linked with higher sperm counts, says Harvard

Marijuana research in the past has found that using the drug is linked to lower testicular health. New research from Harvard, however, has shown the opposite; Marijuana users have more and better quality sperm. These unexpected findings highlight how poorly we understand marijuana's effect on the human body. None The opening crawl for the 1936 film Reefer Madness reads "[Marijuana's] first effect

52min

New Oculus Go Version Comes With VR Porn

Porn-in-a-box now offers an Oculus Go headset, preloaded with a hefty chunk of VR porn. The post New Oculus Go Version Comes With VR Porn appeared first on ExtremeTech .

52min

Cancer cells' plasticity makes them harder to stop

Rice University researchers detail a direct connection between gene regulation and metabolic pathways and how cancer cells take advantage of it to adapt to hostile environments, a process known as cancer metabolic reprogramming.

1h

Finding clues to a functional HIV cure

George Mason University's Yuntao Wu's research team has identified a measurable indicator that could prove instrumental in the fight against HIV.The research recently published in Science Advances, focuses on cofilin, a key protein that regulates cells to mobilize and fight against infection. HIV patients have "significantly lower" levels of cofilin phosphorylation–but by stimulating the T cells

1h

Size and time impact outcomes when mechanical clot removal used for large core strokes

Patient outcomes with large core stroke damage are worse the larger the core volume and the longer the time lapse between stroke onset and treatment. Perfusion imaging may help identify large core stroke patients who are potential candidates for mechanical thrombectomy (clot removal).

1h

Minimally-invasive surgery for brain bleeds may not be better at restoring function than standard me

MISTIE III trial finds surgery for brain bleeding may not be better than medical treatment in restoring function but was better at reducing the risk of death.

1h

Comprehensive review analyzes vocal-cord restoration in 18 Grammy Award-winning singers

A retrospective review of laser microsugery performed in 18 Grammy Award-winning performers treated by surgeons at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Laryngeal Surgery has revealed insights into the treatment and management of vocal-cord disease in elite performers.

1h

Reversal agent decreases life-threatening bleeding

The blood thinner reversal agent – andexanet alfa -was effective at stopping acute major bleeding in patients taking factor Xa inhibitor blood thinners.

1h

Intensive blood pressure lowering safe for clot-buster-treated stroke patients, but…

Rapidly lowering blood pressure beyond recommended targets safely reduced the risk of bleeding as a side effect in stroke patients but did not limit post-stroke disability.

1h

Removing more blood via minimally invasive surgery more likely to improve hemorrhagic stroke recover

The greater the volume of blood removed from the brain via minimally invasive surgery after a hemorrhagic stroke the greater the odds of better functional recovery.

1h

Spacewatch: Mars lander seismometer gets protective shield

Dome will protect instrument from temperature fluctuations of up to 94C over Martian day Nasa’s InSight Mars lander has placed a domed shield over its seismometer , completing that instrument’s deployment. The seismometer will look for evidence of ongoing seismic activity on the red planet to provide data about the deep interior of Mars. Continue reading…

1h

German ruling could impede Facebook's data-combo movesFacebook Instagram Germany

Facebook is pushing back against a German ruling that could make it harder for the company to combine data from all the services it runs in order to target ads even more precisely.

1h

“Green New Deal” Calls for a Zero-Emission America by 2030

It’s Finally Here The Green New Deal, the ambitious climate-change prevention overhaul of the U.S. economy introduced by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Ed Markey, made its way to the internet on Thursday. The Green New Deal (GND), which is not a bill in itself but rather a resolution for the government to craft new laws promoting clean energy, was published online along with

1h

No Nuclear Power, Ocasio-Cortez Says in Green New Deal

submitted by /u/RandChimp [link] [comments]

1h

US Democrats unveil carbon-neutral 'Green New Deal'

Congressional Democrats on Thursday unveiled an unprecedented plan to reverse climate change and eliminate all US carbon emissions within 10 years, by taking drastic steps that would require transformational action across the economy.

1h

Airbnb eyes the sky with hire of aviation execAirbnb Transportation

Airbnb on Thursday said that it hired airline industry veteran Fred Reid away from an autonomous flight vehicle startup backed by Google co-founder Larry Page.

1h

Swiss govt offers reward for hacking its electronic vote system

The Swiss government has issued a 150,000 Swiss franc (US$149,790) challenge to online hackers; break into our new generation electronic voting system and we'll reward you.

1h

NASA satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Gelena near Madagascar

A visible-light image from NASA's Terra satellite revealed Tropical Cyclone Gelena was strengthening off the northeastern coast of Madagascar.

1h

Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, according to research

New research from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute suggests that drivers who use hands-free electronic devices, as opposed to handheld ones, are less likely to get into a crash.

1h

Seafood mislabelling persistent throughout supply chain, study finds

Not only does Canada continue to have a problem with fish mislabelling, but that problem persists throughout the supply chain, according to a first-ever study by University of Guelph researchers.

1h

Open-access satellite data allows tracking of seasonal population movements

A massive release of passive-surveillance satellite data of nighttime lights could help researchers in fields ranging from agriculture to epidemiology. Researchers at Penn State and the University of Southampton in the UK have provided open access to detailed satellite data on brightness for five cities in Niger and Nigeria from 2000 to 2005, as well as detailed methods for analyzing the data to t

1h

Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought

While most hearing experts would say an eardrum is required for long distance hearing, a new study from Binghamton University and Cornell University has found that Aedes aegypti mosquitos can use their antennae to detect sounds that are at least 10 meters away.

1h

The physics underlying complex biological architectures

A building's architectural plans map out what's needed to keep it from falling down. But design is not just functional: often, it's also beautiful, with lines and shapes that can amaze and inspire.

1h

Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells

Perovskites—a broad category of compounds that share a certain crystal structure—have attracted a great deal of attention as potential new solar-cell materials because of their low cost, flexibility, and relatively easy manufacturing process. But much remains unknown about the details of their structure and the effects of substituting different metals or other elements within the material.

1h

Report from prestigious NIH-funded conference looks to biological 'pillars of aging'

Geriatrics researchers and clinicians hope a new understanding–one honed at a prestigious conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), with support from The John A. Hartford Foundation–can lead to better and more effective interventions by targeting the aging process itself rather than discrete conditions or concerns.

1h

Aggressive clearance key to best outcome after a brain hemorrhage

When a patient has an intracerebral hemorrhage, surgeons need to remove at least 70 percent of it to reach a meaningful recovery. Ideally, there should be 15 milliliters or less of blood at the site of the injury.

1h

NASA satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Gelena near Madagascar

A visible-light image from NASA's Terra satellite revealed Tropical Cyclone Gelena was strengthening off the northeastern coast of Madagascar.

1h

Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought

While most hearing experts would say an eardrum is required for long distance hearing, a new study from Binghamton University and Cornell University has found that Aedes aegypti mosquitos can use their antennae to detect sounds that are at least 10 meters away.

1h

The physics underlying complex biological architectures

A building's architectural plans map out what's needed to keep it from falling down. But design is not just functional: often, it's also beautiful, with lines and shapes that can amaze and inspire.

1h

Bizarre Japanese Robot Folds Clothes at a Punishingly Slow Pace

Keep Dreaming We’re sure we’re not the only ones who can’t wait for the arrival of robot housekeepers à la the Jetson’s Rosie. Unfortunately, Mira Robotics’ latest effort isn’t quite there yet. On Thursday, the Japanese startup unveiled ugo , a laundry robot, at an event in Tokyo. After watching an incredibly entertaining demo video, we’ve come to the conclusion that there’s probably someone out

1h

Engineered DNA vaccine protects against emerging Mayaro virus infection

A novel, synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Mayaro virus (MAYV), a mosquito-borne infection endemic to South America, that has the potential to become a global emerging viral threat.

1h

NASA finds a pinhole eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani

Visible-light imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the development of a small eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani as the storm rapidly intensified into a major hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean.

1h

MIT Invents Smart Pill That Injects Insulin Into Your Stomach

Goodbye Injections Hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffer from diabetes. Their bodies either can’t produce or process insulin properly — so they have to regularly inject themselves with shots of freeze-dried insulin. But researchers at MIT may have found a futuristic solution: a high-tech smart pill called SOMA — yes, we get the Aldous Huxley reference, but it also stands for “self-orien

1h

A Tiny Reef Fish Can Recognize Itself in a Mirror

When chimpanzees and elephants pass this classic test, they are said to have self-awareness. Can we say the same for a fish? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

A Photo Trip to China’s Daocheng County

In Garze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, on the west side of China’s Sichuan province, sits Daocheng County, a small, mountainous region that about 31,000 ethnic Tibetans call home. Daocheng currently has the world’s highest civilian airport, sitting at 14,472 feet (4,411 meters) above sea level. Most visitors to the region will make their way to Yading Nature Reserve to hike among the forests and

1h

Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, according to research

New research suggests that drivers who use hands-free electronic devices, as opposed to handheld ones, are less likely to get into a crash.

1h

Blood cells could hold master clock behind aging

Blood cells could hold the key to aging, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. In a study published in Aging Cell, researchers found human blood cells have an intrinsic clock that remains steady even after transplant. The researchers say the clock could control human aging and may underlie blood cancers.

1h

NASA finds a pinhole eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani

Visible-light imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the development of a small eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani as the storm rapidly intensified into a major hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean.

1h

Overdose deaths could increase with 'changing nature' of opioid epidemic

The opioid epidemic in the United States could be responsible for 700,000 overdose deaths between 2016 and 2025, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open.

1h

A Tiny Reef Fish Can Recognize Itself in a Mirror

When chimpanzees and elephants pass this classic test, they are said to have self-awareness. Can we say the same for a fish? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

A Tiny Reef Fish Can Recognize Itself in a Mirror

When chimpanzees and elephants pass this classic test, they are said to have self-awareness. Can we say the same for a fish? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

1h

UK moves toward driverless car tests without safety drivers

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

1h

1h

Trilobites: Beaked Whales Are the Deepest Divers

Cuvier’s beaked whales off Cape Hatteras dive farther and stay underwater longer than any other marine mammal.

1h

A High-Tech Pill to End Drug Injections

Engineers have developed a tiny robotic capsule that injects insulin once it lands in the stomach.

1h

Phthalates may impair fertility in female mice

A phthalate found in many plastic and personal care products may decrease fertility in female mice, a new study found. Researchers found that giving female mice oral doses of the phthalate DiNP for 10 days disrupted their estrus cycles, decreasing their ability to become pregnant for up to nine months afterward.

1h

Seafood mislabelling persistent throughout supply chain, study finds

Researchers examined 203 samples from 12 key targeted species collected from various importers, processing plants and retailers in Ontario. Of the samples, 141 were from retailers, 51 from importers and 11 from processing plants. The findings revealed 32 per cent of the samples overall were mislabelled. The mislabelling rate was 17.6 per cent at the import stage, 27.3 per cent at processing plants

1h

Putting female mosquitoes on human diet drugs could reduce spread of disease

Researchers report that they have identified drugs that can reduce mosquito hunger for blood. Because movement of female mosquitoes from human to human — male mosquitoes do not consume blood — is the means by which mosquito-borne infections are passed along, researchers have theorized that reducing the frequency with which female mosquitoes feed is one way to lessen the spread of disease.

1h

Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections

New research has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration.

1h

Choosy amphipods

Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behavior requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision.

1h

Stalled fertility declines linked to disruptions in women's education in Africa

A slowdown in fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa was partially caused by disruptions in women's education in the 1980s, according to new research.

1h

Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities. Researchers write that 'the number of landslides that occurred during this event was two orders of magnitude greater than those reported from previous hurricanes.'

1h

Rosalind Franklin missed out on a Nobel, but now she'll help look for life on MarsMars Rosalind Franklin

Space A rover of her own. The six-wheeled rover is expected to land on the Red Planet the following year to search for clues as to whether or not there is, or has ever been, life on Mars.

1h

New Bill Would Let FTC Jail Execs For Data Breaches

Gearing Up Recent years have been filled with massive data breaches, from Equifax to Facebook , that have rocked consumer confidence tech companies to keep their data safe. To help cork up the leaky internet, Oregon Senator Ron Wyden introduced a bill that would better equip the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to deal with personal data breaches, according to The Oregonian . In particular, the exe

1h

The Case for Transmissible Alzheimer's Grows

What separates a lethal prion from dementia-inducing amyloid plaque? Maybe not much — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Netflix widens 'smart downloads' to iPhones – CNET

"Smart downloads" automatically swap out an offline episode you've already watched for the next one you need.

2h

Google is shutting down its Louisville fiber network in April

Google’s fiber rollout is coming to a premature end in one major market.

2h

Senators Grill Facebook, Google, and Apple Over Invasive Apps

Lawmakers want more information about Facebook’s Project Atlas program, which collected data from teens and sidestepped device makers’ privacy policies.

2h

2h

Stanford Probes Faculty Who Knew About Gene-Hacked Chinese Babies

Internal Review When a Chinese scientist named He Jiankui announced last year that he had altered the genome of two human babies before they were born, it quickly became clear that he hadn’t acted alone . It turns out that several Stanford University scientists knew about He’s experiments as they were happening. As a result, Stanford recently confirmed to the MIT Technology Review that it commiss

2h

Honeybees Are Smart Enough to Learn Basic Math

Math Bee It turns out that tiny brains are more capable than previously thought. We already knew various primates, birds, and other animals could solve basic math problems . Now, a team of Australian and French researchers has discovered that honeybees can also speak the universal language of mathematics on a rudimentary level — and the discovery could impact the future of artificial intelligence

2h

CBD: Believe the Hype?

I first stumbled upon CBD at a farmers market in Solana Beach, CA. A couple of enthusiastic salesmen were promoting their CBD-infused cold brew. Once I heard the claims of how it could reduce anxiety, improve sleep, and increase energy, I mentally put it into the same category as those pads you put on the […]

2h

Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells

Researchers have been able to decipher a key aspect of the behavior of perovskites made with different formulations: With certain additives there is a kind of 'sweet spot' where greater amounts will enhance performance and beyond which further amounts begin to degrade it. The findings are detailed this week in the journal Science.

2h

The American College of Chest Physicians updates guidelines on PAH

The American College of Chest Physicians® (CHEST) announced the publication of updates to the evidence-based guidelines on therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In the latest evidence-based guideline, Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults: Update of the CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report, experts provide 78 evidence-based recommendations for appropriate use in tre

2h

Will moving to the commercial cloud leave some data users behind?

A growing volume of information from satellites and other sources is leading many federal agencies to consider commercial cloud services to store and distribute the data. A policy forum article urges caution about the design of these commercial cloud partnerships and possible imposition of user fees.

2h

Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures

The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, researchers report.

2h

Identifying brain's preparation for action

Neuroscientists have identified the processes which occur in our brains milliseconds before we undertake a series of movements, crucial for speech, handwriting, sports or playing a musical instrument. Tracking brain activity, researchers could distinguish between neural mechanisms associated with skilled and error-prone actions. Following further research, this new information could lead to the de

2h

New target for chronic pain: Shape of structure that nerve cells use to sense cold

People are great at detecting cold temperatures and the cool sensation induced by natural substances like menthol. And while the same protein in nerve cells is responsible for sensing both, it isn't entirely clear how it works. Now, a team of researchers has determined the structure of this protein when it is bound to menthol. The findings could pave the way for therapies to treat chronic pain and

2h

2h

1989 episode of Ninja Turtles had a cellphone with Facetime

submitted by /u/HungDownLo [link] [comments]

2h

Pathios Therapeutics and Sygnature Discovery sign a strategic and innovative partnership to develop first in class therapies in autoimmune disease and immuno-oncology

Pathios Therapeutics ("Pathios"), an innovative biotech company focused on the development of first in class therapies for autoimmune diseases and immuno-oncology and Sygnature Discovery ("Sygnature"), jointly announce a strategic partnership to accelerate Pathios’ drug discovery and development programmes.

2h

This Jagged Little Pill Could Make Diabetes Easier to Treat

A tortoise-inspired, needle-carrying pill promises to let people swallow drugs that currently have to be injected.

2h

Phthalates may impair fertility in female mice

A phthalate found in many plastic and personal care products may decrease fertility in female mice, a new study found. Researchers at the University of Illinois found that giving female mice oral doses of the phthalate DiNP for 10 days disrupted their estrus cycles, decreasing their ability to become pregnant for up to nine months afterward.

2h

Relationship counseling encourages couples HIV testing

It's long been known that couples HIV testing and counseling is an effective way to mutually disclose HIV status and link to health care — unfortunately, couples don't use it even though it's widely available.

2h

Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought

While most hearing experts would say an eardrum is required for long distance hearing, a new study from Binghamton University and Cornell University has found that Aedes aegypti mosquitos can use their antennae to detect sounds that are at least 10 meters away.

