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nyheder2019februar17

'The Darling will die': Scientists say mass fish kill due to over-extraction and drought

Australian Academy of Sciences panel says urgent steps needed to restore flows A scientific panel investigating the causes of three mass fish deaths at the Menindee lakes has pointed the finger squarely at those managing the Murray-Darling river system, saying the lack of flows was caused by a combination of drought and over-extraction, leading to the environmental disaster. Up to one million nat

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Sound waves get quantum systems to ‘talk’

Researchers have invented a way for different types of quantum technology to “talk” to each other using sound. Researchers are eyeing quantum systems, which tap the quirky behavior of the smallest particles as the key to a fundamentally new generation of atomic-scale electronics for computation and communication. But transferring information between different types of technology, such as quantum

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Brain discovery explains a great mystery of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

One of the great mysteries of neuroscience may finally have an answer: Scientists have identified a potential explanation for the mysterious death of specific brain cells seen in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

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PhD reviews climate change in Civ VI Gathering Storm

submitted by /u/hon_fan [link] [comments]

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LG says it isn’t launching a folding phone

The first wave of folding phone announcements is nigh, with Samsung, Huawei, Xiaomi and others expected to show devices this month. But the one company I’d expect to join them — …

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Biologists identify honeybee 'clean' genes known for improving survival

The key to breeding disease-resistant honeybees could lie in a group of genes — known for controlling hygienic behavior — that enable colonies to limit the spread of harmful mites and bacteria, according to genomics research. The researchers narrowed in on the 'clean' genes known to improve the colony's chance of survival.

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Lithium-air batteries can store energy for cars, houses and industry

Growth in the offer of renewable energy sources will mean increased demand for devices optimal for energy storing.

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U.K. lawmakers scold Facebook, call for increased social-media regulation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Smoking may limit body's ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer

Melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive their skin cancer than people who have never smoked, according to a new report funded by Cancer Research UK.

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Facebook ‘intentionally and knowingly’ violated U.K. privacy and competition rules, British lawmakers say

Lawmakers on Sunday said Facebook had "violated both data privacy and anti-competition laws" in the country, stressing that the U.K. government should open investigations into the social media …

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Magnetic fields enhance bone remodeling

Since the creation of 3D-printed (3DP) porous titanium scaffolds in 2016, the scientific community has been exploring ways to improve their ability to stimulate osteogenesis, or bone remodeling. A recent study revealed the osteogenic potential of Static Magnetic Field (SMF) treatment for human bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) using 3DP scaffolds in vitro and in vivo.

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Embryo ‘Adoption’ Is Growing, but It’s Getting Tangled in the Abortion Debate

Many agencies that offer donated embryos, including most of those supported by federal grants, are affiliated with Christian or anti-abortion rights organizations.

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In Magnificent Desolation

The Chang'e 4 lander and rover seen on the lunar surface from orbit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Galaxy S10 could be all that, but the original Samsung Galaxy S was a confusing mess – CNET

As Samsung prepares to celebrate its 10th anniversary Galaxy, remember that the first Galaxy S wasn't just one phone. It was four.

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The future of robots and artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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NASA and ESA team up for historic planetary defense test

NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are working together on missions to a binary asteroid system. The DART and Hera missions will attempt to deflect and study the asteroid Didymoon. A planetary defense system is important in preventing large-scale catastrophes. None It's not just a Hollywood exaggeration that an impact from an asteroid crashing into Earth would be massively catastrophic. Dep

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3D protein structure reveals a new mechanism for future anti-cancer drugs

Researchers have discovered a new mechanism for a class of anti-cancer drugs known as E1 inhibitors. Their findings reveal a novel binding site that will promote drug design of more efficient E1 inhibitors.

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First model of mitochondrial epilepsy

Researchers have become the first to describe a model of mitochondrial epilepsy which raises hope for better therapies for patients with this incapacitating condition.Despite the severity of this epilepsy, up to now there have been no animal models available to provide a mechanistic understanding of the condition. That is set to change though as researchers can now explain the important role that

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Plastics reach remote pristine environments, scientists say

Birds’ eggs in High Arctic contain chemical additives used in plastics Scientists have warned about the impact of plastic pollution in the most pristine corners of the world after discovering chemical additives in birds’ eggs in the High Arctic. Eggs laid by northern fulmars on Prince Leopold Island in the Canadian Arctic tested positive for hormone-disrupting phthalates, a family of chemicals th

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What leads to a better view point?

