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nyheder2019februar16

B&W-professor: Om 20 år har vi atomdrevne handelsskibe

USA kom først med den atomdrevne ubåd ‘Nautilus’, men en række lande var i 1950’erne i gang med at udvikle atomdrevne tankskibe. I en villa i Hellerup havde B&W sin afdeling for reaktorforskning med seks ingeniører under professor Sven Werners ledelse.

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Art Institute of Chicago unveils key findings in African art thanks to medical technology

On Feb. 16, the Art Institute of Chicago announced the results of significant new research on five terracotta sculptures — so named Bankoni after a village in present-day Mali where they were found. The objects date from between the 12th and 15th centuries.

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Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

When researchers fed mosquitoes a drug used to treat people for obesity, the insects were less interested in hunting for their next human meal ticket. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

When researchers fed mosquitoes a drug used to treat people for obesity, the insects were less interested in hunting for their next human meal ticket. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

When researchers fed mosquitoes a drug used to treat people for obesity, the insects were less interested in hunting for their next human meal ticket. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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3 philosophers set up a booth on a street corner – here’s what people asked

The life choices that had led me to be sitting in a booth underneath a banner that read “Ask a Philosopher" – at the entrance to the New York City subway at 57th and 8th – were perhaps random but inevitable. I'd been a “public philosopher" for 15 years, so I readily agreed to join my colleague Ian Olasov when he asked for volunteers to join him at the “Ask a Philosopher" booth. This was part of t

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The Beets Family Begins Assembling Dredge #2 | Gold Rush

Tony and his children finally begin the process of putting dredge #2 together. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on

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Spectacular Fossil Bird Foot Preserved in Amber

A rare amber inclusion underscores the importance of carnivores to the fossil record — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We will never be able to control an Artificial General Intelligence, because we won't be in control of the Organizations creating them. We're their data points, not their masters.

This is Part 2 of an ongoing series I'm writing, an address of the Control Problem. Parts 1 and 2 are still about setting up the initial conditions, but the specifics of that set up are important my later argument: that we can 'solve' the control problem, through an organic redress of how most societies are currently organized. I've gotten some flak because I use an informal narrative style, inst

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New app reveals the hidden landscapes within Georgia O’Keefe’s paintings

The technique can help analyze—and maybe save—artwork in distress

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'Self is not entirely lost in dementia,' argues new review

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv , an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Syd

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Gossip was a powerful tool for the powerless in Ancient Greece

At the heart of the greatest works of Ancient Greek literature are mighty acts of revenge. Revengers overcome their enemies through superior physical prowess, as when Achilles kills Hector in a single combat to avenge the death of his comrade Patroclus; or through their employment of trickery and deceit, as when Medea slays Creon and his daughter by using poisoned clothing in revenge against Jaso

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Predicting climate change

Thomas Crowther, ETH Zurich identifies long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world. In his AAAS session, Crowther describes how such an effort, could absorb as much as 135 gigatons of atmospheric carbon. Crowther will also describe data from thousands of soil samples collected by local scientists that reveal the world's most abundant population of soil organisms in arctic a

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Political and policy feedbacks in the climate system

Matto Mildenberger, University of California Santa Barbara explains how perceived experiences with climate change in the United States can be linked to political shifts in Congress, culture and society. He will demonstrate how partisan opinions about the prevalence and dangers of climate change in each of the 50 states and 435 congressional districts in the United States can change policymaking by

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The Fault with Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics

submitted by /u/HumanSeeing [link] [comments]

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AAAS: Machine learning 'causing science crisis'

Techniques used to analyse data are producing misleading and often wrong results, critics say.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #7

What we can learn about climate change from the Titanic Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio starred in the 1997 film Titanic. Credit: Paramount Pictures I recently shared the latest news about climate change with my Facebook friends, writing this: “The five warmest years in recorded history have been the last five, and 18 of the 19 warmest years have occurred since 2001.” One of my friends comment

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Trump science adviser calls for more collaboration between industry and government

Trump science adviser calls for more collaboration between industry and government Trump science adviser calls for more collaboration between industry and government, Published online: 16 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00574-3 Meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier emphasized the importance of private science funding in his first public speech since taking office.

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Remembering Why Curiosity Should Be Boundless

Young children provide gentle and chaotic reminders of how to be open to the world around us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Remembering Why Curiosity Should Be Boundless

Young children provide gentle and chaotic reminders of how to be open to the world around us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Twitter hides tweet purportedly from Iranian Supreme Leader

On Thursday, Twitter account @khamenei_ir posted that “Imam Khomeini’s verdict regarding Salman Rushdie is based on divine verses and just like divine verses, it is solid and irrevocable.” The …

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Teslas Are Getting a “Party and Camping Mode”

“Party and Camping Mode” As if “Romance Mode” and “Toilet Humor” wasn’t enough. Tesla owners have two more features to look forward to: “Party and Camping Mode.” CEO Elon Musk confirmed in a tweet on Thursday that the feature would roll out in “probably a month or two.” Party and Camping Mode would allow Tesla Model S, Model X, and Model 3 owners to set the temperature, air flow, lights, and musi

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Mystisk tomatplante og blodrød harpiks: Her er tre øer, forskere bruger som laboratorier

Unikke øer giver forskerne indsigt i evolution og økosystemer.

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Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy

Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician.

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SpaceX Starship and The Von Braun Rotating Space Station

submitted by /u/Shideur-Hero [link] [comments]

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How can I get my aging, anti-technology, parents to engage with technology in ways that allow them to flourish, rather than flounder, as technology keeps advancing?

My folks hate technology, don't like using cell phones, can't use the internet well, and lack anything more than basic computer skills. What are some little tips and tricks to get them using tech to build skill and become future ready? submitted by /u/Jeebzus2014 [link] [comments]

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Undersea Odyssey: Trivia

There is nothing quite like the sight of a majestic whale rising from the sea, and nothing quite like its plaintive song. But beyond whales’ mastery of ocean aesthetics, they are also immensely intelligent animals, demonstrating highly evolved social behavior and communication methods. Some whale species like humpbacks, sperm whales, and belugas even have spindle neurons, which are currently thou

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Scientists Call for a Ban on AI-Controlled Killer Robots

Killer Robots Killer robots are coming for us all. But rather than a T-1000 spewing one-liners, autonomous weapon systems like drones could end up replacing human soldiers on the battlefield entirely, given enough time. But is it ethical to have an artificial intelligence call the shots and decide to take a human life? Autonomous Weapons Experts convening at the American Association for the Advan

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Is quantum computing scalable?

Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 16.

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Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution

While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a Penn State materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem.

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Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions

Researchers have developed new metasurfaces for the arbitrary manipulation of reflected waves, essentially breaking classical reflection law to engineer it at will.

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Push-up capacity linked with lower incidence of cardiovascular disease events among men

Active, middle-aged men able to complete more than 40 push-ups had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes — including diagnoses of coronary artery disease and major events such as heart failure — during 10 years of follow-up compared with those who were able to do less than 10 push-ups during the baseline exam.

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Witch ways: knowing your heart’s desire is modern witchcraft

It has a sad and misunderstood history, but witchcraft still has a role to play Our fascination with witches has long surpassed witchcraft being a crime punishable by death. They are a cultural obsession, it seems, that is always with us in one guise or another. In recent weeks it’s been Netflix’s reboot of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and Sky One’s A Discovery of Witches , as well as an episod

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How to feed the world by 2050? Recent breakthrough boosts plant growth by 40 percent

Recent advances to address hunger through agricultural advancement have been shown to boost crop growth by 40 percent by creating a shortcut for a glitch that plagues most food crops.

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Drinking contexts associated with early onset of alcohol intoxication among adolescents

New research has begun to identify the circumstances by examining relationships between early age of first intoxication (less than 15 years), drinking in different contexts such as one's own home, at friends' homes, or outdoor settings, and problems that arise in those contexts.

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through February 16)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AI Is Reinventing the Way We Invent David Rotman | MIT Technology Review “ i ‘This is where the action is,’ Alán Aspuru-Guzik says. ‘AIs that drive cars, AIs that improve medical diagnostics, AIs for personal shopping—the economic growth from AIs applied to scientific research may swamp the economic impact from all those other AIs combined.’ i ” FUTURE AR Will Spark the Ne

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Does Eating Organic Reduce Cancer Risk?

A recent study claims to confirm that eating organic can reduce your risk of getting cancer. But a closer look at the details reveals a different story — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The best games you can play with your smart speaker

DIY And no, the weather forecast is not a game. Your smart speaker is loaded with arsenal of tricks to make your life easier or more efficient. But your Google Home and Amazon Echo are also good for a diversion. Here…

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Watch a Harpoon Attached to a Satellite Spear a Piece of Space Debris

Harpooning Space Debris Junk floating around in Earth’s orbit is becoming a big problem . Bits of man-made debris can pose a big threat to satellites circling our planet. But a team of British engineers might have a clever solution. The team of researchers from the University of Surrey used the RemoveDEBRIS satellite — a satellite specifically designed to eliminate space junk that launched on boa

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Weekend reads: Article retracted because of “racial characterizations;” India’s high retraction rate; meet the fraud finder

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a judge’s ruling that a university could not revoke a … Continue reading Weekend reads: Article retracted because of “racial

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Forskere besøger usædvanlig vulkanø: Her er de første billeder

Ny ø i Stillehavet fylder fire år og rummer både blomster og fugle.

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How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?

Just as conservators have developed methods to protect traditional artworks, computer scientists, in collaboration with time-based media conservators, have created means to safeguard computer- or time-based art by following the same preservation principles.

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Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings

A multidisciplinary team from Northwestern University and the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico has diagnosed the strange paint disease causing Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings to deteriorate. The micron-sized protrusions are metal soaps, resulting from a chemical reaction between the metal ions and fatty acids commonly used as binder in paints.

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Ugens debat: Sæt strøm på Oslofærgen i københavns havn

Ingeniøren kunne i sidste uge fortælle, at Oslo-færgen Pearl Seaways nu kan modtage landstrøm i Oslo. Men i København findes et sådant anlæg ikke, så der pulser færgen videre – også når den ligger i havn. Blandt læserne på ing.dk var der ikke megen forståelse for, at København ikke også kan lev…

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This AI Can Predict Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients

Predicting Outcomes Figuring out the survival rate of cancer patients relies on a number of tests and it can be difficult for clinicians to determine the prognosis. But a newly developed AI could give them a big leg up. Scientists at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne developed a piece of machine learning software that can predict the prognosis of ovarian cancer patients — an

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Why some Georgia O’Keeffe paintings have ‘art acne’

Tiny protrusions are from chemical reactions in the paint, say scientists who developed an imaging method that could help curators track the knobs.

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Chinese Surveillance, Facebook Tracking, and More Security News This Week

3-D printed rifles, Iran missile hacking, and more of the week's top security news.

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The Pentagon Needs to Woo AI Experts Away From Big Tech

Opinion: Without more DOD investment, there just aren’t enough incentives to lure talent away from high-paying jobs with great benefits into a life of public service.

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Sci-Fi Author Robert Heinlein Was Basically MacGyver

Gregory Benford's new book portrays the writer as a man of action and improvised traps.

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The Voices of Black Mathematicians

Black History Month in the U.S. is a good time to celebrate these important people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"The Future of Packaging: From Linear to Circular" by Tom Szaky

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions

Researchers at Aalto University have developed new metasurfaces for the arbitrary manipulation of reflected waves, essentially breaking classical reflection law to engineer it at will.

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Large-scale window material developed for PM2.5 capture and light tuning

A research team from University of Science and Technology of China develops a simple and economical process to fabricate large-scale flexible smart windows.

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How to feed the world by 2050? Recent breakthrough boosts plant growth by 40 percent

Recent advances to address hunger through agricultural discovery will be highlighted at this year's annual meeting of the AAAS. Session speaker and University of Illinois professor Donald Ort will discuss the global food security challenge and a recent breakthrough in Science that boosted crop growth by 40 percent by creating a shortcut for a glitch that plagues most food crops.

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First evidence discovered of a gigantic remnant around an exploding star

SDSU professor helps discover precursors to the tools we use to map the universe.