2h

Well, Hello There! Fish Recognize Themselves in the Mirror

When it comes to intelligence, fish get a bad rap. They’ve been plagued with the five-second memory stereotype, and thanks to Dory, are thought to “just keep swimming.” But a new study suggests that they might be smarter than we think. Research published today in the journal PLOS Biology shows that fish can recognize and respond to themselves in the mirror. When met with their own reflections, a s

2h

SNAPSHOT: This Star Jet Spans a Whopping 33 Light-Years

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the most beautiful cosmic sights that a southern observer can take in with their naked eye. At just over 150,000 light-years from Earth, this large(ish) satellite galaxy of the Milky Way is roughly 14,000 light-years wide and bursting with newly formed stars. Recently, astronomers homed in on a particularly fertile region of the LMC named LHA 120-N 180B —

2h

Not Only Can Honeybees Count, They Can Also Do Math

Honey bees are a great study system to learn about the animal kingdom. They dance (albeit sloppily), they make jelly that turns their larvae into queens, they have crazy tongues … I could go on. Now, researchers have found, honeybees can add. In a paper out today in Science Advances, a team led by Adrian Dyer at RMIT University in Melbourne put the honey-makers’ arithmetic skills to the test. Inst

2h

Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions

Researchers have engineered a new fabric from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating that is activated by temperature and humidity, releasing heat in warm humid conditions and trapping heat when conditions are cool and dry.

2h

New measurements of exotic form of magnesium suggest surprising shape-shift

An international team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reproduced an exotic form of magnesium, known as magnesium-40, and gleaned new and surprising clues about its nuclear structure.

2h

Awesome mosquito hearing includes our voices

Mosquitoes can hear over distances much greater than anyone suspected, researchers report. Until now, scientists believed that organisms required eardrums for long-range hearing, and that the feathery antennae with fine hairs that mosquitoes and some insects use to hear only worked at close distances of several centimeters (a few inches). A series of experiments has now provided neurophysiologica

2h

Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions

Researchers have engineered a new fabric from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating that is activated by temperature and humidity, releasing heat in warm humid conditions and trapping heat when conditions are cool and dry.

2h

New technique pinpoints milestones in the evolution of bacteria

Scientists have devised a reliable way to determine when certain groups of bacteria appeared in the evolutionary record. The technique could be used to identify when significant changes occurred in the evolution of bacteria, and to reveal details about the primitive environments that drove such changes in the first place.

2h

Fish Appear to Recognize Themselves in the Mirror

The cleaner wrasse fish (Labroides dimidiatus), responds to its reflection and attempts to remove marks on its body during the mirror test — a method considered the gold standard for determining self-awareness in animals. The finding suggests that fish might possess far higher cognitive powers than previously thought, and ignites a high-stakes debate over how we assess the intelligence of animals

2h

Why Asian horses don't get sick with the flu

Avian influenza viruses infect horses in Mongolia but do not cause large outbreaks of disease because they failed to acquire key genetic changes to enable greater cross-species transmissibility, according to a new study.

2h

Charting a path to cheaper flexible solar cells

Researchers have reported new findings about perovskite solar cells that could lead the way to devices that perform better.

2h

Modular AI Wheelchairs Can Watch for Obstacles, Incorporate Head Tracking

Researchers at Kent University are working to create AI-powered, computer vision-assisted wheelchairs as part of the next generation of assistive technology. The post Modular AI Wheelchairs Can Watch for Obstacles, Incorporate Head Tracking appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

“Grandmother Hypothesis” Gets Some Support

New studies suggest forebears’ age and physical proximity matter when it comes to their grandkids’ survival.

2h

Indian Hospital Fires Back at Rumors That Crypto CEO Faked Death

QuadrigaCX Saga It’s been a roller coaster of intrigue, wild conspiracies, and legal proceedings. The widow of Gerald Cotten, the CEO of cryptocurrency exchange QuadrigaCX, says he died in December — taking roughly $190 million worth of blockchain currencies to the grave, and prompting conspiracy theories that Cotten faked his own death. Now the hospital where Cotten died is firing back, telling

2h

New measurements of exotic form of magnesium suggest surprising shape-shift

An international team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reproduced an exotic form of magnesium, known as magnesium-40, and gleaned new and surprising clues about its nuclear structure.

2h

Measles outbreaks are everywhere. Here's what you need to know.

Health Regularly updated to keep you informed. The measles virus is cropping up all over the U.S., and though cases aren’t yet at record levels we’re careening towards a year full of sick children.

2h

Bed Used in Hotel for 15 Years Turns Out to Be Henry VII’s Marriage Bed

An ornately carved antique oak bed had a remarkable hidden history.

3h

Living Near Your Grandmother Has Evolutionary Benefits

Humans are evolutionary oddballs for living long past our reproductive prime. New research explains how grandmothers might be the reason why. (Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR)

3h

Thirdhand smoke residue exposes children to chemicals

In "Nicotine on Children's Hands: Limited Protection of Smoking Bans and Initial Clinical Findings," published Jan. 16 in Tobacco Use Insights, Cincinnati Children's attending physician Melinda Mahabee-Gittens and UC assistant professor Ashley Merianos found that not smoking around children doesn't stop children of smokers from being exposed to nicotine. They also found that higher levels of expos

3h

Open-access satellite data allows tracking of seasonal population movements

A massive release of passive-surveillance satellite data of nighttime lights could help researchers in fields ranging from agriculture to epidemiology.

3h

Seafood mislabelling persistent throughout supply chain, study finds

Researchers examined 203 samples from 12 key targeted species collected from various importers, processing plants and retailers in Ontario. Of the samples, 141 were from retailers, 51 from importers and 11 from processing plants. The findings revealed 32 per cent of the samples overall were mislabelled. The mislabelling rate was 17.6 per cent at the import stage, 27.3 per cent at processing plants

3h

The physics underlying complex biological architectures

In a new study published in Cell, physicists developed a model that describes how patterns form on pollen spores. This is the first physically rigorous framework that details the thermodynamic processes that lead to these complex biological architectures.

3h

Can machine learning deliver critical market insight on consumer needs faster and cheaper?

Consumer brands have long used old-fashioned focus groups, interviews and surveys to best gauge consumer wants, desires and needs as part of processes that range from product development, to marketing and sales. As machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) have emerged, there is an increasing interest in the ability to harness these solutions to save time and money, and to yield more relia

3h

Who's listening? Mosquitos can hear up to 10 meters away

Mosquitoes can hear over distances much greater than anyone suspected, according to researchers at Cornell and Binghamton University.

3h

Can fish be self-aware? The answer is far from easy

A species of wrasse can recognise itself in a mirror, but researchers are unsure of what that actually means. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

3h

Can machine learning deliver critical market insight on consumer needs faster and cheaper?

Consumer brands have long used old-fashioned focus groups, interviews and surveys to best gauge consumer wants, desires and needs as part of processes that range from product development, to marketing and sales. As machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) have emerged, there is an increasing interest in the ability to harness these solutions to save time and money, and to yield more relia

3h

Publisher Correction: Actively personalized vaccination trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma

Publisher Correction: Actively personalized vaccination trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma Publisher Correction: Actively personalized vaccination trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma, Published online: 07 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0959-z Publisher Correction: Actively personalized vaccination trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma

3h

New MERMAID tech will help geoscientists discover the inside of planet Earth

Most of the ocean floor is inaccessible to seismologists. Much can be learned about the inside of Earth by listening to earthquakes. Ingenious new floating sensors are changing the ocean seismology game. None They're called MERMAIDs. They're drifting seismometers that listen to movements of Earth's crust pulsing through the waters of previously unmonitored reaches of the oceans, the two-thirds of

3h

Satellit knipser fantastisk fællesbillede af Månens bagside

En kinesisk satellit, der er i kredsløb om Månen, har fanget sit første billede af Månens bagside og vores blå planet.

3h

Heat-sensitive fabric cools you on hot days and warms you in the cold

A temperature sensitive fabric adjusts to how hot, cold or sweaty the wearer is to help them reach the perfect temperature

3h

A painless pill containing tiny needles may one day replace injections

Injections with insulin or other drugs could one day be replaced by pills that contain tiny needles that painlessly inject drugs into the lining of the stomach

3h

Gaia clocks new speeds for Milky Way-Andromeda collision

ESA's Gaia satellite has looked beyond our Galaxy and explored two nearby galaxies to reveal the stellar motions within them and how they will one day interact and collide with the Milky Way – with surprising results.

3h

Tortoise-Shaped Pill Injects Insulin Into Stomach Lining

Tortoise-Shaped Pill Injects Insulin Into Stomach Lining Pill uses a dissolving spring-loaded needle to spare people with diabetes from normal injections. Tortoise-Pills.jpg Image credits: Felice Frankel Human Thursday, February 7, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A pill shaped like a tortoise could one day help deliver insulin to people with diabetes, a new study fin

3h

Color-changing of light scattered from chiral molecules measures chirality

A new physical effect has been demonstrated after 40 years of pursuit by physicists around the world, which could lead to advancements in chemical manufacturing efficiency, miniaturization and quality control in personalized pharmaceuticals.

3h

Hispanic men most likely to have fatal interaction with police in segregated neighborhoods

While most media attention seems to focus on the number of black males killed by police, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine indicates that among men of color, Hispanic males were two times more likely to have a fatal interaction with the police in neighborhoods that have a high percentage of Hispanic residents—and police agencies with more Hispanic officers were associ

3h

Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures

The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers.

3h

New technique pinpoints milestones in the evolution of bacteria

Bacteria have evolved all manner of adaptations to live in every habitat on Earth. But unlike plants and animals, which can be preserved as fossils, bacteria have left behind little physical evidence of their evolution, making it difficult for scientists to determine exactly when different groups of bacteria evolved.

3h

Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures

The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers.

3h

Hispanic men most likely to have fatal interaction with police in segregated neighborhoods

Hispanic males were two times more likely to have a fatal interaction with the police in neighborhoods that have a high percentage of Hispanic residents — and police agencies with more Hispanic officers were associated with higher odds of Hispanic fatalities.The results suggest that even the most diverse police forces are not exempt from the need for reforms within their ranks.

3h

New technique pinpoints milestones in the evolution of bacteria

MIT scientists have devised a reliable way to determine when certain groups of bacteria appeared in the evolutionary record. The technique could be used to identify when significant changes occurred in the evolution of bacteria, and to reveal details about the primitive environments that drove such changes in the first place.

3h

Big data approach shown to be effective for evaluating autism treatments

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.

3h

Dengue immunity may buffer against Zika, study finds

Research conducted by a team led by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and including University of Florida epidemiologist Derek Cummings finds that previous infection with dengue reduces one's risk of infection with Zika.

3h

USC scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens

USC Dornsife chemists appear to have finished the quest for a cheaper, efficient alternative to the iridium compounds while also solving the decades-long problem with the color blue. Surprisingly, copper does it all.

3h

Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts

The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream.

3h

Feinstein CEO, global researchers show significance of neurotransmitter in viral infection

Feinstein Institute for Medical Research President and CEO Kevin J. Tracey, MD has joined with leading scientists across Canada, Europe and Asia, to discover the critical role the chemical acetylcholine plays as a neurotransmitter in combating chronic viral infection, as published online today in Science. A neurosurgeon specialist in the molecular mechanisms of inflammation, Dr. Tracey has studied

3h

Engineered DNA vaccine protects against emerging Mayaro virus infection

A novel, synthetic DNA vaccine developed at The Wistar Institute induces protective immunity against Mayaro virus (MAYV), a mosquito-borne infection endemic to South America, that has the potential to become a global emerging viral threat.

3h

Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions

Researchers at the University of Maryland have engineered a new fabric from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating that is activated by temperature and humidity, releasing heat in warm humid conditions and trapping heat when conditions are cool and dry.

3h

Butterflies are genetically wired to choose a mate that looks just like them

Male butterflies have genes which give them a sexual preference for a partner with a similar appearance to themselves, according to new research. In a study publishing Feb. 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, a team of academics from the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, observed the courtship rituals and sequenced the DNA

3h

Tak Mak lab discovers how the immune system 'thinks'

New research from the laboratory of cancer scientist Dr. Tak Mak, renowned for cloning the human T-cell receptor, has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections.

3h

The protective role of dengue immunity on Zika infection in a Brazilian favela

By monitoring the spread of Zika virus through a densely populated Brazilian favela during a 2015 outbreak, researchers have gained new perspectives into the outbreaks of this virus in the Americas in recent years.

3h

An adaptive textile keeps cool by self-regulating its thermal properties

Researchers have developed a 'cool' textile that self-regulates its thermal properties based on how hot, sweaty or cold the wearer is, according to a new report.

3h

Untangling the impacts of gut bacteria on drug metabolism

Individual drugs show variations in how successful or toxic they are, person to person.

3h

Ingestible injections made possible by a tortoise-inspired drug delivery device

A new ingestible device, inspired by the self-orienting shape of the leopard tortoise's shell, may soon be used to administer drugs by injecting them through the stomach wall.

3h

3h

China among the countries looking to thorium as new nuclear fuel

submitted by /u/TheCIASellsDrugs [link] [comments]

3h

Shape of structure that nerve cells use to sense cold and menthol could be new target for chronic pain and migraine

People are great at detecting cold temperatures and also the cool sensation induced by natural substances like menthol, which is common in remedies used to soothe aching muscles. But it hasn't been entirely clear how we do this.

3h

Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures

The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers.

3h

New technique pinpoints milestones in the evolution of bacteria

Bacteria have evolved all manner of adaptations to live in every habitat on Earth. But unlike plants and animals, which can be preserved as fossils, bacteria have left behind little physical evidence of their evolution, making it difficult for scientists to determine exactly when different groups of bacteria evolved.

3h

Avoiding The Ouch. Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill

A lot of vaccines and some medications need to be delivered by injection. Two groups of researchers are designing ways of delivering these medications by putting them in pill form. (Image credit: Felice Frankel/MIT)

3h

How Sand Fleas Cause 'Extreme' Infections

A new report describes five cases of "extreme" sand flea infections in Colombia, showing that life-threatening illnesses with this parasite still occur.

3h

Apple releases update to prevent FaceTime eavesdroppingApple Group FaceTime

Apple has released an iPhone update to fix a software flaw that allowed people to eavesdrop on others while using FaceTime.

3h

Scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens

USC Dornsife chemists have found a cheaper way to light up smartphone and TV screens, which could save manufacturers and consumers money without affecting visual quality.

3h

Future of Airbus's A380 superjumbo in doubt as demand fades

A decision by Australian airline Qantas on Thursday to cancel an order for Airbus A380 superjumbos raised fresh questions about the future of the world's largest passenger jet, which has struggled to find enough buyers to justify its production.

3h

Big data approach shown to be effective for evaluating autism treatments

Researchers who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.

3h

Immunotherapy appears better than chemotherapy for aggressive type of skin cancer

The first study of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab as the initial treatment for patients with a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer known as Merkel cell carcinoma reports better responses and longer survival than expected with conventional chemotherapy.

3h

Research details sticky situations at the nanoscale

In a finding that will be useful in nanoscale engineering, researchers have shown that miniscule differences in the roughness of surfaces can have important effects on how they stick together.

3h

Amazon invests in self-driving car startup Aurora

A self-driving car technology startup founded by former Google, Tesla and Uber executives said Thursday it secured $530 billion in new funding that included a "significant" investment from Amazon.

3h

Scientists find some fish can ‘recognise themselves’ in mirror

Wrasse passes intelligence test in disputed study, challenging ‘vacant’ reputation of fish They are often said to have a three-second memory, but the brain power of fish has been considerably underestimated, according to scientists who found some fish can recognise themselves in the mirror. Related: Talking animals: we aren’t the only species capable of speech … Continue reading…

3h

Pill inspired by leopard tortoise could replace diabetic injections

Capsule shape based on domed shell ensures insulin needle within aims at stomach wall Scientists have developed a “needle pill” that could allow diabetics to take insulin without the need for daily injections. The pea-sized capsule contains a small needle made of solid, compressed insulin, which is injected into the stomach wall after the capsule has been swallowed. Continue reading…

3h

Structural basis for blue-green light harvesting and energy dissipation in diatoms

Diatoms are abundant photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments and contribute 40% of its primary productivity. An important factor that contributes to the success of diatoms is their fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding proteins (FCPs), which have exceptional light-harvesting and photoprotection capabilities. Here, we report the crystal structure of an FCP from the marine diatom Phaeodactyl

3h

3h

News at a glance

[no content]

3h

Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low-level clouds

A lack of reliable estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) aerosols over oceans has severely limited our ability to quantify their effects on cloud properties and extent of cooling by reflecting solar radiation—a key uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing. We introduce a methodology for ascribing cloud properties to CCN and isolating the aerosol effects from meteorological effects. Its

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

The new potato

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

The end of evolution?