Oops, meant to call this thread 'What leads to a better world?' Hey all, I'm tryna work out which attitudes/view points are the ones to adopt to best ensure the future of humankind Is there any you would add to this list? I know that some will be controversial, and some will be disputed, but I wanna give this a go to see if we can have a consensus on some/most of them Pro- veganism Pro- a

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Nuclear Power Can’t Survive, Much Less Slow Climate Disruption

submitted by /u/1321123 [link] [comments]

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Study blames YouTube for rise in number of Flat Earthers

Conspiracy theories shown on video-sharing site persuade people to doubt Earth is round Researchers believe they have identified the prime driver for a startling rise in the number of people who think the Earth is flat : Google’s video-sharing site, YouTube. Their suspicion was raised when they attended the world’s largest gatherings of Flat Earthers at the movement’s annual conference in Rayleig

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Hundar ett allt större hot mot djurliv världen över

Förvildade och friströvande hundar har bidragit till utrotningen av nästan ett dussin vilda fåglar och djurarter. Det rapporterar BBC. Därmed kan hundar nu läggas till listan på mänskligt introducerade rovdjur som förstör vilt djurliv.

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Geek Deals: Get 13 2D Games for $12 with Humble Bundle

For a limited time, Humble Bundle is offering up $151 worth of Steam codes for 13 2D games made with GameMaker Studio. If you want a good representation of what can be done […] The post …

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Is Regulation a Way to Restore Faith in Blockchain Systems?

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Understanding China's AI Strategy

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Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia

Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. Resettlement of indigenous communities resulted in the spread of invasive species, the absence of human-set fires, and a general cascade in the interconnected food web that led to the largest mammalian extinction event ever recorded. In this case, the absence of direct human activity on the landscape may be the cause of the extincti

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On Itchiness in Science Writing

Spotting and scratching the places where something just feels off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Another LENR scam LoL

submitted by /u/CrustySteak [link] [comments]

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A future with universal basic income?

submitted by /u/Rattraps123 [link] [comments]

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There's a place for us: New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems

In two back-to-back symposia a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists will present the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time.

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Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change

Understanding the relationship between microbes and viruses is beneficial not only for medical research and practical applications but also in marine biology, say researchers.

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Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks to predict climate change at large scale

Researches have identified long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world. They describe how such an effort, could absorb as much as 135 gigatons of atmospheric carbon.

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Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture

Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new research.

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US millennials a popular but elusive target for brands

American millennials—the generation of people aged 17-35—are a popular target for advertisers and brands, but companies risk missing out by approaching them as one homogenous population.

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Potential privacy lapse found in Americans' 2010 census data

An internal team at the Census Bureau found that basic personal information collected from more than 100 million Americans during the 2010 head count could be reconstructed from obscured data, but with lots of mistakes, a top agency official disclosed Saturday.

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How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?

Software- and computer-based works of art are fragile—not unlike their canvas counterparts—as their underlying technologies such as operating systems and programming languages change rapidly, …

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Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change

Viruses don't always kill their microbial hosts. In many cases, they develop a mutually beneficial relationship: the virus establishes itself inside the microbe and, in return, grants its host …

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Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change

Viruses don't always kill their microbial hosts. In many cases, they develop a mutually beneficial relationship: the virus establishes itself inside the microbe and, in return, grants its host with immunity against attack by similar viruses.

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Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change

Viruses don't always kill their microbial hosts. In many cases, they develop a mutually beneficial relationship: the virus establishes itself inside the microbe and, in return, grants its host with immunity against attack by similar viruses.

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How secret, late-night experiments transformed two scientists into master cartoonists

Matteo Farinella and Jason McDermott explain how other scientists can unleash their inner artists

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The Dead Mars Rover Didn’t Actually Say That “My Battery” Thing

My Battery Is Low When news broke last week that NASA had finally given up hope on its long-lived Opportunity Mars rover, one fact dominated the conversation: that the rover’s last words were the emo-sounding line “My battery is low and it’s getting dark.” The line originated with science reporter Jacob Margolis, who tweeted that the rover’s that those had “basically” been the rover’s last words.

