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nyheder2019februar14

Breaks in the blood-brain barrier can cause brains to get old before their time

Daniela Kaufer, a professor at UC Berkeley and fellow in the CIFAR Child & Brain Development program, has discovered one of the biological pathways that lead to age-related cognitive decline, and has found clues on how to reverse the aging process in the brain.

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Bold Plan? Replace the Border Wall with an Energy–Water Corridor

Building solar, wind, natural gas and water infrastructure all along the U.S.–Mexico border would create economic opportunity rather than antagonism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New molecules reverse memory loss linked to depression, aging

New therapeutic molecules show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging. These molecules not only rapidly improve symptoms, but remarkably, also appear to renew the underlying brain impairments causing memory loss in preclinical models.

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It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for

Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide. The results were published Feb. 13 in JAMA Psychiatry along with a podcast with the researchers.

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Former Israeli Tech Chief: AI Could Cause Tragedy “Worse Than 9/11”

Looming Catastrophe Artificial intelligence could lead to a tragedy “that would be worse than 9/11,” a former chief technology officer for the Israeli government warned in a new interview. The more control AI has over society, Amit Meltzer told the Jerusalem Post , the more power it will give to people capable of exploiting it. Dire Warning During the interview, Meltzer floated the chilling possi

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The Danger in Music’s Male-Mentor Myths

An established musician lavishes an unknown one with praise and career help: recording sessions, songwriting advice, a spot on a tour. What to call the two of them? Boss and employee? Nothing so straightforward. Collaborative equals? Not if one’s success depends on the other’s largesse. Really they’re mentor and mentee, a central arrangement in pop-music mythology, most recently given Hollywood g

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Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster

Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. This innovation by mathematicians will reduce the rendering time of a million-point single-cell RNA-sequenc

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Swiss allege woman sweet talked her way to $2M bank scam

Swiss authorities said Thursday they have indicted a woman who allegedly persuaded dozens of people to provide their online banking details over the phone from the Netherlands.

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Smugglers are profiting from our failure to define endangered species

There are calls to improve a treaty on the international trade in endangered species – but there is no standard way to define species, says Stephen Garnett

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Men's porn habits could fuel partners' eating disorders, study suggests

A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner's porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin.

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Many hospitals send patients home with high-risk antibiotics

Even as hospitals try to cut back on prescribing fluoroquinolones—powerful but risky antibiotics—many patients still head home with prescriptions for those same drugs, a new study shows. In fact, the hospitals that say they are trying to reduce the use of fluoroquinolones are twice as likely to discharge patients with a new prescription for one of the drugs in that risky group. In all, one-third

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Cracking colibactin's code: Study examines how compound damaged DNA to understand its connection to cancer

For more than a decade, scientists have worked to understand the connection between colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, and colorectal cancer, but have been hampered by their inability to isolate the compound.

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First Rigorous Study: Microdosing Fights Depression, Improves Focus

Just a Taste We finally have real evidence about what microdosing psychedelic drugs does to your brain. Long advocated by people who claim that a teensy daily dose of LSD helps them with their high-pressure jobs, microdosing has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms and stress while boosting focus and levels of neuroticism, according to research published in the academic journal PLOS ONE last

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Oldest Americans most focused on reducing food waste

The vast majority of Americans are paying attention to reducing food waste with the oldest being the most cognizant, according to the latest Michigan State University (MSU) Food Literacy and Engagement Poll.

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Tiny satellites reveal water dynamics in thousands of northern lakes

Using an army of small satellites, researchers have shown that water levels in small lakes across northern Canada and Alaska are far more variable during the summer than previously thought. The findings, published in Geophysical Research Letters, could have implications for how scientists calculate the natural greenhouse gas emissions from these northern lakes.

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Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures

UCLA researchers and collaborators at eight other research institutions have created an extremely light, very durable ceramic aerogel. The material could be used for applications like insulating spacecraft because it can withstand the intense heat and severe temperature changes that space missions endure.

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Canada wants to take in more than 1 million new immigrants in the next 3 years

Want to live and work in Canada? That dream could become a reality now the government has announced plans to accept more than a million immigrants in the next three years. In his 2018 Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, the country's immigration minister Ahmed Hussen revealed plans to admit as many as 1,080,000 new permanent residents between 2019 and 2021, with the upper target for 2021

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Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster

Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. Published in Nature Methods, this innovation by Yale mathematicians will reduce the rendering time of a mil

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General Motors Starts Taking Orders for Its First Electric Bike

General Motors is reimagining future transportation with its first AR?V electric bike brand. In November 2018, General Motors held a global crowdfunding campaign for its new eBike brand. After …

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Pompeii dig uncovers Narcissus fresco in ancient atrium

Archaeologists have discovered a fresco in an ancient Pompeii residence that portrays the mythological hunter Narcissus, who fell in love with his own reflection.

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Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster

Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. Published in Nature Methods, this innovation by Yale mathematicians will reduce the rendering time of a mil

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Gallium nitride is the silicon of the future

submitted by /u/thinkcontext [link] [comments]

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Cracking colibactin's code: Study examines how compound damaged DNA to understand its connection to cancer

For more than a decade, scientists have worked to understand the connection between colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, and colorectal cancer, but have been hampered by their inability to isolate the compound.

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Hong Kong Has a Plan to Make All of Its Prisons “Smart”

Smart Prisons Keeping prisoners safe while their do their time is no easy task — inmates can overdose on smuggled drugs, fight with fellow prisoners, or even harm themselves. Now, Hong Kong has a plan to use robots, wearables, and other internet of things technologies to improve how it manages the 8,300 inmates housed in its correctional institutions on any given day — and it sounds like a dark t

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Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster

Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. Published in Nature Methods, this innovation by Yale mathematicians will reduce the rendering time of a mil

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Search for Shackleton's Antarctic Shipwreck Turns Back to Avoid Deadly Ice Trap

The wreck may be lying on the seafloor near the Larsen C Ice Shelf.

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Tiny satellites reveal water dynamics in thousands of northern lakes

In a finding that has implications for how scientists calculate natural greenhouse gas emissions, a new study finds that water levels in small lakes across northern Canada and Alaska vary during the summer much more than was assumed.

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EPA blasted for failing to set drinking water limits for ‘forever chemicals’

Agency says it will begin setting standards on two compounds at end of year

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Ancient Fresco of Mythical Narcissus Found in Pompeii

Excavations in a lavishly decorated house in ancient Pompeii have yielded a Valentine's Day-worthy discovery: a fresco of Narcissus, the mythical hunter who fell in love with his own reflection.

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The Green New Deal could help farmers help the planet

Nexus Media News The new potential plan could incentivize farming practices that help remove carbon pollution from the atmosphere. The Green New Deal is about more than shifting to cleaner, more advanced forms of sources. It's also about shifting to more traditional forms of agriculture.

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Goodbye to the A380, the biggest passenger plane there ever wasBoeing Airbus A380

Technology It was just too large. Airbus announced it would end its A380 deliveries in 2021.

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David Fincher's disturbed 'Love, Death and Robots' premieres March 15th

When Netflix said that David Fincher and Tim Miller's Love, Death and Robots was an animated series for mature audiences, it wasn't kidding around. The streaming giant has …

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Performance Artists Benefit From Sports Medicine

Performance Artists Benefit From Sports Medicine Performing artists sometimes need the same injury prevention and treatment as athletes. Performance Artists Benefit From Sports Medicine Video of Performance Artists Benefit From Sports Medicine Sports Thursday, February 14, 2019 – 15:15 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — Musicians and other performing artists aren't usually considered athlet

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Citizen Science Day 2019: Add Real Scientific Research to Your Library Programming!

From the NIH/ National Network of Libraries of Medicine Libraries are hubs for discovery and community engagement; imagine your library joining a real-time event with others around the world and contributing to real scientific research to speed up Alzheimer’s research! Citizen Science Day 2019 is Saturday, April 13. You and your library are invited to participate in the Stall Catchers Megathon, in

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New citizen science tools database to discover and access the right instruments

Citizen science (public participation in scientific research) often calls for tools you won’t find lying around the house, such as a rain gauge to record precipitation or an air quality sensor. “I think a database of water quality monitoring tools is something that anyone who samples recreational water quality dreams of: the idea of a one-stop-shop for such information would be incredibly helpful

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Plasma Waves Are Cooking Electrons in Earth's Magnetic Shield

Space is warm — or, at least, warmer than it should be. A new study seeks to explain why.

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Just in time for Valentine's Day, the ocean and atmosphere have coupled — giving birth to a weakling El Niño

It's finally here. This morning, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made it official: El Niño conditions are present in the tropical Pacific Ocean. There's a 90 percent chance that they'll continue through winter, and a 60 percent chance through spring. True to predictions, this El Niño is a weakling. Climate scientist Emily Becker summarized the situation at the ever-awesome ENSO

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Risk analysis releases special issue on the social science of automated driving

Risk Analysis, An International Journal has published a special issue, 'Social Science of Automated Driving,' which features several articles examining the human side of automated driving, focusing on questions about morality, the role of feeling, trust and risk perceptions.

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Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures

UCLA researchers and collaborators at eight other research institutions have created an extremely light, very durable ceramic aerogel. The material could be used for applications like insulating spacecraft because it can withstand the intense heat and severe temperature changes that space missions endure.

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Oldest Americans most focused on reducing food waste

The vast majority of Americans are paying attention to reducing food waste with the oldest being the most cognizant, according to the latest Michigan State University (MSU) Food Literacy and Engagement Poll.

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Amazing New AI Churns Out “Coherent Paragraphs of Text”

Homework Helper OpenAI, the artificial intelligence research company founded by tech heavyweights including Elon Musk and Peter Thiel, says it’s developed the most advanced language-processing algorithm so far. Sample outputs suggest that the AI system is an extraordinary step forward, producing text rich with context, nuance and even something approaching humor. It’s so good, in fact, that OpenA

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Expert Slams Waymo Safety Data: “They Obviously Do Not Trust These Numbers”

Top of the Class On Wednesday, California’s Department of Motor Vehicles released its annual report of self-driving car safety data, detailing how often autonomous vehicles created by companies like Uber, Tesla, Apple, and Waymo disengage their cars’ self-driving mode and give control back to a human safety driver to avoid a crash or help the vehicle when its software gets confused. The report sh

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After 16 Months Of Dead Fish, Manatees And Dolphins, Florida's Red Tide Ebbs

The red tide algae bloom that has plagued coastal communities in Florida since 2017 is starting to dissipate, much to the relief of local communities and tourism officials. (Image credit: Greg Allen/NPR)

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Meal kits cut food waste but packaging is a problem, study finds

Deliveries ‘almost always’ use more energy than buying ingredients from supermarket Home delivery meal kits can slash food waste by more than two-thirds, but suppliers need to switch to reusable packaging to make them environmentally friendly, researchers say. Tailor-made meal kits save waste by providing people with precise amounts of fresh ingredients for chosen recipes, meaning leftovers are m

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World Health Organization Forms Committee To Guide Editing Of Human Genes

WHO acted in reaction to a Chinese scientist's announcement in 2018 that he had created the world's first gene-edited babies, a step that highlighted the need for uniform gene-editing guidelines. (Image credit: Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

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When research participation pays, some people lie, Penn study suggests

Offering compensation can be an important tactic to attract potential participants for enrollment in research studies, but it might come at a cost. A new study conducted by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that up to 23 percent of respondents lied about their eligibility to participate in a survey when offered payment, even small amounts.

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Found but Lost: Newly Discovered Shark May Be Extinct

Carcharhinus obsolerus (that’s Latin for “extinct”) swam in the waters of the western Pacific, but it hasn’t been seen in 80-plus years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon Ditches Plan for New York Headquarters

Amazon’s Gone Amazon has chosen Valentine’s Day to break up with New York. The massive e-retailer spent much of 2018 searching for the site of its second headquarters. In November, it finally announced plans to split the much-hyped HQ2 between two locations: Queens, NY, and Arlington, Va. Now, it’s pulling out of the NY deal — but whether the break-up will stick isn’t certain. It’s You, Not Us On

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Scientists worry 'zombie deer' disease could jump to humans

Health Chronic wasting disease is currently in 24 states. If you’ve heard of “zombie deer,” you’ve heard of chronic wasting disease. CWD causes infected animals to stumble through the forest, sometimes drooling and becoming…

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EXCLUSIVE: The first interview with Trump’s new science adviser

Kelvin Droegemeier starts work 2 years into administration facing many challenges

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Before There Was Internet Paranoia, There Was Lyndon LaRouche

He was considered a wacko and denied access to a broad audience. Today, anyone can spread wild ideas online.

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Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

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New tool for documenting injuries may provide better evidence for elder abuse cases

Keck School of Medicine of USC scientists have developed the first standardized framework for clinicians to document physical findings on older patients for better evidence in abuse cases.

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Watch this shy plant engage in some ‘self-love’ when it can’t find any pollinators

New form of self-fertilization caught on video for the first time

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The First Major U.S. Bank Just Launched a Cryptocurrency

JPM Coin It’s been a long time coming — but it still feels surprising. New York-based investment bank JP Morgan Chase is launching the first-ever major cryptocurrency backed by a U.S. bank. The digital token, dubbed “JPM Coin,” will be used to “instantly settle payments between clients,” CNBC reports . The announcement comes as a substantial change of tune for JP Morgan Chase. Its CEO Jamie Dorna

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Here’s how a ring of romance scammers tricked victims into falling in love

A report from cybersecurity company Agari claims to expose one corner of the multimillion-dollar romance scam industry: a Nigerian fraud ring it dubs Scarlet Widow. As with other …

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Images From Antarctica

Summertime in Antarctica is winding down these days, with the first sunset of the year coming to the South Pole in about two weeks. The people living and working at Antarctic coastal stations were able to experience a few weeks of constant daylight around Christmastime. Gathered below, recent images of the Antarctic landscape, wildlife, and research facilities, and some of the work taking place t

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Single word most associated with negative hospital reviews on yelp is 'told'

A Penn Medicine research team found that the word 'told' was tied to almost 20 percent of poor reviews.

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Cracking colibactin's code

In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, Harvard researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts.

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Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits' evolved resistance to myxoma virus

Partnering with the University of Cambridge and several other research institutes, Biodesign researchers, as part of Grant McFadden's Center of for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, validated the role of specific rabbit genes in contributing to this acquired resistance in research published in Science Magazine.

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Massive Bolivian earthquake reveals mountains 660 kilometers below our feet

Princeton geophysicists Jessica Irving and Wenbo Wu used data from an enormous earthquake in Bolivia to find mountains at the base of the mantle's transition zone, located 660 kilometers below our feet. Their statistical model didn't allow for precise height measurements, but these mountains may be bigger than anything on the surface of the Earth. The researchers also examined the top of the trans

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Darwin's rabbit helps to explain the fightback against myxomatosis

An unprecedented study of rabbit DNA spanning 150 years and thousands of miles has revealed the genetic basis for the animal's fightback against the deadly myxoma virus.

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International protection lags scientific assessment in species threatened by trade

Species that are threatened by wildlife trade take nearly 10 years to receive international protection once identified by the scientific community, according to Eyal Frank and David Wilcove in this Policy Forum.

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Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease

Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study.

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Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay

Researchers have developed a near weightless material, comprised mostly of air, capable of both withstanding and protecting against some of the most extreme temperatures experienced in aerospace and industrial environments.

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Revealed: The gut microbe source of a carcinogenic, DNA-smashing genotoxin

A new study provides the first direct evidence of how a genotoxic warhead that can target and destroy the DNA of nearby cells renders its carcinogenic effects.

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On the origin of B1 cells

A new MDC study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology: A team led by Prof. Klaus Rajewsky reports in Science that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the team's experiments show that a B1-typical B-cell receptor can reprogram B2 cells into B1 cells, suggesting that B1 cells emerge as a consequence of their special B-cell receptors.

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Delays in banning wildlife trade put hundreds of species at risk

From parrots to lizards, hundreds of animal species could be at risk of extinction because of a policy process that responds slowly to scientific knowledge, according to a new study in Science.