[no content]

3h

Liquid lessons

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Timing matters

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Helping copper glow

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Eliminating nonradiative decay in Cu(I) emitters: >99% quantum efficiency and microsecond lifetime

Luminescent complexes of heavy metals such as iridium, platinum, and ruthenium play an important role in photocatalysis and energy conversion applications as well as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Achieving comparable performance from more–earth-abundant copper requires overcoming the weak spin-orbit coupling of the light metal as well as limiting the high reorganization energies typical

3h

Impact of preexisting dengue immunity on Zika virus emergence in a dengue endemic region

The clinical outcomes associated with Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas have been well documented, but other aspects of the pandemic, such as attack rates and risk factors, are poorly understood. We prospectively followed a cohort of 1453 urban residents in Salvador, Brazil, and, using an assay that measured immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) responses against ZIKV NS1 antigen, we estimated that 73% of ind

3h

An ingestible self-orienting system for oral delivery of macromolecules

Biomacromolecules have transformed our capacity to effectively treat diseases; however, their rapid degradation and poor absorption in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract generally limit their administration to parenteral routes. An oral biologic delivery system must aid in both localization and permeation to achieve systemic drug uptake. Inspired by the leopard tortoise’s ability to passively reorie

3h

Tilting a ground-state reactivity landscape by vibrational strong coupling

Many chemical methods have been developed to favor a particular product in transformations of compounds that have two or more reactive sites. We explored a different approach to site selectivity using vibrational strong coupling (VSC) between a reactant and the vacuum field of a microfluidic optical cavity. Specifically, we studied the reactivity of a compound bearing two possible silyl bond clea

3h

Dynamic gating of infrared radiation in a textile

The human body absorbs and loses heat largely through infrared radiation centering around a wavelength of 10 micrometers. However, neither our skin nor the textiles that make up clothing are capable of dynamically controlling this optical channel for thermal management. By coating triacetate-cellulose bimorph fibers with a thin layer of carbon nanotubes, we effectively modulated the infrared radi

3h

Supersymmetric laser arrays

Scaling up the radiance of coupled laser arrays has been a long-standing challenge in photonics. In this study, we demonstrate that notions from supersymmetry—a theoretical framework developed in high-energy physics—can be strategically used in optics to address this problem. In this regard, a supersymmetric laser array is realized that is capable of emitting exclusively in its fundamental transv

3h

Homogenized halides and alkali cation segregation in alloyed organic-inorganic perovskites

The role of the alkali metal cations in halide perovskite solar cells is not well understood. Using synchrotron-based nano–x-ray fluorescence and complementary measurements, we found that the halide distribution becomes homogenized upon addition of cesium iodide, either alone or with rubidium iodide, for substoichiometric, stoichiometric, and overstoichiometric preparations, where the lead halide

3h

Life history responses of meerkats to seasonal changes in extreme environments

Species in extreme habitats increasingly face changes in seasonal climate, but the demographic mechanisms through which these changes affect population persistence remain unknown. We investigated how changes in seasonal rainfall and temperature influence vital rates and viability of an arid environment specialist, the Kalahari meerkat, through effects on body mass. We show that climate change–ind

3h

Schema cells in the macaque hippocampus

Concept cells in the human hippocampus encode the meaning conveyed by stimuli over their perceptual aspects. Here we investigate whether analogous cells in the macaque can form conceptual schemas of spatial environments. Each day, monkeys were presented with a familiar and a novel virtual maze, sharing a common schema but differing by surface features (landmarks). In both environments, animals se

3h

Choline acetyltransferase-expressing T cells are required to control chronic viral infection

Although widely studied as a neurotransmitter, T cell–derived acetylcholine (ACh) has recently been reported to play an important role in regulating immunity. However, the role of lymphocyte-derived ACh in viral infection is unknown. Here, we show that the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of ACh production, is robustly induced in both CD4 + and CD8 +

3h

Tumor metastasis to lymph nodes requires YAP-dependent metabolic adaptation

In cancer patients, metastasis of tumors to sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) predicts disease progression and often guides treatment decisions. The mechanisms underlying tumor LN metastasis are poorly understood. By using comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses of primary and LN-metastatic tumors in mice, we found that LN metastasis requires that tumor cells undergo a metabolic shift towa

3h

Innate immune recognition of glycans targets HIV nanoparticle immunogens to germinal centers

In vaccine design, antigens are often arrayed in a multivalent nanoparticle form, but in vivo mechanisms underlying the enhanced immunity elicited by such vaccines remain poorly understood. We compared the fates of two different heavily glycosylated HIV antigens, a gp120-derived mini-protein and a large, stabilized envelope trimer, in protein nanoparticle or "free" forms after primary immunizatio

3h

New Products

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

Strengthened scientific support for the Endangerment Finding for atmospheric greenhouse gases

We assess scientific evidence that has emerged since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2009 Endangerment Finding for six well-mixed greenhouse gases and find that this new evidence lends increased support to the conclusion that these gases pose a danger to public health and welfare. Newly available evidence about a wide range of observed and projected impacts strengthens the association

3h

Comment on "Friction at the bed does not control fast glacier flow"

Stearns and van der Veen (Reports, 20 July 2018, p. 273) conclude that fast glacier sliding is independent of basal drag (friction), even where drag balances most of the driving stress. This conclusion raises fundamental physical issues, the most striking of which is that sliding velocity would be independent of stresses imparted through the ice column, including gravitational driving stress.

3h

Response to Comment on "Friction at the bed does not control fast glacier flow"

Minchew et al . take issue with our main conclusion that friction at the glacier bed does not control fast glacier flow. In this response, we further justify our methodology. We also point out that numerical studies referred to by Minchew et al . rely on inversions that are based on a sliding relation in which sliding speed is proportional to basal drag. Furthermore, observational studies referre

3h

3h

Separating host and microbiome contributions to drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity

The gut microbiota is implicated in the metabolism of many medical drugs, with consequences for interpersonal variation in drug efficacy and toxicity. However, quantifying microbial contributions to drug metabolism is challenging, particularly in cases where host and microbiome perform the same metabolic transformation. We combined gut commensal genetics with gnotobiotics to measure brivudine dru

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Timing matters

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Helping copper glow

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

In some cases, getting dengue may protect against Zika

A Zika outbreak in a Brazilian slum suggests that the timing of dengue infections may matter for protection against Zika.

3h

Pills equipped with tiny needles can inject a body from the inside

High-tech pills equipped with medicinal needles could administer painless shots inside the body.

3h

This new fabric will automatically cool you down when you get hot and sweaty

The material responds to the body’s heat and wetness to help keep us at a comfortable temperature at all times.

3h

Smart liten fisk klarar spegeltest

Den blå putsarfisken verkar kunna känna igen sin egen spegelbild. När forskare märkte fisken med en brun fläck, som bara syntes i en spegel, försökte den skrubba bort den. Det kan tyda på att fiskars kognitiva förmåga är högre än man antagit.

3h

Tablett fungerar som insulinspruta

Experiment med grisar visar att kapseln kan reglera halten av insulin i blodet ungefär lika noggrant som en vanlig spruta. – Vi hoppas att metoden ska bli ett alternativ till injektioner även för andra läkemedel, säger Niclas Roxhed, forskare i medicinsk teknik på Kungliga tekniska högskolan i Stockholm. Magens frätande blandning av syra och enzymer bryter snabbt ner insulin. Därför ges insulin oc

3h

Butterflies are genetically wired to choose a mate that looks just like them

A team of academics from the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, observed the courtship rituals and sequenced the DNA from nearly 300 butterflies to find out how much of the genome was responsible for their mating behaviour.

3h

Do fish recognize themselves in the mirror?

A species of fish, the cleaner wrasse (Labroides dimidiatus), responds to its reflection and attempts to remove marks on its body during the mirror test—a method held as the gold standard for determining if animals are self-aware. The finding, publishing on February 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, suggests that fish might possess far higher cognitive powers than previously thought, and

3h

Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts

The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream.

3h

Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions

Despite decades of innovation in fabrics with high-tech thermal properties that keep marathon runners cool or alpine hikers warm, there has never been a material that changes its insulating properties in response to the environment. Until now.

3h

Shape of structure that nerve cells use to sense cold and menthol could be new target for chronic pain and migraine

People are great at detecting cold temperatures and also the cool sensation induced by natural substances like menthol, which is common in remedies used to soothe aching muscles. But it hasn't been entirely clear how we do this.

3h

Letters: ‘Let the Bible Speak for Itself’

Teaching the Bible in Public Schools Is a Bad Idea—For Christians According to a recent USA Today report, conservative Christian lawmakers in several states have proposed legislation that would “require or encourage public schools to offer elective classes on the Bible’s literary and historical significance.” But if conservative Christians don’t trust public schools to teach their children about

3h

This spud’s for you: A breeding revolution could unleash the potential of potato

Hybrid breeding, and new genes from wild relatives, promise to climate-proof a key crop for food security

3h

3h

Butterflies are genetically wired to choose a mate that looks just like them

A team of academics from the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, observed the courtship rituals and sequenced the DNA from nearly 300 butterflies to find out how much of the genome was responsible for their mating behaviour.

3h

Do fish recognize themselves in the mirror?

A species of fish, the cleaner wrasse (Labroides dimidiatus), responds to its reflection and attempts to remove marks on its body during the mirror test—a method held as the gold standard for determining if animals are self-aware. The finding, publishing on February 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, suggests that fish might possess far higher cognitive powers than previously thought, and

3h

Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts

The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream.

3h

Diabetes pill could inject insulin directly into stomach wall

Researchers from MIT and Novo Nordisk have tested tortoise-inspired oral insulin system

3h

Can fish be self-aware? The answer is far from easy

A species of wrasse can recognise itself in a mirror, but researchers are unsure of what that actually means. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

3h

The berth of cool

The shape of the protein that lets us sense cold is revealed.

3h

Periodic table still influencing today's research

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table, and the principles that drove Dmitri Mendeleev to construct his table are still influencing today's research advances.

3h

A thousand new objects and phenomena in night sky

The Zwicky Transient Facility, based at the Palomar Observatory, has identified over a thousand new objects and phenomena in the night sky, including more than 1,100 new supernovae and 50 near-Earth asteroids. The alert system informs science teams of possible new objects or changes to known objects in the sky.

3h

You should start using a password manager

Technology The system you keep in your head probably isn't cutting it. Passwords are the bane of our online existence, so please consider using a system to manage and improve them for you.

3h

34 percent off air purifiers and other fresh deals happening today

Gadgets The low-down on the day's best discounts. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

3h

The novel method Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments

Researchers used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to optimize a new technique, leading to the development of the method called Nested CRISPR. This cloning-free method involves the insertion of long DNA fragments in two steps.

3h

Finding chemicals inside a cell

How are chemicals distributed in a cell? Scientists have developed a combined mass spectrometry and biological imaging device that enables direct, label-free detection, and high-resolution mapping of chemicals inside a biological cell. The distribution and accumulation of the disinfectant proflavine around the cell organelles could be visualized directly, based on the mass signal from the molecule

3h

Novel electrocatalyst outperforms platinum in alkaline hydrogen production

A novel ruthenium-based catalyst has shown markedly better performance than commercial platinum catalysts in alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogen production. The catalyst is a nanostructured composite material composed of carbon nanowires with ruthenium atoms bonded to nitrogen and carbon to form active sites within the carbon matrix.

3h

Colombia to ban sport hunting

Environmental groups and Colombia's government on Thursday welcomed a court's move to ban hunting for sport, in the highly biodiverse country.

3h

Vast chemical library could yield trove of new medicines

Scientists improve their ability to scan the universe of would-be drugs

3h

Rheumatoid arthritis: Scientists stop tissue damage

Immune T cells in people with rheumatoid arthritis have a faulty mechanism whose repair can stop inflammation and tissue damage in a mouse model.

3h

New measurements of exotic form of magnesium suggest surprising shape-shift

Just over a decade ago scientists pushed magnesium atoms to new limits, jamming extra neutrons into their nuclei toward—and possibly reaching—the maximum limit for this element.

3h

Periodic table still influencing today's research

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table, and the principles that drove Dmitri Mendeleev to construct his table are still influencing today's research advances.

3h

The Green New Deal has been released. Here are four key tech takeawaysMarkey Green New Deal US

The proposal is ambitious, wide-ranging, and somewhat pragmatic about technology’s role. But whether it will ever see the light of day is unclear.

3h

There are ‘Hidden Figures’ in population genetics, too

Many women made significant contributions to population genetics as programmers but did not get recognition as authors. Inspired by the 2016 blockbuster Hidden Figures , researchers analyzed the contributions of women in population genetics. By looking at all the studies published in a single population genetics journal from 1970 to 1990, they found that many female computer programmers responsib

3h

Did eating fat out of bones give us our big brains?

Long before human ancestors began hunting large mammals for meat, a fatty diet provided them with the nutrition to develop bigger brains, a new paper argues. The paper suggests that our early ancestors acquired a taste for fat by eating marrow scavenged from the skeletal remains of large animals that other predators killed and ate. The argument challenges the widely held view among anthropologist

3h

Zwicky Transient Facility nabs several supernovae a night

The results are rolling in from Caltech's newest state-of-the-art sky-surveying camera, which began operations at the Palomar Observatory in March 2018. Called the Zwicky Transient Facility, or ZTF, the new instrument has so far discovered 50 small near-Earth asteroids and more than 1,100 supernovae, and it has observed more than 1 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy. One of the near-Earth aster

3h

Working it out: Researchers find exercise may help fight depression in seniors

The benefits of exercise are widely known but kinesiologists have for the first time found that physical activity may help fight depression in seniors by stimulating muscle-generated mood boosters.

3h

New way to help increase conservation impact

A study reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world.

3h

Scientists generate functional, transplantable B cells from mice

Functional B-1 cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells are capable of long-term engraftment and secrete natural antibodies after transplantation in mice, researchers report. Scientists are interested in B-1 cells generated from pluripotent stem cells because they could be tested as a therapeutic for a broad range of immunological disorders.

3h

Evidence for a new fundamental constant of the sun

New research shows that the sun's magnetic waves behave differently than currently believed.

3h

The novel method Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments

Researchers used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to optimize a new technique, leading to the development of the method called Nested CRISPR. This cloning-free method involves the insertion of long DNA fragments in two steps.

3h

Finding chemicals inside a cell

How are chemicals distributed in a cell? Scientists have developed a combined mass spectrometry and biological imaging device that enables direct, label-free detection, and high-resolution mapping of chemicals inside a biological cell. The distribution and accumulation of the disinfectant proflavine around the cell organelles could be visualized directly, based on the mass signal from the molecule

3h

Mental illness not to blame for gun violence, study finds

Counter to a lot of public opinion, having a mental illness does not necessarily make a person more likely to commit gun violence. According to a new study, a better indicator of gun violence was access to firearms.

3h

Novel electrocatalyst outperforms platinum in alkaline hydrogen production

A novel ruthenium-based catalyst has shown markedly better performance than commercial platinum catalysts in alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogen production. The catalyst is a nanostructured composite material composed of carbon nanowires with ruthenium atoms bonded to nitrogen and carbon to form active sites within the carbon matrix.

3h

Researchers develop prostate cancer prediction tool that has unmatched accuracy

Researchers have developed a novel machine-learning framework that distinguishes between low- and high-risk prostate cancer with more precision than ever before. The framework is intended to help physicians — in particular, radiologists — more accurately identify treatment options for prostate cancer patients, lessening the chance of unnecessary clinical intervention.

3h

More than enough on our plates

Researchers in the United Kingdom have worked with independent retailers in the take-away sector to try and make food healthier — in the first instance, working with independent fish and chip shops. They successfully developed a box which provides a smaller and healthier portion, around 600 calories instead of 1,600 and have sold 12 million of the boxes to independent fish and chip shops.

3h

Neutrophils escort circulating tumor cells

Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them.

3h

3h

2019 already boasts more measles cases than all of 2010

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has recorded 79 measles cases in 2019. Three outbreaks are responsible for the high number of cases, particularly an outbreak in Washington State that's affected at least 50 people so far. The measles vaccine is effective, though vaccine hesitancy and the virus' extremely contagious nature put some communities at risk. None Americans reported more mea

3h

Zwicky Transient Facility nabs several supernovae a night

New discoveries from the Zwicky Transient Facility include exploding stars, near-Earth asteroids, and more.

3h

More Women Reported to Have Rare Cancer Linked to Breast Implants

More cases of a rare cancer linked to breast implants have been reported in the U.S.

