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nyheder2019februar20

The centrosome protein AKNA regulates neurogenesis via microtubule organization

The centrosome protein AKNA regulates neurogenesis via microtubule organization The centrosome protein AKNA regulates neurogenesis via microtubule organization, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0962-4 The interphase centrosome protein AKNA is necessary and sufficient for the organization of centrosomal microtubules, mediates delamination in the formation of the subventri

3h

Network Effects of Demographic Transition

Network Effects of Demographic Transition Network Effects of Demographic Transition, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39025-4 Network Effects of Demographic Transition

12h

White shark genome reveals ancient elasmobranch adaptations associated with wound healing and the maintenance of genome stability [Genetics]

The white shark (Carcharodon carcharias; Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) is one of the most publicly recognized marine animals. Here we report the genome sequence of the white shark and comparative evolutionary genomic analyses to the chondrichthyans, whale shark (Elasmobranchii) and elephant shark (Holocephali), as well as various vertebrates. The 4.63-Gbp white shark…

22h

CASSINI Trial publishes data on preventing blood clots in cancer patients

The first clinical study investigating the use of the direct oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, to prevent blood clots in patients with cancer at high-risk published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study found no significant reduction in venous thromboembolism or death in the overall 180-day trial period; however, the researchers did observe a lower incidence of these events while

3min

The new exercise trend that's made for everyone

Bringing the science of high intensity interval training (HIIT) into everyday life could be the key to helping unfit, overweight people get more of the exercise they need to improve their health, according to an international research team.

3min

Antibody-drug conjugate shows promise against metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

Treatment with the experimental drug sazituzumab govitecan produced a significant treatment response in patients with difficult-to-treat metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

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New 'smart drug' shows promise for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

A clinical trial at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia and other centers found that patients responded to a new 'smart drug' for women with an aggressive form of breast cancer.

3min

Samsung announces cryptocurrency wallet for GalaxyS10

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7min

Unpacked 2019: Every Galaxy Phone and Device Samsung ShowedSamsung Galaxy S10

The brand-new Galaxy S10 line, Galaxy Buds, and—wait—does that phone fold in half?!

16min

5G? 5 Bars? What the Signal Icons on Your Phone Actually Mean

Here’s what it means when your phone says it’s using 4G, LTE, or even 5GE technology, or why you can’t make a call when you have five bars.

16min

The Future of Farming May Take Place Indoors

Vertical farms transform conventional agriculture with biotechnology, data science, and engineering. Here’s why the future of farming may be indoors. The post The Future of Farming May Take Place Indoors appeared first on Futurism .

19min

Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's

The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. A Salk Institute discovery of a potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory chemical in a native California shrub may lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease based on a compound found in nature. The research appears in the February 2019 issue of the journal Redox Biology.

24min

Expert Roasts Musk: Self-Driving Teslas In a Year Is “Impossible”

That Was Fast Earlier today, Futurism reported on Elon Musk’s claim that he’s “certain” fully-autonomous Teslas will hit the streets by next year. Now criticisms of that bold promise are already rolling in. Karl Brauer, the executive publisher at the vehicle conglomerate Cox Automotive, told CNBC that he thinks Musk is exaggerating Tesla’s progress toward fully self-driving cars. “I think the ter

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Letters: ‘Justice Cannot Be Deaf’

Could Black English Mean a Prison Sentence? A new study presented 27 Philadelphia court stenographers with recordings of Black English grammatical patterns; the stenographers, the study found, made transcription errors on average in two out of every five sentences, and could accurately paraphrase only one in three sentences. The Black English gap, John McWhorter wrote in January , can affect peop

35min

The Power Of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Anger

Martin Luther King Jr. dealt with anger in both his personal life and life's work. He often tried to turn his anger into constructive action, but he did occasionally struggle with that balance. (Image credit: William Lovelace/Getty Images)

50min

What the Heck Is a Blobfish?

The blobfish may be ugly on land, but it's rather handsome where it belongs — deep under the ocean.

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Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. Scientists have now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around -200°C.

55min

Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia

Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the February 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Mental activities included reading, playing instruments, singing in a choir, visiting concerts, gardening, doing needlework or attending re

1h

The $1,980 Samsung Galaxy Fold smartphone is the perfect early adopter gadget

Gadgets And here come the folding phones. You shouldn't buy Samsung's new folding phone, but it's totally fine to want it.

1h

Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery

A careful re-analysis of data taken as revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery. The data have led to the extraction of a universal function that describes the EMC Effect, the once-shocking discovery that quarks inside nuclei have lower average momenta than predicted, and supports an explanation for the effect.

1h

New study finds strength of imagination not associated with creative ability or achievement

Imagination is sometimes claimed to be a uniquely human ability, and it has long intrigued psychologists. "Nevertheless, our understanding of the benefits and risks that individual differences in imagination hold for psychological outcomes is currently limited," note two researchers who have created a new psychometric test – the Imaginative Behaviour Engagement Scale (IBES) – for measuring how mu

1h

Yes, That Viking Warrior Buried with Weapons Really Was a Woman

Researchers answer questions following the explosive finding that a Viking warrior was biologically female.

1h

Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman

Here's what the Viking warrior woman may have looked like.

1h

Samsung Galaxy Fold: Price, Specs, Release DateSamsung Galaxy Fold

It's finally here, and it'll cost you $1,980.

1h

Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of the earliest s

1h

Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell

A new study has traced an important period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse. The study is by far the largest dataset of its kind to date.

1h

Bat influenza viruses could infect humans

Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers have now shown.

1h

Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes

Small involuntary eye movements, independent of any response, can be used to determine whether one has successfully learned. This finding opens new possibilities in understanding the process of learning in populations that are less responsive to external events, such young children, or individuals with certain mental or physical conditions.

1h

Plants: How cell walls are assembled

Plant researchers are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how processes are coordinated that are pivotal in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. They describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these building blocks are disrupted.

1h

Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli

Scientists have discovered that a combination of two common antibiotics is able to eliminate multi-drug resistant E. coli causing urinary tract infections. This combination treatment could become an effective measure against clinically relevant antibiotic resistant urinary tract infections.

1h

Water is more homogeneous than expected

In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses show that this is not the case. At room temperature and normal pressure, the water molecules form a fluctuating network with an average of 1.74 ± 2.1 percent donor and acceptor hydrogen bridge bonds per mol

1h

New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover

The ice-covered season plays an important role in the development of river channels, a new study shows. The spatial variability of sediment transport and differences in depositional and erosional locations increase in ice-covered conditions.

1h

Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. Scientists have now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around -200°C.

1h

The holy grail of nanowire production

Researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

1h

Gene-edited animal creators look beyond US market

Gene-edited animal creators look beyond US market Gene-edited animal creators look beyond US market, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00600-4 Tired of regulatory confusion and a lack of funding, some US researchers are taking their gene-edited livestock abroad.

1h

New machine learning technique rapidly analyzes nanomedicines for cancer immunotherapy

With their ability to treat a wide a variety of diseases, spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) are poised to revolutionize medicine. But before these digitally designed nanostructures can reach their full potential, researchers need to optimize their various components.

1h

How to teach kids to talk about taboo topics | Liz Kleinrock

When one of Liz Kleinrock's fourth-grade students said the unthinkable at the start of a class on race, she knew it was far too important a teachable moment to miss. But where to start? Learn how Kleinrock teaches kids to discuss taboo topics without fear — because the best way to start solving social problems is to talk about them.

1h

You can now block Facebook's background location tracking on Android

Facebook announced today that it is adding a new privacy control that allows Android users to turn off location tracking when they aren't using the app. The change comes just days …

1h

Samsung refreshes wearable line, including new Galaxy Watch Active

Lineup includes new true wireless earbuds and fitness tracker as well.

1h

Why do zebras have stripes? To confuse flies

Research suggests the trademark markings protect against insect bites. Tanya Loos reports.

1h

Why our blue planet is getting greener

Environment You can thank India and China for the abundant leafiness. The blue planet is going green—literally. Since the 1980s, satellite images have shown that leafy cover across the globe has grown by 2.3 percent per decade.

1h

Lawyer: People Could Try to Sell the Apollo Moon Footprints

Interplanetary Heritage Right now, there’s no legal framework preventing people from destroying or selling culturally-important landmarks in space. For instance, as space travel becomes more common, an opportunistic someone could find a way to steal and auction off the first bootprints left on the moon by Neil Armstrong, warns University of Mississippi Air and Space Law professor Michelle Hanlon

1h

Automakers Could Give Police Control Over Your Self-Driving Car

More Q’s Than A’s We still have a lot of questions to answer before autonomous vehicles can go mainstream: Who’s at fault if an AV has an accident ? Should people need licenses to ride in a self-driving car ? How should an AV decide between running over a dog or a cat ? On Wednesday, Bloomberg published a story focused on yet another question — how should AVs interact with law enforcement? — and

1h

Samsung launches folding smartphone

Seeking to rev up demand in the slumping smartphone market, Samsung on Wednesday unveiled a folding handset, becoming the first major manufacturer to offer the feature.

1h

Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication

In a strategic search, scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke.

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Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats. The device was successfully tested in pig

1h

Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete

A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tires has been successfully tested.

1h

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer

Scientists have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

1h

Young children may see nationality as biological

Young children see national identity, in part, as biological in nature, a perception that diminishes as they get older. But despite changes in views of nationality as we age, the work suggests the intriguing possibility that the roots of nationalist sentiments are established early in life.

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Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active

Researchers have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being.

1h

Tinier and less power-hungry quantum atomic clock push toward intelligent IoT

Scientists have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock (ULPAC) for small satellites to enable future communication systems beyond 5G. The proposed device outperforms the current industry standards in various benchmarks, such as size, stability, and power consumption.

1h

Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care

Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers have found on computer simulated patients.

1h

Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth

A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary,' has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists.

1h

Driver hurt by air bag shrapnel as investigation drags on

Nearly four years ago, the U.S. government's highway safety agency began investigating air bag inflators made by ARC Automotive of Tennessee when two people were hit by flying shrapnel after crashes.

1h

Testosterone Helps Protect Embryos From Inflammation, Mouse Study Suggests

Testosterone often gets a bad rap as the cause of male aggression, but the hormone actually interacts with our bodies in far more, and more complex, ways. Now, in a new study in mice, researchers find that testosterone protects embryos from harm by reducing inflammation during development. It's a new role for the hormone, and one that could prove beneficial to humans, the researchers say. Female F

1h

Mark Robar video on clean water.

submitted by /u/schafs [link] [comments]

1h

Samsung's more affordable Galaxy S10e will cost $750

If you like the Galaxy S10 but find the two standard models to be overkill, you're in luck. Samsung has unveiled its rumored Galaxy S10e, delivering most of the regular S10's …

1h

The Galaxy S10 has a dedicated Instagram photo mode

Samsung's Galaxy S10 phones have a whole bunch of cameras, so what better what to make use of them than by quickly sharing your selfies to Instagram? There's a built-in Instagram …

1h

Android Users: Check This Facebook Location Privacy Setting ASAPFacebook Location Android

Android users can now stop Facebook from tracking their location when they aren't using the Facebook app.

1h

Samsung Just Revealed a $1,980 Folding Smartphone

Galaxy Fold Korean tech giant Samsung officially announced its take on the growing foldable smartphone trend at its Galaxy Unpacked event today in San Francisco: the Samsung Galaxy Fold . The device will go on sale for $1,980 on April 26. We first got a glimpse of the device in November, but the brand has likely been working on the concept for almost half a decade . Serious About Multitasking The

1h

In colliding galaxies, a pipsqueak shines bright

In the nearby Whirlpool galaxy and its companion galaxy, M51b, two supermassive black holes heat up and devour surrounding material. These two monsters should be the most luminous X-ray sources in sight, but a new study using observations from NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission shows that a much smaller object is competing with the two behemoths.

2h

What Are the Milankovitch Cycles?

Earth has many moves.

2h

Scientists Used Gene Therapy to Cure Deafness in Mice

Three Deaf Mice About half of the time someone is born totally deaf, it’s because of their genetic makeup. Those people are typically treated with cochlear implants , but now researchers from Europe and the U.S. are looking at gene-based treatments as well. Deaf mice treated with a new kind of gene therapy developed the ability to hear almost as well as healthy mice, according to research publish

2h

Royale rumble: 'Apex Legends' smashing 'Fortnite' records

For the first time since its meteoric rise, "Fortnite" is no longer a no-doubt victory royale atop the video game industry.

2h

The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record

The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a new study.

2h

Zebra stripes are not good landing strips

The stripes of a zebra deter horse flies from landing on them, according to a new study.

2h

Peering inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form

A new study lays the ground for uncovering the molecular basis of memory blocking that has baffled scientists for decades.

2h

New machine learning technique rapidly analyzes nanomedicines for cancer immunotherapy

With their ability to treat a wide a variety of diseases, spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) are poised to revolutionize medicine. But before these digitally designed nanostructures can reach their full potential, researchers need to optimize their various components.

2h

Increasing frailty may lead to death

A new study indicates that frail patients in any age group are more likely to die than those who are not frail.

2h

Acetaminophen significantly reduced in-hospital delirium

Patients treated with acetaminophen demonstrated a significant reduction in in-hospital delirium. Moreover, those given acetaminophen also were more likely to have shorter stays in the intensive care unit, less breakthrough pain. Those patients who did experience delirium had shorter bouts of the acute confusion. In addition, adding acetaminophen to postoperative care also reduced the need for opi

2h

Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger one

Neptune's newest and tiniest moon is probably an ancient piece of a much larger moon orbiting unusually close.

2h

Was Roman Emperor Nero's Evil Reputation Just 'Fake News'?

Did the infamously cruel Nero really do all the terrible things that historians reported?

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How the Samsung Galaxy S10's cool new fingerprint sensor works

Technology It's ultrasonic! In addition to showing off the new Samsung "Fold," the company unveiled its new S10 Galaxy smartphones.

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New Research: Earth’s Atmosphere Extends Well Beyond the Moon

The Geocorona A light layer of hydrogen atoms called the geocorona separates Earth’s atmosphere from outer space. And it extends far beyond Earth — much farther than previously believed. Data collected by NASA and the European space agency’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a spacecraft that launched in 1995 to study the Sun, suggests that this gaseous layer extends up to 391,000 miles

2h

Peer support, healing hands may curb prescription opioid misuse

A program offering group support, acupuncture, mindfulness, massage and gentle exercise may help prevent patients on prescription opioids from spiraling down to drug misuse, overdose and death, according to a new study.