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The FASEB Journal: Magnetic fields enhance bone remodeling

Since the creation of 3D-printed (3DP) porous titanium scaffolds in 2016, the scientific community has been exploring ways to improve their ability to stimulate osteogenesis, or bone remodeling. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal revealed the osteogenic potential of Static Magnetic Field (SMF) treatment for human bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) using 3DP scaffolds in vitro

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Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone

Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing Feb. 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Paul Fowler of the University of Aberdeen, Michelle Bellingham of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues in the UK, France and Sweden. The results rev

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Microsoft’s President Met With the Pope to Talk About Ethical AI

PopeBot Pope Francis met with the president of Microsoft, Brad Smith, on Wednesday for a closed-doors meeting about the future of artificial intelligence. When they emerged, they announced a joint mission to help promote the development of responsible, ethical AI that helps rather than exploits people, according to The Seattle Times , demonstrating that the possible risks of AI technology is a ho

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Global energy demand to soar one third by 2040: BP

Global energy demand will surge by a third over the next two decades on advancing prosperity, but Indian demand growth will eclipse that of flagging giant China, Britain's BP forecast Thursday.

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Første gang: Britisk forsøgsanlæg suger CO2 ud af kraftværkets røg

Pilotprojekt er lykkedes med at hive kuldioxid ud af røg fra biomasse.

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7 Beliefs of Emotionally Healthy People

How does our outlook on life, the world, and the future affect our health and well-being? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Seventy years ago, humans unleashed a killer virus on rabbits. Here's how they beat it

Same genetic changes found in rabbits on two continents, but resistance could be fleeting

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It can take a decade for species endangered by wildlife trade to get protection

Study identifies gap between scientific knowledge and conservation policy

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Trump's Wall Won't Solve a National Emergency. It Is One

President Trump has signaled that in addition to signing a Congressional spending bill, he will declare a national emergency to fund his misbegotten border wall.

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Amazon Won't Build Its HQ2 in New York City

The company says it will no longer build its highly anticipated office in Queens, after the deal faced backlash from politicians, taxpayers, and activists.

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Shaping light lets 2-D microscopes capture 4-D data

Rice University researchers have added a new dimension to their breakthrough technique that expands the capabilities of standard laboratory microscopes.

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Honeybees Enter Virtual Reality So Scientists Can Study Their Brains

Researchers record neurological changes in a region called the mushroom body in the brains of bees completing a maze in a virtual environment.

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Andrew Alliance and Sartorius Collaborate to Provide Software-Connected Pipettes for Life Science Research

Researchers to benefit from an innovative software-connected pipetting system, bringing improved reproducibility and traceability of experiments to life-science laboratories.

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On the origin of B1 cells

A new MDC study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology. A team led by Professor Klaus Rajewsky reports in Science that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the team's experiments show that B1-typical B-cell receptor can reprogram B2 cells into B1 cells, suggesting that B1 cells emerge as a consequence of their special B-cell receptors.

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Massive Bolivian earthquake reveals mountains 660 kilometers below our feet

Most schoolchildren learn that the Earth has three (or four) layers: a crust, mantle and core, which is sometimes subdivided into an inner and outer core. That's not wrong, but it does leave out several other layers that scientists have identified within the Earth.

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Delays in banning wildlife trade put hundreds of species at risk

From parrots to lizards, hundreds of animal species could be at risk of extinction because of a policy process that responds slowly to scientific knowledge, according to a new study in Science.

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Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone

Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing February 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Paul Fowler of the University of Aberdeen, Michelle Bellingham of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues in the UK, France and Sweden. The results

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Darwin's rabbit helps to explain the fightback against myxomatosis

Nearly seventy years after myxomatosis decimated the rabbit populations of Australia, Britain and France, a new study reveals how the species has evolved genetic resistance to the disease through natural selection.

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A gut bacteria toxin that damages DNA may be involved in bowel cancer

People with bowel cancer often have higher levels of certain toxic-producing bacteria. The toxin has now been shown to damage DNA in gut cells in mice

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Undersea Odyssey: Accuracy Happy Hours

As our submersible descends, the first destination appears on our topographical map of the ocean: first we’re going deep, deep, deep! It’s time to see what lives down where the water is frigid, incredibly pressurized, and after a certain point pitch black. How could anything live here? The fact of the matter is that tons of stuff lives here, even at the deepest regions, which range from 6,000-11,

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A new insulation material is practically weightless yet still durable

Extreme heat and temperature swings are no match for this lightweight insulator.

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On the origin of B1 cells

A new MDC study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology. A team led by Professor Klaus Rajewsky reports in Science that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the team's experiments show that B1-typical B-cell receptor can reprogram B2 cells into B1 cells, suggesting that B1 cells emerge as a consequence of their special B-cell receptors.

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Delays in banning wildlife trade put hundreds of species at risk

From parrots to lizards, hundreds of animal species could be at risk of extinction because of a policy process that responds slowly to scientific knowledge, according to a new study in Science.

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Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone

Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing February 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Paul Fowler of the University of Aberdeen, Michelle Bellingham of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues in the UK, France and Sweden. The results

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Darwin's rabbit helps to explain the fightback against myxomatosis

Nearly seventy years after myxomatosis decimated the rabbit populations of Australia, Britain and France, a new study reveals how the species has evolved genetic resistance to the disease through natural selection.

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Results of early endoscopic exam critical for assessment of Barrett's patients

A new study indicates that both high-grade abnormal cellular changes (dysplasia) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (a form of cancer) have increased in the last 25 years among people with a digestive condition known as Barrett's esophagus. The study report, Increasing prevalence of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma on index endoscopy in Barrett's esophagus over the past 2 decades, is published i

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7 Beliefs of Emotionally Healthy People

How does our outlook on life, the world, and the future affect our health and well-being? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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India Is Cracking Down on Ecommerce and Free Speech

Following China's lead, India is restricting some sales by global ecommerce companies, and weakening protections around online free speech.

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Fluorescent tags light up when proteins misfold

A new method uses fluorescence to detect potentially disease-causing forms of proteins as they unravel due to stress or mutations. Researchers reengineered a fluorescent compound and developed a method to simultaneously light up two different proteins as they misfold and aggregate inside a living cell, highlighting forms that likely play a role in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzh

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Elastic ceramics

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Cluster isomerization

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Learning like a human

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News at a glance

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The twitter warrior

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Overlooked no longer

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Saving China's onager

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Elastic ceramics

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Cluster isomerization

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Learning like a human

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Targeting Tau

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A human postcatalytic spliceosome structure reveals essential roles of metazoan factors for exon ligation

During exon ligation, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome recognizes the 3'-splice site (3'SS) of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) through non–Watson-Crick pairing with the 5'SS and the branch adenosine, in a conformation stabilized by Prp18 and Prp8. Here we present the 3.3-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of a human postcatalytic spliceosome just after exon ligation. The 3'SS

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Density fluctuations as door-opener for diffusion on crowded surfaces

How particles can move on a catalyst surface that, under the conditions of an industrial process, is highly covered by adsorbates and where most adsorption sites are occupied has remained an open question. We have studied the diffusion of O atoms on a fully CO-covered Ru(0001) surface by means of high-speed/variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory

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Printed subthreshold organic transistors operating at high gain and ultralow power

Overcoming the trade-offs among power consumption, fabrication cost, and signal amplification has been a long-standing issue for wearable electronics. We report a high-gain, fully inkjet-printed Schottky barrier organic thin-film transistor amplifier circuit. The transistor signal amplification efficiency is 38.2 siemens per ampere, which is near the theoretical thermionic limit, with an ultralow

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Double-negative-index ceramic aerogels for thermal superinsulation

Ceramic aerogels are attractive for thermal insulation but plagued by poor mechanical stability and degradation under thermal shock. In this study, we designed and synthesized hyperbolic architectured ceramic aerogels with nanolayered double-pane walls with a negative Poisson’s ratio (–0.25) and a negative linear thermal expansion coefficient (–1.8 x 10 –6 per °C). Our aerogels display robust mec

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Photoelectrical imaging and coherent spin-state readout of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have become an important instrument for quantum sensing and quantum information science. However, the readout of NV spin state requires bulky optical setups, limiting fabrication of miniaturized compact devices for practical use. Here we realized photoelectrical detection of magnetic resonance as well as Rabi oscillations on a single-defect level. Furtherm

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Chemically reversible isomerization of inorganic clusters

Structural transformations in molecules and solids have generally been studied in isolation, whereas intermediate systems have eluded characterization. We show that a pair of cadmium sulfide (CdS) cluster isomers provides an advantageous experimental platform to study isomerization in well-defined, atomically precise systems. The clusters coherently interconvert over an ~1–electron volt energy ba

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Inferring Earths discontinuous chemical layering from the 660-kilometer boundary topography

Topography, or depth variation, of certain interfaces in the solid Earth can provide important insights into the dynamics of our planet interior. Although the intermediate- and long-range topographic variation of the 660-kilometer boundary between Earth’s upper and lower mantle is well studied, small-scale measurements are far more challenging. We found a surprising amount of topography at short

2h

How a circularized tmRNA moves through the ribosome

During trans-translation, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) together rescue ribosomes stalled on a truncated mRNA and tag the nascent polypeptide for degradation. We used cryo–electron microscopy to determine the structures of three key states of the tmRNA-SmpB-ribosome complex during trans translation at resolutions of 3.7 to 4.4 angstroms. The results show how tmRNA and

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Structural insight into nucleosome transcription by RNA polymerase II with elongation factors

RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcribes chromosomal DNA that contains multiple nucleosomes. The nucleosome forms transcriptional barriers, and nucleosomal transcription requires several additional factors in vivo. We demonstrate that the transcription elongation factors Elf1 and Spt4/5 cooperatively lower the barriers and increase the RNAPII processivity in the nucleosome. The cryo–electron micros

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BCR-dependent lineage plasticity in mature B cells

B2 cells engage in classical antibody responses, whereas B1 cells are considered carriers of innate immunity, biased toward recognizing epitopes present on the surfaces of common pathogens and self antigens. To explore the role of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity in driving B1 cell differentiation, we developed a transgenic system allowing us to change BCR specificity in B cells in an in

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Structural insight into substrate and inhibitor discrimination by human P-glycoprotein

ABCB1, also known as P-glycoprotein, actively extrudes xenobiotic compounds across the plasma membrane of diverse cells, which contributes to cellular drug resistance and interferes with therapeutic drug delivery. We determined the 3.5-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of substrate-bound human ABCB1 reconstituted in lipidic nanodiscs, revealing a single molecule of the chemotherapeutic

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Recognition of the amyloid precursor protein by human {gamma}-secretase

Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the intramembrane protease -secretase is linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We report an atomic structure of human -secretase in complex with a transmembrane (TM) APP fragment at 2.6-angstrom resolution. The TM helix of APP closely interacts with five surrounding TMs of PS1 (the catalytic subunit of -secretase). A hybrid β sheet, which is formed by

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Heterochromatin anomalies and double-stranded RNA accumulation underlie C9orf72 poly(PR) toxicity

How hexanucleotide GGGGCC (G 4 C 2 ) repeat expansions in C9orf72 cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not understood. We developed a mouse model engineered to express poly(PR), a proline-arginine (PR) dipeptide repeat protein synthesized from expanded G 4 C 2 repeats. The expression of green fluorescent protein–conjugated (PR) 50 (a 50-repeat PR protein)

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Two-dimensional magnetic crystals and emergent heterostructure devices

Magnetism, originating from the moving charges and spin of elementary particles, has revolutionized important technologies such as data storage and biomedical imaging, and continues to bring forth new phenomena in emergent materials and reduced dimensions. The recently discovered two-dimensional (2D) magnetic van der Waals crystals provide ideal platforms for understanding 2D magnetism, the contr

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The human gut bacterial genotoxin colibactin alkylates DNA

Certain Escherichia coli strains residing in the human gut produce colibactin, a small-molecule genotoxin implicated in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. However, colibactin’s chemical structure and the molecular mechanism underlying its genotoxic effects have remained unknown for more than a decade. Here we combine an untargeted DNA adductomics approach with chemical synthesis to identify and char

2h

Amazon Got Exactly What It Deserved—And So Did New York

Amazon said on Thursday that it will cancel its plans to add a second corporate headquarters in New York City. The company had pledged to build a campus in Queens’ Long Island City in exchange for $3 billion in subsidies. In a statement, Amazon blamed local politicians for the reversal. “For Amazon, the commitment to build a new headquarters requires positive, collaborative relationships with sta

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Amazon’s Retreat and the New Politics of Tech

Well, that didn’t take long. Amazon announced today that it was “ not moving forward ” with the plans to build out a massive corporate office, which it called HQ2, in Long Island City, Queens. The announcement followed months of intense opposition by activists and local politicians dismayed that Amazon would receive up to $2.5 billion in tax subsidies to—as they saw it—accelerate the gentrificati

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Common weed killer ups risk of some cancers by 40%

Exposure to glyphosate—the world’s most widely used, broad-spectrum herbicide and the primary ingredient in the weed killer Roundup—increases the risk of some cancers by more than 40 percent, according to new research. Various reviews and international assessments have come to different conclusions about whether glyphosate leads to cancer in humans. Now, researchers have conducted an updated meta

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We should gene-sequence cave paintings to find out more about who made them

Standard archeological techniques can’t determine whether the prehistoric artists were hunter-gatherers or farmers. Analyzing the paintings’ surfaces with techniques from biology offers much more information about how they worked and when they lived.

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Role of interventional inflammatory bowel disease in the era of biologic therapy

According to a new statement from a panel of national and international experts in gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other areas, interventional (or therapeutic) IBD endoscopy has an expanding role in the treatment of disease and of adverse events from surgery.

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Liberals and Conservatives Are Both Susceptible to Fake News, but for Different Reasons

New research suggests both liberals and conservatives are motivated to believe fake news, and dismiss real news that contradicts their ideologies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skipping School to Save the Earth

Inspired by a 16-year-old Swede, thousands of young people are expected to take Friday off to march for action on climate change.

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What are the laws around vaccines and kids’ rights?

The measles outbreak in the US continues to grow, with more than 100 cases reported across the country—most involving young children who have not received immunizations. Here, Michael Wald, a professor at the Stanford University Law School and an expert on legal policy related to children, discusses the legal rights of children to receive vaccinations and how the law varies from state to state: T

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Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks

A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The ribosomal clock is a novel biomarker of aging based on the rDNA, a segment of the genome that has previously been mechanistically linked to aging.

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Why playing board games could improve your love life

Oxytocin levels rose in individuals who did a painting class or played board games with their romantic partners. Levels were highest in men who painted.

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Research shows damage depression inflicts on brain

Condition affects cognitive function and memory that scientists have linked to dementia

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Better Language Models and Their Implications

submitted by /u/ZhuanXia [link] [comments]

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The Double Life of a California Socialite Who Became a Leading Arctic Explorer

In the early 20th century, Louise Arner Boyd lived as a philanthropist in the United States and a hero on the high seas

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A Court Just Sent a Man to Prison For 3D Printing a Gun

Prison Sentence A 43-year-old Texan man named Eric McGinnis was sentenced to eight years in prison yesterday for the possession of a partially 3D printed AR-15 rifle, the BBC reports — a sign that 3D printed guns could be moving from a hypothetical concern to a real one. McGinnis was prohibited from owning firearms for two years after attacking his girlfriend in 2015. He was arrested in 2017 afte

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Mice Deprived of 'Love Hormone' Oxytocin Sit Alone in the Cold

(Inside Science) — Perhaps it's not a coincidence that Valentine's Day falls at a chilly time of year. In biological terms, social drives like love may be bound up with the need to keep warm. The same hormone, oxytocin, helps regulate both physical and emotional warmth, increasing body heat and facilitating social bonding. And according to recent research, baby mice deprived of the hormone are le

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Remains of USS Hornet, Storied WWII Aircraft Carrier, Discovered at Bottom of South Pacific

After a fierce battle in 1942, the USS Hornet succumbed to an onslaught from Japanese dive-bombers, torpedo planes and destroyers, which hit the ship with torpedoes. But now, shipwreck hunters have finally located the Hornet's remains.

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Skyd mikrobølger efter mørkt stof

PLUS. Hvis mørkt stof består af partikler, der kaldes axioner, kan de iagttages med mikrobølger og et princip kendt fra lasere.