4h

The Guardian view on teenage activists: protesters not puppets | Editorial

A Belgian minister has resigned after falsely claiming that demonstrators were directed by hidden forces. She should have focused on their message When confronted by child protesters, politicians and other adults often reach for the age-based putdown, rather than engage with the substance of whatever it is they are protesting about. Often, the suggestion is that someone older has put them up to it

4h

Study Accuses China of Likely Stealing Organs From Prisoners

Harvesting Organs The scientific community has strict standards for organ transplant research. Researchers can’t use organs from executed prisoners or ones obtained without the consent of the donor , and an international ethics committee must green light every study prior to publication in a research journal. But a startling new report reveals that Chinese researchers may have transplanted thousa

4h

Renewable oils for use in lubricants synthesized

Lubricants keep the world moving, but they leave a heavy environmental footprint. New research provides a strategy to create renewable lubricant base oils efficiently from non-food biomass.

4h

Finally available in a bottle

Since the discovery of the first homoleptic metal carbonyl complex more than 130 years ago, scientists have been trying to obtain further such compounds formed from a carbon monoxide molecule and a metal — compounds that are important for basic research as well as applications.

4h

Har fisk også selvbevidsthed?

PLUS. En pudsefisk foran et spejl opfører sig, som om den er klar over, at den ser sig selv. Hvordan det skal tolkes, er forskerne ikke sikre på.

4h

Therapy derived from parasitic worms downregulates proinflammatory pathways

A therapy derived from the eggs of parasitic worms helps to protect against one of chemotherapy's debilitating side effects by significantly downregulating major proinflammatory pathways, reducing inflammation.

4h

First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene

Germanene is a 2D material that derives from germanium and is related to graphene. As it is not stable outside the vacuum chambers in which is it produced, no real measurements of its electronic properties have been made. Scientists at the University of Groningen have now managed to produce devices with stable germanene. The material is an insulator, and it becomes a semiconductor after moderate h

4h

All the data in the sky, alerted via UW eyes

The Zwicky Transient Facility, based at the Palomar Observatory, has identified over a thousand new objects and phenomena in the night sky, including more than 1,100 new supernovae and 50 near-Earth asteroids. University of Washington scientists are part of the ZTF team and led the development of the collaboration's alert system, which informs science teams of possible new objects or changes to kn

4h

Go Update iOS Right Now To Fix That Very Bad FaceTime Bug

Apple has just released iOS 12.1.4, which fixes a group chat FaceTime bug that let callers eavesdrop on targets.

4h

RNAs play key role in protein aggregation and in neurodegenerative disease

New research reveals RNAs, which are crucial for cells to produce proteins, are also involved in protein aggregation, where proteins do not fold properly and 'clump' together into aggregates.

4h

Renewable oils for use in lubricants synthesized

Lubricants keep the world moving, but they leave a heavy environmental footprint. New research provides a strategy to create renewable lubricant base oils efficiently from non-food biomass.

4h

Sociologists study the impact religion has on child development

Do children raised by religious parents have better social and psychological development than those raised in non-religious homes? In a new study, researchers found that religion can be a mixed blessing for children as they get older.

4h

Promising approach for analyzing atmospheric particles from space

A new analysis has revealed that advanced satellite-based instrument capabilities are needed for global monitoring of microscopic particles, or aerosols, in the stratospheric layer of the atmosphere.

4h

HPV infection may be behind rise in vocal-cord cancers among young nonsmokers

New research finds evidence that the remarkable recent increase in vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies.

4h

Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size

Biologists have discovered why cell sizes are so tightly regulated. Researchers found that the need to produce just the right amount of protein is behind the striking uniformity of sizes.

4h

Finally available in a bottle

Since the discovery of the first homoleptic metal carbonyl complex more than 130 years ago, scientists have been trying to obtain further such compounds formed from a carbon monoxide molecule and a metal — compounds that are important for basic research as well as applications.

4h

Bone Cancer In 240 Million-Year-Old Proto-Turtle Pappochelys

While many people think of cancer as a modern plague, researchers continue to find examples of tumors in animals much older than our own species. Discovery of bone cancer in a very early member …

4h

52-million-year-old bird holds clues to perching evolution

Very early passerine adds to sparse fossil record. Nick Carne reports.

4h

National Air and Space Museum Says Pardon Our Renovation, but Come Anyway

In need of a new facade, the museum undergoes top-to-bottom change, bringing state-of-the-art technology and 21st century stories into its exhibitions

4h

Watch Now: Communicating the Universe's Complexity with Graphic Novels

Theoretical physicist Clifford V. Johnson discusses his eye-catching approach to sharing science with the public — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

This is a neuron on nicotine

Newly developed sensors visually illustrate how nicotine affects cells from the inside out.

4h

High-calorie desserts might not be all bad

If you're going to choose dessert first, then the high-calorie option might lead to your eating a healthier meal, unless you have a lot on your mind, according to new research.

4h

Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use

The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment. Many say that as society has become more permissive, they want information and advice.

4h

See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough

Researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish's digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress.

4h

Tesla Cuts Price of $35K Model 3, Somehow It Still Costs $42,900

Without a traditional dealer network to mislead buyers, Tesla does it at the corporate level. The post Tesla Cuts Price of $35K Model 3, Somehow It Still Costs $42,900 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

Certara advances global initiative to take model-informed precision dosing (MIPD) into the clinic

Certara recognized several years ago that model-informed drug development could also provide tremendous value if used by healthcare providers to determine the optimal drug dose for individual patients in the clinic. Certara scientists have been engaged in critical assessments of hurdles to model-informed precision dosing (MIPD) and have published four new papers in the past months delineating the

4h

Periodic table still influencing today's research

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table, and the principles that drove Dmitri Mendeleev to construct his table are still influencing today's research advances.

4h

New measurements of exotic form of magnesium suggest surprising shape-shift

An international team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reproduced an exotic form of magnesium, known as magnesium-40, and gleaned new and surprising clues about its nuclear structure.

4h

Research details sticky situations at the nanoscale

In a finding that will be useful in nanoscale engineering, Brown University researchers have shown that miniscule differences in the roughness of surfaces can have important effects on how they stick together.

4h

Watch Now: Communicating the Universe's Complexity with Graphic Novels

Theoretical physicist Clifford V. Johnson discusses his eye-catching approach to sharing science with the public — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Research details sticky situations at the nanoscale

Brown University researchers have made a discovery about the way things stick together at tiny scales that could be helpful in engineering micro- and nanoscale devices.

4h

Do cold temperatures result in heat-of-the-moment purchases?

In 2005, the New York Times reported that high end retailer Bergdorf Goodman kept its stores chilled to 68.3 degrees, whereas Old Navy's was kept at a balmy 80.3. Meanwhile, the swanky IFC mall in Hong Kong is kept at a frigid 59 degrees Fahrenheit. There may be a reason why luxury retailers keep their stores so cold aside from keeping heating bills down. When consumers are uncomfortably cold, the

4h

Når politikere, økonomer, patienter og forskere påvirker klinikken

Offentligt ansatte må i princippet være åbne for, at den gældende praksis kan undersøges, evalueres og forandres både ud fra politiske valg og ud fra forskning af høj kvalitet. Uanset at det kan virke meningsløst eller løsrevet fra den konkrete virkelighed.

4h

Immunotherapy appears better than chemotherapy for aggressive type of skin cancer

The first study of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab as the initial treatment for patients with a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer known as Merkel cell carcinoma reports better responses and longer survival than expected with conventional chemotherapy.

4h

Do cold temperatures result in heat-of-the-moment purchases?

In 2005, the New York Times reported that high end retailer Bergdorf Goodman kept its stores chilled to 68.3 degrees, whereas Old Navy's was kept at a balmy 80.3. Meanwhile, the swanky IFC mall in Hong Kong is kept at a frigid 59 degrees Fahrenheit. There may be a reason why luxury retailers keep their stores so cold aside from keeping heating bills down. When consumers are uncomfortably cold, the

4h

Liberal sprinkling of salt discovered around a young star

New ALMA observations show there is ordinary table salt in a not-so-ordinary location: 1,500 light-years from Earth in the disk surrounding a massive young star. Though salts have been found in the atmospheres of old, dying stars, this is the first time they have been seen around young stars in stellar nurseries. The detection of this salt-encrusted disk may help astronomers study the chemistry of

4h

Researchers pinpoint promising approach for analyzing atmospheric particles from space

A new analysis has revealed that advanced satellite-based instrument capabilities are needed for global monitoring of microscopic particles, or aerosols, in the stratospheric layer of the atmosphere. Aerosols in the stratosphere—located above approximately 12 kilometers—increase drastically after a volcanic eruption, leading to changes in the Earth's climate and providing a critical opportunity to

4h

Hacker Figures out How to Drain $1 Million in Cash From ATM

Bank Note A programmer at a Chinese bank discovered a flaw in the institution’s software that let him drain the equivalent of $1 million from its ATMs over the course of about a year. That’s according to Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post , which reports that coder Qin Qisheng’s employers at Huaxia Bank believed his explanation that he was just investigating its security system — bu

4h

The Patient Had Bone Cancer. The Diagnosis Arrived 240 Million Years Too Late.

The fossil of an ancient animal teaches a sad lesson: Cancer has been around for a very, very long time.

4h

Researchers Find Further Evidence That Schizophrenia is Connected to Our Guts

More than 21 million people worldwide suffer from schizophrenia, a profound mental illness that interrupts thinking, language and perception. Quite a few schizophrenic people experience delusions and hear voices. Many of the disease’s symptoms stem from faulty communication between brain cells. And, for decades, scientists have searched for a cure in the brain. Now researchers say they've discover

5h

Bone Cancer In 240 Million-Year-Old Proto-Turtle Pappochelys

While many people think of cancer as a modern plague, researchers continue to find examples of tumors in animals much older than our own species. Discovery of bone cancer in a very early member of the turtle lineage, which lived 240 million years ago, reveals new information about the disease and just how long it's been a scourge to living things. The aggressive osteosarcoma was found in the femur

5h

Pers sukkersyge forsvandt, da han kom under kniven: Tre ud af fire fedmeopererede slipper af med type 2-diabetes

Ny forskning viser, at man også reducerer udviklingen af følgesygdomme ved at blive fedmeopereret.

5h

Sociologists study the impact religion has on child development

Do children raised by religious parents have better social and psychological development than those raised in non-religious homes? In a new study, researchers found that religion can be a mixed blessing for children as they get older.

5h

Liberal Democrats Formally Call for a ‘Green New Deal,’ Giving Substance to a Rallying CryMarkey Green New Deal US

House Democrats introduced a resolution calling for a sweeping environmental and economic mobilization that would make the United States carbon neutral by 2030.

5h

U.K. Doctors Call for Caution in Children’s Use of Screens and Social Media

Britain’s chief medical officers declined to recommend specific age or time limits, but saw associations between social media use and mental health problems.

5h

Serotonin guides fight or flight response in mice

Known for its role in relieving depression, the neurochemical serotonin may also help the brain execute instantaneous, appropriate behaviors in emergency situations, according to a new study. The researchers studied brain activity patterns in mice. If a mouse was experiencing a threat, dorsal raphe serotonin neurons would fire during movements. But, when there was a calm, positive environment, th

5h

Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections

New research from McGill University has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration.

5h

'Time bomb' warning on mining dam disasters

The catastrophic collapse of a dam at a mine in Brazil has exposed a darker side of an industry that the world depends on.

5h

The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?

There is growing evidence that at least in some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the disease may begin in the gut. Experts explore the last two decades of research about the gut-brain axis in PD and look ahead at the possible development and impact of these research areas in the next two decades.

5h

Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyoming

The 'perching birds,' or passerines, are the most common birds in the world today — they include sparrows, robins, and finches. They used to be very rare. Scientists have just discovered some of the earliest relatives of the passerines, including a 52-million-year-old fossil with a thick, curved beak for eating seeds.

5h

Dynamic atmospheres of Uranus, Neptune

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered another mysterious dark storm on Neptune and provided a fresh look at a long-lived storm circling around the north polar region on Uranus.

5h

RNAs play key role in protein aggregation and in neurodegenerative disease

New research reveals RNAs, which are crucial for cells to produce proteins, are also involved in protein aggregation, where proteins do not fold properly and 'clump' together into aggregates.

5h

Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use

The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment. Many say that as society has become more permissive, they want information and advice.

5h

67 percent of bankruptcy filers cite illness and medical bills as contributors to financial ruin

Medical problems contributed to 66.5 percent of all bankruptcies according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, a percentage that is virtually unchanged since the passage of the ACA. Researchers found that yearly, 530,000 families filed bankruptcies linked to illness or medical bills. Debtors reported that medical bills contributed to 58.5 percent of bankruptcies, while i

5h

Erenumab in migraine: Indication of considerable added benefit for certain patients

The first drug of a new drug class can reduce the number of headache days if other prophylactic medications have failed or have not been an option.

5h

Simple drug combination creates new neurons from neighboring cells

A simple combination of molecules converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons, which could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injuries.

5h

This is a neuron on nicotine

Newly developed sensors visually illustrate how nicotine affects cells from the inside out.

5h

Big data approach shown to be effective for evaluating autism treatments

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.

5h

Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections

New research from McGill University has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration.

5h

Hubble reveals dynamic atmospheres of Uranus, Neptune

During its routine yearly monitoring of the weather on our solar system's outer planets, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered a new mysterious dark storm on Neptune and provided a fresh look at a long-lived storm circling around the north polar region on Uranus.

5h

Video: What is white chocolate?

Today, we're showing our love for white chocolate. Sure, it lacks the rich flavor of milk chocolate and the glossy brown color of dark chocolate.

5h

5h

Daily briefing: Stunning ‘light pillars’ in the skies of subarctic Sweden

Daily briefing: Stunning ‘light pillars’ in the skies of subarctic Sweden Daily briefing: Stunning ‘light pillars’ in the skies of subarctic Sweden, Published online: 07 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00528-9 The month’s most spectacular science images, why science shies away from confronting organized research fraud and how the editors of Nature Methods evaluate papers.

5h

Dislike: Facebook will appeal German data-use rulingFacebook Instagram Germany

German authorities ruled Thursday that Facebook should not be allowed to use customer data from other apps and websites to help target advertisements shown on their Facebook pages without their explicit consent, saying it was exploiting its dominant position in social media.

5h

Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?

Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed.

5h

Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?

Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed.

5h

Google's Making It Easier to Encrypt Even Cheap Android Phones

Adiantum will help millions of low-end Android smartphones receive the same encryption protections as flagships.

5h

Ski president sorry for praising dictators and attacking 'so-called' climate change

Gian Franco Kasper said dictators make good event hosts 75-year-old once said women shouldn’t ski jump The president of the International Ski Federation has apologised after an interview in which he questioned climate change and said he preferred countries run by dictators to host competitions. In an interview published in the Swiss newspaper Tages Anzeiger earlier this week, Gian Franco Kasper s

5h

Study reveals the hidden contributions of women to a branch of science

From DNA pioneer Rosalind Franklin to the NASA mathematicians in the film "Hidden Figures," the historical contributions of women to science are increasingly coming to light. And a new study by San Francisco State University researchers shows that it's possible to reveal women's once-hidden scientific work by analyzing decades-old research papers in the field of theoretical population biology. The

5h

The Battle over Public Opinion on Climate Is Over

Now it’s time to focus on pragmatic policy, but the just-announced outline for a Green New Deal may prevent citizens and legislators from doing exactly that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Sunda clouded leopard under threat from habitat fragmentation

The Sunda clouded leopard in Sabah, Malaysia, is under threat from habitat fragmentation and a lack of forest connectivity, finds a study by Cardiff University and the Danau Girang Field Centre.

5h

High-calorie desserts might not be all bad

If you're going to choose dessert first, then the high-calorie option might lead to your eating a healthier meal, unless you have a lot on your mind, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

5h

Two independent mechanisms are involved in tuberous sclerosis

The development of the rare condition called tuberous sclerosis involves mTORC1-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

5h

Keeping things moving

Lubricants keep the world moving, but they leave a heavy environmental footprint. New research from the University of Delaware provides a strategy to create renewable lubricant base oils efficiently from non-food biomass.

5h

Researchers pinpoint promising approach for analyzing atmospheric particles from space

A new analysis has revealed that advanced satellite-based instrument capabilities are needed for global monitoring of microscopic particles, or aerosols, in the stratospheric layer of the atmosphere.

5h

Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections

New research from McGill University has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration.

5h

Sociologists study the impact religion has on child development

Do children raised by religious parents have better social and psychological development than those raised in non-religious homes? In a new study, researchers found that religion can be a mixed blessing for children as they get older.

5h

Anti-microRNAs are possible new therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes

Researchers have shown that targeted silencing of microRNA-132, which is over-expressed in type 2 diabetes, can result in improved insulin secretion and reduced blood glucose in mice and increased insulin secretion in isolated human islet cells.