2h

Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits

Female cells randomly and permanently shut off one of the X chromosomes during embryonic development through a process called X chromosome inactivation, or XCI. Just how XCI occurs has remained unclear — until now. New research performed on mouse female embryonic stem cells traces the origin of XCI to an RNA splicing mechanism.

2h

Samsung’s Galaxy S10 goes wide with a third camera lens

Following Huawei's lead with the Mate 20 Pro, Samsung has introduced a third piece of glass for its new Galaxy S10. The additional wide angle lens should make short work of landscapes …

2h

Tesla’s top attorney leaves after two months on job due to ‘poor cultural fit’

Tesla’s general counsel, a veteran trial lawyer, has been replaced with a company insider just two months after taking the post. Dane Butswinkas, who was named Tesla general counsel in …

2h

Nuts are full of fat and calories—and you should probably eat more of them

Health Nutritionists used to think nuts should be avoided, but now they’re a prescribed part of a well-rounded diet. Nuts are full of fat—it’s what makes peanut butter tastes so good. Heck, it’s why you can even turn a hard nut into a butter-like paste in the first place. All that fat…

2h

Vaccine Rejection: Truth and Consequences

Kent State epidemiologist Tara Smith talks about vaccines, recent preventable measles outbreaks and her 2017 journal article on vaccine rejection. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells

A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins. The findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism that activates the cells' protein-disposal machinery, allowing them to adapt their protein content to shifting demands and new conditions.

2h

Viruses that linger in gut could trigger type 1 diabetes

Researchers provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children and islet autoimmunity, a precursor to type 1 diabetes.

2h

New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent.

2h

Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost

Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests.

2h

The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure

A new study has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people.

2h

Can a nerve injury trigger ALS?

Researchers have demonstrated that a peripheral nerve injury can trigger the onset and spread of the disease in an animal model of ALS.

2h

Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity

Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a new study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity.

2h

'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D

Scientists have produced a 3-D cluster molecule based on palladium. First, they created a 'butterfly-shaped' Pd4 framework, using an organosilicon compounds bearing the aromatic substitutents as both template and support for the palladium atoms. Then, using another template, they connected two butterfly-shaped Pd4 skeleton, via chlorine, into a Pd6 cluster based on edge-sharing tetrahedra. This st

2h

Vaccine Rejection: Truth and Consequences

Kent State epidemiologist Tara Smith talks about vaccines, recent preventable measles outbreaks and her 2017 journal article on vaccine rejection. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Trilobites: Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? Scientists Camouflaged Horses to Find Out

If you spend time around horses or flies, you might want to invest in some zebra print.

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Trilobites: Sleepless Flies Lived Long Lives. Why Not Us?

Flies deprived of sleep didn’t see reductions in their life spans. Does that mean we’ve got sleep deprivation all wrong?

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White House climate change panel to include man who touted emissions

William Happer, a physicist who has suggested higher levels of carbon dioxide are beneficial, would be on committee Follow the latest in US politics The White House is planning to assess how climate change impacts national security and will involve a prominent doubter of the scientific consensus that manmade warming is putting the US at risk. Related: US coastal businesses hit by everyday impact

2h

The Galaxy S10 Is Here. Pricing, Specs, Release Date

Samsung’s new flagship phone can be unlocked with an in-display fingerprint sensor, and has its own neural processing unit.

2h

Is Spotify spying on you?

Spotify Teardown claims that the streaming service is sending (and receiving) much more than music. The authors contend that the service is engaged in emotional manipulation given their playlist emphasis. Music is only the surface layer of a much larger data collection and advertising infrastructure. Spotify Teardown: Inside the Black Box of Streaming Music (The MIT Press) List Price: $19.95 New

2h

Life-changing magic of tidying up: Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold

Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination.

3h

EEG helps scientists predict epileptic seizures minutes in advance

Study shows that acetate, an acid found in some foods, may help doctors intervene when seizures are imminent.

3h

Salt could be a key factor in allergic immune reactions

Salt apparently affects allergic immune reactions. A team working with Professor Christina Zielinski at the Technical University of Munich has demonstrated in cell cultures that salt leads to the formation of Th2 cells. These immune cells are active in allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis. The team also detected elevated salt concentrations in the skin of patients.

3h

Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy

Atopic dermatitis, also known as allergic eczema, affects nearly 20 percent of children, 30 percent of whom also have food allergies. Scientists have found that children with both atopic dermatitis and food allergy have structural and molecular differences in top layers of skin near the eczema lesions, whereas children with atopic dermatitis alone don't. Defining these differences may help identif

3h

A deeper look at the relationship between dermatitis and food allergy, in pediatric patients

Researchers have discovered that food allergies are associated with distinct abnormalities in seemingly-healthy skin in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), a common skin disorder.

3h

Seen for the first time: Golden snub-nosed monkeys nurse other females' infants

More than 87 percent of golden snub-nosed monkey infants evaluated in a five-year field study were nursed by females other than their mothers — a phenomenon called allomaternal nursing. This is the first evidence of allomaternal nursing in an Old World nonhuman primate, the study's authors say. It occurred predominantly among relatives and was usually reciprocal; around

3h

Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

3h

Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies

Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive.

3h

Study finds way to potentially improve immunotherapy for cancer

A new study has identified a drug that potentially could make a common type of immunotherapy for cancer even more effective. The study in laboratory mice found that the drug dasatinib, which is FDA-approved to treat certain types of leukemia, greatly enhances responses to a form of immunotherapy that is used against a wide range of other cancers.

3h

Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands

One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory — that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at lower elevations.

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New tool for tracking cholera outbreaks could make it easier to detect deadly epidemics

Algorithms using data from antibody signatures in peoples' blood may enable scientists to assess the size of cholera outbreaks and identify hotspots of cholera transmission more accurately than ever, according to a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

3h

Tracking cholera in a drop of blood

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers has developed a method that identifies individuals recently infected with Vibrio cholerae O1. The results of the study are available online in the February 20 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

3h

When does one of the central ideas in economics work?

Many situations in economics are complicated and competitive; this research raises the question of whether many theories in economics may suffer from the very fundamental problem that the key behavioral assumption of equilibrium is wrong.

3h

How zebra stripes disrupt flies' flight patterns

Scientists learned in recent years why zebras have black and white stripes — to avoid biting flies. But a new study probes the question further: What is it about stripes that make them such lousy landing strips for flies preying on zebras?

3h

The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record

The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published Feb. 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by C. Jara-Figueroa and colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.

3h

Zebra stripes are not good landing strips

The stripes of a zebra deter horse flies from landing on them, according to a new study published Feb. 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tim Caro of the University of California Davis, Martin How of the University of Bristol, and colleagues.

3h

Sea levels have already cost Annapolis over $86K

Rising sea levels due to climate change are already costing businesses in the city of Annapolis, Maryland, according to new research. Miyuki Hino, a graduate student at Stanford University, and her colleagues found that downtown Annapolis, Maryland’s state capital, suffered a loss of 3,000 visits in 2017 due to high-tide flooding, which equates to a loss of somewhere between $86,000 and $172,000

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NASA just got its best budget in a decade

submitted by /u/SpaceElevatorOrBust [link] [comments]

3h

Young Blood Unproven as Anti-Aging Treatment: US FDA

The agency warns that plasma treatments costing thousands of dollars, which supposedly treat the infirmities of old age, have not been proven "safe or effective."

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Retro-surfing: Nu kan du besøge nettet, som var det 1990

I anledningen af World Wide Webs 30 års fødselsdag har CERN genskabt den originale udgave af systemet.

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Bacteria living on insects could provide new antibiotics

Insects harbor bacteria that protect them from infection. Tapping this source could yield new antibiotics to combat the growing threat of drug resistance.

3h

Mia sökte vård 13 gånger utan att cancern upptäcktes

Lungcancern, den cancer som dödar flest i Sverige, ökar nu snabbt bland dem som aldrig rökt. I dag drabbas fler kvinnor än män av denna cancerform, men då den typiska lungcancerpatienten är en äldre man som röker har vården svårt att upptäcka just kvinnorna som inte röker men som ändå drabbas. Mia Rajalin är en av dem, och hon tvingades söka vård 13 gånger innan cancern upptäcktes.

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Lungcancer ökar snabbt bland kvinnor som aldrig rökt

Lungcancer är den cancersjukdom som skördar flest liv i Sverige, ungefär 4 000 varje år. Trots att rökningen minskar ökar antalet lungcancerfall stadigt, inte minst bland kvinnor som aldrig rökt.

3h

Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism

A small pilot clinical study suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision. Increased melanin could help protect people with the condition against the sun's UV rays and promote the development of normal vision.

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Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a new study.

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Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory

When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, scientists have found.

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Genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry.

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'Breakneck speed' mini moon hurtles around Neptune at 20,000mph

Astronomers confirm orbit of tiny moon Hippocamp via multiple images from Hubble A miniature moon that whizzes around Neptune at breakneck speed has been tracked by astronomers working from the US. The speck of a moon, no more than 21 miles across, hurtles around the distant gas giant at about 20,000 miles an hour, 10 times faster than our own moon circles Earth, scientists said. Continue reading

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Why the zebra got its stripes: to deter flies from landing on it

Pattern seems to confuse flies, researchers who dressed horses up as zebras find The mystery of how the zebra got its stripes might have been solved: researchers say the pattern appears to confuse flies, discouraging them from touching down for a quick bite. The study, published in the journal Plos One , involved horses, zebras, and horses dressed as zebras. The team said the research not only su

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The Surprising Reason Zebras Have Stripes

For Tim Caro , it was surprisingly easy to dress horses like zebras. Several vendors were already selling coats with black-and-white stripes, often as fun gimmicks. But, as Caro learned, such coverings have an unexpectedly serious effect. “There are enormous benefits to having a striped coat for a horse,” he told me. Caro, a biologist at the University of California at Davis, has spent years thin

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Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

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The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record

The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published February 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by C. Jara-Figueroa and colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands

One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory—that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at lower elevations.

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Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies

Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive.

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When does one of the central ideas in economics work?

The concept of equilibrium is one of the most central ideas in economics. It is one of the core assumptions in the vast majority of economic models, including models used by policymakers on issues ranging from monetary policy to climate change, trade policy and the minimum wage. But is it a good assumption? In a forthcoming Science Advances paper, Marco Pangallo, Torsten Heinrich and Doyne Farmer

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Scientists say every animal needs sleep. These fruit flies didn’t get the memo

Some Drosophila melanogaster sleep only a few minutes a day

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Zebra stripes confuse biting flies, causing them to abort their landings

Coat pattern helps zebras and horses evade dangerous insects

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Transcriptional profiling at the DLK1/MEG3 domain explains clinical overlap between imprinting disorders

Imprinting disorders (IDs) often affect growth in humans, leading to diseases with overlapping features, regardless of the genomic region affected. IDs related to hypomethylation of the human 14q32.2 region and its DLK1/MEG3 domain are associated with Temple syndrome (TS14). TS14 is a rare type of growth retardation, the clinical signs of which overlap considerably with those of Silver-Russell sy

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Routine allomaternal nursing in a free-ranging Old World monkey

While regular allomaternal nursing (suckling) has been documented in a number of rodent and carnivore species, as well as in some prosimians, New World monkeys, and humans, it is not common in Old World monkeys and apes. Here, we present a detailed field study of allomaternal nursing in golden snub-nosed monkeys ( Rhinopithecus roxellana , Colobinae). We found that more than 87% of infants were n

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Microbial dormancy in the marine subsurface: Global endospore abundance and response to burial

Marine sediments host an unexpectedly large microbial biosphere, suggesting unique microbial mechanisms for surviving burial and slow metabolic turnover. Although dormancy is generally considered an important survival strategy, its specific role in subsurface sediments remains unclear. We quantified dormant bacterial endospores in 331 marine sediment samples from diverse depositional types and ge

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Targeting DDR2 enhances tumor response to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy

While a fraction of cancer patients treated with anti–PD-1 show durable therapeutic responses, most remain unresponsive, highlighting the need to better understand and improve these therapies. Using an in vivo screening approach with a customized shRNA pooled library, we identified DDR2 as a leading target for the enhancement of response to anti–PD-1 immunotherapy. Using isogenic in vivo murine m

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Bottlebrush-architectured poly(ethylene glycol) as an efficient vector for RNA interference in vivo

Nonhepatic delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) remains a challenge for development of RNA interference–based therapeutics. We report a noncationic vector wherein linear poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), a polymer generally considered as inert and safe biologically but ineffective as a vector, is transformed into a bottlebrush architecture. This topology provides covalently embedded siRNA with

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Best reply structure and equilibrium convergence in generic games

Game theory is widely used to model interacting biological and social systems. In some situations, players may converge to an equilibrium, e.g., a Nash equilibrium, but in other situations their strategic dynamics oscillate endogenously. If the system is not designed to encourage convergence, which of these two behaviors can we expect a priori? To address this question, we follow an approach that

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Crucial role of feedback signals from prelimbic cortex to basolateral amygdala in the retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory

An important reasons for drug relapse is the retrieval of drug withdrawal memory induced by conditioned context. Previous studies have suggested that the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an important role in conditioned context–induced retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory. However, the downstream neuronal circuits of the activation of the BLA in conditioned context–induced retrieval of morphin

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Copepods drive large-scale trait-mediated effects in marine plankton

Fear of predation may influence food webs more than actual predation. However, the mechanisms and magnitude of nonconsumptive predator effects are largely unknown in unicellular-dominated food webs such as marine plankton. We report a general mechanism of chemically induced predator effects in marine plankton. Copepods, the most abundant zooplankton in the oceans, imprint seawater with unique pol

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Cochlear outer hair cell horizontal top connectors mediate mature stereocilia bundle mechanics

Outer hair cell (OHC) stereocilia bundle deflection opens mechanoelectrical transduction channels at the tips of the stereocilia from the middle and short rows, while bundle cohesion is maintained owing to the presence of horizontal top connectors. Here, we used a quantitative noncontact atomic force microscopy method to investigate stereocilia bundle stiffness and damping, when stimulated at aco

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Seed predation increases from the Arctic to the Equator and from high to low elevations

Species interactions have long been predicted to increase in intensity toward the tropics and low elevations because of gradients in climate, productivity, or biodiversity. Despite their importance for understanding global ecological and evolutionary processes, plant-animal interaction gradients are particularly difficult to test systematically across large geographic gradients, and evidence from

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Most sleep does not serve a vital function: Evidence from Drosophila melanogaster

Sleep appears to be a universally conserved phenomenon among the animal kingdom, but whether this notable evolutionary conservation underlies a basic vital function is still an open question. Using a machine learning–based video-tracking technology, we conducted a detailed high-throughput analysis of sleep in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster , coupled with a lifelong chronic and specific sle

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Humans, machines and lawyers: legal problems loom for cyborgs

Human-machine hybrids already exist. The problem is the law doesn’t recognise them. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

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Why do zebras have stripes? To confuse flies

Research suggests the trademark markings protect against insect bites. Tanya Loos reports.

