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nyheder2019februar18

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists

Rutgers and other physicists have discovered an exotic form of electrons that spin like planets and could lead to advances in lighting, solar cells, lasers and electronic displays.

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Professor: 12.000 nye job på Avedøre Holme er 'grebet ud af luften'

Hvis Hvidovres ambition om de mange tusind nye arbejdspladser skal lykkes, skal dampen under den danske økonomi fortsætte mange år frem.

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Climate change and climate change velocity analysis across Germany

Climate change and climate change velocity analysis across Germany Climate change and climate change velocity analysis across Germany, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38720-6 Climate change and climate change velocity analysis across Germany

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Great white shark genome decoded

In a major scientific step to understand the biology of this iconic apex predator and sharks in general, the entire genome of the white shark has now been decoded in detail.

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Helping patients breathe during dangerous procedure prevents complications

A new study is showing that using bag-mask ventilation, squeezing air from a bag into the mouth for 60 seconds to help patients' breathing, improves outcomes and could potentially save lives.

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Can couches and vinyl floors make kids really sick?

Children who live in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful compounds in their blood or urine than children who live in homes that don’t, according to a new study. The study shows that kids living in homes where the sofa in the main living area contains flame-retardant polybrominated diphenyl ethers (P

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Japan Approves iPS Cell Therapy Trial for Spinal Cord Injury

The treatment will be tested in a handful of patients who suffered nerve damage in sports or traffic accidents.

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Why Do We Forget Things? It May Make The Mind More Efficient

In the quest to fend off forgetfulness, some people build a palace of memory. It’s a method for memorizing invented in ancient times by (legend has it) the Greek poet Simonides of Ceos, more recently made popular by multiple best-selling books (and the “mind palace” of Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock Holmes). Memory palaces provide imaginary architectural repositories for storing and retrieving an

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Think You Love Your Partner? It's Complicated

Valentine cards are filled with expressions of unequivocal adoration and appreciation. That’s fitting for the holiday set aside to express love and reaffirm commitment to one’s romantic partner. But what if there’s more going on below the surface of these adoring declarations? How might thoughts and feelings that people are not even aware of shape their romantic relationships? We are two psycholog

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Japan's Hayabusa 2 Mission Will Mine an Asteroid This Week

The Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa 2 is ready to touch down on asteroid Ryugu and should do so later this week. On Monday morning, Japanese officials confirmed that the spacecraft will attempt to land at 6 p.m. EST on Thursday, Feb. 21. The spacecraft has been in orbit around Ryugu since June of 2018. Once it reaches the surface, it will start its main mission of collecting samples from Ryugu’s surf

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Researchers Trace the Origins of Thousands of Ancient European Megaliths

(Inside Science) – New research suggests that megaliths — monuments such as Stonehenge created from large rocks during the Stone and Copper Ages in Europe — owe their origins to a mysterious culture from northwest France with advanced seafaring technology. Roughly 35,000 megaliths are known throughout Europe, including standing stones, stone circles and megalithic tombs. Most megaliths date from

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HIV rates hold steady among transwomen in S.F.

Programs in San Francisco to prevent HIV among transgender women are helping to lower the rate of new infections, research finds. However, this vulnerable population—especially people of color or those with lower income—still needs better care and treatment, according to the study in the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases . “Despite the stability in HIV prevalence, infection is still highest a

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Chrome browser patch will close loophole used to block Incognito mode

When using Incognito mode, browsing history is not recorded, and websites cannot use cookies to track internet activity. Since so much of the internet uses tracking cookies to target users with …

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Why sparks fly when you microwave grapes

Physicists burned out 12 microwaves putting this trick to the test

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Grape Balls of Fire: Making Sparks in the Kitchen

Grape Balls of Fire: Making Sparks in the Kitchen Physicists figured out why grapes and water-filled beads make sparks in the microwave. BeadsandPlasma.jpg Researchers studied the way plasma forms between this pair of hydrogel beads while they are irradiated in a household microwave oven. The same phenomenon happens with grapes. Image credits: Hamza K. Khattak Physics Monday, February 18, 2019 –

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Specialized lung cells appear very early in development

Specialized lung cells appear in the developing fetus much earlier than scientists previously thought. A new animal study reports how cells that become alveoli begin their specialized roles very early in prenatal life. The researchers say that investigating the fetal signaling pathways active in this biological event may offer future opportunities to treat lung damage caused by prematurity and oth

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Fetal signaling pathways may offer future targets for treating lung injury

Investigating the fetal signaling pathways active in developing mice may offer future opportunities to treat lung damage caused by prematurity and other lung injuries.

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Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI identified as a potential biomarker for psychosis

Researchers have shown that a type of magnetic resonance imaging — called neuromelanin-sensitive MRI (NM-MRI) — is a potential biomarker for psychosis. NM-MRI signal was found to be a marker of dopamine function in people with schizophrenia and an indicator of the severity of psychotic symptoms in people with this mental illness. The study was funded, in part, by the National Institute of Mental

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Mapping brain circuits in newborns may aid early detection of autism

A new map of newborn babies' brains offers details of structure that will provide a new reference for researchers studying both typical brain development and neurological disorders. Using noninvasive, 20-minute MRI scans, researchers have revealed some of the complex and precisely organized brain architecture that emerges as the brain reshapes itself during the third trimester of pregnancy.

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How our plants have turned into thieves to survive

Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbors.

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Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists

Rutgers and other physicists have discovered an exotic form of electrons that spin like planets and could lead to advances in lighting, solar cells, lasers and electronic displays. It's called a 'chiral surface exciton,' and it consists of particles and anti-particles bound together and swirling around each other on the surface of solids, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Aca

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Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant

Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new MIT study finds.

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Parenthood contributes to gender imbalance in STEM employment, but it's not just an issue for mother

Nearly half of new moms and a quarter of new dads leave their full-time STEM jobs after they have their first child, according to a new study.

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World's biggest terrestrial carbon sinks are found in young forests

More than half of the carbon sink in the world's forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young — under 140 years old — rather than in tropical rainforests, research at the University of Birmingham shows.

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As citizen scientists, farmers can make important contributions to climate adaptation

To help smallholder farmers adapt to climate change, scientists need to provide recommendations of crop varieties suitable to farmers' marginal and heterogeneous environments. However, existing on-farm approaches are difficult to scale. A novel scalable method using crowdsourced citizen science was employed on 12,409 trial plots in Ethiopia, India and Nicaragua. The results showed the potential of

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A shared past for East Africa's hunter-gatherers

Research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists offers a new look at African genetic diversity, with data from 50 populations. Among other insights, their analysis suggests that geographically far-flung hunter-gatherer groups, a few of whom speak languages involving clicks, share a common ancestry.

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Great white shark genome decoded

In a major scientific step to understand the biology of this iconic apex predator and sharks in general, the entire genome of the white shark has now been decoded in detail.

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Grapes in a microwave generate a fiery plasma and now we know why

For years people have been uploading videos of the blazing eruption caused by microwaving sliced grapes – but the explanations were all wrong

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World's biggest terrestrial carbon sinks are found in young forests

More than half of the carbon sink in the world's forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young—under 140 years old—rather than in tropical rainforests, research at the University of Birmingham shows.

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Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant

Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new MIT study finds.

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Chinese media reveals space solar power station plans — pie in the sky?

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Neanderthals ate fresh herbivores, not rotten meat

Isotope analysis throws doubt on previous diet research. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Why a Grape Turns Into a Fireball in a Microwave

Nuking a grape produces sparks of plasma, as plenty of YouTube videos document. Now physicists think they can explain how that energy builds up.

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The Great White Shark Genome Is Here—Superpowers and All

Sharks are renowned for their wound healing, lifespans of 70-odd years, and low rates of cancer. Their genes could reveal their superpowers.

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How our plants have turned into thieves to survive

Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbours. The findings suggest wild grasses are naturally genetically modifying themselves to gain a competitive advantage.

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Great white shark genome decoded

The great white shark is one of the most recognized marine creatures on Earth, generating widespread public fascination and media attention, including spawning one of the most successful movies in Hollywood history. This shark possesses notable characteristics, including its massive size (up to 20 feet and 7,000 pounds) and diving to nearly 4,000 foot depths. Great whites are also a big conservati

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How our plants have turned into thieves to survive

Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbours. The findings suggest wild grasses are naturally genetically modifying themselves to gain a competitive advantage.

1h

Parenthood contributes to gender imbalance in STEM employment, but it's not just an issue for mother

Nearly half of new moms and a quarter of new dads leave their full-time STEM jobs after they have their first child, according to a new study.

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Great white shark genome decoded

The great white shark is one of the most recognized marine creatures on Earth, generating widespread public fascination and media attention, including spawning one of the most successful movies in Hollywood history. This shark possesses notable characteristics, including its massive size (up to 20 feet and 7,000 pounds) and diving to nearly 4,000 foot depths. Great whites are also a big conservati

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Shark genome secrets revealed

The great white is beautifully bad all the way to its DNA. Samantha Page reports.

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Advancing therapy by measuring the 'games' cancer cells play

Despite rapid advances in targeted therapies for cancer, tumors commonly develop resistance to treatment. When resistance emerges, tumor cells continue to grow unchecked, despite all attempts to slow cancer progression. While mutations in cancer cells significantly affect drug sensitivity, it is increasingly recognized that ecological interactions between cells can also play a role.

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Preserved leaves reveal 7000 years of rainfall and drought

A study has revealed what south-east Queensland's rainfall was like over the last 7000 years — including several severe droughts worse and longer lasting than the 12-year Millennium Drought.

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Blood clot discovery could pave way for treatment of blood diseases

Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke and vascular dementia.

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The Lypla1 gene impacts obesity in a sex-specific manner

Susceptibility to obesity, insulin resistance and other cardio-metabolic traits may also be dependent on a person's sex. An international research team studied sex differences and sex-specific interaction with the genetic background in cardio-metabolic phenotypes. The researchers discovered, among other things, a sex-specific obesity locus of the Lypla1 gene, which is associated with human obesity

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More primary care physicians leads to longer life spans

New research shows us just how important primary care physicians are in prolonging our lives. Every 10 additional primary care physicians per 100,000 people in the United States was associated with a 51.5-day increase in life expectancy during the decade from 2005 to 2015, according to a new study.

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Hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism

Researchers are studying click beetles to inspire more agile robots.