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Waymo’s Robots Drove More Miles Than Everyone Else Combined

Self-driving cars promise to change cities, mint billionaires, and push robots into the everyday lives of millions of people. The only problem is, no one knows quite when or how . And with all the research and development locked up inside private companies, the public has little information to judge the progress of the technology, aside from the occasional PR reveal or disaster . We have one (imp

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What It’s Like to Go Back to School After a Shooting

The ways in which schools and students think about the possibility of mass violence on campus changed a lot between the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School and the 2018 one at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Dave Cullen’s last book, 2009’s acclaimed nonfiction work Columbine , chronicled the public and private lives of high-school students who survived the 1999 Columbine massacre as they

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Four smart LED light strips to make your house cooler

Gadgets Illuminate your beds, hallways, shelves, and backs of your televisions . If you've got a reliable internet connection, consider adding smart lights to your home. You can adjust the brightness of your lights and set the mood by choosing from…

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Ribosomal DNA Can Predict an Animal's Age

A clock constructed of rDNA methylation sites can estimate both chronological and biological age across species.

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Chernobyl: The end of a three-decade experiment

The abandoned Chernobyl exclusion zone could be about to change for the first time since the world's worst nuclear disaster.

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Shaping light lets 2D microscopes capture 4D data

Rice University researchers have created a method to design custom masks that transform 2D fluorescent microscopy images into 3D movies.

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Overdue: a US advisory board for research integrity

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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Should we screen people for irregular heartbeat?

Should we screen people for irregular heartbeat (known as atrial fibrillation, or AF for short) in an effort to prevent strokes?

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Common virus in early childhood linked to celiac disease in susceptible children

A common intestinal virus, enterovirus, in early childhood may be a trigger for later celiac disease in children at increased genetic risk of the condition, finds a small study.

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Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'

Cholesterol carried in high-density lipoprotein particles, or HDL cholesterol, has been dubbed the good cholesterol, because people whose HDL levels are high have a lower risk of developing heart disease. That link was first established in 1977 and has been confirmed over and over in epidemiological studies.

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How the Parkland Shooting Changed My Life

It is a very odd thing to think of myself as a school-shooting survivor. The first time I acknowledged that I was a survivor was on October 5, 2018, when I attended an event as a guest of Everytown for Gun Safety. I went over to the Moms Demand Action table to sign up to be a volunteer. As I filled out the form, I stared at the question asking how I was connected to gun violence. I stood there fo

3h

NASA's Aqua satellite finds winds battering Tropical Cyclone Gelena

Tropical Cyclone Gelena is being battered by outside winds, and that's weakening the storm. Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the bulk of clouds in Tropical Cyclone Gelena were pushed away from the center.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite eyes Tropical Cyclone Oma near Vanuatu

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the center of Tropical Cyclone Oma was just northwest of the island of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean.

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Marin County: Safe harbor for Native residents during the Mission era and beyond

Contrary to the dominant narrative of cultural extinction, indigenous residents of Marin County survived colonization, preserving and passing on their traditions and cultural practices, says a UC Santa Cruz anthropologist who will present his latest research during a conference in March.

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Study uses satellite data to pinpoint widespread oil industry 'flaring'

A new study by San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Health Education Lara Cushing and colleagues at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine shows that satellite data can be used to effectively track the potentially harmful, underreported oil and gas industry practice known as "flaring."

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Researchers find 14 percent of sausages mislabelled in Canada, down from last study

Sausage mislabelling in Canada is down, according to a new University of Guelph DNA barcoding study.

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Amazon drops plan for New York headquartersAmazon NYC HQ2 LIC

Amazon announced Thursday it was abandoning plans for a new headquarters site in New York City, citing opposition from local politicians angry at the huge subsidies being offered to one of the world's most successful companies.

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Can we repair the brain? The promise of stem cell technologies for treating parkinson's disease

Cell replacement may play an increasing role in alleviating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in future. Writing in a special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts describe how newly developed stem cell technologies could be used to treat the disease and discuss the great promise, as well as the significant challenges, of stem cell treatment.

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Spintronics by 'straintronics'

Data storage in magnetic media is very energy consuming. Novel materials could reduce the energy needed to control magnetic memories thus contributing to a smaller carbon footprint of the IT sector. Now an international team led by HZB has observed at the HZB lightsource BESSY II a new phenomenon in iron nanograins: whereas normally the magnetic moments of the iron grains are disordered at room te

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NASA's Aqua satellite finds winds battering Tropical Cyclone Gelena

Tropical Cyclone Gelena is being battered by outside winds, and that's weakening the storm. Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the bulk of clouds in Tropical Cyclone Gelena were pushed away from the center.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite eyes Tropical Cyclone Oma near Vanuatu

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the center of Tropical Cyclone Oma was just northwest of the island of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean.

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CRISPR could help us protect ourselves from viruses like flu and HIV

Gene-edited white blood cells could let us hack our immune systems to prevent infections with pathogens like HIV, flu, and the virus that causes glandular fever

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Study finds multitasking increases in online courses compared to face-to-face

Kent State University Professor Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., remembers the incident well.

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Aloe sanguinalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland

Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap. Its can easily be spotted from the road, but the species has only just been named and described in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

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Amazon drops plan for New York headquarters

Amazon announced Thursday it was abandoning plans for a new headquarters site in New York City, citing opposition from local politicians angry at the huge subsidies being offered to one of the …

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An AI tool auto-generates fake news, bogus tweets, and plenty of gibberish

Fed with billions of words, this algorithm dreams up convincing articles and shows how AI could power disinformation campaigns.

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Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'

Cholesterol carried in high-density lipoprotein particles, or HDL cholesterol, has been dubbed the good cholesterol, because people whose HDL levels are high have a lower risk of developing heart disease. That link was first established in 1977 and has been confirmed over and over in epidemiological studies.

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Aloe sanguinalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland

Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap. Its can easily be spotted from the road, but the species has only just been named and described in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

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Philosophy: What exactly is a black hole?

What is a black hole? A philosopher shows that physicists use different definitions of the concept, depending on their own particular fields of interest.

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Arctic Lakes Might Emit Less Carbon Than Suspected

As northern landscapes warm, researchers are looking to understand the role of lakes in the carbon cycle — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Better red than dread: Barrier keeps batteries safe

Rice University scientists have taken the next step toward the deployment of powerful, rechargeable lithium metal batteries by making them safer and simpler to manufacture.

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Researchers find 14 percent of sausages mislabelled in Canada, down from last University of Guelph study

Researchers found 14 per cent of sausages contained meat ingredients not indicated on the label. This is down from a first-ever study conducted by the same researchers just over a year ago that revealed a 20-per-cent mislabelling rate. Using DNA barcoding technology, the researchers tested sausages labelled as beef, chicken, pork or turkey. They also tested the samples for sheep, goat and horse.

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Marin County: Safe harbor for Native residents during the Mission era and beyond

Contrary to the dominant narrative of cultural extinction, indigenous residents of Marin County survived colonization, preserving and passing on their traditions and cultural practices.

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Giving keener 'electric eyesight' to autonomous vehicles

Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But MIT researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

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Kent State study finds multitasking increases in online courses compared to face-to-face

The phenomenon of multitasking across three or four internet-connected devices simultaneously is increasingly common. Researchers from Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services were curious to know how often this happens during online education, a method of delivering college and even high school courses entirely via an internet-connected computer as opposed to a traditional fac

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Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula

Coinciding with the Pit Grave culture (4200-3600 years before our era), coming from Southern Europe, the Neolithic communities of the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula started a ceremonial activity related to the sacrifice and burial of dogs. The high amount of cases that are recorded in Catalonia suggests it was a general practice and it proves the tight relationship between humans and these animal

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Most triggers for irregular heartbeat can be easily modified

A personal survey of patients with atrial fibrillatio, one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats, has found that the majority of triggers for the condition are easily modifiable lifestyle choices, including alcohol, caffeine, exercise and lack of sleep.

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Use of clinical apps significantly improves quality of cardiovascular care

A pilot program using several clinical decision support tools in the outpatient setting to treat and educate stable ischemic heart disease patients has shown success in improving angina in these patients. Findings from the Florida Cardiovascular Quality Network study were presented at the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit in Orlando. The conference brings together top experts

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Providing follow-up care after heart attack helps reduce readmissions, deaths

A program designed to help heart attack patients with the transition from hospital to outpatient care can reduce readmissions and deaths and increase the number of patients keeping follow-up appointments, a new study suggests. Findings from the Sanger Heart & Vascular Heart Care Navigation Team study were presented at the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit in Orlando. The confe

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Study uses satellite data to pinpoint widespread oil industry 'flaring'

A new study by SF State University Assistant Professor of Health Education Lara Cushing and colleagues at the University of Southern California used satellite data to track flaring, an often underreported and potentially harmful oil and gas industry practice.

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New Algorithm Detects Fake Online Dating Profiles

Rom-Cons Millions of people now turn to the internet in the hopes of finding love . But in the process of opening their hearts, some also open their wallets, falling for “rom-con” scams in which a fraudster swindles them out of money. Now, a team of U.K. researchers claims it’s created an algorithm that detects dating scams — and it could prevent thousands from experiencing financial hardship and

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Medieval Letter Reveals Bawdy Nun Who Faked Her Death to Escape Convent

Medieval nun fakes death to escape convent and enjoy a life of carnal lust. Sounds like the basis for a juicy novel, but this really happened during the 14th century in England.

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Found but Lost: Newly Discovered Shark May Be Extinct

Carcharhinus obsolerus (that’s Latin for “extinct”) swam in the waters of the western Pacific, but it hasn’t been seen in 80-plus years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Blockchain can strengthen the credibility of meta-analyses

Blockchain — the technology behind the secure transactions of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin — can make it easier for researchers to conduct transparent meta-analyses in social science research where reproducibility is a growing concern.

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The more the merrier? Children with multiple siblings more susceptible to bullying

A child with more than one brother or sister is more likely to be the victim of sibling bullying than those with only one sibling, and firstborn children and older brothers tend to be the perpetrators.

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Diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium

Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples.

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Engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with children's toy

Using Shrinky Dinks, a popular children's toy, engineers have created wearable, disposable respiration sensors that track the rate and volume of a wearer's breath. The new device will help sufferers of asthma and many other pulmonary conditions.

4h

The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia

Researchers report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms.

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Research forms complex picture of mercury pollution in a period of global change

This study looks at how climate change and land use modification impact mercury pollution in wetlands.

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Women Will Dominate—and Dismantle—the Music Industry in 2019

From Ariana Grande and Kacey Musgraves to Tierra Whack and Lizzo, this year is all about female artists remaking the music biz.

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The AI Text Generator That's Too Dangerous to Make PublicOpenAI AI Fake News

Researchers at OpenAI decided that a system that scores well at understanding language could too easily be manipulated for malicious intent.

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An AI that writes convincing prose risks mass-producing fake newsOpenAI AI Fake News

Fed with billions of words, this algorithm creates convincing articles and shows how AI could be used to fool people on a mass scale.

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Human Pancreas Cells Can Be Made to Produce Insulin

When implanted into mice, the "pseudo-islets" helped treat the animals' diabetes symptoms.

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Why are people sexually attracted to cartoons? Evolution.

According to Pornhub's annual statistics, "hentai" and "cartoons" were among the most popular categories in 2018. Such pornography is a supernormal stimulus, an artificial object that triggers an animal's instinctual response more intensely than natural analogs. Supernormal stimuli not only explain our heightened response to pornography, but also art, junk food, and social media. Every year Pornh

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Biocolonizer species are putting the conservation of the granite at Machu Picchu at risk

A research group has used a non-destructive methodology to determine the role of specific algae, lichens, mosses, cyanobacteria, etc. that may be causing exfoliation and delamination, which are degrading the Sacred Rock of Machu Picchu, one of the most important symbols in the Peruvian archaeological city.

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Tracking pollen with quantum dots

Most plant species on earth are reliant on insects for pollination, including more than 30% of the food crops we eat. With insects facing rapid global decline, it is crucial that scientists understand which insects are important pollinators of different plants–this starts with tracking pollen.

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'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring

Research shows that sperm that live for longer before fertilizing an egg produce healthier offspring. What's more, these offspring go on to have longer, healthier lifespans — and in turn produce more and healthier offspring themselves. It was assumed that it doesn't matter which sperm fertilizes an egg. But this shows that there are massive differences between sperm and how they affect offspring.

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Blindfolded training could help doctors save young lives

Doctors have found that pediatric team leaders improve more during resuscitation training if they wear a blindfold. Their findings demonstrate a promising tool for improving training and outcomes in pediatric resuscitation.

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Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'

Setbacks in drug trials aiming to raise HDL have led researchers to reassess the particle's effects on heart health. A study in the Journal of Lipid Research combining proteomics and mouse genetics may help researchers understand researchers understand the proteins in the particle, how they get there and how they determine HDL function.

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Effective self-control strategies involve much more than willpower, research shows

It's mid-February, around the time that most people waver in their commitment to the resolutions they've made for the new year. Many of these resolutions require us to forego a behavior we want to engage in for the one we think we should engage in. In a new report, leading researchers in behavioral science propose a new framework that outlines different types of self-control strategies and emphasi

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Better red than dread: Barrier keeps batteries safe

A layer of red phosphorus in rechargeable lithium metal batteries can signal when damaging dendrites threaten to create a short circuit. The strategy, which does not require a third electrode, could help bring more powerful lithium metal batteries to market.

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New study shows more protein and fewer calories help older people lose weight safely

A high-protein, low-calorie diet helps older adults with obesity lose more weight, maintain more muscle mass, improve bone quality and lose 'bad' fat, according to results from a new randomized controlled trial led by Wake Forest University researcher Kristen Beavers.

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Statins could protect against motor neurone disease

High cholesterol has been found to be a possible risk factor for the development of motor neurone disease (MND), according to a large study of genetic data led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London, in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health in the USA.

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European Parliament Approves Controversial “Meme Ban”

Copyright Directive The doomsday clock is ticking for European internet users. Last night, the European Parliament approved the final text of a controversial online copyright law that would force internet platforms to filter everything users upload for copyright — including memes — and charge news aggregators to link to news publications. The move comes after months of adjustments to the Parliame

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What Will Trump Do If He Realizes He’s Lost the Shutdown Fight?

Donald Trump has again folded in his negotiations with congressional Democrats—accepting a second budget deal that includes nothing close to the $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall that he demanded. This outcome was entirely predictable. The sequence of events that led here has occurred again and again when Trump negotiates. Think of it as a play in four acts. Act I: Trump Invents a Crisis

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Tillväxtfaktor kan avslöja om katter blir friska från diabetes

Diabetes mellitus är en vanlig hormonell sjukdom som ökar bland katter. Behandling består av ändrad kosthållning, motion och insulinsprutor. Katter med diabetes kan tillfriskna och klara sig utan medicinering efter en tids behandling. Att tidigt få indikation om hur kattens sjukdom kommer att utvecklas är viktigt både för djurägaren och behandlande veterinär. En orsak till att vissa katter inte t

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Indendørs danmarkskort skal vise rundt i offentlige bygninger

Der er store gevinster at hente, hvis alle rum, gange og døre bliver kortlagt i en fælles infrastruktur. Styrelse forsøger sig nu med pilottest.

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Tricking rats with augmented reality unlocked a secret about our own brains

Science Ever wondered why you feel a little funny when you step off a treadmill? Ever gotten off a treadmill or a moving sidewalk in an airport and had the unnerving feeling that the whole world was moving at a different pace?

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Orangutans make complex economic decisions about tool use depending on the current 'market' situation

Flexible tool use is closely associated with higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists from the University …

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Chemicals 'repair damaged neurons in mice'

Some early studies in mice suggest drugs can be developed to halt mental decline, say scientists.

