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nyheder2019februar08

Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge, the godfather of caffeine

Today's Google doodle celebrates Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge, who was the first to isolate caffeine and quinine but his contributions to chemistry are often overlooked

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Vandmiljø-rapport: Alle andre faktorer end kvælstof har kun minimal betydning

Forskere blev sat til at undersøge, om andre forhold end næringsstoffer, som hovedsageligt kommer fra landbruget, er med til at give dårligt vandmiljø. Allerede efter den indledende rapport vurderer professor, at det kun i minimalt omfang er tilfældet på nationalt plan.

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What are 'black bloc' anarchists?

"Black blocs" are a common sight in protests. The black-garbed and masked protesters often commit acts of violence and vandalism, and the tactic is most commonly associated with anarchists. Learning about the history of the tactic and how its used can help you navigate and understand modern protest movements. None On January 20, 2017, white nationalist Richard Spencer was giving an interview duri

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NIH Raises Concerns About Foreign Influence in Biomedical Research

Information made public by US Senator Chuck Grassley reveals that a handful of allegations have recently been referred to federal investigators.

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Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2D material

Researchers have directly imaged 'edge conduction' in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, a newly discovered 2D topological insulator and quantum material. The research makes it possible to exploit this edge conduction feature to build more energy-efficient electronic devices.

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Trilobites: Yellowstone’s Steamboat Geyser Is Gushing at a Record Pace

It’s the talk of the national park these days, erupting a record 32 times last year and keeping up its showstopping pace this winter.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: At His Whitaker’s End

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, February 8. Testy Testimony: Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker testified before the House Judiciary Committee that he has not discussed the special counsel’s investigation with President Donald Trump, nor denied funding for it. Tensions ran high: At one point, Whitaker reminded committee Chairman Jerry Nadler that his allotted time was up. This is likel

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Life on the edge in the quantum world

Pulling off high-speed energy transfers in the lab gives researchers insight into quantum computing, high-speed rechargeable batteries, and other future applications of quantum technology.

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Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2D material

Researchers have directly imaged 'edge conduction' in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, a newly discovered 2D topological insulator and quantum material. The research makes it possible to exploit this edge conduction feature to build more energy-efficient electronic devices.

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Chang'e 4 Rover comes into view

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter got a closer look at Chang'e 4 on the lunar far side. This time the small Yutu-2 rover shows up (two pixels) just north of the lander. Also, shadows cast by the lander and rover are now visible.

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MRI cardiac stress test shows promise at identifying fatal heart disease

Results from a large, multi-center study suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance, or CMR, has potential as a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, catheterizations and stress nuclear exams in identifying the severity of coronary artery disease.

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Study: Universal Basic Income Won’t Make People Work Less

Universal Basic Income Basic income would give everyone a base amount of money every month, regardless of employment status. A common criticism: without an incentive, people would work less. But new research shows that those worries might be unfounded. A two-year study in Finland found that a randomly selected group of people who received a sum of money from the government every month worked no l

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New Evidence Found of Celtic Decapitation and Embalming Practices 2,300 Years Ago

New Evidence Found of Celtic Decapitation and Embalming Practices 2,300 Years Ago Chemical analysis shows presence of what was probably a primitive embalming fluid. Celtic-Helmet.jpg Image credits: Stefano Venturi/ Shutterstock Culture Friday, February 8, 2019 – 16:30 Thomas Garlinghouse, Contributor (Inside Science) — In a finding that mirrors the fantasy of HBO's “Game of Thrones,” French rese

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Eastern Monarchs Flourish While Western Numbers Plunge

In the last year, the butterfly's eastern group has more than doubled its hibernation area while the other population waned. Plus, researchers are moving trees to save monarch habitat.

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Common sense in robots isn't so common, but this Pictionary-like game could help change that

Super Bowl commercials this year featured robots and intelligent assistants interacting with humans in ways that far surpass the capabilities of real-world systems today. In one rather meta advertisement for a telecom provider, robots brainstorm with humans to come up with the premise for another commercial.

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New method improves infrared imaging performance

By successfully suppressing spectral cross-talk in dual-band photodetectors, Professor Manijeh Razeghi has opened the door to a new generation of infrared imaging devices with applications in medicine as well as defense and security.

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The Reason These Poisonous Butterflies Don't Mate Is Written in Their DNA

Wing color and mate preference seem to be genetically bound, leading these tropical butterflies to only choose mates that look like them

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What was Planet V?

The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) occurred about 3.8 billion years ago, during which time Earth, Venus, Mercury, and Mars were assaulted by asteroids. Scientists are pretty sure the LHB occurred, but they're not certain what caused it. It could be that a hypothetical fifth inner planet once existed in our solar system. As it left, it may have caused the LHB. None When the Apollo astronauts brought

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China Thinks AI Could Make Its Military As Powerful as America’s

Smart Bombs China’s military is working to adopt artificial intelligence and autonomous technology as quickly as it can. That’s because Chinese President Xi Jinping believes that AI and other cutting-edge technologies, especially when applied to military systems, are the key to keeping up and leveling the playing field between China and countries like the U.S. that had a head start on its industr

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The Family Weekly: How Facebook Created a New Type of Relationship

This Week in Family On the 15th anniversary of Facebook, the Atlantic senior editor Julie Beck writes that the popular, all-encompassing social network is like unicorn blood in Harry Potter . Much like the substance that keeps Voldemort barely alive in a semi-lifelike state, Facebook allows relationships with old classmates and distant relatives to drag on well beyond their natural life span. “Fa

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Thomas Garlinghouse

Contributor Thomas Garlinghouse ( @garlinghouseTom ) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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Eyewire Release Report 2/8/2019

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. There have been some big updates to the Scouts’ Log! If you’re a Scout or Scythe and haven’t read about this yet, here are the details . For promoted players, the sponsorship sheet link has been moved from the Scouts’ Log to the hamburger menu in the top righ

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How exercise may protect against Alzheimer's

A hormone called irisin — produced during exercise — may protect neurons against Alzheimer's disease.

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Chang'e 4 Rover comes into view

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter got a closer look at Chang'e 4 on the lunar far side. This time the small Yutu-2 rover shows up (two pixels) just north of the lander. Also, shadows cast by the lander and rover are now visible.

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A better way to make acrylics

Acrylics are an incredibly diverse and useful family of chemicals used in all kinds of products, from diapers to nail polish. Now, a team of researchers from UConn and ExxonMobil describe a new process for making them. The new method would increase energy efficiency and reduce toxic byproducts, they report in the Feb. 8 issue of Nature Communications.

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Are birds using quantum entanglement to navigate?

Birds' navigation using Earth's very faint magnetic fields suggests an incredible level of sensitivity. There's reason to think that sensitivity may be based on quantum entanglement in cryptochrome in their eyes. Identifying the role of quantum physics in biology could lead, well, who knows where? None Okay, this is far from confirmed, but it's pretty radical, and exciting. It's a possible and pl

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“Trojan Horse” Cancer Drug Sneaks Inside Tumor Cells to Kill Them

Gift Horse According to “The Iliad,” the Greeks won the Trojan War by sneaking a few dozen soldiers into the city of Troy inside a giant wooden horse disguised as a gift of surrender. The men waited until nightfall before emerging from the horse and opening the city gates for the rest of the Greek army, which destroyed Troy and ended the war. It wasn’t the most forthright battle plan, but it work

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My Friend, John Dingell

When I nominated John Dingell for the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which he received in 2014, I quoted President Lyndon Johnson signing Medicare into law. “History shapes men,” Johnson said, “but it is a necessary faith of leadership that men can help shape history.” Johnson was speaking about former President Harry Truman, who would shortly become the first Medicare enrollee. He could not have

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New DOE policies would block many foreign research collaborations

Two memos describe crackdown on foreign talents program and interactions with national labs

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Dung Beetles Navigate by Polarized Moonlight

Like humans throughout history, it turns out that dung beetles are celestial navigators. Steering is important to dung beetles. When a choice load drops, they want to grab their ball and roll away in as straight a line as they can manage. In this sense, they’re not so much navigating (which implies a destination), but they are orienting themselves by the skies. Dung beetles who work during the day

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How Scientists Actually Dismantle a Nuclear Bomb

(Inside Science) — There are enough nuclear weapons in the world to cause atomic Armageddon many times over, according to scientists, who estimate that no country could fire more than 100 nuclear warheads without wreaking such devastation that their own citizens back home would be killed. Most nuclear nations recognized by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons — namely, France,

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The US Army’s Strange Inspiration for Its Next Rifle: The iPhone

Killer App An official told military and veterans site Task & Purpose that the Army plans for its upcoming rifle to be an expandable platform comparable to Apple’s iconic iPhone. “We have hundreds of capabilities we can put into this weapons system, but we want to do it by holistically creating a system that that takes advantage of everything we’ve done in the past,” Army Col. Elliott Caggins, a

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Welcome to Eyewire’s Undersea Odyssey!

The Earth’s oceans are a precious source of literally unfathomable beauty, and beyond that they form some of the most vital ecosystems for our planet’s weather and the sustenance of life itself. Since they’re so huge, so complex, and so deep, humanity has only just begun to understand them better, too… meaning ocean exploration might be about on par with the mysteries of our connectome! At Eyewir

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These Soviet-Era Spas Are Still Accepting Guests

Between 1917 and 1991 the USSR built hundreds of sanatoriums across its empire. Many of them still survive.

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20,000 birds just starved to death off the Dutch coast and no one knows why

Animals Birds are continuing to wash ashore and so far none of the obvious explanations can solve the mystery. Thousands of seabirds have been washing onto the Dutch shoreline for about a month now and no one really knows why. At least, we think it’s been a month. It’s unclear.

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How to Watch the Grammy Awards 2019

Here's how to tune in, even if you don't have a TV. (And give Kendrick album of the year already.)

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Rating riverside corridors — the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change

While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts.

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Anther rubbing, a new movement discovered in plants, promotes prior selfing

Most plants have developed mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization and its detrimental effects of inbreeding depression. Traits promoting selfing in plants have been approached mainly from the perspective of a loss of function. However, the shift from cross-fertilization to selfing has been identified as one of the most frequent evolutionary transitions. Therefore, adaptive mechanisms actively pr

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Worrisome nonstick chemicals are common in U.S. drinking water, federal study suggests

A study of 25 water systems found that all had some contamination

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Quake that battered ancient Rome is traced to its lair

Quake that battered ancient Rome is traced to its lair Quake that battered ancient Rome is traced to its lair, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00480-8 A fault in the Apennine Mountains wreaked damage on structures including the Colosseum.

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This polymer carries the seeds of its own destruction

This polymer carries the seeds of its own destruction This polymer carries the seeds of its own destruction, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00481-7 A molecule’s partial dissolution generates acid, leading to runaway degradation.

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Friday News Roundup – International

Savage, climate change and the latest on Venezuela are some of the things that made headlines this week. (Image credit: Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

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Why We Keep Forgiving Facebook

No number of scandals seem to scrape the company’s bottom line. (Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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A deep dive into the world of Distributed Governance

submitted by /u/MihaiAlisie [link] [comments]

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Photos of the Week: Hair Dress, Frosty Bison, Bajadasaurus Pronuspinax

A moment at a piano on the front lines in Ukraine, motorcycles on the ice in Kazakhstan, snow monkeys in hot springs in Japan, President Trump’s State of the Union address, World Hijab Day in Kyrgyzstan, eel fishing at night in Japan, a Titan missile silo in Arizona, a Super Bowl celebration in Boston, a Year of the Pig parade in Hong Kong, and much more

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Ariana Grande Tells the Cold Truth on Thank U, Next

Courtesy of Ariana Grande, here’s a new breakup phrase to fear: “Don’t want you in my bloodline.” Yes, the 25-year-old singer has thought ahead to the far-off century when she is but a leaf on Ancestry.com. She has determined the desired height and hair-shininess of the future influencers who will call her nonna . Your genome, sir, has been sequenced and found wanting. Take your trash DNA and go.

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Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates

Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects.

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Less anesthesia doesn’t stave off post-surgery delirium

Meticulously monitoring brain activity and then taking care to minimize levels of anesthesia during surgery had no significant effect on the occurrence of delirium among older patients, according to a new study. In the group that had close brain monitoring, however, there were fewer deaths in the first 30 days after surgery. That was an unexpected finding, and the researchers believe it points to

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Best Cars of the 2019 Chicago Auto Show

Significant introductions were led by the turbocharged 2020 Subaru Legacy sedan, the Land Rover Evoque, Ram pickups with a multi-open tailgate, and the VW Jetta GLI. Here's our take on the best cars of the 111th Chicago Auto Show. The post Best Cars of the 2019 Chicago Auto Show appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Nitrogen gets in the fast lane for chemical synthesis

Rice University scientists have given organic chemists a boost with their latest discovery of a one-step method to add nitrogen to compounds for drugs, pesticides, fertilizers and other products.

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Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria

Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. P. vivax is a single-celled transmitted by mosquitoes. It is the most widespread human malaria parasite, respo

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Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria

Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. P. vivax is a single-celled transmitted by mosquitoes. It is the most widespread human malaria parasite, respo

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Sälens fortplantning påverkas när havsisen krymper i Östersjön

Havsisen i Östersjön krymper på grund av den globala uppvärmningen. Nu riskerar sälen vikares fortplantning på grund av det. Det visar en ny rapport från Finlands miljöcentral, Syke. – Det är många arter och organismer som är beroende av havsisen, säger Henrik Nygård, specialforskare vid Syke.

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An Antarctic expedition will search for what lived under the Larsen C ice shelf

The fourth attempt to investigate the seafloor once hidden by the Larsen C iceberg may have the best chance yet of success.

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This “Molecular Coffee” is Brewed Entirely Without Beans

Molecular Coffee Take the animal out of meat, and you’ve got fake meat. Take the dairy out of milk and you have soy or almond milk. But what happens when you try to take the bean out of the coffee? Seattle-based startup Atomo has developed a “molecular coffee” that promises to make a better cup without needing to harvest a single coffee bean. The company is touting it as a way to ditch the cream

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It's an exciting find given the planet is only six light-years away from Earth, making it one of closest worlds outside of our solar system.

Credit: Getty Images: Ron Miller/Stocktrek Images Primitive life might exist on a large, rocky planet that is relatively nearby Earth, according to a team of scientists who presented their work at an astronomy conference last week. The team says that the planet – known as Barnard b or GJ 699 b – might have microbes or other simple life in its environment as long as there is a lot of thermal activ

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A New Cocktail of Proteins Makes Mice Regenerate Toes Like Lizards

We Can Rebuild Him For the first time, scientists have figured out how to regrow not just the bone but even the joints of a mouse’s amputated toes. Normally mammals like mice don’t regenerate body parts — meaning the new development could help lead to futuristic medical procedures in which amputees are able to grow back their missing limbs. Expanding Reach Thanks to a cocktail of proteins that st

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Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria

Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria.

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New NIH research policy seeks greater inclusion across lifespan

Beginning this year, the National Institutes of Health will for the first time in its history require NIH-funded scholars to eliminate arbitrary age limits in their work, age limits that previously allowed for excluding groups like older people without just cause. A series of articles recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society explores how the change came to fruition–in

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Spotify cracks down on accounts that use ad blockers

Spotify is updating its terms of service, effective March 1st, to explicitly ban accounts that user ad blockers. Free users were installing ad blockers to keep Spotify from playing ads in the …

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Scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens

Chemists appear to have finished the quest for a cheaper, efficient alternative to the iridium compounds while also solving the decades-long problem with the color blue. Surprisingly, copper does it all.

