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nyheder2019februar19

Isotopes found in bones suggest Neanderthals were fresh meat eaters

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests at least some Neanderthals were mainly fresh meat eaters. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes testing protein samples discovered in Neanderthal bones and what they found.

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Ny forskning: Glyphosat øger risikoen for kræfttype markant

Glyphosat, der indgår i ukrudtsmidler som Roundup, forøger risikoen for at få kræftsygdommen Non-Hodgkins lymfom med op til 41 pct. Det konkluderer forskere i et metastudie fra University of Washington.

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Path integration maintains spatial periodicity of grid cell firing in a 1D circular track

Path integration maintains spatial periodicity of grid cell firing in a 1D circular track Path integration maintains spatial periodicity of grid cell firing in a 1D circular track, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08795-w In an open field, the preferential firing of grid cells on a hexagonal lattice is formed by integrating external as well as self-motion cues. Here, the

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The British Military Is Working on Anti-Aircraft Drone Swarms

Drone Swarms A swarm of 150 drones buzzed over Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine’s head during this year’s Super Bowl half time show, spelling out the words “One Love.” It was a dazzling display of drone technology — and military developers in the United States and United Kingdom are increasingly interested in using something similar, but with a very different goal in mind: to surround enemy aircraft,

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Germany, France take aim at EU anti-trust rules in new industrial strategy

Germany and France agreed Tuesday on a strategy to create European industrial "champions" and to seek to change EU competition rules that now prevent blockbuster mergers of homegrown companies.

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Using anti-cancer immunotherapy to fight HIV

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have shown that immunotherapy treatments against cancer could reduce the amount of virus that persists in people on triple therapy. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, they show, in the cells of people living with HIV, how these therapies reveal the virus – until now hidden in the hollows of infected

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Digital PLL achieves a power consumption of 0.265 mW

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed an advanced phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer that can drastically cut power consumption. This digital PLL could be an attractive building block for Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and other wireless technologies to support a wide range of Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

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Nano-droplets are the key to controlling membrane formation

The creation of membranes is of enormous importance in biology, but also in many chemical applications developed by humans. These membranes are shaped spontaneously when soap-like molecules in water join together. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology now have a clear picture of the entire process. The results are published in Nature Chemistry.

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Research finds ethnoracial differences in Alzheimer's disease

A team of Mayo Clinic researchers found Hispanic-American patients with Alzheimer's tend to survive significantly longer with the disease than other ethnoracial groups, according to a study in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. Hispanic-Americans were found to live an average of 12 years with the disease from the time of the onset of symptoms.

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Insight into tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effects of cellular senescence

Wistar researchers have described a novel role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) metabolism in the ability of senescent cells to release tumor-promoting molecules.

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Engineers develop placenta-on-a-chip to study caffeine transport from mother to fetus

Iowa State's Nicole Hashemi has used her expertise in microfluidics to lead development of a device that models a human placenta. She and her research team have used the 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study transport of caffeine from the mother, across the placental barrier, to the fetus. The journal Global Challenges has just published a paper describing the device and reporting on the caffeine study.

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A sociable personality attenuates neuropathic pain and anxiety intensifies it

Certain personality traits such as sociability, anxiety or depression influence manifestations of neuropathic pain in mice, according to a new study by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar at Pompeu Fabra University. The study, led by Rafael Maldonado, has been published in the journal Neuropharmacology.

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Mouse study reveals how chronic stress promotes cancer, identifies vitamin C as therapy

A new study, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, establishes that the stress hormone epinephrine sets off a cascade of biochemical reactions that favor breast cancer growth and spread in chronically stressed patients.

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Grasses can acquire genes from neighboring plants

Published in the Feb. 18, 2019, edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a study led by an international team including Guillaume Besnard, CNRS researcher at the 'Evolution et diversité biologique' laboratory (CNRS/IRD/Université Toulouse III — Paul Sabatier), reveals that the genome of Alloteropsis semialata, a grass found in Australia, contains nearly 60 genes acquired from a

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan får man Merkurs bane til at stemme med Newtons tyngdelov?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvor stor Solens masse skulle være, hvis Newtons beregninger skulle passe. Professor fra Aarhus Universitet forklarer, hvorfor det er noget nær umuligt at svare på.

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New Squid Genome Shines Light on Symbiotic Evolution

Every evening, nocturnal Hawaiian bobtail squids ( Euprymna scolopes ) emerge from their burrows in shallow waters of the Pacific to hunt for shrimp. These soft-bodied, golf ball-size cephalopods don’t have much to protect them from predators like seals, eels and fish. So they rely on another organism to help out: the bacterium Vibrio fischeri . This microbe lives in an organ embedded in the squi

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Getting to Mars may happen only if we can grow food in space

Decades after the last human set foot on the moon, NASA is contemplating setting up a permanent base there or sending astronauts to Mars. Accomplishing those goals, however, will require a few green thumbs.

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Novel gene therapy approach creates new route to tackle rare, inherited diseases

Nonsense mutations are single-letter errors in the genetic code that prematurely halt the production of critical proteins. These unfinished proteins are unable to function normally, and nonsense mutations cause 10-15 percent of all inherited genetic diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, cystic fibrosis and polycystic kidney disease. There is currently no cure or

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'Ivory Queen' Yang Fenglan jailed in Tanzania

The Chinese businesswoman was sentenced to 15 years in prison for operating an ivory-smuggling ring.

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Getting to Mars may happen only if we can grow food in space

Decades after the last human set foot on the moon, NASA is contemplating setting up a permanent base there or sending astronauts to Mars. Accomplishing those goals, however, will require a few green thumbs.

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Novel gene therapy approach creates new route to tackle rare, inherited diseases

Nonsense mutations are single-letter errors in the genetic code that prematurely halt the production of critical proteins. These unfinished proteins are unable to function normally, and nonsense mutations cause 10-15 percent of all inherited genetic diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, cystic fibrosis and polycystic kidney disease. There is currently no cure or

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Interactive space simulation for nanosatellites

Pioneer partner Open Cosmos are taking mission development to a new dimension, using a virtual reality-like simulation that replicates life in orbit for space technologies.

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Are smartwatches the ideal gadget for motorcyclists?

Gadgets TAG Heuer awarded its Connected timepiece to Pikes Peak winners. Are smartwatches the ideal gadget for motorcyclists? There are times when checking directions, email, and text messages are important when traveling.

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20-million-year-old tusked sea cow is Central America's oldest marine mammal

A researcher searching the shoreline of the Panama Canal for fossil plants instead found an ancient sea cow. An 'emergency fossil excavation' due to rising water levels yielded a remarkably complete skeleton of a new genus and species of dugong, estimated to be about 20 million years old, the first evidence of a marine mammal from the Pacific side of the canal.

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Ocean acidification harms cod larvae more than previously thought

The Atlantic cod is one of the most important commercial fish species in the world. Recent studies have shown that ocean acidification threatens the early life stages of this species. So far it was hoped that at least the larvae that survive might be more robust and therefore may aid in the adaptation of this population. A new paper, which has been published by scientists from GEOMAR in the journa

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Birch pollen allergen immunotherapy normalizes nasal gene-expression and microbial community

According to a new study, birch pollen allergen immunotherapy modifies the gene expression and microbiome profile of the nasal epithelium to correspond to those of healthy controls.

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No evidence tougher policies deter adolescent cannabis use

A new study from the University of Kent has found no evidence that teenage cannabis use is lower in countries with tougher policies.

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Multinational collaboration study on familial primary distal renal tubular acidosis

Familial primary distal renal tubular acidosis may be associated with significant complications. It is a very rare disorder and because of this, even specialised clinicians may only ever see a small number of affected patients thus making it difficult to gain experience and to understand long-term outcomes. The European dRTA consortium has successfully overcome this problem by gathering informatio

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Researchers discover variants in DNA that significantly influence how the body distributes fat

A new breakthrough that identifies multiple genetic variants associated with how the body stores and distributes fat, broadening our understanding of how genes can predispose certain individuals to more pear-like obesity or more apple-like obesity, is published in Nature Genetics today.

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Forest fires as an opportunity for ecosystem recovery

It is estimated that globally there are more than two million hectares of land in need of restoration. The fires that occurred in those places provided the people who manage them with an opportunity to change, via a suitable process of ecological restoration, the previous bad forestry practices.

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Epidemiological model lends insight to chlamydia outbreak in Japan

Mathematical models that quantify the dynamics of infectious diseases are crucial predictive tools for the control of ongoing and future outbreaks. In an article publishing on Feb. 19 in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, a publication of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Toshikazu Kuniya studies the global behavior of a multi-group SIR epidemic model with age structure and

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'Arapuca', a device developed in Brazil for international neutrino experiment, is enhanced

One of the makers of the light detector to be used in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) presented a new version, X-Arapuca, that will make the capture of photons even more efficient, at FAPESP Week London.

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Machine learning unlocks plants' secrets

Plants are master chemists, and Michigan State University researchers have unlocked their secret of producing specialized metabolites.