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Chinese monkeys suckle nieces, nephews and grandchildren

An Old World species takes a family-based approach to infant care. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

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Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands

One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory—that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at lower elevations.

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Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies

Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive.

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Salt Could Play a Role in Allergies

High salt concentrations are present in the affected skin of people with atopic dermatitis and promote the differentiation of the T helper cells involved in the development of allergic diseases.

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EPA: Low Doses of Toxins, Radiation Could Actually Be Healthy

Toxic Changes In April, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed new standards for how it studies the health impacts of low doses of chemicals, trading in a previously cautious approach for one that’s far more flexible. On Tuesday, the Los Angeles Times published a deep dive into the work that went on behind the scenes to get this proposed rule change added to the Federal Register — and

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2019 Fitness Goals and Trends from 7 Experts

Before you set your fitness goals in stone, here are a few wishes from some fitness professionals that you may want to keep in mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nike’s Android App Is Bricking Shoes Because That’s a Headline We Write in 2019

Nike's new self-lacing Adapt BB sneakers are being bricked by bad firmware updates and an Android software problem that leaves users connected to just one shoe. Nope. Not making this up. I just …

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Utah startup company is developing a thorium reactor

submitted by /u/SpaceElevatorOrBust [link] [comments]

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Elon Musk: Teslas Will Be Fully Self-Driving By Next Year

Full Autonomy According to Elon Musk, Tesla’s cars are nearly ready for fully autonomous driving. “I think we will be feature complete — full self-driving — this year,” Musk told Cathie Wood and Tasha Keeney of ARK Invest in a podcast on Tuesday . “Meaning the car will be able to find you in a parking lot, pick you up and take you all the way to your destination without an intervention, this year

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Lots of moms and dads leave STEM careers

Nearly half of new moms and a quarter of new dads who work in STEM leave their full-time jobs after a baby’s arrival, according to a new study. The findings show that 43 percent of new moms and 23 percent of new dads leave within four to seven years of the birth or adoption of their first child. Women have been underrepresented in these male-dominated fields (science, technology, engineering, and

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The first privately funded trip to the moon is about to launch

After failing to claim the Lunar X Prize (which, to be fair, everyone did), the Israeli firm SpaceIL could have a rover on lunar soil in a little over a month.

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The ten commandments for learning how to code

The ten commandments for learning how to code The ten commandments for learning how to code, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00653-5 Programming is an exercise in learning how to learn. Start small, practise often and don’t be afraid to make mistakes, advises Atma Ivancevic.

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Fireflies inspire new energy-saving LED light bulbs

Light-emitting diodes made with firefly-mimicking structures could improve efficiency, new research suggests. The new type of LED lightbulb could one day light homes while reducing power bills, according to the findings in Optik . “LED lightbulbs play a key role in clean energy,” says Stuart (Shizhuo) Yin, professor of electrical engineering at Penn State. “Overall commercial LED efficiency is cu

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China produces nano fibre that can lift 160 elephants – and a space elevator?

submitted by /u/SpaceElevatorOrBust [link] [comments]

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Why a data scientist warns against always trusting AI’s scientific discoveries

Artificial intelligence that helps make scientific discoveries needs to get better at admitting its uncertainty, Genevera Allen says.

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Neptune’s smallest moon keeps getting smashed up and resurrected again

A tiny moon of Neptune called Hippocamp, first spotted in 2013, has probably been smashed up and reassembled around nine times in the last 4 billion years

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Photos of the Super Snow Moon

Last night, skywatchers around the world were treated to views of the so-called super snow moon, the largest full moon of the year, which happens to take place in February. The moon appeared about 10 percent larger than average as it approached its closest point in orbit, about 220,680 miles (356,760 kilometers) from Earth. Though the moon might appear larger and brighter, the size difference is

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Does nationalism begin with this little kid idea?

Research finds that young children see national identity, in part, as biological—a perception that diminishes as they get older. But despite changes in views of nationality as we age, the work suggests the intriguing possibility that the roots of nationalist sentiments take root early in life. “As children grow up, they continue to think an individual’s nationality is a stable aspect of their ide

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India Just Swore in Its First Robot Police Officer

RoboCop India just swore in its first robotic police officer, which is named KP-Bot. The animatronic-looking machine was granted the rank of sub-inspector on Tuesday, and it will operate the front desk of Thiruvananthapuram police headquarters, according to India Today . Action Figure The robot was welcomed aboard with a salute from Pinarayi Vijayan, the Chief Minister of Kerala. India Today repo

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Bat influenza viruses could infect humans

Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown.

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Peer support, healing hands may curb prescription opioid misuse

A program offering group support, acupuncture, mindfulness, massage and gentle exercise may help prevent patients on prescription opioids from spiraling down to drug misuse, overdose and death, according to a study led by researchers at UCSF.

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Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell

A new study by researchers at the Allen Discovery Center at UW Medicine has traced animportant period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse. Published today in the journal Nature, the study is by far the largest dataset of its kind to date.

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Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery

A careful re-analysis of data taken at DOE's Jefferson Lab has revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery. The data have led to the extraction of a universal function that describes the EMC Effect, the once-shocking discovery that quarks inside nuclei have lower average momenta than predicted, and supports an explanation for the effect

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Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of t

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Meet Neptune's New Moon, Hippocamp

Neptune has a new moon, and it's also the gas giant's smallest to date — only a little over 20 miles across. The brand new satellite is called Hippocamp. Astronomers led by Mark Showalter of the SETI Institute discovered it using the Hubble Space Telescope combined with an innovative method to track dim and tiny objects as they orbit. Because the object is so tiny, there’s still a lot astronomers

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Neptune Has a Newly Discovered Moon. What Else Is It Hiding?Neptune Hippocamp Moon

There is much more learn about the solar system’s eighth planet, which hasn’t been visited by a spacecraft for 30 years.

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White House Panel Will Study Whether Climate Change Is a National Security Threat. It Includes a Climate Denialist.

The Pentagon and federal intelligence agencies have said that climate change is a threat. Now, the White House is planning a panel to study whether or not that is true.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing

Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.

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Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications

Researchers have discovered that the ancient technique of heating metal to create vibrant colors creates a nanostructured surface that acts as a perfect light absorber. Perfect light absorbers—materials that absorb more than 99% of a certain color—can be used for sensing, solar panels, anti-counterfeiting and stealth technologies.

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Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia—one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.

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A City-Size Moon Was Hiding Around Neptune

The planets may get top billing in the solar system, but they are far outnumbered by the moons. There are hundreds, and they come in all kinds of varieties, like a cosmic tray of assorted chocolates. Our own moon is a barren, rocky world coated with craters. Enceladus, of Saturn, and Europa, of Jupiter, are frozen , shrouded in a thick layer of ice with a liquid-ocean center. Io, another moon of

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The U.S. Teaching Population Is Getting Bigger, and More Female

Teaching in the United States was once considered a career for men. Then the profession’s gender composition shifted dramatically around the mid-19th century, when the country’s public-school system was born. As schoolhouse doors opened to children of all social classes and genders, so too did the education profession. By the late 1880s, women made up a majority—63 percent—of all the country’s te

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Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia—one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.

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Podcast: Mouse cell atlases, and cataloguing viruses

Podcast: Mouse cell atlases, and cataloguing viruses Podcast: Mouse cell atlases, and cataloguing viruses, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00644-6 Hear the latest science news, with Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell.

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Coal going from winner to loser in India's energy future

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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NASA-NOAA satellite looks at large-eyed Tropical Cyclone Oma

Tropical Cyclone Oma is a large hurricane with a big eye. The storm appeared well-organized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell

The very early days of growth, long before we are born, are a time of incredible development. In a relatively short period of time, we and other mammals create our bodies' dozens of different organs from a few thin layers of cells. In mice, that period is only four days long. In humans, it's complete before the end of the first trimester of pregnancy.

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Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of t

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Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery

A careful re-analysis of data taken at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery. The data have led to the extraction of a universal function that describes the EMC Effect, the once-shocking discovery that quarks inside nuclei have lower average momenta than

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Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell

The very early days of growth, long before we are born, are a time of incredible development. In a relatively short period of time, we and other mammals create our bodies' dozens of different organs from a few thin layers of cells. In mice, that period is only four days long. In humans, it's complete before the end of the first trimester of pregnancy.

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Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of t

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A new moon for Neptune

A new moon for Neptune A new moon for Neptune, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00576-1 Hippocamp, a previously undetected moon of Neptune, has a peculiar location and a tiny size relative to the planet’s other inner moons, which suggests a violent history for the region within 100,000 kilometres of the planet.

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Retraction Note: A homing system targets therapeutic T cells to brain cancer

Retraction Note: A homing system targets therapeutic T cells to brain cancer Retraction Note: A homing system targets therapeutic T cells to brain cancer, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0967-z Retraction Note: A homing system targets therapeutic T cells to brain cancer

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Bacterial cGAS-like enzymes synthesize diverse nucleotide signals

Bacterial cGAS-like enzymes synthesize diverse nucleotide signals Bacterial cGAS-like enzymes synthesize diverse nucleotide signals, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0953-5 A bacterial family of cGAS/DncV-like nucleotidyltransferases synthesizes a diverse range of cyclic dinucleotide and trinucleotide compounds that are likely to modulate the interaction of both pathogen

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Unstable genomes promote inflammation

Unstable genomes promote inflammation Unstable genomes promote inflammation, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00510-5 Faulty DNA replication can make genomes unstable. It now seems that, in mice, severe disruption of DNA replication triggers inflammation in the placenta, and female embryos are more sensitive to this than are male ones.

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Modified structure of protons and neutrons in correlated pairs

Modified structure of protons and neutrons in correlated pairs Modified structure of protons and neutrons in correlated pairs, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0925-9 Simultaneous high-precision measurements of the EMC effect and short-range correlated abundances for several nuclei reveal a universal modification of the structure of nucleons in short-range correlated neu

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Neuromodulatory control of localized dendritic spiking in critical period cortex

Neuromodulatory control of localized dendritic spiking in critical period cortex Neuromodulatory control of localized dendritic spiking in critical period cortex, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0963-3 A transient circuit that links cholinergic neuromodulation and inhibition is responsible for the dendritic compartmentalization of evoked responses in the mouse visual co

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Why neutrons and protons are modified inside nuclei

Why neutrons and protons are modified inside nuclei Why neutrons and protons are modified inside nuclei, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00577-0 The structure of a neutron or a proton is modified when the particle is bound in an atomic nucleus. Experimental data suggest an explanation for this phenomenon that could have broad implications for nuclear physics.

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The seventh inner moon of Neptune

The seventh inner moon of Neptune The seventh inner moon of Neptune, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0909-9 Hubble Space Telescope observations of the seventh inner moon of Neptune, Hippocamp, show that it is smaller than the other six, orbits near Proteus and probably originates from a fragment of Proteus.

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Multiple sclerosis enters a grey area

Multiple sclerosis enters a grey area Multiple sclerosis enters a grey area, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00563-6 Studies of multiple sclerosis have long focused on the white matter of the brain. Insights into how immune cells target the brain’s grey matter now illuminate the stage of the disease at which neurodegeneration occurs.

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β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration

β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0964-2 In a rat model of multiple sclerosis, β-synuclein-specific T cells induce inflammation and pathological changes in the grey matter of the central nervous system; these cells were a

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A single-cell molecular map of mouse gastrulation and early organogenesis

A single-cell molecular map of mouse gastrulation and early organogenesis A single-cell molecular map of mouse gastrulation and early organogenesis, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0933-9 Single-cell profiling is used to create a molecular-level atlas of cell differentiation trajectories during gastrulation and early organogenesis in the mouse.

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The single-cell transcriptional landscape of mammalian organogenesis

The single-cell transcriptional landscape of mammalian organogenesis The single-cell transcriptional landscape of mammalian organogenesis, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0969-x Data from single-cell combinatorial-indexing RNA-sequencing analysis of 2 million cells from mouse embryos between embryonic days 9.5 and 13.5 are compiled in a cell atlas of mouse organogenesis

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Female-biased embryonic death from inflammation induced by genomic instability

Female-biased embryonic death from inflammation induced by genomic instability Female-biased embryonic death from inflammation induced by genomic instability, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0936-6 Genomic instability, caused by MCM mutations, results in embryonic lethality that disproportionally affects female mouse embryos and is rescued by testosterone or ibuprofen t

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MHC class II proteins mediate cross-species entry of bat influenza viruses

MHC class II proteins mediate cross-species entry of bat influenza viruses MHC class II proteins mediate cross-species entry of bat influenza viruses, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0955-3 The DR isotype of the human leukocyte antigen of the MHC class II—or its homologues in bats, pigs, mice and chickens—is an essential cell entry determinant for bat influenza A viruse

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Receptor for bat influenza virus uncovers potential risk to humans

Receptor for bat influenza virus uncovers potential risk to humans Receptor for bat influenza virus uncovers potential risk to humans, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00580-5 How bat influenza viruses infect cells has been unclear. The discovery that they bind to a cell receptor that is present in many different species raises concerns about their potential risk to huma

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Putting data privacy in the hands of users

MIT and Harvard University researchers have developed Riverbed, a platform that ensures web and mobile apps using distributed computing in data centers adhere to users' preferences on how their data are shared and stored in the cloud.

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Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio report their insights into how colors are generated on heated metal surfaces and apply those findings to create a nickel thin-film that perfectly absorbs red light.

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Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia — one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.

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Neptune’s smallest moon may be a chip off another moon

Neptune’s tiniest moon probably formed when a comet hit a larger moon.