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A leaky toilet on the International Space Station is about as fun as it sounds

Space In space, no one can fix your toilet for you. The next time you’re facing a leaking toilet, just remember at least you have gravity on your side.

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360 Video: Curiosity rover departs Vera Rubin Ridge

After exploring Mars' Vera Rubin Ridge for more than a year, NASA's Curiosity rover recently moved on. But a new 360-video lets the public visit Curiosity's final drill site on the ridge, an area nicknamed "Rock Hall." The video was created from a panorama taken by the rover on Dec. 19. It includes images of its next destination—an area the team has been calling the "clay-bearing unit" and recentl

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Life thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago, research suggests

3.5 billion years ago Earth hosted life, but was it barely surviving, or thriving? A new study led by researchers at the Earth-Life Science Institute of Tokyo Tech provides new answers to this question. Microbial metabolism is recorded in billions of years of sulfur isotope ratios that agree with this study's predictions, suggesting life throve in the ancient oceans. Using this data, scientists ca

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How the immune system 'thinks'

New research has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections.

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New patent win for University of California upends CRISPR legal battle

Companies may have to license patents on genome editor from multiple places

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Study identifies new target to prevent, treat alcoholism

New research conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, identifies a gene that could provide a new target for developing medication to prevent and treat alcoholism. Researchers unraveled a link between alcohol and how it modulates the levels of activity of this particular gene. Researchers discovered that when they increased the levels of the gene-encoded protein in mice, they reduced alcohol consumpt

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Nitrogen gets in the fast lane for chemical synthesis

A new one-step method discovered by synthetic organic chemists at Rice University allows nitrogen atoms to be added to precursor compounds used in the design and manufacture of drugs, pesticides, fertilizers and other products.

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Rice U. lab adds porous envelope to aluminum plasmonics

New research from Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics describes the first combination of a gas-trapping molecular sieve called a metal-organic framework, or MOF, with catalytic aluminum nanocrystals that can draw their power from sunlight.

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Life on the edge in the quantum world

Pulling off high-speed energy transfers in the lab gives researchers insight into quantum computing, high-speed rechargeable batteries, and other future applications of quantum technology.

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Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2D material

A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged 'edge conduction' in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2D topological insulator and quantum material. The research makes it possible to exploit this edge conduction feature to build more energy-efficient electronic dev

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Facebook will soon tell you more info about how it’s targeting you with ads

Technology How did it know that you wanted that robotic cat food dish? Facebook will tell you who uploaded your personal information that got you a targeted ad.

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Imax Ditched VR—but Big Theaters Are Buying In

Cinemark is the latest chain to dip a toe into the deepest water of the VR pool: high-end "free roam" experiences like Terminator Salvation: Fight For the Future.

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The Reason These Poisonous Butterflies Don't Mate Is Written in Their DNA

Wing color and mate preference seem to be genetically bound, leading these tropical butterflies to only choose mates that look like them

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Why Do Smart People Send Nudes?

In so many ways, Jeff Bezos isn’t a relatable guy. As the CEO of Amazon, he’s the world’s richest man . He lords over much of the internet’s infrastructure . He turns the municipal governments of America’s largest cities into slavering lapdogs at the prospect of his company’s arrival. In at least one way, though, Bezos is exactly like a huge number of Americans in 2019: On at least a few occasion

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Scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens

Chemists appear to have finished the quest for a cheaper, efficient alternative to the iridium compounds while also solving the decades-long problem with the color blue. Surprisingly, copper does it all.

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Therapy derived from parasitic worms downregulates proinflammatory pathways

A therapy derived from the eggs of parasitic worms helps to protect against one of chemotherapy's debilitating side effects by significantly downregulating major proinflammatory pathways, reducing inflammation.

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Erenumab in migraine: Indication of considerable added benefit for certain patients

The first drug of a new drug class can reduce the number of headache days if other prophylactic medications have failed or have not been an option.

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Researchers add porous envelope to aluminum plasmonics

When Rice University chemist and engineer Hossein Robatjazi set out to marry a molecular sieve called MOF to a plasmonic aluminum nanoparticle two years ago, he never imagined the key would be the same process nature uses to petrify wood.

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Reports: Russian authorities make deal with Google

Russian news reports say that Google has agreed with national authorities to delete links to websites banned in Russia.

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2 genes protect staph bacteria from copper’s powers

Researchers have discovered two genes that make some strains of harmful Staphyloccocus bacteria resistant copper, a potent and frequently used antibacterial agent. The discovery shows that Staphyloccocus aureus can acquire additional genes that promote infections and antibacterial resistance and may open new paths for the development of antibacterial drugs, according to a study in the Journal of

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Drug combo makes neurons to replace damaged ones

Researchers have created a drug cocktail that converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons. The cocktail could potentially treat stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, and brain injuries, researchers report. They’ve discovered a set of four, or even three, molecules that could convert glial cells—which normally provide support and insulation for neurons—into new neurons. “The bigg

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Love at First Swipe? How Netflix and Tinder are Using Similar Algorithms

Finding love isn’t as easy as finding something good to watch on Netflix. But the algorithms that get you there are more similar than you might expect. The post Love at First Swipe? How Netflix and Tinder are Using Similar Algorithms appeared first on Futurism .

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Trilobites: Aboriginal Hunters’ Fires Help Restore an Australian Desert

A study of how the Martu shaped their land presents an example where humans seem to benefit an environment perceived as wilderness.

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Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, suggests new research

New research suggests that drivers who use hands-free electronic devices, as opposed to handheld ones, are less likely to get into a crash.

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Developed self-controlling 'smart' fuel cell electrode material

A research team has electrode material for a new form of high-performance solid oxide fuel cell.

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Scientists discover new type of self-healing material

A research group has developed a new type of material, based on ethylene, which exhibits a number of useful properties such as self-healing and shape memory. Remarkably, some of the materials can spontaneously self-heal even in water or acidic and alkali solutions. The new material is based on ethylene, a compound that is the source of much of the plastic in use today.

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Canada partners with Lockheed Martin on next-gen warships

Canada announced Friday it had partnered with US weapons maker Lockheed Martin on a Can$815 million project to design 15 warships.

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Amazon reconsidering move to New York: reportAmazon HQ2 New York

Amazon is rethinking its decision to create an additional headquarters in New York City amid opposition from key political leaders and protests in the community, the Washington Post reported Friday.

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Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2-D material

A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged "edge conduction" in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2-D topological insulator and quantum material.

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Life on the edge in the quantum world

Quantum physics sets the laws that dominate the universe at a small scale. The ability to harness quantum phenomena could lead to machines like quantum computers, which are predicted to perform certain calculations much faster than conventional computers. One major problem with building quantum processors is that the tracking and controlling quantum systems in real time is a difficult task because

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Imaging quantum spin Hall edges in monolayer WTe2

A two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator exhibits the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in which topologically protected conducting channels exist at the sample edges. Experimental signatures of the QSH effect have recently been reported in an atomically thin material, monolayer WTe 2 . Here, we directly image the local conductivity of monolayer WTe 2 using microwave impedance microscopy, estab

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Recording interfacial currents on the subnanometer length and femtosecond time scale by terahertz emission

Electron dynamics at interfaces is a subject of great scientific interest and technological importance. Detailed understanding of such dynamics requires access to the angstrom length scale defining interfaces and the femtosecond time scale characterizing interfacial motion of electrons. In this context, the most precise and general way to remotely measure charge dynamics is through the transient

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Superadiabatic population transfer in a three-level superconducting circuit

Adiabatic manipulation of the quantum state is an essential tool in modern quantum information processing. Here, we demonstrate the speedup of the adiabatic population transfer in a three-level superconducting transmon circuit by suppressing the spurious nonadiabatic excitations with an additional two-photon microwave pulse. We apply this superadiabatic method to the stimulated Raman adiabatic pa

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Multimaterial 3D laser microprinting using an integrated microfluidic system

Three-dimensional (3D) laser micro- and nanoprinting has become a versatile, reliable, and commercially available technology for the preparation of complex 3D architectures for diverse applications. However, the vast majority of structures published so far have been composed of only a single constituent material. Here, we present a system based on a microfluidic chamber integrated into a state-of

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New tolerance factor to predict the stability of perovskite oxides and halides

Predicting the stability of the perovskite structure remains a long-standing challenge for the discovery of new functional materials for many applications including photovoltaics and electrocatalysts. We developed an accurate, physically interpretable, and one-dimensional tolerance factor, , that correctly predicts 92% of compounds as perovskite or nonperovskite for an experimental dataset of 576

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Experimental observation of dual magnetic states in topological insulators

The recently discovered topological phase offers new possibilities for spintronics and condensed matter. Even insulating material exhibits conductivity at the edges of certain systems, giving rise to an anomalous quantum Hall effect and other coherent spin transport phenomena, in which heat dissipation is minimized, with potential uses for next-generation energy-efficient electronics. While the m

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Biomimetic potassium-selective nanopores

Reproducing the exquisite ion selectivity displayed by biological ion channels in artificial nanopore systems has proven to be one of the most challenging tasks undertaken by the nanopore community, yet a successful achievement of this goal offers immense technological potential. Here, we show a strategy to design solid-state nanopores that selectively transport potassium ions and show negligible

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Metal-organic frameworks tailor the properties of aluminum nanocrystals

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metal nanoparticles are two classes of materials that have received considerable recent attention, each for controlling chemical reactivities, albeit in very different ways. Here, we report the growth of MOF shell layers surrounding aluminum nanocrystals (Al NCs), an Earth-abundant metal with energetic, plasmonic, and photocatalytic properties. The MOF shell gr

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Emergent magnetic monopole dynamics in macroscopically degenerate artificial spin ice

Magnetic monopoles, proposed as elementary particles that act as isolated magnetic south and north poles, have long attracted research interest as magnetic analogs to electric charge. In solid-state physics, a classical analog to these elusive particles has emerged as topological excitations within pyrochlore spin ice systems. We present the first real-time imaging of emergent magnetic monopole m

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NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Funani's rainfall rates

Tropical Cyclone Funani continued tracking southeast through the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 7, 2019. When the GPM satellite passed overhead, it revealed that Funani's strongest rains wrapped around the center and extended northwest.

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Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Gelena's strongest side

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Gelena that revealed strongest storms were northwest of the eye.

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Researchers help define Southern Ocean's geological features

New data collected by University of Wyoming researchers and others point to a newly defined mantle domain in a remote part of the Southern Ocean.

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Five solutions offered for achieving gender equality in medicine and science

Women's representation in science and medicine has slowly increased over the past few decades. However, this rise in numbers of women, or gender diversity, has not been matched by a rise in gender inclusion. Despite increasing representation, women still encounter bias and discrimination when compared with men in these fields across a variety of outcomes, including treatment at school and work, hi

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Sea snakes that can't drink seawater

Surrounded by salty water, sea snakes sometimes live a thirsty existence. Previously, scientists thought that they were able to drink seawater, but recent research has shown that they need to access freshwater. A new study published in PLOS ONE on Feb. 7 and led by Harvey Lillywhite, professor of biology of the University of Florida, shows that sea snakes living where there is drought relieve thei

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Tiger killed by new mate at London Zoo

Male tiger Asim arrived at London Zoo days ago as a potential mate for long-term resident Melati.

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Sea snakes that can't drink seawater

Surrounded by salty water, sea snakes sometimes live a thirsty existence. Previously, scientists thought that they were able to drink seawater, but recent research has shown that they need to access freshwater. A new study published in PLOS ONE on Feb. 7 and led by Harvey Lillywhite, professor of biology of the University of Florida, shows that sea snakes living where there is drought relieve thei

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Measles Outbreak Spurs Vaccination Surge in Anti-Vaxxer Hotspot

Weeks after a hotspot for anti-vaxxers turned into a hotspot for measles infections, it became a hotspot for vaccination

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UK Startup Shows Off World’s Largest 3D Printed Rocket Engine

3D Printed Rockets We’ve seen 3D printed rockets before , but never on this scale. UK space startup Orbex just showed off its Prime Rocket’s gigantic second stage — the “world’s largest 3D printed rocket engine,” according to a press release . The entire rocket, including the engine, will stand at 56 feet (17 meters) tall — roughly a quarter of the size of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket, for context. I

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Tesla’s New “Dog Mode” Will Keep Canines Happy With AC, Music

Roll Out Tesla CEO Elon Musk doesn’t want dogs to get trapped in hot Teslas. On Thursday, Musk tweeted that his company will roll out two new Enhanced Autopilot features next week via an over-the-air software update — including one suggested by a dog-loving Twitter follower that’ll keep pups cool and entertained while their owners run errands. Puppy Love On Oct. 18, Twitter user Josh Atchle y use

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Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid

Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage.

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Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, suggests new research

New research suggests that drivers who use hands-free electronic devices, as opposed to handheld ones, are less likely to get into a crash.

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How do metastatic tumor cells grow in lymph nodes?

Scientists revealed a mechanism to suppress the growth and spread of cancer cells in lymph nodes, forestalling any chance for them to invade new territories of the body.

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Butterflies are genetically wired to choose a mate that looks just like them

Male butterflies have genes which give them a sexual preference for a partner with a similar appearance to themselves, according to new research. Researchers observed the courtship rituals and sequenced the DNA from nearly 300 butterflies to find out how much of the genome was responsible for their mating behavior.

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Liberal sprinkling of salt discovered around a young star

New ALMA observations show there is ordinary table salt in a not-so-ordinary location: 1,500 light-years from Earth in the disk surrounding a massive young star. Though salts have been found in the atmospheres of old, dying stars, this is the first time they have been seen around young stars in stellar nurseries. The detection of this salt-encrusted disk may help astronomers study the chemistry of

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This One Number Shows Why Measles Spreads Like Wildfire

Measles is highly contagious, which makes it difficult to eradicate.

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How the brain responds to texture

New research by neuroscientists shows that as neurons process information about texture from the skin, they each respond differently to various features of a surface, creating a high-dimensional representation of texture in the brain.

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Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid

Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage.

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Complementary medicine use remains hidden from conventional medicine providers

Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.

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Shedding light on the science of auroral breakups

Scientists have quantitatively confirmed how energetic an auroral breakup can be. Using a combination of cutting-edge ground-based technology and new space-borne observations, they have demonstrated the essential role of an auroral breakup in ionizing the deep atmosphere. The research furthers our understanding of one of the most visually stunning natural phenomena.

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How a fungus can cripple the immune system

Scientists have now discovered how the fungus knocks out the immune defenses, enabling a potentially fatal fungal infection to develop.

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Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease

The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments that do not target problem genes.

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Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer

Researchers have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The study reveals the distinct roles played by two critical tumor suppressor genes that are commonly mutated in these highly lethal cancers.

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Wine before beer, or beer before wine? Either way, you'll be hungover, study finds

'Beer before wine and you'll feel fine; wine before beer and you'll feel queer' goes the age-old aphorism. But scientists have now shown that it doesn't matter how you order your drinks — if you drink too much, you're still likely to be ill.