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Neandertals' main food source was definitely meat

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany describe two late Neandertals with exceptionally high nitrogen isotope ratios, which would traditionally be interpreted as the signature of freshwater fish consumption. By studying the isotope ratios of single amino acids, they however demonstrated that instead of fish, the adult Neandertal had a diet relying on lar

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'Phantom' volcanoes discovery signals new hope for North Sea oil and gas exploration

Geologists at the University of Aberdeen have discovered a huge swathe of the North Sea left unexplored for oil and gas because of so-called 'phantom' volcanoes they have proven don't exist.

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Here's Why Great White Sharks Are Natural-Born Superheroes

What's the secret to being a badass great white shark? Millions of years of highly specialized genetic evolution.

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Not all ions in tokamaks go with the flow

For the first time, scientists are measuring the rotation of the main (deuterium) plasma in the edge region of a fusion device. New spectroscopic measurements combined with state-of-the-art spectroscopic simulation made this measurement possible. The observed rotation at the plasma edge is substantially higher than previously thought based on measurements of impurity elements in the plasma.

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Porous carbon fiber research one step closer to use in automotive industry

An update on recently reported research on porous carbon fibers shows how this material can be used in an industrial setting, marking an important step from the theoretical to application.

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PET og CFCS advarer mod cybertrusler fra insidere i danske organisationer

Det er ikke kun bevidst ondsindede insidere, der udgør et problem for sikkerheden. Ubevidste insidere er involveret i op mod halvdelen af sikkerhedshændelserne i en organisation, vurderer CFCS og PET.

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Reckless Even By Roger Stone Standards

Roger Stone, the trash-talking Nixon-tattooed Trump advisor recently indicted for lying to Congress and threatening a witness , had an eventful Presidents Day. In the space of time you or I might enjoy a leisurely brunch, Stone posted an online attack on United States District Judge Amy Berman Jackson, who is presiding in his case, then altered the post, deleted the post, offered a defense for th

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What Roma Gets Right About Being a Domestic Worker

“That was me,” I whispered to myself when, early in Roma , a maid named Cleo (played by Yalitza Aparicio) perched on the edge of a sleeping child’s bed one morning. I whispered those words again when Cleo peeled eggs for young Pepe (Marco Graf) at breakfast while he shared his dreams of becoming a pilot. As I watched Alfonso Cuarón’s sumptuous black-and-white Netflix drama about a domestic worker

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First molecular test that selects immunotherapy for kidney cancer

National Cancer Centre Singapore and Lucence Diagnostics Announce First Molecular Test that Selects Immunotherapy for Kidney Cancer. – Study was conducted on 36 kidney cancer patients using the CLEARScore™ test that identifies eight genes linked to immunotherapy. – Findings from this study will be presented at the 2019 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in San Francisco.

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Porous carbon fiber research one step closer to use in automotive industry

Liu's porous carbon fibers can enable high energy density and high electron/ion charging rates, which are typically mutually exclusive in electrochemical energy storage devices.

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Novel gene therapy approach creates new route to tackle rare, inherited diseases

A new study reveals a novel approach and robust technology platform for suppressing nonsense mutations using engineered transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. The research shows that modified tRNAs can efficiently and accurately repair nonsense mutations with any amino acid. The findings by researchers at the University of Iowa, The Wistar Institute, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Lab, and In

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Putting the brakes on aging

Salk Institute researchers have developed a new gene therapy to help decelerate the aging process. The findings, published on February 18, 2019, in the journal Nature Medicine, highlight a novel CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing therapy that can suppress the accelerated aging observed in mice with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that also afflicts humans.

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Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 18, 2019

ORNL story tips: Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutrons investigate novel crystals' ability to capture carbon dioxide from air; gleaning valuable data from Twitter used to quickly map power outages, emergencies; ORNL's lightweight, heat-shielding graphite foam tested at Germany's Wendlestein 7-X stellarator yields positive results in fusion reactors; open source software scales up analysis of moto

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Natural resources valued differently by men and woman, study shows

Men and women value, access and use resources from the natural environment in distinct and different ways, a new study has shown.

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Controlling entry and platform fees best way to control market power

Technological services can be strategic substitutes or complements in platform competition, new research from Cass Business School has found.

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Inflammation: Study explains loss of protective abilities of T cells

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) make sure that immune responses are not too strong and that inflammation is inhibited. This makes them highly interesting for therapies against inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. But they are hard to use with patients, because Tregs lose their abilities in particularly inflamed tissues. A team of Technical University of Munich has now succeeded

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Progress in the treatment of aggressive brain tumors

Cancer researchers at the University of Bonn have reported significant progress in the treatment of glioblastoma. About one third of all patients suffer from a particular variant of this most common and aggressive brain tumor. Survival of these patients treated with the new combination therapy increased on average by nearly half compared to patients who received the standard therapy. The study has

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Breakthrough nanoscience discovery made on flight from New York to Jerusalem

Magic-size nanoclusters are the missing link that bridges the divide between how matter rearranges itself in small-scale molecular isomerization and in large, solid bulk matter phase transitions.

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Is That Dagobah? No, Just a Real-Life Magical Forest

Neil Burnell's photographs of Wistman's Wood in Devon, England evoke comparisons to 'Star Wars' and 'The Lord of the Rings'.

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Customs Letter About a Long-Lost Suitcase Leads to Artifacts from Desert with Early 'Jesus' Painting

The ancient desert village of Shivta in southern Israel made headlines when archaeologists discovered a wall painting there that is thought to show the baptism of Jesus Christ, the earliest representation of Christ known in Israel.

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Giving Neural Nets an Innate Brain-Like Structure Could Bolster Deep Learning

How many times have you heard the following idea? Deep learning, the machine learning technique that has taken the AI world by storm, is loosely inspired by the human brain. I myself have repeated the statement so many times it’s easy to forget that the emphasis is on the word “loosely.” Even among academics, the draw of mapping deep learning to brain computations has led many to ask whether tech

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Caffeine slows down the movement of water molecules

Contrary to the well-known stimulating effect on humans, caffeine slows down the movement of water molecules. Researchers from the NWO Institute AMOLF in Amsterdam and the ESPCI in Paris report this in a recent publication in the Journal of Physics Communications.

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Small research teams produce more new ideas

It’s common to hear that to work out a big research problem, you need a big team. A new analysis of more than 65 million papers, patents, and software projects suggests otherwise. Researchers examined 60 years of publications and found that smaller teams are far more likely to introduce new ideas to science and technology, while larger teams more often develop and consolidate existing knowledge.

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Twitter tightens its political ad rules ahead of EU elections

Twitter is expanding its transparent ads policy to Europe ahead of the European parliament elections in May. The sweeping rules debuted in the US last May after Russia's wide-ranging …

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Finnish startup Varjo rolls out $5,995 VR headset

Atomico-backed Finnish startup Varjo on Tuesday launched its top-of-the-range virtual reality headset, aiming to take VR technology to the aerospace and automotive sectors.

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Reliable method for detecting extraterrestrial life is used on Earth for the first time

Dutch scientists have developed an instrument capable of detecting the presence of living plants kilometres away. In future, the technique could be used in the search for extraterrestrial life. The biologist Lucas Patty will be announcing these results to the world when he defends his Ph.D. at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam on 18 February 2019.

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Aktivist-læge: I et eller andet omfang er sundhedsvæsenet ved at kollapse

En række af de læger, der stod bag #detkuhaværetmig-kampagnen, har iværksat en ny underskriftindsamling, der skal få politikerne til at indse, at det er nødvendigt at prioritere langt skarpere, hvis ikke sundhedsvæsenet skal kollapse. »Jeg gør det, fordi jeg synes, det er nødvendigt,« siger en af bagmændene.

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Venstre: Vi er enige i, at der skal ske noget

Regeringens sundhedsudspil peger i den helt rigtige retning, siger Venstres sundhedsordfører som svar på den seneste underskriftindsamling fra utilfredse læger.

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Scientists identify atomic structure of catalytically active copper-ceria interface

Recently, Dr. ZHOU Yan and Prof. SHEN Wenjie at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators identified the atomic structure of the catalytically active copper-ceria interface and proposed a copper bilayer model.

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The key to increased lifespan? Rubicon alters autophagy in animals during aging

Autophagy is an important biological recycling mechanism that influences the progression of aging in animals. Here, age-related changes in autophagy were studied in multiple model organisms. An Osaka University-led research team found that Rubicon suppression led to reduction of age-associated motor decline, as well as reduction of fibrosis, and that Rubicon could be an important new target for tr

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Catch me if you can: Study reveals disguises are surprisingly effective

In a new study, led by researchers at the universities of York and Huddersfield, disguises reduced the ability of participants to match faces by around 30 percent, even when they were warned that some of the people had changed the way they look.

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Antibiotic resistances spread faster than so far thought

By studying fish raised in aquaculture, researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Copenhagen and the University of Campinas in Brazil have shed new light on the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes are transferred between bacteria. According to the study published in the journal Microbiome, those mechanisms are more varied than previously thought.

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International research collaboration computes climate past, present, and future

Researchers from the Ludwig-Maximillains University Munich and Canadian research organization Ouranos have been investigating extreme flooding events by modelling European and Canadian climate from 1950 to 2100.

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The global impact of coal power

With data and modelling from almost 8,000 coal power plants, researchers from ETH Zurich present the most comprehensive global picture to date of climate and human health impacts from coal power generation.