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Nature Retracts Paper on Delivery System for CAR T Immunotherapy

The manuscript had amassed more than 50 comments about problematic figures and data on PubPeer.

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Sue Povey obituary

Molecular geneticist who was a leading contributor to the Human Genome Project In 2003 the Human Genome Project (HGP) published the complete sequence of human DNA. Sue Povey, who has died aged 76, contributed greatly to this international collaborative project with her team at University College London, her work as a molecular geneticist having started much earlier, in the late 1960s. She was moti

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Mountain Range More Rugged Than the Rockies Found Buried Deep Within Earth

Ain't no mountain rough enough like those 660 kilometers deep in the ground.

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LOFAR radio telescope reveals secrets of solar storms

The team of scientist showed that solar storms can accelerate particles simultaneously in several locations by combining data from the Low Frequency Array, LOFAR, with images from NASA, NOAA and ESA spacecraft.

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About a Dozen Lawmakers Just Made Brexit More Complicated

LONDON—Among the things that unite the British lawmakers who resigned from the Labour and Conservative parties this week, perhaps the greatest commonality is their shared support for Britain having a second Brexit referendum. Paradoxically, their departures might have made that goal much harder to achieve. The walkouts began on Monday with seven Labour MPs, who announced in a press conference the

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Hubble spotter ny måne i kredsløb om iskæmpen Neptun

Den nye måne Hippocamp bringer planetens antal af måner op på 14. Der kommer nok flere til, siger forsker.

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Daily briefing: Israel is sending the first privately built lander to the Moon

Daily briefing: Israel is sending the first privately built lander to the Moon Daily briefing: Israel is sending the first privately built lander to the Moon, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00652-6 A new era of lunar exploration, the first leader of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and why nearly half of US female scientists leave full-time science after their fi

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Russian researchers made gold nano-stars for intracellular delivery

Researchers from Russian Academy of Sciences developed a new method for star-shaped nanoparticles synthesis based on laser irradiation. A wide range of customizable conditions provides an opportunity to create comfortable environment for various substances delivery to different types of cells. The results are published in Journal of Biophotonics. The research was supported by the Russian Science F

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing

Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.

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New insight on potent HIV antibody could improve vaccine design

A new observation, led by researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute, highlights the importance of previously unstudied mutations that arises early in bnAbs, giving the antibodies the flexibility to adapt to changes in the virus's outer envelope protein structure. This flexibility enables the antibody to dock on diverse strains of the virus and more potently neutralize them.

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NASA-NOAA satellite looks at large-eyed Tropical Cyclone Oma

Tropical Cyclone Oma is a large hurricane with a big eye. The storm appeared well-organized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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The future of Mars exploration may rest on a glider

After Opportunity, now what? An unpowered inflatable craft using thermal updrafts to stay aloft could cost-effectively map less-documented parts of the planet’s surface to help plan lander missions.

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What does it actually mean for a commercial plane to hit 801 mph?

Technology The jet stream propelled a 787 to super-fast speeds, but determining a plane’s velocity is a complex matter. On Monday, a Boeing 787 operated by Virgin Atlantic hit an astounding ground speed: 801 miles per hour.

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Google: Secret Nest Microphone “Never Intended to Be a Secret”

End of an Error People who use Google’s home security device, Nest Guard, got some surprising news earlier this month when the company announced that the device could now be used as a smart assistant. That was startling because Google Assistant devices use voice recognition, and the company had never disclosed that Nests had built-in microphones. Now the search giant is admitting they do — and sa

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A High-Fat Diet May Be Bad for Your Gut Bacteria

Eating too much fat may be bad for your gut bacteria, a new study from China suggests.

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Nepal social media bill sparks freedom of speech concerns

Nepal's government on Wednesday tabled draft legislation that would impose harsh penalties for "improper" social media posts, igniting concerns it could be used to suppress freedom of speech and stifle dissent.

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How Drug Company Ads Downplay Risks

Study shows the power of the “argument dilution effect” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

How Drug Company Ads Downplay Risks

Study shows the power of the “argument dilution effect” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Advances in naturopathy research reported in new special issue of JACM

Naturopathy, or 'naturopathic medicine' as the profession is branded in the United States, is a rapidly growing profession and scientifically advancing form of practice that can have a positive impact on a wide variety of chronic and complex conditions.

5h

Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells

A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins. The findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism that activates the cells' protein-disposal machinery, allowing them to adapt their protein content to shifting demands and new conditions.

5h

Eliminating HIV in Black Communities

Trump’s plan to end new HIV/AIDS diagnoses by 2030 misses a key element: prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory

When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the Moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the Moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, NASA scientists have found.

5h

Footballers really are working harder and getting injured more often

Football players cover 30 per cent more ground during a match than they used to and they get injured more often too

5h

Vampire Clinic That Sold Young Blood to the Wealthy Closes Shop

Bad Blood Ambrosia Health, the controversial clinic that sold transfusions of young, healthy people’s blood, has “ceased patient treatments,” according to the company’s website . The decision to stop taking patients comes after an official statement from FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb this week, which described the company’s practices as a dangerous scam . Dr. Acula Ambrosia claimed its transfus

5h

Can we halt cellular aging? New drug combo shows promise

In the first clinical trial in humans, researchers test a promising drug combination that could help fight the effects of cellular aging.

5h

Researchers find genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry

In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry.

5h

Digital to overtake traditional advertising in US: tracker

Spending on digital advertising is set to overtake that of traditional media in the United States for the first time in 2019, in a major milestone for the industry, a market tracker said Wednesday.

5h

Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years

Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds. A new study finds humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse gas was emitted during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a global warming event that occurred roughly 56 mill

5h

New one-two punch against melanoma in mouse model

Study shows new forms of an older anti-cancer agent appear to enhance the immune system's ability to fight melanoma in mice.

5h

Blueprint for treating a deadly brain tumor

In a study of mice and human brain tumors researchers searched for new treatments by exploring the reasons why some patients with gliomas live remarkably longer than others. The results suggested that certain patients' tumor cells are less aggressive and much better at repairing DNA than others but are difficult to kill with radiation. The researchers then showed that combining radiation therapy w

5h

New nurses work overtime, long shifts, and sometimes a second job

New nurses are predominantly working 12-hour shifts and nearly half work overtime, trends that have remained relatively stable over the past decade, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. In addition, 13 percent hold a second job, according to the study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.

5h

Misunderstanding food date labels linked with higher food discards

A new survey examining US consumer attitudes and behaviors related to food date labels found widespread confusion, leading to unnecessary discards, increased waste and food safety risks.

5h

Familiarity breeds aggression

Aggressiveness among animals may increase the longer individuals live together in stable groups. The study used the Amazon molly, a naturally clonal fish species that produces genetically identical individuals to isolate the effects of familiarity on behavior.

5h

People more likely to be generous towards charities if they donate before a windfall

People will donate more to charity if they make a pledge before receiving an unexpected cash windfall, a study has shown.

5h

Climate goals of the Paris Agreement: Impact of land use

Significantly less than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times — this is the temperature to which global warming should be limited, according to the Paris Climate Agreement. In a current study, a research team shows that previous efforts to reduce greenhouse gases through human land use are insufficient.

5h

Eliminating HIV in Black Communities

Trump’s plan to end new HIV/AIDS diagnoses by 2030 misses a key element: prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Vagthunde: Statens jagt på konkurrence ødelagde forskningsmiljø på DTU

Kun 27 ud af 288 medarbejdere på DTU's veterinærområde flytter med over til Københavns Universitet og Statens Serum Institut, viser Rigsrevisionens undersøgelse.

5h

A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover

A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history — the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

5h

'Astrocomb' opens new horizons for planet-hunting telescope

The hunt for Earth-like planets, and perhaps extraterrestrial life, just got more precise, thanks to record-setting starlight measurements made possible by the 'astrocomb.'

5h

Citizen scientist finds ancient white dwarf star encircled by puzzling rings

The oldest and coldest known white dwarf — an Earth-sized remnant of a sun-like star that has died — could be the first known white dwarf with multiple dust rings. The discovery forces researchers to reconsider models of planetary systems.

5h

Visualizing mental valuation processes

Researchers have developed a computer model capable of predicting certain human decisions. With it, researchers can predict for example which food someone in a supermarket will choose to buy — valuable information for marketing and health.

5h

Revealed: How the 'Iron Man' of immune cells helps T cells fight infection

The immune system's killer T cells are crucial in fighting viral infections. A fraction of them – memory cells – live on once infection is controlled in order to fight re-infection by the same virus. They are of great interest as the basis of T cell-based vaccination and immunotherapies. Now, scientists have revealed the mechanisms by which other immune cells called 'helper T cells' are able to pr

5h

Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory

When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, NASA scientists have found.

5h

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a US team from Baylor University.

5h

Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism

A small pilot clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI) suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision. Increased melanin could help protect people with the condition against the sun's UV rays and promote the development of normal vision.

5h

Mandarin Chinese could help us understand how infants learn English

Infants may be more sensitive to non-native speech sounds than previously thought, according to a study published in the Journal of Memory and Language. The findings shed light on the way babies begin to understand language.

5h

Viruses that linger in the gut could trigger type 1 diabetes

Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children and islet autoimmunity, a precursor to type 1 diabetes. The paper appears in the journal Scientific

5h

Bangladesh Declares “War on Pornography,” Blocks TikTok

Porn Ban Over the past week, Bangladesh has blocked tens of thousands of sites and apps and is policing the social media accounts of celebrities in an effort to scrub the nation’s internet of pornography. The porn purge comes as part of the government’s push to crack down on adult-oriented content like porn and gambling, which originated with a November decision in Bangladesh’s High Court, accord

5h

Facebook needs regulation – here's why it should be done by algorithms

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

5h

Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits

As many know, females have two X chromosome while males have one X and one Y chromosome.

5h

Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits

As many know, females have two X chromosome while males have one X and one Y chromosome.

5h

Parker Nearly Breaks His Own Gold Record | Gold Rush

Despite some setbacks, Parker's team nearly breaks his all-time weekly gold record. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We'r

5h

Daimler faces mega fine in diesel probe

Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler could be set for a massive fine in Germany over diesel trickery, as prosecutors confirmed Wednesday they had opened a probe similar to one that cost Volkswagen one billion euros ($1.1 billion).

5h

UK budget airline Flybe snubs counter-bid

Ailing no-frills British airline Flybe on Wednesday rejected a counterbid and repeated its backing for a takeover from a consortium led by Britain's Virgin Atlantic.

5h

Dubai budget airline flydubai loses $43.5m in 2018

Dubai budget carrier flydubai chalked up a loss of $43.5 million in 2018, it said Wednesday, as airlines across the Gulf struggle with mounting costs and political tensions.

5h

Digital to overtake traditional advertising in US: tracker

Spending on digital advertising is set to overtake that of traditional media in the United States for the first time in 2019, in a major milestone for the industry, a market tracker said Wednesday.

5h

Physicists 'flash-freeze' crystal of 150 ions

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have "flash-frozen" a flat crystal of 150 beryllium ions (electrically charged atoms), opening new possibilities for simulating magnetism at the quantum scale and sensing signals from mysterious dark matter.

5h

Google Apologizes for ‘Hidden’ Nest Secure Microphone Dilemma

Customers are not happy with Google: The company is under fire after it forgot to tell Nest Secure users about a “hidden” microphone built into the security system. On Tuesday, Google …

5h

Border Wall Could Sap Military Funding for Climate Adaptation

Under the emergency declaration, some money to build the wall will come from a military construction account — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Pet Chicken ‘From Hell’

The density of human life in Mumbai can give rise to peculiar circumstances—as the filmmaker Rishi Chandna describes it, “situations where the mundane intersects with the insane.” In this manic cross section of life, Chandna told The Atlantic , “nothing is considered too bizarre to witness unbiasedly.” When Chandna heard about a family living with a rooster as a pet in their cramped city apartmen

5h

Trump's New Red Scare

There are a lot of people talking about socialism these days. Senator Bernie Sanders, who on Tuesday launched a bid for the Democratic nomination for president, calls himself a democratic socialist, and so does Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Public intellectuals are debating the label anew. And then there’s the most high-profile participant in the discussion: Donald Trump. The president

5h

Så positionerar sig elever i musikklassrummen

I en ny doktorsavhandling i musikpedagogik undersöker musikläraren Mikael Persson elevers positionerande i musikklassrummet och hur det påverkar deras förutsättningar för delaktighet i musikaliska aktiviteter. Han har videodokumenterat musikundervisning i två undervisningsgrupper i årskurs åtta under en termin, en lektion per vecka. Den ena gruppen kommer från en kommunal skola med högt söktryck

5h

Delhi's complicated air pollution problem

According to the World Health Organization, Delhi is the world's most polluted large city. And it's only going to get worse if something isn't done about it, say some experts in an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

6h

Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years

Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds.

6h

Crocodile face off: Study examines how developmental changes resulted in changes to crocodile snouts

The story that's often told about crocodiles is that they're among the most perfectly adapted creatures on the planet—living fossils that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years.

6h

A new law was supposed to protect South Africans' privacy. It may block important research instead

Law may prevent researchers from reanalyzing data and samples in big databases

6h

Crocodile face off: Study examines how developmental changes resulted in changes to crocodile snouts

The story that's often told about crocodiles is that they're among the most perfectly adapted creatures on the planet—living fossils that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years.

6h

A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover

A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history — the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

6h

New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent.

6h

For patients with schizophrenia, some drug combinations may be more effective than others

Patients with schizophrenia are often treated with more than one type of psychiatric medication, but a new study suggests that some combinations may be more effective than others.

6h

Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits

Female cells randomly and permanently shut off one of the X chromosomes during embryonic development through a process called X chromosome inactivation, or XCI. Just how XCI occurs has remained unclear — until now. New research performed on mouse female embryonic stem cells by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, traces the origin of XCI to an RNA splicing mechanism.

6h

Do improvements in sexual functioning after weight-loss surgery last?

Short-term improvements in sexual functioning have been reported after weight-loss surgery but not much is known about whether these improvements last. This study included about 2,000 adults undergoing bariatric surgery who completed questionnaires about sexual functioning before and after surgery over five years of follow-up. Among those adults who reported some level of dissatisfaction with thei

6h

Is guideline-recommended therapy for coronary artery disease more likely in Medicare Advantage?