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Think big, at least when it comes to global conservation

According to a group of international researchers, the potential for large countries to contribute to environmental protection is being overlooked. The researchers recently examined the leverage an individual country has when it comes to protecting ecosystem values. And they say it isn't–nor should it be — a level playing field.

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New phenomenon discovered that fixes a common problem in lasers: Wavelength splitting

Physicists have discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. The never-before-seen phenomenon will be important for an emerging field of photonics research, including one day making micro-chips that code information using light instead of electrons.

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MRI cardiac stress test shows promise at identifying fatal heart disease

Results from a large, multi-center study suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance, or CMR, has potential as a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, catheterizations and stress nuclear exams in identifying the severity of coronary artery disease.

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Are Intellectuals Suffering a Crisis of Meaning?

What is the relationship between intellectual giftedness and meaning in life? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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OrCam’s MyMe uses facial recognition to remember everyone you meet

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Video games are unlocking the mysteries of the quantum world

submitted by /u/ibmzrl [link] [comments]

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Trilobites: Islands Helped Penguins Evolve. Then Hungry Humans Showed Up.

The discovery of two extinct penguin subspecies in New Zealand is a cautionary tale of the threats faced by the waddling birds in the wild.

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Mighty Warrior's Medieval Sword Pulled Triumphantly … from Denmark Sewer

A sharp sword lodged deep within a sewer recently caught the eye of a pipe layer and an engineer working in Aalborg, Denmark.

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Hangovers tips: Does mixing your drinks make a difference?

Mixing drinks may not actually make your hangover worse. So here are some tips to help you the morning after the night before.

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Space is tough on an astronaut's bones, muscles, blood flow and much more.

Credit: Getty Images: Eugen Wais/EyeEm Flying in space can be a bit like growing old, because without exercise and proper nutrition astronauts on weeks- or months-long missions would come back to Earth with difficulties staying balanced, with weaker bones and muscles, and with other health problems that are usually confined to seniors or those with disease. To help better understand these effects

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Some States Still Lag in Teaching Climate Science

While climate education has made major strides, many teachers still lack resources and training — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study: Serious health concerns missed in older adults

Researchers examined the prevalence and impact of six common symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, breathing difficulty, sleep problems) and found that nearly half of adults ages 65 and older have two or more of these symptoms and one-fourth have three or more. But often clinicians miss these symptoms, and the more serious health issues they portend because patients only talk about one of

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Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy

This study is the first to report a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model.

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Study finds a dearth of mental health interventions for ethnic minority youth in the US

A research team from Arizona State University, DePaul University and the University of Southern California analyzed how effective evidence-based mental health intervention programs were for ethnic minority youth in the United States. Four treatment programs met the criteria of 'well-established.' These treatments addressed substance abuse, disruptive behavior and anxiety in Hispanic/Latino and Afr

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Pain was sharp but short for ancient ‘bog body’ victims

Pain was sharp but short for ancient ‘bog body’ victims Pain was sharp but short for ancient ‘bog body’ victims, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00534-x Methods that would minimize suffering were chosen to kill people found in peat bogs.

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Amazon reconsidering move to New York: report

Amazon is rethinking its decision to create an additional headquarters in New York City amid opposition from key political leaders and protests in the community, the Washington Post reported …

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The Books Briefing: Beyond ‘Happily Ever After’

Whether you’re the dreamiest of romantic optimists or a determined skeptic of fairy-tale endings, you can’t deny that love makes for a compelling story line—or that it can have an impact that reaches far beyond “happily ever after.” Throughout the course of his career, James Baldwin wrote not only about the ways that love could transform American race relations, but also about the relationships t

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Twitter Is Devouring Jeff Bezos' 'National Enquirer' Fight

It's the kind of scandal that social media eats up.

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The best massagers for every part of your body

Gadgets All the gear you knead to release tension. Every year a new part of my body aches—and still not enough money to get a massage every month. Instead of leaving your house for some tenderizing relief, grab a…

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Brain scans decode an elusive signature of consciousness

Newly described patterns of brain activity may help reveal the level of awareness in people with brain injuries.

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To Stop Mosquitoes From Biting, Scientists Put Them on Diet Pills

Liquid Diet Most humans aren’t big fans of bugs that feed on their blood. Keeping mosquitoes at bay is a task that scientists have been buzzing about for quite some time now. Not only because the pests can be a nuisance, but also because they can transmit terrible diseases like West Nile Virus and Malaria. The quest to fend off the hungry swarms has led scientists to some innovative solutions — i

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Sodium intake associated with increased lightheadedness in context of DASH-sodium trial

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that higher sodium intake, when studied in the context of the DASH-Sodium trial (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), increases lightheadedness. These findings challenge traditional recommendations to increase sodium intake to prevent lightheadedness.

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How bees stay cool on hot summer days

Harvard researchers have developed a framework that explains how bees use environmental signals to collectively cluster and continuously ventilate the hive.

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How the brain responds to texture

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that as neurons process information about texture from the skin, they each respond differently to various features of a surface, creating a high-dimensional representation of texture in the brain.

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'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck

About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea. There are no written records saying where the ship was going or where it came from — the only clues are the mostly-disintegrated structure of the vessel and its cargo. But archaeologists have found a new way to tell where the ceramic cargo of the ship originally came from: by zapping it with an X-ray gun.

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We're Not Using One of Our Best Weapons against Drug-Resistant Microbes

New antibiotics will help, but vaccines are a more immediate, complementary solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Daily briefing: How to make the most of Instagram

Daily briefing: How to make the most of Instagram Daily briefing: How to make the most of Instagram, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00538-7 Instagram for science communication, diet drugs suppress mosquitos’ thirst for blood, and how to scrub the world of non-stick chemicals

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The ACLU Moves to Embrace Due Process on Title IX

After Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos proposed a new rule on the obligations of colleges under Title IX, focusing on the due-process rights owed to students accused of sexual misconduct, members of the public submitted more than 96,000 comments. The ACLU’s contribution is of particular interest. By way of background, Title IX is a law that states, “No person in the United States shall, on the

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Letters: When and Why Did You Join—or Quit—Facebook?

We Asked Readers: How old were you when you first joined Facebook, and do you remember why you joined? Has the way you use it changed over the years? What might cause you to leave the platform for good? Here’s how readers responded. I first joined Facebook in June of 2007, the summer before my junior year of high school. I joined because I had heard my friends talking about Facebook for a couple

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Fluconazole makes fungi sexually active

Under the influence of the drug fluconazole, the fungus Candida albicans can change its mode of reproduction and thus become even more resistant, scientists report.

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Tyrannosaurus rex might have accidentally helped fruit grow

The king of the dinosaurs was a famed carnivore, but its diet of plant-eaters may have helped T. rex disperse fruit seeds over a wide area

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Gelena's strongest side

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Gelena that revealed strongest storms were northwest of the eye.

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NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Funani's rainfall rates

Tropical Cyclone Funani continued tracking southeast through the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 7, 2019. When the GPM satellite passed overhead, it revealed that Funani's strongest rains wrapped around the center and extended northwest.

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We're Not Using One of Our Best Weapons against Drug-Resistant Microbes

New antibiotics will help, but vaccines are a more immediate, complementary solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck

About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea off the coast of the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. There are no written records saying where the ship was going or where it came from—the only clues are the mostly-disintegrated structure of the vessel and its cargo, which was discovered on the seabed in the 1980s. Since the wreck's recovery in the 1990s, researchers have been

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A Japanese City Is Using AI to Prevent Youth Suicides

Too Much In 2011, a 13-year-old student in Otsu, Japan, jumped to his death following weeks of intense bullying from other students. His teacher had reportedly brushed off the abuse as a joke, and the school denied that bullying was the direct cause of the suicide until a survey of his fellow students made the connection clear. The case shone a spotlight on bullying in Japanese schools — and soon

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Amazon Calls for Regulation of Its Own Facial Recognition Tech

Turncoat Amazon sells one of the most well-known facial recognition services — but now it’s calling on politicians to develop stronger regulations for the controversial technology. On Thursday, Amazon Web Services’ Global Public Policy VP Michael Punke published a blog post that outlined several key areas where policy surrounding facial recognition technology, especially when used by police, coul

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SpaceX Pushes Crewed Dragon Test Back to March 2

It's taken a long time to get here, and it may be a little longer still. SpaceX has announced yet another delay in its Dragon 2 test flight, which was supposed to take place this month. The post SpaceX Pushes Crewed Dragon Test Back to March 2 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Simpler parts make for a more efficient system

A team of researchers has discovered that decentralized systems work better when the individual parts are less capable.

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Mæslinger hærger videre i Europa: Antallet af smittede er tredoblet i 2018

Det er især i Syd- og Østeuropa, at sygdommen spreder sig. Men heller ikke Danmark går fri af den ekstremt smitsomme sygdom.

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Sea snakes that can't drink seawater

New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall.

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Five solutions offered for achieving gender equality in medicine and science

n a review published in a special issue of The Lancet, Professors Sonia Kang and Sarah Kaplan of the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management identify five myths that continue to perpetuate gender bias and offer five strategies for improving not only the number of women in medicine, but also their lived experiences, capacity to aspire, and opportunity to succeed.

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2018 was one of the hottest years on record and this year could be even hotter

All five of the hottest years on record have occurred in the last five years, according to global temperature data released Wednesday by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Shorter course of radiation therapy effective in treating men with prostate cancer

A new UCLA-led study shows that men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer can safely undergo higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time and still have the same, successful outcomes as from a much longer course of treatment.

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Mayo Clinic finds individualized diets are most effective for managing blood sugar levels

An individualized diet based on a person's genetics, microbiome and lifestyle is more effective in controlling blood glucose (sugar) levels than one that considers only nutritional composition of food, Mayo Clinic researchers have confirmed. The research published in the Feb. 8 edition of JAMA Network Open demonstrates that each person's body responds differently to similar foods, due to the uniqu

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Optimism associated with less likelihood of new pain reported by soldiers after deployment

Many veterans experience chronic pain after deployment. This study of almost 21,000 US Army soldiers who deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq examined the association between feelings of optimism (such as expecting the best and believing good things will happen) before deployment and new reports of pain after deployment, including new back pain, joint pain and frequent headaches.

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The Low-Budget Netflix Film Where NBA Players Overturn the System

“They invented a game on top of a game.” So says Spence (played by Bill Duke), gruffly reflecting on the history of organized basketball to his friend and protégé Ray (André Holland), in Steven Soderbergh’s new film, High Flying Bird . In this movie—shot on smartphones and distributed both online and in a few theaters—no professional game is ever played, and no team is ever named. Everything abou

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A century of alien landings, in two maps

The first extra-terrestrial to make contact (in a movie) appeared in 1920s Germany. ET set off a wave of 'first contact' movies in the 1980s. Many recent alien-landing movies are set in China and India – the future of the genre may well be Asian. Until humanity makes contact with some genuine extra-terrestrials, the aliens we invent will say more about us than about them. By extension, the same g

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Megapixels: These tentacle-nosed catfish are aquatic superheroes

Animals Repulsive or adorable? You decide. It’s not every day that we discover a new species that looks like cthulhu is possessing the face of a fish. Luckily, today is one of those days. In fact, we found…

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Here’s What AOC’s Friends and Enemies Are Saying About the “Green New Deal”

Green New Deal Yesterday, the left wing of the U.S. Democratic party unveiled the “Green New Deal,” a broad-spectrum plan to fight climate change that would radically reshape the future of energy policy and infrastructure in the United States. The plan — and its champion, the newly elected U.S. Representative from New York Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — immediately drew strong reactions from across t

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2018 was the fourth hottest year on record, say both NASA and NOAA

President Trump and other politicians have routinely dismissed climate change as a hoax. Data from NASA and NOAA show 2018 was the fourth hottest year on record. Collectively, the last five years have represented the hottest in the 139-year record. At a time when a majority of Americans worry over climate change , politicians and the fossil-fuel industry continue to drag their feet over regulatin

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Elon Musk tweets photos of SpaceX’s milestone test of Raptor rocket engine

SpaceX plans to use its new Raptor engines to power Starship and Super Heavy, two craft that would be used on a future Mars journey. The company has been testing its Raptor engines in Texas this week, though Thursday's announcement is the first time the engine has been shown able to produce the force necessary to lift Super Heavy and Starship. Raptor is powered by methane, a fuel source that Spac

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How to use Twitter to further your research career

How to use Twitter to further your research career How to use Twitter to further your research career, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00535-w The social-media platform is often a tool for procrastination, says Jet-Sing M. Lee. But what else can it be?

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China’s military is rushing to use artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A new fabric becomes more breathable as you work up a sweat

A yarn-based textile can switch from breathable to insulating and back again, depending on how much you sweat.

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A better eyeshot of the makeup of ancient meteorites

A team of scientists has visualized meteorite components at resolution powers much higher than ever before. Their efforts resulted in a much better look at — and enhanced understanding of — substances inside carbonaceous chondrites, the organic-containing meteorites that land on Earth. These substances include hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and water, all of which are needed for life.

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How poppy flowers get those vibrant colors that entice insects

With bright reds and yellows — and even the occasional white — poppies are very bright and colorful. Their petals, however, are also very thin; they are made up of just three layers of cells. University of Groningen scientists Casper van der Kooi and Doekele Stavenga used microscopy and mathematical models describing how light interacts with petals to find out how the vibrant colors are created.

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Famous 'sandpile model' shown to move like a traveling sand dune

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years. Even though the sandpile model serves as the archetypical model to study self-organized criticality, questions about its characteristics are still open and remain an active field of research. Researchers at IST Austria have now discovered a new property of this mathematical model: they managed to induce dyn

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When sequencing fails to pinpoint a rare disease

Genomics fails to diagnose up to half of patients who are tested. German scientists tackled the problem in a recent study in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. Using a new neutrophil proteome database they made genetic diagnoses for children with severe congenital neutropenia whom typical sequencing had failed.

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Researchers help define Southern Ocean's geological features

The scientists present data from the region that show the Australian-Antarctic Ridge has isotopic compositions distinct from both the Pacific and Indian mantle domains.

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New insight into cell receptors opens the way for tailored cancer drugs

New research on how cancer mutations influence a certain type of receptor on the cell membrane opens the way for the development of tailored drugs for certain cancers, such as rectal cancer and lung cancer. This according to researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University, who have been collaborating with researchers in the UK and USA. The results of their work, which concerns

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New study linking blight and homicide may help predict where murder may occur

A new study led by LSU Department of Sociology Assistant Professor Matthew Valasik is the first to show a statistical connection between homicide, blighted buildings and convenient stores.

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Ink made of air pollution | Anirudh Sharma

What if we could capture pollution in the air around us and turn into something useful? Inventor Anirudh Sharma shares how he created AIR-INK, a useable black ink that's made from PM 2.5 pollution. Learn how new carbon-based materials could disrupt age-old processes in industries like fashion, printing and packing — and make the world just a bit cleaner in the process.

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Grab a soda and go: Convenience stores get more convenient

Get ready to say good riddance to the checkout line.