5h

Scientists Claim to Find “Neurological Signature” of Consciousness

Seat of Consciousness Back in the middle of the 19th century, a physician named William Carpenter theorized that a part of the brain called the sensory ganglion was the “ seat of consciousness .” He was wrong — we now know that what he called the sensory ganglion, since renamed the thalamus, is more of a switchboard for most of our senses. But the mystery of where consciousness comes from remaine

5h

Sunda clouded leopard under threat from habitat fragmentation

The Sunda clouded leopard in Sabah, Malaysia, is under threat from habitat fragmentation and a lack of forest connectivity, finds a study by Cardiff University and the Danau Girang Field Centre.

5h

The Battle over Public Opinion on Climate Is Over

Now it’s time to focus on pragmatic policy, but the just-announced outline for a Green New Deal may prevent citizens and legislators from doing exactly that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

A better way to make plastics out of sulfur

Scientists have discovered a new process to make polymers out of sulfur which could provide a way of making plastic that is less harmful to the environment.

5h

Why forgetting at work can be a good thing

Psychologists and information scientists have looked at how digital information systems support daily work and why it can be a good for us to forget certain things.

5h

Grafik: Sådan fjernes kalk fra drikkevandet

Kalk er et problem i de københavnske vandhaner, hvor det nedsætter levetiden for elektriske apparater og øger mængden af sæbe, københavnerne skal bruge til rengøring. Derfor er Hofor som de første i Danmark i gang med at introducere et system, der kan blødgøre det kalkholdige vand i Hovedstaden.

5h

5h

The real problem with toxic masculinity is that it assumes there is only one way of being a man

For centuries, male violence and acts of aggression were often the way that power was understood and patriarchy upheld. In contemporary times, in more moderate societies, this has become somewhat tempered, yet it still exists in different forms and has now been given the name "toxic masculinity".

5h

Giving a place a bad reputation can harm its residents' health – unless they're empowered to change it

From "crap towns" to "shitholes", there's no denying that some places are unfairly tarred with a bad reputation. Sometimes it's the result of sensationalised news coverage, but in recent years, the rise of "fly-on-the-wall" TV shows such as Benefits Street or Panorama documentaries has also left residents feeling misrepresented, and their communities tarnished.

5h

Blood leukocytes mirror insufficient sleep

Prior studies have indicated that prolonged insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular diseases, dementia and psychiatric disorders. Researchers have now identified changes in blood leukocytes associated with sleep deprivation.

5h

Green water-purification system works without heavy metals or corrosive chemicals

Scientists have developed an effective and energy-efficient technique for purifying water by using graphitic carbon nitride sheets. Their prototype purified pathogen-rich water in 30 minutes, killing over 99.9999 percent of bacteria, such as E. coli, meeting China's requirements for clean drinking water.

5h

Normal brain aging patterns occur at a faster rate in people with psychosis

Patients with psychosis have accelerated aging of two brain networks important for general cognition — the frontoparietal network (FPN) and cingulo-opercular network (CON) — according to a new study.

5h

Hubble reveals dynamic atmospheres of Uranus, Neptune

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered another mysterious dark storm on Neptune and provided a fresh look at a long-lived storm circling around the north polar region on Uranus.

5h

Liberal sprinkling of salt discovered around a young star

New ALMA observations show there is ordinary table salt in a not-so-ordinary location: 1,500 light-years from Earth in the disk surrounding a massive young star. Though salts have been found in the atmospheres of old, dying stars, this is the first time they have been seen around young stars in stellar nurseries. The detection of this salt-encrusted disk may help astronomers study the chemistry of

5h

HPV infection may be behind rise in vocal-cord cancers among young nonsmokers

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team finds evidence that the remarkable recent increase in vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies.

5h

Addressing cooling needs and energy poverty targets in the Global South

With most of the northern hemisphere currently in the icy grip of one of the coldest winters ever recorded, in the south, it is record-breaking heat that is the problem. The results of a new IIASA study show that between 1.8 and 4.1 billion people require access to indoor cooling to avoid heat-related stresses.

5h

High rates of weight-based bullying found among LBGTQ adolescents

Adolescents who identify as LGBTQ often face victimization and bullying because of their sexual and/or gender identity. New research from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut indicates that high percentages of LGBTQ youth are also teased and bullied because of their body weight — in some cases at hi

5h

Why forgetting at work can be a good thing

Psychologists and information scientists at the University of Münster have looked at how digital information systems support daily work and why it can be a good for us to forget certain things. The results of their study have been published in the Ergonomics journal.

5h

The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?

There is growing evidence that at least in some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the disease may begin in the gut. Writing in a special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts explore the last two decades of research about the gut-brain axis in PD and look ahead at the possible development and impact of these research areas in the next two decades.

5h

Tracks in rocks tell us where ancient animals roamed in southern Africa

At first glance, they look like nothing more interesting than rocks. But to our research team, these two rocks – situated just 420 metres apart on a rugged, remote portion of South Africa's Cape south coast – are fascinating and important pieces of ancient history.

6h

6h

6h

Melting Ice Sheets Could Worsen Extreme Weather

Polar melt could have more complicated climate impacts than previously thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Crows can solve a tricky puzzle box by planning ahead and using tools

New Caledonian crows are some of the cleverest birds — they can plan several steps ahead while using tools to get food out of a series of puzzle boxes

6h

Sequencing the Y chromosome is notoriously tough

Scientists have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly—the most that anyone has achieved yet. When researchers say they have sequenced the human genome, there is a caveat to this statement: a lot of the human genome is sequenced and assembled, but there are regions that are full of repetitive elements, making them difficult to map. One piece that is notorious

6h

Atomic-scale simulation of antiarrhythmic drug interaction with cardiac cells

To unravel the mysterious mechanisms of drug potency for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, a group of researchers at UC Davis have developed novel simulations that provide insights on vital atomic-scale drug-cardiac cells interactions.

6h

How metrics are changing editorial decisions in African newsrooms

New digital technologies such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and WhatsApp have significantly shaped news production, distribution and consumption practices around the world. This has led to changes in the ways in which news is gathered by citizens and professional journalists as well as the ways in which it's consumed.

6h

Scientists discover a better way to make plastics out of sulfur

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered a new process to make polymers out of sulfur which could provide a way of making plastic that is less harmful to the environment.

6h

NIH study provides answer to long-held debate on blood sugar control after stroke

Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke. Primary results from the Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) study, a large, multisite cl

6h

Immunotherapy drug used as 1st-line therapy for Merkel cell carcinoma improved survival

A multi-center phase II clinical trial investigating pembrolizumab as a first-line and programmed cell death-1 therapy in patients with advanced Merkel cell carcinoma reports lasting tumor control, generally manageable side effects and improved overall survival. Dr. Adam Riker led the study at LSU Health New Orleans.

6h

The novel method Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments

The group of Dr. Cerón at IDIBELL used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to optimize the technique, leading to the development of the method called Nested CRISPR. This cloning-free method involves the insertion of long DNA fragments in two steps.

6h

Evidence for a new fundamental constant of the sun

New research undertaken at Northumbria University, Newcastle, shows that the sun's magnetic waves behave differently than currently believed.Their findings have been reported in the latest edition of the prominent journal, Nature Astronomy.

6h

What is white chocolate? (video)

Today, we're showing our love for white chocolate. Sure, it lacks the rich flavor of milk chocolate and the glossy brown color of dark chocolate. And many people even argue it's not really chocolate at all. But in this Reactions video, we show you all there is to love about this creamy pale confection: https://youtu.be/4qI8qbfTkys.

6h

Study finds HIV+ cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy

The immunotherapy that has revolutionized treatment of many cancers appears to offer similar benefit to cancer patients living with HIV.

6h

New findings could make mosquitos more satisfied — and safer to be around

Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. A new study shows that some appetite-reducing drugs can curtail the insects' impulse to feed on warm-blooded hosts.

6h

Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyo.

The 'perching birds,' or passerines, are the most common birds in the world today — they include sparrows, robins, and finches. They used to be very rare. Scientists have just discovered some of the earliest relatives of the passerines, including a 52-million-year-old fossil with a thick, curved beak for eating seeds.

6h

Increased patient-provider communication affects outcomes of the IBD patient journey

It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Currently, there are no cures for these diseases. For many patients, their disease impacts other areas of their health and well-being, including aspects of their reproductive and mental health. Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis highlights t

6h

Improving diagnosis leads to better outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no cures for these diseases. For many patients the path to diagnosis and effective treatment is long and arduous, leading to delayed treatment and increased complications. Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress reinforce the need f

6h

Is chronic rhinosinusitis associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety?

Chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition marked by sinus inflammation that can make breathing difficult and cause face pain or tenderness. The condition affects quality of life but whether it contributes to depression and anxiety in patients is unclear. This study of about 49,000 people in a South Korean insurance database examined the risk of depression and anxiety in chronic rhinosinusitis a

6h

Emerging therapies show benefit to patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no cures for these diseases. Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress — a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association, in Las Vegas, Nev., from Feb. 7-9 – highlight advancem

6h

Case study documents bone cancer in 240-million-year-old stem-turtle

This research letter documents bone cancer in a 240-million-year-old stem-turtle from the Triassic period, helping to provide more data about the history of cancer in tetrapod evolution. This is a case study about a highly malignant bone tumor on the femur of a shell-less stem-turtle.

6h

Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size

MIT biologists have discovered why cell sizes are so tightly regulated. Researchers led by Angelika Amon found that the need to produce just the right amount of protein is behind the striking uniformity of sizes.

6h

Healthy ageing and grandmother involvement with grandchildren benefit multiple generations

Women live remarkably long after their fertility ends, but why? Researchers at the University of Turku used historical Finnish church records to show that being there after the menopause to look after grandchildren improved the grandchildren's survival. However, the study finds the ability to provide help to grandchildren declines with grandmother age and deteriorated health, and the benefits from

6h

Circular RNA holds promise as cancer biomarker

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have cataloged circular RNA in multiple cancers and conducted initial research that suggests these stable structures could serve as cancer biomarkers in blood or urine.

6h

First identification of brain's preparation for action

Neuroscientists have identified the processes which occur in our brains milliseconds before we undertake a series of movements, crucial for speech, handwriting, sports or playing a musical instrument.Tracking brain activity, researchers could distinguish between neural mechanisms associated with skilled and error-prone actions.Following further research, this new information could lead to the deve

6h

Green water-purification system works without heavy metals or corrosive chemicals

Scientists at the Institute of Process Engineering at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing and Yangzhou University in Jiangsu have developed an effective and energy-efficient technique for purifying water by using graphitic carbon nitride sheets. Their prototype, presented Feb. 7 in the journal Chem, purified pathogen-rich water in 30 minutes, killing over 99.9999 percent of bacteria, such a

6h

Putting female mosquitoes on human diet drugs could reduce spread of disease

In a study publishing Feb. 7 in the journal Cell, researchers report that they have identified drugs that can reduce mosquito hunger for blood. Because movement of female mosquitoes from human to human — male mosquitoes do not consume blood — is the means by which mosquito-borne infections are passed along, researchers have theorized that reducing the frequency with which female mosquitoes feed

6h

Studies lend support to 'grandmother hypothesis,' but there are limits

Humans are unusual in that women go through menopause and stop reproducing long before reaching the end of their life expectancy. One theory holds that this aspect of human life history may be explained by the evolutionary benefits associated with the role of grandmothers in helping their grandchildren. Now, two studies reported in Current Biology on Feb. 7 add to evidence for this so-called 'gran

6h

Scientists generate functional, transplantable B cells from mice

Functional B-1 cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells are capable of long-term engraftment and secrete natural antibodies after transplantation in mice, researchers report Feb. 7 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. Scientists are interested in B-1 cells generated from pluripotent stem cells because they could be tested as a therapeutic for a broad range of immunological disorders.

6h

Scientists develop metal-free photocatalyst to purify pathogen-rich water in minutes

Scientists across the world have been racking their brains to solve the global problem of clean water scarcity. Chinese scientists have recently found a new way to purify pathogen-rich water with high efficiency and without using metal.

6h

Painted Wolves Caught on Camera Hunting Baboons for the First Time

Africa's painted wolves are beautiful, hard-core hunters.

6h

'Oldest' Case of Bone Cancer Is Diagnosed in a 240-Million-Year-Old Shell-Less Turtle

Hundreds of millions of years ago, a shell-less turtle developed a malady in its bones.

6h

In Photos: The Majestic Painted Wolves of Zimbabwe

The painted wolves of Africa are one of the world's most endangered mammals.

6h

Liam Neeson’s Cold Pursuit Is Like Taken, but With Insight

Nels Coxman (played by Liam Neeson), the lead character of Cold Pursuit , has never killed anyone in his life. A snowplow driver in the fictional Colorado ski town of Kehoe, he’s beloved enough that his fellow citizens name him “Man of the Year,” letting him give a corny speech as his beaming wife, Grace (Laura Dern), looks on. Nels seems harmless—but this is a Liam Neeson movie, one firmly plant

6h

A New Way to Keep Mosquitoes From Biting

The experiment really shouldn’t have worked. Several years ago, Laura Duvall from Rockefeller University decided to feed mosquitoes with experimental drugs designed to suppress the appetite of humans. Perhaps these chemicals might also reduce the insects’ appetite for blood? And, by extension, stop them from biting people and spreading diseases? “The whole thing started off as a joke,” says Lesli

6h

Trump Is Walling Off the GOP

The most misleading line in Donald Trump’s State of the Union address this week might have also been the most revealing about how he is reconfiguring the Republican Party and reshaping America’s electoral alignment. “Legal immigrants enrich our nation and strengthen our society in countless ways,” he declared at one point. “I want people to come into our country, in the largest numbers ever, but

6h

Study shows unusual microbes hold clues to early life

A new study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, according to a recent paper in The ISME Journal. Researchers used cutting-edge molecular methods to study these microbes, which thrive in the hot, oxygen-free fluids that flow through Earth's crust.

6h

Atomic-scale simulation of antiarrhythmic drug interaction with cardiac cells

To unravel the mysterious mechanisms of drug potency for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, a group of researchers at UC Davis have developed novel simulations that provide insights on vital atomic-scale drug-cardiac cells interactions.

6h

Fossil fuels are bad for your health and harmful in many ways besides climate changeMarkey Green New Deal US

Many Democratic lawmakers aim to pass a Green New Deal, a package of policies that would mobilize vast amounts of money to create new jobs and address inequality while fighting climate change.

6h

Major new report on impact of hunting

A new report – commissioned by a leading international organisation – promotes the creation of a sustainable wild meat sector to protect disadvantaged people and endangered species from hunting.

6h

Major new report on impact of hunting

A new report – commissioned by a leading international organisation – promotes the creation of a sustainable wild meat sector to protect disadvantaged people and endangered species from hunting.

6h

Researchers Propose An Inflatable Sailplane to Explore Mars

Inflatable Sailplane Exploring Mars isn’t easy. Satellite imagery lacks detail and rovers move slowly. But researchers at the University of Arizona say they have a better concept that would cost a fraction of those technologies: an inflatable sailplane that weighs just 11 pounds (5 kg) and sports a wingspan of 18.7 feet (570 cm), that’ll cruise high above the Martian landscape and survey from a b

6h

‘Diet drugs’ suppress mosquitoes’ thirst for blood

‘Diet drugs’ suppress mosquitoes’ thirst for blood ‘Diet drugs’ suppress mosquitoes’ thirst for blood , Published online: 07 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00511-4 Method shows promise for disease control, but practical hurdles remain.

6h

6h

Half of Americans have heart disease, but there are easy ways to reduce your risk

Health Three strategies to improve your cardiovascular health. Last week, the American Heart Association (AHA) published a bold statement: Nearly half of American adults are living with some form of cardiovascular disease.

6h

Higher rates of foreclosure follow black homeowners into white areas

Even in predominantly white areas, black homeowners are more likely to face a foreclosure than their white neighbors, according to research at The University of Alabama.

6h

First study of black bear population in 30 years identifies need for safer, habitable public land in Alberta

A new study by University of Alberta biologists shows black bear populations are lowest on Crown land and most dense on national park land, followed by private land, highlighting issues for management and conservation efforts.

6h

Why stop at plastic bags and straws? The case for a global treaty banning most single-use plastics

Single-use plastics are a blessing and a curse. They have fueled a revolution in commercial and consumer convenience and improved hygiene standards, but also have saturated the world's coastlines and clogged landfills. By one estimate 79 percent of all plastic ever produced is now in a dump, a landfill or the environment, and only 9 percent has been recycled.

6h

First study of black bear population in 30 years identifies need for safer, habitable public land in Alberta

A new study by University of Alberta biologists shows black bear populations are lowest on Crown land and most dense on national park land, followed by private land, highlighting issues for management and conservation efforts.