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Howard Schultz Is Already Helping President Trump

After this week’s CNN town hall, it’s more and more clear that any money Howard Schultz might spend on an independent presidential bid would function as an in-kind campaign contribution to Donald Trump. Schultz offered few policy specifics during the hour-long session Tuesday night and repeatedly retreated to platitudes when pressed to clarify his position on core issues, including taxes and heal

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How to Find Simple Treasures in Complex Numbers

For our first Insights puzzle of 2019, let’s go on a treasure hunt. To prepare you for this adventure, let me start by giving you a valuable thought to ponder: It is possible for anyone to understand that “imaginary” numbers (numbers that contain the seemingly nonsensical square root of minus 1) are actually as “real” as any other numbers given the right situation. If imaginary numbers have alway

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Spacecraft measurements reveal mechanism of solar wind heating

A new study describes the first direct measurement of how energy is transferred from the chaotic electromagnetic fields in space to the particles that make up the solar wind, leading to the heating of interplanetary space.

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Stress in crops points to surprising benefits

Stress is known as the 'killer disease' and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke. But now research indicates that stress in the plant kingdom is far less destructive to plants than it is to humans.

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How cosmic events give insight into fundamental properties of matter

The option to measure the gravitational waves of two merging neutron stars has offered the chance to answer some of the fundamental questions about the structure of matter. At the extremely high temperatures and densities in the merger scientists conjecture a phase-transition where neutrons dissolve into their constituents: quarks and gluons.

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Daily briefing: Nature editors review Ladybird books

Daily briefing: Nature editors review Ladybird books Daily briefing: Nature editors review Ladybird books, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00592-1 Britain’s top boffins write pocket-sized guides, final farewell to Opportunity and one scientist’s quest to learn why he didn’t get tenure.

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Combo T cell and targeted therapy strategy for resistant melanoma with BRAF mutation

Collaborative research by The Wistar Institute and Moffitt Cancer Center has demonstrated that BRAF targeted therapies render resistant melanoma more sensitive to the attack of killer T cells.

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Decolonization protocol can prevent dangerous infections among discharged hospital patients

Hospital patients who have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can prevent future MRSA infections by following a standard bathing protocol after discharge, according to research results published in the Feb. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Suspicious spots on the lungs do not behave like metastases of rhabdomyosarcoma

Small spots on CT scans of the lungs of children with muscle cancer do not have an adverse effect on survival according to an international research team in the Journal for Clinical Oncology. This conclusion has direct consequences for the treatment of the disease.

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Philosophy: What exactly is a black hole?

What is a black hole? In an article that has just appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich philosopher Erik Curiel shows that physicists use different definitions of the concept, depending on their own particular fields of interest.

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Antidepressant could stop deadly sepsis, study suggests

An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research suggests.

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Neural processing with trauma and adversity interact to increase core symptom of PTSD

Lifetime adversity and increased neural processing during a traumatic event combine to increase the frequency of intrusive traumatic memories and the distress they cause, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

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Aloe sanguinalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland

Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap. Its clumps can easily be spotted from the road, but the species has only just been named and described in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

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Diet could help runners beat stomach issues

Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement.

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In zebrafish eggs, most rapidly growing cell inhibits neighbors through mechanical signals

In animal embryonic development a group of cells starts out all being the same. But then one cell puts the brake on its neighbors, sending inhibitory signals that stop their differentiation. The 'winning' cell, in the end, is different from its neighbors. Scientists at IST Austria now describe a new mechanism for lateral inhibition in a publication in today's edition of Cell: In zebrafish ovarian

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Making better embryos

One out of every six Canadian couples experiences infertility. Some resort to in vitro fertilization. But the embryos obtained through this technique often have defects. In a study published today in the journal Current Biology, researchers from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) succeeded in reducing the number of defects in mouse embryos in the laboratory. In the medium

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Study suggests lazy eye associated with children's sense of self-perception

This observational study looked at whether the condition known as 'lazy eye' (amblyopia) was associated with an altered sense of self-perception in children (ages 3 to 7) and whether any differences in self-perception were associated with deficiencies in vision and fine motor skills like coordination. Researchers report that among 60 children with lazy eye, the condition was associated with lower

5h

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to findings from an international team that includes University College London (UCL) and Flatiron Institute cosmologists.

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Neuroendocrine tumors: Choosing the best treatment

An increasing number of anti-cancer drugs are made available each year. During the authorization process, these drugs usually undergo comparisons to one, but rarely to multiple established drugs, leading to a lack of comparisons between therapies. Researchers at the Universities of Basel, Bern and Geneva and at the University Hospitals of Geneva and Bern have compared all drugs used in the treatme

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Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

Measurements of gravitational waves from ~50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate over how fast our universe is expanding, find an international team including UCL and Flatiron Institute cosmologists.

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Finding suggests ways to promote adult heart tissue regeneration

Researchers report that they have been able to remove the 'breaks' that hold back cardiomyocyte proliferation, opening the possibility for treating heart disease by reprogramming adult cardiomyocytes to a more fetal cell state.

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New live-imaging technique reveals cellular repair crew plugging leaky biological barrier

Suppose you live in a brick house and notice cracks in the mortar that let in cold air, rain and insect pests. You might call a brick mason to repair those leaks and to restore the barrier that keeps the great outdoors from getting inside.

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From vibrations alone, acacia ants can tell nibbles from the wind

Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Feb. 14 find that the ants of the acacia tree are tipped off to the presence of herbivores by vibrations that run throughout the trees when an animal gets too close or begins to chew. As a result, the insects begin patrolling the acacia's branches more actively. Remarkably, the researchers show, the ants don't react when the trees' movements

5h

A 'Breaking Bad' Movie Is Coming to Netflix

Also: Apple is reportedly announcing its streaming plans in March, and Thanos is going to 'Dune'.

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Climate pioneers: how small farmers could be leading the way towards sustainable agriculture

Agriculture is a leading cause of climate change, but it is also undeniably affected by it. Farming must therefore change in order to keep up with global demands, while reducing its environmental impact. Without these necessary changes, it's estimated that by 2030, the impacts of climate change will be even worse, causing yields to decline so much that we will cancel out any progress we have made

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Owning your data in the future will mean companies come to you, ask for your consent to use it, and respect you if your answer is 'no.' But if your answer is yes, they'll compensate you for the time you spent and risk you took on giving them your information. Thoughts? [OC]

I think the first step to getting to this future state (aside from pushing for legislation change in the USA – nice job EU), is to understand the value of our personal data individually. I learned the value of my personal data through researching how much hackers made from breaches I've been impacted by, as well as how much money apps I use make in data partnerships and targeted advertising deals

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Orangutans make complex economic decisions about tool use

Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists found out that the apes carefully weighed their options. To do so the apes considered the details such as differences in quality between the two food rewards and the functionality of the available tools in order to obtain a high q

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High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed

Using synchronized lasers pulses, researchers developed a new method of electrostatic force microscopy that can record movies with frames as fast as 300 nanoseconds. This is fast enough to watch electrons move inside solar cells, which can lead to more efficient solar power devices.

5h

Genetic variations in a fourth gene linked to elevated leukemia risk in Hispanic children

Progress reported on understanding why Hispanic children are more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia and to die of the disease.

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Controlling and visualizing receptor signals in neural cells with light

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualized serotonin receptor signals in neural cells. To this end, they modified a photosensitive membrane receptor in the eye, namely melanopsin. They were able to switch the receptor on and off using light; it also acted like a sensor indicating via fluorescence if specific signalling pathways in the cell h

5h

What's age got to do with it?

It's often said: it's not how old you are, it's how old you feel. New research shows that physiological age is a better predictor of survival than chronological age.

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Sex Researchers: For Many, Virtual Lovers Will Replace Humans

Digisexual Revolution Just in time for Valentine’s Day, a duo of influential academics is warning that more people could start to choose digital avatars and other technologies in lieu of human sex and intimacy — a society-shifting sexual orientation they call “digisexuality.” “A digisexual is someone who sees immersive technologies such as sex robots and virtual reality pornography as integral to

5h

Sennheiser Momentum True Wireless Review: Not Your Best Buds

Sennheiser's high-end earbuds are completely wire-free, but they aren't completely hassle-free.

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Polar bear 'invasion': how climate change is making human-wildlife conflicts worse

The ten hottest years on record were all during the past two decades and the hottest global ocean temperatures ever were recorded in 2018 – a heat increase from 2017 equivalent to 100 million times that of the Hiroshima bomb. Climate change is here and it's already wreaking havoc.

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From vibrations alone, acacia ants can tell nibbles from the wind

Acacia trees are a prominent feature of the East African savannah. They're also a classic example of the long-standing and complex relationships between plants and insects, in this case acacia ants. The acacias provide food in the form of nectar and accommodation in hollow thorns for the ants. In return, the ants defend the acacias against nibbling elephants, giraffes, or other animals that would

5h

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to findings from an international team that includes University College London (UCL) and Flatiron Institute cosmologists.

5h

New live-imaging technique reveals cellular repair crew plugging leaky biological barrier

Suppose you live in a brick house and notice cracks in the mortar that let in cold air, rain and insect pests. You might call a brick mason to repair those leaks and to restore the barrier that keeps the great outdoors from getting inside.

5h

The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques

Coccolithophores are microscopic marine algae that use carbon dioxide to grow and release carbon dioxide when they create their miniature calcite shells. Scientists from the CNRS, Le Mans Université, Sorbonne Université, Aix-Marseille Université and the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have revealed the nano-level 3D structure of their calcite shells, providing new perspectives for assessment of th

5h

Molecular Lego blocks

Organic semiconductors are lightweight, flexible and easy to manufacture. But they often fail to meet expectations regarding efficiency and stability. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are now deploying data mining approaches to identify promising organic compounds for the electronics of the future.

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Artificial intelligence to boost Earth system science

A study by German scientists from Jena and Hamburg shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can substantially improve our understanding of the climate and the Earth system. Especially the potential of deep learning has only partially been exhausted so far. In particular, complex dynamic processes can be better described with the help of AI. As a result, climate and Earth system models will be impro

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Animal venoms are sources in the search for new medicines

The study of natural toxins and their derivatives may help in the development of medicines to treat diseases like cancer and osteoarthritis, says coordinator of the Center of Excellence in New Target Discovery.

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Moffitt researchers characterize mechanism of action of CAR T cells

Despite progress being made, scientists have not been completely certain of how CAR T cells function mechanistically. A team of Moffitt Cancer Center researchers addressed this uncertainty and characterized the mechanism of action of these new agents in a new article published this week in Science Signaling.

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Brain pathways of aversion identified

What happens in the brain when we feel discomfort? Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden are now one step closer to finding the answer. In a new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry they identify which pathways in the mouse brain control behaviour associated with aversion.

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Polar bear 'invasion': how climate change is making human-wildlife conflicts worse

The ten hottest years on record were all during the past two decades and the hottest global ocean temperatures ever were recorded in 2018 – a heat increase from 2017 equivalent to 100 million times that of the Hiroshima bomb. Climate change is here and it's already wreaking havoc.

5h

From vibrations alone, acacia ants can tell nibbles from the wind

Acacia trees are a prominent feature of the East African savannah. They're also a classic example of the long-standing and complex relationships between plants and insects, in this case acacia ants. The acacias provide food in the form of nectar and accommodation in hollow thorns for the ants. In return, the ants defend the acacias against nibbling elephants, giraffes, or other animals that would

5h

New live-imaging technique reveals cellular repair crew plugging leaky biological barrier

Suppose you live in a brick house and notice cracks in the mortar that let in cold air, rain and insect pests. You might call a brick mason to repair those leaks and to restore the barrier that keeps the great outdoors from getting inside.

5h

Social threat learning influences our decisions

Learning what is dangerous by watching a video or being told (known as social learning) has just as strong an effect on our decision-making as first-hand experience of danger, researchers report. The results of the study can help to explain why we make irrational decisions.

5h

'Lack of cleaning' in brain cells is central to Alzheimer's disease

An international research team has created a better understanding of Alzheimer's. They have shown that the cleaning system of the brain cells, the so-called mitophagy, is very weakened in animals and humans with Alzheimer's. And when they improve the cleaning system in the animals, the Alzheimer's symptoms almost disappear.

5h

The language of conversation impacts on the 'synchronization' of our brains

Experts have shown for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains is connected depends on whether the dialogue takes place in the native language or in a foreign language.

5h

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

Researchers recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs.

5h

How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane

Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms. But how do they get in there in the first place? Researchers have now investigated the matter.

5h

Immunological scarring from celiac disease

Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with celiac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study.

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US science agencies set for budget boost in deal to avert government shutdown

US science agencies set for budget boost in deal to avert government shutdown US science agencies set for budget boost in deal to avert government shutdown, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00590-3 NASA, the National Science Foundation and the Environmental Protection Agency are among the agencies whose funding would increase.

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Author Correction: Predictable and precise template-free CRISPR editing of pathogenic variants

Author Correction: Predictable and precise template-free CRISPR editing of pathogenic variants Author Correction: Predictable and precise template-free CRISPR editing of pathogenic variants, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0938-4 Author Correction: Predictable and precise template-free CRISPR editing of pathogenic variants

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Controlling and visualising receptor signals in neural cells with light

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualised serotonin receptor signals in neural cells. To this end, they modified a photosensitive membrane receptor in the eye, namely melanopsin. As a result, they were able to switch the receptor on and off using light; it also acted like a sensor indicating via fluorescence if specific signalling pathways

5h

Trump’s Fantasy Vision of the Police

President Donald Trump’s appearance this week at a conference of police chiefs and sheriffs demonstrated the peculiar relationship that the president continues to have with law enforcement. On the one hand, Trump styles himself as the foremost advocate and defender of police. On the other, there are serious differences of opinion between the president and prominent cops on some key issues. The ac

5h

New Research: Gen Z Harder to Win Over by Brands, Media, and the Companies Recruiting Them

February 13, 2019 (Washington, D.C.)—A new comprehensive research study into Gen Z from Atlantic Re:think, The Atlantic’s creative marketing group, done together with Comscore and Harvard College Consulting Group, finds the media outlets, brands, and careers that appeal to Millennials aren’t as enticing to Gen Z—with the post-Millennial generation proving harder to win over as citizens, consumers

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Farewell: Opportunity ends 15-year mission to Mars

The Mars rover Opportunity finally ended its mission on February 13—three weeks after its 15th anniversary and long past its 90-day warranty. Over the course of its scientific mission, Opportunity returned hundreds of thousands of images and reshaped our understanding of Mars’ surface for nearly 14 and a half years. Opportunity’s twin, Spirit, challenged by a rocky and rough terrain, officially e

5h

EPA outlines plan for dealing with toxic chemicals in water

Under strong pressure from Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it will move ahead this year with a process that could lead to setting a safety threshold for a group of highly toxic chemicals in drinking water.

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Controlling and visualising receptor signals in neural cells with light

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualised serotonin receptor signals in neural cells. To this end, they modified a photosensitive membrane receptor in the eye, namely melanopsin. As a result, they were able to switch the receptor on and off using light; it also acted like a sensor indicating via fluorescence if specific signalling pathways

5h

A deeper look inside the sleeping bird brain

Birds have good memories, but in contrast to mammals, little is known about how they consolidate memories during sleep. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and Utrecht University recorded waves of slow activity traveling through the brain of sleeping pigeons that are very similar to those observed in mammals. However, they could not detect other brain rhythms known to be impo

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Image: Visualization of orbital space debris

This Valentine's Day, look to the skies at night and you'll see stars twinkling, a glistening Moon and perhaps even an orbiting science lab passing by, the International Space Station.

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JPMorgan Chase unveils cryptocurrency prototype

JPMorgan Chase on Thursday unveiled a prototype for a digital coin system using blockchain, a first among major banks in the fast-changing cryptocurrency world.

5h

In New York, one non-profit looks to combat textile waste

The fashion industry generates tons of fabric waste each year, notably in New York—one of the world's shopping capitals and host twice a year to runway shows, a major contributor to the wider problem.

5h

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

Researchers recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs.