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Ha Jin on the wild and tragic life of China's greatest poet, Li Bai

"I knew in the case of Li Bai, I should follow the poems. Every masterpiece by him would be kind of a small crisis…a center for drama in his life." "There are people who want a different kind of fulfillment. Society should be open to that. In the long run, you don't know—maybe those idlers can produce more for the society." None Let's start with a very old poem : On the bank of Caishi River is Li

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Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

NASA's admission this week that the agency has lost contact with a Mars rover brings an end to a compelling story of usefulness and resilience. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count

For years, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Great Backyard Bird Count have provided valuable data for avian research. Ray Brown from the Talkin' Birds podcast talks with Scott Simon about it.

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Ph.D. Student Breaks Down Electron Physics Into A Swinging Musical

John Bohannon, founder of Science magazine's "Dance Your Ph.D." contest, presents the 2018 winner, Pramodh Senarath Yapa. He won over judges with his choreographic rendition of some chaotic electrons. (Image credit: Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall)

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A School Nurse Is on a Mission to Count the Women Killed by Men

PLANO, Texas—In February 2017, a school nurse in this Dallas suburb began counting women murdered by men. Seated at her desk, beside shelves of cookbooks, novels, and books on violence against women, Dawn Wilcox, 54, scours the internet for news stories of women killed by men in the United States. For dozens of hours each week, she digs through online news reports and obituaries to tell the stori

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Blackface Was Never Harmless

Long before the future leaders of America were moonwalking with shoe polish smeared on their cheeks , the first blackface minstrels took to the stage in the early 19th century. Beginning in the decades leading up to the Civil War, troupes of white men, women, and children darkened their faces with burnt cork and traveled the country performing caricatures of blackness through songs, dances, and s

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Rarely Glimpsed Scaly Pangolins Caught Hugging Trees in the Dark

New videos show a rare glimpse of strange, scaly mammals.

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Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More

As hard as it is to say goodbye to our favorite little rover, the mission had a hell of a run on Mars.

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The technology behind OpenAI’s fiction-writing, fake-news-spewing AI, explained

The language model can write like a human, but it doesn’t have a clue what it’s saying.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending February 16, 2019)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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Drinking contexts associated with early onset of alcohol intoxication among adolescents

New research by scientists at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation has begun to identify these circumstances by examining relationships between early age of first intoxication (less than 15 years), drinking in different contexts such as one's own home, at friends' homes, or outdoor settings, and problems that arise in those contexts.

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PET/CT imaging agent shows promise for better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism

Researchers report that a new nuclear medicine tracer may allow better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). Acute VTE is a disease that includes deep-vein thrombosis and its complication, pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal. The research is featured in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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Why Men Who Can Do 40 Pushups May Have Better Heart Health

The ability to do a lot of pushups may be a sign not only of strength, but also of good heart health, a new study suggests.

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Readers marvel at AI, space missions and wombat poop

Readers had comments and questions about defining artificial intelligence, the New Horizons space mission and more.

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Brain discoveries open doors to new treatments

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the history of neuroscience and new techniques scientists are using to influence the brain.

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28 Best President's Day Sales on Laptops, TVs, Gear (2019)

We found the best tech bargains for the long holiday weekend from Beats, Dyson, and more.

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The Soothing Promise of Our Own Artisanal Internet

As unease with Big Tech grows, some prescribe a slower, less viral online existence. "Eat independent sites, mostly not Facebook."

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China Is Reportedly Building a Solar Power Station in Space

Taking solar power to a whole new level.

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Analyse: Stædig aktivist vandt kamp mod TDC’s masselogning

PLUS. Efter en tre år lang kamp udtalte Datatilsynet i denne uge »alvorlig kritik« af, at TDC op til flere hundrede gange i døgnet har registreret kundernes færden.

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Kamala Harris’s Blackness Isn’t Up for Debate

I would never have put Snoop and Tupac Shakur on the list of things that could potentially harm Senator Kamala Harris’s presidential bid. But this week, two of the greatest hip-hop artists of all time unwillingly played a part in the latest attack on Harris’s blackness, which came after the California Democrat’s appearance on the popular morning-radio show The Breakfast Club . Harris engaged in a

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A Mother Learns the Identity of Her Child’s Grandmother. A Sperm Bank Threatens to Sue.

The results of a consumer genetic test identified the mother of the man whose donated sperm was used to conceive Danielle Teuscher’s daughter. Legal warnings soon followed.

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Billionaire warlords: Why the future is medieval

Russia? China? No. The rising world superpower is the billionaire class. Our problem, says Sean McFate, is that we're still thinking in nation states. Nation states have only existed for the last 300-400 years. Before that, wealthy groups – tribes, empires, aristocracies, etc – employed mercenaries to wage private wars. As wealth inequality reaches combustion point, we could land back in the stat

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Rødvin, syge bakterier og håndsæbe: Det kan redde dig, når antibiotika ikke længere virker

Trods voksende resistens kommer der sjældent ny antibiotika. Heldigvis er der andet, der kan holde bakterierne i skak.

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AI autotune makes your terrible karaoke singing more tolerable

Autotune can often sound robotic because it shifts off notes into perfect pitch, a new version listens to the notes you've already sung and uses them to help fill in the gaps

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Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.

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EPA hits chemical maker for not notifying on new compounds

A chemical maker's North Carolina plant may have broken federal law by failing to notify the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before it started manufacturing and repurposing new industrial compounds, the agency said this week.

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Runner recalls desperate fight with thrashing mountain lion

Fear washed over Travis Kauffman as he wrestled with a thrashing mountain lion that attacked him on a Colorado mountain trail, but then his fighting instinct took over as he found its neck with his foot and suffocated the young cat.

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Runner recalls desperate fight with thrashing mountain lion

Fear washed over Travis Kauffman as he wrestled with a thrashing mountain lion that attacked him on a Colorado mountain trail, but then his fighting instinct took over as he found its neck with his foot and suffocated the young cat.

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Beloved rhinoceros dies at age 49 in North Carolina zoo

The North Carolina Zoo says that a beloved rhinoceros named Stanley has died.

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Beloved rhinoceros dies at age 49 in North Carolina zoo

The North Carolina Zoo says that a beloved rhinoceros named Stanley has died.