Medicare Advantage is Medicare's managed-care alternative to traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Private insurance plans in Medicare Advantage have financial incentives to follow evidence-based guidelines but whether this results in better care for a long-term condition such as coronary artery disease isn't clear. This observational study included about 36,000 patients enrolled in Medicare Advan

6h

Gene Drive-Equipped Mosquitoes Released into Lab Environment

The large-scale experiments aim to test how the technology would fare in the wild, if deployed to knock down populations of the pests.

6h

Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity

Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity.

6h

A scientific method for perfect fondue

Cheese fondue is an icon of Swiss cuisine and a dinner party staple. While it may seem like a simple dish, getting the texture right can be a challenge for optimal mouthfeel, dipping and flavor release. This requires the perfect balance of cheese, wine and starch. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega reveal how to use these key ingredients to produce deliciously melted fondue.

6h

Skateboarding defies the neoliberal logic of the city by making it a playground for all

Skateboarding today is a global phenomenon, with around 50m riders and thousands of skate parks worldwide – it will even feature as a sport in the 2020 Olympic Games. From the full on testosterone of Thrasher skateboard magazine to the fashionable styling of Vogue, the skater girls and boys of Kabul to the Native American reservations of South Dakota, the skate parks of Brazil to the streets of Sh

6h

City bees' favourite flowers, according to our DNA tracking experiment

As cities get bigger and cover more land, the need to make space for wildlife – including insects – in urban areas has become more pressing. Research has shown that cites may not be such a bad place for pollinating insects such as bumble bees, solitary bees and hoverflies. In fact, one UK study of ten cities and two large towns found a greater variety of species in urban areas than in rural areas,

6h

Elon Musk: Bitcoin Is “Brilliant” And “Paper Money Is Going Away”

“Seriously?” Elon Musk is talking cryptocurrency. The real Elon Musk, not one of those Twitter scammers . On Tuesday, Tesla’s CEO sat down for a podcast interview with ARK Invest, a tech investment firm. In addition to chatting about electric vehicles and self-driving cars, the interviewers decided to throw Musk an “off-topic” question about cryptocurrencies. After an initially incredulous respon

6h

Elon Musk: Bitcoin is Brilliant and Crypto is Way Better than Fiat Money

submitted by /u/weddingzilla199 [link] [comments]

6h

Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity

Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity.

6h

City bees' favourite flowers, according to our DNA tracking experiment

As cities get bigger and cover more land, the need to make space for wildlife – including insects – in urban areas has become more pressing. Research has shown that cites may not be such a bad place for pollinating insects such as bumble bees, solitary bees and hoverflies. In fact, one UK study of ten cities and two large towns found a greater variety of species in urban areas than in rural areas,

6h

ATM Hacking Has Gotten So Easy, the Malware's a Game

A strain of ATM malware called WinPot turns the act of cashing out into something like a slot machine.

6h

Don't be fooled by fake images and videos online

One month before the 2016 U.S. presidential election, an "Access Hollywood" recording of Donald Trump was released in which he was heard lewdly talking about women. The then-candidate and his campaign apologized and dismissed the remarks as harmless.

6h

Undersea Odyssey: Team Squid wins!

As the ink clears from the battlefield, it appears we have a winner… Team Squid reigns supreme, a monarch among molluscs! Congratulations to both teams on their bravery; who said invertebrates were spineless? Artwork by Daniela Gamba

6h

The Documentary That Bucks Oscar Trends—And Still Got a Nomination

RaMell Ross’s stunning directorial debut, Hale County This Morning, This Evening , has garnered critical acclaim and a host of accolades, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary Feature. An impressionistic and avant-garde film set in Hale County, Alabama, it examines the quotidian and intimate moments of its African American protagonists and the community in which they live. In

6h

Close encounters: planning for extra Hera flyby

ESA's proposed Hera mission will already visit two asteroids: the Didymos binary pair. The Hera team hopes to boost that number by performing a flyby of another asteroid during the mission's three-year flight.

6h

Children suffer more from air pollution, but our policies don't reflect that

Health Exposure to air pollution likely contributes to childhood health effects like asthma and pre term birth. Burning fossil fuels causes health effects around the world both in the short and long term. Immediately, things like power plants and cars emit strong pollutants that…

6h

Samurajernas favoritväxt ashitaba ger ökad livslängd

Den japanska läkeväxten ashitaba har visat sig innehålla en substans som ger celler längre liv, i alla fall hos maskar och flugor. Den innehåller ett ämne som läker celler och gör att de lever längre.

6h

Capturing and converting carbon dioxide into a useful product

Carbon dioxide is a troublemaker. So it's a good idea to remove it from powerplant emissions—and it may have an extra economic benefit.

6h

First evidence for an unusual congenital pathology in cave bears

Scientists from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) have published a paper in the International Journal of Paleopathology that describes the first case of a congenital pathology in vertebrae of a cave bear (Ursus spelaeus). The findings were based on a specimen recovered in the 2014 excavation campaign in the archaeological and paleontological site of Cueva de G

6h

Weight loss surgery improves more than the waistline

Study finds long-term improvements in sexual function following bariatric procedures. Andrew Masterson reports.

6h

Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost

Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests.

6h

Can a nerve injury trigger ALS?

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to demonstrate that a peripheral nerve injury can trigger the onset and spread of the disease in an animal model of ALS.

6h

The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure

A new study published in the Journal of Gerontology Series A has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people.

6h

Låg kondition kopplat till sämre impulskontroll och minne

– Detta är en av de första studierna som kunnat visa på att konditionen är positivt relaterad till tankemässiga förmågor endast upp till en viss brytpunkt, säger Maria Ekblom, forskningsledare vid GIH. Totalt 362 studiedeltagarna har genomgått ett flertal kognitionstester och fått sin kondition beräknad via ett icke-maximalt konditionstest på cykel. I studien identifierades också brytpunkter för

6h

Mobile video game players' mindset: They don't consider themselves "gamers," survey finds

When you think of a "gamer," you might imagine the stereotype of teenagers or thirtysomething guys intensely playing Xbox or Playstation for hours at a time.

6h

6h

Is the Insect Apocalypse Really Upon Us?

submitted by /u/Freeze95 [link] [comments]

6h

The Pediatric AI That Outperformed Junior Doctors

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

6h

Accused College Students Deserve the Presumption of Innocence

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos believes that college students accused of sexual misconduct in Title IX cases are owed a presumption of innocence, or non-responsibility, in keeping with a bedrock principle of Western justice. Attorneys general from 18 states and the District of Columbia disagree. In a formal letter, these senior law-enforcement officials, who must overcome the presumption of i

6h

What if all US health care costs were transparent? | Jeanne Pinder

In the US, the very same blood test can cost $19 at one clinic and $522 at another clinic just blocks away — and nobody knows the difference until they get a bill weeks later. Journalist Jeanne Pinder says it doesn't have to be this way. She's built a platform that crowdsources the true costs of medical procedures and makes the data public, revealing the secrets of health care pricing. Learn how

6h

More sustainable conversion of amino acids using light instead of with heat

Ph.D. candidate Cecilia Bottecchia was one of the first to succeed in converting amino acids, which can be used for medication, with the help of visible light. This is more sustainable than conventional methods, in which the conversion is powered by heating. She used photocatalysts to capture the light and to direct the energy to the desired chemical reactions. Bottecchia obtained her Ph.D. with d

6h

Big data is being reshaped thanks to 100-year-old ideas about geometry

Your brain is made up of billions of neurons connected by trillions of synapses. And how they're arranged gives rise to the brain's functionality and to your personality. That's why scientists in Switzerland recently produced the first-ever digital 3-D brain cell atlas, a complete mapping of the brain of a mouse. While this is a colossal achievement, the great challenge now lies in learning to dec

6h

What plant proteins can tell us about Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are a growing burden on society and a leading cause of death among the elderly. There is no cure.

6h

The holy grail of nanowire production

Nanowires have the potential to revolutionize the technology around us. Measuring just 5-100 nanometers in diameter (a nanometer is a millionth of a millimeter), these tiny, needle-shaped crystalline structures can alter how electricity or light passes through them.

6h

What plant proteins can tell us about Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are a growing burden on society and a leading cause of death among the elderly. There is no cure.

6h

New method to detect cancer cells faster, potentially improving outcomes

A new Purdue University technique to analyze proteins expressed on cancer cells shows promise in more rapidly detecting these cell types in patients.

6h

Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity

Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity.

6h

Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce

Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a Kansas State University family studies researcher.

6h

Crocodile face off

Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles.

6h

NIST physicists 'flash-freeze' crystal of 150 ions

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have 'flash-frozen' a flat crystal of 150 beryllium ions (electrically charged atoms), opening new possibilities for simulating magnetism at the quantum scale and sensing signals from mysterious dark matter.

6h

Study finds melanoma brain metastases are immunosuppressive with treatment-resistant metabolism

Melanoma tumors that have spread to the brain are equipped to thwart immunotherapies and targeted therapies that succeed against tumors growing in other sites. Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Cancer Discovery that the heavy reliance of these tumors on a specific metabolic pathway presents a potentially new therapeutic against these lethal tumors.

6h

Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years

Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds. A new study finds humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse gas was emitted during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a global warming event that occurred roughly 56 mill

6h

FDA Issues Warning about Young-Blood Transfusions

Plasma from young people offers “no proven clinical benefit” as a treatment against aging or Alzheimer’s disease, the agency says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Möbius Strips Defy a Link With Infinity

In math, three-dimensional space sprawls out to infinity in every direction. With an infinite amount of room, it should be able to hold an infinite number of things inside of it — pearls, peacocks or even planets. But a recent proof by Olga Frolkina, a mathematician at Moscow State University, shows that one relatively well-known mathematical object can’t be packed an uncountably infinite number

6h

Nanoparticle delivery service aids cartilage repair

Researchers report a new way to deliver treatment for cartilage regeneration. The nanoclay-based platform for sustained and prolonged delivery of protein therapeutics has the potential to impact treating osteoarthritis, says study leader Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, assistant professor in the biomedical engineering department at Texas A&M University. The degenerative disease affects nearly 27 million Am

6h

Australian License Plates Can Now Include Emoji

License to Emoji It’s the natural evolution of the vanity license plate: emoji. As of March 1, drivers in Queensland, Australia will be able to include one of five emoji in their license plates: laughing out loud, winking face, sunglasses, heart eyes, and the classic smiley face. “For quite some time we’ve seen that you can support your favourite team or your favourite town with a symbol on your

6h

Banning plastic bags, town by town: A guide

Since plastic carryout bags were introduced in the 1960s, people have used trillions of them, and, for the most part, thrown them away. And whether they're sitting in a landfill, hung up in a tree limb or floating around the ocean, the bags don't biodegrade, and they're not going away anytime soon. They're free to consumers, convenient and cheap for stores to use. But they have joined billions of

6h

How to Let Your Dragon Go

The How to Train Your Dragon series occupies a particularly vital spot in the world of animated fables. Other hit films such as Kung Fu Panda and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse are stirring tales of heroism and maturity; recent Pixar classics such as Coco and Inside Out examined the bonds of the family unit through the eyes of kids on the verge of growing up. The Dragon trilogy, directed by De

6h

National parks are beautiful, but austerity and inequality prevent many from enjoying them

Spending time in nature is good for you. A person's access to parks and green, open spaces is important for their health, as research from the NHS and the OPENSpace research group at Edinburgh and Heriot Watt universities shows. Spending time in parks lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease and asthma, helps address obesity and mitigates mental health issues.

7h

Delhi's complicated air pollution problem

According to the World Health Organization, Delhi is the world's most polluted large city. And it's only going to get worse if something isn't done about it, say some experts in an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

7h

Antibody therapy training phagocytes to destroy tumors now tested on patients

Developed by researchers at the University of Turku in Finland, an immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill cancer. The antibody therapy prevented the growth of tumours in several mouse models. The development of the therapy has now progressed to patient testing in a phase I/II clinical trial.

7h

Health-related Google searches doubled in week before ER visits

Patients are often willing to share their Google search histories with medical researchers, revealing that many people do searches on their condition well before deciding to go to the hospital.

7h

A scientific method for perfect fondue

Cheese fondue is an icon of Swiss cuisine and a dinner party staple. While it may seem like a simple dish, getting the texture right can be a challenge for optimal mouthfeel, dipping and flavor release. This requires the perfect balance of cheese, wine and starch. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega reveal how to use these key ingredients to produce deliciously melted fondue.

7h

New AI able to identify and predict the development of cancer symptom clusters

Cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy could soon benefit from a new AI that is able to identify and predict the development of different combinations of symptoms — helping to alleviate much of the distress caused by their occurrence and severity.

7h

Complete world map of tree diversity

Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have succeeded in constructing, from scattered data, a world map of the diversity of tree species. Climate plays a central role for its global distribution; however, the number of species in a specific region also depends on the spatial scale of the observation, the res

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Women with a strong social support network may be at lower risk for heart disease

Having good friends can save your life, as a study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) demonstrates how strong social support may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in postmenopausal women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

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Report says health systems are key to improving cancer outcomes in the United States

A new report says without a national investment and commitment to transforming health care delivery in the United States, many people will not benefit from the substantial progress made against cancer.

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We don't know what a fifth of our genes do – and won’t find out soon

We still don't know what 3000 of our protein-coding genes do, and people are reluctant to stump up the cash to find out

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Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists

An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilised eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals.

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Amatørastronom fanger ISS på video

Szabolcs Nagy fik forleden nogle helt fantastiske billeder i kassen.

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Danske forskere får kontrol over ustyrligt grafen til effektiv nanoelektronik

PLUS. Danske forskere har som de første løst en af de største udfordringer med at lave effektiv nanoelektronik baseret på grafen. De nye resultater er netop offentliggjort i tidsskriftet Nature Nanotechnology.

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Gold nanowires grow longer with vitamin C

Some vitamin C helps turn small gold nanorods into fine gold nanowires, report researchers. Common, mild ascorbic acid is the not-so-secret sauce that helped the Rice University lab of chemist Eugene Zubarev grow pure batches of nanowires from stumpy nanorods without the drawbacks of previous techniques. “There’s no novelty per se in using vitamin C to make gold nanostructures because there are m

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Hem för smådjursjägare – för 45 000 år sen.