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Helping patients breathe during dangerous procedure prevents complications

A Vanderbilt University Medical Center study in the New England Journal of Medicine is showing that using bag-mask ventilation, squeezing air from a bag into the mouth for 60 seconds to help patients' breathing, improves outcomes and could potentially save lives.

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CNIC researchers identify a very early marker of cardiac damage triggered by cancer treatment

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a very early marker of cardiac damage in patients undergoing therapy with anthracyclines, a family of drugs commonly used to treat cancer. This finding will enable the early diagnosis of the cardiotoxicity associated with this group of widely used chemotherapy drugs.

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Phones still aren’t quite right for people with disabilities

Mobile phones are increasingly more accessible for people with disabilities, but there are still some significant gaps in service, according to a new study. Researchers compared 2017 model year phones capable of receiving Wireless Emergency Alert notifications—a category that includes most top-tier phones—to 2015 versions and found improved accessibility across 10 of 13 features. However, phones

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Parents: Keep medical marijuana dispensaries away from kids

Seven in 10 parents think they should have a say in whether dispensaries are located near their child's school or daycare and most say they should be banned within a certain distance of those facilities.

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Physicists pinpoint a simple mechanism that makes bacteria resistant to antibiotics

Physicists have for the first time identified a simple mechanism used by potentially deadly bacteria to fend off antibiotics, a discovery which is providing new insights into how germs adapt and behave at a level of detail never seen before.

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Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk during gender transition

People receiving hormone therapy during gender transition had an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, such as strokes, blood clots and heart attacks. Findings underscore the importance of counseling and close monitoring of transgender patients receiving hormone therapy.

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Happy as a pig in muck?

Photos play an important role when it comes to how agricultural products are seen by consumers. A team of scientists investigated how people perceive and evaluate photos of a pig in different stalls.

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Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules

Chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials.

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Researchers discover anti-laser masquerading as perfect absorber

Researchers have discovered that a perfect absorber of electromagnetic waves they described in a 2017 paper can easily be tweaked into a sort of 'time-reversed laser' known as a coherent perfect absorber (CPA).

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Can we trust scientific discoveries made using machine learning?

Statisticians are cautioning fellow scientists not to make assumptions about the accuracy, uncertainty or reproducibility of scientific discoveries made with today's machine learning models.

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Solid-state catalysis: Fluctuations clear the way

Chemists have identified a mechanism that allows molecules to diffuse rapidly on the already crowded surface of a solid-state catalyst – an important capability, especially for efficient catalysis under industrial conditions.

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Linking sensing to signaling during plant immunity

A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) in Cologne has revealed that a previously unappreciated structural feature underlies the ability of the plant immune molecule EDS1 to provide a timely defense boost against pathogens.

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Researchers discover anti-laser masquerading as perfect absorber

Researchers have discovered that a perfect absorber of electromagnetic waves they described in a 2017 paper can easily be tweaked into a sort of 'time-reversed laser' known as a coherent perfect absorber (CPA).

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Magic Leap's Mica Artificial Human From LeapCon

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Gearing up for 5G: A miniature, low-cost transceiver for fast, reliable communications

Researchers have designed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) technology. Measuring just 3 mm by 4 mm, this tiny transceiver could help improve performances of fifth-generation cellular network (5G) and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

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People who cunningly use cooperation and egoism are 'unbeatable'

People who cunningly use cooperation and egoism are unbeatable.

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Looking behind a rare brain disease for clues to treat more common mental disorders

Researchers have clarified, for the first time, the mechanism behind a very rare brain disorder called MICPCH (microcephaly, disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia) syndrome in animal models. Information gleaned from this study could also inform research into other, more common neurological diseases such as mental retardation, epilepsy, and autism.

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Genetic clues can be used to predict whether early-stage cancer will form an invasive tumour

Genetic clues can be used to predict whether early-stage cancer will form an invasive tumour Genetic clues can be used to predict whether early-stage cancer will form an invasive tumour, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00567-2 Early-stage cancerous growths can look similar under the microscope, and whether they will form an invasive tumour is hard to predict. Genomic pr

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Nerve transfer restores some motion for kids with rare illness

Nerve transfer surgery may help children with a rare yet frightening disease known as acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) that causes paralysis. At Brandon Noblitt’s first appointment with surgeon Amy Moore a year ago, he was barely able to walk, mostly using a wheelchair to get around. Only 6 years old at the time, Brandon had come down with a cold. A week later, he was unable to move his right arm and

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Microfluidic ‘placenta’ tests if fetus gets caffeine

To model how compounds can pass from mother to fetus, engineers have created a “placenta on a chip.” “I am interested in microfluidics and I’ve been excited about using the technology to understand what happens in the cellular environment and within the body,” says Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University and the leader of this project. “We looked

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Netflix cancels The Punisher and Jessica Jones, ending its Marvel shows – CNET

Marvel Head of Television Jeph Loeb writes a letter thanking fans for enjoying the Netflix shows.

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Brain represents optical illusion as delayed reality

A study of humans and monkeys published in JNeurosci has found the same subset of neurons encode actual and illusory complex flow motion. This finding supports, at the level of single neurons, what the Czech scientist Jan Purkinje surmised 150 years ago: 'Illusions contain visual truth.'

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So close, rats can almost taste it

A subset of neurons in the hippocampus respond to both place and taste, according to research in male rats published in JNeurosci. The study shows how animals may remember and find their way back to locations where they previously found nourishment.

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This optical illusion breaks your brain for 15 milliseconds

Showing this optical illusion to monkeys reveals it works by tricking the neurons that perceive global motion into overriding those that track local motions

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A Philosopher Asked Physicists: 'What is a Black Hole?'

Ask a dozen physicists what a black hole is, and you may get a dozen different answers – at least if those physicists are from different sub-fields. But new philosophy research suggests that may be okay, and may even lead to more interesting findings for black holes in the future. Such is the conclusion of Erik Curiel, who asked many different physicists across a range of research fields how they

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Tuberculosis: Commandeering a bacterial 'suicide' mechanism

The bacteria responsible for tuberculosis can be killed by a toxin they produce unless it is neutralized by an antidote protein. The scientists are now seeking to appropriate this 'suicide' mechanism for therapeutic purposes.

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DMD: Single CRISPR treatment provides long-term benefits in mice

Researchers have shown that a single systemic treatment using CRISPR genome editing technology can safely and stably correct a genetic disease — Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) — for more than a year in mice, despite observed immune responses and alternative gene editing outcomes.

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How 3D arrangement of DNA helps perpetuate the species

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future g

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Researchers find trigger that turns strep infections into flesh-eating disease

Scientists discovered a previously unknown trigger that turns run-of-the-mill strep infections into the flesh-eating disease childbed fever, which strikes postpartum moms and newborns, often leaving victims without limbs. Using an unprecedented approach, they looked at the interplay between the genome, transcriptome and virulence. This generated a massive data set, lending itself to artificial int

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Depression reversed in male mice by activating gene that helps excite neurons

Directly activating a gene important to exciting our excitatory neurons and associated with major depression may help turn around classic symptoms like social isolation and loss of interest, at least for males, scientists report.

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Heavy smoking can damage vision

Smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day can damage your vision, researchers find.

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DNA variants significantly influence body fat distribution

Researchers have identified multiple genetic variants associated with how the body regulates and distributes body-fat tissue. The new findings broaden the understanding of how genes can predispose certain individuals to obesity.

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Febrile infants may not need painful tests, antibiotics, hospitalizations

A national research team has derived and validated a new protocol for emergency departments that can determine which infant patients with fevers, age 60 days or younger, are at low risk of significant bacterial infections.

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Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules

Chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials.

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Synvillan fungerar på apor

Fäst blicken mitt i figuren. När du flyttar huvudet framåt ser de röda och blå ringarna ut att rotera åt var sitt håll. När du i stället flyttar huvudet bakåt byter de riktning. Ingen vet exakt hur synvillan uppstår, men generellt beror illusioner på att nervsystemets gissningar om världen slår fel. Det drabbar även apor, enligt sinnrika experiment där makaker fick träna sig i att urskilja verklig

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PTSD may one day be treated with a common blood pressure drug

Preliminary experiments suggest that a type of blood pressure drug can make it easier to un-learn fear memories, hinting at a possible treatment for PTSD

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Audi's in-car Information system helps drivers avoid red lights

Cars It will also tell you how long before they turn green. Some Audi cars will know lots about traffic lights.

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Brain cells combine place and taste to make food maps

A select group of brain cells responds to both flavor and location, a specialty that may help an animal find the next good meal.

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Elon Musk Quits Research Group That Built “Fake News” Generator

Research Group These days, Elon Musk is probably best known for his work on SpaceX and Tesla. But along the way, he also teamed up with Y Combinator president Sam Altman to co-found OpenAI, a research group dedicated to building AI that benefits humanity. But this weekend, Musk took to Twitter to confirm that he’d left the organization — citing disagreements with the group’s direction. Fake News

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Gartner Debunks Five Artificial Intelligence Misconceptions

submitted by /u/MaikeruShogun [link] [comments]

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Climate change is pushing desperate polar bears, kangaroos, and other wildlife into human territory

Environment Human-wildlife interactions can be dangerous, and they're only growing more common. It’s thought that if global temperatures continue to rise by an average of 4.5°C since pre-industrial times, which is likely to happen if we do nothing to reduce our…

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New way to measure nicotine exposure in children

A team of researchers has found silicone wristbands to be an effective way to measure children's exposure to secondhand smoke.

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For a Black Mathematician, What It’s Like to Be the ‘Only One’

Fewer than 1 percent of doctorates in math are awarded to African-Americans. Edray Goins, who earned one of them, found the upper reaches of the math world a challenging place.

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Men and women’s wrist bones move differently

Our left and right wrists mirror each other, but there are differences between the wrists of men and women, according to new research. While wrist-based therapies had assumed that individuals’ left and right wrists mirrored each other, there has been insufficient evidence to back this assumption up until now. The discoveries could help inform and guide future treatments. “If someone has dysfuncti

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New Research: YouTube Caused The “Flat Earther” Epidemic

Falling Flat If you feel as though there are a growing number of people online who think the world is flat — a peculiar conspiracy theory that ignores centuries of evidence that the planet is actually round — you might not be wrong. According to an alarming new study , the alarming growth of the number of people who think the Earth is flat is directly tied to the growth of conspiracy theories on

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Daily Briefing: Both sides of the scalpel

Daily Briefing: Both sides of the scalpel Daily Briefing: Both sides of the scalpel, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00625-9 Stephen Fry and his surgeon recount their experiences of treating Fry’s prostate cancer. Plus, allaying fears about open peer review, and exploring a hidden ocean in the Antarctic.