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Apple Reportedly Acquires Voice Assistant Startup Pullstring

When it comes to the digital assistant space, Siri is clearly behind the likes of Google Assistant and Alexa, both of whom are commanding pretty large market shares, largely thanks to …

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Twitter can keep copies of your deleted DMs for years

Twitter might still have copies of your DMs saved in its system even if it's been years since you deactivated your account. Security researcher Karan Saini told TechCrunch that …

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INTERAKTIV Kan du overleve multiresistente bakterier?

Tag dine egne valg og se, om du kan overleve multiresistente bakterier.

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Racetrack Memory Gets a Boost

submitted by /u/ADHDWhatWasISaying [link] [comments]

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Driverless delivery startup Nuro gets $940 million SoftBank investment

submitted by /u/John_Wilson_543 [link] [comments]

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A fly-through of the fly brain.

submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]

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IBM Project Debater | All Debates | Debate | IQ2US Debates

submitted by /u/Borlax-5 [link] [comments]

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CRISPR could make you immune to the flu

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Structural basis for activity of TRIC counter-ion channels in calcium release [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Trimeric intracellular cation (TRIC) channels are thought to provide counter-ion currents that facilitate the active release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. TRIC activity is controlled by voltage and Ca2+ modulation, but underlying mechanisms have remained unknown. Here we describe high-resolution crystal structures of vertebrate TRIC-A and TRIC-B channels, both in…

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Reactive oxygen species modulate macrophage immunosuppressive phenotype through the up-regulation of PD-L1 [Cell Biology]

The combination of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapy is currently under investigation as a promising strategy for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most prominent component of the breast cancer microenvironment because they influence tumor progression and the response to therapies. Here we…

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Emergence of analogy from relation learning [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

By middle childhood, humans are able to learn abstract semantic relations (e.g., antonym, synonym, category membership) and use them to reason by analogy. A deep theoretical challenge is to show how such abstract relations can arise from nonrelational inputs, thereby providing key elements of a protosymbolic representation system. We have…

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Deep elastic strain engineering of bandgap through machine learning [Engineering]

Nanoscale specimens of semiconductor materials as diverse as silicon and diamond are now known to be deformable to large elastic strains without inelastic relaxation. These discoveries harbinger a new age of deep elastic strain engineering of the band structure and device performance of electronic materials. Many possibilities remain to be…

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Metalearners for estimating heterogeneous treatment effects using machine learning [Statistics]

There is growing interest in estimating and analyzing heterogeneous treatment effects in experimental and observational studies. We describe a number of metaalgorithms that can take advantage of any supervised learning or regression method in machine learning and statistics to estimate the conditional average treatment effect (CATE) function. Metaalgorithms build on…

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E-protein regulatory network links TCR signaling to effector Treg cell differentiation [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for the differentiation and maintenance of effector regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, the contribution of individual TCR-dependent genes in Treg cells to the maintenance of immunotolerance remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that Treg cells lacking E protein undergo further differentiation into…

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Musical pleasure and musical emotions [Commentaries]

In a pharmacological study published in PNAS, Ferreri et al. (1) present evidence that enhancing or inhibiting dopamine signaling using levodopa or risperidone modulates the pleasure experienced while listening to music. This result is the latest development in an already remarkable series of studies by the groups of Robert Zatorre…

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PGC1A regulates the IRS1:IRS2 ratio during fasting to influence hepatic metabolism downstream of insulin [Cell Biology]

Precise modulation of hepatic glucose metabolism is crucial during the fasting and feeding cycle and is controlled by the actions of circulating insulin and glucagon. The insulin-signaling pathway requires insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2, which are found to be dysregulated in diabetes and obesity. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor…

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Solution to the 50-year-old Okazaki-fragment problem [Commentaries]

The antiparallel structure of double-stranded DNA, together with the known 5′→3′ directionality of DNA polymerases, necessitates that the two DNA strands are replicated in opposite directions. The leading strand is synthesized in the same direction as the replication fork, whereas the lagging strand is replicated in the opposite direction. In…

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Probing the link between residual entropy and viscosity of molecular fluids and model potentials [Chemistry]

This work investigates the link between residual entropy and viscosity based on wide-ranging, highly accurate experimental and simulation data. This link was originally postulated by Rosenfeld in 1977 [Rosenfeld Y (1977) Phys Rev A 15:2545–2549], and it is shown that this scaling results in an approximately monovariate relationship between residual…

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Altered neural odometry in the vertical dimension [Neuroscience]

Entorhinal grid cells integrate sensory and self-motion inputs to provide a spatial metric of a characteristic scale. One function of this metric may be to help localize the firing fields of hippocampal place cells during formation and use of the hippocampal spatial representation (“cognitive map”). Of theoretical importance is the…

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Quantum experiments and graphs II: Quantum interference, computation, and state generation [Physics]

We present an approach to describe state-of-the-art photonic quantum experiments using graph theory. There, the quantum states are given by the coherent superpositions of perfect matchings. The crucial observation is that introducing complex weights in graphs naturally leads to quantum interference. This viewpoint immediately leads to many interesting results, some…

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Pivotal role for {alpha}V integrins in sustained Tfh support of the germinal center response for long-lived plasma cell generation [Immunology and Inflammation]

CD4+ follicular helper T cells (Tfh) are essential for germinal center (GC) reactions in the lymph node that generate high-affinity, long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). Temporal GC analysis suggests B memory cells (Bmem) are generated early, while LLPCs are generated late in the GC reaction. Distinct roles for Tfh at these…

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Motor neuron disease-associated loss of nuclear TDP-43 is linked to DNA double-strand break repair defects [Neuroscience]

Genome damage and their defective repair have been etiologically linked to degenerating neurons in many subtypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients; however, the specific mechanisms remain enigmatic. The majority of sporadic ALS patients feature abnormalities in the transactivation response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), whose nucleo-cytoplasmic mislocalization is…

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Single-molecule excitation-emission spectroscopy [Chemistry]

Single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) provides a detailed view of individual emitter properties and local environments without having to resort to ensemble averaging. While the last several decades have seen substantial refinement of SMS techniques, recording excitation spectra of single emitters still poses a significant challenge. Here we address this problem by…