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When a defect might be beneficial

In the quest to design more efficient solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a team of engineers has analyzed different types of defects in the semiconductor material that enables such devices to determine if and how they affect performance.

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Quarrying of Stonehenge 'bluestones' dated to 3000 BC

Excavations at two quarries in Wales, known to be the source of the Stonehenge 'bluestones', provide new evidence of megalith quarrying 5,000 years ago, according to a new UCL-led study.

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IAU names landing site of Chinese Chang'e-4 probe on far side of the moon

The International Astronomical Union Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature has approved the name Statio Tianhe for the landing site where the Chinese spacecraft Chang'e-4 touched down on 3 January this year, in the first-ever landing on the far side of the Moon. The name Tianhe originates from the ancient Chinese name for the Milky Way, which was the sky river that separated Niulang and

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Har forlænget vingerne 'i smug': Nu skal Vestas levere møller med verdens længste vinger

I al ubemærkethed har MHI Vestas næsten solgt de første af en ny type 9,5 MW havmølle med vinger på hele 85 meter. Dermed er det nu MHI Vestas, der kan levere en havmølle med markedets længste vinger – indtil videre.

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Why the Rosenhan Experiment still matters

In 1973, eight experimenters faked insanity to see how easy it was to get into a mental hospital. The hard part was getting out. Their findings sparked a great debate over how psychiatry treated patients and how accurate diagnostic procedures were. In an age marked by a lack of proper mental health care, the finding that it was too easy to get a doctor's attention seems shocking. In the United St

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Dose of vitamin C helps gold nanowires grow

A boost of vitamin C helped Rice University scientists turn small gold nanorods into fine gold nanowires.

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Climate-friendly labriculture depends on an energy revolution, study says

Currently proposed types of lab-grown meat cannot provide a cure-all for the detrimental climate impacts of meat production without a large-scale transition to a decarbonised energy system, a new study has found.

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The study of poop finally gets a name

Researchers have coined a new scientific term that means “excrement examined experimentally,” or, in simpler terms, the study of poop: in fimo . Why, you might ask, do we need a scientifically accurate term based in Latin for the study of poop? The answer is quite simple: because so many scientific words are based in Latin and there hasn’t been one for the experimental study of excrement, even th

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Instagram will support fundraisers using Story stickers

Facebook's fundraising tool has raised over $1 billion for non-profits and personal causes since its launch, and now it looks like a similar feature will be rolled out to Instagram …

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Dornith Doherty's Mesmerizing Photos Capture the Contradictions of Seed Banking

"Archiving Eden," now at the National Academy of Sciences, shows how guarding against an ecological catastrophe is both optimistic and pessimistic

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Revealed: How the 'Iron Man' of immune cells helps T cells fight infection

The immune system's killer T cells are crucial in fighting viral infections. A fraction of them – memory cells – live on once infection is controlled in order to fight re-infection by the same virus. They are of great interest as the basis of T cell-based vaccination and immunotherapies. Now, scientists has revealed the mechanisms by which other immune cells called 'helper T cells' are able to pro

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Children with autism, co-occurring ADHD symptoms lag in key measures of independence

A pair of new studies has provided new insight into the challenges faced by children on the autism spectrum who exhibit symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to the findings from researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), these children have difficulty with adaptive behavior, a key measure of independence.

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Pest eller ebola – så förhindras nya epidemier

Femåriga Andry pekar på bilden på mobiltelefonens skärm. Det är en selfie med en pojke och en kvinna som tittar rakt in i kameran. Deras ansikten täcks till hälften av stora munskydd. Hans mamma Lova undrar om han minns var bilden av dem är tagen. – Det var där de gav oss sprutor, säger Andry. Allt började i oktober 2017 när Lova och Andry besökte en släkting i norra delarna av landet. Vid det la

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Natural resources valued differently by men and woman, study shows

Men and women value, access and use resources from the natural environment in distinct and different ways, a new study has shown.

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Breakthrough in the search for graphene-based electronics

For 15 years, scientists have tried to exploit the "miracle material" graphene to produce nanoscale electronics. On paper, graphene should be great for just that: it is ultra-thin—only one atom thick and therefore two-dimensional, it is excellent for conducting electrical current, and holds great promise for future forms of electronics that are faster and more energy efficient. In addition, graphe

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Search engine for new breakthroughs in physics

Imagine that you have a lot of data, but you do not really know what you are looking for. So what do you do? In that case you use a computer that automatically searches for deviations. According to researcher Sascha Caron, this will be a promising method to achieve new breakthroughs in particle physics. Together with other ATLAS researchers at CERN, he has demonstrated this new approach in a paper

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High-energy X-ray bursts from low-energy plasma

Solar flares shouldn't produce X-rays, but they do. Why? The one-size-fits-all approach to electron collisions misses a lucky few that lead to an intense X-ray burst. Scientists thought there were too many electron-scattering collisions in such cold plasmas for electrons to be accelerated to high energy and radiate X-rays. While most of the electrons in a cold plasma collide before they can accele

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Peter Gøtzsche aflyser sin deltagelse i workshop for vaccine-skeptikere

Professor Peter Gøtzsche aflyser sit oplæg på en workshop for vaccine-skeptisk organisation, efter at hans deltagelse blev genstand for massiv kritik. Grotesk, mener hovedpersonen selv.

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Aarhus Universitet får ny doktor i kræftbehandling

Karen-Lise Garm Spindler har netop forsvaret sin doktorafhandling, der er baseret på resultaterne fra kliniske lægemiddelforsøg og undersøgelser ved kræft i tarmen.

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A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour

The viceroy butterfly is a mimic, modeling its orange-and-black colors after the queen butterfly, a bug that tastes so disgusting predators have learned not to eat it or anything that looks like it, including viceroys. The apparent dependence of mimics on their models made biologists wonder if the fates of the two species are forever intertwined. If so, then what happens when the mimic and the mod

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A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour

The viceroy butterfly is a mimic, modeling its orange-and-black colors after the queen butterfly, a bug that tastes so disgusting predators have learned not to eat it or anything that looks like it, including viceroys. The apparent dependence of mimics on their models made biologists wonder if the fates of the two species are forever intertwined. If so, then what happens when the mimic and the mod

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Reaching Into the Cell

One would like to be able to reach into a cell and mess around with its functions in real time. Thanks to CRISPR and other gene-editing technologies, we can (more or less selectively) tweak individual genes, to a wide number of interesting effects. What if that gene just disappears? What if it gets expressed even more? How about replacing it with a protein whose active site has been modified? The

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00627-7 How Nature reported the roles of birds in the First World War, and a resurgent kanagaroo population in 1968.

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The death penalty, an American tradition on the decline

Capital punishment has been practiced on American soil for more than 400 years. Historians have documented nearly 16,000 executions, accomplished by burning, hanging, firing squad, electrocution, lethal gas and lethal injection. An untold number of others have doubtlessly occurred yet escaped recognition.

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Land use delays could hamper climate efforts

Global climate change targets are unlikely to be met because of delays in changes to land use, Edinburgh researchers say.

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Would You Pay $6,000 For Vision-Quality VR?

The VR-1, from Finnish company Varjo, isn't exactly chump change, but its resolution is so high that companies in multiple industries await it eagerly.

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Climate-friendly labriculture depends on an energy revolution

In a first-of-its-kind study, the climate-change impact of several production methods for lab-grown and farmed beef was assessed accounting for the differing greenhouse gases produced. The new projections reveal that over the long term, cultured meat production methods requiring large energy inputs could increase global warming more than some types of cattle farming if energy systems remain depend

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Quarrying of Stonehenge 'bluestones' dated to 3000 BC

Excavations at two quarries in Wales, known to be the source of the Stonehenge 'bluestones', provide new evidence of megalith quarrying 5,000 years ago.

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Terahertz wireless makes big strides in paving the way to technological singularity

Scientists have announced the successful development of a terahertz (THz) transceiver that can transmit or receive digital data at 80 gigabits per second (Gbit/s). The transceiver was implemented using silicon CMOS integrated circuit technology, which would have a great advantage for volume production.

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Study says attacks on infrastructure in Gaza and West Bank exact a human cost

Israel's targeting of agricultural, water and energy infrastructures in the West Bank and Gaza Strip has had dire impacts on human welfare and livelihoods in both locations, a new report by researchers at Duke University and the University of New Hampshire shows.

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Physicists explain fireballs erupting from grapes in microwave oven

A trio of researchers with McMaster, Concordia and Trent Universities has solved the mystery of why pairs of grapes ignite into fireballs when cooked together in a microwave oven. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Hamza Khattak, Pablo Bianucci and Aaron Slepkov claim that the fireball is not the result of heat from the outside of the grapes making its way

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New report shines light on who commits animal cruelty and how they are punished

The Sentencing Advisory Council has just released the first ever review of how animal cruelty offenders are sentenced in Victoria.

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Rare type of tumors can’t handle cholesterol

Scientists have discovered a rare tumor type that is unable to synthesize cholesterol, a molecule without which cells can’t survive. “These cells become dependent on taking up cholesterol from their environment, and we can use this dependency to design therapies that block cholesterol uptake,” says Kivanç Birsoy, assistant professor at Rockefeller University, who reports the findings in Nature .