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Amazon announces plans to make half of shipments carbon neutral by 2030

The company will make its carbon footprint available publicly for the first time later this year

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Heavy smoking can dull color vision

Smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day can take a toll on vision, research shows. A new study included 71 healthy people who smoked fewer than 15 cigarettes in their lives and 63 people who smoke more than 20 cigarettes a day, have tobacco addiction, and say they have not tried to quit smoking. Participants were between the ages of 25 and 45. Standard visual acuity charts showed they had normal or

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Why antibiotics fail in the fight against bacteria

For the first time ever, researchers have managed to establish what allows drug-resistant bacteria to repel the action of potent antibiotics.

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Liberals and Conservatives Are Both Susceptible to Fake News, but for Different Reasons

New research suggests both liberals and conservatives are motivated to believe fake news, and dismiss real news that contradicts their ideologies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Liberals and Conservatives Are Both Susceptible to Fake News, but for Different Reasons

New research suggests both liberals and conservatives are motivated to believe fake news, and dismiss real news that contradicts their ideologies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2017, 10 million people around the world fell ill with TB and 1.3 million died. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL

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Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2017, 10 million people around the world fell ill with TB and 1.3 million died. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL

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China accuses US of trying to block its tech development

China's government on Monday accused the United States of trying to block its industrial development by alleging that Chinese telecom gear is a cybersecurity threat.

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Bacteria keep us healthy – but could they keep us young?

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Why the United States will never have high-speed rail

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Når akkreditering runger rigtig hult

Reel måling af ægte kvalitet er svær, men lad os så komme i gang – og det skal være sammen med folk, som aktuelt arbejder klinisk, ikke kun sammen med nogen, som gjorde det engang.

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Giv mennesker med dobbeltdiagnoser den nødvendige hjælp

Det er afgørende med en politisk forståelse af, at patienter med dobbeltdiagnoser har ventet og ventet og ventet. Nu er muligheden der – tænk dem ind i sundhedsreformen.

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Revolt Against the Rich

Nobel laureates, a new congresswoman and others urge raising taxes on the ultra-wealthy to counter surging inequality. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In 1999, David Bowie knew the internet would change the world

David Bowie was well known as a rock star, but somehow his other interests and accomplishments remain obscure. In this 1999 interview, he explains why he knows the internet is more than just a tool and why it was destined to change the world. He launched his own internet service provider in 1998, BowieNet. It ceased operations in 2006. When you think of the brilliant minds who understood what a g

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‘Tornado Alley’ deaths hit a turning point in 1916

The rate of tornado-related fatalities in the “Tornado Alley” region of the United States increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century, according to a new study. The Louisiana Purchase in 1803 ushered in a movement of westward migration in the United States, and with new territory came new challenges—and weather phenomena. Around 1916, the trend started

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This Researcher Is Worried About Child Sex Robots

Detrimental Effects In a new essay for The Conversation , University of Minnesota law professor Francis Shen grapples with the difficult legal and social issues raised by sexbots — including the specter of ones designed to look like children. “Childlike sex robots are robots, not humans,” Shen wrote. “Like virtual child pornography, the development of a childlike sex robot does not require intera

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»Bremsesvigt har naturligvis skabt utryghed blandt betjentene«

Politiets biler har oplevet flere tilfælde af bremsesvigt i trafikken efter omfattende værkstedsfejl. Det har skabt bekymring blandt politibetjente.

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A.I. app knows just what cancer patients need

A new app is using artificial intelligence to guide and support some 50 breast cancer patients in rural Georgia, giving them personalized recommendations on everything from side effects to insurance. The app, called MyPath, adapts to each stage in a patient’s cancer experience. So the information available on the app—which runs on a tablet computer—regularly changes based on each patient’s progre

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From giant sloths to Pythagorean proofs: Five presidents with niche scientific interests

Science What a bunch of nerds. President’s day is one of those holidays you forget about until you realize you have the day off from work. Or, if you don’t get off work, a holiday you forgot about…

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Researchers find febrile infants may not need painful tests, antibiotics, hospitalizations

A national research team led by UC Davis Health clinicians and researchers from the University of Michigan, Nationwide Children's Hospital and Columbia University, has derived and validated a new protocol for emergency departments that can determine which infant patients with fevers, age 60 days or younger, are at low risk of significant bacterial infections.

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Researchers discover DNA variants significantly influence body fat distribution

A new breakthrough from the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits consortium, which includes many public health researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, identifies multiple genetic variants associated with how the body regulates and distributes body-fat tissue. The new findings broaden the understanding of how genes can predispose certain individuals to obesity.

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CRISPR gene editing makes stem cells 'invisible' to immune system

UC San Francisco scientists have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to create the first pluripotent stem cells that are functionally 'invisible' to the immune system, a feat of biological engineering that, in laboratory studies, prevented rejection of stem cell transplants. Because these 'universal' stem cells can be manufactured more efficiently than stem cells tailor-made for each patient

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Advancing therapy by measuring the 'games' cancer cells play

Despite rapid advances in targeted therapies for cancer, tumors commonly develop resistance to treatment. When resistance emerges, tumor cells continue to grow unchecked, despite all attempts to slow cancer progression. While mutations in cancer cells significantly affect drug sensitivity, it is increasingly recognized that ecological interactions between cells can also play a role. Jacob Scott, M

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More primary care physicians leads to longer life spans, Stanford researcher says

New research shows us just how important primary care physicians are in prolonging our lives. Every 10 additional primary care physicians per 100,000 people in the United States was associated with a 51.5-day increase in life expectancy during the decade from 2005 to 2015, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School.

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Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules

EPFL chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials.

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Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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New protocol could ease diagnosis of bacterial infections in infants

A new protocol could help emergency room physicians to rule out life-threatening bacterial infections among infants up to 2 months of age who have fevers, potentially eliminating the need for spinal taps, unnecessary antibiotic treatments or expensive hospital stays.

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Researchers find trigger that turns strep infections into flesh-eating disease

Houston Methodist scientists discovered a previously unknown trigger that turns run-of-the-mill strep infections into the flesh-eating disease childbed fever, which strikes postpartum moms and newborns, often leaving victims without limbs. Using an unprecedented approach, they looked at the interplay between the genome, transcriptome and virulence. This generated a massive data set, lending itself

5h

Has screen time increased for young children and on what screen?

Children younger than 6 spend most of their screen time watching TV. That's the finding of a new study that assessed screen time in young children in 1997 and in 2014, before and after mobile devices were widely available. The study used time diary data from a representative group of American children younger than 6 who completed the time diary (1,327 children in 1997 and 443 children in 2014).

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Primary care physician supply and life expectancy

This study used U.S. population data to identify changes in the supply of primary care physicians across counties from 2005 to 2015 and the association with life expectancy and other outcomes. A greater supply of primary care physicians was associated with better life expectancy but the per capita supply of primary care physicians across counties decreased, mostly because of disproportionate losse

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Single CRISPR treatment provides long-term benefits in mice

Researchers at Duke University have shown that a single systemic treatment using CRISPR genome editing technology can safely and stably correct a genetic disease — Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) — for more than a year in mice, despite observed immune responses and alternative gene editing outcomes.

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Scientists reveal how 3D arrangement of DNA helps perpetuate the species

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future g

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Tuberculosis: Commandeering a bacterial 'suicide' mechanism

The bacteria responsible for tuberculosis can be killed by a toxin they produce unless it is neutralized by an antidote protein. The European team of scientists behind this discovery is coordinated by researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology (IPBS–CNRS/UPS) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Their findings are published in Molecular Cell. The team i

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Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL in Hamburg investigated this promising feature for therapeutic targets. They now s

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Forskning för hjärtats bästa

Alexandru Schiopu tvekar inte en sekund när man frågar om hur vi bäst tar hand om vårt hjärta. – Rök inte. Träna. Gå ner i vikt om du är överviktig. Ha även koll på blodtrycket, säger han. ”Det överraskade oss att inflammation och reparation efter infarkt hänger ihop så tätt: utan inflammation – ingen reparation. Så utmaningen blir att hitta rätt balans mellan inflammation och reparation i hjärta

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Wake up, humanity! A hi-tech dystopian future is not inevitable | Steven Poole

As Airbus’s cancelled superjumbo shows, technological progress is not compulsory – we can choose to call a halt When is the future no longer the future? Only a decade ago, air travel seemed to be moving ineluctably towards giant planes, or “superjumbos”. But last week Airbus announced it will cease manufacturing its A380 , the world’s fattest passenger jet, as current trends favour smaller and mor

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How streaming music could be harming the planet

submitted by /u/mynameis_neo [link] [comments]

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Photonic topological insulator in synthetic dimensions

Photonic topological insulator in synthetic dimensions Photonic topological insulator in synthetic dimensions, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0943-7 A spatially oscillating two-dimensional waveguide array is used to realize a photonic topological insulator in synthetic dimensions with modal-space edge states, unidirectionality and robust topological protection.

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Multiplex chromatin interactions with single-molecule precision

Multiplex chromatin interactions with single-molecule precision Multiplex chromatin interactions with single-molecule precision, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0949-1 A strategy using droplet-based and barcode-linked sequencing captures multiplex chromatin interactions at single-molecule precision, and here provides topological insight into chromatin structures and tra

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Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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Scientists reveal how 3-D arrangement of DNA helps perpetuate the species

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3-D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future

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Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells are widely studied for the conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels. They use photocathodes and photoanodes to "split" water into hydrogen and oxygen respectively. PEC cells can work under mild conditions with light, which makes them also suitable for other catalyzing reactions that turn organic molecules into high added-value chemicals, like those used to de

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Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

5h

Undersea Odyssey: Squid vs. Octopus

Since ocean exploration first began, the almost unearthly qualities of marine life have captured our imagination. Strange shapes, bizarre abilities… and some animals that exemplify these are two distinct cousins in the invertebrate phylum Mollusca , class Cephalopoda . Let’s give a salute to the weird, wild, wonderful squids and octopodes! But though they may seem like tentacular twins, they’re a

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Observations reveal new 'shape' for coronal mass ejections

Radiation signatures produced by giant solar storms more complex than previously thought. Phil Dooley reports.