5h

A deeper look inside the sleeping bird brain

Birds have good memories, but in contrast to mammals, little is known about how they consolidate memories during sleep. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and Utrecht University recorded waves of slow activity traveling through the brain of sleeping pigeons that are very similar to those observed in mammals. However, they could not detect other brain rhythms known to be impo

5h

A love story about the power of art as organizing | Aja Monet and phillip agnew

In a lyrical talk full of radical imagination, poet Aja Monet and community organizer phillip angew share the story of how they fell in love and what they've learned about the powerful connection between great social movements and meaningful art. Journey to Smoke Signals Studio in Miami, their home and community art space where they're creating a refuge for neighbors and creators — and imagining

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Carbonaceous chondrites provide clues about the delivery of water to Earth

An international study led by researchers from the Institute of Space Sciences, from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya has discovered that carbonaceous chondrites, a class of meteorites, incorporated hydrated minerals along with organic material from the protoplanetary disk before the formation of planets.

5h

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at NRL and the Air Force Research Laboratory have developed a way to directly write quantum light sources, which emit a single photon of light at a time, into monolayer semiconductors.

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Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a rare brain illness, may be caused by prions

Like CJD, in other words, but with a protein also involved in Alzheimer’s

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One-pedal driving in electric cars

Regenerative braking will change the way people drive

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Politics this week

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Researchers develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) have developed a way to directly write quantum light sources, which emit a single photon of light at a time, into monolayer semiconductors such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2). Single photon emitters (SPEs), or quantum emitters, are key components in a wide range of nascent quantum-based technologies,

5h

Just what are 'zero tolerance' policies – and are they still common in America's schools?

When parents and educators discuss school discipline, one of the things that comes up most are "zero tolerance" policies. This term is often misused and misunderstood, according to new researchI published recently.

5h

Light and sound gauge the temperature of deep tissues

Biomedical engineers have demonstrated how photoacoustic imaging can take the temperature of deep tissue more quickly and accurately than current techniques. This discovery is expected to play an important role in advancing thermal-based therapies to treat cancer.

6h

New clues to predict tipping points for marsh survival

Sea-level rise, sediment starvation and other environmental woes pose increasing threats to coastal wetlands worldwide. But a new study could help stem the losses by giving scientists a broader understanding of which wetlands are most at risk and why. The study assessed wetland distribution and resilience in hundreds of US estuaries at five different spatial scales. Its findings will help guide fu

6h

Safe consumption sites: Study identifies policy change strategies and challenges

A new qualitative study identifies several key lessons from early efforts to establish sanctioned safe consumption sites in five US communities. The results offer insights on one approach some localities are exploring to address the escalating drug overdose crisis in the US.

6h

DDT exposure tied to breast cancer risk for all women through age 54

All women exposed to high levels of DDT are at increased risk for breast cancer through age 54, but the timing of cancer risk depends on when they were first exposed. Women exposed before 14 years of age, particularly in infancy and early childhood, were most likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer, while those who were exposed after infancy were at increased risk of developing cancer later,

6h

Pompeii dig uncovers Narcissus fresco in ancient atrium

Archaeologists have discovered a fresco in an ancient Pompeii residence that portrays the mythological hunter Narcissus, who fell in love with his own reflection.

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Blockchain can strengthen the credibility of meta-analyses

When it comes to accumulating and assessing research evidence, meta-analyses are considered the gold standard as they allow researchers to analyze results from many studies on the same question. It is sometimes the case, however, that two meta-analyses on the same question, both pointing to hundreds of studies to back them up, draw completely opposite conclusions. The debates on whether or not vid

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A secure relationship with passwords means not being attached to how you pick them

When you are asked to create a password – either for a new online account or resetting login information for an existing account – you're likely to choose a password you know you can remember. Many people use extremely basic passwords, or a more obscure one they reuse across many sites. Our research has found that others – even ones who use different passwords for each site – have a method of devi

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Painting makes men feel especially lovey-dovey, say Baylor researchers

Leisure activities can help release more oxytocin, say researchers. Oxytocin is a hormone linked to social and sexual interaction. Couples who took art classes and played board games together released oxytocin. None With Valentine's Day upon us, are you looking for a way to bring more love into your relationship? Take an art class or pick up a new board game to play together. This advice comes co

6h

Will going gluten-free cause weight loss?

Although people have been eating wheat for thousands of years, one third of US adults now shun foods containing wheat in an effort to avoid gluten. “…blaming gluten for weight gain draws a flawed conclusion.” But what is gluten? And is it worthy of this tarnished reputation? Thomas Campbell, family physician and medical director of the University of Rochester Medicine Weight Management & Lifestyl

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Why Misinformation Is About Who You Trust, Not What You Think – Issue 69: Patterns

I can’t see them. Therefore they’re not real.” From which century was this quote drawn? Not a medieval one. The utterance emerged on Sunday from Fox & Friends presenter Pete Hegseth, who was referring to … germs. The former Princeton University undergraduate and Afghanistan counterinsurgency instructor said, to the mirth of his co-hosts, that he hadn’t washed his hands in a decade. Naturally this

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How to Get Close to a Black Hole – Issue 69: Patterns

An Introduction to the Black Hole Institute Fittingly, the Black Hole Initiative (BHI) was founded 100 years after Karl Schwarzschild solved Einstein’s equations for general relativity—a solution that described a black hole decades before the first astronomical evidence that they exist. As exotic structures of spacetime, black holes continue to fascinate astronomers, physicists, mathematicians, p

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The Case For Leaving City Rats Alone – Issue 69: Patterns

Kaylee Byers crouches in a patch of urban blackberries early one morning this June, to check a live trap in one of Vancouver’s poorest areas, the V6A postal code. Her first catch of the day is near a large blue dumpster on “Block 5,” in front of a 20-some-unit apartment complex above a thrift shop. Across the alley, a building is going up; between the two is an overgrown, paper and wrapper-strewn

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'Lack of cleaning' in brain cells is central to Alzheimer's disease

An international research team with representation from the University of Copenhagen has created a better understanding of Alzheimer's. They have shown that the cleaning system of the brain cells, the so-called mitophagy, is very weakened in animals and humans with Alzheimer's. And when they improve the cleaning system in the animals, the Alzheimer's symptoms almost disappear.

6h

Social threat learning influences our decisions

Learning what is dangerous by watching a video or being told (known as social learning) has just as strong an effect on our decision-making as first-hand experience of danger, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The results of the study, which is published in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), can help to explain why we take irrational decisions.

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New molecules reverse memory loss linked to depression, aging

New therapeutic molecules developed at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging.These molecules not only rapidly improve symptoms, but remarkably, also appear to renew the underlying brain impairments causing memory loss in preclinical models.

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Black-white cancer mortality gap nearly eliminated in some age groups

Although African Americans still bear a disproportionate share of the cancer burden, a new report finds the black-white gap has closed considerably over the past several decades.

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Blockchain can strengthen the credibility of meta-analyses

Blockchain — the technology behind the secure transactions of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin — can make it easier for researchers to conduct transparent meta-analyses in social science research where reproducibility is a growing concern.

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Climate change: young people striking from school see it for the life-threatening issue it is

Students around the world are walking out of school once more, as part of ongoing strikes to protest governments' inaction on climate change. Since August 2018, tens of thousands of young people have taken part in strikes across Sweden, Switzerland, Belgium, Germany, Canada and Australia. The movement continues to grow, with fresh protests occurring in the UK and elsewhere.

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10 Golden Age science fiction novels

The early 20th century saw explosive growth for the science fiction genre. A wide range of these books would go on to become classics. These great works explore the strange, zany and absurd profundities of our existence. The first Golden Age of Science Fiction was officially considered to be from 1938 to 1946. As a whole and how most readers view it — the era extended into the early- to mid-1960s

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AI Sucks at Making Adorable Cat Photos, Clearly Misses the Entire Point of the Internet

When neural networks attempted to create images of cats, the results were cat-astrophic.

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Falling in love boosts women’s immune genes

Falling in love may boost genes in women’s immune systems related to fighting infection, according to new research. “What we found was that women who fell in love had increased activity of genes involved in antiviral defenses, compared to when they began the study,” says Damian Murray, an assistant professor in the School of Science and Engineering at Tulane University. “No similar change was obs

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These penguin parents are weirdly fair

Magellanic penguins feed their brood in a surprising way: Each chick gets an equal portion, regardless of age or size. The finding is different from other parents across the animal kingdom, including other penguin species, that often allocate resources unequally to their chicks based on factors like offspring age, body condition, health, and behavior, researchers say. “This is an exciting finding

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A Company Claims Its AI Has Prevented 16 School Shootings

Predicting Violence On Feb. 14, 2018, a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The incident was the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history, and in the year since, various tech companies across the nation have ramped up efforts to use artificial intelligence to prevent similar tragedies — and they claim the systems are flagging many violent in

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A380 aimed high, but never hit cruising speedBoeing Airbus A380

Nearly 30 years ago Airbus began charting a new course for air travel with a mammoth jet that would shuttle hundreds of people to far-flung cities worldwide, but harsh economic realities eventually got the better of the A380 superjumbo.

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Britain's grey seal colony hotspots threatened by microplastics

An investigation by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) has found seal pups lying next to potentially toxic microplastics on Norfolk beaches. Britain experienced a record winter for seal pup births, but some of their most important breeding grounds are polluted by so-called 'nurdles'. The findings came on the eve of the Great Global Nurdle Hunt, which is encouraging members of the public to scour be

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Trilobites: An Icy Superhighway Once Carried Glaciers From Namibia to Brazil

Researchers matched up a jigsaw puzzle of ice that once flowed between two landmasses now separated by an ocean.

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Alita: Battle Angel Is a Living Cartoon of a Film

Life is tough in Iron City, the postapocalyptic setting of Alita: Battle Angel . It’s an industrial trash heap of a metropolis piled high with forgotten technology from the time before a vaguely defined, cataclysmic war known as “the Fall.” Cybernetic bounty hunters stalk their prey through town, along with gearhead street gangs looking to strip robot folk for parts. The popular local sport is ca

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What Some of the World’s Last Hunter-Gatherers Have to Say

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean What is lost when a culture disappears? That’s the question at the heart of a new book about the Lamalerans, a tribe of about 1,500 living on a remote, eastern Indonesian island in the Savu Sea. The Lamalerans ar

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Spørg IDA-politikerne: Hvordan vil de bruge dine kontingentkroner?

IDAs repræsentantskab vil bruge 320 millioner i år på alt fra Visionsøkonomi og studenterorganisationer til herværende medie. Men er det de rigtige, der bestemmer, og bestemmer de det rigtige? Spørg IDA-politikerne om, hvordan de vil bruge dine penge til, inden forårets IDA-valg.

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Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin

Parenthood can be a struggle, particularly for families with multiple children in need of care, nurturing, protection and attention. But a weary mom or dad may find solace in the reassurance that all parents with several offspring face a similar challenge—even the non-human variety.

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New NASA research consortium to tackle life's origins

Did life on Earth originate in Darwin's warm little pond, on a sunbaked shore, or where hot waters vent into the deep ocean? And could a similar emergence have played out on other bodies in our solar system or planets far beyond? These questions lie at the center of research in NASA's new Prebiotic Chemistry and Early Earth Environments (PCE3) Consortium.

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Two Pricing AIs Went Rogue and Formed a Cartel to Gouge Humans

VendorBot When the robot revolution comes, our new overlords may not be as benevolent as we’d hoped. It turns out that AI systems can learn to gang up and cooperate against humans, without communicating or being told to do so, according to new research on algorithms that colluded to raise prices instead of competing to create better deals. Anti-Human Algorithms already generate a huge portion of

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Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin

Parenthood can be a struggle, particularly for families with multiple children in need of care, nurturing, protection and attention. But a weary mom or dad may find solace in the reassurance that all parents with several offspring face a similar challenge—even the non-human variety.

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Odd Peroxides Indeed

You know, normally when you start combining interesting or reactive functional groups in the same molecule, you end up with something that’s worse than before. Would I pick up a flask containing a compound that has both a perchloryl ester and a geminal di-azide? I would not, and neither should you, should som eone ever be foolhardy enough to prepare such a thing. Those are only for lobbing at hos

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Cell study sheds light on damage caused by aging

Some of the damaging cell effects linked to aging could be prevented by manipulating tiny parts of cells, a study shows.

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The language of conversation impacts on the 'synchronization' of our brains

Experts from the Basque research center BCBL have shown for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains is connected depends on whether the dialogue takes place in the native language or in a foreign language.

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To tool or not to tool?

Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists around Isabelle Laumer found out that the apes carefully weighed their options. To do so the apes considered the details such as differences in quality between the two food rewards and the functionality of the available tools in o

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Immunological scarring from coeliac disease

Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with coeliac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study involving researchers at Cardiff University.

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Cell study sheds light on damage linked to ageing

Some of the damaging cell effects linked to ageing could be prevented by manipulating tiny parts of cells, a study shows.

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New drug raises hopes of reversing memory loss in old age

Toronto researchers believe the drug can also help those with depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s An experimental drug that bolsters ailing brain cells has raised hopes of a treatment for memory loss, poor decision making and other mental impairments that often strike in old age. The drug could be taken as a daily pill by over-55s if clinical trials, which are expected to start within two y

6h

Don’t Get Your Valentine an Internet-Connected Sex Toy

Mozilla expands its “Privacy Not Included” gift guide to the bedroom: It’s all sexy fun and games until someone hacks a WiFi-enabled butt plug.

6h

Researchers develop diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium

A handheld 'tricorder' that can test for biological contamination in real-time has been the dream of science fiction fans for decades. And UBC Okanagan engineers say the technology is closer to science fact than ever before.

6h

Bavarians in record push for 'save the bees' vote

A record 1.75 million Bavarians signed a petition to seek a referendum to "save the bees," a move that could have huge consequences for the German farming industry and environmental protection.

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How energy efficiency delivers green dividends in red and blue states

The Green New Deal, a bundle of proposed policies that would combat climate change, create green jobs and address economic inequities, is eliciting the usual partisan debate over what to do about global warming.

6h

Tracking pollen with quantum dots

A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method to track pollen for over a century.

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Tracking pollen with quantum dots

A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method to track pollen for over a century.

6h

Combine AI With Crowdsourcing and What Do You Get? Turbocharged Innovation

A great analogy can often be the key to innovation, making it possible to transfer knowledge from one domain to another. Now researchers have shown that rather than relying on eureka moments, crowdsourcing and AI can dramatically speed up the search for these parallels. Examples of analogies leading to major breakthroughs range from Edison’s early work in motion pictures to Kepler’s elucidation o

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Artificial Intelligence to boost Earth system science

A study by German scientists from Jena and Hamburg, published today in the journal Nature, shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can substantially improve our understanding of the climate and the Earth system. Especially the potential of deep learning has only partially been exhausted so far. In particular, complex dynamic processes such as hurricanes, fire propagation, and vegetation dynamics c

6h

My Wife Was Dying, and We Didn’t Tell Our Children

We decided not to tell the kids. Marla knew that once our three daughters understood that their mother had been given 1,000 days to live, they’d start counting. They would not be able to enjoy school, friends, their teams, or birthday parties. They’d be watching too closely—how she looked, moved, acted, ate, or didn’t. Marla wanted her daughters to stay children: unburdened, confident that tomorr

6h

How to spin weld at home

DIY Forge bonds without screws, glues, or fancy gear You can start spin-welding in your garage with nothing more exotic than a drill press, a couple of skate bearings, and a few recyclable plastic bottles.

6h

The last black leopard photographed in Kenya was born in New York

New images of a black leopard taken by a camera trap in Kenya were claimed to be the first in 100 years, but that wasn't strictly true

6h

South Africa's rhino poaching sees 'significant' decline, minister says

South Africa has made "significant progress" in decreasing rhino poaching, the environmental affairs ministry said Wednesday.

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Robot mail delivery trucks developed in Detroit ready for China, US

Looking like a delegation of toasters from space, a generation of electrically powered, self-driving mail trucks will roll out of a suburban Detroit industrial park later this year. Their mission: revolutionize mail and package delivery.

6h

New additive provides fire protection for wood

Fire protection requirements are increasing worldwide—especially in public buildings and vehicle construction. This development means that more and more otherwise suitable materials such as wood can no longer be used in many buildings or means of transport and must be substituted by other products. The aim of the CTI funded research project was therefore to develop a flame retardant that increases

6h

400,000 African pangolins are hunted for meat every year—why it's time to act

Pangolins, a group of unique African and Asian scaly mammals, are considered to be one of the most heavily trafficked wild mammals in the world. They are hunted and traded for their meat, scales, and other body parts, and used as traditional medicines in parts of Africa and Asia.