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Drug combination may become new standard treatment for advanced kidney cancer

A combination of two drugs — one of them an immunotherapy agent — could become a new standard, first-line treatment for patients with metastatic kidney cancer, results from a phase 3 clinical trial suggest.

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A hidden source of air pollution? Your daily household tasks

Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city.

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Weak spots for Mission to Mars revealed

Researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars.

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Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution

While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem.

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Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy

Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a statistician.

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How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?

Software- and computer-based works of art are fragile—not unlike their canvas counterparts—as their underlying technologies such as operating systems and programming languages change rapidly, placing these works at risk.

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Meteorite source in asteroid belt not a single debris field

A new study published online in Meteoritics and Planetary Science finds that our most common meteorites, those known as L chondrites, come from at least two different debris fields in the asteroid belt. The belt contains many debris fields created from former dwarf planets, or dwarf planets in the making, that collided long ago. These fragments, called asteroids, continue to collide, producing the

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A hidden source of air pollution? Your daily household tasks

Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city, University of Colorado Boulder researchers say.

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Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy

Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician.

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Art Institute of Chicago unveils key findings in African art thanks to medical technology

On February 16, the Art Institute of Chicago announced the results of significant new research on five terracotta sculptures—so named Bankoni after a village in present-day Mali where they were …

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To fight off unemployment, Iraqi youth plant start-up seeds

Stuck between an endless waitlist for a government job and a frail private sector, Iraqi entrepreneurs are taking on staggering unemployment by establishing their own start-ups.

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Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution

While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a Penn State materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem.

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Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia

Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. Resettlement of indigenous communities resulted in the spread of invasive species, the absence of human-set fires, and a general cascade in the interconnected food web that led to the largest mammalian extinction event ever recorded. In this case, the absence of direct human activity on the landscape may be the cause of the extincti

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There's a place for us: New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems

In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 1:30 and 3:30 PM respectively, a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists will present the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time.

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Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings

Even Georgia O'Keeffe noticed the pin-sized blisters bubbling on the surface of her paintings. For decades, conservationists and scholars assumed these tiny protrusions were grains of sand, kicked up from the New Mexico desert where O'Keeffe lived and worked. But as the protrusions began to grow, spread and eventually flake off, people shifted from curious to concerned.

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Art Institute of Chicago unveils key findings in African art thanks to medical technology

On February 16, the Art Institute of Chicago announced the results of significant new research on five terracotta sculptures—so named Bankoni after a village in present-day Mali where they were found. The objects date from between the 12th and 15th centuries. This places them "among the oldest surviving sculptures from sub-Saharan Africa and among the oldest works of African art in the Art Institu

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Study of analog crews in isolation reveals weak spots for Mission to Mars

Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars.

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First evidence discovered of a gigantic remnant around an exploding star

A San Diego State University astrophysicist has helped discover evidence of a gigantic remnant surrounding an exploding star—a shell of material so huge, it must have been erupting on a regular basis for millions of years.

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Political and policy feedbacks in the climate system

Matto Mildenberger, University of California Santa Barbara explains how perceived experiences with climate change in the United States can be linked to political shifts in Congress, culture and society. He will demonstrate how partisan opinions about the prevalence and dangers of climate change in each of the 50 states and 435 congressional districts in the United States can change policymaking by

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Kitchen pollutants can be as unhealthy as city smog

Even toast can lower air quality to levels considered unsafe outdoors, says study

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #7

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… El Niño/La Niña Update… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Poster of the Week… SkS Week in Review… Story of the Week… 16-Year-Old Greta Thunberg Cheers 'Beginning of Great Changes' as Climate Strike Goes Global Because "present and future on this planet are at stake," say teen climate activists, "we won't be silent any longer" Students

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The Narrative Fallacy: The story of your life is most likely a sham.