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Scientists reveal how 3-D arrangement of DNA helps perpetuate the species

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3-D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future

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For scientists, the ripple effects of the government shutdown are still spreading

Matt Helgeson knew it was time to pull the plug. For weeks, the University of California, Santa Barbara professor of chemical engineering had held out hope that politicians in Washington would find a way to end the government shutdown. If they did, his graduate students could still make their long-planned trip to Maryland to conduct experiments at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

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NASA Is Studying Whether a Mars Crew Would Need a Class Clown

Class Clown An anthropologist at the University of Florida is making the case that long space missions, like a crewed trip to Mars, would require crew members with pronounced senses of humor to build social bridges and defuse tension at a perilous distance from Earth. “These are people that have the ability to pull everyone together, bridge gaps when tensions appear and really boost morale,” said

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Drug Combo Creates New Neurons from Neighboring Cells

submitted by /u/Numberwang [link] [comments]

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Gearing up for 5G: A miniature, low-cost transceiver for fast, reliable communications

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) technology. Measuring just 3 mm by 4 mm, this tiny transceiver could help improve performances of fifth-generation cellular network (5G) and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

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Surprise findings turn up the temperature on the study of vernalization

Researchers have uncovered new evidence about the agriculturally important process of vernalization in a development that could help farmers deal with financially damaging weather fluctuations.

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Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients

Researchers have created new machine learning software that can forecast the survival rates and response to treatments of patients with ovarian cancer.

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White House gets report that could trigger auto tariffs

The White House received Monday a Commerce Department report on the auto industry that could trigger tariffs against imported cars and intensify tensions with Europe.

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Something from Quora: using an AI and Bioprinting to create artificial bodies

https://www.quora.com/Bioprinting-and-Deepmind-AI-could-an-AI-learn-to-copy-a-brain-and-bodys-structures?share=1 Additional details provided (originally posted by user Matthew Lane on 2/17/19) : In short, what I ask is whether or not an AI could use a recently deceased body, to piece by piece copy it, rather than trying to bioprint body parts from scratch. If nothing else, for the sake of learn

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Programming Self-Driving Cars Makes People Less Selfish

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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New computing technique predicts weather further ahead

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

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A Single Earthquake Can Move Millions of Tons of Carbon into Earth's Deepest Trenches

Earthquakes may be dumping millions of tons of carbon into the Earth's deepest cracks. And scientists aren't sure what that means.

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Porsche warns of Brexit price hike on UK cars

Porsche customers in the UK should brace for a price hike of up to 10 percent in case of a hard Brexit, the luxury German carmaker warned Monday.

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NVIDIA Dispels DLSS Myths, Addresses AMD Criticism And Gamer Questions

One of the staple features of NVIDIA's recently launched GeForce RTX series is something called Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS). It promises to deliver better performance in games that …

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Israel's first lunar mission to launch this week

Israel is to launch its first moon mission this week, sending an unmanned spacecraft to collect data to be shared with NASA, organisers said Monday.

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Announcing the 2019 ScientistAtWork photo competition

Announcing the 2019 ScientistAtWork photo competition Announcing the 2019 ScientistAtWork photo competition, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00589-w Send us your very best science photos, and you could win a cash prize plus a year’s print and online subscription to Nature.

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Earth has more green area, but that’s not quite good news

It seems obvious that “greening” of the planet would be good for reducing atmospheric carbon, but a closer look shows that not all leaves are equally valuable. Chi Chen, a Boston University graduate researcher, and Ranga Myneni, professor of Earth and environment, are lead and senior authors of the paper in Nature Sustainability . Here, they explain their work: Looking at remote sensing data from

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Astronauter laver affald om til værktøj med særlig 3D-printer

Den Internationale Rumstation har fået en 3D-printer, der kun bruger skum og plastikposer til at printe alt fra værktøj til bestik.

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Lænkede droner skal i luften som arbejdsbier

PLUS. Med projektet ‘Drones as a tool’ vil Teknologisk Institut øge anvendelsesmulig­hederne for droner – ved at holde snor i dem.

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Programming Self-Driving Cars Makes People Less Selfish

Self-driving cars are just around the corner, but working out the rules that should govern them is proving tricky . Should they mimic often self-interested human decision making, or be programmed to consider the greater good? It turns out that when you let people program autonomous vehicles themselves, the gap between self-interest and the greater good shrinks . Much of the focus in this area has

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Plastic bags may soon be powering your smartphone

submitted by /u/jcjpaul [link] [comments]

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Australia Is Planting a Billion Trees to Fight Climate Change

Tree Guy The Australian government is gearing up to plant a billion new trees , as part of a vast campaign aimed to meet the climate targets set by the Paris Agreement. The government estimates that the project, which will run until 2050, will eventually remove 18 million tons of greenhouse gases per years — an intriguing example of a less technical response to climate change. Forest Gump The new

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The new Air Force One arrives in 2024. Here's what we know so far.

Technology This Presidents Day, consider the past, present, and future of the airborne White House. We looked back at over half a century of presidential planes.

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Huge variations in US postdoc salaries point to undervalued workforce

Huge variations in US postdoc salaries point to undervalued workforce Huge variations in US postdoc salaries point to undervalued workforce, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00587-y Rare effort to track wages reveals inconsistencies and a gender pay gap.

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AASM publishes clinical practice guideline on use of PAP therapy for sleep apnea

A new clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) provides guidance to clinicians on the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults.

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Politiske forhandlinger om sundhedsreformen begynder onsdag

De politiske forhandlinger om regeringens sundhedsreform begynder onsdag i denne uge, siger statsministeren. »Jeg hæfter mig ved, at der lyder mange positive ord om regeringens udspil,« siger han.

6h

Regionshospital søger fem læger til regionsklinik

Region Midtjylland er på jagt efter fem almen medicinere til regionens første regionsklinik, der skal ligge på Regionshospitalet Lemvig.

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Kontroll av översvämningar blir ett måste runt Östersjön

Lösningen ska kunna användas av stadsplanerare. Verktyget, som kallas för NOAH, kommer att hjälpa städer att förebygga översvämningar, och att minska mängden föroreningar i Östersjön, uppger Högskolan i Halmstad i ett pressmeddelande. Översvämningar ger inflöde av föroreningar Att effektivt hantera dagvatten är ett av de största miljöproblemen som städer runt Östersjön står inför idag. Klimatförä

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Predicting climate change

Thomas Crowther has identified long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world, finding that there is room for an additional 1.2 trillion new trees globally that could absorb more carbon than human emissions each year. Crowther also describes data from thousands of soil samples collected by local scientists that reveal the world's Arctic and sub-Arctic regions store most of the

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Saving the Bats, One Cave at a Time

Biologists are searching caves and abandoned mines in the West, hoping to spare many species of the winged creatures from the devastating fungus, white-nose syndrome.

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The yin and yang of cell signaling

Lysophospholipids (LysoPLs) are potent cellular signaling biomolecules that also maintain the structure, shape and fluidity of cell membranes.

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The yin and yang of cell signaling

Lysophospholipids (LysoPLs) are potent cellular signaling biomolecules that also maintain the structure, shape and fluidity of cell membranes.

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The decoy effect: how you are influenced to choose without really knowing it

Price is the most delicate element of the marketing mix, and much thought goes into setting prices to nudge us towards spending more.

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Solid-state catalysis: Fluctuations clear the way

The use of efficient catalytic agents is what makes many technical procedures feasible in the first place. Indeed, synthesis of more than 80 percent of the products generated in the chemical industry requires the input of specific catalysts. Most of these are solid-state catalysts, and the reactions they make possible take place between molecules that adsorb to their surfaces.

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Professor Finds 30-Year-Old Apple Mac Computer (And It Still Works and Loads Games)

A New York professor had Gen Xers taking a trip down memory lane when he posted images of a dusty, 30-year-old Apple IIe computer, in full working order, on Twitter on Saturday. John […] The …

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Marvel at This Glittering 'Galaxy' Inside a Fly's Testicles

The "stars" in this photo aren't what you think.

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Why an Outlaw Was Stabbed to Death and Then Buried Face-Down in Medieval Sicily

The killing was "effective and rapid" by someone who knows human anatomy "very well."

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Target brain cell ‘cleaning process’ to fight Alzheimer’s?

Targeting the cleaning system in brain cells known as mitophagy could offer a new way to attack Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research. “When the cleaning system does not work properly, there will be an accumulation of defective mitochondria in the brain cells. And this may be really dangerous,” says study author Vilhelm Bohr, affiliate professor at the Center for Healthy Aging and Nation

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Ny professor vil forsøge at løse gåden om uventet hjertestop

Henrik Kjærulf Jensen skal som ny klinisk professor forske i, hvordan uventet hjertedød kan forhindres.

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How the oldest evidence of movement could change what we know about life on Earth

In a suspension of disbelief, the countless readers who have picked up J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings books have readily accepted that Ents, the ancient treelike creatures of the fictional Fangorn forest, walk, talk and even dispense wisdom for hobbits lost in the woodland they shepherd. But while our imaginations can readily accept that tree people walk around Middle Earth, it can be harder t

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Star Wars News: Is 'Episode IX' Called 'Balance of the Force'?

That's the rumor. It sounds possible—but also kinda hokey.

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Regeringen klar med 5G-handlingsplan: Andre EU-lande buldrer allerede afsted

PLUS. Mens den danske regering mandag har fremlagt en handlingsplan for udrulningen af det kommende 5G-net, så har flere andre europæiske lande allerede uddelt de konkrete frekvenser til 5G.

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Self-driving rovers explore Moroccan desert, shooting for Mars

Ever since the first successful landing on Mars in the 1970s, scientists have striven to deepen their knowledge of the red planet's surface. The first successful rover, the Sojourner, was deployed on Mars's surface in July 1997. Since then, there have been another three successful robotically operated rovers on the planet, collecting information on water, rocks, soils and minerals, and the presenc

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We forget presidents surprisingly fast. Even Trump?

Research shows most United States presidents fade quickly from the nation’s collective memory—a fate that could even befall Trump. Building toward the climax of his recent State of the Union address, President Donald Trump implored the leaders of “the most extraordinary nation in all of history” to consider their legacies at this tumultuous moment in history. “How will we be remembered?” he asked

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Where Climate Change Fits into Venezuela's Ongoing Crisis

A severe and persistent drought has led to rationing of water and electricity from hydropower — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Design principles for peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes

Nanozymes, enzyme-like catalytic nanomaterials, are considered to be the next generation of enzyme mimics because they not only overcome natural enzymes' intrinsic limitations, but also possess unique properties in comparison with conventional artificial enzymes. Until now, lots of nanomaterials have been explored to mimic various natural enzymes, such as peroxidase, oxidase, catalase, and hydrola

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The battle against bugs: it's time to end chemical warfare

Insects are important wildlife often overlooked in urban habitats. What we do notice are the cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes in and around our homes. All too often we reach for the insect spray.