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New study linking blight and homicide may help predict where murder may occur

A new study led by LSU Department of Sociology Assistant Professor Matthew Valasik is the first to show a statistical connection between homicide, blighted buildings and convenient stores in Baton Rouge. Valasik, doctoral candidate in sociology Elizabeth Brault and his former student Stephen Martinez, who is now an investigator in the East Baton Rouge District Attorney's office looked at where hom

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Map shows how grains took over the world

A new map shows how ancient cereal crops spread from isolated pockets of first cultivation to become dietary staples in civilizations across the Old World. Since the beginning of archaeology, researchers have combed the globe searching for evidence of the first domesticated crops. Painstakingly extracting charred bits of barley, wheat, millet, and rice from the remains of ancient hearths and camp

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A century of alien landings, in two maps

The first extra-terrestrial to make contact (in a movie) appeared in 1920s Germany ET set off a wave of 'first contact' movies in the 1980s Many recent alien-landing movies are set in China and India – the future of the genre may well be Asian Until humanity makes contact with some genuine extra-terrestrials, the aliens we invent will say more about us than about them. By extension, the same goes

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Seasons change: Researchers provide new definition for major Indian monsoon season

Toward the end of every year, the Northeast Indian Monsoon (NEM) batters southern India with torrents of driving rain, but climatologists have never precisely defined when the monsoon begins and ends.

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Ex-Marine pilot dreams of ferrying folks into space

Mark Stucky fought in the Iraq war, once buzzed a Soviet warplane over the Sea of Japan and has flown all sorts of experimental aircraft.

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Robbie the Robot becomes soap fan after watching Emmerdale to learn about dementia

Edge Hill University's robot, Robbie, has become a soap fan after watching episodes of popular UK drama Emmerdale to learn about dementia.

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Report: Bezos-hired sleuth suspects sexts stolen by “government entity”

Bezos gave private eye unlimited budget to investigate stolen photos.

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Sprint sues AT&T over ‘5G E’ marketing, calling it deceptive and misleading

Sprint alleges that it's already lost business due to the tactic.

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Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties

Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields associated with lightning may have played an evolutionary role in living organisms, Tel Aviv University research has found.

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Seasons change: Researchers provide new definition for major Indian monsoon season

FSU Professor of Meteorology Vasu Misra has used detailed surface temperature analyses to develop the first-ever objective definition of the Northeast Indian Monsoon.

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Investment in LEGO can yield returns of up to 600 percent

Economists of the Higher School of Economics Victoria Dobrynskaya and Yulia Kishilova analyzed secondary market prices of the world-famous toy construction sets released from 1987-2014.

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Fluconazole makes fungi sexually active

Under the influence of the drug fluconazole, the fungus Candida albicans can change its mode of reproduction and thus become even more resistant. Scientists at the University of Würzburg report this in the journal mBio.

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A new protocol for Hepatitis A vaccination to prevent a vaccine-resistant virus

Researchers of the University of Barcelona (UB) have analysed, with massive sequencing techniques for the first time, the evolution of the Hepatitis A virus with samples from patients. The results, published in the journal EBioMedicine, show the presence of variants of the virus that could escape the effects of the vaccine.

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Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea

The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War — and often very close to shore. Should we simply leave them where they are and accept the risk of their slowly releasing toxic substances, or should we instead remove them, and run the risk of their falling apart — or even exploding?

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Lonza and AllCells Join Forces for Global Commercialization of Hematopoietic Primary Cells

Lonza and AllCells have entered into a private label partnership for the manufacture and global commercialization of an extensive range of hematopoietic primary cells. This partnership expands Lonza’s broad offering of hematopoietic cell lines and enables cell biologists to easily access a wide selection of high-quality cells to boost their scientific research.

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4 steps get kids into the ‘flow’ of learning

New research outlines a four-step plan to develop students’ connection to their learning environment and achieve an ideal state for learning: “flow.” Terry Bowles and Daniela Russo of the University of Melbourne and associate professor Janet Scull of Monash University explain the research here: Most of us have memories of our days at school—usually some good and some not so good. But the chances

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Bluetooth reveals how we learn at museums

Researchers have used Bluetooth technology to learn more about how people learn at museums. Here, Eduardo Araujo Oliveira and Paula de Barba of the University of Melbourne explain how the technology could also enhance museum visitors’ learning experience: Museums are an important setting for informal learning–their invaluable collections and purposefully designed spaces mean learning can happen a

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In the fight against human trafficking, industrial engineers can help

An estimated 24.9 million people worldwide are victims of human trafficking. The majority of these individuals are tricked, threatened, or coerced into forced labor in domestic work, construction, manufacturing, agriculture, the food industry, or other areas. Approximately one-fifth of them are forced into prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation. Although it's notoriously difficult to t

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Why SpaceX Built A Stainless Steel Starship

submitted by /u/sidcool1234 [link] [comments]

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Psychology: Robot saved, people take the hit

To what extent are people prepared to show consideration for robots? A new study suggests that, under certain circumstances, some people are willing to endanger human lives — out of concern for robots.

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Bridging the 'liking-gap,' researchers discuss awkwardness of conversations

Social and personality psychologists will present their latest findings on how people engage in casual conversations, and what this means for our own performance anxiety.

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MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users

Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests.

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Innovative, simple treatment to combat the Candida albicans fungus

A study led by the UPV/EHU has developed an innovative, simple treatment based uterine stem cells to combat the Candida albicans fungus, responsible for vaginal candidiasis disease Despite not being life-threatening, this disease, which is very widespread among women, reduces patient life quality owing to its symptoms (itching and stinging). This research has been published in the international Fr

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Tackling tumor scar tissue could be key to treating pancreatic cancer

The first study in the world to take a detailed look at scar tissue in human pancreatic cancer has revealed a range of different scar tissue types that could help clinicians predict which patients will respond best to particular treatments.

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New insights into radial expansion of plants can boost biomass production

Besides the obvious longitudinal growth, plants also enlarge in the radial sense. This thickening of plant stems and roots provides physical support to plants, provides us with wood and cork, and plays a major role in sequestering atmospheric carbon into plant biomass. The tissues responsible for this radial expansion are the vascular tissues which transport water and nutrients around plants and a

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Supercomputing propels jet atomization research for industrial processes

Researchers at the Bundeswehr University Munich recently appeared on the cover of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics for their simulations studying turbulence in jet sprays at the atomic level.

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Planning ahead: A new robust approach for minimizing costs in power-distribution networks

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed a new method for scheduling the turning on and off of power generators that minimizes costs and ensures reliability while addressing the issues prevalent in multiple previous methods.

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UCI-led study reveals how blood cells help wounds heal scar-free

New insights on circumventing a key obstacle on the road to anti-scarring treatment have been published by Maksim Plikus, an associate professor in developmental and cell biology at the UCI School of Biological Sciences and colleagues in Nature Communications. The research team discovered that the natural scar-free skin repair process relies partially on assistance from circulating blood cells. Th

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Is it better to have a heart attack while traveling or at home?

Is it better to have a heart attack while travelling or at home? Find out at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2019. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a branch of the European Society of Cardiology, will be held March 2-4 at the Palacio de Ferias y Congresos de Malaga in Malaga, Spain. Explore the scientific program to see the innovations that will guide practice.

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Image: Northeast Kenya

Captured on 1 October 2018 by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite, this image features part of northeast Kenya – an area east of the East African Rift.

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Boosting solid state chemical reactions

A cross-coupling reaction is typically performed in an organic solvent and leads to the production of a large amount of solvent waste, which is often harmful to the environment. A new strategy developed by Hokkaido University researchers in Japan opens the door for more environmentally friendly solvent-free solid-state cross coupling processes using mechanochemistry. It also has many potential app

7h

Google Is Censoring Search Results to Hide Russian Corruption

Scrubbed Search Google has begun the process of scrubbing its search engine to comply with Russian censorship laws. After years of pressure, Russians using Google will no longer see search results for pornography, political extremism, unlicensed gambling, drugs, pirated media, and other banned topics, according to the Russian newspaper Vedomosti . The list of blocked sites and topics are maintain

7h

When a Yearbook Is a Current Event

O n Thursday afternoon , The Virginian-Pilot , the daily paper based in Norfolk, Virginia, broke news that was at once shocking and deeply predictable: another Virginia politician , another instance of racism captured in a yearbook. This time around, the lawmaker was Tommy Norment, the majority leader of Virginia’s state Senate; the publication was the 1968 issue of The Bomb , the Virginia Milita

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Economics professor discovers concerning effects for oil and gas boomtowns

Oil and gas "boomtowns," such as Ohio's Belmont County, may be bearing the costs of drilling without reaping all of its benefits, according to a newly published paper by Dr. Amanda Weinstein, assistant professor of economics at The University of Akron.

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How to keep your pets safe from marijuana poisoning

If you live with a pet, there is a good chance you consider it to be a member of your family. It is well established that companion animals, ranging from cats and dogs through to birds and rodents, can have a positive health benefit in our lives.

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How to keep your pets safe from marijuana poisoning

If you live with a pet, there is a good chance you consider it to be a member of your family. It is well established that companion animals, ranging from cats and dogs through to birds and rodents, can have a positive health benefit in our lives.

7h

New pill can deliver insulin through the stomach

A research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing the injections that patients with type 2 diabetes have to give themselves every day.

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[in-depth] A comprehensive series on the science behind cell-based meat

The /r/Futurology subreddit frequently features highly upvoted posts on cell-based meat, reflecting the media attention and public interest that has followed the industry. There are many introductory resources to how cell-based meat is produced and what its benefits may be, however there are no comprehensive resources which fully inform those interested in learning more. Below you’ll find the fir

7h

Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties

Lightning was the main electromagnetic presence in the Earth's atmosphere long before the invention of electricity. There are some 2,000 thunderstorms active at any given time, so humans and other organisms have been bathed in extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for billions of years.

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Emoji are becoming more inclusive, but not necessarily more representative

At least 230 new emoji, when different skin tones and genders are included, are due to be released this year. That's a leap on 2018 when only 157 emoji were added to the Unicode Standard – the code used to support emoji on different platforms.

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What is the value of a robot life?

People are prepared to save a robot at the cost of human lives under certain conditions. One of these situations is when we believe the robot can experience pain. This has been indicated in research led by the team of Sari Nijssen of Radboud University, in collaboration with Barbara Müller of Radboud University and Markus Paulus from LMU Munich, which will appear in Social Cognition on 7 February.

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Generating electricity with rice straw

Rice straw is the waste product of growing rice. Normally, it is simply burned adding sooty pollution to the local air and nudging up atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. What if there were a better alternative to simply burning this material? Writing in the International Journal of Environment and Waste Management a team from India offer an alternative. Pardeep Aggarwal and Anu Prashaant of Amity U

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Game theory says Brexit negotiations are now all about avoiding blame

The UK and the EU are continuing Brexit talks because, as game theory suggests, both sides want to avoid being blamed for the fallout, says Petros Sekeris

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New pill can deliver insulin through the stomach

A research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing the injections that patients with type 2 diabetes have to give themselves every day.

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Forskere vil gøre økologi mere økologisk

Økologiske landbrug i Europa bruger stadig kobber, svovl og antibiotika i produktionen. Et nyt projekt med dansk deltagelse skal prøve at få skåret kraftigt ned på disse stoffer.

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Adenoid and tonsil trouble for teens

With a new, exacting longitudinal study, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers challenge the established medical consensus that adenoids and tonsils shrink significantly during the teenage years. By carefully measuring X-ray images from the same students at different ages, they generated the most accurate growth curves to date. These findings can help diagnose several adult di

8h

How a fungus can cripple the immune system

An international research team led by Professor Oliver Werz of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has now discovered how the fungus knocks out the immune defenses, enabling a potentially fatal fungal infection to develop.

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Cricket females choose male losers

According to popular belief, females prefer males with high social status (alpha males) when as partners to continue the race. However, as recent studies have shown, males losing fights have equal or even greater chances of success among females. The study was published in Frontiers of Ecology and Evolution.

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Shedding light on the science of auroral breakups

Japanese scientists have quantitatively confirmed how energetic an auroral breakup can be. Using a combination of cutting-edge ground-based technology and new space-borne observations, they have demonstrated the essential role of an auroral breakup in ionizing the deep atmosphere. The research furthers our understanding of one of the most visually stunning natural phenomena.

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Study reveals complementary medicine use remains hidden to conventional medicine providers

Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.

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How New 2D Materials Convert Wi-Fi Signals to Electricity

Our eyes are only attuned to a narrow band of possible wavelengths for electromagnetic radiation, between around 390-700 nanometers. If you could see the world in different wavelengths , you’d be aware that, in a built-up area, you’re illuminated even in the dark, constantly irradiated by infrared, microwaves, and radio waves. Some of this is ambient electromagnetic radiation given off by objects

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Growing Up on the Road With a Bunch of Perfect Dogs

With four days to go before the prestigious 2019 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Mara Flood is spending a good chunk of her waking hours keeping Poe, a two-year-old smooth collie (full name: Travler SugarNSpice Witches Do Come Blue), from impulsively humping the young female in heat who’s been staying in the next room over. Flood has been taking the two outside in shifts, making sure one or the

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Goop has a Netflix deal – this is a dangerous win for pseudoscience | Arwa Mahdawi

The brand that championed coffee colonics and jade vagina eggs is coming to our TV screens. Is there no escaping Gwyneth Paltrow’s woo? Are you wary of experts? Do you enjoy a fact-free lifestyle? Are you itching to splurge on non-toxic skin creams and 24-carat-gold sex toys ? Well, I’ve got brilliant news. Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s controversial lifestyle brand, has signed a deal with Netflix . So

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Does the presence of colleges and hospitals increase home prices?

Whether the presence of a college or hospital increases a home's value has to do with the institution's size and the ZIP code's population, says a new study by computer scientists at the University of California, Riverside.

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Think big—at least when it comes to global conservation

According to a group of international researchers, the potential for large countries to contribute to environmental protection is being overlooked.

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How a fungus can cripple the immune system

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is everywhere, and is extremely dangerous for people with weakened immune systems. It occurs virtually everywhere on Earth, as a dark grey stain on damp walls or in microscopically small spores that blow through the air and cling to wallpaper, mattresses and floors. Healthy people usually have no problem if spores find their way into their body, as their immune def

8h

Think big—at least when it comes to global conservation

According to a group of international researchers, the potential for large countries to contribute to environmental protection is being overlooked.

8h

Artificial Intelligence Study of Human Genome Finds Unknown Human Ancestor

The genetic footprint of a "ghost population" may match that of a Neanderthal and Denisovan hybrid fossil found in Siberia

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Researchers discover corn plants call in hungry nematodes when resistant rootworms attack

Someday – in some scientifically savvy encyclopedia perhaps – the word "resilience" may include a photograph of the Western Corn Rootworm. This crafty, intrepid rootworm has found a way to circumvent just about every defense a corn plant and its advocates have thrown at it.

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Core technology for ultra-small 3-D image sensor

A KAIST research team developed a silicon optical phased array (OPA) chip, which can be a core component for three-dimensional image sensors. This research was co-led by Ph.D. candidate Seong-Hwan Kim and Dr. Jong-Bum You from the National Nanofab Center (NNFC).

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The composition of ancient meteorites

A team of Japanese and American scientists has visualized meteorite components at higher resolution than ever before. Their efforts have resulted in an enhanced understanding of substances inside carbonaceous chondrites, the organic-compound-containing meteorites that land on Earth. These substances include hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and water, all of which are needed for life.