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New report shines light on who commits animal cruelty and how they are punished

The Sentencing Advisory Council has just released the first ever review of how animal cruelty offenders are sentenced in Victoria.

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Oculus founder sends free repair kits for Rift headsets

Despite leaving Facebook in 2017, Palmer Luckey is shipping his custom repair kit to gamers free of charge.

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Light Skin Variant Arose in Asia Independent of Europe

A new genetic study of Latin Americans provides evidence that gene variants for lighter skin color came about in Asia as well as in Europe. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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The race to save Myanmar's Inle Lake

Myanmar's famed Inle Lake has enchanted tourists for decades with its floating gardens and the graceful leg-rowing style of its fisherman, but experts warn the lake is drying up and urgent action is needed to avoid disaster.

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AUH retter op efter at have handlet i strid med sundhedsloven

1.800 patienter på Aarhus Universitetshospital blev ikke oplyst om deres rettigheder eller fik en operationstid. Hospitalsdirektør beklager og vil afklare, om det også sker andre steder.

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Why Is This Cross-Shaped Memorial Constitutional?

Could the United States put “In Jesus Christ We Trust” on its coins? Justice Antonin Scalia asked the conservative lawyer Charles Cooper that question during oral argument on November 6, 1991, in a high-profile church-state case called Lee v. Weisman . “I don't think we would put that on the coins,” Cooper replied. “But I think that is because, at this stage, that would not be politically possibl

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Astronomers publish sky map of thousands of newly discovered galaxies

An international team of more than 200 astronomers from 18 countries has published the first phase of a major new radio sky survey at unprecedented sensitivity using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope. The survey reveals hundreds of thousands of previously undetected galaxies, shedding new light on many research areas including the physics of black holes and how clusters of galaxies evolve.

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Life quickly finds a way: The surprisingly swift end to evolution's big bang

The Cambrian explosion more than 500 million years ago is often considered biology's "big bang".

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School climate strikes: What next for the latest generation of activists?

School students across the UK (and the world) went on strike on February 15, leaving their lessons to protest the lack of effective action on climate change. Coordinated school strikes may be a novel tactic, but mass environmental activism isn't. So will things be any more successful this time around?

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Oral antifungal drug used to treat yeast infections linked to higher rates of miscarriage

A commonly used medication, fluconazole, used to treat vaginal yeast infections, is linked to higher rates of miscarriage if used during pregnancy, found new research.

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Adolescent female blood donors at risk for iron deficiency and associated anemia

Female adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study suggests.

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Spherical display brings virtual collaboration closer to reality

Virtual reality can often make a user feel isolated from the world, with only computer-generated characters for company. But researchers think they may have found a way to encourage a more sociable virtual reality.

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CO2-neutralitet: Aarhus på vej mod historisk transformation

PLUS. I Aarhus Kommune står man foran at skulle designe en by uden CO2-udledning i 2050. Vi skal tænke os om, siger chefkonsulent.

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Life quickly finds a way: The surprisingly swift end to evolution's big bang

The Cambrian explosion more than 500 million years ago is often considered biology's "big bang".

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Should men tell women to wear makeup at work?

While the #metoo movement has focused on sexual misconduct, there are many ways discrimination pervades society. Wearing makeup should be a choice, not a male-directed demand, many women stated in an informal survey. Since going makeup free in 2016, Alicia Keys says it has been empowering. None Two weeks ago, a friend told me about a work training she had recently attended. During her company's n

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When it Comes to Cyber Security, Passive Defense is Best

The deluge of cyberattacks sweeping across the world has governments and companies thinking about new ways to protect their digital systems, and the corporate and state secrets stored within. But aggressive tactics to gain information on an adversary's systems could lead to dire consequences.

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White parents who feel left behind by today's economy favor harsher parenting practices, study finds

White parents who feel that they're falling through the cracks of today's economy may be more likely to believe in authoritarian parenting practices such as spanking and demanding obedience, a new study found.

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Natural resources valued differently by men and woman, study shows

Men and women value, access and use resources from the natural environment in distinct and different ways, a new study has shown.

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Oldest skull mudlarked from Thames belongs to neolithic male

Frontal bone initially believed to be pottery shard to be shown at Museum of London The oldest skull ever found on the banks of the River Thames – dating from about 5,600 years ago – will go on display at the Museum of London. Related: Mega lift? Stonehenge pillars were carried 230km over land – research Continue reading…

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'River of Stars' Streaming Through the Milky Way Was Hiding in Plain Sight for 1 Billion Years

This cluster of stars has been visible for a long time, but scientists only just now realized they're part of the same cosmic river.

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Fake-News-Generating AI Deemed Too Dangerous for Public Release

Your friendly neighborhood fake news writer could be out of a job if systems like GPT2 become commonplace. For the time being, the researchers who developed this AI consider it too dangerous to release. The post Fake-News-Generating AI Deemed Too Dangerous for Public Release appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Quarrying of Stonehenge 'bluestones' dated to 3000 BC

Excavations at two quarries in Wales, known to be the source of the Stonehenge 'bluestones', provide new evidence of megalith quarrying 5,000 years ago, according to a new UCL-led study.

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Sphero hits Kickstarter with new RVR robotics platform

Last year, Sphero stepped away from the flashiness of Disney IP, opting instead to focus on education. It was a pragmatic business decision, above all. The draw of licensing brands like Star …

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Invasive species are likely to spread to a community that has not adapted to climate change

Invasive species are those that spread to new areas as a result of human activity and can displace local species and present threats to forestry and agriculture. Laboratory experiments indicate that alien species are most likely to invade under varying environmental conditions. The risk of invasions will increase further if the local species community has not adapted to the variation.

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Aussie rodent becomes first 'climate change extinction'

Australia officially declared a Great Barrier Reef rodent extinct on Tuesday, making it the first mammal believed to have been killed off by human-induced climate change.

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The biggest public lands bill in a decade has something for everyone

Environment And that's why it might actually pass. The White House has signaled its intention to sign a 700-page public lands package, formally known as the Natural Resources Management Act, the largest such measure in a…

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Algblomning följer inte prognosen vid extremväder

Blågrönalger, även kallade cyanobakterier, gynnas av värme. Forskare trodde därför att fjolårets torra och mycket varma sommar skulle leda till omfattande blomningar i bland annat Vombsjön, den sjö som förser malmöborna med dricksvatten. Det är också en sjö som årligen har drabbats av giftiga blågrönalgblomningar – utom sommaren 2018. I stället för blågrönalger blommade ifjol alger kallade pansar

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Making cities more walkable by understanding how other people influence our journeys

Cities around the world are changing to become more "walkable". As more and more people move to cities, the benefits of encouraging people to walk are clear. Aside from making the urban environment more pleasant, safer and less polluted, improving a city's walkability can also ease traffic congestion and improve public health.

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Invasive species are likely to spread to a community that has not adapted to climate change

Invasive species are those that spread to new areas as a result of human activity and can displace local species and present threats to forestry and agriculture. Laboratory experiments indicate that alien species are most likely to invade under varying environmental conditions. The risk of invasions will increase further if the local species community has not adapted to the variation.

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Aussie rodent becomes first 'climate change extinction'

Australia officially declared a Great Barrier Reef rodent extinct on Tuesday, making it the first mammal believed to have been killed off by human-induced climate change.

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Nano-droplets are the key to controlling membrane formation

The creation of membranes is of enormous importance in biology, but also in many chemical applications developed by humans. These membranes are shaped spontaneously when soap-like molecules in water join together. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology now have a clear picture of the entire process. Membrane formation turns out to start with nano-droplets in the water with a higher conc

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LOFAR radio telescope reveals secrets of solar storms

An international team of scientists led by a researcher from Trinity College Dublin and University of Helsinki announced a major discovery on the very nature of solar storms in the journal Nature Astronomy.

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Fish with a high level of familiarity are more aggressive towards each other

Aggressiveness among animals may increase the longer individuals live together in stable groups. This is the finding of a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB). The study, published in the journal Animal Behaviour used the Amazon molly, a naturally clonal fish species that produces genetically identical individuals to is

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Opinion: Was the EU's ban on electric fishing the right decision?

Last week, on 13 February 2019, the EU approved the ban on pulse trawling. This followed the vote for a ban by the European Parliament on 16 January 2018. Half of the 84 Dutch pulse trawling vessels must stop immediately; the other half will receive a transitional arrangement until July 2021. Outcomes of ongoing research can reopen the discussion.

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Fish with a high level of familiarity are more aggressive towards each other

Aggressiveness among animals may increase the longer individuals live together in stable groups. This is the finding of a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB). The study, published in the journal Animal Behaviour used the Amazon molly, a naturally clonal fish species that produces genetically identical individuals to is

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Opinion: Was the EU's ban on electric fishing the right decision?

Last week, on 13 February 2019, the EU approved the ban on pulse trawling. This followed the vote for a ban by the European Parliament on 16 January 2018. Half of the 84 Dutch pulse trawling vessels must stop immediately; the other half will receive a transitional arrangement until July 2021. Outcomes of ongoing research can reopen the discussion.