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Design principles for peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes

Nanozymes, enzyme-like catalytic nanomaterials, are considered to be the next generation of enzyme mimics because they not only overcome natural enzymes' intrinsic limitations, but also possess unique properties in comparison with conventional artificial enzymes. Until now, lots of nanomaterials have been explored to mimic various natural enzymes, such as peroxidase, oxidase, catalase, and hydrola

7h

Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions

In our daily lives, we can find many examples of manipulation of reflected waves, such as mirrors, or reflective surfaces for sound that improve auditorium acoustics. When a wave impinges on a reflective surface with a certain angle of incidence and the energy is sent back, the angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence. This classical reflection law is valid for any homogenous surface

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The battle against bugs: it's time to end chemical warfare

Insects are important wildlife often overlooked in urban habitats. What we do notice are the cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes in and around our homes. All too often we reach for the insect spray.

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Peopleʼs evaluation of pigs in farm photos with different backgrounds

Photos play an important role when it comes to how agricultural products are seen by consumers. A team of scientists from the Universities of Bozen-Bolzano and Göttingen investigated how people perceive and evaluate photos of pigs in different stalls. The results were published in the scientific journal PLoS ONE.

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Chemist develops a new catalyst for oxidation and amidation

A RUDN chemist has obtained a compound with a new structural type containing atoms of metals (copper and sodium) in a carcass structure and that is shaped like a bicycle helmet. The compound shows catalytic activity in two important organic synthesis reactions. The development may be used to create new catalysts for chemical industry. The work was published in the Dalton Transactions journal.

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Sound waves let quantum systems 'talk' to one another

Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have invented an innovative way for different types of quantum technology to "talk" to each other using sound. The study, published Feb. 11 in Nature Physics, is an important step in bringing quantum technology closer to reality.

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The exorbitant cost of climate procrastination

From COP24's disappointing final agreement to France's abandonment of the carbon tax increase due to the "gilets jaunes" movement… it seems that concerns about climate change have fell to the very bottom of the global political agendas.

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Desert ants' survival strategy emerges from millions of simple interactions

Ants' frenzied movements may seem aimless and erratic to a casual observer, but closer study reveals that an ant colony's collective behavior can help it thrive in a harsh environment and may also yield inspiration for robotic systems.

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Desert ants' survival strategy emerges from millions of simple interactions

Ants' frenzied movements may seem aimless and erratic to a casual observer, but closer study reveals that an ant colony's collective behavior can help it thrive in a harsh environment and may also yield inspiration for robotic systems.

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Britisk rapport: Facebook overskrev brugeres privatlivsindstillinger

En rapport udgivet af britiske parlamentsmedlemmer anklager Facebook for bevidst at have overtrådt både privatlivslove og konkurrencelove. I rapporten fremgår det, at Facebook overskrev brugeres privacy-indstillinger i jagten på profit.

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GPS-modtagernes Y2K rammer til april

Den 6. april har GPS-systemets ur kørt i 1025 uger. Det er én mere, end nogle modtagere kan holde til.

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New device simplifies measurement of fluoride contamination in water

Adding fluoride to water is common practice in a number of countries, including the U.S., Australia, Brazil, Malaysia, India and Vietnam. In low concentrations (below 1.5 mg/L), it can prevent tooth decay and even strengthen bones, but levels above that can have the opposite effect, causing serious dental and bone disease, especially in children and developing fetuses.

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How climate change can make catastrophic weather systems linger for longer

Many parts of Australia have suffered a run of severe and, in some cases, unprecedented weather events this summer. One common feature of many of these events – including the Tasmanian heatwave and the devastating Townsville floods – was that they were caused by weather systems that parked themselves in one place for days or weeks on end.

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Researchers create the conditions for growing plants in the Arctic

Researchers at the TSU Siberian Botanical Garden (SibBG), the Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS (IHCE), and Tomsk Polytechnic University have implemented an interdisciplinary project to study the optimal parameters of UV radiation for pre-seed treatment and photosynthetically active radiation for growing economically valuable plants. The proposed approach will permit growing different c

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Researchers create the conditions for growing plants in the Arctic

Researchers at the TSU Siberian Botanical Garden (SibBG), the Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS (IHCE), and Tomsk Polytechnic University have implemented an interdisciplinary project to study the optimal parameters of UV radiation for pre-seed treatment and photosynthetically active radiation for growing economically valuable plants. The proposed approach will permit growing different c

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The Furor in Virginia Has Quieted

The bonfire of scandals in Virginia politics has seemingly burned down to embers as top Democrats have come to accept that their tainted leaders will not be leaving office, at least not anytime soon. While most party elites have not withdrawn their calls for resignation, a week of détente and two television appearances on Sunday suggest that the furor has quieted. Governor Ralph Northam faced nea

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Antarctica's Ice Shelves Get a Bounce from Ephemeral Lakes

GPS measurements the flexing movement of one of the ice shelves that act as key backstops to sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Antibiotic resistances spread faster than so far thought

By studying fish raised in aquaculture, researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Copenhagen and the University of Campinas in Brazil have shed new light on the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes are transferred between bacteria. According to the study published in the journal 'Microbiome', those mechanisms are more varied than previously thought.

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Technology is useful, but drones alone won't save Africa's elephants

Technology has made a tremendous difference in the world, in areas as diverse as health and education, and pretty much everything in between.

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Antibiotic resistances spread faster than so far thought

By studying fish raised in aquaculture, researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Copenhagen and the University of Campinas in Brazil have shed new light on the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes are transferred between bacteria. According to the study published in the journal 'Microbiome', those mechanisms are more varied than previously thought.

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Technology is useful, but drones alone won't save Africa's elephants

Technology has made a tremendous difference in the world, in areas as diverse as health and education, and pretty much everything in between.

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What happens to the natural world if all the insects disappear?

There are an awful lot of insects. It's hard to say exactly how many because 80% haven't yet been described by taxonomists, but there are probably about 5.5m species. Put that number together with other kinds of animals with exoskeletons and jointed legs, known collectively as arthropods – this includes mites, spiders and woodlice – and there are probably about 7m species in all.

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Stone Age Europe may have been home to no more than 1500 people

Our species arrived in Europe about 43,000 years ago – and for the following 10,000 years the population remained astonishingly low

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What happens to the natural world if all the insects disappear?

There are an awful lot of insects. It's hard to say exactly how many because 80% haven't yet been described by taxonomists, but there are probably about 5.5m species. Put that number together with other kinds of animals with exoskeletons and jointed legs, known collectively as arthropods – this includes mites, spiders and woodlice – and there are probably about 7m species in all.

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Warning About Big Data in Science

At the AAAS this past weekend Dr Genevera Allen from Rice University in Houston presented her findings regarding the impact of using machine learning algorithms on evaluating scientific data. She argues that it is contributing to the reproducibility problem. The core problem, which I have discussed many times before , is that if scientists do not use sufficiently rigorous methods, they will find

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Researchers plan to enlist ocean viruses in climate change fight

Marine bacteria could be enabled to absorb more carbon dioxide

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Upgraded Water Risk Filter will help companies respond to worsening water risks

With water crises posing a growing threat to the global economy, WWF today announced a major upgrade to its Water Risk Filter, launching a new Respond section that will help companies and financial institutions mitigate water risks to their operations and assets around the world.

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Returning lost eagle species to Wales

Research taking place in Wales could see the return of lost eagle species to our countryside, bringing both conservation and economic benefits.

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Returning lost eagle species to Wales

Research taking place in Wales could see the return of lost eagle species to our countryside, bringing both conservation and economic benefits.

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World's finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons

Using neutron characterization techniques a team of scientists have peered inside one of the most unique examples of wire gold, understanding for the first time the specimen's structure and possible formation process. The 263 gram, 12 centimeter tall specimen, known as the Ram's Horn, belongs to the collection of the Mineralogical and Geological Museum Harvard University (MGMH).

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Video: Big questions about small worlds

Scientists who study the solar system tend to ask big questions: How was our solar system formed? Where did the building blocks of life come from? What hazards from above threaten life on our planet? To find answers, they're looking more and more at small worlds.

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A call for a theoretical framework to address replication crisis facing the psychological sciences

A pair of researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science and Harvard University has published a Perspective piece in the journal Nature Human Behavior suggesting a possible solution to the replication crisis facing the psychological sciences. Michael Muthukrishna and Joseph Henrich believe the answer lies in convincing researchers to start working within a theoretical framew

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Image of the Day: Gnashers

A mollusk grows magnetic teeth so tough they can grind down rocks.

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Fabulous fun at Australia’s World Science Festival

Now in its fourth year, Queensland’s international science celebration has something for everyone.

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In disasters, Twitter influencers are out-tweeted

Analysis finds users with small networks are critical in keeping their communities informed. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Neutron star collisions hold key to universe expansion

Measuring gravitational wave events might solve Hubble constant uncertainties. Lauren Fuge reports.

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Together for half a millennium

Imaging confirms relationship of ancient African art pieces.

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Antarctica's Ice Shelves Get a Bounce from Ephemeral Lakes

GPS measurements the flexing movement of one of the ice shelves that act as key backstops to sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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3d Printing Market’S Growth Opportunities In 2017-2025

3D printing markets have not just reached to the sky but have created new horizons in the industry. The number of 3D printing projections is continuously increasing along with the number of people engaging themselves in the actual operations. submitted by /u/peterhardy321 [link] [comments]

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ZSL London Zoo shares animal X-rays

X-ray images reveal the inner workings of a variety of different species at ZSL London Zoo.