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Massive Storms Lead to Elevated Landslide Hazards for the West Coast

Saturated slopes can be very bad news. The good news: Congress may be ready to do something about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could AI be used to predict stock prices? [Answer and Tutorial]

submitted by /u/SilentDifficulty [link] [comments]

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Research: Planting Trillions of Trees Could Cancel Out CO2 Emissions

Fresh Air An ambitious new analysis of the world’s forests found that there’s space to plant 1.2 trillion new trees — a number that would absorb more carbon than human emissions. According to the new data, ETH Zurich researcher Thomas Crowther told The Independent , trees are “our most powerful weapon in the fight against climate change.” Wiped Out Crowther told the Independent that the new analy

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Visa And Mastercard Transactions Could Get More Expensive In The U.S.

Ever wondered how card networks like Visa and Mastercard make money? They charge processing fees from merchants. They have to pay a small fee to the bank that issued the customers’ …

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Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change

Understanding the relationship between microbes and viruses is beneficial not only for medical research and practical applications but also in marine biology, says Alison Buchan, Carolyn W. Fite Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Want to get a politician to listen to science? Here’s some advice

Experts provide tips for getting evidence-based research into Congress

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Navy’s Giant New Robot Sub Will Prowl Ocean For Months Autonomously

Absolute Unit The Navy just awarded Boeing a contract to build a giant robot submarine, called the Orca Extra-Large Unmanned Undersea Vehicle, which it says will prowl the depths of the ocean autonomously for months at a time. The U.S. Naval Institute says the sub will be used for “mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, electronic warfare and strike missions.” Extra L

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New app reveals the hidden landscapes within Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings

The technique can help analyze—and maybe save—artwork in distress

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Forskare kräver att oberoende aktör ska granska hälsoböcker

Många böcker om kost och hälsa innehåller så allvarliga fel att det kan påverka människors hälsa negativt. Det menar fyra medicinforskare, som nu föreslår att en oberoende aktör ska granska innehållet i böcker som sägs vara grundade i forskning och vetenskap.

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NASA Chief: SpaceX’s Starship Tougher Than Any NASA Project, Ever

Orders of Magnitude In a new interview with Business Insider , the director of the Space Technology and Exploration Directorate at NASA Langley warned that Elon Musk’s proposed Starship design was going to be “orders of magnitude” more difficult than any NASA project in history. “It won’t be easy for us or SpaceX,” Walt Engelund told Business Insider . Sweating Bullets Engelund’s specific concern

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Northwestern study of analog crews in isolation reveals weak spots for Mission to Mars

Researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars.Highlights: Space exploration analogs in US, Russia offer rare opportunity to study teams in isolation, confinement; Mars crew will likely experience decline in creative thinking, problem solving; predicti

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Stable ischemic heart disease in the older adult

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Juan R. Vilaro from the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., USA considers stable ischemic heart disease in the older adult.

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Diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Cody Schwartz and David Winchester from the Malcom Randall VAMC, Gainesville, Fla., USA consider diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease.

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Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic targets in stable ischemic heart disease

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, C. Richard Conti from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, Fla., USA considers epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic targets in stable ischemic heart disease.

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TCL's folding phone projects include a watch-like bracelet

Multiple companies have ideas as to how they'll develop folding smartphones. TCL, however, isn't content to settle on one — it's seemingly tackling them all. CNET …

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Macklemore was a visionary!

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Sensors and Machine Learning Are Giving Robots a Sixth Sense

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Technology in deep time: How it evolves alongside us

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Sensors and Machine Learning Are Giving Robots a Sixth Sense

According to some scientists, humans really do have a sixth sense. There’s nothing supernatural about it: the sense of proprioception tells you about the relative positions of your limbs and the rest of your body. Close your eyes, block out all sound, and you can still use this internal “map” of your external body to locate your muscles and body parts – you have an innate sense of the distances b

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Contemporary management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Radmila Lyubarova, Joshua Schulman-Marcus and William E. Boden from the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Albany Medical Center, Albany, N.Y., USA and VA New England Healthcare System, Boston, Mass., USA, consider contemporary management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

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Chemicals firms move regulation to EU in case of no-deal Brexit

Fears of no-deal Brexit prompt 50 firms with UK operations to seek to use EU regulators The threat of a no-deal Brexit has prompted a slew of chemicals companies to move regulatory approvals from the UK to the EU to protect their ability to do business legally. More than 50 British chemicals companies with operations in the UK have applied to use EU regulators for critical authorisations that wil

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Space junk: Harpoon tested to clean up space

New footage from a space mission shows the latest idea to collect space junk.