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TRPM7 is the central gatekeeper of intestinal mineral absorption essential for postnatal survival [Physiology]

Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ are essential minerals required for a plethora of metabolic processes and signaling pathways. Different categories of cation-selective channels and transporters are therefore required to tightly control the cellular levels of individual metals in a cell-specific manner. However, the mechanisms responsible for the organismal balance of these…

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Nanometer-accuracy distance measurements between fluorophores at the single-molecule level [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Light microscopy is a powerful tool for probing the conformations of molecular machines at the single-molecule level. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer can measure intramolecular distance changes of single molecules in the range of 2 to 8 nm. However, current superresolution measurements become error-prone below 25 nm. Thus, new single-molecule…

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This Nuclear Robot Could Tunnel for Alien Life on Europa

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Hasbro’s new Fortnite Nerf guns launch on March 22nd, with preorders starting today

Hasbro, owner of the Nerf brand, today revealed its full lineup of Fortnite-themed Nerf products, including the previously announced AR-L Elite blaster modeled after the SCAR in …

20h

Study on measles transmission in China have implications for controlling the epidemic worldwide

A new study on the measles epidemic in China has far-reaching implications for eliminating the infection globally. Using a new model-inference system, the researchers were able to estimate population susceptibility and demographical characteristics in three key locations in China, in a period that spans the pre-vaccine and modern mass-vaccination eras.

20h

Study examines how compound damaged DNA to understand its connection to cancer

In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts.

20h

A weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

20h

Graphene-based wearables for health monitoring, food inspection and night vision

Scientists have developed dozens of new graphene-based prototypes. These technologies aim to turn mobile phones into life saving devices.

20h

Teens living in US states allowing medical marijuana smoke less cannabis

According to a large-scale study of American high school students, legalizing medicinal marijuana has actually led to a drop in cannabis use among teenagers. The study used the results of an anonymous survey given to more than 800,000 high school students across 45 states to calculate the number of teens who smoke cannabis.

20h

Lefty or righty molecules lend a hand to material structures

Researchers construct block copolymers that follow the chirality of their basic elements as they self-assemble into larger structures. Their controllable 'handed-ness' and tunability could lead to materials with unique optical qualities.

20h

Uber Sues NYC to Kill Its Ride-Hail Car Cap

New York's mayor says the rule, which halts the granting of new licenses, is vital for reining in congestion. Uber says the city is overreaching.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: Struggling for a United Front

What We’re Following President Donald Trump did end up calling for a national emergency, in order to get the funds to build his border wall. It’s a consequential announcement, but one that was temporarily dulled by the president’s rambling, chaotic speech. He ad-libbed on the threat posed by gangs and criminal cartels—and even undermined his own case for the move by saying that he made the call o

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The Home of the Future Isn’t Smart—It’s ‘Living’ and Green

submitted by /u/MIIAIIRIIK [link] [comments]

21h

Pumped Milk Gives Infants Different Bacteria Than Breastfeeding, Study Says

Mother’s milk provides sustenance for babies. Now researchers find pumped breast milk exposes newborns to more disease-causing bacteria than milk directly from the breast. The discovery suggests breastfeeding practices could shift the makeup of microorganisms in breast milk and infants’ digestive systems. “We were surprised that the method of feeding was the most consistent factor associated with

21h

NASA Just Announced More Strange Results From Its Ambitious 'Twin Study'

Space does weird things to the human body. But there's good news.

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Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

Deer populations have exploded in North American woodlands, changing forest ecology—and how sounds, like birdsong, travel through the trees. Christopher Intagliata reports.

22h

SUPERINTELLIGENCE by Nick Bostrom

I am halfway through the book seems Bostrom like a hardworking author and book promise to delve in the "superintelligence" looks promising. Though i am highly annoyed by the Notes in the back. What do you think anyone read it or heard of it? submitted by /u/Danj_memes_ [link] [comments]

22h

Call to ban killer robots in wars

Scientists have called for a ban on the development of weapons controlled by AI.

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Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

Deer populations have exploded in North American woodlands, changing forest ecology—and how sounds, like birdsong, travel through the trees. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

What we know about diet soda's connection to heart disease, stroke, and early death

Health People who drank two or more artificially-sweetened drinks per day might be at a higher risk. A recent study on diet sodas published this week in the journal Stroke drew conclusions that sound worrying: In postmenopausal women, drinking two or more of these…

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Researchers connect reversed LEDs for cooling breakthrough

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

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Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

Deer populations have exploded in North American woodlands, changing forest ecology—and how sounds, like birdsong, travel through the trees. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Genetic vulnerability to menthol cigarette use

A genetic variant found only in people of African descent significantly increases a smoker's preference for cigarettes containing menthol, a flavor additive. The variant of the MRGPRX4 gene is five to eight times more frequent among smokers who use menthol cigarettes than other smokers. The multi-ethnic study is the first to look across all genes to identify genetic vulnerability to menthol cigare

22h

Brain connections that disadvantage night owls revealed

'Night owls' — those who go to bed and get up later — have fundamental differences in their brain function compared to 'morning larks,' which mean they could be disadvantaged by the constraints of a normal working day.

22h

It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for

Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide.

22h

Giving keener 'electric eyesight' to autonomous vehicles

Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

22h

Germany’s wolves are on the rise thanks to a surprising ally: the military

Training reserves provide key early habitat for returning predators

22h

Hiker speaks after taking on mountain lion… and winning

Travis Kauffman was hiking in Colorado when he came toe-to-toe with a young mountain lion

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The Family Weekly: Introducing the Friendship Files

This Week in Family: Introducing The Friendship Files Today we’re kicking off a project I’ve been working on for months now: The Friendship Files. We so often tell stories of parents, children, or significant others—but friendships are our most formative relationships. These relationships, while not defined by blood or law, shape and anchor our lives. Every week, I’ll talk to two or more friends

23h

Drug to rejuvenate muscle cells

Researchers have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a new study.

23h

Open-science model for drug discovery expands to neurodegenerative diseases

Parkinson's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis are the newest frontiers for open science drug discovery, a global movement led by academic scientists that puts knowledge sharing and medication affordability ahead of patents and profits.