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Genetics efforts enriching nutrition of popcorn, sorghum

Two kernels of the same idea—cultivating protein quality in cereal grains—are reaching maturity at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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Genetics efforts enriching nutrition of popcorn, sorghum

Two kernels of the same idea—cultivating protein quality in cereal grains—are reaching maturity at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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Genetics efforts enriching nutrition of popcorn, sorghum

Two kernels of the same idea—cultivating protein quality in cereal grains—are reaching maturity at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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Researchers Find YouTube Is Heavily Influencing Evidence-Challenged Flat Earthers

Could YouTube partly be responsible for the increase in “flat earthers”? Researchers have discovered that many flat earthers were persuaded by YouTube videos. Many of these videos had been …

8h

Linking sensing to signaling during plant immunity

Plant defense against invading pathogens relies upon effective recognition of non-self organisms and a subsequent signaling response characterized by reprogramming of host gene expression and localized cell death to combat infection and provide resistance. At a molecular level, plant responses are initiated by the recognition of so-called effectors by intracellular receptors in a process known as

8h

Linking sensing to signaling during plant immunity

Plant defense against invading pathogens relies upon effective recognition of non-self organisms and a subsequent signaling response characterized by reprogramming of host gene expression and localized cell death to combat infection and provide resistance. At a molecular level, plant responses are initiated by the recognition of so-called effectors by intracellular receptors in a process known as

8h

If society is to improve then things must change.

To the fault of society, and referencing logic, sharing: What use is your 'contribution' if you think that you should have total control over your content and oppress anyone that wish to share? In years to pass and or perhaps you are gone, what will be of your actions? You've slowed progress down, valuable time wasted for the rest of society. If you would have rather openly shared your work and

8h

UK believes it can manage risks from using Huawei equipment in its 5G networks

The Financial Times reports that the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), part of GCHQ, has concluded that the risks posed by Huawei’s equipment can be mitigated. The agency believes …

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Dear Therapist: I’m Worried the College-Admissions Process Is Rigged Against My Son

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My son is in the middle of the college-application process. He has very good grades and very good SAT and ACT scores; he is an Eagle Scout and a captain of the cross-country team. He is also white, male, and u

9h

Should humanity merge into a single consciousness, or keep our indviduality?

This has been on my mind for the past few days and I am conflicted. It came after reading about the ending to Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End. In the end of the novel all of the children in the world suddenly lost their individuality and merged with an a alien being that absorbs other consciousness into itself called the Overmind. The children ended up destroying the planet in the process, kil

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Breeding the "Snot Otter"

The gigantic Ozark hellbender salamander is in trouble in the wild, but one zoo—and a hard-working team—is helping to boost its populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Multiple stellar populations detected in the cluster Hodge 6

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found that the cluster Hodge 6 hosts multiple stellar populations. The detection could provide important hints on the formation and evolution of Hodge 6 and star clusters in general. The finding is detailed in a paper published February 7 on arXiv.org.

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In Defense of Videogame Selfies (Yes, Really)

Corny? Maybe. But sharing our characters' journey in games like Kingdom Hearts 3 is prelude to a world in which virtual and real inextricably coexist.

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10 Best Cheap Headphones and Earbuds for 2019 (Under $100)

We’ve picked the best affordable in-ear, over-ear, and on-ear headphones in every budget price bracket.

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NATO Group Catfished Soldiers to Prove a Point About Privacy

With $60 and a few fake Facebook accounts, researchers were able to identify service members in a military exercise, track their movement, and even persuade them to disobey orders.

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Breeding the "Snot Otter"

The gigantic Ozark hellbender salamander is in trouble in the wild, but one zoo—and a hard-working team—is helping to boost its populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What if you could diagnose endometriosis with a tampon?

Women’s health care is often treated as all about reproduction. Some “femtech” startups are exploring the innovations that get overlooked as a result.

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Why We Should Think Twice About Colonizing Space – Facts So Romantic

There are lots of reasons why colonizing space seems compelling. The popular astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson argues that it would stimulate the economy and inspire the next generation of scientists. Elon Musk, who founded SpaceX, argues that “there is a strong humanitarian argument for making life multiplanetary…to safeguard the existence of humanity in the event that something catastrophic were t

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Predicting sequence from structure

One way to probe intricate biological systems is to block their components from interacting and see what happens. This method allows researchers to better understand cellular processes and functions, augmenting everyday laboratory experiments, diagnostic assays, and therapeutic interventions. As a result, reagents that impede interactions between proteins are in high demand. But before scientists

9h

Do Dams Increase Water Use?

Reservoirs may promote waste by creating a false sense of water security — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Physicists pinpoint a simple mechanism that makes bacteria resistant to antibiotics

Physicists at McMaster University have for the first time identified a simple mechanism used by potentially deadly bacteria to fend off antibiotics, a discovery which is providing new insights …

9h

Apple bends its own rules by using push notifications to promote Apple Music

Apple is sending out push notifications to Apple Music subscribers, offering a month of free music streaming to friends they refer to the service, reports 9to5Mac. The previous …

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”Big data”, muffins och rymdresor

Vad har muffins och rymdresor gemensamt? Svar: De förändrar våra DNA-metyleringsmönster, som i sin tur påverkar funktionen av våra gener. Två forskare som studerat detta närmare möttes nyligen vid en disputation vid Lunds universitet.

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Do Dams Increase Water Use?

Reservoirs may promote waste by creating a false sense of water security — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Predicting sequence from structure

One way to probe intricate biological systems is to block their components from interacting and see what happens. This method allows researchers to better understand cellular processes and functions, augmenting everyday laboratory experiments, diagnostic assays, and therapeutic interventions. As a result, reagents that impede interactions between proteins are in high demand. But before scientists

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Standardkamera gør det nemmere at flytte rundt på kollaborative robotter

PLUS. Et kamera og en pixelmarkør skal gøre det lettere at flytte samarbejdende robotter rundt mellem forskellige arbejdsstationer, fordi robotten kan kalibrere sin position ud fra markøren.

9h

Mobilmaster og rejsekort: Kommuner vil overvåge mere for at finde sociale bedragere

29 danske kommuner mener ikke, at de har tilstrækkeligt med redskaber i kampen mod socialt bedrageri.

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Does the big bang mean aliens are getting ever further away from us?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts If the galaxies have been accelerating outwards since the big bang , does this mean any aliens out there are getting further and further away from us, so that it becomes ever less likely that we will meet them? James Simpson, Manchester Continu

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Implementing a practical quantum secure direct communication system

Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of quantum communication, based on the principles of quantum mechanics for the direct transmission of classified information. While recent proof-of-principle experimental studies have made remarkable progress; QSDC systems remain to be implemented in practice. In a recent study, Ruoyang Qi and co-workers at the departments of low-di

9h

Physicists pinpoint a simple mechanism that makes bacteria resistant to antibiotics

Physicists at McMaster University have for the first time identified a simple mechanism used by potentially deadly bacteria to fend off antibiotics, a discovery which is providing new insights into how germs adapt and behave at a level of detail never seen before.

9h

Physicists pinpoint a simple mechanism that makes bacteria resistant to antibiotics

Physicists at McMaster University have for the first time identified a simple mechanism used by potentially deadly bacteria to fend off antibiotics, a discovery which is providing new insights into how germs adapt and behave at a level of detail never seen before.

9h

What Presidential Announcements Reveal About the Candidates

Amy Klobuchar made her presidential announcement in the accommodating weather conditions all candidates want. The cold was ringing in the audience’s ears as much as the senator’s words. The snow draped a doily of flakes on her head. She charged ahead without an umbrella: bad weather, but in sync with her message. “I don’t have a political machine. I don’t come from money. But what I do have is th

9h

The New ‘New Education’

A ddressing a nation riven by civil war, Charles Eliot offered a solution for its dangerous disunity: education. “The American people are fighting the wilderness, physical and moral, on the one hand, and on the other are struggling to work out the awful problem of self-government,” he wrote. “For this fight they must be trained and armed.” In a word, educated. Eliot’s essay, “The New Education,”

9h

The Oscar-Nominated Mirai Is More Than a Moving Tale of Childhood

If you’ve watched the trailer for Mamoru Hosoda’s Academy Award–nominated Mirai , you’d be forgiven for thinking that it looks a little childish. The Japanese film follows Kun-chan, a 4-year-old boy grappling with his jealousy of his new infant sister, Mirai—until, in a fantastical twist, he encounters Mirai’s future teenage self. For the most part, the movie is eye-level with the little boy; ten

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What's really feeding Long Island's destructive brown tides?

Researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory may have found a new strategy to limit the growth of an algae species called Aureococcus anophagefferens, which at high densities can result in devastating brown tides. Leveraging a genomic approach called metatranscriptomics, the researchers determined that phosphorus management may be important to controlling brown tides.

10h

Energetic particles can bombard exoplanets

TRAPPIST-1 is a system of seven Earth-sized worlds orbiting an ultra-cool dwarf star about 120 light-years away. The star, and hence its system of planets, is thought to be between five-to-ten billion years old, up to twice as old as our own solar system. For scientists seeking evidence for life elsewhere, the advanced age provides more time for chemistry and evolution to operate than the Earth ha

10h

Karkirurgien på Regionshospitalet Viborg devalueres kraftigt

Til april mister Karkirurgisk Afdeling i Viborg sin selvstændige ledelse og bliver dermed skudt tilbage til før 2007. Region Midtjylland og hospitalsledelsen skylder at fortælle om baggrunden for destruktionen af karkirurgien i Viborg og om den fremtidige struktur

10h

Is science synonymous with 'truth'? Game theory says, 'not always.'

Scientists strive to earn credit from their peers, for grants from federal agencies, and so a lot of the decisions that they make are strategic in nature. They're encouraged to publish exciting new findings that demonstrate some new phenomenon that we have never seen before. This professional pressure can affect their decision-making — to get acclaim they may actually make science worse. That is,

10h

Techtopia #92: Nu kommer Kinas svar på Tesla

Nu kommer de kinesiske el-biler for alvor på gaden. Tesla og de europæiske bilproducenter får kamp til stregen både på teknologi, design og infrastruktur.

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Kunstig intelligens kan se, hvor kidnappede børn holdes fanget

En AI med navnet Hotels-50K bliver nu brugt af amerikanske myndigheder til at lokalisere kidnappede børn og sexarbejdere ud fra billeder af hotelværelser.

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The Imperfect Truth About Finding Facts in a World of Fakes

It used to make sense to believe something until it was debunked; now, it makes sense to assume certain claims are fake—unless they are verified.

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Inside the Alexa-Friendly World of Wikidata

Virtual assistants do their jobs better thanks to Wikidata, which aims to (eventually) represent everything in the universe in a way computers can understand.

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The Best Gear for the E-Scooter Commuter

Stay safe, warm, stylish, and caffeinated as you Bird.

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6 Apps for Taking a Bit of the Work Out of Your Workday

Managing your tasks shouldn't be a distraction unto itself. These desk mates let your phone handle the hard stuff.