6h

Amazon Moves Into Self-Driving Cars, Invests in Aurora

The tech titan just announced it's investing in autonomous technology developer Aurora.

6h

The climate crisis has arrived – so stop feeling guilty and start imagining your future

Evidence of the devastating impacts of anthropogenic climate change are stacking up, and it is becoming horrifyingly real. There can be no doubt that the climate crisis has arrived. Yet another "shocking new study" led The Guardian and various other news media this week. One-third of Himalayan ice cap, they report, is doomed.

6h

What's needed for a sustainable, equitable and healthy food system?

Today, we are trapped in a situation where one billion people are underfed and facing stunted growth, while more than two billion are overfed and suffering from obesity and related diseases. It is true that life expectancy has increased globally; however, health is on decline due to our food choices. Nutrition-related chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some for

6h

Defending against adversarial artificial intelligence

Today, machine learning (ML) is coming into its own, ready to serve mankind in a diverse array of applications – from highly efficient manufacturing, medicine and massive information analysis to self-driving transportation, and beyond. However, if misapplied, misused or subverted, ML holds the potential for great harm – this is the double-edged sword of machine learning.

6h

I fight anti-GMO fears in Africa to combat hunger

As a child, I remember feeling hungry most of the time. Growing up in rural Tanzania, I walked to school barefoot and most of the time had one meal a day. After school, I helped my mother with various farming chores, including feeding the animals, weeding, harvesting and planting. I often heard my mother express concerns about the lack of ways to protect our crops from drought, pests and diseases.

6h

Researchers obtain an important chemical compound

Since the discovery of the first homoleptic metal carbonyl complex Ni(CO)4 more than 130 years ago, scientists try to obtain further such compounds formed from a carbon monoxide molecule and a metal that are important for basic research as well as applications. The last new compound of this type to be bottled, the Co(CO)5 cation, was reported in 2003. However, extensive research in the gas phase h

6h

Green water-purification system works without heavy metals or corrosive chemicals

Scientists at the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing and Yangzhou University (YZU) in Jiangsu have developed an effective and energy-efficient technique for purifying water by using graphitic carbon nitride sheets.

6h

Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size

MIT biologists have discovered the answer to a fundamental biological question: Why are cells of a given type all the same size?

6h

Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyoming

Most of the birds you've ever seen—sparrows, finches, robins, crows—have one crucial thing in common: they're all what scientists refer to as perching birds, or "passerines." The passerines make up about 6,500 of the 10,000 bird species alive today. But while they're everywhere now, they were once rare, and scientists are still learning about their origins. In a new paper in Current Biology, resea

6h

New findings could make mosquitos more satisfied—and safer to be around

She weighs less than one ten-thousandth of an ounce and her top speed is less than two miles per hour. Nonetheless, the female mosquito is one of the most dangerous animals on the planet. For as she flies from person to person, biting us to draw the blood she needs to lay her eggs, this tiny creature transmits microbes that sicken and kill millions of people every year.

6h

Scientists develop metal-free photocatalyst to purify pathogen-rich water in minutes

Scientists around the world have been wracking their brains to solve the global problem of clean water scarcity. Chinese scientists now report a new way to purify pathogen-rich water with high efficiency and without using metal.

6h

Study explores new way to increase conservation impact

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world.

6h

Choosy Amphipods

Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behaviour requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision.

6h

Scientists discover a better way to make plastics out of sulfur

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered a new process to make polymers out of sulfur which could provide a way of making plastic that is less harmful to the environment.

6h

52-million-year-old bird holds clues to perching evolution

Very early passerine adds to sparse fossil record. Nick Carne reports.

6h

Evolutionarily, grandmas are good for grandkids — up to a point

Women may live past their reproductive years because they help their grandchildren survive, but there are limits to that benefit.

6h

Popular Music is Getting Sadder and Angrier, New Study Finds

Popular Music is Getting Sadder and Angrier, New Study Finds An analysis of more than 50 years of song lyrics identifies a dark trend in popular music. SadMusic_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: alexkich via Shutterstock Culture Thursday, February 7, 2019 – 10:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) – "Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth," sings Pharrell Williams in "Happy," but t

6h

I fight anti-GMO fears in Africa to combat hunger

As a child, I remember feeling hungry most of the time. Growing up in rural Tanzania, I walked to school barefoot and most of the time had one meal a day. After school, I helped my mother with various farming chores, including feeding the animals, weeding, harvesting and planting. I often heard my mother express concerns about the lack of ways to protect our crops from drought, pests and diseases.

6h

Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size

MIT biologists have discovered the answer to a fundamental biological question: Why are cells of a given type all the same size?

6h

New findings could make mosquitos more satisfied—and safer to be around

She weighs less than one ten-thousandth of an ounce and her top speed is less than two miles per hour. Nonetheless, the female mosquito is one of the most dangerous animals on the planet. For as she flies from person to person, biting us to draw the blood she needs to lay her eggs, this tiny creature transmits microbes that sicken and kill millions of people every year.

6h

Study explores new way to increase conservation impact

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world.

6h

Choosy Amphipods

Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behaviour requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision.

6h

Researchers fear 400 scientific studies used organs illegally harvested from Chinese prisoners

A new study suggests hundreds of published scientific papers involving organ transplants in China violated ethical standards. International professional standards say studies involving organ transplants shouldn't be published if the organs came from executed prisoners, or donors don't provide consent. China has long been accused of facilitating a shady network of organ harvesting and trafficking,

6h

Jordan Peterson accepts bitcoin after leaving Patreon

Alongside Dave Rubin, Jordan Peterson left Patreon over "free speech" issues to launch their own platform. In the interim, Peterson is accepting bitcoin, which might hint at the "extra features" their platform will include. They point to anti-feminist Youtuber, Sargon of Akkad, as the impetus for leaving Patreon — ironic, considering how often Peterson points to identity politics as a problem. No

6h

Working it out: Researchers find exercise may help fight depression in seniors

The benefits of exercise are widely known but kinesiologists at McMaster University have for the first time found that physical activity may help fight depression in seniors by stimulating muscle-generated mood boosters.

6h

Finally available in a bottle

Researchers succeed in gaining access to an important chemical compound.

6h

Smartphone use risks eye examination misdiagnosis

Clinicians who use smartphones to capture photographs of patients' eyes risk misdiagnosis if they base their decisions on objective data extracted from non-calibrated cameras.

6h

Study explores new way to help increase conservation impact

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world.

6h

Illinois professor to lead AAAS session on 'Blockchain and the Scientific Method'

Lav Varshney, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will lead a session on 'Blockchain and the Scientific Method' as a part of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Washington D.C., on February 15, 2019.

6h

Game behavior can give a hint about player gender

Researchers from ITMO University managed to predict people's personality features such as gender using data from online gaming platform. This is one of the first studies where machine learning is applied to analyze a large amount of game data. Such an approach can improve the system of personal games recommendations. It can also be used to identify gaming addiction. The results were presented at t

6h

Blood leukocytes mirror insufficient sleep

Prior studies have indicated that prolonged insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular diseases, dementia and psychiatric disorders. Finnish researchers have now identified changes in blood leukocytes associated with sleep deprivation.

6h

Doctors Wired a Prosthetic Hand Directly Into a Woman’s Nerves

Sans Hand In a world first, doctors in Sweden say they’ve wired a prosthetic hand directly into a woman’s nerves , allowing her to move its fingers with her mind and even feel tactile sensations. The hand is an enormous step up from existing prostheses, which often rely on electrodes placed on the outside of the skin — and it could herald a future in which robotic devices interface seamlessly wit

6h

Fatty acids ‘feed’ prostate cancer tumors

A new study shows a link between prostate cancer and cancer cells’ uptake of fatty acids. The findings point to a possible therapeutic target for this common cancer, the second most diagnosed cancer in men. Prostate cancer accounts for 15 percent of male cancer diagnoses and 8 percent of all cancer cases. “There is a strong link between obesity, diet, and poor outcomes in men who develop prostate

6h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

6h

Politics this week

[no content]

6h

Business this week

[no content]

6h

The rewilding movement is going from strength to strength

One site in Argentina now has tapirs, jaguars, peccaries and macaws

6h

How to preserve nature on a tight budget

Saving species cheaply and effectively

6h

6h

Israeli GenCell to mass produce fuel-cell generators as demand surges

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

6h

6h

What your breath could reveal about your health | Julian Burschka

There's no better way to stop a disease than to catch and treat it early, before symptoms occur. That's the whole point of medical screening techniques like radiography, MRIs and blood tests. But there's one medium with overlooked potential for medical analysis: your breath. Technologist Julian Burschka shares the latest in the science of breath analysis — the screening of the volatile organic co

6h

Researchers find evidence for a new fundamental constant of the Sun

New research undertaken at Northumbria University, Newcastle shows that the sun's magnetic waves behave differently than currently believed.

6h

Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?

Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed.

6h

Normal brain aging patterns occur at a faster rate in people with psychosis

Patients with psychosis have accelerated aging of two brain networks important for general cognition — the frontoparietal network (FPN) and cingulo-opercular network (CON) — according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry.

6h

Nanomachines are taught to fight cancer

Scientists from ITMO University in collaboration with their international colleagues proposed new DNA-based nanomachines that can be used for gene therapy of cancer. This new invention can greatly contribute to making the treatment of oncological diseases more effective and selective. The results were published in Angewandte Chemie.

6h

Finding chemicals inside a cell

How are chemicals distributed in a cell? Chinese scientists have developed a combined mass spectrometry and biological imaging device that enables direct, label-free detection, and high-resolution mapping of chemicals inside a biological cell. As demonstrated in their publication in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the distribution and accumulation of the disinfectant proflavine around the cell orga

6h

Promising results for new acute porphyria treatment

Acute porphyria is a group of uncommon diseases that can cause severe, potentially life-threatening attacks of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and paralysis. Liver transplantation is currently the only effective treatment available for the most seriously afflicted patients. A clinical trial conducted in collaboration with researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now shows that a new drug ca

6h

Choosy amphipods

Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behavior requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision.

6h

Stalled fertility declines linked to disruptions in women's education in Africa

A slowdown in fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa was partially caused by disruptions in women's education in the 1980s, according to new IIASA research.

6h

Evolution: Larger datasets unravel deep roots

Comparative genome content analyses provide insight into the early evolution of animals. A novel method that permits the use of larger datasets in such studies yields results that are consistent with classical views of animal phylogeny.

6h

Discovering new particles using black holes

Some theories that go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics predict the existence of new ultralight particles, with masses much below the lightest known particles in nature. When these particles have very weak interactions with ordinary matter, they are hard to detect by particle colliders and dark matter detectors. However, as a new paper by physicists Daniel Baumann and Horng Sheng Chia

7h

Theraly Fibrosis Inc. Licenses Scarab Genomics’ Bacterial Production Technologies for its Pharmaceutical Program

Scarab Genomics LLC, a global biotechnology company focused on developing breakthrough technologies in biomanufacturing by applying its proprietary Clean Genome® E. coli expression and production systems for the manufacturing of proteins, single chain antibodies, plasmid DNA including retroviral, lentiviral, and shRNA vectors, and RNA and Theraly Fibrosis Inc., a biopharmaceutical company with a m

7h

Chemical and topographical single-cell imaging at nanoscale resolution by near-field desorption mass spectrometry

How are chemicals distributed in a cell? Chinese scientists have developed a combined mass spectrometry and biological imaging device that enables direct, label-free detection, and high-resolution mapping of chemicals inside a biological cell. As demonstrated in their publication in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the distribution and accumulation of the disinfectant proflavine around the cell orga

7h

7h

Researchers Think They've Identified the Brain Pattern that Signals Consciousness

Imagine lying in a hospital bed, conscious, but unable to convey that to the world around you. For sufferers of strokes, traumatic brain injuries or the ever-terrifying locked-in syndrome, it’s not just nightmare fuel — it's reality for some patients. What’s potentially more frightening is that neuroscience hasn’t landed on a way to truly test for consciousness. That's not for a lack of trying. Bu

7h

NASA Honors Fallen Astronauts with Day of Remembrance

Every year, NASA recognizes astronauts who lost their lives in the pursuit of spaceflight with an official Day of Remembrance. This year, it's celebrated Feb. 7. And NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine will lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery. Another wreath-laying ceremony will also happen at Kennedy Space Center’s Space Mirror Memorial. Both ceremonies w

7h

Common antidepressants make drugs like Vicodin less effective

People who take the most common form of antidepressants get less pain relief from hydrocodone, such as Vicodin, report researchers. The finding could help combat the opioid epidemic, as poorly managed pain may lead to opioid abuse. As many as 1 in 6 Americans takes antidepressants, mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Researchers found that SSRIs reduce the effectiveness of hydrocodone

7h

Is the Entire Car Industry Really Doomed?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Game behavior can give a hint about player gender

Researchers from ITMO University report that they have predicted personality features such as gender using data from an online gaming platform. This is one of the first studies of machine learning applied to a large amount of game data. The approach could improve personal game recommendation systems. It can also be used to identify gaming addiction. The results were presented at the AAAI Conferenc

7h

ESA's Mars rover has a name – Rosalind FranklinMars Rosalind Franklin

The ExoMars rover that will search for the building blocks of life on the Red Planet has a name: Rosalind Franklin. The prominent scientist behind the discovery of the structure of DNA will have her symbolic footprint on Mars in 2021.

7h

AI technology addresses parts accuracy, a major manufacturing challenge in 3-D printing

Imagine using machine learning to ensure that the pieces of an aircraft fit together more precisely, and can be assembled with less testing and time. That is one of the uses behind new technology being developed by researchers at Purdue University and the University of Southern California.

7h

Gustav Klimt in the Brain Lab – Issue 69: Patterns

The neuroscientist was in the art gallery and there were many things to learn. So Eric Kandel excitedly guided me through the bright lobby of the Neue Galerie New York, a museum of fin de siècle Austrian and German art, located in a Beaux-Art mansion, across from Central Park. The Nobel laureate was dressed in a dark blue suit with white pinstripes and red bowtie. I was dressed, well, less elegan

7h

How Supermassive Black Holes Were Discovered – Issue 69: Patterns

An Introduction to the Black Hole Institute Fittingly, the Black Hole Initiative (BHI) was founded 100 years after Karl Schwarzschild solved Einstein’s equations for general relativity—a solution that described a black hole decades before the first astronomical evidence that they exist. As exotic structures of spacetime, black holes continue to fascinate astronomers, physicists, mathematicians, p

7h

Impossible Cookware and Other Triumphs of the Penrose Tile – Issue 69: Patterns

In 1974, Roger Penrose, a British mathematician, created a revolutionary set of tiles that could be used to cover an infinite plane in a pattern that never repeats. In 1982, Daniel Shechtman, an Israeli crystallographer, discovered a metallic alloy whose atoms were organized unlike anything ever observed in materials science. Penrose garnered public renown on a scale rarely seen in mathematics. S

7h

Fossils of new oviraptorosaur species discovered in Mongolia

A new oviraptorosaur species from the Late Cretaceous was discovered in Mongolia.

7h

Tecan launches NGS DreamPrep™ delivering unprecedented speed and accuracy for automated library preparation

Tecan today announces the launch of NGS DreamPrep™, a fully-automated approach to next-generation sequencing (NGS) library preparation for research use. This groundbreaking new approach offers quality controlled, sequencing-ready NGS libraries in just a matter of hours, with minimal manual interaction and no sample loss.

7h

Scientists discover new type of self-healing material

A research group from RIKEN and Kyushu University has developed a new type of material, based on ethylene, which exhibits a number of useful properties such as self-healing and shape memory. Remarkably, some of the materials can spontaneously self-heal even in water or acidic and alkali solutions. The new material is based on ethylene, a compound that is the source of much of the plastic in use to

7h

New materials for high-voltage supercapacitors

A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has developed new materials for supercapacitors with higher voltage and better stability than other materials. Their research was recently published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science.

7h

Duke-NUS study: Interaction between two immune cell types could be key to better dengue vaccines

A sentinel immune cell in the skin surprises researchers by forming a physical connection with a virus-killing T cell.

7h

Study reveals the hidden contributions of women to a branch of science

A new study by San Francisco State University researchers shows that it's possible to reveal women's once-hidden scientific work by analyzing decades-old research papers in the field of theoretical population biology. The implications of the study stretch far beyond that particular field of science, and the historical bias shown by the research likely continues to impact the representation of wome

7h

Developed self-controlling 'smart' fuel cell electrode material

A research team led by Professor Kang Taek Lee in the Department of Energy Science and Engineering developed electrode material for a new form of high-performance solid oxide fuel cell.