23h

Hope for fighting disease known as Ebola of frogs

Despite widespread infection, some frog populations are surviving a deadly disease that is the equivalent of humankind's Ebola virus. The reason — genetic diversity.

23h

The prospects of American strawberries

Researchers have embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective guideline essential for research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools.

23h

Bioengineers create ultrasmall, light-activated electrode for neural stimulation

Scientists have detailed a less invasive method of neural stimulation that would use an untethered ultrasmall electrode activated by light, a technique that may mitigate damage done by current methods.

23h

Ride out Climate Change in This $5.5 Million Self-Sustaining Yacht

Luxury Living In 2017 we wrote about Arkup , a company designing “hurricane-proof” livable yachts powered by solar energy and capable of operating completely off the grid. Now, the company has finally debuted a real-life version of one of its designs, and it could let you ride out the worst that climate change might throw at the Earth in the near future — assuming you have $5.5 million to spend o

23h

Smeltende indlandsis fører sand for milliarder med sig

Ny forskning viser, at den fortsat stigende afsmeltning fra Grønlands indlandsis fører…

23h

England's Oldest Cave-Art Site Is Covered with Signs to Ward off Evil Spirits

The marks, meant to protect against evil spirits, are out of place in a cave known for ancient animal carvings.

23h

Standardized tests: Finland’s education system vs. the U.S.

Imperial China developed the first standardized tests for bureaucratic hopefuls. Finland has all but done away with standardized tests, and its education system remains one of the best in the world. The United States relies heavily on these tests and scores lower than Finland in academic rigor, yet provides a more balanced educational system for boys and girls, as well as immigrants Imperial Chin

23h

Jokers please: first human Mars mission may need onboard comedians

Researchers are working with Nasa to see if clowns help team cohesion on long space missions Wanted: smart, fit and unflappable applicants for humanity’s first mission to Mars. Must have: crazy wig, oversized boots and a big red nose. It is enough to make Neil Armstrong spin in his grave, but researchers have found that the success of a future mission to the red planet may depend on the ship havi

23h

The prospects of american strawberries

A comprehensive review led by Jayesh Samtani of Virginia Tech and Curt Rom of the University of Arkansas encapsulates an understanding of the challenges, needs, and opportunities of strawberry growers across the United States. Samtani and Rom formed and gathered support from a team of 12 researchers from 10 different states as they embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Anything to Declare?

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, February 15. President Donald Trump signed a spending deal to avert a government shutdown. But Wait, There’s More: During his free-associative remarks from the Rose Garden, Trump said that he is officially declaring a national emergency in order to access funds to build his border wall. He also plans to reallocate approximately $8 billion in agency funds. M

23h

This 78-hour Excel bootcamp shows you how to crunch big data

Get 5 in-depth courses for $39. This 78-hour Excel bootcamp shows you how to crunch big data. You can get 5 in-depth courses for $39.

23h

Gene-edited animal plan to relieve poverty in Africa

Researchers in Edinburgh develop gene-edited farm animals for poor farmers in Africa.

23h

Study shows hope for fighting disease known as Ebola of frogs

Despite widespread infection, some frog populations are surviving a deadly disease that is the equivalent of mankind's Ebola virus. The reason —genetic diversity.

23h

Study shows hope for fighting disease known as Ebola of frogs

Despite widespread infection, some frog populations are surviving a deadly disease that is the equivalent of mankind's Ebola virus. The reason —genetic diversity.

23h

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Gelena's post-tropical transition

Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low pressure area. As Tropical Cyclone Gelena transitioned into a subtropical storm, NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

23h

Scientists May Have Finally Found the Universe’s Missing Matter

Spotted When scientists calculate how much matter ought to exist in the universe, their estimates always vastly exceeded the amount of matter that they’ve actually accounted for. The consensus, in fact, is that we’re missing about a third of the matter that should be out there. But thanks to a new technique for scanning the cosmos, scientists think they may have finally spotted all that missing s

23h

Hacks, Nudes, and Breaches: It's Been a Rough Month for Dating Apps

Trouble at OKCupid, Coffee Meets Bagel, and Jack'd have made February a bad stretch for romantics online.

23h

Major medical journals don’t follow their own rules for reporting results from clinical trials

Systemic look across papers finds that letters pointing out problems are often rejected

23h

World's first 'floating tunnel' proposed in Norway

submitted by /u/skoalbrother [link] [comments]

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NASA Wants to Return to the Moon as Early as This Year

In November, NASA tapped nine private spaceflight companies who will be allowed to bid on upcoming projects. Yesterday, they elaborated on what those projects would be during an industry forum. Starting as early as this year, NASA hopes to send commercial landers to the lunar surface as the first step toward returning to the moon, this time for good. Long Lunar To-Do List There’s a lot of work to

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STEM Profs' Views on Intelligence May Affect Student Outcomes

Students, especially racial minorities, tend to perform worse when professors believe intelligence is fixed

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New Technique Improves Transparent Wood

New Technique Improves Transparent Wood Researchers use a more environmentally friendly approach to make larger see-through wood panels than before. Transparent-wood.jpg Image credits: Courtesy of Rongbo Zheng Technology Friday, February 15, 2019 – 14:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Inspired by a technique first developed by botanists during the 1990s, materials scientists in the pa

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Drones Just Shut Down Another Huge Airport

Brief Delays A drone sighting has once again shut down a major airport while officials scrambled to figure out what was going on. This time, the airport in question was Dubai International Airport, one of the largest international airports in the world. After a drone was spotted nearby, the airport suspended all flight activity between 10:13 and 10:45 a.m. local time, according to The Wall Street

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Interval training may shed more pounds than continuous moderate intensity workout

Interval training may shed more pounds than a continuous moderate intensity workout, suggests a pooled analysis of the available evidence.

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Immersive virtual reality therapy shows lasting effect in treatment of phobias in children with autism

New research shows that an immersive virtual reality environment treats 45 percent of children with autism, freeing them from their fears and phobias — and that the treatment lasts.

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New tool for documenting injuries may provide better evidence for elder abuse cases

Scientists have developed the first standardized framework for clinicians to document physical findings on older patients for better evidence in abuse cases.