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How to limit which companies track your internet activity

DIY All the privacy settings in your browser and how they work. Here's what those privacy settings in your browser mean—and how you can use them to browse the web safely.

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The future of transportation

submitted by /u/jmalipio [link] [comments]

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Samsung quits making new Blu-ray players

Slowly but surely, spinning discs are dying out, and Samsung just put another nail in their coffin. The company told Forbes that it’s done producing 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players …

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Nyt superlet materiale er perfekt som varmeisolator i rumfartsindustrien

PLUS. En aerogel holdt sammen af lag af hexagonal bornitrid udvider sig under tryk og negativ termisk udvidelseskoeffecient – og så er det i modsætning til lignende materialer stabilt og holdbart.

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Problems with self driving vehicles

A new car will be godlike, driving 100 times better than a human but what after 5 -7 years. Cars develop problems, weird problems and they are suspected to a lot of abuse. Old or ever current cars are simple in their construction. They can survive harsh conditions and unintentional rash driving. these AV are not that strong in their construction. Too many parts to failure and too much complicated

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Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture

Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new Duke University-led research. The researchers presented their findings Feb. 17 at the annual meeting

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A hidden source of air pollution? Your daily household tasks

Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city.

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Cooking Sunday roast causes indoor pollution ‘worse than Delhi’

Scientists say roast meal can make household air dirtier than in sixth most polluted city Cooking a Sunday roast can drive indoor air pollution far above the levels found in the most polluted cities on Earth, scientists have said. Researchers found that roasting meat and vegetables, and using a gas hob, released a surge of fine particles that could make household air dirtier than that in Delhi. C

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An ageing world needs more resourceful robots

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The End Of Work: The Consequences Of An Economic Singularity

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Opportunity Rover Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

The internet also said "hello, again" to more government shutdown talk last week.

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Digging Into Self-Driving Data and More Car News This Week

Plus: We bid adieu to the Airbus A380, Amazon makes a move, and we take a tour of the gear that keeps Nascar racers on the oval.

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Quiz: Er du klog nok til at undgå farlige bakterier i din hverdag?

Tag quizzen og kom ind i kampen mod multiresistente bakterier.

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The Couple That Studies the Intermediate Value Theorem Together Stays Together

Mathematicians Nikita Nikolaev and Beatriz Navarro Lameda share their favorite theorem and their mathematics-themed wedding — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smartwatches Are Changing the Purpose of the EKG

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET on February 17, 2019 Think of the stereotypical representations of medicine, as they might appear on a television show: the crisp white coat, of course, and the stethoscope dangling at the ready. Syringes and intravenous lines, maybe. An X-ray or CT scan slammed theatrically into a light box. But any medical scene is incomplete without an electrocardiogram (EKG) machine r

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Volunteers Fight Bad Science

James Heathers is a postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University, who looks for mistakes for fun. He speaks to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks about errors published in scientific papers.

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'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space

Kindergartners from Georgetown Day School in Washington D.C., help NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro field questions to McClain, who's an astronaut serving on the International Space Station. (Image credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

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Astrophysicists Find New Clue in Search for Universe's Missing Matter

Astronomers think they've found a new clue in their continuing quest to solve one of the most substantial mysteries of the cosmos: where about a third of the universe's matter is hiding.

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What the Heck Happened to This Yo-Yo Champ's Index Finger?

A yo-yo champion experienced dramatic ups and downs for the circulation in his index finger.

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Mendeleev's Periodic Table Draft Is Virtually Unrecognizable — But It Changed Science Forever

Back in 1869, the periodic table of elements had just 63 elements and was scribbled in ink.

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Common gut virus linked to coeliac disease

Researchers identify a possible connection between a childhood illness and later autoimmune disease. Lyndal Byford reports.