7h

SUTD researchers developed new methods to create microfluidic devices with fluoropolymers

Researchers from SUTD developed a new rapid prototyping technique for fluoropolymer microfluidic device. This microfluidic device was fabricated by two steps: (1) cutting commercially available fluoropolymer films using a computer controlled cutting plotter and (2) heat pressing fluoropolymer films using a heat press machine. The technique provides a simple, low-cost avenue to create fluoropolymer

7h

Body building supplement could be bad for the brain

L-norvaline is an ingredient widely used in body building supplements and is promoted as a compound that can boost workouts and aid recovery. Similar compounds have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases and a study on human cells, by scientists from the University of Technology Sydney, suggests L-norvaline may also cause damage to brain cells.

7h

Author Correction: GABAA receptor signalling mechanisms revealed by structural pharmacology

Author Correction: GABA A receptor signalling mechanisms revealed by structural pharmacology Author Correction: GABA A receptor signalling mechanisms revealed by structural pharmacology, Published online: 07 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0929-5 Author Correction: GABA A receptor signalling mechanisms revealed by structural pharmacology

7h

Method converts plastic trash into clean fuel

A new chemical conversion process could transform the world’s polyolefin waste, a form of plastic, into useful products, such as clean fuels. The United Nations estimates that more than 8 million tons of plastics flow into the oceans each year. “Our strategy is to create a driving force for recycling by converting polyolefin waste into a wide range of valuable products, including polymers, naphth

7h

Disney Won't Stop Deadpool From Dropping F-Bombs

The merc will still have a mouth in the Mouse House. Also, *The Walking Dead* is getting another season—surprise!

7h

Forskningsmidler på vej til to projekter om type 1-diabetes

Projekter i diabetes stress og forskellige psykologiske problemstillinger ved type 1-diabetes har fået forskningsmidler.

7h

Artificial Intelligence Finds Ancient ‘Ghosts’ in Modern DNA

Could deep learning help paleontologists and geneticists hunt for ghosts? When modern humans first migrated out of Africa 70,000 years ago, at least two related species, now extinct, were already waiting for them on the Eurasian landmass. These were the Neanderthals and Denisovans, archaic humans who interbred with those early moderns, leaving bits of their DNA behind today in the genomes of peop

7h

Ergonomic, Quiet Peltier Product for Histology

Every histology lab is different, but the need for a quiet, cold surface is universal.TECA’s newest Thermoelectric Cold Plate product offers a unique option for histology laboratories.Originally designed as a custom solution for a large histology lab, TECA has added Model ERGO-900 to our standard products line.

7h

Indoor air pollutants affecting health, well-being of people working, living in enclosed areas

The average American spends nearly 90 percent of their time indoors, where air pollutants can be two to five times more concentrated than outdoors, putting people at risk for severe health complications, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

7h

LG Confirms 3D Time-Of-Flight Sensor For New G8 Flagship

LG has made no secret of the fact that it’s going to unveil a new flagship smartphone at MWC 2019 in Barcelona. The company also revealed that the LG G8 ThinQ is going to feature …

7h

Marshmello’s Fortnite Performance Hints at the Mindblowing Potential for Huge Shared Virtual Events

An interesting moment at the intersection of digital entertainment, virtual reality, music, and gaming took place this past weekend. It may be remembered as an iconic achievement in the use of online virtual worlds for a large-scale media event. On Saturday, Marshmello, a popular DJ, performed a live virtual concert inside the even more popular online video game Fortnite. If you missed it, it’s w

7h

Sandia identifies unusual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using tandem mass spectrometry

In most situations, breaking things apart isn't the best way to solve a problem. However, sometimes the opposite is true if you're trying to characterize complex chemical compounds. That's what Sandia National Laboratories scientists Nils Hansen and Scott Skeen did to definitively identify pollution-causing soot precursors in a flame.

7h

Scientists simulate a black hole in a water tank

Certain phenomena that occur in black holes but cannot be directly observed in astronomic investigations can be studied by means of a laboratory simulation. This is possible due to a peculiar analogy between processes that are characteristic of black holes and hydrodynamic processes. The common denominator is the similarity of wave propagation in both cases.

7h

For the love of technology! Sex robots and virtual reality

Sex as we know it is about to change.

7h

European Mars rover named after DNA discoverer Rosalind Franklin

The European Space Agency is sending a rover to look for signs of life on Mars, and it has been named after one of the discoverers of DNA

7h

Is That a Hand? Glitches Reveal Google Books' Human Scanners

Google Books exist in an intangible digital realm—one propped up by manual labor.

7h

7h

Breast cancer cells shifted into HER2 positive status with bold new strategy

One of the most effective breast cancer drugs, Herceptin, is only available to people whose tumors test HER2-positive. That's only one in five breast cancer patients. That could change with a new approach from Scripps Research.

7h

Walnut consumers tend to have lower prevalence of depression symptoms, says new study

A new epidemiological study suggests consuming walnuts may be associated with a lower prevalence and frequency of depression symptoms among American adults. After evaluating study participants for depression, researchers found that depression scores were 26 percent lower for walnut consumers and eight percent lower for consumers of other nuts, compared to those who did not consume nuts at all.

7h

Japanese study finds concerning trends in cervical cancer and treatment response

Osaka University-centered research examined a large-scale Japanese data cohort for trends in cervical cancer prevalence, treatment, and survival. They identified a troubling increase in age-adjusted prevalence, especially among younger people. Japan is the only advanced economy to show such an increase. Additionally, and interestingly, the research found that, in localized cervical cancer, younger

7h

Researchers reveal prostate tumors 'fed' by fatty acids

An international multidisciplinary study initiated by Melbourne scientists has shown a link between prostate cancer and the uptake of fatty acids by cancer cells. The findings point to a possible therapeutic target for this common cancer.

7h

Atomic-scale simulation of antiarrhythmic drug interaction with cardiac cells

Thanks to several technological breakthroughs and an increasing number of available high-resolution structures of ion channels, UC Davis Health researchers have built a model of the human NaV channel that enables them to study drug interactions on heart cells at atomic resolution.

7h

Two studies reveal pregnant women bear greater risk of hemorrhagic stroke

Pregnant women face a much greater risk of having a fatal, but less common, type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain, according to results of two studies presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston at the International Stroke Conference 2019.

7h

“Smart Stethoscope” Can Diagnose Pneumonia on Its Own

Deadly Infection Each year, pneumonia and other lower respiratory infections kill nearly 1 million children — more than malaria and HIV combined. Some of those deaths could be avoided if every child on Earth had access to advanced healthcare, but that’s not the case. In fact, more than 95 percent of people in the developing world lack access to the X-ray imaging technology that’s ideal for pneumo

7h

Mega docking library poised to speed drug discovery

Researchers have launched an ultra-large virtual docking library expected to grow to more than 1 billion molecules by next year. It will expand by 1,000-fold the number of such 'make-on-demand' compounds readily available to scientists for chemical biology and drug discovery. The larger the library, the better its odds of weeding out inactive 'decoy' molecules that could otherwise lead researchers

7h

How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem

Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment. The study represents a strategy for uncovering, and perhaps even predicting, the ecological implications of evolutionary change.

7h

When the insurance company monitors your driving in real time does it help?

The auto insurance industry's Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) approach, which uses on-board technology to report drivers' real time driving behavior, benefits both the motorist and the insurer, according to new research.

7h

Grønne opgaver forsvinder i sundhedsreformen

Regionernes arbejdsopgaver inden for energiomstilling, klimatilpasning og cirkulær økonomi bortfalder i regeringens reform, der ellers ønsker at overføre regionernes arbejdsopgaver til kommuner og stat.

7h

Cory Booker Is Damned If He Does, Damned If He Doesn’t

There are important differences—and even more important similarities—between Barack Obama’s announcement for president in 2007 and Cory Booker’s announcement last week. The similarities could sink Booker’s chances of winning the Democratic nomination. One obvious difference is that Obama downplayed his ties to the African American community. Obama launched his campaign in Springfield, Illinois, w

7h

This New NAD+ Booster Promises to Increase Your Body’s Anti-Age Defenses

“Don’t get old; there is no future in it.” While that quote might seem like good advice, stopping the aging process isn’t exactly feasible – at least, not yet. While we can’t stop aging, a New York-based company called Elysium thinks they’ve developed a supplement that will change the way we age. The supplement, Basis , an NAD+ booster, is designed to support healthy aging at the cellular level.

7h

NYPD Demands That Google Stop Flagging DWI Checkpoints on Waze

Cease and Desist Drivers using Waze, Google’s community-driven traffic app, have the option of flagging police checkpoints meant to spot drunk drivers. The idea was to help drivers circumvent traffic, but the New York Police Department says it’s helping boozed up motorists escape justice. The NYPD recently sent a cease and desist letter to Google over the weekend. The letter argues that the Waze

7h

Microsoft Is Worried Its AI Will Go Rogue and Hurt Its Reputation

Bumpy Ride One day, we might have autonomous cars that drive us to work and robots that prepare our dinners. But what we have right now are autonomous cars that run red lights and robots that agree to “ destroy humans. ” Clearly, we have a ways to go before we work out all the kinks in the extremely promising area of artificial intelligence — and Microsoft wants to be sure its investors know the

7h

How will the Amazon deal with more severe droughts?

New research digs into the Amazon rainforest’s response to droughts in order to better predict how forest growth and physiology will affect tree diversity and, ultimately, the planet’s climate. The Amazon isn’t necessarily a place that many would associate with a drought, yet scientists project that prolonged dry spells will become more prevalent and severe because of climate change. The question

7h

How to plan a motorcycle trip

DIY A few tips to make your next motorcycle adventure seamless. There’s no better way to take in the sights than from the seat of a motorcycle. Whatever compels you to get out and ride, proper planning can make the experience a lot…

7h

New technology helps address big problems for small satellites

The small size and relatively low cost of CubeSats have made them a popular choices for commercial launches in recent years, but the process to propel such satellites in space comes with a number of problems. Researchers have developed a technology to address one key problem – the uncertainty of ignition system that initiates the propulsion system of the CubeSats. Current ignition systems are unre

7h

New welfare tool to help improve the lives of elephants in human care

Zoos and safari parks in the UK are using a special new tool to help them more successfully monitor the wellbeing of elephants in their care, thanks to a new study.

7h

Species 'hotspots' created by immigrant influx or evolutionary speed depending on climate

New research reveals that biodiversity 'hotspots' in the tropics produced new species at faster rates over the last 25 million years, but those in temperate regions are instead full of migrant species that likely sought refuge from shifting and cooling climates.

7h

Cancer: Nullifying protein YTHDF1 enhances anti-tumor response

Identifying molecular pathways that boost the immune response to tumor neoantigens opens up new ways to develop and amplify cancer immunotherapy.

7h

Mega docking library poised to speed drug discovery

Researchers have launched an ultra-large virtual docking library expected to grow to more than 1 billion molecules by next year. It will expand by 1,000-fold the number of such 'make-on-demand' compounds readily available to scientists for chemical biology and drug discovery. The larger the library, the better its odds of weeding out inactive 'decoy' molecules that could otherwise lead researchers

7h

New type of magnet has been been discovered

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

7h

7h

A five kg inflatable sail-plane for Mars exploration.

submitted by /u/OliverSparrow [link] [comments]

7h

Improving the body's ability to fight cancer and intruders

Individualized cancer therapies are improved, thanks to two new methods for characterizing the immune system.

8h

DNA provides insights into penguin evolution and reveals two new extinct penguins

New University of Otago research has improved our understanding of when and why penguins evolved, and has identified two recently extinct penguins from New Zealand's remote Chatham Islands.

8h

The Clinic Giveth And Most Definitely Taketh Away

There have been some pretty dramatic clinical trial results coming out recently, and unfortunately drama is a variable that can take either a positive or a negative sign in front of it. On the plus side , MacroGenix, a company that not many people had been paying attention to, announced results of a head-to-head trial of their latest HER2 antibody ( Fc-optimized ) against Genentech’s Herceptin in

8h

Brexit has already cost the average worker a more than a week's wages, academic study shows

The vote to leave the European Union has already cost the average worker more than a week's wages thanks to higher prices, a study shows today.

8h

The truth about generations: Why millennials aren't special snowflakes

We increasingly form opinions about people based on the generation they belong to, but these labels are often lacking in science

8h

Developing a moral compass from human texts

Artificial Intelligence (AI) translates documents, suggests treatments for patients, makes purchasing decisions and optimises workflows. But where is its moral compass? A study by the Centre for Cognitive Science at TU Darmstadt shows that AI machines can indeed learn a moral compass from humans. The results of the study have been presented at this year's ACM/AAAI Conference on AI, Ethics, and Soc

8h

Climate change is poised to deliver more Black Saturdays in decades to come

Ten years ago, on February 7, 2009, the Black Saturday bushfires killed 173 people. More than 2,000 houses were destroyed in Victoria, including at Kilmore, Kinglake, Vectis (Horsham), Narbethong, Marysville, Strathewan, Beechworth, Labertouche (Bunyip), Coleraine, Weerite, Redesdale, Harkaway, Upper Ferntree Gully, Maiden Gully, Bendigo, Eaglehawk, Lynbrook, St Andrews, Flowerdale, Narre Warren,

8h

Hearing and deaf infants process information differently

Deaf children face unique communication challenges, but a new study shows that the effects of hearing impairment extend far beyond language skills to basic cognitive functions, and the differences in development begin surprisingly early in life. Researchers have studied how deaf infants process visual stimuli compared to hearing infants and found they took significantly longer to become familiar w

8h

How does the Amazon rain forest cope with drought?

The Amazon rain forest isn't necessarily a place that many would associate with a drought, yet prolonged dry spells are projected to become more prevalent and severe because of climate change. The question at hand is how these droughts are going to affect the rain forest, as it has a large influence on global climate and future warming.

8h

Ten years ago, climate adaptation research was gaining steam. Today, it's gutted

Ten years ago, on February 7, 2009, I sat down in my apartment in central Melbourne to write a job application. All of the blinds were down, and the windows tightly closed. Outside it was 47℃. We had no air conditioning. The heat seeped through the walls.

8h

Dry lightning has set Tasmania ablaze, and climate change makes it more likely to happen again

Every year Tasmania is hit by thousands of lightning strikes, which harmlessly hit wet ground. But a huge swathe of the state is now burning as a result of "dry lightning" strikes.

8h

A circuit platform made of strongly interacting microwave photons

A team of researchers at the University of Chicago has developed a circuit platform for the exploration of quantum matter made of strongly interacting microwave photons. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group outlines their platform and how it might be used.

8h

How a telenovela was adapted for US audiences: With more sex, violence and alcohol

The Spanish-language telenovela "Juana la Virgen" was remade into "Jane the Virgin" for American audiences in 2014, following a trail pioneered nearly a decade earlier with the television show "Ugly Betty."

8h

Manfred Eigen, 1967 Nobel chemistry laureate, dies at 91

Manfred Eigen, who shared the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1967 for his work on extremely fast chemical reactions, has died. He was 91.

8h

8h

Twitter profit soars as user base shrinks

Twitter said Thursday profits rose sharply in the fourth quarter, lifted by gains in advertising despite a drop in its global user base.

8h

Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle

In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. For the first time, they succeeded in quantifying the amount of organic carbon transported into the deep sea by a single tectonic event, the giant Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011. The results have now been published in Scientific Reports.

8h

Ice melt in Greenland and Antarctica predicted to bring more frequent extreme weather

Last week, rivers froze over in Chicago when it got colder than at the North Pole. At the same time, temperatures hit 47℃ in Adelaide during the peak of a heatwave.

8h

A scientific study reveals the enigmas on social behaviour of western lowland gorillas

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences reveals one of the enigmas related to the social behaviour of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the heart of the African equatorial rainforest. These primates show a dynamic social structure –individuals change frequently between families, and have a high degree of tolerance and peac

8h

Industrien betaler flere penge til færre læger

Færre læger samarbejder med industrien, men det samlede honorar fra industrien til læger stiger.

8h

Anæstesiolog bliver ledende overlæge i Vejle og Middelfart

Karina Bækby Houborg er tiltrådt som ny ledende overlæge på anæstesiologisk afdeling på Vejle og Middelfart sygehuse.

8h

Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities. In a new article from GSA Today, authors Erin Bessette-Kirton and colleagues write that 'the number of landslides that occurred during this event was two orders of magnitude greater than those reported from previous hurricanes.'

8h

Aspirin to prevent colon cancer underutilized in high-risk patients

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps, which are a major risk factor. To explore whether high risk patients are adhering to USPSTF guidelines, FAU researchers analyzed data from structured interviews with 84 patients and found that less than half (42.9 percent) reported taki

8h

Could omega-3 fatty acids help prevent miscarriages?

A new study in mice reveals that omega-3s, a type of fat found in fish oil, reduces fetal and neonatal deaths, suggesting they could prevent some miscarriages in women.