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Effective self-control strategies involve much more than willpower

It's mid-February, around the time that most people waver in their commitment to the resolutions they've made for the new year. Many of these resolutions require us to forego a behavior we want to engage in for the one we think we should engage in. In a new report, leading researchers in behavioral science propose a new framework that outlines different types of self-control strategies and emphasi

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Most triggers for irregular heartbeat can be easily modified

A personal survey of patients with atrial fibrillatio, one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats, has found that the majority of triggers for the condition are easily modifiable lifestyle choices, including alcohol, caffeine, exercise and lack of sleep.

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Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin

Researchers wanted to know how Magellanic penguin parents in South America balance the dietary demands of multiple chicks. They found that when a Magellanic penguin parent returns to its nest with fish, the parent tries to feed each of its two chicks equal portions of food, regardless of the youngsters' differences in age or size.

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Novel app uses AI to guide, support cancer patients

Artificial intelligence is helping to guide and support some 50 breast cancer patients in rural Georgia through a novel mobile application that gives them personalized recommendations on everything from side effects to insurance.

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Trump Declared an Emergency Based on Data That Doesn’t Exist

As he declared a national emergency Friday, President Trump repeatedly dismissed statistics and reports produced by his own government.

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Tiny, Motorized Pill Delivers Vaccine to Mouse Intestine

The pea-size machine uses body fluids as fuel to propel itself through the digestive tract.

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Scientist Defends Controversial Cloning of Gene-Edited Monkeys

Primate Problem In January, we reported on a controversial video featuring five newborn monkeys, all of which are clones of a single monkey genetically engineered with CRISPR to cause problems with its circadian rhythms. The monkey clones are clearly not well, exhibiting signs of anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia-like behaviors. Some in the scientific community questioned whether the researc

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Patients' own cells could be the key to treating Crohn's disease

A new technique using patients' own modified cells to treat Crohn's disease has been proven to be effective in experiments using human cells, with a clinical trial of the treatment expected to start in the next six months.

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New live-imaging technique reveals cellular repair crew plugging leaky biological barrier

Suppose you live in a brick house and notice cracks in the mortar that let in cold air, rain and insect pests. You might call a brick mason to repair those leaks and to restore the barrier that keeps the great outdoors from getting inside.

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Q&A: A Tree Grows in — Well, You Don’t Want to Know

Fruit on trees grown near outhouses and latrines usually is safe. That’s not true of produce found on the ground in the same areas.

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Out There: Where’s the Nobel Prize for the Bureaucrats?

In science, as in sports, some of the most important action happens off season and on the sidelines.

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The New Old Age: Dialysis Is a Way of Life for Many Older Patients. Maybe It Shouldn’t Be.

So-called conservative management can ease symptoms without dialysis in some people with kidney disease. But many of them are never given the option.

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The prospects of American strawberries

A team of 12 researchers from 10 different states embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective guideline essential for research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools.

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Social Spelunking With Will Hunt

What's really under our feet? According to author Will Hunt, there are whole worlds. (Image credit: Evening Standard/Getty Images)

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Watch a space harpoon impale a chunk of space debris

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Study shows hope for fighting disease known as Ebola of frogs

Despite widespread infection, some frog populations are surviving a deadly disease that is the equivalent of mankind's Ebola virus. The reason — genetic diversity. That's the finding of a new study published this week in the journal Immunogenetics. Anna Savage, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Central Florida, is the lead author of the study.

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Tesla’s Anti-ICEing System Just Got an Upgrade

ICEd Out In early January, news broke that certain drivers of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles were blocking electric vehicle (EV) charging stations , an act known as ICEing, seemingly as some sort of protest against the vehicles. Within weeks, Tesla proposed a solution , and now — as is the Tesla way — the company is already rolling out an update to it. Automatic Unlocks In mid-January,

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A Philosopher Is Trying to Figure out What Black Holes Really Are

Converging Theories Black holes remain mysterious. It was huge news, back in October, when astronomers did as little as actually confirming that there’s a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. But it turns out that scientists very rarely agree about black holes on a philosophical level — they often can’t even agree what they are. Words Matter That’s the conclusion of an investigati

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Humans Crossed the Bering Land Bridge to People the Americas. Here’s What It Looked Like 18,000 Years Ago.

The Bering Strait land bridge is now underwater, but a newly created digital map reveals how the landscape likely appeared about 18,000 years ago.

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CRISPR Could Make You Immune to the Flu

Flu Vaccine Vaccines for bacterial and viral infections are extremely difficult to develop. But thanks to gene-editing, we could soon be able to make people immune to the flu or even HIV. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington developed a new technique to artificially create improved and longer-lasting antibodies by editing the DNA of so-called B cells —

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Climate march students: 'We need change and we need it now'

Students have protested across the UK to air their views on the issue of climate change. We talked to some of those in Manchester.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: The Allure of OG Usernames

Product designer Chris Messina snagged @chris as his Instagram name. It’s been awesome—and terrible. Plus: Amazon splits with NYC, on the Gadget Lab podcast.

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Open-science model for drug discovery expands to neurodegenerative diseases

Parkinson's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis are the newest frontiers for open science drug discovery, a global movement led by academic scientists in Toronto that puts knowledge sharing and medication affordability ahead of patents and profits.

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Science in Puerto Rico Still Recovering After Hurricane Maria

Scientists at the University of Puerto Rico suffered major setbacks due to damages and delays in repairs, and government austerity measures are adding insult to injury.

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With HQ2, New York and Amazon Played a Zero Sum Game—And Everyone Lost

With the HQ2 split, New York lost a chance for a more diverse economy. Amazon lost a chance to engage with critics. And in it all, America lost out too.

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Science Agencies to Get Boost Under New US Budget

The bill for fiscal year 2019 increases allocations for NSF, FDA, and others above 2018 levels.

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Bonds with teachers boost interest in math class

Having a healthy bond with a teacher might have academic perks, according to new research. A new study finds that when a teacher believes they have a positive association with a student, that student may be more likely to agree that they have a positive connection, as well as a higher interest and greater confidence in mathematics. “While it might not be surprising that better student-teacher rel

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Twitter Could Consider Implementing A ‘Clarify’ Feature

Twitter has been slowly opening themselves up to the idea of introducing an edit feature, and more recently Twitter’s CEO floated an idea of how such a feature could work. However the …

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AI text generator too dangerous to release, say creators

Developers cite concerns over fake news proliferation and risk of online impersonation

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Is This the Footprint of One of the Last Neandertals?