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Research suggests life thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago

Three and a half billion years ago, Earth hosted life, but was it barely surviving, or thriving? A new study carried out by a multi-institutional team with leadership including the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) provides new answers to this question. Microbial metabolism is recorded in billions of years of sulfur isotope ratios that agree with thi

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NASA Loses Contact With Mars CubeSats, as Expected

These tiny satellites were not essential to InSight, but they performed their intended functions perfectly. Now, these robotic pioneers have winked out, but that doesn't equate to failure. The post NASA Loses Contact With Mars CubeSats, as Expected appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Researchers discover corn plants call in hungry nematodes when resistant rootworms attack

Someday – in some scientifically savvy encyclopedia perhaps – the word "resilience" may include a photograph of the Western Corn Rootworm. This crafty, intrepid rootworm has found a way to circumvent just about every defense a corn plant and its advocates have thrown at it.

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Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid

Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage.

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Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease

The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments that do not target problem genes. The findings were published on Feb. 4 in the online edition of Blood.

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Does the presence of colleges and hospitals increase home prices?

Whether the presence of a college or hospital increases a home's value has to do with the institution's size and the ZIP code's population, says a new study by computer scientists at the University of California, Riverside. Colleges and hospitals do affect home prices and rents, but not always positively. Prices also rise and fall faster around these institutions, increasing the risk for investors

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New phenomenon discovered that fixes a common problem in lasers: Wavelength splitting

A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. The never-before-seen phenomenon will be important for an emerging field of photonics research, including one day making micro-chips that code information using light instead of electrons.

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Think big — at least when it comes to global conservation

According to a group of international researchers, the potential for large countries to contribute to environmental protection is being overlooked.The researchers, spanning 13 universities and three countries, were led by UBC Okanagan's Adam T. Ford and Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow Laura Coristine. They recently examined the leverage an individual country has when it comes to protecting ecosystem

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How to photograph moving vehicles

Technology A step-by-step guide to capturing that perfect motion shot. A step-by-step guide on how to photograph moving vehicles, including the gear you'll need to capture that perfect shot.

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Fluconazole makes fungi sexually active

The yeast Candida albicans occurs in most healthy people as a harmless colonizer in the digestive tract. However, it can also cause life-threatening infections, especially in immunocompromised patients.

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To save the Earth someday, team builds spacecraft to crash into an asteroid and shove it off course

A team of scientists, astronomers and engineers meets weekly in a conference room on a Howard County, Md., research campus and plans to save the world.

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Heartbreak becomes burnout for teachers when work is turbulent

Teaching is often known as a "trial by fire" profession.

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Perceptions play big role in how residents feel about wind energy

When local residents feel the planning process for building wind turbines is fair and open, their perceptions of the often-controversial energy source remain steady or improve with time, according to a University of Michigan study.

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Gene-Hacking Breakthrough Could Nix Mammals’ Ability to Reproduce

Gene Drive In 2015, researchers learned they could use CRISPR-Cas9 to create what are known as gene drives. By editing an organism’s genes in a specific way, they could increase the likelihood that its offspring inherited certain genetic traits. While researchers knew gene drives worked in bugs — many are exploring its potential use against disease-spreading mosquitoes — they didn’t know if the s

8h

Fluconazole makes fungi sexually active

The yeast Candida albicans occurs in most healthy people as a harmless colonizer in the digestive tract. However, it can also cause life-threatening infections, especially in immunocompromised patients.

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The Science of Dismantling a Nuclear Bomb

The Science of Dismantling a Nuclear Bomb Once the tricky political agreements have been reached, how do nations take apart their nuclear weapons? NuclearWarhead_topNteaser.jpg A Mark 28 thermo-nuclear bomb is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force Boeing B-52H Stratofortress aircraft. Image credits: TSgt. Boyd Belcher, USAF Rights information: Public domain Technology Friday, February 8, 2019 – 09:00 Be

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Tasmanian lakes metal contamination among worst in the world

A study of metal contamination in south-west Tasmania by the ANU has found lakes in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) are contaminated with dangerous metals, and at levels among the highest in the world.

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Decision making in space

An academic at Royal Holloway has conducted research to see how people make decisions in space with zero gravity and the results prove this little-known area needs to be addressed.

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Chimpanzee 'mini-brains' hint at secrets of human evolution

At some point during human evolution, a handful of genetic changes triggered a dramatic threefold expansion of the brain's neocortex, the wrinkly outermost layer of brain tissue responsible for everything from language to self-awareness to abstract thought. Identifying what drove this evolutionary shift is fundamental to understanding what makes us human, but has been particularly challenging for

8h

How a fungus can cripple the immune system

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is everywhere, and is extremely dangerous for people with weakened immune systems. It occurs virtually everywhere on Earth, as a dark grey stain on damp walls or in microscopically small spores that blow through the air and cling to wallpaper, mattresses and floors. Healthy people usually have no problem if spores find their way into their body, as their immune def

8h

Chimpanzee 'mini-brains' hint at secrets of human evolution

At some point during human evolution, a handful of genetic changes triggered a dramatic threefold expansion of the brain's neocortex, the wrinkly outermost layer of brain tissue responsible for everything from language to self-awareness to abstract thought. Identifying what drove this evolutionary shift is fundamental to understanding what makes us human, but has been particularly challenging for

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Zwicky Transient Facility spots a bumper crop of supernovae, black holes and more

The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), an automated sky survey project based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory near San Diego, California, has produced its first bounty of new results. Since officially beginning operations in March 2018, the new instrument has discovered 50 small near-Earth asteroids and more than 1,100 supernovae, while observing more than 1 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

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Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The study, which will be published February 8, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals the distinct roles played by two critical tumor suppressor genes that are commonly mutated in these hi

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Skriv nu under, Ellen Trane Nørby

Afskaffelsen af seksårsfristen mangler kun sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørbys underskrift på et cirkulære, som Sundhedsstyrelsen skal sende ud. Det kan kun gå for langsomt.

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Why forgetting at work can be a good thing

The amount of information and data which workers are confronted with every day has increased enormously over the past few years. Globalisation and digitalisation have led to a steady increase in the complexity of work and business processes. Anything that is up to date today can be outdated tomorrow. As a result, decision-makers constantly need to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information.

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A laser system built on principles of supersymmetry

A team of researchers from the University of Central Florida and Michigan Technological University has developed a laser system concept built on the principles of supersymmetry. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group reports that their system is meant to solve the problem of producing more light with a compact laser system. Tsampikos Kottos with Wesleyan University has written

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Video: Planetary scientist talks about her work with NASA studying asteroid Bennu

What can the asteroid Bennu tell us about the universe and its origins? Assistant astronomy professor Cristina Thomas talked to NAU-TV about her experience as a team member of NASA's OSIRIS REx mission, which landed on the asteroid late last year and is collecting samples of regolith, or loose surface material, which scientists think may have answers about the earliest history in the solar system.

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New phenomenon discovered that fixes a common problem in lasers: Wavelength splitting

A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. The never-before-seen phenomenon will be important for an emerging field of photonics research, including one day making micro-chips that code information using light instead of electrons.

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Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid

A research team led by Hokkaido University in Japan has constructed a porous material that is very stable and changes color when exposed to acid vapor. This is believed to be the first reported instance of a hydrogen-bonded organic framework changing color in response to acid. The findings are described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Scientists take X-ray aim in effort to discover new fuel catalyst

For many years, scientists have been looking for an effective and efficient way to turn water into energy-storing fuels using solar- and wind-powered electricity, likely by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. To do this, they have been searching for catalysts to make these water-splitting reactions happen.

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Benefits of pulses: Good for you and the planet

An illogical revolution has swept the Canadian Prairies and can take over the world. Farmland is now never rested —it is planted and harvested every year —and yet soil health has improved.

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Cladding fire risks have been known for years. Lives depend on acting now, with no more delays

The fire at the Neo200 building on Spencer Street in the Melbourne CBD this week has eerie similarities to the Grenfell Tower disaster. Fortunately, instead of 72 people dead as at Grenfell, only one person was hospitalised for smoke inhalation.

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Can ‘air traffic control’ make self-driving cars cheap and safe?

Combining human and artificial intelligence in autonomous vehicles could push self-driving cars more quickly toward wide-scale adoption, researchers say. That’s the goal of a new project that relies on a technique called instantaneous crowdsourcing to provide a cost-effective, real-time remote backup for onboard autonomous systems without the need for a human to be physically in the driver’s seat

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Australia streaks ahead to be renewables world champion

Research from the Australian National University (ANU) has found that Australia is installing renewable power per person each year faster than any other country, helping it to meet its entire Paris Agreement emissions reduction targets five years early.

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Bone cancer found in 240-million-year-old stem-turtle fossil

A team of researchers with Museum für Naturkunde and Charité—Universitätsmedizin, both in Germany, reports a case of a rare type of cancer in a 240-million-year-old stem-turtle fossil. In their paper published in JAMA Oncology, the group describes their study of the unique growth on the ancient fossil.

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Scientists scour the cosmos to find the origins of the periodic table's 118 elements

Since the invention of the periodic table 150 years ago this month, scientists have worked to fill in the rows of elements and make sense of their properties.

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Pittsburgh residents don't fear driverless vehicles, survey says

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A better eyeshot of the makeup of ancient meteorites

A team of Japanese and American scientists has visualized meteorite components at resolution powers much higher than ever before. Their efforts resulted in a much better look at — and enhanced understanding of — substances inside carbonaceous chondrites, the organic-containing meteorites that land on Earth. These substances include hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and water, all of which are needed fo

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ELSI research suggests life thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago

3.5 billion years ago Earth hosted life, but was it barely surviving, or thriving? A new study led by researchers at the Earth-Life Science Institute of Tokyo Tech provides new answers to this question. Microbial metabolism is recorded in billions of years of sulfur isotope ratios that agree with this study's predictions, suggesting life throve in the ancient oceans. Using this data, scientists ca

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From supergiant to solar-mass star: Study finds HD 179821 less massive than previously thought

A post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star known as HD 179821 turns out to be significantly less massive than previously thought, according to a new study. Using new data from ESA's Gaia satellite, astronomers found that HD 179821 is not a supergiant, which was suggested by previous observations, but is rather a solar-mass star. The finding is presented in a paper published January 28 on arXiv

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Central Africa's first ever research-class astronomical observatory moves a step closer

Kenya could soon host the only research-class observatory in equatorial Africa, thanks to a collaboration between the nation and the UK.

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Ride With the Guy Who Builds Roller Coasters in His Yard

With the help of a 300-pound test dummy named Todd, Will Pemble has turned his home into an amusement park.

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Surprisingly, Disney Is Happy With EA's 'Star Wars' Games

Also, 'Apex Legend' is selling remarkably fast and there's, um, a 'Halo' theme park coming. Find out more here.

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Razer Blade Stealth Review (2019): Better Graphics and Battery

One of our favorite laptops for portable playtime now offers improved graphics performance and battery life.

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Lack of basic research hiding behind 'clean meat' hype

Tens of millions of dollars are funding projects to create a consumer-ready lab-grown burger. Despite the hype, experts warn that a lot more research needs to be conducted. Mainstream adoption of plant-based foods, however, is making lab-grown meat a welcome possibility. None Few people disagree that a better solution to factory farming needs to be implemented. Yet since the stark realities of li

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VIDEO: Se hvordan lp’er trykkes i form med 120 ton

Iværksættervirksomheden Nordsø Records i Københavns Nordhavn har specialiseret sig i små serier af grammofonplader til en voksende skare af vinylentusiaster. Selvom teknologien er gammel, er det noget af en kunst at få et godt pres og udnytte mulighederne for at give pladerne et unikt farvespil.

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The Best Photos of the Sony's 2019 Wildlife Photography Competition

The World Photography Organisation has announced the shortlist of finalists for its annual Natural World & Wildlife competition.

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Jesper Ravn er ny klinikchef på Rigshospitalet

Thoraxkirurgisk klinik på Rigshospitalet får overlæge Jesper Ravn som klinikchef.

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Systematic Fraud

Here’s a personal experience with fraudulent scientific literature, as reported in Nature: In 2015, I discovered several papers had been written about a gene that I and my colleagues first reported in 1998. All were by different authors based in China, but contained shared and strange irregularities. They also used highly similar language and figures. I think the papers came from third parties wo

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Photos: Stunning Shots of the Natural World and Wildlife

Here's a look at the finalists for a Sony photo contest.

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Asteroid from 'rare species' sighted in the cosmic wild

Astronomers have discovered an asteroid looping through the inner solar system on an exotic orbit. The unusual object is among the first asteroids ever found whose orbit is confined almost entirely within the orbit of Venus. The asteroid's existence hints at potentially significant numbers of space rocks arcing unseen in uncharted regions nearer to the sun.

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Addressing cooling needs and energy poverty targets in the Global South

While most of the northern hemisphere is currently in the icy grip of one of the coldest winters ever recorded, record-breaking heat is the problem in the south. The results of a new IIASA study show that between 1.8 and 4.1 billion people require access to indoor cooling to avoid heat-related stresses.

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‘Openness’ is key to how locals feel about wind turbines

When local residents feel the planning process for building wind turbines is fair and open, their perceptions of wind energy remain steady or improve with time, according to a new study. In fact, the openness in the planning process is more important in shaping residents’ perceptions of wind energy than receiving a payment, researchers say. “…residents want to be heard.” Likewise, if residents fe

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Artificial Intelligence Study of Human Genome Finds Unknown Human Ancestor

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Worried about robots taking your job? You can rest easy … for now

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments

CRISPR is a technique that is revolutionizing biomedical research through high-precision genome editing. However, even though it allows the creation or correction of mutations consisting of a single or few nucleotides with relative ease, it still possesses limitations for larger fragments of DNA in the genome. For instance, the genomic insertion of a gene that produces a fluorescent protein such a

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DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species.

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Sound and light trapped by disorder

Sound and light are crucial for our life and are essential in many energy, communication and information technologies. Their interaction allows many fundamental observations in physics, from the detection of cosmic gravitational waves to the cooling of quantum systems into their quantum ground state. However, their interaction may be subtle and weak. Enhancing their interaction requires confining

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Tune in and switch off

The simple act of switching on the TV for some downtime could be making a bigger contribution to childhood obesity than we realise, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

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Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments

CRISPR is a technique that is revolutionizing biomedical research through high-precision genome editing. However, even though it allows the creation or correction of mutations consisting of a single or few nucleotides with relative ease, it still possesses limitations for larger fragments of DNA in the genome. For instance, the genomic insertion of a gene that produces a fluorescent protein such a

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DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species.

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Hispanic men face high risk of deadly police interaction

Among men of color, Hispanic males are two times more likely to have a fatal interaction with the police in neighborhoods that have a high percentage of Hispanic residents, according to a new study. The research also indicates police agencies with more Hispanic officers are associated with higher odds of Hispanic fatalities. “We can’t just assume it’s only black males at risk.” The results sugges

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How quantum terrorists could bring down the future internet

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Ellen Trane holder fast: Der er for store regionale forskelle ved hjertestop

Hjertestop-tallet om Region Sjælland var et eksempel på store regionale forskelle, siger sundhedsminister, der mener, at der mangler et ordentligt talgrundlag for at sammenligne regioner. Lægelig chef i Region Sjælland er enig i, at der mangler sammenlignelige tal.