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Flashes of inspiration: scientists look to moon impacts to better understand near-Earth objects

Rocks hitting the moon have excited attention for at least 1000 years. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Andrew McCabe Couldn’t Believe the Things Trump Said About Putin

In the months before President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey, FBI counterintelligence agents investigating Russian election interference were also collecting evidence suggesting that Trump could be compromised by Russian President Vladimir Putin. Andrew McCabe, the former FBI deputy director who oversaw the bureau’s Russia investigation, told me in an interview conducted late last w

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How to Stop Hating Your Least Favorite Food

Cucumbers are my nemesis. I want to fight every food in the melon family and many melon-adjacent foods, but melons avoid my primary disdain because they usually take their rightful place as easily avoidable fruit-salad filler. Cucumbers, though. Cucumbers. They hide in all kinds of things that otherwise seem safe to put in my mouth: sushi rolls, salads, sandwiches, the takeout “lunch bowls” that

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Cultured Meat and Climate Change

Climate change has altered the debate over the ethics of meat consumption, adding a new dimension that certainly changes the equation. There are also new options on the horizon, however, such as lab grown or cultured meat. How this will all shake out is still unknown, but it seems likely our meat consumption habits are going to be different in 50 years. There are several issues to consider regard

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The Government's New Weather Model Faces a Storm of Protest

The National Weather Service will soon introduce a new forecasting model, but meteorologists are saying it's worse than its predecessor.

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Evenflo Gold Smart Convertible Car Seat Review: Safety First

We know you would never leave your child unattended in the car. But if you did, this seat would tell you—over and over again.

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Adventures of a bathynaut, art goes algorithmic, and CRISPR encapsulated: Books in brief

Adventures of a bathynaut, art goes algorithmic, and CRISPR encapsulated: Books in brief Adventures of a bathynaut, art goes algorithmic, and CRISPR encapsulated: Books in brief, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00609-9 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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The quest for quasicrystals is a physics adventure tale

In ‘The Second Kind of Impossible,’ physicist Paul Steinhardt recounts his journey to find quasicrystals in nature.

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Revealed: why grapes spark when you microwave them

When you make a grape flash, does it give a little whine? Natalie Parletta reports.

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How Neolithic miners quarried the pillars of Stonehenge

Evidence points to an ‘original’ Stonehenge 230 kilometres from the current one. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Optical illusions aren’t optional

Brains struggle to determine what moves and what doesn’t.

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Mountains taller than the Himalayas found 660 kilometres underground

Earthquake data leads to a re-evaluation of the Earth’s mantle structure. Kaya Wilson reports.

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Pottery reveals America's first social media networks

Long before Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and even MySpace, early Mississippian Mound cultures in America's southern Appalachian Mountains shared artistic trends and technologies across regional networks that functioned in similar ways as modern social media, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

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Study finds wide variation between human cell lines used for research

More than 70 percent of researchers failed to reproduce another scientist's experiment, according to a survey conducted by Nature in 2016. If scientists can't reproduce each other's work, important discoveries may never leave the lab and have an impact on human health. One cause for this "reproducibility crisis" may lie in the significant differences in cell lines used by different laboratories, a

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Mechanism of iron-based hydrogen bond cleavage revealed

Hydrogen-based fuel cells hold promise for sustainable power generation, but to become practical they need to be more efficient and cost effective. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME) are working to understand the fundamental reactivity of H2 that could contribute to making hydrogen a more widely used fuel source. Working with

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Image of the Day: Water Sensors

Zebrafish detect water movement around them through signals sent to the brain by cells containing tiny hairs.

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Study finds wide variation between human cell lines used for research

More than 70 percent of researchers failed to reproduce another scientist's experiment, according to a survey conducted by Nature in 2016. If scientists can't reproduce each other's work, important discoveries may never leave the lab and have an impact on human health. One cause for this "reproducibility crisis" may lie in the significant differences in cell lines used by different laboratories, a

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Light Skin Variant Arose in Asia Independent of Europe

A new genetic study of Latin Americans provides evidence that gene variants for lighter skin color came about in Asia as well as in Europe. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Giving workers a voice improves retention

Giving low-wage workers a "voice" on the job—the ability to communicate concerns to management—was thought to improve employee satisfaction and retention.

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Qualcomm already has a new 5G chip that promises sleeker, long-lasting phones – CNET

The second-generation chip comes as we're still waiting on first-generation 5G smartphones.

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Xiaomi releases another transparent phone with fake parts

Back in May last year, Xiaomi released the Mi 8; a phone that looked an awful lot like the iPhone X. A version of this handset, the Mi 8 Explorer Edition, came with a transparent back panel, …

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3d Printing Market’S Growth Opportunities

3D printing is used in most major industrial and research applications right from designing, prototyping to making things like prosthetic limbs & artificial organs to even actually printing out an entire building like they have recently done in China. The sheer versatility of use of 3D printing is staggering to say the least. submitted by /u/peterhardy321 [link] [comments]

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New research calls for national database of Indigenous cultural heritage sites in Australia

New research from the Whitlam Institute within Western Sydney University calls for a national database of places of Indigenous historical and cultural significance following revelations that national protection for significant places for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, which were introduced during the Whitlam era, have been severely diminished under subsequent governments.

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Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber

Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean.

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A polariton filter turns ordinary laser light into quantum light

An international team of researchers led out of Macquarie University has demonstrated a new approach for converting ordinary laser light into genuine quantum light.

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Solving the mystery of Stonehenge

The discovery confirms a prediction made a century ago

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Quarrying of Stonehenge 'bluestones' dated to 3000 BC

Excavations at two quarries in Wales, known to be the source of the Stonehenge 'bluestones', provide new evidence of megalith quarrying 5,000 years ago, according to a new UCL-led study.

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Should Mental Disorders Have Names?

After nearly a century of effort, psychiatry's best diagnoses leave much to be desired — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Läslusten i skolan går genom kroppens förnimmelse

Vad avgör om barn och unga blir litteraturläsare? Hur gör man som lärare för att undervisa i litteratur när läroplanen är fylld av motstridiga krav? I avhandlingen Den kroppsliga läsningen – bildningsperspektiv på litteraturundervisning undersöker Djamila Fatheddine grundskolans litteraturundervisning med fokus på läsning, kropp och bildning. Avhandlingen behandlar grundskolans litteraturundervis

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Climate change science pioneer Wallace Smith Broecker dies

US professor raised early alarms about climate change and popularised term ‘global warming’ The scientist Wallace Smith Broecker, who raised early alarms about climate change and popularised the term “global warming”, has died aged 87. The Columbia University professor and researcher died on Monday at a hospital in New York City, according to a spokesman for the university’s Lamont-Doherty Earth

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Mega lift? Stonehenge pillars were carried 230km over land – research

Archaeologists say up to 80 two-ton blocks may have been dragged from Preseli hills They are among the most famous and most enigmatic mysteries in all of archaeology: how did neolithic builders, using only stone, wooden and bone tools, carve Stonehenge’s bluestone pillars from the hilltops of western Wales – and how on earth did they transport them more than 230km (143 miles) to Salisbury plain?

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Arbejdsgiverne glæder sig til de nye erhvervskandidater i statskundskab

Læs statskundskab på deltid og arbejd 25 timer om ugen ved siden af. Det er konceptet for…

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Firefly-inspired surfaces improve efficiency of LED lightbulbs

A new type of light-emitting diode lightbulb could one day light homes and reduce power bills, according to Penn State researchers who suggest that LEDs made with firefly-mimicking structures could improve efficiency.

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Should Mental Disorders Have Names?

After nearly a century of effort, psychiatry's best diagnoses leave much to be desired — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Will AI Achieve Consciousness? Wrong Question

We should not be creating conscious, humanoid agents but an entirely new sort of entity, rather like oracles, with no conscience, no fear of death, no distracting loves and hates.

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Rosetta's comet sculpted by stress

Feeling stressed? You're not alone. ESA's Rosetta mission has revealed that geological stress arising from the shape of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has been a key process in sculpting the comet's surface and interior following its formation.

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Total synthesis of marine antitumor agents trabectedin and lurbinectedin

With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. Because only tiny amounts can be obtained from sea organisms, synthetic production is necessary. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new, efficient synthe

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Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness

Paleontologists working on a steep river bank in Alaska have discovered fossil evidence of the northernmost marsupial known to science.

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Hydropower dams can help mitigate the global warming impact of wetlands

Hydropower dams can help mitigate the global warming impact of wetlands Hydropower dams can help mitigate the global warming impact of wetlands, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00616-w Manage methane emissions and produce clean, cheap energy at the same time, argues Mike Muller.

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Should Mental Disorders Have Names?

After nearly a century of effort, psychiatry's best diagnoses leave much to be desired — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In China, some parents seek an edge with genetic testing for tots

Questionable DNA “talent” tests find a market in up-and-coming Shenzhen.

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Huawei P30 and P30 Pro set to be unveiled March 26 in Paris – CNET

The latest flagship phones from Huawei are rumored to have four rear cameras and will debut a month after Mobile World Congress.

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Australia dials back effort to control ‘dual use’ research

Australia dials back effort to control ‘dual use’ research Australia dials back effort to control ‘dual use’ research, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00606-y Scientists welcome the independent findings, saying sweeping controls of research that could have military use would have restricted collaborations.

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The 'Supermoon' Syndrome Rises with February's Full Moon

Why did "supermoon" become such a thing?