När människan spred sig från Afrika till Europa, Mellanöstern och Asien så skedde det till stor del via öppna gräslandskap. Det berodde sannolikt på att jaktmetoderna förbättrades så att det blev lättare att jaga de stora gräsätarna som finns i dessa miljöer. Människan spred sig också via kusterna i takt med att med att vi blev bättre på att fiska. Regnskogar däremot, har betraktats som ett hinder

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Superconduction—why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. TU Wien has now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around -200°C

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Cosmic dust forms in supernovae blasts

Scientists claim to have solved a longstanding mystery as to how cosmic dust, the building blocks of stars and planets, forms across the Universe.

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Carbon Capture and Storage project publishes findings

The ACT Acorn project, an international research project which involves University geology experts, has announced the findings of its research into the feasibility of establishing a carbon capture and storage facility in the North Sea.

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How to keep conservation policies from backfiring in a globally connected world

For many years environmentalists have urged the public to "think globally, act locally" – meaning, consider the health of the planet, then take action in your own community.

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Top smart cities are global cities, new research reveals

An unprecedented global study has analysed and ranked leading cities in the worldwide "smart city" phenomenon.

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Make CEOs join the same pension scheme as staff to help protect it, say experts

Making company bosses join the same defined benefit scheme as their staff makes it more likely the scheme will survive, according to research carried out by the University of Exeter Business School.

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From Science Careers: After a baby, 28% of new parents leave full-time STEM work

More than 40% of new moms and 20% of new dads in science change fields, go part time, or quit the workforce

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What to Watch for During the Catholic Church’s Sex-Abuse Meeting

VATICAN CITY —This week, 190 bishops and other prelates from around the world are gathering for a meeting on the protection of minors in the Catholic Church . Called by Pope Francis, the meeting is the first of its kind at the Vatican, and a sign that the pope and the Church hierarchy are finally acknowledging that the sexual-abuse crisis has become a global issue —in recent years, scandals have

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The Coming Care Crisis as Kids With Autism Grow Up

The Medicaid provider had assured her that this was the best option, so Marie Solomonik walked into the day-habilitation center in Queens, New York, with all the optimism she could muster. Marie was with her husband, Eddie, on this rainy March morning to scout out the facility for their son, Anthony, who has autism. “This place makes my skin crawl,” Marie whispered. “Just promise me you’ll keep a

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Move over, mindfulness: it’s time for 'finefulness'

After endless guides to self-help, a new wave of books spearheaded by The Little Book of Bad Moods is switching the focus to more realistic hopes Although Finnish doesn’t have a direct equivalent of English’s “mustn’t grumble”, Lotta Sonninen admits, it has a few equivalents. “ Vali vali ” comes from “ valittaminen ”, meaning complaining: but there is also “ marina ”, “ kitinä ” and “ jupina ” (t

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How to keep conservation policies from backfiring in a globally connected world

For many years environmentalists have urged the public to "think globally, act locally" – meaning, consider the health of the planet, then take action in your own community.

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Don’t Toss That Busted Toy Just Yet—Grab a Multimeter

This essential tool lets you measure the electric current and voltage of a circuit. Here's what you need to know to use it correctly.

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Earth's atmosphere stretches out to the moon – and beyond

The gaseous layer that wraps around Earth reaches up to 630,000 kilometers away, or 50 times the diameter of our planet, according to a new study based on observations by the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO, and published in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics.

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Should you feed wild birds in winter?

Nothing brightens a yard like a flock of twittering birds, and nothing draws them like a free meal—but it's an open question whether bird feeders are good for them or not, says a University of Alberta expert.

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Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot

Hike around the natural habitats of San Diego County and it becomes abundantly clear that honey bees, foreign to the area, are everywhere. In a study published last year, researchers at the University of California San Diego found that honey bees are the most widespread and abundant pollinators of wild plants in the world, with the San Diego region having exceptionally high honey bee visitation on

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From Echo to Ring doorbell and Fire TV, are you comfortable Amazon with controlling your smart home?

Amazon acquired another startup this week, the maker of the beloved tech product Eero, a mesh router that improves dead Wi-Fi spots in the home. To that, you might have said, OK, so?

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Should you feed wild birds in winter?

Nothing brightens a yard like a flock of twittering birds, and nothing draws them like a free meal—but it's an open question whether bird feeders are good for them or not, says a University of Alberta expert.

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Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot

Hike around the natural habitats of San Diego County and it becomes abundantly clear that honey bees, foreign to the area, are everywhere. In a study published last year, researchers at the University of California San Diego found that honey bees are the most widespread and abundant pollinators of wild plants in the world, with the San Diego region having exceptionally high honey bee visitation on

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New therapeutic strategy to treat Alzheimer's

Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) have identified a potential therapeutic strategy to treat Alzheimer's, according to a study published in Journal of Neuroscience. The study shows, in a model of the illness in mice, that astrocytes — a type of cells in the brain — are able to release proteins that favour survival of neurons.

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Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. TU Wien has now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around -200°C.

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Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists

An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals.

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Water is more homogeneous than expected

In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses at BESSY II, ESRF and Swiss Light Source show that this is not the case. At room temperature and normal pressure, the water molecules form a fluctuating network with an average of 1.74 ± 2.1 percent donor a

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Light at the end of the tunnel

A new nationally representative study reports that approximately two-thirds (69 percent) of Canadians who had ever attempted suicide were completely free of any suicidal thoughts in the past year.

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Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli

Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability have discovered that a combination of two common antibiotics is able to eliminate multi-drug resistant E. coli causing urinary tract infections. This combination treatment could become an effective measure against clinically relevant antibiotic resistant urinary tract infections.

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Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA

Researchers at The University of Queensland have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. The findings, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could help guide the development of new treatments for fear-related anxiety disorders.Professor Timothy Bredy of UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) said while fear is an important survival mechanism which uses cu

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Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents

Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research by University of Sydney and the NSW Poisons Information Centre. The study found there were more than 33,500 self-poisonings in young people in Australia from 2006 – 2016, with a 98 per cent increase over this time.

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The Pediatric AI That Outperformed Junior Doctors

Training a doctor takes years of grueling work in universities and hospitals. Building a doctor may be as easy as teaching an AI how to read. Artificial intelligence has taken another step towards becoming an integral part of 21st-century medicine. New research out of Guangzhou, China, published February 11th in Nature Medicine Letters , has demonstrated a natural-language processing AI that is c

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Fabric the reinforcer

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology (MISIS) have tested experimental composite materials for aircraft brakes, developed by PJSC Aviation Corporation "Rubin." New materials, reinforced by carbon "fabric," have turned out to be far more durable than the current analogues. As a result of testing, the scientists developed recommendations to improve the fracture toughness

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Parents need this skill for the frustrating teen years

Parents who are less able to diminish their anger are more likely to resort, over time, to the use of harsh, punitive discipline and hostile conflict behavior toward their teenagers, research finds. The field of adolescent psychology increasingly focuses on parents, with researchers asking how mothers and fathers control themselves—and their anger—in difficult interactions with their children. “D

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Reformforhandlinger skudt i gang: Hurtig og smal aftale i sigte

Onsdag bød regeringen til de første sættemøder i forhandlingerne, der skal føre til at politisk aftale om sundhedsreformen. Alt tyder på et kompakt forløb og en smal aftale med Dansk Folkeparti.

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Ny professor i neurologi skal undersøge forandringer i hjernens små blodkar

Christina Rostrup Kruuse tiltræder som ny professor i neurologi på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital. Blodprop og blødninger i hjernen bliver et fokusområde i hendes professorat.

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Advancing additive manufacturing by slashing support

3-D printing opens up design possibilities that engineers could once only dream of.

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Technology developed in Brazil will be part of the International Space Station

A new version of equipment developed in Brazil—the Solar-T—will be sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to measure solar flares. It is estimated that the sun-THz, the new photometric telescope, will be launched in 2022 on one of the missions to the ISS and will remain there to take consistent measurements.

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Someone built an electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle in 1978

Technology High voltage, 40 years ago. Holy Harley high voltage, Batman! Steve Fehr built an electric motorcycle in 1978, teaming with legendary designer Brooks Stevens. What happened to it?

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Skickliga smådjursjägare – för 45 000 år sedan.

När människan spred sig från Afrika till Europa, Mellanöstern och Asien så skedde det till stor del via öppna gräslandskap. Det berodde sannolikt på att jaktmetoderna förbättrades så att det blev lättare att jaga de stora gräsätarna som finns i dessa miljöer. Människan spred sig också via kusterna i takt med att med att vi blev bättre på att fiska. Regnskogar däremot, har betraktats som ett hinder

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Climate action helps companies build reputations and attract investors

This year, climate change topped off the agenda at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland —where every January, global leaders and the heads of the world's largest companies gather to find ways to improve the state of the world. When surveyed, experts from government, business, academia and non-governmental organizations said the failure to respond to climate change i

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Plants: How cell walls are assembled

Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how processes are coordinated that are pivotal in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. In the renowned scientific publication The EMBO Journal, they describe the tasks of certain membrane building bloc

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Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot

New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The non-native bees have established robust feral populations and currently make up 75 percent of the region's observed pollinators. Their monopoly over the most abundantly blooming plant species may strongly affect th

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Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes

The study, conducted at the Center for Mind/Brain sciences at the University of Trento, Italy, shows that small involuntary eye movements, independent of any response, can be used to determine whether one has successfully learned. This finding opens new possibilities in understanding the process of learning in populations that are less responsive to external events, such young children, or individ

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The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy

The smell of food affects physiology and aging. That is the result of research conducted on the model organism of the roundworm by a research team led by Professor Thorsten Hoppe at the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD). Surprisingly, this relationship is due to a single pair of olfactory neurons. The results have now been published in Nature Metabolism.

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Young bone marrow rejuvenates aging mouse brains, study finds

A new study has found that transplanting the bone marrow of young laboratory mice into old mice prevented cognitive decline in the old mice, preserving their memory and learning abilities. The findings support an emerging model that attributes cognitive decline, in part, to aging of blood cells, which are produced in bone marrow.

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New Gadget Detects Lifeforms From Long Distances

Upgrading SETI A new scientific instrument with the extraordinary name “TreePol spectropolarimeter” can be used to detect the presence of lifeforms from several kilometers away. And while right now the device is best used for spotting faraway plants, a high-powered version of the tool could someday serve as the most reliable means of searching for extraterrestrial life to date, according to a pre

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Beauty is in the algorithm of the beholder

Manal El Rhazi, Arsalane Zarghili, Aicha Majda, and Anissa Bouzalmat of the Intelligent Systems and Applications Laboratory at Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, in Fez, Morocco, together with Ayat Allah Oufkir of the University's Medical Center of Biomedical and Translational Research, are investigating facial beauty analysis by age and gender.

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'Origami' diagnostic device offers affordable malaria diagnoses

Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of the developing world, scientists say.

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How Documentary Now! Spoofs Male Genius

Part of the strange magic of Documentary Now! is that it’s a spoof that takes its efforts very, very seriously. The IFC series from Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, and Seth Meyers is irreverent in tone and fanatical in approach, drawing out the absurdity in classic nonfiction films such as Grey Gardens and The Thin Blue Line even as it painstakingly mimics their craft. Documentary Now! is obviously a p

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Budget‑friendly ways to get your veggie fix as prices rise

The Food Price Report 2019, released by Dalhousie University and the University of Guelph in December, suggested vegetable prices will go up by as much as six per cent this year. That's significant because, unlike meat or fish, fewer alternatives exist when it comes to replacing vegetables.

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Observing matter-wave diffraction from a periodic array of half planes

Researchers at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), in Korea, and Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, in Germany, have recently conducted a study investigating matter-wave diffraction from a periodic array of half planes. Their paper, published on Physical Review Letters (PRL), reports on the reflection and diffraction of He and D2 beams from square-wave gratin

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GraphON: Conductive coatings and materials breakthrough

Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, has created a breakthrough new form of graphitic material that's conductive, easy to apply and offers greater control over performance than graphene.

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Activating tooth regeneration in mice

Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions—how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve?—and developmental ones—which mechanisms prevent replacement teeth in a

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Activating tooth regeneration in mice

Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions—how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve?—and developmental ones—which mechanisms prevent replacement teeth in a

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Simulated ocean mesoscale structures induce air-sea interaction

Using the Community Earth System Model framework, the authors build a very high-resolution quasi-global coupled model by coupling an eddy-resolving quasi-global ocean model with a high-resolution atmospheric model. The model is successfully run for six years under present climate conditions, and the simulations are evaluated against observational and reanalysis data. The model is capable of simula

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'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D

A Japanese research team at The University of Tokyo produced a 3-D cluster molecule based on palladium. First, they created a 'butterfly-shaped' Pd4 framewok, using an organosilicon compounds bearing the aromatic substitutents as both template and support for the palladium atoms. Then, using another template, they connected two butterfly-shaped Pd4 skeleton, via chlorine, into a Pd6 cluster based

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An intricate interaction: dietary fatty acid intake influences hypertension risk

Hypertension is an important public health problem that can lead to life-threatening cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke. Here, the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension, using blood pressure measurement and a diet history questionnaire. A Kanazawa University research team found that increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids positively impac

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New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover

The ice-covered season plays an important role in the development of river channels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The spatial variability of sediment transport and differences in depositional and erosional locations increase in ice-covered conditions.

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Xeno/endobiotic metabolism potencies vary between strains and sex in rats

Rats are used commonly in nonclinical drug-development studies (DDS). Miki Nakajima and colleagues at Kanazawa University (Kanazawa, Japan) quantified hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression of uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugt) isoforms in rats. They revealed strain- and sex-based differences in expression of Ugts in rats. This study would be helpful for pharmaceutical scientists i

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The holy grail of nanowire production

EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

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Johns Hopkins researchers define cells used in bone repair

Research led by Johns Hopkins investigators has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair.

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As genetic data expand, researchers urge caution in how predictors of education outcomes are used

In a review published online today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, researchers from Stanford University and the University of Cambridge warn that — as the predictive power of genes tied to learning and educational outcomes increases and access to genetic data expands — researchers, educators, and policymakers must be cautious in how they us

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Cold-temperature variability important in evaluating climate change

New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, highlights the importance of considering cold temperature variability, and not just warming temperatures, when evaluating the impact of climate change.

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Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication

In a strategic search, Johns Hopkins scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke.

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Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus

A relatively unknown fungus, accidentally found growing on an Acacia tree in the Northern Cape, has emerged as a voracious wood-munching organism with enormous potential in industries based on renewable resources.