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Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

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Everybody Knows Is a Slow-Burning Thriller

Everybody Knows , the new film by the acclaimed Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, opens with an image of ancient, heavy gears clanking away. These are revealed to be the workings of a clock in an old church tower, and they perform purposes both literal and metaphorical. It is in this clock tower that one character offers another the titular phrase, “Everybody knows.” (It is the first, but not only

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A Better Pill–Internal Delivery Devices May Help Patients Take Their Medicine

A tortoise and a pufferfish inspire technology to overcome the multibillion-dollar nonadherence problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Better Pill–Internal Delivery Devices May Help Patients Take Their Medicine

A tortoise and a pufferfish inspire technology to overcome the multibillion-dollar nonadherence problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Google Doodle Celebrates the Chemist Who Accidentally ‘Discovered’ Caffeine

The name Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge may not mean much to you. But chances are you owe him a huge debt. For it was he who first “discovered” caffeine. Today, Google is celebrating …

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The Milky Way is warped, but astronomers still aren't sure why

Space Our neck of the universe is not such a flat space after all. Sometimes it might seem like life on Earth has taken a few bizarre twists and turns in the last few years, but if it helps you feel better, it’s not just us. In reality,…

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Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

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Robot Love: Why romance with machines is a foregone conclusion | ZDNet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Gaze Upon the Black Magic of Electrical Discharge Machining

Ever seen GIFs of metal parts fitting together so precisely that the boundaries between them seem to disappear? That's the joy of EDM. (Um, the other EDM.)

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How the brain remembers amputated limbs, and continues to control them

"Phantom" libs aren't just an oddity, but a crucial phenomenon. Harriet Dempsey-Jones from University College London explains.

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Musikken presses ned på vinyl i Nordhavn

PLUS. To iværksættere har kickstartet den første danske produktion af vinylplader i over 30 år med en nybygget vinylpresse.

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Apple fjerner anti-sporing fra Safari – kan bruges til at spore brugere

Apple fjerner do-not-track-indstillingen fra browseren Safari, med henvisning til at den kan være med til at identificere gennem browser fingerprinting.

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Image of the Day: Star Burst

Pancreatic cells associated with cancer resemble celestial bodies as revealed by microscopy.

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How quantum terrorists could bring down the future internet

Malicious actors could exploit the laws of quantum mechanics to destroy quantum information on a global scale, say physicists.

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In six objects

The National Museum of Scotland unveils the final three galleries of its £80m redevelopment.

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'The gates of hell'

Ten years ago, the nation had its worst-ever bushfire disaster – and it has left a profound legacy.

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Kan nya metoder hjälpa läkare att hitta högriskpatienter?

Hjärtinfarkt och stroke är de vanligaste dödsorsakerna i världen. En av de starkaste riskfaktorerna för dessa sjukdomar utgörs av höga nivåer av fetter i blodet. Idag arbetar forskarna med att ta fram och testa nya metoder så att läkarna lättare ska hitta patienter med hög risk för dessa sjukdomar. Slår det väl ut kan det även hjälpa diabetespatienter.

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Oral Insulin

Insulin is a protein. Like all protein (or peptide) drugs it needs to be injected, you can’t take it in pill form. This is because proteins are digested in the GI tract, are generally large and difficult to absorb intact, and if they make it that far they then have to deal with the liver before they can get to their intended target. So protein or peptide drugs are simply not able to be delivered

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Apple to pay teenager who found FaceTime bug

The flaw let iPhone owners eavesdrop on people they called via the FaceTime video-chat system.

10h

Bernie Sanders Is Ready to Rumble

Bernie Sanders has seen himself as on a mission since he started running for office in the 1970s, and he sees no reason to stop now. He thinks he’s dramatically changed the conversation over the past three years, and he feels like he’s close to achieving his ultimate goal. Plus, there’s Donald Trump. When the president used his State of the Union speech on Tuesday to preview his own reelection ca

10h

Øl før vin? Tømmermands-myte underkastet tysk grundighed

Med dansk sponsorstøtte har tyske forskere set på betydningen af, om man drikker øl før vin eller gør det omvendte.

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Video: Flying under Aeolus

Following the launch of Aeolus on 22 August 2018, scientists have been busy fine-tuning and calibrating this latest Earth Explorer satellite. Aeolus carries a revolutionary instrument, which comprises a powerful laser, a large telescope and a very sensitive receiver. It works by emitting short, powerful pulses –50 pulses per second –of ultraviolet light from a laser down into the atmosphere.

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South Korea Becomes a Testing Ground for Trump’s Grievances With Allies

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he will meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Vietnam for more nuclear talks wasn’t the only big news for the Korean peninsula this week. Quietly, with none of the pomp of the State of the Union address, U.S. and South Korean negotiators reached a new deal “in principle” for sharing the costs of the tens of thousands of American troops who have been ba

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Fraternities Can Push Boys Toward a Terrible Sort of Masculinity—Or Help Them Resist It

The first speech that Oliver, a West Coast fraternity-chapter president whose story I closely followed for a year, gave his new pledges was not the lecture one might expect from a fraternity brother. “We’ve worked really hard to build a reputation as a house of nice guys. If you endanger that reputation, you’ll immediately be kicked to the curb,” Oliver told the pledges. “That’s not the kind of p

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Something Is Not Quite Right In the Universe, Ultraprecise New Measurement Reveals

A super-precise measurement of one of the fundamental constants of the universe suggests it's expanding faster now than it was in its early years.

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Weird, Bumpy Landscape in African Desert Explained by Ancient Ice Stream

This ancient ice stream was comparable to those found in Antarctica today

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Photos: Traces of an Ancient Ice Stream

300 million years ago, Namibia was covered in ice. Now, we see traces of it.

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I Was a Teenage Element Hoarder

Even at the age of 15, I realized my obsession with collecting all the elements in the periodic table’s is not something most kids aspire to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ipswich Tidal Flood Barrier to protect 1,600 homes

It is hoped the new defensive barrier will also protect 400 businesses for the next 100 years.

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Drought, deluge turned stable landslide into disaster

"Stable landslide" sounds like a contradiction in terms, but there are indeed places on Earth where land has been creeping downhill slowly, stably and harmlessly for as long as a century. But stability doesn't necessarily last forever. For the first time, researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and collaborating institutions have documented the transition of a stab

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Infographic: How not to lose a spacecraft

ESA's ultra-precise deep-space navigation technique – Delta-DOR – tells us where spacecraft are, accurate to within a few hundred metres, even at a distance of 100,000,000 km.

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Why are Australians still using Facebook?

This weeks marks 15 years since Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg first set up the platform with his college roommate Eduardo Saverin. Since then, Facebook has grown into a giant global enterprise.

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Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk

The devastating bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 and 2017 rightly captured the world's attention. But what's less widely known is that another World Heritage-listed marine ecosystem in Australia, Shark Bay, was also recently devastated by extreme temperatures, when a brutal marine heatwave struck off Western Australia in 2011.

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Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk

The devastating bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 and 2017 rightly captured the world's attention. But what's less widely known is that another World Heritage-listed marine ecosystem in Australia, Shark Bay, was also recently devastated by extreme temperatures, when a brutal marine heatwave struck off Western Australia in 2011.

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Justice Department Challenges Legality of Supervised Injection Sites

Prosecutors in Pennsylvania, along with the U.S. Department of Justice, filed a lawsuit on Wednesday to block the opening of a supervised injection site in Philadelphia. While those developing the site believe it's legal, others see it as a way to normalize the use of drugs including heroin and fentanyl.

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European Slaughter of Indigenous Americans May Have Cooled the Planet

The Europeans killed so many indigenous Americans during the 16th century — through warfare and by causing disease and famine — that it actually cooled the planet during the Little Ice Age, a new study suggests.

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Twitter Still Can't Keep Up With Its Flood of Junk Accounts, Study Finds

Iowa researchers built an AI engine they say can spot abusive apps on Twitter months before the service itself identifies them.

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The Green New Deal Shows How Grand Climate Politics Can Be

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her allies' sprawling plan leans heavily on what local governments are already doing to fend off climate change.

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The real reason America is scared of Huawei: internet-connected everything

Five things you need to know about 5G, the next generation of wireless tech that’s fueling tensions between the US and China.

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Rotavirus Vaccine May Reduce Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

Rotavirus infections kill thousands of kids every year around the world, but far fewer than before the introduction of a safe and effective vaccine in 2006. Now it looks like the vaccine may also prevent type 1 diabetes.

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I Was a Teenage Element Hoarder

Even at the age of 15, I realized my obsession with collecting all the elements in the periodic table’s is not something most kids aspire to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wayward Satellites Test Einstein's Theory of General Relativity

The botched launch of two Galileo navigation probes made for an unexpected experiment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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No, Drinking 'Beer Before Wine' Won't Prevent a Hangover, Study Finds

The old adage doesn't hold up to scientific scrutiny.

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Rediscovering Our Nature Instinct

Our innate sense for apprehending the workings of the natural world and extracting meaning from interrelated phenomena like bird behavior, plant growth, sunlight, and wind direction has been largely forgotten because people today are stuck in a mode of abstract thinking demanded by urban life.

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Researchers develop new methods to create microfluidic devices with fluoropolymers

A wide range of applications are based on microfluidic devices made of silicone rubbers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), including materials synthesis, separation and sorting, diagnostics and bioanalysis. The popularity of PDMS in academic laboratories is due to the simplicity of the fabrication and well-characterised properties of PDMS. However, PDMS is not compatible with strong organic solv

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Wayward Satellites Test Einstein's Theory of General Relativity

The botched launch of two Galileo navigation probes made for an unexpected experiment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease

Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury. The controlled application of such stimuli to living tissues in vivo and in vitro has now proven instrumental to studying the conditions that lead to disease.

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Nanomachines taught to fight cancer

Scientists from ITMO in collaboration with international colleagues have proposed new DNA-based nanomachines that can be used for gene therapy for cancer. This new invention can greatly contribute to more effective and selective treatment of oncological diseases. The results were published in Angewandte Chemie.

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First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene

Germanene is a 2-D material derived from germanium and related to graphene. As it is not stable outside the vacuum chambers in which is it produced, no real measurements of its electronic properties have been made. Scientists led by Prof. Justin Ye of the University of Groningen have now produced devices with stable germanene. The material is an insulator, and it becomes a semiconductor after mode

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A ‘Green New Deal’ Is Far From Reality, but Climate Action Is Picking Up in the States

The midterm elections brought in a new wave of governors with aggressive plans to cut emissions and expand low-carbon energy. Now, those plans are being implemented.

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TIMES INSIDER: For a Climate Reporter, a Dreaded Question: ‘Then Why Is It So Cold?’

When temperatures dip, we hear it over and over. Here’s the answer — and why it matters.

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Before You Sip That Cocktail, a Few Safety Warnings

Today’s rule-breaking bartenders can unwittingly concoct a health hazard, but a website is here to help stave off trouble.

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Universal income study finds money for nothing won't make us work less

The most robust trial of universal basic income yet shows that it boosts well-being and doesn't decrease employment, as some had feared

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Universal basic income boosts well-being without affecting employment

The most robust trial of universal basic income yet shows that it boosts well-being and doesn't decrease employment, as some had feared

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How the ‘U-S-A’ Chant Became a Political Weapon

When President Donald Trump gave his State of the Union address earlier this week, chants of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” broke out several times among the lawmakers in attendance. This wasn’t a new phenomenon in the Trump era. At last year’s State of the Union, the “U-S-A” cheer broke out when Trump extolled the Capitol building as “the monument to the American people,” and then again at the end of the speec

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The State of the Union Was Political Malpractice

The State of the Union address was a golden opportunity for President Donald Trump to reset his presidency, create a blueprint for the next two years of his administration, and launch his uphill battle for reelection. He failed on all fronts. The president’s approval ratings hover around 40 percent, a shockingly low number, given the robust health of the economy. The only other recent presidents

11h

Why the Wall Will Never Rise

The brush country along the Rio Grande on the Texas-Mexico border grows thick: a jagged, tangled landscape of thorny trees, prickly pear, and grass so tall, it can hide a horse. Eight-foot rattlesnakes blend into rocks. Feral hogs wallow beneath mesquite thickets. If President Donald Trump ever gets the funding for his long-promised wall, he will have to plot a course through Texas. But he will n

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Chem journal yanks paper because authors had stolen it as peer reviewers

The UK’s Royal Society of Chemistry has retracted a 2017 paper in one of its journals after learning that the authors stole the article from other researchers during peer review. The offending article, “Typical and interstratified arrangements in Zn/Al layered double hydroxides: an experimental and theoretical approach,” appeared in CrystalEngComm, and was written by Priyadarshi … Continue reading

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How to use a thesaurus to actually improve your writing

Using a thesaurus to find larger or more impressive words is misguided, says Martin Amis. Instead, use a thesaurus to find words with the perfect rhythm for your sentence. For example, the Nabokov novel "Invitation to a Beheading" was originally called – not for very long – "Invita tion to an Execu tion ". Nabokov nixed the repetitive suffix. A dictionary is also a writer's best friend; looking u

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A cryptocurrency company’s covert bug fix has confusing legal implications

The Zcash episode illustrates how we’re still struggling to define basic characteristics of cryptocurrency networks.

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DNA reveals early mating between Asian herders and European farmers

A new genetic analysis could upend assumptions about the origins of Indo-European languages.

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Rätt sorts konflikter behövs i politiken

− Om partipolitiska konflikter är önskvärda eller hur de bör hanteras har det rått delade meningar om bland forskare. Men gemensamt är att de ofta har behandlats som om de är ett och samma fenomen, när det i själva verket finns flera sorters konflikter som orsakas av olika saker och har olika konsekvenser, säger Louise Skoog. Genom intervjuer, dokumentstudier och en enkätundersökning till kommunp

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21 ulykker på halvandet år: Bilister overser letbanetog i Aarhus

En ny opgørelse over ulykkerne på Danmarks første letbane viser, at de øvrige trafikanter i alle tilfælde har overset togene, og at venstresvingende biler er den største udfordring.

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Erupting Indonesian volcano spews ash, lava

Indonesia's Mount Merapi, one of the world's most active volcanoes, has spewed a plume of grey ash into the sky as fiery red molten lava streamed down from its crater.

12h

Scientists discover genes that help harmful bacteria thwart treatment

A Rutgers-led team has discovered two genes that make some strains of harmful Staphyloccocus bacteria resistant to treatment by copper, a potent and frequently used antibacterial agent.

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Scientists discover genes that help harmful bacteria thwart treatment

A Rutgers-led team has discovered two genes that make some strains of harmful Staphyloccocus bacteria resistant to treatment by copper, a potent and frequently used antibacterial agent.

12h

Betydelsen hos sammansatta ord är inte självklar

En sammansättnings betydelse är inte given utifrån de ingående ordleden, och inlärningen av sammansättningar – liksom språkinlärning i stort – tar lång tid och kräver riklig repetition. Innan betydelsen uppfattas som självklar behöver man höra ett ord eller språkligt mönster många gånger. I sin avhandling undersöker Lisa Loenheim hur enspråkiga gymnasieelever med svenska som modersmål och flerspr

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Amerikanske politikere vil kulegrave udenlandske VPN-apps for spionage

To amerikanske senatorer er bekymrede over, om udenlandske VPN-apps spionerer i stedet for beskytter.