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3 Smart Things: What You Might Not Know About Attention

We do actually become less attentive as we get older, but refocusing someone's attention can have concrete physical effects.

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The Devastating Allure of Medical Miracles

After sepsis forced the amputation of Sheila Advento's hands, an intricate transplant technique made her whole again. Then came the side effects.

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Jargon Watch: What ‘Roadmanship’ Means to a Self-Driving Car

More than a century later, the quaint term is back as a basis for long-­overdue safety standards in autonomous vehicles.

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How a DIY Tesla Mechanic Resurrects Damaged Electric Cars

Rich Benoit stumps for the right-to-repair movement, pushing uncooperative manufacturers to make it easier for owners to fix stuff themselves.

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‘Summer’ Blockbusters Are Coming Too Soon

Now, in a perversion of the Time Stone worthy of Thanos, *Captain Marvel* is coming out the first week of March. March! Great Gregorian gods, why?

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Infoporn: 100 Years of Sci-Fi, Explored

Using data scraping, network analysis, and machine learning, the Science Fiction Concept Corpus includes more than 2,600 books written since 1900. Here's what we found.

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AI-Powered Apps Could Make Us More Creative—or Less Human

Google, Microsoft, and other tech companies keep injecting more and more smarts into our daily tasks. Will we become indistinguishable, or truly free?

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My Life Online—Without All the Metrics

Remove the integers and we might find our digital Shangri-la. Or at least a slightly healthier, more sustainable life online.

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VCs Are Hungry for Fast-Casual ‘Food Platforms’

A new batch of food-­focused investment firms are pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into fast-casual startups—powered by AI and data-mining apps.

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Why the Aeron Is Still the Most Coveted Seat in the Office

With its pioneering mesh support, ingenious tilt mechanism, and conspicuously engineered design, the "dotcom throne" has survived and thrived.

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Our Ears Are Unlocking an Era of Aural Data

While the eye is superior at perceiving sizes and ratios, the ear is better at detecting patterns that occur over *time*. Enter: sonification.

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Cool Gear for Turning Your Office Into a Calming Oasis

When you need a moment of zen, reach for these items to turn the break room, or anywhere you can find some free space, into an escape pod.

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Microsoft's Surface Studio 2 Hits the Deck to Help You Work

The latest version of Redmond's dextrous desktop combines thoughtful design and premium guts to boost your productivity—no matter what you do.

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Amazon Alexa and the Search for the One Perfect Answer

Voice computing seeks to deliver a single correct response to any query. That's why it's going to upend our relationship with information.

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Will Identity Politics Force the Stubborn Mind to Adapt?

I was ashamed by my inability to readjust to new grammar. If I didn’t, my failure would exact social costs, registering as unintended dis­respect—or worse, bigotry.

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Found in translation: Authors blame language barriers after forging co-authors

When the merde hits the fan, blame the translator. That’s Rule 1 of botched international diplomacy — and, evidently, botched international science. Otolaryngology researchers in China have lost their 2018 paper in the American Journal of Translational Research for what they’re calling (with some degree of chutzpah) language barriers. The article, “Therapeutic ultrasound potentiates the … Continue

10h

Synchrotron light to analyse mining waste in marine sediment in the Portman bay

The ALBA Synchrotron is expected to reveal the environmental impact of the tons of mining waste thrown for over 40 years into Portman Bay (Murcia, Spain), as part of the research project by the Consolidated Research Group in Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the University of Barcelona, which will apply new technologies to study one of the most severely polluted sites by the m

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Baby’s mouth might hold sway over breast-milk microbiome

Baby’s mouth might hold sway over breast-milk microbiome Baby’s mouth might hold sway over breast-milk microbiome, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00568-1 The bacterial content of breast milk differs between mothers who pump and those who nurse.

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UK Adds GPS Location Monitoring to Criminal Ankle Tags

The UK government is rolling out new GPS tags to keep 24/7 tabs on criminals. Announced last week by Justice Secretary David Gauke, the program is aimed at domestic abuse and stalking offenders. …

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Becoming Greta: ‘Invisible Girl’ to Global Climate Activist, With Bumps Along the Way

A Swedish girl’s solitary act of civil disobedience has turned her into a symbol for climate action. But her path hasn’t been easy.

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Bonaire: Where Coral and Cactus Thrive, and the Sea Soothes the Soul

In a dying reef world, the writer explores the underwater bliss of a little Caribbean island that is showing the world just how to save coral.

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Characterization of Plasmodium ovale spp. imported from Africa to Henan Province, China

Characterization of Plasmodium ovale spp. imported from Africa to Henan Province, China Characterization of Plasmodium ovale spp. imported from Africa to Henan Province, China, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38629-0 Characterization of Plasmodium ovale spp. imported from Africa to Henan Province, China

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Harnessing neurovascular interaction to guide axon growth

Harnessing neurovascular interaction to guide axon growth Harnessing neurovascular interaction to guide axon growth, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38558-y Harnessing neurovascular interaction to guide axon growth

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The effect of Robertsonian translocations on the intranuclear positioning of NORs (nucleolar organizing regions) in human sperm cells

The effect of Robertsonian translocations on the intranuclear positioning of NORs (nucleolar organizing regions) in human sperm cells The effect of Robertsonian translocations on the intranuclear positioning of NORs (nucleolar organizing regions) in human sperm cells, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38478-x The effect of Robertsonian translocations on the intranuclear p

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Immobilization of Peroxidase on Functionalized MWCNTs-Buckypaper/Polyvinyl alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane

Immobilization of Peroxidase on Functionalized MWCNTs-Buckypaper/Polyvinyl alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane Immobilization of Peroxidase on Functionalized MWCNTs-Buckypaper/Polyvinyl alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39621-4 Immobilization of Peroxidase on Functionalized MWCNTs-Buckypaper/Polyvinyl alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane

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Attentional selection and illusory surface appearance

Attentional selection and illusory surface appearance Attentional selection and illusory surface appearance, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37084-7 Attentional selection and illusory surface appearance

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Quantitative Analysis of CT Images in Patients with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome

Quantitative Analysis of CT Images in Patients with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome Quantitative Analysis of CT Images in Patients with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38669-6 Quantitative Analysis of CT Images in Patients with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruc

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Lambda bacteriophage nanoparticles displaying GP2, a HER2/neu derived peptide, induce prophylactic and therapeutic activities against TUBO tumor model in mice

Lambda bacteriophage nanoparticles displaying GP2, a HER2/neu derived peptide, induce prophylactic and therapeutic activities against TUBO tumor model in mice Lambda bacteriophage nanoparticles displaying GP2, a HER2/neu derived peptide, induce prophylactic and therapeutic activities against TUBO tumor model in mice, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38371-z Lambda bacter

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Towards a data-integrated cell

Towards a data-integrated cell Towards a data-integrated cell, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08797-8 Integration of omics data remains a challenge. Here, the authors introduce iCell, a framework to integrate tissue-specific protein–protein interaction, co-expression and genetic interaction data, enabling identification of the most rewired genes in cancer, unidentifiab

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Flagellar cAMP signaling controls trypanosome progression through host tissues

Flagellar cAMP signaling controls trypanosome progression through host tissues Flagellar cAMP signaling controls trypanosome progression through host tissues, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08696-y Trypanosoma brucei probably relies on chemotactic signals for movement through tsetse fly tissues, but the molecular basis is unknown. Here, the authors show that flagellar

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HIV-1 vaccination by needle-free oral injection induces strong mucosal immunity and protects against SHIV challenge

HIV-1 vaccination by needle-free oral injection induces strong mucosal immunity and protects against SHIV challenge HIV-1 vaccination by needle-free oral injection induces strong mucosal immunity and protects against SHIV challenge, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08739-4 Oral vaccination is a potential option to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity against HIV. Here, J

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Engineered transfer RNAs for suppression of premature termination codons

Engineered transfer RNAs for suppression of premature termination codons Engineered transfer RNAs for suppression of premature termination codons, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08329-4 Premature termination codon suppression therapy could be used to treat a range of genetic disorders. Here the authors present a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify anticodon en

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Siderophore-inspired chelator hijacks uranium from aqueous medium

Siderophore-inspired chelator hijacks uranium from aqueous medium Siderophore-inspired chelator hijacks uranium from aqueous medium, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08758-1 Development of simple uranyl recognition motifs possessing siderophore-like binding strength and selectivity presents a challenge. Here the authors show a comprehensive theoretical and experimental s

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Carbonate formation in salt dome cap rocks by microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane

Carbonate formation in salt dome cap rocks by microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane Carbonate formation in salt dome cap rocks by microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08687-z The nature of the microbial reactions occurring during cap rock formation is poorly understood. Here the authors find that sulfur and carbon isotope signatur

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Sphingolipid-dependent Dscam sorting regulates axon segregation

Sphingolipid-dependent Dscam sorting regulates axon segregation Sphingolipid-dependent Dscam sorting regulates axon segregation, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08765-2 Little is known about the initial segregation of axonal and dendritic proteins during the differentiation of newly generated neurons. Here authors use a forward genetic screen to identify the role of sph

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PD-1 blockade potentiates HIV latency reversal ex vivo in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed individuals

PD-1 blockade potentiates HIV latency reversal ex vivo in CD4 + T cells from ART-suppressed individuals PD-1 blockade potentiates HIV latency reversal ex vivo in CD4 + T cells from ART-suppressed individuals, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08798-7 The immune checkpoint molecule PD-1 is expressed on a fraction of CD4+ T cells latently infected with HIV, but whether PD-1

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In Afghanistan, Replacing Shame With Understanding on the Topic of Menstruation

New guidelines aim to help teachers talk about menstruation with students — boys and girls alike. The goal is to equip educators with the knowledge and tools to effectively discuss the science and practical implications of puberty with their students, and allow pubescent girls to emerge from the shadows.

10h

Physicists pinpoint a simple mechanism that makes bacteria resistant to antibiotics

Physicists at McMaster University have for the first time identified a simple mechanism used by potentially deadly bacteria to fend off antibiotics, a discovery which is providing new insights into how germs adapt and behave at a level of detail never seen before.

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Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk during gender transition

People receiving hormone therapy during gender transition had an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, such as strokes, blood clots and heart attacks.Findings underscore the importance of counseling and close monitoring of transgender patients receiving hormone therapy.