The fossilized print, found in Gibraltar, is said to date to 28,000 years ago, which might mean it belonged to a Neandertal. But not everyone agrees with that interpretation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Volkswagen is pushing for CO2 neutral production of electric cars

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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How Taylor Swift showed us the scary future of facial recognition | Technology

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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UTMB develops drug to rejuvenate muscle cells

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a study just published in Biochemical Pharmacology.

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NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Gelena's post-tropical transition

Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low pressure area. As Tropical Cyclone Gelena transitioned into a subtropical storm, NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

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California's Rain Was a 'Cat 4' Atmospheric River. Wait, What?

All that rain drenching California this week came from an atmospheric river. A new rating scale would tell you how much water is fueling the system.

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Space junk harpooned like whale in orbit-cleanup test

A harpoon flung from a satellite has successfully captured a piece of pretend space junk, like a whale.

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Is This the Footprint of One of the Last Neandertals?

The fossilized print, found in Gibraltar, is said to date to 28,000 years ago, which might mean it belonged to a Neandertal. But not everyone agrees with that interpretation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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5 of the worst keto diet side effects

In addition to weight loss, there are a few well-known side effects of the keto diet, some of which can be unpleasant. Some side effects of the keto diet are bound to occur, though others only happen when the diet is implemented poorly. The keto diet doesn't have to lead to a host of negative side effects, but anyone considering undertaking the diet over the long term should be especially careful

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LIGO will be getting a quantum upgrade

Quantum squeezing of light will help scientists make better gravitational wave detectors.

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Flu season's been pretty quiet this year—here's why

Health It's not just because of measles. We haven’t been hearing much about influenza this year, and that’s only in part because measles has taken a priority. This week, the Centers for Disease Control released…

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Samples of text generated by OpenAI's recent model

submitted by /u/vintermann [link] [comments]

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Tom Cade, a Savior of the Peregrine Falcon, Dies at 91

After DDT had wiped the bird out on the East Coast, he led the effort to bring it back. It was eventually removed from the federal endangered species list.

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Study: No race or gender bias seen in initial NIH grant reviews

Examinations of National Institutes of Health grants in the last 15 years have shown that white scientists are more likely to be successful in securing funding from the agency than their black peers.A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that bias is unlikely to play out in the initial phase of the process NIH uses to review applications for the billions of federal grant dollar

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Researchers find genetic vulnerability to menthol cigarette use

A genetic variant found only in people of African descent significantly increases a smoker's preference for cigarettes containing menthol, a flavor additive. The variant of the MRGPRX4 gene is five to eight times more frequent among smokers who use menthol cigarettes than other smokers. The multi-ethnic study is the first to look across all genes to identify genetic vulnerability to menthol cigare

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Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation

Choosing the 'right' brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. Jonathan Brumberg of the University of Kansas will present on this subject and demonstrate a variety of brain-computer interfaces Feb. 17 at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

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STEM Profs' Views on Intelligence May Affect Student Outcomes

Students, especially racial minorities, tend to perform worse when professors believe intelligence is fixed

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Daily briefing: How one academic couple solved the two-body problem

Daily briefing: How one academic couple solved the two-body problem Daily briefing: How one academic couple solved the two-body problem, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00603-1 Juggling two careers and a child, how broken sleep promotes cardiovascular disease, and why we’re about to see a lot more gravitational waves.

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Will Trump Live to 500?

Six days passed between the president’s physical exam and the release of the doctors’ findings on Thursday. Even then, the anticlimactic unveiling raised only more speculation about the true state of Donald Trump’s health. On February 8, Trump underwent a physical exam, according to the White House, which afterward released a brief press memo that said it was from the president’s new physician, S

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Letters: ‘Tribes Do Not Tolerate Freedom’

What I’ve Gained by Leaving the Republican Party Since the political rise of Donald Trump, Peter Wehner has found himself deeply disappointed in—and often at odds with—the Republican Party. Both losses and insights come from being politically homeless, he wrote last week : “The main thing I’ve gained in unfastening myself from the GOP is critical distance and detachment. One can see certain thing

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Photos of the Week: Lego Bugatti, Snowy Seattle, Cattle Dating

Valentine’s Day among humans and animals, fashion in New York City, dogs at play and in competition, a peasant-revolt reenactment in Croatia, family reunions at an Indian border fence, an icy dinosaur in Latvia, the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles, snow kayaking in Estonia, International Condom Day in Mexico City, and much more

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Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to new findings.

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Study: Faculty beliefs about intelligence predict racial achievement gaps in STEM classes

In a major analysis of university faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and math, Indiana University social psychologists found that professors' beliefs about intelligence play a measurable role in the success of all students, especially underrepresented minorities taking their first college-level STEM courses.

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What rising seas mean for local economies

High-tide flooding resulting from climate change is already disrupting the economy of Annapolis, Md. As sea levels rise, the impacts are expected to get worse for coastal communities.

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Hong Kong seizes $1m worth of rhino horn at airport

Two men carrying at least 24 severed rhino horns have been arrested at Hong Kong airport's customs.

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Researchers hung men on a cross and added blood in bid to prove Turin Shroud is real

Latest attempt to authenticate cloth—which dating tests have confirmed is a medieval fake—to be presented at forensic meeting

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On the origin of B1 cells

A new study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology: researchers report that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the team's experiments show that a B1-typical B-cell receptor can reprogram B2 cells into B1 cells, suggesting that B1 cells emerge as a consequence of their special B-cell receptors.

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A Mind-Boggling Soviet Nostalgia Project

PARIS—It’s the most bananas artistic undertaking of this century. DAU , as the project is known, is a Soviet thought experiment that brings together A-list artists, world-class scientists, a handful of famous actors, Cambridge Analytica (almost), and a lot of Russian money to create 13 feature-length films, as well as an online experience and a rich auxiliary cultural program. The Guardian called

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