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Supercomputere giver hurtige kræftdiagnoser til børn

PLUS. High Performance Computing er ikke blot egnet til store beregninger på forskningsdata. De store computer-klynger bruges også, når der skal udarbejdes hurtige behandlingsplaner for kræftpatienter.

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Odd electron wave packets from cycloidal ultrashort laser fields

Odd electron wave packets from cycloidal ultrashort laser fields Odd electron wave packets from cycloidal ultrashort laser fields, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08601-7 Laser fields can be tuned to probe electronic motion in atoms and molecules. Here the authors ionize Na atoms using bichromatic pulses to generate electron wave packets of crescent-shaped and 7-fold ro

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Selective electroreduction of carbon dioxide to methanol on copper selenide nanocatalysts

Selective electroreduction of carbon dioxide to methanol on copper selenide nanocatalysts Selective electroreduction of carbon dioxide to methanol on copper selenide nanocatalysts, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08653-9 While the conversion of CO2 to valuable, storable chemicals is attractive, there are few inexpensive and abundant catalysts that are also active and se

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Coherent spin dynamics of electrons and holes in CsPbBr3 perovskite crystals

Coherent spin dynamics of electrons and holes in CsPbBr 3 perovskite crystals Coherent spin dynamics of electrons and holes in CsPbBr 3 perovskite crystals, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08625-z Despite remarkable optical properties in lead halide perovskites, spin control in these materials is largely unexplored. Herein Belykh et al. study the coherent spin dynamics

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Block copolymer derived uniform mesopores enable ultrafast electron and ion transport at high mass loadings

Block copolymer derived uniform mesopores enable ultrafast electron and ion transport at high mass loadings Block copolymer derived uniform mesopores enable ultrafast electron and ion transport at high mass loadings, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08644-w High mass loading and fast charge transport are two crucial but often mutually exclusive characteristics of pseudoc

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The binding of Borealin to microtubules underlies a tension independent kinetochore-microtubule error correction pathway

The binding of Borealin to microtubules underlies a tension independent kinetochore-microtubule error correction pathway The binding of Borealin to microtubules underlies a tension independent kinetochore-microtubule error correction pathway, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08418-4 How the chromosome passenger complex (CPC) phosphorylates the kinetochores that can be a

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Fire-derived organic matter retains ammonia through covalent bond formation

Fire-derived organic matter retains ammonia through covalent bond formation Fire-derived organic matter retains ammonia through covalent bond formation, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08401-z Fire-derived organic matter (OM) is present throughout the environment, and its impact on nutrient cycling remains poorly understood. Here, the authors show that this pyrogenic OM

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Lymphocyte innateness defined by transcriptional states reflects a balance between proliferation and effector functions

Lymphocyte innateness defined by transcriptional states reflects a balance between proliferation and effector functions Lymphocyte innateness defined by transcriptional states reflects a balance between proliferation and effector functions, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08604-4 Innate T cells (ITC) contain many subsets and are poised to promptly respond to antigens an

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Porous hypercrosslinked polymer-TiO2-graphene composite photocatalysts for visible-light-driven CO2 conversion

Porous hypercrosslinked polymer-TiO 2 -graphene composite photocatalysts for visible-light-driven CO 2 conversion Porous hypercrosslinked polymer-TiO 2 -graphene composite photocatalysts for visible-light-driven CO 2 conversion, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08651-x Renewable CO2 conversion to useful products presents a sustainable, carbon-neutral method to limit clim

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Scientists discover genes that help harmful bacteria thwart treatment

A Rutgers-led team has discovered two genes that make some strains of harmful Staphyloccocus bacteria resistant to treatment by copper, a potent and frequently used antibacterial agent. The discovery shows that Staphyloccocus aureus can acquire additional genes that promote infections and antibacterial resistance and may open new paths for the development of antibacterial drugs, according to a stu

12h

The 2008 recession associated with greater decline in mortality in Europe

In recent decades, Europe has experienced a downward trend in the annual number of deaths. Not only was this trend not arrested by the economic recession that started in 2008, in fact, the rate of decline increased during the recession years. This acceleration has been evidenced by the results of a study published in Nature Communications.

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Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

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Læger får erstatning efter alt for lange vagter

Kirurger på OUH har igennem en længere periode haft ulovligt mange vagter i træk, og de kritisable forhold udløser undskyldning fra chefen og nu bøde til afdelingen, hvor Svendborgsagen udsprang. Vi har kikkerten indstillet på andre afdelinger, siger tillidsmand.

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Tidligere tillidsrepræsentant: »Det var rædselsfuldt at være der«

Læge Mikkel A. Holm var tillidsmand på Kirurgisk Afdeling A på Odense Universitetshospital, da lægerne blev presset til at arbejde mere end det lovlige. Han håber, at sagen får andre afdelinger til at rette ind. Ledende overlæger beklager.

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Malleability of the self: electrophysiological correlates of the enfacement illusion

Malleability of the self: electrophysiological correlates of the enfacement illusion Malleability of the self: electrophysiological correlates of the enfacement illusion, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38213-y Malleability of the self: electrophysiological correlates of the enfacement illusion

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Mint companion plants attract the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis

Mint companion plants attract the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Mint companion plants attract the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis , Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38098-x Mint companion plants attract the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis

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The discovery of Lake Hephaestus, the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth

The discovery of Lake Hephaestus , the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth The discovery of Lake Hephaestus , the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38444-z The discovery of Lake Hephaestus , the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth

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Introduction of ‘Generalized Genomic Signatures’ for the quantification of neighbour preferences leads to taxonomy- and functionality-based distinction among sequences

Introduction of ‘Generalized Genomic Signatures’ for the quantification of neighbour preferences leads to taxonomy- and functionality-based distinction among sequences Introduction of ‘Generalized Genomic Signatures’ for the quantification of neighbour preferences leads to taxonomy- and functionality-based distinction among sequences, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-381

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Local agro-pastoralists’ perspectives on forage species diversity, habitat distributions, abundance trends and ecological drivers for sustainable livestock production in West Africa

Local agro-pastoralists’ perspectives on forage species diversity, habitat distributions, abundance trends and ecological drivers for sustainable livestock production in West Africa Local agro-pastoralists’ perspectives on forage species diversity, habitat distributions, abundance trends and ecological drivers for sustainable livestock production in West Africa, Published online: 08 February 2019

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Extreme sediment fluxes in a dryland flash flood

Extreme sediment fluxes in a dryland flash flood Extreme sediment fluxes in a dryland flash flood, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38537-3 Extreme sediment fluxes in a dryland flash flood

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Studies of Multiferroic Palladium Perovskites

Studies of Multiferroic Palladium Perovskites Studies of Multiferroic Palladium Perovskites, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38411-8 Studies of Multiferroic Palladium Perovskites

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Factorial design-assisted supercritical carbon-dioxide extraction of cytotoxic active principles from Carica papaya leaf juice

Factorial design-assisted supercritical carbon-dioxide extraction of cytotoxic active principles from Carica papaya leaf juice Factorial design-assisted supercritical carbon-dioxide extraction of cytotoxic active principles from Carica papaya leaf juice, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37171-9 Factorial design-assisted supercritical carbon-dioxide extraction of cytotoxi

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Working Scientist podcast: The grant funding lottery and how to fix it

Working Scientist podcast: The grant funding lottery and how to fix it Working Scientist podcast: The grant funding lottery and how to fix it, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00525-y Many grant funding decisions are random, with luck playing a large part. How can the system be improved, particularly when funds are tight?

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Detaljerade hjärnor

Med hjälp av en ny, snabbare avbildningsteknik med högre upplösning har amerikanska forskare lyckats avbilda hela hjärnan hos en bananfluga och stora delar av hjärnan hos en mus på bara några dagar. Med tidigare metoder skulle arbetet ha tagit flera veckor.

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32 meter højt genbrugeligt trætårn planlægges på Aarhus Havn

Et 10 etager og 32 meter højt tårn skal vise potentialet med massivtræ, før det bliver pillet ned igen, og elementerne bliver genbrugt i nye byggerier – hvis ellers en investor vil være med.

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Google kan blive tvunget til at udlevere data om tusindvis af mennesker til politiet

Politiet kan via Google opspore data på mere end 10.000 mennesker ad gangen i forsøget på at fange en forbryder.

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Hør ugens podcast: Gladsaxe overtræder persondatalov og metrobyggeriet i problemer

Gladsaxe Kommune har ifølge flere eksperter brudt persondataloven ved at bruge algoritmer til at overvåge borgerne. De første exoskeletter er på vej i industrien, og så har metrobyggeriet i København problemer med sine italienske entreprenører.

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Sundhedsvæsen Danmark: Her er læsernes bestyrelse

Dagens Medicin har spurgt læserne, hvem de helst ser stå i spidsen for sundhedsvæsenet.

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Australian parliamentary network hacked; no sign data stolen

Australia's leading cybersecurity agency is investigating a breach of the country's federal parliamentary computing network amid speculation of hacking by a foreign nation.

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Where on earth is North? – Science Weekly podcast

Earth’s north magnetic pole wandering so quickly in recent decades that this week, scientists decided to update the World Magnetic Model, which underlies navigation for ships and planes today. Ian Sample looks at our relationship with the magnetic north. The north magnetic pole is moving, fast. So quickly in fact, that scientists decided to release an update of where magnetic north really is, nea

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Where on earth is North? – Science Weekly podcast

Earth’s north magnetic pole wandering so quickly in recent decades that this week, scientists decided to update the World Magnetic Model, which underlies navigation for ships and planes today. Ian Sample looks at our relationship with the magnetic north.

14h

Gender funding gap grows when research pitches get personal: study

Women are less successful in receiving research funding than men if the selection process focusses on the scientist making the pitch rather than the science presented, according to new research released Friday.

14h

Data center smoke causes outage for Wells Fargo customers

Smoke at one of Wells Fargo's data centers left some of the bank's customers without access to online or mobile banking as well as accessing cash from ATMs on Thursday.

14h

Instagram curbs self-harm posts after teen suicide

Instagram has announced a clampdown on images of self-injury after a British teen who went online to read about suicide took her own life.

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Astronomers unlikely victims of Mexico's violence, crime

Astronomers have become the latest victims of Mexico's violence with activities at two observatories being reduced because their staff suffered crimes while travelling to the remote mountain sites, researchers said Thursday.

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Tokyo strikes gold, silver and bronze with e-waste Olympic medals

All medals for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics will be made from metal collected by recycling electronic waste, games organisers said on Friday.

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'Hundreds of thousands' of cattle feared dead after Australia floods

Hundreds of thousands of cattle weakened from a severe drought are feared to have died in record-breaking floods in northeastern Australia, authorities said Friday, as they stepped up efforts to feed surviving livestock.

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Tata Motors shares plunge 30% on Jaguar woes

Shares in India's Tata Motors tanked almost 30 percent on Friday after problems at its Jaguar Land Rover unit dragged the luxury carmaker to India's biggest quarterly loss.

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Richard Branson says he'll fly to space by July

British billionaire Richard Branson plans to travel to space within the next four or five months aboard his own Virgin Galactic spaceship, he told AFP Thursday.

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On Lake Victoria, a green stain spreads across Africa's blue heart

With nets piled onto wooden boats, a group of fishermen joke while gazing out across Lake Victoria and the vast green weed clogging up the waterway. But their laughter has a worried edge as the sun sets.

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Australia using new decryption powers even before planned review

Australian security agencies have begun using sweeping new powers to access encrypted communications even before a promised review meant to address concerns from the likes of Google, Apple and Facebook.

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Australian court rejects coal mine on climate grounds

An Australian court on Friday delivered a landmark ruling by rejecting plans to build a coal mine on the grounds it would worsen climate change.

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Nano-switches made out of graphene could make our electronics even smaller

For the first time, physicists have built reliable, efficient graphene nanomachines that can be fabricated on silicon chips. They could lead to even greater miniaturization.

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Tre ud af fire slipper af med type 2-diabetes efter fedmekirurgi

Positive konsekvenser i form af forsvunden type 2-diabetes og markant færre senfølger til diabetes vejer tungere end bivirkningerne ved en gastrisk bypass operation, mener forfatteren til et stort dansk registerstudie om effekten af det kirurgiske indgreb.

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Tablet på vej mod godkendelse som tillægsbehandling af type 1-diabetes

SGLT2-hæmmeren Forxiga kan få godkendelse som tillægsbehandling til patienter med type 1-diabetes.

15h

Improvement in gender diversity at top US, UK, and Canadian universities fails to match promises

An analysis of the 15 highest ranked social sciences and public health universities in the U.S., U.K., and Canada show that clear gender and ethnic disparities remain at the most senior academic positions, despite numerous diversity policies and action plans in place at these universities.

15h

Gender gaps in research funding are due to less favorable assessment of women, not their science

An analysis of nearly 24,000 grant applications at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) finds that women are less successful in receiving funding if reviewers are explicitly asked to review the principal investigator, rather than when they are asked to assess the quality of the science.

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The U.S. climate became afflicted by split personality disorder in 2018

Meanwhile, the Earth as a whole continues to ride the up-escalator of human-caused global warming Two U.S. agencies have reported on how Earth's climate fared in 2018. For the most part, the news wasn't all that surprising: The long-term trend of human-caused global warming showed no significant signs of relenting. But I was surprised by one finding: The United States experienced something of a sp

15h

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors

Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species.

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Aarhus Universitet: Der er plads til to danske blockchain-centre

Danmarks andet blockchain-forskningcenter skal ikke konkurrere med det på ITU, men i stedet kigge på det kryptografiske lag, der understøtter blockchain-baserede applikationer.

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Climate change: UK carbon capture project begins

A controversial new scheme is capturing CO2 emissions from wood burning.

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Svensk ekspert: Danmark bør overtage atomkraftværk i Gøteborg

En dansk overtagelse af lukningstruede reaktorer kan levere store mængder billig, CO2-neutral elektricitet. Danske energieksperter er dog skeptiske.

17h

The future is here… (finally)

submitted by /u/ejsennott [link] [comments]

17h

Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease

EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease.

17h

New drug brings unexpected hope in targeting cancer cells

An unexpected finding in preclinical platelet studies by Baker Institute researchers could provide a novel approach to targeting and destroying difficult-to-treat cancer cells, providing new therapeutic options for a range of cancers.

17h

Among Latinos, Puerto Rican children less likely to use their asthma inhalers

Compared to Mexican-American children, Puerto Rican children were more likely to have poor or decreasing use of inhaled medication needed to control their asthma, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

17h

Positive thinking during pregnancy could help children's ability in math and science

Your attitude during pregnancy could have an effect on your child's ability in math and science, according to a new study published by Frontiers in Psychology today.

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Dansk forskning sakker bagud på computerkraft

Det vil årligt kræve 125 mio. kr. ekstra at dække danske forskeres behov for super­computere, vurderer Uddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet. Men universiteterne må selv betale.