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There's A Gap Between Perception And Reality When It Comes To Learning

Increasingly, people feel they can master tasks simply by watching instructional videos like the kind you find on YouTube. But sometimes the gap between perception and reality can be deep and wide.

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Israel Heads To The Moon

A spacecraft named Beresheet is set to be Israel's first spacecraft to land on the moon. It came about because Israeli scientists lost a contest — but continued with the work anyway.

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Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

Remarkably little is known about the fundamentals of how a woman carries a baby inside her. Two Columbia University researchers aim to change that, to reduce the number of kids born too soon. (Image credit: Adrienne Grunwald for NPR)

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Efter bremseproblemer: Politiet har »ingen mulighed« for selv at teste biler

PLUS. Det er et rent held, at politiets bremseproblemer ikke har medført trafikulykker, siger politiinspektør. Men sagen kommer ikke til at medføre skærpet kontrol af politiets biler.

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I'm going to livestream 24/7 and see how far I can get towards being a senator.

The future has let me down. Now I'm taking drastic measures. Fully Automated Luxury Communism, UBI, Patreon. More to follow. Please hurry. Very tired. submitted by /u/_L_U_K_E_ [link] [comments]

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Australske partier hacket før valgkamp

Australske politiske partier er blevet udsat for hacking, muligvis af fremmed stat.

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C. elegans collectively forms dynamical networks

C. elegans collectively forms dynamical networks C. elegans collectively forms dynamical networks, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08537-y Understanding collective motions in a group of interacting animal is a challenge owing to the lack of control over, for example, real fish schools. Here, the authors study the aggregation of C. elegans at controllable conditions and

11h

How Brexit Threatens Peace in Northern Ireland

It was music that first brought me to Belfast. In the 1990s, I would travel from Dublin to see bands play at Queen’s University, though I never ventured much beyond the school. There was a justifiable tension in the city—British army patrols were commonplace, and all vehicles crossing the border that separated the Republic of Ireland from Northern Ireland were stopped and checked by security forc

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Privat israelsk 'månehopper' flyver denne uge

Natten til fredag sender Israel verdens første private landingsfartøj til Månen. Efter planen når den overfladen om godt tre måneder.

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Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia

Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. Resettlement of indigenous communities resulted in the spread of invasive species, the absence of human-set fires, and a general …

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'Urgent steps' needed to save Australia's biggest river system

The viability of a key river that feeds into Australia's biggest water system is under threat if poor conditions that killed millions of fish are not improved within six months, scientists warned Monday.

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Istanbul vets make city's stray animals feel at home

Concerned for the health of a black cat roaming around the university campus where she works, Mevlude dropped off the feline at the veterinary clinic for street animals run by the Istanbul municipality.

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Istanbul vets make city's stray animals feel at home

Concerned for the health of a black cat roaming around the university campus where she works, Mevlude dropped off the feline at the veterinary clinic for street animals run by the Istanbul municipality.

13h

The strange saga of Peter Gøtzsche and Physicians for Informed Consent

Recently, it was noted that Peter Gøtzsche, formerly of Cochrane Nordic, was featured on the speaker list for an antivaccine quackfest organized by the antivaccine group Physicians for Informed Consent, along with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Toni Bark, and Marry Holland. Two days later, he announced that he would not be speaking there. So what happened? And what is Physicians for Informed Consent?

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New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems

In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb. 17, a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists presented the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time. By compiling and comparing detailed data from pre-industr

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New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems

In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb. 17, a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists presented the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time. By compiling and comparing detailed data from pre-industr

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Researchers first to show hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism

Aimy Wissa, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, leads an interdisciplinary research team to study click beetles to inspire more agile robots. The …

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Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia

Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. Resettlement of indigenous communities resulted in the spread of invasive species, the absence of human-set fires, and a general cascade in the interconnected food web that led to the largest mammalian extinction event ever recorded. In this case, the absence of direct human activity on the landscape may be the cause of the extincti

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Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia

Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. Resettlement of indigenous communities resulted in the spread of invasive species, the absence of human-set fires, and a general cascade in the interconnected food web that led to the largest mammalian extinction event ever recorded. In this case, the absence of direct human activity on the landscape may be the cause of the extincti

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Researchers first to show hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism

Aimy Wissa, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, leads an interdisciplinary research team to study click beetles to inspire more agile robots. The team, which includes MechSE Assistant Professor Alison Dunn and Dr. Marianne Alleyne, a research scientist in the Department of Entomology, recently presented their ongoing and novel work on the quick release m

13h

Researchers first to show hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism

Aimy Wissa, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, leads an interdisciplinary research team to study click beetles to inspire more agile robots. The team, which includes MechSE Assistant Professor Alison Dunn and Dr. Marianne Alleyne, a research scientist in the Department of Entomology, recently presented their ongoing and novel work on the quick release m

13h

As artificial intelligence changes the world, it changes our language too

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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A young star is sprinkled with table salt

A young star is sprinkled with table salt A young star is sprinkled with table salt, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00569-0 Dust particles might have given rise to the cosmic grains of an everyday seasoning.

13h

Smart NBA Jerseys Lets You Switch Allegiances On The Fly

Sport jerseys are a good way for you to advertise the team and the player that you support. However, there are times when you might be wishing you weren’t wearing your jersey, such …

13h

Any RAY KURZWEIL fans?

I have read the Singularity is near, age of spiritual machines, how to create a mind & iam waiting for Daniel Ray kurzweil changed my perspective not just towards AI & Technological's Implications but toward life, he is one of the most optimistic humans on the planet!! His prediction are the best we have, the man's faith in them is also amplified by the fact he eats 150-200 per day! What do you t

14h

Study of Brazil favela stricken by Zika shows dengue may protect against virus

Analysis of community where 73% of residents contracted Zika in 2015 offers new clues about epidemic Scientists studying the 2015 Zika outbreak in Brazil have discovered that people previously exposed to dengue may have been protected from the virus. Three-quarters of the inhabitants of a favela in the country’s north-east caught the mosquito-borne Zika virus during the epidemic. The outbreak lef

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Ready for more Apple? New AirPods, Macs, iPhones, and updated iPod Touch may come in 2019

From new AirPods to iPhones, Apple may be in for a very busy 2019.

14h

Neuroscientists Say They've Found an Entirely New Form of Neural Communication

It can 'jump' across physical gaps in brain tissue.

14h

Watch how immune cells attack and eliminate bacteria :-O

submitted by /u/pollisa_85 [link] [comments]

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Parents: Keep medical marijuana dispensaries away from children

Seven in 10 parents think they should have a say in whether dispensaries are located near their child's school or daycare and most say they should be banned within a certain distance of those facilities.

14h

The Passion of Don Carlos

I obtained a partial script of a stage play which recently premiered in Paris: "La Passion de Don Carlos". Any similarities with Spanish or French cancer researchers are entirely coincidental.

15h

Burned out and overwhelmed: should you embrace the joy of no?

Once we were pressured to acquire things and do more with our lives. Now, we’re being told to declutter our homes and diaries. What happened to just being ourselves? What brings you joy? It is a question that is hard to avoid these days, as joy seems to be the new buzzword. It is on the cover of two new books, The Joy of No (#Jono) by Debbie Chapman, published at the end of last year, and The Joy

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Virus dræber resistente bakterier: Kan blive antibiotikas afløser

Dansk forsker mener, at listig virus kan blive en del af fremtidens løsning på antibiotikaresistens.

15h

Leverandører presser kommuner til at indgå databehandleraftaler – truer med at opsige samarbejde

Kommuner og leverandører er ofte uenige om, om der er brug for en databehandleraftale. Flere kommuner har følt sig presset af leverandører og påtager sig unødvendigt dataansvar.

15h

Illinois researchers first to show hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism

Aimy Wissa, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, leads an interdisciplinary research team to study click beetles to inspire more agile robots. The team, which includes MechSE Assistant Professor Alison Dunn and Dr. Marianne Alleyne, a research scientist in the Department of Entomology, recently presented their ongoing and novel work on the quick release m

16h

Heavy smoking can damage vision, Rutgers researcher finds

Smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day can damage your vision, a study co-authored by a Rutgers researcher finds.

16h

Depression reversed in male mice by activating gene that helps excite neurons

Directly activating a gene important to exciting our excitatory neurons and associated with major depression may help turn around classic symptoms like social isolation and loss of interest, at least for males, scientists report.

16h

Small cell lung cancer may respond to combination of immunotherapy and DNA damage repair inhibitors

MD Anderson researchers discovered that a combination of immunotherapy and targeted therapies that block normal DNA damage repair, such as PARP inhibitors, achieved dramatic tumor reduction in mouse models of small cell lung cancer.

16h

Payless is closing all its 2,100 US stores

submitted by /u/nick7566 [link] [comments]

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26MW Solar Plant Starts Operation in Fukushima

Banpu Power Japan Co Ltd (Chuo-ku, Tokyo) built a solar power plant with a total solar panel capacity of 26.2MW and a grid capacity of 20.46MW in Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, …

18h

What are the main obstacles in the way of letting us transplant our brains into cyborg bodies? Is it unlikely we will reach that stage in our lifetime?

Yes I was just at the cinema and saw Alita. But this is actually something I've been pondering a lot in the past as well. We are already well underway with bionic eyes and arms and such that can be controlled by our brains. So that doesen't seem like one of the main obstacles. However the brain requires oxygen and nutrients. Synthetic blood would solve oxygen, and nutrients as well. However as a

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The Snowflake in Chief

To support President Donald Trump is to be complicit in the rule of a thin-skinned authoritarian who denigrates the free-speech rights of people who criticize him. The latest illustration: his weekend outburst against Saturday Night Live , a sketch-comedy show that has regularly poked fun at every American president for 40 years. The most powerful snowflake in America was triggered by Alec Baldwi

18h

Stores accused of 'watering down' bottle deposit scheme

Campaigners say retailers want fees to apply only to smaller containers, rather than all plastic bottles.

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Australia blames 'state actor' for hacking political parties

A "sophisticated state actor" was behind a cyberattack on the Australian Parliament's computing network that also affected the network used by major political parties, the prime minister said …

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Clothing conscience

How sustainable are your fashion habits? Take our quiz.

19h

Live better with attainable goals

Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. The key for later satisfaction is whether the life goals are seen as attainable and what they mean to the person, as psychologists report in a study with over 970 participants.

20h

Lithium-air batteries can store energy for cars, houses and industry

Growth in the offer of renewable energy sources will mean increased demand for devices optimal for energy storing.

20h

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