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Out of the Way, Human! Delivery Robots Want a Share of Your Sidewalk

As automated delivery ramps up, cities must decide how to make the best use of public spaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Out of the Way, Human! Delivery Robots Want a Share of Your Sidewalk

As automated delivery ramps up, cities must decide how to make the best use of public spaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mystery disease killing beech trees

A mystery disease that is killing beech trees could cause widespread die-offs unless more is done to halt its spread, warn scientists.

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New study shows Transcendental Meditation reduces PTSD in South African college students

A study published in Psychological Reports showed that after 3.5 months of practicing Transcendental Meditation (TM), most of the 34 tertiary-level students at Maharishi Institute (MI) — all of whom were initially diagnosed with PTSD by mental health professionals — went below clinical thresholds as measured by standard assessments. Students also experienced relief from depression. A comparison

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As citizen scientists, farmers can make important contributions to climate adaptation

In the context of rapidly evolving climate conditions, a new study by Bioversity International and partners addresses the challenge of climate adaptation in a way that is both scalable and targeted. The scientists have demonstrated a unique approach using crowdsourced citizen science that capitalizes on farmers' knowledge.

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Observation of quantized heating in quantum matter

Shaking a physical system typically heats it up, in the sense that the system continuously absorbs energy. When considering a circular shaking pattern, the amount of energy that is absorbed can potentially depend on the orientation of the circular drive (clockwise/anti-clockwise), a general phenomenon known as circular dichroism.

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Google trækker i land: Vil ikke spænde ben for ad-blockere

Ad-blockere i Chrome kan godt bruge en ældre API, uden at det får konsekvenser for ydeevnen i Chrome, viser en ny undersøgelse.

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EU stiller miljøkrav til lastbiler

EU-parlamentet og medlemslandene er for første gang blevet enige om CO2-krav for lastbiler, som skal beskære udledningen med 15 procent fra 2025 og 30 procent fra 2030.

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Once hailed as unhackable, blockchains are now getting hacked

More and more security holes are appearing in cryptocurrency and smart contract platforms, and some are fundamental to the way they were built.

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Amazon pledges to be halfway to carbon neutral by 2030

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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How to Decarbonize America and the World

submitted by /u/RamezNaam [link] [comments]

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Controversial pediatrics researcher has 20-year-old paper retracted for misconduct

A journal has retracted a paper on a drug for a blood disorder 20 years after it was published — and 17 years after an author of the article was told to request the move by his university. The retraction is of a paper in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring by Gideon Koren and colleagues, then at … Continue reading Controversial pediatrics researcher has 20-year-old paper retracted for misconduct

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The Moment the Transatlantic Charade Ended

Europe and the Trump administration have stopped pretending to respect each other. For the past two years, we have been treated to a transatlantic charade. Everyone knows there’s a problem, but publicly the leaders proclaim that nothing has fundamentally changed. But at the 2019 Munich Security Conference, which took place over the weekend, the charade ended. The American position is collapsing u

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What makes someone gay? Science is trying to get it straight.

Heterosexual people have been less interesting to scientists than gay people, in terms of where they come from, because, evolutionarily speaking, being gay doesn't lead to a higher "higher reproductive fitness" — meaning, it doesn't lead to more babies. Across cultures, gay boys tend to be more interested in spending time with their mothers. We still don't really know why gay people are attracted

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Tidal floods driven by climate change may hurt small businesses

Parking data from Annapolis, Md.’s historic downtown shows how tidal flooding, driven by sea rise, can hurt local business.

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The society that turned Cambridge into a scientific powerhouse

The society that turned Cambridge into a scientific powerhouse The society that turned Cambridge into a scientific powerhouse, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00608-w In the nineteenth century, reform at the ancient university came from an unexpected source. Georgina Ferry enjoys its history.

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Single gold-bridged nanoprobes for identification of single point DNA mutations

Single gold-bridged nanoprobes for identification of single point DNA mutations Single gold-bridged nanoprobes for identification of single point DNA mutations, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08769-y The identification of single point mutations is an important step toward personalizing detection and treatment. Here the authors design a gold-bridged nanoparticle for sen

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Author Correction: Caution in inferring viral strategies from abundance correlations in marine metagenomes

Author Correction: Caution in inferring viral strategies from abundance correlations in marine metagenomes Author Correction: Caution in inferring viral strategies from abundance correlations in marine metagenomes, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08955-y Author Correction: Caution in inferring viral strategies from abundance correlations in marine metagenomes

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Suppression of autophagic activity by Rubicon is a signature of aging

Suppression of autophagic activity by Rubicon is a signature of aging Suppression of autophagic activity by Rubicon is a signature of aging, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08729-6 Autophagic activity decreases with age via unknown mechanisms. Here the authors show that expression of the negative autophagy regulator Rubicon increases with age, that its genetic ablation

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High performance n-type Ag2Se film on nylon membrane for flexible thermoelectric power generator

High performance n-type Ag 2 Se film on nylon membrane for flexible thermoelectric power generator High performance n-type Ag 2 Se film on nylon membrane for flexible thermoelectric power generator, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08835-5 Although flexible thermoelectric materials based on conducting polymers are attractive for energy harvesting, their performance is in

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Optical soliton molecular complexes in a passively mode-locked fibre laser

Optical soliton molecular complexes in a passively mode-locked fibre laser Optical soliton molecular complexes in a passively mode-locked fibre laser, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08755-4 It has recently been shown that optical solitons can form stably bound states, so-called soliton molecules. Here, Wang et al. demonstrate stable soliton molecule complexes and explo

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CD8+ T cells from patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls recognize hypocretin neuron-specific antigens

CD8 + T cells from patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls recognize hypocretin neuron-specific antigens CD8 + T cells from patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls recognize hypocretin neuron-specific antigens, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08774-1 Autoreactive T cells are suspected to destroy hypocretin-producing neurons in narcolepsy. Here the authors de

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Stereoselective synthesis of sulfur-containing β-enaminonitrile derivatives through electrochemical Csp3–H bond oxidative functionalization of acetonitrile

Stereoselective synthesis of sulfur-containing β-enaminonitrile derivatives through electrochemical Csp 3 –H bond oxidative functionalization of acetonitrile Stereoselective synthesis of sulfur-containing β-enaminonitrile derivatives through electrochemical Csp 3 –H bond oxidative functionalization of acetonitrile, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08762-5 Direct α-functi

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Climate-friendly labriculture depends on an energy revolution, says Oxford study

In a first-of-its-kind study from the Oxford Martin School, the climate-change impact of several production methods for lab-grown and farmed beef was assessed accounting for the differing greenhouse gases produced. The new projections reveal that over the long term, cultured meat production methods requiring large energy inputs could increase global warming more than some types of cattle farming i

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Ökad politisk kontroll över medierna

Dagens medier har blivit allt mer beroende av nyheter som produceras av regeringskanslierna. Det visar en ny studie utförd av bland andra Karl Magnus Johansson, professor i statsvetenskap och Gunnar Nygren, professor i journalistik, båda Södertörns högskola. I deras bok Close and Distant: Political Executive – Media Relations in Four Countries undersöks relationen mellan toppolitiker, pressekrete

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At last, a Brexit dividend – shame it’s for the pedlars of fake medicine | Elizabeth Pisani

Criminals selling counterfeit drugs prey on the vulnerable. The threat of no deal may make anxious patients turn to them Some crimes are just worse than others. When I tell people I research the market for fake and substandard medicines, their most common reaction is: “Fake cancer medicines? That’s horrible. Why would anyone do that?” Related: Revealed: UK patients stockpile drugs in fear of no-de

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Transcriptome-derived investigation of biosynthesis of quinolizidine alkaloids in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) highlights candidate genes linked to iucundus locus

Transcriptome-derived investigation of biosynthesis of quinolizidine alkaloids in narrow-leafed lupin ( Lupinus angustifolius L.) highlights candidate genes linked to iucundus locus Transcriptome-derived investigation of biosynthesis of quinolizidine alkaloids in narrow-leafed lupin ( Lupinus angustifolius L.) highlights candidate genes linked to iucundus locus, Published online: 19 February 2019

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Flexible updating of dynamic knowledge structures

Flexible updating of dynamic knowledge structures Flexible updating of dynamic knowledge structures, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39468-9 Flexible updating of dynamic knowledge structures

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Pressure build-up and stress variations within the Earth’s crust in the light of analogue models

Pressure build-up and stress variations within the Earth’s crust in the light of analogue models Pressure build-up and stress variations within the Earth’s crust in the light of analogue models, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38256-1 Pressure build-up and stress variations within the Earth’s crust in the light of analogue models

5h

Sources and selection of snow-specific microbial communities in a Greenlandic sea ice snow cover

Sources and selection of snow-specific microbial communities in a Greenlandic sea ice snow cover Sources and selection of snow-specific microbial communities in a Greenlandic sea ice snow cover, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38744-y Sources and selection of snow-specific microbial communities in a Greenlandic sea ice snow cover

5h

Hydroxyoleoside-type seco-iridoids from Symplocos cochinchinensis and their insulin mimetic activity