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Microalgae as natural detector of environmental safety

An international group of toxicologists, including experts from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), report that unicellular microalgae, the most common microorganisms on Earth and an important part of the food chain for more developed organisms, serve as an effective biomarker of environmental pollution. Microalgae quickly respond to chemical contamination of the environment by oxidative st

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Coastal communities losing ground on climate change planning, study shows

Coastal communities like Homer, Alaska, are losing ground when it comes to planning for climate change even as they're already seeing its effects, according to new research out of the University of Alberta.

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Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication

In a strategic search, Johns Hopkins scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke.

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Scientists Found a “River of Stars” Flowing Through the Milky Way

Flow On The Milky Way is home to a variety of star clusters. Most of the time, its gravity quickly pulls these clusters apart, but some clusters have enough mass to remain stuck together, and sometimes the clusters form stellar streams , which are river-like stretches of stars that orbit the galaxy. Now, researchers have identified a billion-year-old stellar stream comprising nearly 4,000 stars —

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Japan Sends Robot Into the Nuclear Hell of the Fukushima Reactor

Nuclear Probe The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) just sent a robot into one of the reactors of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was destroyed by a tsunami back in 2011. The robot made contact with the melted fuel, picking it up and putting it back down to determine whether it was solid enough to cart away during a future mission, according to Ars Technica . Image Credit: TEPCO The C

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HPV-dækningen brager i vejret

Nye tal fra Sundhedsstyrelsen viser, at 20 pct. flere piger sagde ja til HPV-vaccinen i 2018 end året før. »Det er helt vildt flot. Det kan man kun blive glad for,« lyder det fra overlæge i Sundhedsstyrelsen.

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Her er lægerne bag ny lægeprotest

Otte læger har netop sat gang i en ny underskriftindsamling for at sætte fokus på det øgede pres på det offentlige sundhedsvæsen. Se hvem de er her.

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Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus

A relatively unknown fungus, accidentally found growing on an Acacia tree in the Northern Cape, has emerged as a voracious wood-munching organism with enormous potential in industries based on renewable resources.

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SK Telecom to launch quantum gateway for self-driving car security

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Tesla's Elon Musk: Full self-driving technology nearly complete

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Amazon's 'collaborative' robots offer peek into the future

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Iceland sets whaling quotas despite falling profits

Iceland has set new quotas for its controversial minke and fin whale hunt for the next five years despite declining profits recently, a decision bound to anger environmentalists.

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UK cybersecurity chief: oversight of Huawei is working

British government oversight of Huawei has proven it can flag up security problems, the head of its cybersecurity agency said Wednesday, suggesting he doesn't think the Chinese company needs to be banned from supplying mobile networks.

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With Opportunity Lost, NASA Confronts the Tenuous Future of Mars Exploration

Following decades of continuous flights to Mars, NASA is facing a shortage of missions

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Iceland sets whaling quotas despite falling profits

Iceland has set new quotas for its controversial minke and fin whale hunt for the next five years despite declining profits recently, a decision bound to anger environmentalists.

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Large Teams and Small Ones in Science

I had a book review recently in Nature, on a new volume ( Thrifty Science ) that looks over the history of early scientific experimentation from the viewpoint of its frugal nature – the idea of reusing and repurposing equipment, objects, and even rooms in one’s house. There was indeed a lot of this sort of thing, as the book makes clear, but I wondered about one of its conclusions – which was tha

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Microsoft detects hacking targeting Europe democracy groups

A hacking group has targeted European democratic institutions including think tanks and non-profit groups ahead of highly anticipated EU parliamentary elections in May, Microsoft said.

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In new book, researchers address challenges of adopting additive manufacturing

Additive manufacturing holds promise as a speedier, less costly and more effective method to fabricate parts for a wide array of industries, from aerospace and automotive to healthcare and construction. But while the technological advances of this 3-D printing technique attract attention, executives in industry remain uncertain – even skeptical – about adopting the new technology in favor of tradi

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Plants can skip the middlemen and directly recognize disease-causing fungi

Fungal diseases collectively termed "powdery mildew" afflict a broad range of plant species, including agriculturally relevant cereals such as barley, and result in significant reductions in crop yield. Fungi that cause powdery mildew deliver so-called effector molecules inside plant cells, where they manipulate the host's physiology and immune system. In response, some plants have developed Resis

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Japan's Hayabusa 2 may finally kick-start the asteroid mining era

The turn of the decade saw a huge surge of interest in asteroid mining, but now this would-be industry has flopped. Can a tiny Japanese probe revive it?

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Rice University researchers unveil Internet of Things security feature

Rice University integrated circuit designers will present a new approach for creating secure keys and IDs on Internet of Things (IoT) devices at this week's 2019 International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco.

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Potential link between vitamin D deficiency and loss of brain plasticity

University of Queensland research may explain why vitamin D is vital for brain health, and how deficiency leads to disorders including depression and schizophrenia.Associate Professor Thomas Burne at UQ's Queensland Brain Institute led the studies, which provide the groundwork for research into better prevention and treatments.'Over a billion people worldwide are affected by vitamin D deficiency,

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Plants can skip the middlemen and directly recognize disease-causing fungi

Fungal diseases collectively termed "powdery mildew" afflict a broad range of plant species, including agriculturally relevant cereals such as barley, and result in significant reductions in crop yield. Fungi that cause powdery mildew deliver so-called effector molecules inside plant cells, where they manipulate the host's physiology and immune system. In response, some plants have developed Resis

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Russia may be forced to aim weapons at Washington, suggests Putin

‘Centres of decision making’ will be targeted if west deploys new missiles in Europe Vladimir Putin has said that Russia will develop new weapons and aim them at western “centres of decision-making” if the west deploys new short and medium-range missiles in Europe. The threat, which appears to describe Washington and other western capitals, came after the United States and then Russia suspended c

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Get Ready For Gravitational Waves All Day, Every Day

An infusion of cash is kicking off the next set of gravitational wave detectors, which will help physicists map the universe in richer detail.

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International research collaboration computes climate past, present, and future

Many of the world's largest cities are built near coasts, whether along rivers or oceans. Humanity relies on waterways for transportation, trade and sustenance. However, waterways can also unleash devastating floodwaters that lead to billions in damage, loss of life, and years-long cleanup efforts.

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Cold-temperature variability important in evaluating climate change

New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, highlights the importance of considering cold temperature variability, and not just warming temperatures, when evaluating the impact of climate change.

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Feral cat cull: Why the 2 million target is on scientifically shaky ground

The Australian government's target of killing 2 million feral cats by 2020 attracted significant public interest and media attention when it was unveiled in 2015.

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Arapuca device for international neutrino experiment is enhanced

A critical part of one of the largest recent particle physics experiments was developed in Brazil. The Arapuca is a light detector to be installed in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), a project seeking to discover new properties of neutrinos, fundamental particles with very little mass that travel at close to the speed of light.

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Shape-changing element holds key to anti-bacterial coating

A University of Canterbury research team is another step closer to developing germ-proof surface coatings for environments such as hospitals, after an unexpected development in the lab.

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Combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure

Treadmill walking for 30 minutes in the morning lowered average blood pressure over an eight-hour day among older, overweight or obese men and women. Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day.

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Apple wants to combine iOS and macOS apps by 2021

Last year at Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) 2018, the company previewed a framework that allows developers to port iOS apps to macOS. Apple itself ported the Stocks, News, Home, …

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Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to …

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Feral cat cull: Why the 2 million target is on scientifically shaky ground

The Australian government's target of killing 2 million feral cats by 2020 attracted significant public interest and media attention when it was unveiled in 2015.

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Gene therapy durably reverses congenital deafness in mice

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China sets sights on first solar power stations in space

submitted by /u/Boofing_with_Squee [link] [comments]

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5 things to know about the future U.S. demographics

Besides its decennial official count, the U.S. Census Bureau produces national population projections every few years, but these projections are not broken down by state.

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Skulle lokke bilister over i toget: Droppet infotavle kunne »skabe farlige situationer«

Et infomations-display over motorvejen ved den nye Køge Nord Station skulle friste bilister til at tage toget ind til hovedstaden i stedet for at køre i bil. Men skiltet var for farligt, bedyrer ministeren efter at have droppet det.

8h

Activating tooth regeneration in mice

Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions — how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve? — and developmental ones — which mechanisms prevent replacement t

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Despite America's protein craze, adults are still missing the mark according to new study

Research reveals more than 1 in 3 Americans 50+ aren't meeting the recommended protein intake and it's saying a lot about their diets and healthTiming matters — eating protein evenly throughout the day, and even before bedtime, can support muscles for optimal health

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Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus

The first time someone took note of Coniochaeta pulveracea was more than two hundred years ago, when the South African-born mycologist Dr Christiaan Hendrik Persoon mentioned it in his 1797 book on the classification of fungi. Now C. pulveracea has had its whole genome sequenced by microbiologists at Stellenbosch University (SU) in South Africa. All because this relatively unknown fungus has an ex

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Teen girls who donate blood have higher anemia risk

Adolescent girls who donate blood are at greater risk for iron deficiency and anemia and should take extra steps to keep their bodies’ iron stores up to recommended levels, researchers say. The researchers recommend these girls consider oral iron supplements, increase the minimum time between donations, and donate platelets or plasma instead of whole blood. “We’re not saying that eligible donors

8h

New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover

The ice‐covered season plays an important role in the development of river channels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The spatial variability of sediment transport and differences in depositional and erosional locations increase in ice‐covered conditions. The greatest erosional forces are located in the shallow sections of the river in both open‐channel and ice‐covered con

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Facebook needs regulation – here's why it should be done by algorithms

Facebook has been likened to a "digital gangster" by a critical parliamentary report into disinformation and fake news. One witness in the 18-month inquiry into the way digital platforms have transformed the flow of information describes the current use of technology as "hijacking our minds and society".

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Study shows foraging gene works nearly the same in humans and fruit flies

A team of researchers from Canada, the U.K. and the U.S. has found that a gene known to influence foraging in fruit flies has a similar effect on humans. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes experiments they carried out with college student volunteers and what they found.

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Study shows foraging gene works nearly the same in humans and fruit flies

A team of researchers from Canada, the U.K. and the U.S. has found that a gene known to influence foraging in fruit flies has a similar effect on humans. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes experiments they carried out with college student volunteers and what they found.

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Honeybees found to have rightward bias under certain circumstances

Entomologist Thomas O'Shea-Wheller with Louisiana State University has found that under certain circumstances, honeybees demonstrate a rightward bias. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters, he describes experiments he conducted with honeybees in his lab and what he found.

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Understanding the drivers of coral reef recovery: A long-term study in the Pacific

New research on reef recovery shows corals need nine to 12 years to recover following large disturbance events such as mass bleaching and storm damage.

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Honeybees found to have rightward bias under certain circumstances

Entomologist Thomas O'Shea-Wheller with Louisiana State University has found that under certain circumstances, honeybees demonstrate a rightward bias. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters, he describes experiments he conducted with honeybees in his lab and what he found.

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Understanding the drivers of coral reef recovery: A long-term study in the Pacific

New research on reef recovery shows corals need nine to 12 years to recover following large disturbance events such as mass bleaching and storm damage.

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Airbus A380: From high-tech marvel to commercial flop

This time it really is over. Airbus chief executive, Tom Enders, recently announced the end of the A380, the largest commercial aircraft ever built. Despite reported investments of more than €14 billion, this iconic European project has not been as successful as was originally hoped. With only 234 units delivered out of 313 ordered over 13 years, it is far from the break-even point – originally es

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What the Jussie Smollett Story Reveals

I was one of many people who found Jussie Smollett’s story a little off from the beginning. Two white men in ski masks are out in 10-degree weather in the middle of the night, equipped with a bottle of bleach or something like it and a rope that they fashioned into a mock noose. These thugs, who shouted Trump slogans as well as racist and homophobic slurs, seemed to know who Smollett was on sight

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Keto Diet for Neurological Disorders

Does the ketogenic diet work for epilepsy or other neurological disorders? While the consensus is that it probably does, the evidence is surprisingly thin.

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Video: The krill factor in ocean mixing

Scientists have long chalked up ocean mixing of salt, heat, nutrients and gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, to wind and tides. New research is investigating another possible contributor: krill. Mixing ocean water may seem like a big job for such a tiny creature, but krill are a force of nature when they migrate in giant swarms to feed at night.

9h

The global impact of coal power

Coal-fired power plants produce more than just carbon dioxide, which contributes to global warming. Coal burning also releases particulate matter, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and mercury—thus damaging the health of many people around the world. To estimate where action is most urgently required, the research group led by Stefanie Hellweg from ETH Zurich's Institute of Environmental Engineering

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Causal disentanglement is the next frontier in AI

Recreating the human mind's ability to infer patterns and relationships from complex events could lead to a universal model of artificial intelligence.

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Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication

In a strategic search, Johns Hopkins scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke.

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Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats, according to a report in ACS Nano. The de

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Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine

A frosty mug of beer or ruby-red glass of wine just wouldn't be the same if the liquid was murky or gritty. That's why producers of alcoholic beverages usually filter them. But in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that a material often used as a filter could be transferring heavy metals such as arsenic to beer and wine. They also found ways to

9h

How to Watch Samsung Unpacked 2019: Galaxy Phones and MoreSamsung Galaxy S10

Join us for the 10th birthday party of Samsung's Galaxy phone.

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Air purification is catching on – but it may be doing more harm than good

I recently found myself in the surreal world of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas discussing the next generation of pollution sensors that one day you might find inside your phone. The exhibits I saw suggested the next big thing in home technology could be anything from intelligent cat litters to internet-enabled teapots, with everything powered by mysterious machine learning and the unfa

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Nanopores make portable mass spectrometer for peptides a reality

University of Groningen scientists have developed nanopores to directly measure the mass of peptides. Although the resolution needs improvement, this proof of principle shows that a cheap and portable peptide mass spectrometer can be constructed using existing nanopore technology and the patented pores that were developed in the lab of University of Groningen Associate Professor of Chemical Biolog

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Shutting down the internet doesn't work—but governments keep doing it

As the internet continues to gain considerable power and agency around the world, many governments have moved to regulate it. And where regulation fails, some states resort to internet shutdowns or deliberate disruptions.

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Driverless buses will soon begin operating in Orlando

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Space-junk spear, depression drug and the EU’s digital copyright

Space-junk spear, depression drug and the EU’s digital copyright Space-junk spear, depression drug and the EU’s digital copyright, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00614-y The week in science: 15–21 February 2019.