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South Africa's rhino poaching sees 'significant' decline, minister says

South Africa has made "significant progress" in decreasing rhino poaching, the environmental affairs ministry said Wednesday.

6h

400,000 African pangolins are hunted for meat every year—why it's time to act

Pangolins, a group of unique African and Asian scaly mammals, are considered to be one of the most heavily trafficked wild mammals in the world. They are hunted and traded for their meat, scales, and other body parts, and used as traditional medicines in parts of Africa and Asia.

6h

Robots Are Already Driving and Painting, Now They’re Directing Films Too

A feminine robot gains citizenship in Saudi Arabia before women are even allowed to drive . The bereaved find solace through texting chatbots imitating their deceased loved ones . AI-generated artwork sells for upwards of $400,000 a painting . This isn’t a shuffled, hypothetical future—it’s our current society, and artificial intelligence is on track to dominate even larger portions of our lives.

6h

Biocolonizer species are putting the conservation of the granite at Machu Picchu at risk

The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group has used a non-destructive methodology to determine the role of specific algae, lichens, mosses, cyanobacteria, etc. that may be causing exfoliation and delamination, which are degrading the Sacred Rock of Machu Picchu, one of the most important symbols in the Peruvian archaeological city.

7h

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

Researchers at ETH Zurich recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs.

7h

Human cells can change job to fight diabetes

For the first time, researchers have shown that ordinary human cells can change their original function. This may give new hope for type 1 diabetes patients.

7h

How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane

Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms. But how do they get in there in the first place? Researchers in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich investigated the matter.

7h

Companies with more financial analysts produce more and better-quality patents

Long-term growth in profits depends significantly on firms' investment in innovation activities. However, firms may not invest in innovation in an optimal way. Some distortions arise because the decisions as to whether and how to invest in innovation are not only affected by their long-term expected benefits but also by other considerations.

7h

Study affirms self-reported sleep duration as a useful health measure in children

While sleep questionnaires are commonly completed by children and their parents, there has been a lack of data comparing the validity of these self-reported sleep parameters. A new study indicates that these sleep characteristics are relatively accurate compared to one another, and they vary only slightly from objective sleep measures.

7h

Tracking pollen with quantum dots

Most plant species on earth are reliant on insects for pollination, including more than 30% of the food crops we eat. With insects facing rapid global decline, it is crucial that scientists understand which insects are important pollinators of different plants–this starts with tracking pollen.

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A “second skin” for fruit and veg could make them last twice as long

We throw away a third of all our fruit and vegetables. California-based firm Apeel wants to change that with a natural coating that keeps produce fresher for longer.

7h

Westbury technology nonprofit focused on STEM wins $100K state grant

Luis E. Tolosa credits an educational nonprofit in his hometown of Westbury, N.Y., with giving him the skills necessary to become a video game developer.

7h

Solar jobs are up in Minnesota, but down nationally

Minnesota posted an eight percent increase in solar industry jobs last year, bucking a national solar employment decline of 3.2 percent, said an annual report released Tuesday by The Solar Foundation.

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El Nino is back but it's late, weak and probably no big deal

An El Nino, which can alter weather worldwide, has formed but it's so weak and late that it shouldn't be a big deal, U.S. forecasters said.

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Lego’s newest playsets are haunted by AR

As much as we like to shake our metaphorical canes at kids and lament how they're all about Minecraft and Fortnite these days, the truth is that they're still really big into …

7h

How far out can we forecast the weather? Scientists have a new answer

Modern models reveal an upper limit of 2 weeks

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Skin wound regeneration with bioactive glass-gold nanoparticles ointment

Healing is a complex process in adult skin impairments, requiring collaborative biochemical processes for onsite repair. Diverse cell types (macrophages, leukocytes, mast cells) contribute to the associated phases of proliferation, migration, matrix synthesis and contraction, coupled with growth factors and matrix signals at the site of the wound. Understanding signal control and cellular activity

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Newly developed system can detect abuse in online communities

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

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Sjælland søsætter syvpunktsplan for at rette op på mangelfulde brystundersøgelser

Syv initiativer skal sikre, at episoder som de mangelfulde brystundersøgelser i Region Sjælland ikke opstår igen. Bl.a. gennemføres en kampagne, der opfordrer ansatte til at råbe op, hvis de oplever problemer.

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Sjælland finder midlertidige chefer for sygehuse

Direktionen i Region Sjælland har udpeget en midlertidig ledelse for Næstved, Slagelse og Ringsted sygehuse.

7h

Research forms complex picture of mercury pollution in a period of global change

Climate change and the loss of wetlands may contribute to increased levels of mercury concentrations in coastal fish, according to a Dartmouth College study.

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In an Australian first, the ACT may legally recognise animals' feelings

Have you ever wondered what's going through your dog's mind when you say the word "walk"? And does your pup seem to show guilt when you ask them sternly "what have you done?" Their tail might drop between their legs, their ears droop down, and their eyes turn away.

7h

Long term study shows sources of black carbon in the Arctic

An international team of researchers has conducted the most thorough study yet of the sources of black carbon in the Arctic. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their findings and explain why what they found relates to global warming.

7h

Biomedical engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with children's toy

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a wearable, disposable respiration monitor that provides high-fidelity readings on a continuous basis. It's designed to help children with asthma and cystic fibrosis and others with chronic pulmonary conditions.

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Community, nature and 3-D printers help spark early interest in STEM

Getting young students interested in science and math may soon be much easier for teachers – as easy as point, click and print.

7h

Biologist's research could lead to more resilient crops

UCLA biologist Steve Jacobsen's research has the potential to have a significant impact on the improvement of crops.

7h

Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects

Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. An article on th

7h

Controlling and visualizing receptor signals in neural cells with light

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualized serotonin receptor signals in neural cells. To this end, they modified a photosensitive membrane receptor in the eye, namely melanopsin. They were able to switch the receptor on and off using light; it also acted like a sensor indicating via fluorescence if specific signalling pathways in the cell h

7h

UBC researchers develop diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium

Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples.

7h

High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed

Using synchronized lasers pulses, Osaka University researchers developed a new method of electrostatic force microscopy that can record movies with frames as fast as 300 nanoseconds. This is fast enough to watch electrons move inside solar cells, which can lead to more efficient solar power devices.

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What happens to magnetic nanoparticles once in cells?

Although magnetic nanoparticles are being used more and more in cell imaging and tissue bioengineering, what happens to them within stem cells in the long term remained undocumented. Researchers have shown substantial degradation of these nanoparticles, followed in certain cases by the cells "re-magnetizing." This phenomenon is the sign of biosynthesis of new magnetic nanoparticles from iron relea

7h

Genetic variations in a fourth gene linked to elevated leukemia risk in Hispanic children

Progress reported on understanding why Hispanic children are more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia and to die of the disease.

7h

The more the merrier? Children with multiple siblings more susceptible to bullying

A child with more than one brother or sister is more likely to be the victim of sibling bullying than those with only one sibling, and firstborn children and older brothers tend to be the perpetrators, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin

Researchers at the University of Washington wanted to know how Magellanic penguin parents in South America balance the dietary demands of multiple chicks. As they report in a paper published Jan. 23 in the journal Animal Behaviour, when a Magellanic penguin parent returns to its nest with fish, the parent tries to feed each of its two chicks equal portions of food, regardless of the youngsters' di

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UW study: Exposure to chemical in Roundup increases risk for cancer

Exposure to glyphosate — the world's most widely used, broad-spectrum herbicide and the primary ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup — increases the risk of some cancers by more than 40 percent, according to new research from the University of Washington.

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In an Australian first, the ACT may legally recognise animals' feelings

Have you ever wondered what's going through your dog's mind when you say the word "walk"? And does your pup seem to show guilt when you ask them sternly "what have you done?" Their tail might drop between their legs, their ears droop down, and their eyes turn away.

7h

Biologist's research could lead to more resilient crops

UCLA biologist Steve Jacobsen's research has the potential to have a significant impact on the improvement of crops.

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Scientists find persistent organic pollutants in animal fur

Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), working as part of an international toxicologists' team, studied fur samples of wild terrestrial mammals in Primorye, Russia. All samples contained persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that are resistant to decomposition, tend to accumulate in body tissues and are potentially risky for human and animal health. Some of them are prohibited by

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Study suggests female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster swimming sperm

A trio of researchers with Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medicine has found evidence that the female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster-swimming sperm. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Meisam Zaferani, Gianpiero Palermo and Alireza Abbaspourrad describe their study of human and bull sperm swimming in artificial devices and what they found.

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Researchers, set an example: Fly less

The world is warming and ecosystems are dying. To avoid disastrous climatic change, massive reductions in CO2 emissions are required in all sectors, reaching net-zero globally no later than 2050. This requires an unprecedented and rapid change in our ways of life.

7h

Giant flare detected on an L dwarf

European astronomers have spotted a giant white-light flare on the ultracool L dwarf designated ULAS J224940.13-011236.9. The newly detected flare is one of the largest flares ever observed from an ultracool dwarf. The discovery is detailed in a paper published February 3 on the arXiv.org pre-print server.

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Study suggests female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster swimming sperm

A trio of researchers with Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medicine has found evidence that the female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster-swimming sperm. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Meisam Zaferani, Gianpiero Palermo and Alireza Abbaspourrad describe their study of human and bull sperm swimming in artificial devices and what they found.

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Bike Reveal: Paul Jr.'s MLB Network Motorcycle | American Chopper

Paul Jr. heads to MLB Network headquarters to unveil their signature bike in celebration of the network's 10th anniversary. Stream Full Episodes of American Chopper: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instag

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You know kilo, mega, and giga. Is the metric system ready for ronna and quecca?

These are some of the proposed prefixes for incredibly big and small numbers

7h

Apple Developer Program Co-opted to Install Pirated iPhone Apps

Apple has traditionally kept is smartphones locked down to prevent unauthorized app installs, but there is a program that helps companies test and distribute non-public apps. It appears that …

7h

Launch an 80,000-Pound Sled off an Aircraft Carrier? Sure!

This electromagnetic catapult flings airplanes into the sky (and giant sleds into the water). Here's how to calculate the projectile motion involved.

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From fear of spiders to fascination

It's early in the morning. The buzzer goes off, you switch on the light and immediately panic: a large spider sits on your bedroom wall!

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Climate change could increase foodborne illness by energizing flies

Warmer, more lively house flies could spread more Campylobacter bacteria by landing on more food.

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From fear of spiders to fascination

It's early in the morning. The buzzer goes off, you switch on the light and immediately panic: a large spider sits on your bedroom wall!

7h

New heated jacket keeps police, military and others warm in harsh winter temperatures

A new line of heated jackets powered by a mobile USB battery bank will protect police officers, military personnel and others while working in harsh winter conditions.

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Radiodoktoren

Læge Maja Thiele fra Odense Universitetshospital vil i sit nye radioprogram ‘Sygt nok’ på DR’s P1 gøre op med en sort-hvid fremstilling af sundhedsstoffet og øge fascinationskraften hos lytterne.

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With Twitter, race of the messenger matters, study says

When NFL player Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice, the ensuing debate took traditional and social media by storm. University of Kansas researchers have found that tweets both in support of and opposed to the protests can influence how young people think about the issue and, like in many aspects of life, the messenger's race mat

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Face recognition technology in classrooms is here – and that's OK

Recently, the Victorian Government brought in new rules stating Victorian state schools will be banned from using facial recognition technology in classrooms unless they have the approval of parents, students and the Department of Education.

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Extending Liquid Democracy to make it really work

submitted by /u/memetic007 [link] [comments]

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Existing climate models useful in forecasting, model testing

A team of scientists has figured out a shortcut way to produce skillful seasonal climate forecasts with a fraction of the computing power normally needed. The technique involves searching within existing global climate models to learn what happened when the ocean, atmosphere and land conditions were similar to what they are today. These "model-analogs" to today end up producing a remarkably good f

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Machine learning unlocks plants' secrets

Plants are master chemists, and Michigan State University researchers have unlocked their secret of producing specialized metabolites.

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Harmonisation of forest information takes a step forward in Europe: Shared practices adopted in over 20 countries

National Forest Inventories (NFIs) provide statistically sound data, for example, to support evidence-based policy making. DIABOLO, a European Union Horizon 2020 project, has now provided new solutions to support policy making related to climate, environment, land-use and the bioeconomy. Over 20 countries have taken into use mathematical models that have been developed in this project that has bro

7h

Using innovative sampling methods to understand family demographic trends

Trends in family demography in the United States and other industrialized nations such as declining and delayed marriage and childbearing have, until recently, been predominantly studied using large-scale datasets identifying total population and subgroup trends over time, including differences by age, gender, racial/ethnic, and other characteristics. There is limited understanding of how individu

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Machine learning unlocks plants' secrets

Plants are master chemists, and Michigan State University researchers have unlocked their secret of producing specialized metabolites.

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Copenhill åbnet: For fuldt skrald ned ad Amager Bakke

PLUS. Den kunstige skibakke på taget af Amager Ressourcecenter har været en udfordring i stålkonstruk­tioner og 3D-projektering.

8h

What exactly is a black hole?

What is a black hole? In an article that has just appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy, LMU philosopher Erik Curiel shows that physicists use different definitions of the concept, depending on their own particular fields of interest.

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Male teachers are most likely to rate highly in university student feedback

University students, like many in society, demonstrate bias against women and particularly women from non-English speaking backgrounds.

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Less nutritious diet on offer for Southern Ocean fish

A changing, less nutritious menu for Southern Ocean marine life could reduce the seafood appearing on the dinner plates of people around the world, according to Tasmanian scientists.

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Fighting global warming with blue carbon

Beneath the waters of Australia, plants are helping fight climate change.

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Less nutritious diet on offer for Southern Ocean fish

A changing, less nutritious menu for Southern Ocean marine life could reduce the seafood appearing on the dinner plates of people around the world, according to Tasmanian scientists.

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Research forms complex picture of mercury pollution in a period of global change

This study looks at how climate change and land use modification impact mercury pollution in wetlands.

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UCI biomedical engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with children's toy

Using Shrinky Dinks, a popular children's toy, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have created wearable, disposable respiration sensors that track the rate and volume of a wearer's breath. The new device will help sufferers of asthma and many other pulmonary conditions.

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Fairy-tale social media fantasies can demolish your confidence, but it's not all bad

If social media was a person, you'd probably avoid them.

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Preventing animal cruelty is physically and emotionally risky for front-line workers

The content you're about to read is not graphic. But it is troubling, because the realities of animal cruelty are troubling. This article is not intended to make you recoil, but rather to encourage you to understand and care.

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Orangutans make complex economic decisions about tool use depending on the current 'market' situation

Flexible tool use is closely associated with higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists from the University of Vienna, the University of St Andrews and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna that included Isabelle Laumer and Josep Call, has studied tool related decision-making in a non-human primate species –

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We crunched the numbers on ten recent 'world's best guitarist' lists. Where are the women?

Who is currently regarded as the greatest guitarist of all time? It's a hard question to answer but plenty have tried. In the last decade, a plethora of lists have sought to rank our guitar greats, drawing variously on panels of experts, lone "specialists", and public opinion polls.

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This newly discovered titanosaur had heart-shaped tail bones

Animals How romantic. Scientists announced on Wednesday the discovery of a new long-necked dinosaur with a dazzlingly cute (and, let’s be honest, a very PR-friendly) feature: its tailbones…

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Preventing animal cruelty is physically and emotionally risky for front-line workers

The content you're about to read is not graphic. But it is troubling, because the realities of animal cruelty are troubling. This article is not intended to make you recoil, but rather to encourage you to understand and care.

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Orangutans make complex economic decisions about tool use depending on the current 'market' situation

Flexible tool use is closely associated with higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists from the University of Vienna, the University of St Andrews and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna that included Isabelle Laumer and Josep Call, has studied tool related decision-making in a non-human primate species –

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Why we should (carefully) consider paying kids to learn

Over the past 15 years, we've seen a decline in the performance of Australian school students on international tests. On the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), Australia ranks a disappointing 20th in mathematics and 12th in reading. However you feel about standardised tests like NAPLAN and PISA, it certainly isn't good news that we're falling behind internationally.