8h

A scientific study reveals the enigmas on social behaviour of western lowland gorillas

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences reveals one of the enigmas related to the social behaviour of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the heart of the African equatorial rainforest. These primates show a dynamic social structure –individuals change frequently between families, and have a high degree of tolerance and peac

8h

Why Rap and R&B Still Might Not Triumph at the Grammys

Given that this is the award show where Christopher Cross beat The Wall , the Grammys are—historically, presently, perhaps eternally—bound up with a sense of confusion. But the confusion this year might, at least, be of a novel sort. Rarely has predicting the outcomes been more of a challenge. That’s because the Recording Academy expanded the nominee pool for each of its “big four” cross-genre aw

8h

Japan sets date for asteroid 'rock grab'

The Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa 2 will attempt to collect a sample of soil and rock from an asteroid on 22 February, the country's space agency says.

8h

Bioplotting bone-mimetic 3-D tissue scaffolds with osteogenic effects

In bone tissue engineering (BTE), 3-D printing is a reliable and customizable method used to repair bone defects by producing biomimetic tissue scaffolds. In a recent study published online on Tissue Engineering Part A (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc), Qing Li and a team of scientists engineered a biomimetic substitute closest to the natural bone structure and composition for bone grafting. For this work,

8h

The effectiveness of real-time monitoring of drivers by insurance companies

The traditional model for setting auto insurance premiums has been to base rates on the motorist's driving history, age, gender and even marital status (in some states). Thanks to new technological options, insurance companies and motorists have started to work together to give the insurance companies access to better data on an individual driver's risk level, and give the same driver a sense of g

8h

Diffusing the methane bomb—we can still make a difference

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, causing the carbon-containing permafrost that has been frozen for tens or hundreds of thousands of years to thaw and release methane into the atmosphere, thereby contributing to global warming. The findings of a study that included researchers from IIASA, however, suggest that it is still possible to neutralize this threat.

8h

Do custom-compounded pain creams actually work?

Pharmacy-prepared pain creams are widely used for different types of pain and injuries. They may be expensive, but do they work better than a placebo?

8h

Now You Can Join the Search for Killer Asteroids

A Hawaii observatory just put the largest astronomical data trove ever online, making it free and accessible so anyone can hunt for new cosmic phenomena.

8h

'Apex Legends' Is a Surprising Threat to the Dominance of 'Fortnite'

The battle royale field is crowded with competitors, but some inventive game mechanics help this one stand out.

8h

It's Not too Late for Social Media to Regulate Itself

Opinion: A self-regulatory organization for search and social media—like the financial industry's FINRA—would protect the public interest without enacting overly blunt laws that discourage innovation.

8h

Larger datasets unravel deep roots

Comparative genome content analyses provide insight into the early evolution of animals. A novel method that permits the use of larger datasets in such studies yields results that are consistent with classical views of animal phylogeny.

8h

8h

Larger datasets unravel deep roots

Comparative genome content analyses provide insight into the early evolution of animals. A novel method that permits the use of larger datasets in such studies yields results that are consistent with classical views of animal phylogeny.

8h

Farside Politics: The West Eyes Moon Cooperation with China

Scientists and policy makers in the U.S. and Europe are seeking new ways to work with China on its ambitious lunar exploration program — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Farside Politics: The West Eyes Moon Cooperation with China

Scientists and policy makers in the U.S. and Europe are seeking new ways to work with China on its ambitious lunar exploration program — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Kæderne er fæstnet: Sådan vil nordmænd bjærge forlist fregat

PLUS. Vejret er afgørende for, om hævningen af fregatten kan begynde denne uge. De sidste forberedelser er nu færdige.

8h

Bees can do basic arithmetic

Researchers set out to test whether bees could do math, building on a groundbreaking finding that bees understand the concept of zero. The new study shows bees can be taught to recognize colors as symbolic representations for addition and subtraction, and use this information to solve arithmetic problems. The revelation that even the miniature brain of a honeybee can grasp basic mathematical opera

8h

How microbes produce key compound used to fight cancer

Researchers have untangled how bacteria found in soil are able to manufacture streptozotocin, showing for the first time that the compound is produced through an enzymatic pathway and revealing the novel chemistry that drives the process.

8h

Vitamin D helps treat lethal drug-resistant TB

Vitamin D has been found to speed up the clearance of tuberculosis (TB) bacteria from the lungs of people with multi-drug resistant TB, according to a study of 1,850 patients receiving antibiotic treatment.

8h

Being kind to yourself has mental and physical benefits

Taking time to think kind thoughts about yourself and loved ones has psychological and physical benefits, new research suggests.

8h

Sand fiddler crabs have home advantage in competition for breeding burrows

Sand fiddler crabs that reside in a burrow usually prevail if challenged by another, intruding crab, provided their claw pinching strength is similar to that of the competing crab, a study suggests.

8h

Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'

Researchers have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster — the most that the Y chromosome has been assembled in fruit flies. The research provides new insights into the processes that shape the Y chromosome, adding to the evidence that, far from a genetic wasteland, Y chromosomes are highly dynamic and have mechanisms to acquire and mai

8h

Cilostazol-combo antiplatelet therapy reduced risk for recurrent stroke

The long-term combination of cilostazol with aspirin or clopidogrel resulted in fewer recurrent strokes than with aspirin or clopidogrel alone in high-risk patients.

8h

Manure injection offers hope, challenge for restoring Chesapeake water quality

Widespread adoption by dairy farmers of injecting manure into the soil instead of spreading it on the surface could be crucial to restoring Chesapeake Bay water quality, according to researchers who compared phosphorus runoff from fields treated by both methods. However, they predict it will be difficult to persuade farmers to change practices.

8h

9h

Joint bank accounts make for happier couples

In a world of dual-income households and relationships formed years into one's career (and accumulation of assets and debts), many couples today choose to keep their finances at least partially separate.

9h

How a bushfire can destroy a home

Ten years after the devastation of Black Saturday, building design has largely been unrecognised as an area worthy of research. We have advanced our knowledge of the materials used in the construction of homes in bushfire-prone areas but we continue to use the design model of the suburban home.

9h

Six new species of hideously adorable tentacle-nosed catfish discovered in Amazon

Scientists just discovered six new species of bristlenose catfish in the Amazon. In an evolutionary move that takes 'catfishing' to a whole new, kind of sweet level, the males have tentacled faces to attract females. The tentacles look like eggs, and when females see a male with a tentacled face, they see a good potential father. The discovery of these new species might pave the way for conservati

9h

Motorola G7 Mid-Range Phone Family Gets Official With Up To 5000 mAh Battery Option

While most smartphone makes are struggling over the decision to go with a notch or bezel (or a punch-hole design), Motorola threw its hands up in the air and said 'Screw it, we're rolling with …

9h

Twitter profit soars as user base shrinks

Twitter said Thursday profits rose sharply in the fourth quarter, lifted by gains in advertising despite a drop in its global user base.

9h

How Does Consciousness Arise in the Brain?

It's one of the most important unanswered questions of modern neuroscience.

9h

Single molecules show promise to optically detect single electrons

Optical detection of a single electron using a single molecule has never been done. Leiden physicist Michel Orrit and his team have now identified a molecule that is sensitive enough to detect an electron at a distance of hundreds of nanometers. The results are published as a cover article in ChemPhysChem.

9h

A step closer to conducting top-level research in physics

Experiments in astrophysics and nuclear and particle physics are crucial to analyse how the universe works. These usually require complex detector systems whose design and testing necessitate a deep understanding of a variety of topics in physics, electronics and computing. Thanks to the EU-funded PaRaDeSEC project, a research institute in Croatia has taken a major step in strengthening its potent

9h

Physicists take big step in nanolaser design

Lasers are widely used in household appliances, medicine, industry, telecommunications and more. Several years ago, scientists introduced nanolasers. Their design is similar to that of the conventional semiconductor lasers based on heterostructures in common use for several decades. The difference is that the cavities of nanolasers are exceedingly small, on the order of the wavelength of the light

9h

Study sheds light on continued challenges facing women in music industry

The annual report from the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative reveals that little has changed for women in music and explores why that might be the case.

9h

Research explains how snakes lost their limbs

Snakes and lizards are reptiles that belong to the order Squamata. They share several traits but differ in one obvious respect: Snakes do not have limbs. The two suborders diverged more than 100 million years ago. Identification of the genetic factors involved in this loss of limbs is a focus of an article titled "Phenotype loss is associated with widespread divergence of the gene regulatory lands

9h

Research explains how snakes lost their limbs

Snakes and lizards are reptiles that belong to the order Squamata. They share several traits but differ in one obvious respect: Snakes do not have limbs. The two suborders diverged more than 100 million years ago. Identification of the genetic factors involved in this loss of limbs is a focus of an article titled "Phenotype loss is associated with widespread divergence of the gene regulatory lands

9h

How plants expand their capacity to use solar energy

Green plants capture light that spans the visible solar spectrum, and while a broad spectral range is required for sufficient absorption, the process requires energy to be funneled rapidly and efficiently downhill to drive charge separation and water splitting. Carotenoids, the accessory pigments in photosynthesis, play light harvesting, photoprotective, and structural roles.

9h

Researchers uncover mechanism of protein transport in mitochondria

The research labs of Dr. Thomas Becker and Dr. Nikolaus Pfanner from the Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Freiburg have reported a function of the metabolite channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane in protein transport. The researchers published their findings in Molecular Cell.

9h

Competent chimpanzee nutcrackers

Humans consider themselves as the tool user par excellence. Previous work comparing human tool use skills to that of other species tended to place the animals in artificial conditions far removed from their natural environments. Such comparisons disadvantage the animals and lead to underestimating the tool use demonstrated by wild populations. In a first comparison between individuals of two group

9h

Scientists to create new 'chemical noses' to rid the environment of industrial pollutants

Scientists from five European countries have joined forces to develop next-generation 'chemical noses' to remove industrial pollutants from the environment. The European Commission allocated 2.9 million euros to finance the Horizon2020 FET-OPEN project INITIO that will bring together researchers from TalTech and five other universities as well as experts from Interspectrum OÜ operating in Estonia

9h

How plants expand their capacity to use solar energy

Green plants capture light that spans the visible solar spectrum, and while a broad spectral range is required for sufficient absorption, the process requires energy to be funneled rapidly and efficiently downhill to drive charge separation and water splitting. Carotenoids, the accessory pigments in photosynthesis, play light harvesting, photoprotective, and structural roles.

9h

Image: X-ray eye of Athena

This 'mirror module' – formed of 140 industrial silicon mirror plates, stacked together by a sophisticated robotic system – is destined to form part of the optical system of ESA's Athena X-ray observatory.

9h

Video: What do adults lose when they stop engaging in competitive play?

More than just an opportunity to break a sweat and maybe have some fun, competitive physical activity like sparring allows people to explore disagreement with respect, according to Janet O'Shea, professor of dance at UCLA, who recently wrote a book about the value of play. "If I'm trying trying to punch you and you're trying to kick me in the head, we disagree on a pretty basic level. But we agree

9h

Researchers uncover mechanism of protein transport in mitochondria

The research labs of Dr. Thomas Becker and Dr. Nikolaus Pfanner from the Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Freiburg have reported a function of the metabolite channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane in protein transport. The researchers published their findings in Molecular Cell.

9h

New music styles driven by direct challenges to elites

A research team led by scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) reports that fashion cycles in music are driven by outsider groups. Outsiders challenge the dominant music style by strongly contrasting the preferences of the current elite, for instance, by using different instrumentation or new rhythms.

9h

Competent chimpanzee nutcrackers

Humans consider themselves as the tool user par excellence. Previous work comparing human tool use skills to that of other species tended to place the animals in artificial conditions far removed from their natural environments. Such comparisons disadvantage the animals and lead to underestimating the tool use demonstrated by wild populations. In a first comparison between individuals of two group

9h

Mimicking how the biological world arranges itself could help advance the next generation of nanomaterials

Collaboration between material scientists, biologists and chemists could advance the development of self-assembling nanomaterials, called nanoarchitectonics, argues a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. And while cyber technologies currently capture the public imagination, investment in this type of collaborative materials research is crucial in order to meet societ

9h

Demeaning job interviews and bullying bosses are still far too common

"And is there anything you'd like to ask us?"

9h

A long-sighted laser beam

Sometimes, opportunities fall into our laps when we're least expecting them. A team of CERN surveyors, in collaboration with the Institute of Plasma Physics in Prague (IPP), has developed a pioneering laser beam while working on a particularly challenging alignment system. "While developing the alignment system for the HIE-ISOLDE accelerator, we discovered that the system generating a structured l

9h

Tværgående akutfunktion forebygger ikke indlæggelser

Kommunale akutteam sættes ofte i søen for at forebygge indlæggelser, men en evaluering af det prisvindende team i Esbjerg viser, at det ikke er tilfældet.

9h

9h

What It’s Like to Survive Being Shot 16 Times

Dustin Theoharis doesn’t like to talk about the day he was shot 16 times. Neither do the officers who shot him, so it’s hard to describe exactly how it unfolded. What’s clear is that on February 11, 2012, several law-enforcement officers entered a house in Auburn, Washington, where Theoharis happened to be renting a room. They detained the homeowner’s son, who was wanted for violating his parole

9h

Russian-Style Kleptocracy Is Infiltrating America

For two years, in the early 1990s, Richard Palmer served as the CIA station chief in the United States’ Moscow embassy. The events unfolding around him—the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the rise of Russia—were so chaotic, so traumatic and exhilarating, that they mostly eluded clearheaded analysis. But from all the intelligence that washed over his desk, Palmer acquired a crystalline underst

9h

How to unlock the resource potential of undiscovered mineral deposits

Raw materials like nickel are crucial for the production of batteries that are a key technology for low-emission mobility and the circular economy. With the demand for batteries expected to grow exponentially in the next few years, the creation of a competitive and sustainable battery manufacturing industry will be more important than ever.

9h

These genetic 'goggles' could help us engineer wildly resilient crops

Science Making up for a lack of genetic diversity. A new method for finding disease-resistance genes in the wild cousins of domesticated crops could improve our ability to fight back against disease.

9h

Artificial intelligence and big data provide the first global maps on key vegetation traits

Researchers of Valencia University (UV) have developed the first global maps of phosphorus and nitrogen content in vegetation, as well as efficiency in water use, via artificial intelligence and big data techniques. The application of these maps could benefit fields such as biodiversity, agriculture and the adaptation of species to climate change.

9h

Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities. In a new article from GSA Today, authors Erin Bessette-Kirton and colleagues write that "the number of landslides that occurred during this event was two orders of magnitude greater than those reported from previous hurricanes."

9h

Supercapacitor material with energy density 2.7 times higher than conventional materials

A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has developed new materials for supercapacitors with higher voltage and better stability than other materials. Their research was recently published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science.

9h

Refillable' technology could provide enough energy to drive an electric car up to 3,000 miles

A new type of electric vehicle power using "refillable" technology has taken another giant leap in advancing alternative energy with testing that shows it could provide enough energy to run a car for about 3,000 miles.

9h

Understanding tropical rainfall, both past and present

A drop of rainwater that falls on a cassava field in Uganda takes a different path than one that falls 500 miles east in Somalia. Knowing where rain comes from now, and where it might come from under future climate scenarios, is important for the millions of people who rely on subsistence agriculture to survive.

9h

Voting systems that let losing side win may increase overall happiness

A test of two alternative voting systems that measure the strength of people’s opinions has found that it is sometimes better to let the losing side win

9h

9h

Can We All Agree the Earth Is Warming Yet?

The last four years were the four warmest years on record (in the order 2016,2017,2015 and 2018). Since 1880 the average surface temperature on Earth has risen by about 1 degree C, 0.79 degrees above the 20th century average. At the same time global ice is decreasing , especially in the arctic which is losing 12.8% per decade. Sea level is also rising – in 2014 the average sea level was 2.6 inche

9h

Young people know more old music than you’d think

Young people’s recognition of songs from the 1960s through the 1990s is relatively stable over this 40-year period, report researchers. By contrast, their recognition of musical hits from 2000 to 2015, while higher overall than the previous era, diminishes rapidly over time. “The 1960s to 1990s was a special time in music, reflected by a steady recognition of pieces of that era—even by today’s mi

9h

Putting Solar Panels on Water Is a Great Idea—but Will It Float?

The U.S. has been slow to embrace the technology, even though Japan and China are zooming ahead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

How do you feed astronauts on a journey that lasts millennia?

Interstellar travellers will need to produce their own food. A team of astronomers have calculated how that could be done. Lauren Fuge reports.

9h

Link found between walking pace and depression in older adults

Changes in gait may be diagnostic for mental illness, study suggests. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

9h

AI will never conquer humanity. It’s too rational

Mathematical models help describe reality, but only by ignoring its inherent integrity. Physicist Alfredo Metere explains

9h