Hydroxyoleoside-type seco -iridoids from Symplocos cochinchinensis and their insulin mimetic activity Hydroxyoleoside-type seco -iridoids from Symplocos cochinchinensis and their insulin mimetic activity, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38013-4 Hydroxyoleoside-type seco -iridoids from Symplocos cochinchinensis and their insulin mimetic activity

5h

Highly Selective Supported Graphene Oxide Membranes for Water-Ethanol Separation

Highly Selective Supported Graphene Oxide Membranes for Water-Ethanol Separation Highly Selective Supported Graphene Oxide Membranes for Water-Ethanol Separation, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38485-y Highly Selective Supported Graphene Oxide Membranes for Water-Ethanol Separation

5h

Both cold and sub-zero acclimation induce cell wall modification and changes in the extracellular proteome in Arabidopsis thaliana

Both cold and sub-zero acclimation induce cell wall modification and changes in the extracellular proteome in Arabidopsis thaliana Both cold and sub-zero acclimation induce cell wall modification and changes in the extracellular proteome in Arabidopsis thaliana , Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38688-3 Both cold and sub-zero acclimation induce cell wall modification and

5h

Tunable polytetrafluoroethylene electret films with extraordinary charge stability synthesized by initiated chemical vapor deposition for organic electronics applications

Tunable polytetrafluoroethylene electret films with extraordinary charge stability synthesized by initiated chemical vapor deposition for organic electronics applications Tunable polytetrafluoroethylene electret films with extraordinary charge stability synthesized by initiated chemical vapor deposition for organic electronics applications, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-0

5h

To move research from quantity to quality, go beyond good intentions

To move research from quantity to quality, go beyond good intentions To move research from quantity to quality, go beyond good intentions, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00613-z Australian chief scientist Alan Finkel calls for formal action to bake in better research practices.

5h

Cultured lab meat may make climate change worse

Growing meat in the laboratory may damage the climate more in the long run, than meat from cattle.

5h

Politi og forsvar bruger udstyr fra spionagemistænkte Huawei

Flere centrale myndigheder benytter sig af udstyr fra techgiganten Huawei, på trods af at forsvarsministeren er bekymret over virksomhedens forbindelser til den kinesiske stat.

5h

Troldtekt fordobler kapaciteten med robotter

PLUS. Den vestjyske producent af træbeton, Troldtekt, indvier i februar en ny fuldautomatisk produktionshal til 180 mio. kr. Robotter og predictive maintainance er nøgleord.

5h

Magnetic field alignment of stable proton-conducting channels in an electrolyte membrane

Magnetic field alignment of stable proton-conducting channels in an electrolyte membrane Magnetic field alignment of stable proton-conducting channels in an electrolyte membrane, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08622-2 Proton exchange membranes with short-pathway through-plane proton conductivity are attractive for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Here the authors a

5h

Publisher Correction: Investigation of F-BAR domain PACSIN proteins uncovers membrane tubulation function in cilia assembly and transport

Publisher Correction: Investigation of F-BAR domain PACSIN proteins uncovers membrane tubulation function in cilia assembly and transport Publisher Correction: Investigation of F-BAR domain PACSIN proteins uncovers membrane tubulation function in cilia assembly and transport, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08872-0 Publisher Correction: Investigation of F-BAR domain PAC

5h

A MST1–FOXO1 cascade establishes endothelial tip cell polarity and facilitates sprouting angiogenesis

A MST1–FOXO1 cascade establishes endothelial tip cell polarity and facilitates sprouting angiogenesis A MST1–FOXO1 cascade establishes endothelial tip cell polarity and facilitates sprouting angiogenesis, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08773-2 Angiogenesis is driven by the directed migration of tip endothelial cells towards hypoxic tissues. Here, Kim et al. show that t

5h

The Confounding Climate Science of Lab-Grown Meat

The assumption goes that lab-grown meat will drastically reduce emissions of beef production. But you know what they say about assumptions…

5h

Russian Hackers Go From Foothold to Full-On Breach in 19 Minutes

A new ranking of nation-state hacker speed puts Russia on top by a span of hours.

5h

3D printing: don’t add to plastic pollution

3D printing: don’t add to plastic pollution 3D printing: don’t add to plastic pollution, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00623-x 3D printing: don’t add to plastic pollution

5h

Europe rules on harm from fluoroquinolone antibiotics

Europe rules on harm from fluoroquinolone antibiotics Europe rules on harm from fluoroquinolone antibiotics, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00619-7 Europe rules on harm from fluoroquinolone antibiotics

5h

African swine fever could cause EU rift

African swine fever could cause EU rift African swine fever could cause EU rift, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00621-z African swine fever could cause EU rift

5h

3D-printed lab parts can contaminate experiments

3D-printed lab parts can contaminate experiments 3D-printed lab parts can contaminate experiments, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00622-y 3D-printed lab parts can contaminate experiments

5h

Groundwater-management plans — how well will they work?

Groundwater-management plans — how well will they work? Groundwater-management plans — how well will they work?, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00620-0 Groundwater-management plans — how well will they work?

5h

5h

Klimatförändringarna tros ha utrotat däggdjur

Nu är det officiellt: En däggdjursart tros ha utrotats till följd av klimatförändringar orsakade av människan. Det är i så fall första gången det sker.

5h

6h

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

The disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) — marked by the attack on joints, skin, and kidneys by the body's immune system — is linked to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the gut. This is according to a new study led by scientists at NYU School of Medicine.

6h

Renewable energy to power African mines

submitted by /u/energynew [link] [comments]

6h

Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

6h

#57 Ensomhed

Ensomhed koster sundhedssektoren omkring tre mia. kr. om året. Stetopskopet taler med to, der arbejder for at skabe tiltag for ensomme.

6h

Depth Electrodes or Digital Biomarkers? The future of mood monitoring

Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs. Mindstrong Health Mood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone Swipes Which Would You Choose? That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood.

6h

Ny fiberoptisk rekord: Sandsynlighedsberegning giver vilde datahastigheder

Med et nyudviklet chipsæt og avanceret sandsynlighedsberegning har tyske forskere og Nokia haft held med at sende data med en hastighed på 500 gigabits per sekund på en enkelt bølgelængde i et fiberoptisk kabel over 320 kilometer.

6h

A disadvantaged background doesn’t have to be a barrier to success

A disadvantaged background doesn’t have to be a barrier to success A disadvantaged background doesn’t have to be a barrier to success, Published online: 19 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00617-9 Six female researchers discuss how they overcame social and financial obstacles in science and engineering.

6h

Are you a proper adventurer if you haven’t lost a toe?

Sir Ranulph Fiennes keeps his fingertips in a jar and Aron Ralston cut off his arm to escape death. Is this the ultimate in heroism? When Matthew Henson removed the boots and socks of his companion Robert Peary during an expedition to the Canadian Arctic in 1899, he found something unusual. First one, then another, and finally eight toes snapped away as he unpeeled the fabric. Henson was appalled,

6h

ScienceTake: Inside the Spittlebug’s Bubble Home

Those foamy eruptions on garden plants protect a slow and steady sap drinker that is growing into a froghopper. But it has to stick its hind end out to breathe.

7h

How the Spittlebug Builds Its Bubbly Fortress

Spittlebugs feed on plant sap and then excrete bubbly foam to create a protective fortress around themselves. Later, they emerge as adult froghoppers.

7h

Malaysia to end bauxite mining ban despite environment fears

Malaysia will next month lift a ban on bauxite mining that has been in place for three years, a minister said Tuesday, despite warnings the move may cause serious environmental damage.

7h

The Magic Feather Effect: Placebos and the Power of Belief in Alternative Medicine

In her book The Magic Feather Effect, journalist Melanie Warner covers placebo research, shows that alternative medicine is placebo medicine, takes a "try it yourself" approach, and gives belief and anecdotes more credit than they deserve.

7h

AI Needs to Become Less Elitist

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

7h

New Zealand plans new tax for giants like Google, Facebook

New Zealand's government plans a new tax targeting online giants like Google and Facebook that earn plenty of money in the country but pay little tax.

7h

Huawei's founder says world can't live without it

The founder of Chinese telecom giant Huawei has hit back at US efforts to blacklist the company, saying defiantly that the world cannot do without Huawei and its "more advanced" technology.

7h

Running an LED in reverse could cool future computers

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

8h

New Zealand leader says no final decision on using Huawei

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Tuesday that no final decision has been made on whether Huawei equipment can be used in a planned network upgrade.

8h

Study: Adolescent female blood donors at risk for iron deficiency and associated anemia

Female adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests.

8h

Scientist who popularized term "global warming" dies at 87

A scientist who raised early alarms about climate change and popularized the term "global warming" has died. Wallace Smith Broecker was 87.

8h

Hot great white sharks could motor but prefer to swim slow

Yuuki Watanabe has always been fascinated by speed and power. As a child, he recalls being transfixed by the raw strength of great white sharks (Carcharadon carcharias). 'They look cool' says Watanabe, from the National Institute of Polar Research, Japan. However, he now has another reason for being in awe of these charismatic predatory sharks: 'they are an endothermic fish', he says. In other wor

8h

Hot great white sharks could motor but prefer to swim slow

Yuuki Watanabe has always been fascinated by speed and power. As a child, he recalls being transfixed by the raw strength of great white sharks (Carcharadon carcharias). 'They look cool' says Watanabe, from the National Institute of Polar Research, Japan. However, he now has another reason for being in awe of these charismatic predatory sharks: 'they are an endothermic fish', he says. In other wor

8h

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8h

Justitsminister vil bremse retssag om masselogning: Vi skal vente på ny EU-dom

Justitsministeriet har bedt landsretten om at sætte behandlingen af et sagsanlæg om den danske logningsbekendtgørelse i bero, til der er faldet endnu en EU-dom. Absurd forsinkelses-taktik, mener foreningen bag retssagen.