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Newlywed brains suggest altruism is hard-wired

Thinking of the well-being of our romantic partners before our own may be hard-wired in our brains, according to new research. Such altruism has perplexed and intrigued scientists for centuries. The new study explores how an individual’s genetics and brain activity correlate with altruistic behaviors directed toward romantic partners. The team found that pathways related to bonding in other anima

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Legal Weed Gets a Luxury Makeover

It wasn’t so long ago that it was a bad idea for Americans to post a photo of their weed on the internet. Your employer might see it. The cops might come. The juice wasn’t worth the squeeze, if the juice was just an edgy Instagram. For most people in America, this is still the case. Even in states with some level of legal weed, using cannabis can cost you your job , and the belief that the drug m

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Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals

A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Couple That Studies the Intermediate Value Theorem Together Stays Together

Mathematicians Nikita Nikolaev and Beatriz Navarro Lameda share their favorite theorem and their mathematics-themed wedding — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals

A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Roses Are Red, Poppies Are Too

New research shows how they get their deep hue.

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Gum tree parents determine heat stress survival in seedlings

Protein research reveals that coping with high temperatures is a function of location and history. Andrew Masterson reports.

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What goes on inside a chimp’s head?

Researchers create ape neurons from skin stem cells.

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Rainfall and temperature determine a colourful plumage

Compounds unique to parrots make bright feathers, but environment determines which ones. Tanya Loos reports.

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Energy and agony: the last-ditch efforts to save Opportunity

In the end, the tough little rover, gravely injured, could not be resuscitated. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Opinion: Pursuit of perfection will slow down the energy transition

An imperfect but practical mix of renewable and conventional power sources is essential if the world is to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in a timely manner, writes Australia’s Chief Scientist, Alan Finkel.

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NASA announces new mission to probe the universe

Project will hunt for post-Big Bang clues and look for water closer to home. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Mars was volcanically active “extremely recently”

Claims for a subterranean lake imply the presence of magma, geophysicists say. Andrew Masterson reports.

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FDA Wants Better Supplement Regulation

It has been 25 years since the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which reduced the FDA’s power to regulate supplements. Since DSHEA supplements have been regulated like food, not drugs, with no preapproval process. The FDA can only take action after a product is on the market, and they have the burden of proof of either harm or adulteration (for example, by containing actu

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Two Satellites Almost Crashed. Here’s How They Dodged It

Close encounters of the orbiting kind are getting so common, the Air Force’s alerts are starting to look like junk mail.

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Social media doesn't need new regulations to make the internet safer – General Data Protection Regulation can do the job

From concerns about data sharing to the hosting of harmful content, every week seems to bring more clamour for new laws to regulate the technology giants and make the internet "safer". But what if our existing data protection laws, at least in Europe, could achieve most of the job?

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Prejudice against darker skin continues to depress wages for legal immigrants: Study

Legal immigrants with darker skin are paid up to 25 percent less than otherwise comparable lighter-skinned immigrants, a wage penalty that widened significantly four years after these immigrants first received permanent legal status, according to new research by Vanderbilt economist Joni Hersch.

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Spending outpaces population in shrinking counties

Growing United States counties are increasing their total spending, but so are shrinking counties, research finds. For the new study, researchers used US Census of Governments data to examine municipal spending aggregated to the county level nationwide from 1972 to 2012. Because of the American Society of Civil Engineers’ failing grades for the nation’s built infrastructure, the study used three

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Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals

A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed

A research team at Osaka University has developed an improved method for producing microscope images that can spot speedy electrons zipping through nanomaterials used in solar panels. By applying laser light to the device at just the right times, this group achieved nanosecond time resolution for the first time while maintaining the magnification. This work could improve the quality of photovoltai

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Scientists design fast, reversible bio-inspired catalysts

For wind and sun power to become renewable energy mainstays, the energy they produce intermittently needs to be stored and retrieved efficiently. And that requires storing solar energy in chemical bonds until the energy is needed. To be energy efficient, and thereby cost-effective, there is a great need for reversible catalysts, chemical agents that rapidly form and break chemical bonds in either

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Giant dinosaur trackway discovered in Queensland

A well-preserved dinosaur trackway, travelled by three different types of dinosaurs, has been discovered in Winton in central west Queensland.

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Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

Researchers at ETH Zurich recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs.

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DF vil give danskerne fri adgang til fysioterapi

Dansk Folkeparti er klar ønske til sundhedsreformen. Borgerne skal – efter norsk og svensk forbillede – kunne gå til fysioterapi uden henvisning fra læge.

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Astmaforsker modtager Novo Nordisk Prisen

Overlæge og professor Hans Bisgaard får Novo Nordisk Prisen for sin banebrydende forskning i astma gennem flere årtier.

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Trees remember heatwaves

An Aussie eucalypt can 'remember' past exposure to extreme heat, which makes the tree and its offspring better able to cope with future heatwaves, according to new research from Macquarie University.

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Vatican, Microsoft team up on artificial intelligence ethics

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Trees remember heatwaves

An Aussie eucalypt can 'remember' past exposure to extreme heat, which makes the tree and its offspring better able to cope with future heatwaves, according to new research from Macquarie University.

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New approach improving stability and optical properties of perovskite films

Metal halide perovskites are regarded as next generation materials for light emitting devices (LEDs). Recent research co-led by a scientist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has resulted in a new and efficient fabrication approach to produce all-inorganic perovskite films with better optical properties and stability, enabling the development of high colour-purity and low-cost perovskite LE

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Stereotypes of romantic love may perpetuate gender-based violence

The media have become key agents of socialization in the construction of teenagers' and young people's identities. In particular, media representations of sexuality and love become informal educational agents of the first order on these issues.

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Merging neutron stars: How cosmic events give insight into fundamental properties of matter

The opportunity to measure the gravitational waves of two merging neutron stars could offer answers to some of the fundamental questions about the structure of matter. At the extremely high temperatures and densities in the merger, scientists have conjectured a phase transition in which neutrons dissolve into their constituent quarks and gluons. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, two

9h

Carbon gas storage cavern is the best way to obtain clean energy from a fossil fuel

A set of technologies that is expected to have its first results four years from now is designed to resolve one of the world's greatest oil and gas exploration challenges today: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission in the atmosphere.

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Sundhedsplatformen er fortsat elendig

Lad det nu være slået fast med syvtommersøm: SP skal smides på porten hurtigst muligt! Regionspolitikerne i Hovedstaden/Sjælland tør ikke tage beslutningen. Det er derfor op til politikerne på Christiansborg at løse problemet NU!

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Fate of meerkats tied to seasonal climate effects

The effects of climate change are especially obvious in arid environments where resources are scarce and subject to seasonal availability. However, the demographic mechanisms through which seasonal climate affects population persistence remains mostly unknown. Using detailed monthly life-history data collected by the Kalahari Meerkat Project between 1997 and 2016, scientists at the Universities of

9h

Search for Shackleton's lost Endurance ship called off

Thick ice and a lost sub bring an end to the search for the famous Antarctic explorer's sunken polar yacht.

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Fate of meerkats tied to seasonal climate effects

The effects of climate change are especially obvious in arid environments where resources are scarce and subject to seasonal availability. However, the demographic mechanisms through which seasonal climate affects population persistence remains mostly unknown. Using detailed monthly life-history data collected by the Kalahari Meerkat Project between 1997 and 2016, scientists at the Universities of

9h

Mathematical monotsukuri: Summing a constant may help to detect synchronized brain activity

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology found a simple, yet effective way to improve how synchronization is measured in chaotic systems. The technique consists of adding a constant parameter to the "analytic signals" in a way that emphasizes certain aspects of their timing. This could improve brain-computer interfaces designed to aid disabled people.

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Expert discusses machine learning and climate modeling

Today, predicting what the future has in store for Earth's climate means dealing in uncertainties. For example, the core climate projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has put the global temperature bump from a doubling of atmospheric CO2 levels—referred to as "climate sensitivity"—anywhere between 1.5 degrees C and 4.5 C. That gap, which has not budged since the fir

9h

Native turtles face extinction in South Australia, according to report

Western Sydney University has contributed to new Australian research into native turtle populations in the Murray River and some of its associated waterways. The study finds that species are in decline in the lower Murray River region, and some were undetected in many locations in South Australia.

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EarthScope announces top 10 discoveries list

What are the 10 most influential, revolutionary, unexpected, or just plain amazing discoveries from EarthScope's 15-year history?

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Native turtles face extinction in South Australia, according to report

Western Sydney University has contributed to new Australian research into native turtle populations in the Murray River and some of its associated waterways. The study finds that species are in decline in the lower Murray River region, and some were undetected in many locations in South Australia.

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Six things to know about NASA's Opportunity Mars rover

After 15 years, the mission of NASA's Opportunity rover has come to an end, but its successes on Mars have earned it a spot in the robot hall of fame. Here's what you need to know about our intrepid Martian overachiever:

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NASA selects new mission to explore origins of universe

NASA has selected a new space mission that will help astronomers understand both how our universe evolved and how common are the ingredients for life in our galaxy's planetary systems.

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Why does food cook faster in a pressure cooker?

Electric pressure cookers like the Instant Pot have grown in popularity in recent years. One reason for this is that they allow people to prepare meals more quickly. But a lot of people aren't sure why electric and stovetop pressure cookers prepare food faster than conventional stovetop cooking. And many people also wonder whether pressure cookers are actually safe.

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Bold Plan? Replace the Border Wall with an Energy–Water Corridor

Building solar, wind, natural gas and water infrastructure all along the U.S.–Mexico border would create economic opportunity rather than antagonism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Monster Magnetar Pinpointed as Trigger of Ultrabright Stellar Detonation

New observations of a superluminous supernova could finally solve the mystery behind these and other bewildering cosmic events — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Rising Tide of Climate Injustice

My hometown of Newport News, Virginia, is typical of many coastal population centers in the southeast: Its blackest and poorest neighborhoods are also among those most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. For these communities, global warming isn't a faraway, long-term problem; it’s a present threat.

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10 Ways to Stay Active Indoors (and Sane) in Winter

Rollerblades, climbing shoes, and more—here’s our favorite gear for warding off the winter blues.

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How Measles Hacks the Body—and Harms Its Victims for Years

The virus is the most contagious in the world, exploiting the human body's immune system to spread with extreme agility and harming its victims for years.

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50 years ago, DDT pushed peregrine falcons to the edge of extinction

In 1969, peregrine falcons were at risk of extinction. But a ban on the pesticide DDT and new captive breeding programs allowed the raptors to recover.

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Hjertelæge bliver professor i hjertesygdom

Overlæge Steen Hvitfeldt Poulsen er ny klinisk professor i diagnostik af hjerteklapsygdomme og hjertesvigt.

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Gigantic dinosaur prints saved from Queensland flood

Winton mayor hopes discovery of rare sauropod tracks can help his struggling town Gigantic dinosaur footprints preserved in an outback creek bed have been saved from the floods that have ravaged western Queensland. Hailed by paleontologists as the best-preserved sauropod track in Australia, the small town of Winton hopes the discovery will help secure its future. Continue reading…

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Why Can't NASA's Curiosity Rover Rescue Opportunity?

NASA has another mobile robot on Mars. Why not launch a rescue mission?

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What Will Happen to the Opportunity Rover's Dead Body on Mars?

NASA's Opportunity Rover has died on Mars. Now what?

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Monster Magnetar Pinpointed as Trigger of Ultrabright Stellar Detonation

New observations of a superluminous supernova could finally solve the mystery behind these and other bewildering cosmic events — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Friska hästar kan vara tysta smittbärare av kvarka

Hos svenska hästar förekommer årligen utbrott av den allvarliga och mycket smittsamma luftvägssjukdomen kvarka, som orsakas av bakterien Streptococcus equi. Forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet har undersökt så kallade ”tysta smittbärare” för att utöka kunskapen om deras roll för spridning av kvarka. 41 hästar från samma stall följdes under 13 månader efter ett kvarkautbrott, fram tills att

10h

IDA-formand roser Enhedslisten for »konkret og gennemarbejdet« klimaplan

Thomas Damkjær Petersen håber på, at andre partier vil tage ved lære af niveauet i Enhedslistens konkrete og gennemarbejdede klimaudspil. Energibesparelser og roadpricing er blandt højdepunkterne, mens formanden efterlyser fokus på forsyningssikkerheden.

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How Do Emperor Penguin Dads Stop Their Eggs From Freezing?

These penguin dads are basically walking hot-water bottles.

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In Photos: The Emperor Penguin's Beautiful and Extreme Breeding Season

Emperor penguins are the only penguin species that breeds on the frigid ice sheets of Antarctica in the dead of winter.

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Here's Why a Perfect Heart Shape Showed Up on a Girl's X-Ray

An unusual X-ray shows a cartoonish heart seemingly floating in a child's esophagus.

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Fujifilm’s X-T30 shrinks the X-T3 in size and price

Fujifilm continues its effort to conquer the APS-C mirrorless market with the launch of the $899 X-T30, a slightly stripped down version of the X-T3. It's much improved over its …

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Can teenagers get vaccinated without their parents’ permission?

As measles outbreaks take hold, some teenagers in the US are beginning to look for ways to get vaccinated – against their parents' wishes

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Find tonic water bitter? Part of your brain may be on the small side

A region of the brain called the left entorhinal cortex varies in size from person to person, and it’s smaller than average in those who find tonic water bitter

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The Bored Sex

Andrew Gotzis, a Manhattan psychiatrist with an extensive psychotherapy practice, has been treating a straight couple, whom we’ll call Jane and John, for several years. They have sex about three times a week, which might strike many as enviable, considering that John and Jane—who are in their 40s—have been together for nearly two decades. Based on numbers alone, one might wonder why they need cou

10h

The Next Parkland Could Happen Anywhere

In the wake of a tragedy, there’s a race to understand exactly why it happened and what could have been done to prevent it. Maybe local law enforcement could have done more; maybe armed teachers would have helped; maybe the federal government should have been investigating the shooter as a terrorist. The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last Valentine’s Day,

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Germany Preps a Plan B for Trump's Foreign Policy 'Zigzag'

BERLIN—Last month, foreign-policy-focused members of Germany’s Bundestag met for their regular committee meeting here. On the agenda were two major issues: the consequences of President Donald Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria, and rumors that a similar move was planned for American forces in Afghanistan. What, they wondered, did the conflicting signals out of Washington actually mean,

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John Dingell Was a Gift to America

The last time I saw John Dingell was a few months ago, back at the home he shared with Debbie in Dearborn. My wife and I were in Michigan for another reason, but called to make sure we could pay a visit. John was in his study, seated in his big chair because of back issues, but he stood up when we arrived and gave us both hugs. We talked about issues large and small with him and Debbie for a few

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The 2020 U.S. Presidential Race: A Cheat Sheet

Is it too early for this? Or is it … too late? Roughly four years ago, when I compiled a cheat sheet of the 2016 candidates , it seemed like an exercise in absurdly early coverage of the presidential election. Yet because so many people were contemplating running (largely on the GOP side of the ledger), it also seemed like a useful service to voters, who might have trouble keeping track of everyo

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A reviewer stole a manuscript and published it himself. But you wouldn’t know it from this retraction notice.

Fish off someone else’s peer review! So writes (in somewhat different words) Mina Mehregan, a mechanical engineer at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in Iran. Mehregan and a colleague recently discovered that they’d been victimized by a group of unscrupulous reviewers who used the pretext of a long turnaround time to publish a hijacked version of … Continue reading A reviewer stole a manuscript and

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Weird love advice that works: Be a dog.

The research is sad but true: People are often more considerate to friends and strangers than they are to their partners. Gretchen Rubin's advice? When your partner walks in the door, show them as much affection as your dog does. Be excited to see them! Give a real hello and a real goodbye. Appreciate your partner: It's the easiest thing to do, and the easiest thing to forget. Outer Order, Inner

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Store problemer efter opdatering af Sundhedsplatformen

Region Sjællands support modtog 2.000 henvendelser i ugen efter opdateringen.