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A meerkat stares into an uncertain future

Study suggests more heat and less rain will affect the iconic species.

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A robot that can touch, eat and sleep? The science of cyborgs like Alita: Battle Angel

A new steampunk movie is a worthy addition to the canon of films that provoke us to think about just what our world of tomorrow will look like, say Michael Milford and Peter Stratton.

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How the Brain Keeps Its Memories in the Right Order

A long-standing mystery in neuroscience is how the brain attaches a timestamp to our memories. Researchers now may have identified a neural mechanism.

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Estimating childbirth deaths in prehistory

Modern United Nations data offers a way to assess the rates of maternal mortality in ancient communities. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Genetic engineering promises improved bone marrow transplants

First clinical trial shows partial donors can be used in blood cancer treatments. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The Strange Beach Novel That Would Make Mallarmé Proud

Chloe Aridjis is not a novelist who appears to care about plot, so let’s get the story of Sea Monsters , her third book, out of the way. Its protagonist, a moody, Morrissey-loving teenager named Luisa, meets a boy named Tomás and lets him persuade her to run away from home. The two take the bus from Mexico City to Oaxaca, where they camp in a beach town called Zipolite and where Luisa rapidly los

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What Is Credential Stuffing?

What happens to all those emails and passwords that get leaked? They're frequently used to try to break into users' other accounts across the internet.

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This Company Takes the Grunt Work Out of Using the Cloud

HashiCorp has won fans among developers, and a billion-dollar valuation, by automating the mundane tasks of setting up and configuring servers.

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Fossil Sport Smartwatch Review: A (Mostly) Solid WearOS Watch

Even with some flaws, it's almost certainly the best WearOS smartwatch you can buy.

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Tooth plaque shows drinking milk goes back 3,000 years in Mongolia

The hardened plaque on teeth is helping scientists trace the history of dairying in Mongolia.

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Hidden Passengers on Insects Could Give Us The New Antibiotics We Desperately Need

We could have thousands of new recruits ready to help.

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Scientists work to save ‘fragile’ digital media artworks

Without intervention works can be unplayable just a few years after their creation

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Analyse: Kæmpefejl sikrer forbud mod fluorstoffer

PLUS. I årevis overskred industrien uden konsekvenser vej­ledende grænser for fluorstoffer. Men da myndighederne erkendte at have skudt grænsen 1.750 gange for lavt, blev det for meget.

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Kaepernick Won. The NFL Lost.

Technically, Colin Kaepernick withdrew his collusion case. Technically, the NFL did not admit that it conspired to blackball Kaepernick from the league after he began taking a knee during the national anthem to protest racial injustice. But nontechnically speaking, the NFL lost. Massively. The terms of the settlement, announced on Friday, were not disclosed. But it doesn’t matter how much money K

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Three Bishops Stand Against an Execution in Georgia

There is no toxin more pernicious than hatred based on racial stereotypes. Despite progress in overcoming the sin of racism in recent years, racism still exists in American society—causing pain and hurt, and even leading to death. As a case in point, Keith Tharpe sits on death row in Jackson, Georgia, convicted of a gruesome murder 28 years ago. While we cannot speak to the legal issues of this c

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Florida's farmers plot new course after Hurricane Michael's deadly tear

Storm’s assault through Panhandle has left growers moving away from traditional farming towards alternatives like hemp and hops Hurricane Michael’s deadly tear through Florida’s Panhandle four months ago will help fuel a transformation of the state’s agricultural industry, experts are predicting, with significant numbers of growers moving away from traditional farming and towards a future of alte

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Sharp rise in methane levels threatens world climate targets

submitted by /u/StK84 [link] [comments]

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Scientists are creating music to unlock your brain’s potential

Instead of prescribing medications to kids with ADD or ADHD, Clark and his team at Brain.fm are looking to music as another option for treatment. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the company is developing music that features "neural-phase locking" — a combination of different principles that create specific characteristics in the brain, such as increased concentration or rela

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Can a 16th-century martyr help to save Italy from rightwing populism? | Stephanie Merritt