9h

Are we on the road to civilisation collapse?

submitted by /u/Au_Ag_Cu [link] [comments]

9h

9h

9h

Rengøring i rummet: Se harpun gennembore rumaffald

En europæisk satellit har netop haft succes med test af en harpun, der skal fange affald i rummet.

10h

10h

Spherical display brings virtual collaboration closer to reality

Virtual reality can often make a user feel isolated from the world, with only computer-generated characters for company. But researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Saskatchewan think they may have found a way to encourage a more sociable virtual reality.

10h

Marijuana dispensaries associated with rise, then decline in some neighborhood crime

A new study found an association between marijuana dispensaries and increases in rates of crime and disorder in neighborhoods in Denver, Colo., shortly after Colorado commenced legal retail sales of marijuana.

10h

Oral antifungal drug used to treat yeast infections linked to higher rates of miscarriage

A commonly used medication, fluconazole, used to treat vaginal yeast infections, is linked to higher rates of miscarriage if used during pregnancy, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

10h

10h

OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness at greatest risk of cardiovascular disease

Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive sleepiness while awake appear to be at far greater risk for cardiovascular diseases than those without excessive daytime sleepiness, according to new research.

11h

Children with autism more likely to face maltreatment, study finds

A recent study of 11 counties in Middle Tennessee revealed that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were nearly 2.5 times more likely than children without ASD to be reported to the Child Abuse Hotline by the age of 8.

11h

New study looks at ways to cut roadkill numbers for small and medium-sized mammals

A study of a stretch of highway in Quebec looks at the effect of road fencing and underground passages on the number of roadkill deaths of small and medium-sized mammals. The study found that roadkill numbers were higher at the ends of road fences, suggesting that they are not long enough to prevent animals from crossing busy roadways.

11h

Finansminister: Kunstige øer kommer næppe til at skabe større BNP

Finansministeren sår tvivl om, hvorvidt regeringens storstilede ø-plan vil øge BNP. Der vil til gengæld være afledte effekter af projekt, påpeger han, mens Hvidovre Kommune ser mere positivt på projektet.

11h

'Grandfather Of Climate Science' Wallace Broecker Dies At 87

Broecker was an early advocate for reducing fossil fuels to avoid the disruptive effects of climate change and brought the term "global warming" into the mainstream. (Image credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

11h

Why Twisted Light Holds the Key to Radically Faster Internet

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

11h

Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the …

11h

Biodiversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

11h

Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings

A multidisciplinary team has diagnosed the strange paint disease causing Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings to deteriorate. The micron-sized protrusions are metal soaps, resulting from a chemical reaction between the metal ions and fatty acids commonly used as binder in paints.

11h

What rising seas mean for local economies

High-tide flooding resulting from climate change is already disrupting the economy of Annapolis, Md. As sea levels rise, the impacts are expected to get worse for coastal communities.

11h

11h

Scientists discover mysterious new communication mechanism in the brain

submitted by /u/ManInTheMirruh [link] [comments]

11h

13h

Creating a Living Nanomachine Using CRISPR

submitted by /u/Health_Wealth_Love [link] [comments]

13h

13h

13h

Signal of first known exomoon may actually be from Jupiter-like planet

There have been several hints of a moon orbiting the exoplanet Kepler-1625b, but now researchers say these signals might actually point to a Jupiter-like planet

14h

Physicists Finally Discover Why Grapes Ignite in the Microwave

Consider the humble grape. Small, spheroid, with pleasantly taut skin, leaving a burst of sweetness on the tongue. Hardly a fruit you'd need to defend yourself against. Put a gently touching pair in the microwave, though, and the inoffensive fruit turns into a literal firecracker. Within just a few seconds, microwaved grapes will begin sparking as if electrified, and in some cases they'll even pro

14h

Teach Science Process Over Findings

Seismologist and policy advisor Lucy Jones says science education needs to teach how science works more than just what it finds out.

14h

Plastic waste – what Neath pupils think

What do these Neath pupils think of plastic waste after a beach clean-up?

15h

15h

Misbehaving: being clever and wicked is a form of creativity

Suppose you forgot it was your partner's birthday, but you know that they would appreciate the smallest of gestures, say a bouquet. It's late at night and no florists are open. The cemetery on your way home has recently had a funeral, and you walk across the site and pick up a good-looking bouquet of roses from someone's grave. You then head home, and the flowers are happily received by your part

15h

Terahertz wireless makes big strides in paving the way to technological singularity

Hiroshima University, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and Panasonic Corporation announced the successful development of a terahertz (THz) transceiver that can transmit or receive digital data at 80 gigabits per second (Gbit/s). The transceiver was implemented using silicon CMOS integrated circuit technology, which would have a great advantage for volume production.

15h

Huawei founder says 'there's no way the US can crush us,' calls CFO arrest politically motivated

After the US had long been accusing Huawei of spying on behalf of the Chinese government, its CFO, Meng Wanzhou, was arrested in Canada last December at the request of the United States. She's …

15h

Here are the best deals from our President's Day sale

Save over 90 percent on tech, ebooks, courses, and more. Save over 90 percent on tech, ebooks, courses, and more with the best deals from our President's Day sale.

15h

15h

Fast fashion: 'Penny on a garment' to drive clothes recycling

Clothing brands and retailers should pay per item to fund a £35m annual recycling scheme, MPs say.

15h

Teach Science Process Over Findings

Seismologist and policy advisor Lucy Jones says science education needs to teach how science works more than just what it finds out. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

The Atlantic Daily: Hard Border

What We’re Following The trajectory of Brexit may threaten hard-earned peace in Ireland . Brexit drama, before the March 29 deadline when Britain is set to legally withdraw from the EU, has taken on the thrum of a dull, persistent headache. A withdrawal with no formal terms in place will affect every aspect of life and commerce in the United Kingdom, from the makeup of its workforce to drug testi

16h

16h

Hot great white sharks could motor but prefer to swim slow

Great white sharks have warmer muscles than other cold-blooded fish so they could swimmer faster, but now it turns out that they actually choose to swim relatively slowly when browsing their feeding grounds, probably to increase their chance of catching a fat seal snack.

16h

What happens to magnetic nanoparticles once in cells?

Although magnetic nanoparticles are being used more and more in cell imaging and tissue bioengineering, what happens to them within stem cells in the long term remained undocumented. Researchers have shown substantial degradation of these nanoparticles, followed in certain cases by the cells "re-magnetizing." This phenomenon is the sign of biosynthesis of new magnetic nanoparticles from iron rel

16h

Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant

Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new study finds.

16h

Very early marker of cardiac damage triggered by cancer treatment

Researchers have identified a very early marker of cardiac damage in patients undergoing therapy with anthracyclines, a family of drugs commonly used to treat cancer. This finding will enable the early diagnosis of the cardiotoxicity associated with this group of widely used chemotherapy drugs.

16h

Are We Really Alone In The Universe? | Answers With Joe

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

16h

Harpoon successfully captures space debris

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

16h

CRISPR gene editing makes stem cells 'invisible' to immune system

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16h

16h

First Evidence of a Giant Exoplanet Collision

For the first time ever, astronomers think they've discovered an exoplanet that survived a catastrophic collision with another planet. And according to the new research, which was published Feb. 4, in the journal Nature Astronomy, the evidence for the impact comes from two twin exoplanets that seem to be more fraternal than identical. Mass Matters The pair of planets in question orbit a Sun-like s

16h

Despite rising prevalence of heart disease in China, primary preventive treatment rates remain low

About one in 10 middle-aged adults in China are at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet use of risk reduction therapies is strikingly low. Findings from a Chinese national screening project are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

17h

Gene therapy could treat rare brain disorder in unborn babies

Doctors could use Crispr tool to inject benign virus into foetus’s brain to ‘switch on’ key genes Scientists are developing a radical form of gene therapy that could cure a devastating medical disorder by mending mutations in the brains of foetuses in the womb. The treatment, which has never been attempted before, would involve doctors injecting the feotus’s brain with a harmless virus that infec

17h

'Hundreds' of badgers illegally killed each year in NI

Badger baiting: 'Hundreds' illegally killed every season in Northern Ireland

17h

17h

Statistician: Machine Learning Is Causing A “Crisis in Science”

Crisis In Science Rice University statistician Genevera Allen issued a grave warning at a prominent scientific conference this week: that scientists are leaning on machine learning algorithms to find patterns in data even when the algorithms are just fixating on noise that won’t be reproduced by another experiment. “There is general recognition of a reproducibility crisis in science right now,” s

18h

18h

Solar-Powered Cars Headed for Europe

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

18h

Coal dust turns white snow black in Siberian town

A Siberian coal mining town has gotten a blanket of black snow, a regular occurrence in the region known for high industrial pollution levels.

18h

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