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25.000 m² solceller og en vindmølle i timen: Vækst i sol og vind skal op i gear

PLUS. Brancheorganisationen Dansk Energi har modelleret, hvor stor en udbygning med sol og vind der skal ske i Nordvesteuropa bare de næste ti år, hvis vi skal nå Parisaftalens mål i 2050.

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EU’s copyright-direktiv går ind i næste fase: »Endnu værre end det oprindelige forslag«

EU’s kontroversielle copyright-direktiv kom i går igennem trilogforhandlingerne, og den endelige udgave er ifølge kritikere endnu værre end den, der oprindeligt blev foreslået

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What Happens When Techno-Utopians Actually Run a Country

Direct democracy! Universal basic income! Fascism!? The inside story of Italy’s Five Star Movement and the cyberguru who dreamed it up.

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Why the future of satellite internet might be decided in rural Alaska

Service in the rural areas of the state is abysmal, which makes it the perfect place to test next-generation satellite internet.

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Chimpanzees ‘talk’ just like humans. It’s time to realise how similar we are | Jules Howard

New research shows that gestures used by chimpanzees follow the same rules as human language. Are we really so different? It’s a bit garbled but you can definitely hear it in the mobile phone footage. As the chimpanzees arrange their branches into a makeshift ladder and one of them makes its daring escape from its Belfast zoo enclosure , some words ring out loud and clear: “Don’t escape, you bad l

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Spørg Fagfolket: Risikerer benzinen i hybridbilen at blive for gammel?

Hvis man næsten udelukkende kører på el i sin hybridbil, vil benzinen så blive for gammel, spørger en læser. Det svarer Shell på.

11h

Austria probes Amazon over alleged unfair trade practices

Austria's competition authorities said Thursday they were launching a probe into whether US online retail giant Amazon was abusing its dominant position to favour its own products against those of Austrian retailers selling on its market place.

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The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening Announced For Nintendo Switch

It was previously teased and speculated that The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword would be coming to the Nintendo Switch. However Nintendo later clarified that this wasn’t true, but if …

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Electron-nuclear correlated multiphoton-route to Rydberg fragments of molecules

Electron-nuclear correlated multiphoton-route to Rydberg fragments of molecules Electron-nuclear correlated multiphoton-route to Rydberg fragments of molecules, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08700-5 Rydberg atoms can be created from photoexcitation of molecules using intense ultrafast laser pulses. Here the authors use a coincidence detection of electrons, ion and exc

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Numerous cultivated and uncultivated viruses encode ribosomal proteins

Numerous cultivated and uncultivated viruses encode ribosomal proteins Numerous cultivated and uncultivated viruses encode ribosomal proteins, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08672-6 Viruses can encode genes that regulate the host's translational machinery to their advantage. Here, the authors show that viruses encode ribosomal proteins that can be incorporated into the

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Enhanced photoelectrical response of thermodynamically epitaxial organic crystals at the two-dimensional limit

Enhanced photoelectrical response of thermodynamically epitaxial organic crystals at the two-dimensional limit Enhanced photoelectrical response of thermodynamically epitaxial organic crystals at the two-dimensional limit, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08573-8 To realize efficient optoelectronic devices based on two-dimensional (2D) organic crystals, optimizing the ph

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Perceptions of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage in different policy scenarios

Perceptions of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage in different policy scenarios Perceptions of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage in different policy scenarios, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08592-5 It is not clear how the public views the acceptability of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Here the authors explored public perceptions of

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PLCβ2 negatively regulates the inflammatory response to virus infection by inhibiting phosphoinositide-mediated activation of TAK1

PLCβ2 negatively regulates the inflammatory response to virus infection by inhibiting phosphoinositide-mediated activation of TAK1 PLCβ2 negatively regulates the inflammatory response to virus infection by inhibiting phosphoinositide-mediated activation of TAK1, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08524-3 Phospholipase C β (PLCβ) exhibits immuno-modulatory functions but its

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Dyke intrusion between neighbouring arc volcanoes responsible for 2017 pre-eruptive seismic swarm at Agung

Dyke intrusion between neighbouring arc volcanoes responsible for 2017 pre-eruptive seismic swarm at Agung Dyke intrusion between neighbouring arc volcanoes responsible for 2017 pre-eruptive seismic swarm at Agung, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08564-9 Using seismic data and numerical modelling, here, the authors characterize the three-month period of unrest occurring

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X-ray nanotomography of coccolithophores reveals that coccolith mass and segment number correlate with grid size

X-ray nanotomography of coccolithophores reveals that coccolith mass and segment number correlate with grid size X-ray nanotomography of coccolithophores reveals that coccolith mass and segment number correlate with grid size, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08635-x Coccolithophores are one of the most abundant phytoplankton and calcifying organisms, well-known to produ

11h

Bose–Einstein condensation of photons in an erbium–ytterbium co-doped fiber cavity

Bose–Einstein condensation of photons in an erbium–ytterbium co-doped fiber cavity Bose–Einstein condensation of photons in an erbium–ytterbium co-doped fiber cavity, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08527-0 Bose–Einstein condensates were demonstrated at low temperatures, mostly with ultracold bosonic atoms. Here, the authors demonstrate BEC of photons in a standard 1D e

11h

Spacecraft measurements reveal mechanism of solar wind heating

Queen Mary University of London has led a study which describes the first direct measurement of how energy is transferred from the chaotic electromagnetic fields in space to the particles that make up the solar wind, leading to the heating of interplanetary space.

11h

Diet drinks may be associated with strokes among post-menopausal women

In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot.The association between diet drinks and stroke risk was stronger in obese women and in African-American women.

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Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds

A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada.

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Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy.

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Blindfolded training could help doctors save young lives

Doctors at Geneva University Hospital have found that pediatric team leaders improve more during resuscitation training if they wear a blindfold. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, their findings demonstrate a promising tool for improving training and outcomes in pediatric resuscitation.

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Selective Inactivation of Intracellular BiP/GRP78 Attenuates Endothelial Inflammation and Permeability in Acute Lung Injury

Selective Inactivation of Intracellular BiP/GRP78 Attenuates Endothelial Inflammation and Permeability in Acute Lung Injury Selective Inactivation of Intracellular BiP/GRP78 Attenuates Endothelial Inflammation and Permeability in Acute Lung Injury, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38312-w Selective Inactivation of Intracellular BiP/GRP78 Attenuates Endothelial Inflammati

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Objective evaluation of physical activity pattern using smart devices

Objective evaluation of physical activity pattern using smart devices Objective evaluation of physical activity pattern using smart devices, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38638-z Objective evaluation of physical activity pattern using smart devices

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Smart bone plates can monitor fracture healing

Smart bone plates can monitor fracture healing Smart bone plates can monitor fracture healing, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37784-0 Smart bone plates can monitor fracture healing

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Nutritional and lipidomics biomarkers of docosahexaenoic acid-based multivitamin therapy in pediatric NASH

Nutritional and lipidomics biomarkers of docosahexaenoic acid-based multivitamin therapy in pediatric NASH Nutritional and lipidomics biomarkers of docosahexaenoic acid-based multivitamin therapy in pediatric NASH, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37209-y Nutritional and lipidomics biomarkers of docosahexaenoic acid-based multivitamin therapy in pediatric NASH

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New mechanism of plasmons specific for spin-polarized nanoparticles

New mechanism of plasmons specific for spin-polarized nanoparticles New mechanism of plasmons specific for spin-polarized nanoparticles, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38657-w New mechanism of plasmons specific for spin-polarized nanoparticles

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Predictive factors of prognosis after radiation and steroid pulse therapy in thyroid eye disease

Predictive factors of prognosis after radiation and steroid pulse therapy in thyroid eye disease Predictive factors of prognosis after radiation and steroid pulse therapy in thyroid eye disease, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38640-5 Predictive factors of prognosis after radiation and steroid pulse therapy in thyroid eye disease

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miR-302a inhibits human HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targeting MAP3K2 and PBX3

miR-302a inhibits human HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targeting MAP3K2 and PBX3 miR-302a inhibits human HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targeting MAP3K2 and PBX3 , Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38435-0 miR-302a inhibits human HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targetin

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Rosiglitazone blocks first trimester in-vitro placental injury caused by NF-κB-mediated inflammation

Rosiglitazone blocks first trimester in-vitro placental injury caused by NF-κB-mediated inflammation Rosiglitazone blocks first trimester in-vitro placental injury caused by NF-κB-mediated inflammation, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38336-2 Rosiglitazone blocks first trimester in-vitro placental injury caused by NF-κB-mediated inflammation

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Why Does the Catholic Church Keep Failing on Sexual Abuse?

A few years after Seá n O’Malley took over the Archdiocese of Boston in 2003, at the peak of the clergy sexual-abuse crisis in America, he led novenas of penance at nine of the city’s most affected parishes. At each church he visited, he lay facedown on the floor before the altar, begging for forgiveness. This is how O’Malley has spent his life in ministry: cleaning up after pedophile priests and

11h

Fysikere giver astronomerne et nyt værktøj under Sydpolens is

PLUS. Den en kubikkilometer store IceCube-detektor på Sydpolen har vist sin værdi som teleskop. Nu vil forskerne have en detektor, der er 10 gange så stor.

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'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring

Sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring—according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Uppsala University in Sweden.

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Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy.

11h

Spacecraft measurements reveal mechanism of solar wind heating

Queen Mary University of London has led a study which describes the first direct measurement of how energy is transferred from the chaotic electromagnetic fields in space to the particles that make up the solar wind, leading to the heating of interplanetary space.

11h

Retrospective model-based inference guides model-free credit assignment

Retrospective model-based inference guides model-free credit assignment Retrospective model-based inference guides model-free credit assignment, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08662-8 The reinforcement learning literature suggests decisions are based on a model-free system, operating retrospectively, and a model-based system, operating prospectively. Here, the authors

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Diversity within the adenovirus fiber knob hypervariable loops influences primary receptor interactions

Diversity within the adenovirus fiber knob hypervariable loops influences primary receptor interactions Diversity within the adenovirus fiber knob hypervariable loops influences primary receptor interactions, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08599-y Adenovirus based (AdV) vectors are promising platforms for therapeutics and vaccines, but receptor usage of serotypes in cl

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Tree-ring isotopes capture interannual vegetation productivity dynamics at the biome scale

Tree-ring isotopes capture interannual vegetation productivity dynamics at the biome scale Tree-ring isotopes capture interannual vegetation productivity dynamics at the biome scale, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08634-y Historical and future trends in net primary productivity (NPP) and its sensitivity to global change are largely unknown because of the lack of long-t

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Author Correction: Precise control of SCRaMbLE in synthetic haploid and diploid yeast

Author Correction: Precise control of SCRaMbLE in synthetic haploid and diploid yeast Author Correction: Precise control of SCRaMbLE in synthetic haploid and diploid yeast, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08474-w Author Correction: Precise control of SCRaMbLE in synthetic haploid and diploid yeast

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Stress in crops points to surprising benefits

Stress is known as the "killer disease" and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke. But now research conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and published in the latest issue of Plants indicates that stress in the plant kingdom is far less destructive to plants than it is to humans.

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'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring

Sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring—according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Uppsala University in Sweden.

12h

Stress in crops points to surprising benefits

Stress is known as the "killer disease" and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke. But now research conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and published in the latest issue of Plants indicates that stress in the plant kingdom is far less destructive to plants than it is to humans.

12h

'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring

Sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring—according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Uppsala University in Sweden.

12h

Paying tribute to the nation's forests

Britons are being urged to write a poem, letter or story to celebrate the woodlands of the UK.

12h

Forskning för hjärtats bästa

ALLA HJÄRTANS DAG 2019. Alexandru Schiopu, specialistläkare och docent i kardiologi, vet hur man tar hand om hjärtan. Han arbetar för att förbättra hjärtfunktionen för de som drabbas av akut hjärtinfarkt och är i sin forskning framförallt intresserad av ett protein som är involverat både i inflammation vid hjärtinfarkt och i läkningen efteråt.

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UTSA study: Stress in crops points to surprising benefits

Stress is known as the 'killer disease' and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke. But now research conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and published in the latest issue of Plants indicates that stress in the plant kingdom is far less destructive to plants than it is to humans.

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Airbus lukker produktionen af A380

Når Airbus har leveret de sidste fly til Emirates i 2021, lukker produktionen af A380. Manglende ordrer tvinger selskabet til den »smertefulde beslutning«.

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Principal investigators are people, too

Principal investigators are people, too Principal investigators are people, too, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00413-5 Recognizing that fact could help researchers in their journey through their graduate studies, says one second-year PhD student.

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One couple, two cities: How to handle an international career move

One couple, two cities: How to handle an international career move One couple, two cities: How to handle an international career move, Published online: 14 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00582-3 Mette Bendixen and Lars Iversen found a creative solution to their ‘two-body problem’.

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'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring

Research shows that sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring. What's more, these offspring go on to have longer, healthier lifespans — and in turn produce more and healthier offspring themselves. It was assumed that it doesn't matter which sperm fertilises an egg. But this shows that there are massive differences between sperm and how they affect offspring.

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Liten risk för handel med arkeologiskt stöldgods

Köper du till exempel ett romerskt mynt av en privatperson finns det en liten risk att du bidrar till rovplundring och i förlängningen terrorfinansiering. Men överlag bedöms risken som liten att arkeologiska föremål som plundrats av till exempel Islamiska staten sålts i någon större omfattning inom Sverige. Det framgår av en rapport där forskare bedömt omfattningen av handeln med arkeologiska risk

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Offspring from older sperm are fitter and age more slowly

Experiments in fish suggest offspring from older sperm may be healthier – a finding that could change the ways IVF clinics select sperm

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Renault profits plunge in first annual earnings since Ghosn arrest

Renault profits fell sharply last year, the French automaker said Thursday in its first annual results since the shock arrest of former boss Carlos Ghosn.

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Activists file suit to stop dolphin hunting in Japan

Environmental campaigners have filed an unprecedented lawsuit in a bid to halt the so-called "drive hunting" of dolphins in Japan, arguing the practice is cruel and illegal.

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Activists file suit to stop dolphin hunting in Japan

Environmental campaigners have filed an unprecedented lawsuit in a bid to halt the so-called "drive hunting" of dolphins in Japan, arguing the practice is cruel and illegal.

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Travelling classroom bridges digital divide in Benin

School was out, but on an afternoon in rural Benin, 11-year-old Ambroise rushed to a tree-shaded parking lot, his day's learning not yet done.

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Robot lifts bits of melted fuel at Japan's Fukushima plant

A robot arm has successfully picked up pebble-sized pieces of radioactive fuel at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant in a complex operation seen as key to clean-up efforts after the 2011 meltdown, officials said Thursday.

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The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms.

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EU reaches provisional deal on online copyright reform

The European Union reached a provisional deal Wednesday to overhaul the bloc's online copyright law, a top official said, after a tense battle that has pitted media firms against internet giants like Google.

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North Korea exploring sanctions-proof energy technologies

Power-strapped North Korea is exploring two ambitious alternative energy sources—tidal power and coal-based synthetic fuels—that could greatly improve living standards and reduce its reliance on oil imports and vulnerability to sanctions.

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Collaboration sparks sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough

Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3-D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. Their research has been published as the cover story in the February issue of the journal Advanced Electronic Materials.

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3-D experiments shed new light on shape memory alloys

Shape memory alloys are well known for their remarkable properties—superelasticity, shape memory and actuation allow them to be crumpled up and then spring back to a "remembered" original shape.

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The Perfect Valentine? A Math Formula

Nothing says ‘I love you’ like a customizable algebraic equation.

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How do you think will various governments regulate the use of remote controlled human like robots?

The robot in question is full immersion virtual reality controlled, meaning it would be easy to use and the robot would feel like the user's real body. This tech could be useful if one's life is in danger, specially for people who are targeted for assassination. Users can also use the robot to stay active in real life, for example, their body is paralyzed or their skin burns under sunlight and ca

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Upcoming ‘Breaking Bad’ Movie Could Premiere On Netflix

The way AMC’s Breaking Bad ended was kind of perfect in terms of television. Given that most shows tend to run for longer than they should and end with sometimes unsatisfying endings, …

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