18h

Bill Gates' quixotic quest to revive nuclear power

submitted by /u/patb2015 [link] [comments]

18h

New research, January 28 – February 3, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. Mankind Historical Analysis of U.S. Tornado Fatalities (1808-2017): Population, Science and Technology (open access) Climate Change and Psychology: Effects of Rapid Global Warming on Violence and Aggression The Nexus of Climate Change, Land Use, and Conflicts (open access) Assessment of climate change impacts on buildings, struc

19h

Update day

So Wednesday was temperature series update day. The HadCRUT4, NOAA NCEI and GISTEMP time-series were all updated through to the end of 2018 (slightly delayed by the federal government shutdown). Berkeley Earth and the MSU satellite datasets were updated a couple of weeks ago. And that means that everyone gets to add a single additional annual data point to their model-observation comparison plots

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Jeff Bezos Wrote a Blog Post

On Thursday evening, Jeff Bezos, the chief executive of Amazon and the owner of The Washington Post , published a post on the website Medium that— —well, it’s hard to describe what it did, really. Bezos accused the owner of the National Enquirer of “extortion and blackmail,” alleging that the supermarket tabloid threatened to publish revealing photos of Bezos if he did not call off an investigati

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Thirdhand smoke residue exposes children to chemicals

Researchers find that indoor smoking bans may not fully protect children.

20h

Stanford investigates links to scientist in baby gene-editing scandal

University to assess how much its staff knew about Chinese scientist’s plans to use Crispr to modify genes Stanford University has begun an investigation following claims some of its staff knew long ago of Chinese scientist He Jiankui’s plans to create the world’s first gene-edited babies. A university official said a review was under way of interactions some faculty members had with He, who was

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John Dingell Is Gone, but His Politics Are Back

Before John Dingell was a piece of history, he was a witness to it. Dingell, a teenage congressional page, was on the floor of the U.S. House when President Franklin D. Roosevelt called for a declaration of war on Japan, saying the attack on Pearl Harbor a day earlier made December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy.” Almost exactly 14 years later, Dingell would be back in the House, this

20h

Jeff Bezos Brings the Receipts

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET on February 7, 2019. Jeff Bezos does not often speak publicly about his personal life, his philanthropic endeavors, or the future of Amazon, the company he founded 25 years ago. He doesn’t even make a peep on Amazon’s quarterly earnings calls. But on Thursday, he decided to go to war with the National Enquirer on Medium, accusing the publication of “extortion and blackmail

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Structural basis for HOCl recognition and regulation mechanisms of HypT, a hypochlorite-specific transcriptional regulator [Microbiology]

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is generated in the immune system to kill microorganisms. In Escherichia coli, a hypochlorite-specific transcription regulator, HypT, has been characterized. HypT belongs to the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family that contains a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a regulatory domain (RD). Here, we identified a hypT gene from…

20h

Recoil-induced ultrafast molecular rotation probed by dynamical rotational Doppler effect [Physics]

Observing and controlling molecular motion and in particular rotation are fundamental topics in physics and chemistry. To initiate ultrafast rotation, one needs a way to transfer a large angular momentum to the molecule. As a showcase, this was performed by hard X-ray C1s ionization of carbon monoxide accompanied by spinning…

20h

Design-functionality relationships for adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins [Physiology]

Glycan-lectin recognition is assumed to elicit its broad range of (patho)physiological functions via a combination of specific contact formation with generation of complexes of distinct signal-triggering topology on biomembranes. Faced with the challenge to understand why evolution has led to three particular modes of modular architecture for adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins in…

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Infiltration of CD8+ T cells into tumor cell clusters in triple-negative breast cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]

Infiltration of CD8+ T lymphocytes into solid tumors is associated with good prognosis in various types of cancer, including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, the mechanisms underlying different infiltration levels are largely unknown. Here, we have characterized the spatial profile of CD8+ T cells around tumor cell clusters (tightly connected…

20h

Interpreting contemporary trends in atmospheric methane [Perspectives]

Atmospheric methane plays a major role in controlling climate, yet contemporary methane trends (1982–2017) have defied explanation with numerous, often conflicting, hypotheses proposed in the literature. Specifically, atmospheric observations of methane from 1982 to 2017 have exhibited periods of both increasing concentrations (from 1982 to 2000 and from 2007 to…

20h

Therapeutic targeting of HER2-CB2R heteromers in HER2-positive breast cancer [Pharmacology]

Although human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies have dramatically improved the clinical outcome of HER2-positive breast cancer patients, innate and acquired resistance remains an important clinical challenge. New therapeutic approaches and diagnostic tools for identification, stratification, and treatment of patients at higher risk of resistance and recurrence are…

20h

Elucidating cancer metabolic plasticity by coupling gene regulation with metabolic pathways [Systems Biology]

Metabolic plasticity enables cancer cells to switch their metabolism phenotypes between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) during tumorigenesis and metastasis. However, it is still largely unknown how cancer cells orchestrate gene regulation to balance their glycolysis and OXPHOS activities. Previously, by modeling the gene regulation of cancer metabolism we have…

20h

Modification of excitation and charge transfer in cavity quantum-electrodynamical chemistry [Physics]

Energy transfer in terms of excitation or charge is one of the most basic processes in nature, and understanding and controlling them is one of the major challenges of modern quantum chemistry. In this work, we highlight that these processes as well as other chemical properties can be drastically altered…

20h

Visualizing the iron atom exchange front in the Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite by atom probe tomography [Environmental Sciences]

The autocatalytic redox interaction between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxide minerals such as goethite and hematite leads to rapid recrystallization marked, in principle, by an atom exchange (AE) front, according to bulk iron isotopic tracer studies. However, direct evidence for this AE front has been elusive given the analytical challenges of…

20h

Machine-learning approach to the design of OSDAs for zeolite beta [Chemistry]

We report a machine-learning strategy for design of organic structure directing agents (OSDAs) for zeolite beta. We use machine learning to replace a computationally expensive molecular dynamics evaluation of the stabilization energy of the OSDA inside zeolite beta with a neural network prediction. We train the neural network on 4,781…

20h

Grammar of protein domain architectures [Evolution]

From an abstract, informational perspective, protein domains appear analogous to words in natural languages in which the rules of word association are dictated by linguistic rules, or grammar. Such rules exist for protein domains as well, because only a small fraction of all possible domain combinations is viable in evolution….

20h

Accurate molecular polarizabilities with coupled cluster theory and machine learning [Chemistry]

The molecular dipole polarizability describes the tendency of a molecule to change its dipole moment in response to an applied electric field. This quantity governs key intra- and intermolecular interactions, such as induction and dispersion; plays a vital role in determining the spectroscopic signatures of molecules; and is an essential…

20h

Recruitment of APOL1 kidney disease risk variants to lipid droplets attenuates cell toxicity [Medical Sciences]

Two coding variants in the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) gene (termed G1 and G2) are strongly associated with increased risk of nondiabetic kidney disease in people of recent African ancestry. The mechanisms by which the risk variants cause kidney damage, although not well-understood, are believed to involve injury to glomerular podocytes….

20h

AhR controls redox homeostasis and shapes the tumor microenvironment in BRCA1-associated breast cancer [Cell Biology]

Cancer cells have higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) than normal cells, due to genetic and metabolic alterations. An emerging scenario is that cancer cells increase ROS to activate protumorigenic signaling while activating antioxidant pathways to maintain redox homeostasis. Here we show that, in basal-like and BRCA1-related breast cancer (BC), ROS…

20h

Molecular basis for autoinhibition of RIAM regulated by FAK in integrin activation [Biochemistry]

RAP1-interacting adapter molecule (RIAM) mediates RAP1-induced integrin activation. The RAS-association (RA) segment of the RA-PH module of RIAM interacts with GTP-bound RAP1 and phosphoinositol 4,5 bisphosphate but this interaction is inhibited by the N-terminal segment of RIAM. Here we report the structural basis for the autoinhibition of RIAM by an…

20h

HCMV trimer- and pentamer-specific antibodies synergize for virus neutralization but do not correlate with congenital transmission [Microbiology]

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes substantial disease in transplant patients and harms the development of the nervous system in babies infected in utero. Thus, there is a major focus on developing safe and effective HCMV vaccines. Evidence has been presented that a major target of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is the HCMV…

20h

Relapse-associated AURKB blunts the glucocorticoid sensitivity of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [Genetics]

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used in combination chemotherapies as front-line treatment for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Although effective, many patients relapse and become resistant to chemotherapy and GCs in particular. Why these patients relapse is not clear. We took a comprehensive, functional genomics approach to identify sources of GC…

20h

Cancer cells' plasticity makes them harder to stop

Researchers have created a basic framework of how cancer cells adapt when their attempts to metastasize are blocked by drugs or the body's immune system. Understanding the cells' strategies could someday help scientists design therapies that keep them in check.

20h

Folliculin mutations disrupt embryo implantation

New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy — the changes in an embryo's cells that occur as it prepares to lodge in the wall of the uterus. Understanding what can go wrong with these genetic controls is shedding light on implantation failure, a major cause of human infertility.

20h

Republicans in Congress Are Talking Net Neutrality, at Least

Three Republicans plan bills to restore some version of net neutrality, but they are a far cry from the Obama-era rules, or what many Democrats want.

20h

Finding clues to a functional HIV cure

Scientists have identified a measurable indicator that could prove instrumental in the fight against HIV. The research focuses on cofilin, a key protein that regulates cells to mobilize and fight against infection. HIV patients have 'significantly lower' levels of cofilin phosphorylation. But by stimulating the T cells with additional therapeutics, researchers could modulate the levels of cofilin

21h

Simple drug combination creates new neurons from neighboring cells

A simple combination of molecules converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons, which could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injuries.

21h

Scientists discover new type of magnet

A team of scientists has discovered the first robust example of a new type of magnet — one that holds promise for enhancing the performance of data storage technologies.

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Bagsiden: Hjælpemiddel til et psykrometer

Fugtdrejeskiven – læserne løser mysteriet!

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Jeff Bezos Goes Hard Against National EnquirerAmazon Jeff Bezos NE AMI

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, the world's richest man, publishes emails purportedly from the National Enquirer urging him to call off an investigation of the tabloid publisher.

22h

Jeff Bezos: Amazon boss accuses National Enquirer of blackmail

Jeff Bezos says National Enquirer attempted extortion by threatening to publish "intimate photos".

22h

The Atlantic Daily: A Man, a Plan, a Tabloid, Amazon

What We’re Following To get packages to your doorstep in just a day or two, Amazon has built up an enormous real-estate empire. Though the company has been around since the 1990s, its physical footprint has exploded in recent years, nearly tripling from 2014 to 2018. The numbers reveal a remarkable inflection point in the 25-year-old company’s growth. But in spite of its many warehouses, there’s

22h

22h

Beer before wine or wine before beer: the hangover is the same

Forget folk wisdom — mixing drinks doesn't affect your hangover. Only the amount you consume appears to impact how you feel the following day

22h

New legislation needed to regulate police facial recognition technology

Facial recognition technology, being trialled by two major police forces in Britain, should be subjected to more rigorous testing and transparency, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Monash University.

22h

Fair treatment by supermarkets key to suppliers' performance

Small suppliers who believe they are fairly treated by big supermarkets will put more resources into their relationship with buyers and perform better, according to academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA). Published in Supply Chain Management: an International Journal, the findings show that the way supermarket buyers treat their suppliers matters more for their suppliers' performance tha

22h

Beer before wine not fine, scientists find after vomit-filled tests

Research into old saying about alcohol consumption shows you get a hangover either way Beer before wine, or wine before beer; whatever the order, you’ll feel queer. That, at least, is the updated aphorism drinkers will have to embrace now scientists have proved that drink order has no effect on the magnitude of one’s hangover. Under carefully-controlled lab conditions, British and German research

22h

German Regulators Just Outlawed Facebook's Whole Ad Business

The country’s antitrust regulator told Facebook it couldn't demand so much data from users simply to have an account. Experts say it’s a big deal.

23h

Chinese Censorship Company Invests Millions in Reddit

submitted by /u/notfrontpage [link] [comments]

23h

New legislation needed to regulate police facial recognition technology

Facial recognition technology, being trialled by two major police forces in Britain, should be subjected to more rigorous testing and transparency, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Monash University.

23h

Fair treatment by supermarkets key to suppliers' performance

Small suppliers who believe they are fairly treated by big supermarkets will put more resources into their relationship with buyers and perform better, according to academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA).

23h

Don't believe women in science face huge inequality? Here's the proof

Scientists read and react to peer reviewed research, making the pages of leading scientific journals like The Lancet a good venue to fight for gender equity, says Jessica Wade

23h

Amazon Joins Microsoft's Call for Rules on Facial Recognition

Amazon, which offers facial recognition services, asks Congress to regulate how the technology can be used appropriately.

23h

Body building supplement could be bad for the brain

L-norvaline is an ingredient widely used in body building supplements and is promoted as a compound that can boost workouts and aid recovery. Similar compounds have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, and a study on human cells suggests L-norvaline may also cause damage to brain cells.

23h

New 'Trojan horse' cancer treatment shows early promise in multiple tumor types

A brand new type of cancer drug that acts as a 'Trojan horse' to get inside tumor cells has shown promise in patients with six different cancer types.

23h

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: High mortality rate due to inaccurate tests

Inaccurate tests carried out on tuberculosis patients in developing countries often fail to reliably detect resistance to drugs, leading to incorrect treatment and a higher mortality rate. These are the results of study by an international group of researchers led by a team at the University of Bern published today.

23h

Fortnite has an account merger for console users with two accounts

To play on both devices, I had to create a separate Epic account for the Switch since my main PS4 profile was inaccessible. It was a less than ideal situation, but since I never spend real money …

23h

Most biomedical studies fail to report if results differ by sex

Gender bias concern as analysis shows differences in how sexes respond to drugs overlooked Nearly three-quarters of biomedical studies fail to report whether outcomes differ for men and women, according to a study which raises concerns about gender bias. Analysis of more than 11.5m medical research papers published between 1980 and 2016 found a majority overlooked the role of sex differences in g

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Cancer rates are rising in young adults. Here's how to lower your risk.

Health The population-level effects of obesity is concerning public heart experts. Barring weight loss, there are other steps young adults at risk for colorectal and kidney cancer might be able to take to stay healthier and reduce their cancer risk.

23h

Woody Allen sues Amazon for dropping A Rainy Day in New York

The film-maker takes legal action against the company for allegedly refusing to release his latest film.

23h

The Lost World of the Maya is Finally Emerging From the Jungle

From massive fortresses to sprawling suburbs, a bold new vision of the vanished Maya civilization takes shape.

23h

Magnetic north isn’t even close to where it used to be

Magnetic north has recently been moving north from Canada to Russia in a cold hurry. It's moving about 33 miles a year instead of the usual 7 miles. World navigation models had to updated ahead of schedule to catch up with it. None If you're reading this as you travel the arctic, odds are you're probably already a bit confused. Your compass has been, well, strange, lately. That's because magnetic

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Deal or Green Deal

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, February 7. New on the Left: Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts unveiled an outline for a “Green N ew Dea l” —a highly ambitious policy package to remake the U.S. economy and cut carbon emissions. The legislation is a nonbinding resolution, meaning that even if it passes, it wouldn’t on its own creat

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A Rover That Will Look for Life on Mars Named for DNA Pioneer Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Franklin was the British scientist whose work was integral to the discovery of DNA's structure.

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Tests for Oil in Arctic Refuge Won’t Happen This Winter, Officials Say

The decision to delay seismic testing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska signals at least a temporary victory for groups that oppose oil exploration there.

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