The philosopher Giordano Bruno, burned for heresy in 1600, has become a symbol of free expression and tolerance Every year on 17 February, a crowd gathers in Rome’s Campo de’ Fiori to place wreaths, poems and candles at the foot of the statue that glowers towards the Vatican from beneath its friar’s cowl. The man it memorialises, the Neapolitan philosopher Giordano Bruno , was burned alive by the

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Your phone and shoes are home to completely unknown life forms

Samples taken from people’s shoes and phones have been found to contain DNA from nine mysterious and unstudied branches of the bacteria family tree

15h

NASA wants to go back to the moon as quickly as possible

submitted by /u/rgeek63 [link] [comments]

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor indeholder unge stjerner mere metal end gamle?

En læser undrer sig over, at unge stjerner skulle indeholde mere metal end gamle stjerner, for kommet metallet ikke med alderen? Det svarer Ole J. Knudsen fra Aarhus Universitet på.

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US Military Releases Its Artificial Intelligence Strategy

submitted by /u/strontiumae [link] [comments]

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Miraklernes tid er forbi: Overforbrug af antibiotika har ført til kamp mod tiden

I 2050 risikerer flere mennesker at dø af multiresistente bakterier end af kræft. Heldigvis er der nogle, der arbejder hårdt på at finde løsninger.

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Se in i stenålderns dödsrike

Överallt längs väggarna sitter de döda, insvepta som Inka-mumier. Några kroppar har precis börjat upplösas, andra har redan fallit sönder. I en sådan här stenåldersgrav kan myten om vikingarnas dödsrike skapats.

20h

Därför klarar björnen av sex månader i ide

Då en björn ligger i ide slår hjärtat långsammare och kroppen ger inte ifrån sig varken avföring eller urin. Hur kommer det sig att björnen kan ligga stilla i flera månader och ändå vara frisk efter den långa vintervilan? Spela klippet för att se hur björnens kropp fungerar.

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Björnblod kan leda till nya läkemedel

Förmågan att äta sig fet, sova sig igenom långa vintrar och ändå hålla sig frisk är något som björnen klarar. Nu har man hittat ämnen i björnblodet som visat sig kunna stimulera mänskliga muskelceller och kanske bli nya läkemedel.

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Rumored banana-yellow Galaxy S10E teaches us something about ourselves – CNET

Black phones outsell colors, but companies keep making flashy phones for a reason.

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1d

Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count

Bird lovers around the world are counting birds this weekend for the annual Great Backyard Bird Count, which provides valuable data for avian research. (Image credit: Courtesy of August Davidson-Onsgard)

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Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

submitted by /u/dyingofdysentery [link] [comments]

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Asteroid mining colonies are technically feasible

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Can these smart glasses do what Google couldn’t?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Behold, close-ups of the sand from around the cosmos

Microscopic photography exposes the beauty and strangeness of sand. Water wave action produces a startling variety of sand grains. That stuff between your toes is a lot more interesting than you might think. None We typically refer to grains of sand as uncountable tiny bits of rock whose most interesting characteristic is just how many of them there are. Like stars in the sky. We do them a disser

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The Epic Scale of Spacetime

submitted by /u/jenpalex [link] [comments]

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The TechCrunch reading guide to building the future

submitted by /u/eliotpeper [link] [comments]

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Remembering Mars Rover, 'Opportunity'

Space scientists pay tribute to the Mars rover, Opportunity, which died this week after 14 years sending data back to Earth. The rover was expected to last only three months.

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PET/CT imaging agent shows promise for better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism

Researchers report that a new nuclear medicine tracer may allow better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). Acute VTE is a disease that includes deep-vein thrombosis and its complication, pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal.

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How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?

Just as conservators have developed methods to protect traditional artworks, computer scientists have now created means to safeguard computer- or time-based art by following the same preservation principles.

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Drug combination may become new standard treatment for advanced kidney cancer

A combination of two drugs — one of them an immunotherapy agent — could become a new standard, first-line treatment for patients with metastatic kidney cancer, says an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial.

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DRINKING NASTY SWAMP WATER (to save the world)

submitted by /u/Jazz30-06 [link] [comments]

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Newly discovered design rules lead to better fuel cell catalyst

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

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