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Gifts of Prometheus

Gifts of Prometheus Gifts of Prometheus, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00618-8 Out of the frying pan, into the fire.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Bruger man kunstig intelligens til vejrudsigten?

Hvordan beregner meteorologerne morgendagens vejr? Står de med store ligninger, eller bliver det meste smidt ind i et neuralt netværk? Det svarer ph.d.-studerende fra DMI på.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: hot air balloon riots and the man-eatingest tiger

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Predicting the existence of heavy nuclei using machine learning

A collaboration between the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Department of Statistics and Probability (STT) at Michigan State University (MSU) estimated the boundaries of nuclear existence by applying statistical analysis to nuclear models, and assessed the impact of current and future FRIB experiments.

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Israel to launch first privately funded moon mission

Attempt to become fourth country to send spacecraft to the surface blasts off this week A team of Israeli scientists is to launch what will be the first privately funded mission to land on the moon this week, sending a spacecraft to collect data from the lunar surface. Named Beresheet, the Hebrew word for Genesis, the 585kg (1,290lb) robotic lander will blast off from Florida at 01.45 GMT on Frid

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Hunt closes in on source of heavy metals in beer and wine

Filtration material linked to arsenic, lead and cadmium contamination. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Inducing TB to kill itself

Cell study suggests new way to tackle killer disease.

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Your new daily fix: the Martian weather forecast

NASA makes the InSight lander's meteorological data freely available. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine

A frosty mug of beer or ruby-red glass of wine just wouldn't be the same if the liquid was murky or gritty. That's why producers of alcoholic beverages usually filter them. But in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that a material often used as a filter could be transferring heavy metals such as arsenic to beer and wine. They also found ways to

9h

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats, according to a report in ACS Nano. The de

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Image of the Day: Under the Illusion

The same group of neurons encode both actual motion and movement perceived in an optical illusion, according to a study on macaques.

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Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth

A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilised while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the University …

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Google expected to unveil long-expected gaming project at GDC next month

Google could be ready to dive headlong into video games.

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Studying ant cooperation is revealing how brains work together

As a child, you almost certainly at one stage spent hours watching ants move about from their nest. Maybe you dropped a piece of food and watched as a group of ants came and picked it up, carrying it home in an impressive display of cooperation.

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The moon's water: Where did it come from – and where did it all go?

Fragments of moon rock brought back from the lunar surface by astronauts on the Apollo space missions are providing new insights about where our planet's life-giving water came from.

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Studying ant cooperation is revealing how brains work together

As a child, you almost certainly at one stage spent hours watching ants move about from their nest. Maybe you dropped a piece of food and watched as a group of ants came and picked it up, carrying it home in an impressive display of cooperation.

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Author Correction: El Niño–Southern Oscillation complexity

Author Correction: El Niño–Southern Oscillation complexity Author Correction: El Niño–Southern Oscillation complexity, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0994-9 Author Correction: El Niño–Southern Oscillation complexity

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Opinions requested: the role of hydrogen in the future?

Hydrogen can be used * As a way to store energy (eg. excess electric energy) but so can batteries. * To propel cars with a combustion engine or fuel cell, but so can batteries. * Maybe in avionics? It seems hydrogen is a clean tech that can do many things (but so can other techs), so will it be important in the future you think? submitted by /u/Possjulian [link] [comments]

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A 30 minute walk may reduce blood pressure by as much as medication

Walking 30 minutes on a treadmill in the morning reduced blood pressure for people for the rest of the day by as much as taking medication

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Ocean acidification harms cod larvae more than previously thought

Next to rising temperatures and dwindling oxygen concentrations, acidification is one of the major threats to marine life due to the changing global climate. Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are rising and the ocean therefore takes up increasing amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere, as well. The reaction of carbon dioxide with the water forms carbonic acid, the pH is lowered—the ocean

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Steam store dumps movies, TV shows as Valve refocuses on gaming – CNET

People just weren't watching the other videos, the company says.

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Japan Just Shot a Fake Asteroid with a Space Bullet … for Science

Say you need to prepare to shoot bullets into an asteroid and suck up the debris kicked up from the blast, then tuck it away for safekeeping.

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Research rethinks tutorial teaching

Professors and graduate students are at opposite ends of the university hierarchy in terms of experience, qualifications and pay. But at many universities, both do the same job: they teach tutorials offered in parallel with lectures.

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Scientists identify atomic structure of catalytically active copper-ceria interface

Recently, Dr. Zhou Yan and Prof. Shen Wenjie at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators identified the atomic structure of the catalytically active copper-ceria interface and proposed a copper bilayer model. Their findings were published in Nature Catalysis.

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Polymer twin: New implant imitates bone structure

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology (MISIS) developed a unique hybrid bone implant, the core of which is made of porous ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, and the shell is made of polyetheretherketone. Thanks to the combination of the unique properties of the two polymers, it was possible to create an implant that imitates the bone structure and is additionally

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Introduced daisy changes its appearance on Australian beaches, defying evolutionary expectations

In less than a century since it was introduced to Australia, the South African beach daisy has drastically changed its appearance – a clear and unusual example of rapid evolution in plants, a new study led by UNSW scientists has shown.

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The monkey hunters: Humans colonized South Asian rainforest by hunting primates

A multidisciplinary study has found evidence for humans hunting small mammals in the forests of Sri Lanka at least 45,000 years ago. The researchers discovered the remains of small mammals, including primates, with evidence of cut marks and burning at the oldest archaeological site occupied by humans in Sri Lanka, alongside sophisticated bone and stone tools. The hunting of such animals is an exam

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Space behaviour

Europe's Columbus laboratory enters its eleventh year in space with steady operations, a few upgrades and several experiments in full swing.

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Introduced daisy changes its appearance on Australian beaches, defying evolutionary expectations

In less than a century since it was introduced to Australia, the South African beach daisy has drastically changed its appearance – a clear and unusual example of rapid evolution in plants, a new study led by UNSW scientists has shown.

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Forest fires as an opportunity for ecosystem recovery

Large forest fires occur with increasing frequency globally, and their consequences grow more severe and destructive. Climate change and human activity are influencing the capacity of ecosystems and the life forms that inhabit them to recover from forest fires. However, the actions to recover the affected environment can be an opportunity to recover lost natural values.

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Polymer twin: New implant imitates bone structure

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology (MISIS) developed a unique hybrid bone implant, the core of which is made of porous ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, and the shell is made of polyetheretherketone. Thanks to the combination of the unique properties of the two polymers, it was possible to create an implant that imitates the bone structure and is additionally

10h

The Value of Tinkering

It helped develop Stephen Hawking's creativity, and we should encourage it in our children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Renewable energy generation with kites and drones

Airborne Wind Energy Systems (AWES) are a new kind of technology to harvest wind energy. The expensive and heavy tower and rotor of a conventional wind turbine are replaced by a light tether and an aircraft (flexible giant kites or large drones), respectively. In the so-called ground generation scheme, AWES use the tension force of the tether to move an electrical generator on the ground whereas,

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How evolutionary theory guides policy

How evolutionary theory guides policy How evolutionary theory guides policy, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00605-z Monique Borgerhoff Mulder welcomes a study on Darwinian solutions to social issues.

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When Kids Realize Their Whole Life Is Already Online

Updated at 4:53 p.m. on February 20, 2019. For several months, Cara has been working up the courage to approach her mom about what she saw on Instagram. Not long ago, the 11-year-old—who, like all the other kids in this story, is referred to by a pseudonym—discovered that her mom had been posting photos of her, without prior approval, for much of her life. “I’ve wanted to bring it up. It’s weird

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Travelers use hotels' loyalty programs to get instant perks and rewards

Many travellers are members of multiple loyalty programmes, and the role of these programmes is often insignificant when choosing between different hotels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Tourists use loyalty programmes when it's convenient and when they offer instant perks and rewards. The findings were reported in Tourism Management.

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Can a flowing liquid-like material maintain its structural order like crystals?

Studying the crystalline structures of organic materials has enabled significant advances in both technology and the scientific understanding of the material world. Recently, a research team from Tokyo Tech, including Professor Takanori Fukushima, developed a new organic material with surprising and unprecedented properties.

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New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids

Is evolution predictable? What are the mechanisms that allow different fish to respond to the same environmental challenge in slightly different ways? When the same jaw bones and muscles change to produce the same feeding behaviour, are the morphologies of these fish that evolved independently from one another modified in an identical way? What is the genetic basis for this kind of convergence? Th

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Physics explains how pollen gets its stunning diversity of shapes

These varied pollen patterns can all be explained by one simple trick of physics.

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Boxed in: The Struggles of Gaza’s Technology Entrepreneurs

For information technology entrepreneurs in Gaza — whose livelihoods depend on contact with the outside world — tight restrictions on foreign travel, frequent electricity outages, and curbs on equipment imports present daily challenges to the building of this robust new industry.

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The clitoris is a gift, so why is there an ingrained fear of talking about it? | Lucy McCormick

If we want to make progress with FGM, we need to first tackle our outdated, misogynistic views on sex The first UK conviction for female genital mutilation (FGM) this month was a milestone in the fight for the basic human rights of women and girls. But one of the things that stands out from the news reports of that case is how oddly furtive they were about communicating the key facts – in particu

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China sets sights on first solar power stations in space

China sets sights on first solar power stations in space China sets sights on first solar power stations in space, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00629-5 The country has a plan to overcome the challenges experienced by other nations.

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First private Moon lander heralds new lunar space race

First private Moon lander heralds new lunar space race First private Moon lander heralds new lunar space race, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00634-8 An Israeli firm is sending a privately built craft to the Moon — and leading a fresh era of exploration.

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New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids

Is evolution predictable? What are the mechanisms that allow different fish to respond to the same environmental challenge in slightly different ways? When the same jaw bones and muscles change to produce the same feeding behaviour, are the morphologies of these fish that evolved independently from one another modified in an identical way? What is the genetic basis for this kind of convergence? Th

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China Will Likely Corner the 5G Market—and the US Has No Plan

China is on track to deploy high-capacity fiber-optic cable across much of Eurasia and lock out American companies. The US sorely needs a way to compete.

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Your Boring, Everyday Life Belongs on Social Media

Dull tours of supermarkets and mundane shots on YouTube and Instagram are warm and relatable—and also push back against the envy industry.

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Boaty McBoatface Gears Up for Epic Swim Across the Arctic

The probe with the famous name may soon have a new claim to fame, by crossing the Arctic Ocean on the longest underwater robot journey yet.

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The Value of Tinkering

It helped develop Stephen Hawking's creativity, and we should encourage it in our children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Signs Directive to Create a Military Space Force

The Space Force just took a big step from sci-fi-sounding dream toward reality.

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Microsoft detects hacking targeting Europe democracy groups

A hacking group has targeted European democratic institutions including think tanks and non-profit groups ahead of highly anticipated EU parliamentary elections in May, Microsoft said.

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Isotopes found in bones suggest Neanderthals were fresh meat eaters

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests at least some Neanderthals were mainly fresh meat eaters. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy …

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Ansatte i almen praksis er gladere for jobbet end hospitalskolleger

Sygeplejersker og bioanalytikere i almen praksis giver overordnet udtryk for et bedre psykisk arbejdsmiljø end tilfældet er hos ansatte i hospitalssektoren og kvinder på arbejdsmarkedet generelt. Det viser en ny arbejdsmiljøundersøgelse.

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Should We Kill Off Disease-Causing Pests? Not So Fast

Eradicating harmful species may have unintended consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Should We Kill Off Disease-Causing Pests? Not So Fast

Eradicating harmful species may have unintended consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Do So Many Americans Now Support Legalizing Marijuana?

Here's why public opinion has changed dramatically in favor of pot legalization.

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LED-lys på vejene kan spare 2.000 ton CO2 om året

LED-belysning på statsvejene vil nedbarbere energiforbruget med over 70 procent, viser beregninger fra Vejdirektoratet.

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Should We Kill Off Disease-Causing Pests? Not So Fast

Eradicating harmful species may have unintended consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Varning för hajp om ungt blod

På senare år har forskare runt om i världen rapporterat att gamla möss som får ungt blod i sina ådror bland annat blir starkare, får bättre platsminne och känsligare luktsinne. Det har skapat en ny marknad. Privata kliniker och företag i USA erbjuder transfusioner av blod och blodplasma från unga donatorer mot sjukdomar som demens, Parkinsons sjukdom, multipel skleros, Alzheimers sjukdom, hjärt- k

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'Super snow moon' lights up the skies

The biggest and brightest supermoon of 2019 was observed around the world.

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Xiaomi Mi 9 Smartphone Launches Packing Snapdragon 855 Starting At $445

As older devices age, many smartphone shoppers are simply forgoing the big boys like Apple and Samsung and going for much cheaper alternative flagship devices from reasonably priced makers …

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Are we on the road to civilisation collapse?

submitted by /u/calimani77 [link] [comments]

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Udlandet har kun gode erfaringer med fysioterapi uden henvisning

Flere europæiske lande har indført fysioterapi uden henvisning, og der er lutter gode erfaringer at hente, mens danske lægers frygt bliver gjort til skamme.

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A new model for disease research in Africa

A new model for disease research in Africa A new model for disease research in Africa, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00612-0 Locally led studies on public health are good for the continent and the globe. Scientists, politicians and funders should support it.

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This Nigerian doctor might just prevent the next deadly pandemic

This Nigerian doctor might just prevent the next deadly pandemic This Nigerian doctor might just prevent the next deadly pandemic, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00615-x As leader of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control, Chikwe Ihekweazu works to protect the nation — and the world — from devastating outbreaks.

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Iværksættere med vild påstand: Vi kan lade en elbil på 5 minutter

PLUS. Det behøver ikke at tage mere end fem minutter at lade en elbiler, påstår selskabet GBatteries, som vil bruge algoritmer til at nå sit spektakulære mål. Eksperter er skeptiske.

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The Virginia Democrats’ Warring Factions

Last week, the drama in Richmond entered a new act. Protesters converged on the Virginia governor’s mansion on Wednesday, carrying Ralph Must Resign signs. The crowd wasn’t composed of the Republicans who have opposed Ralph Northam’s agenda as governor or his recent comments in support of a new bill protecting access to abortion, but from many of the very people responsible for Northam’s election

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The Lessons Southern Baptists Need to Learn

America’s largest Protestant denomination has seen better days. Last week, an investigation of the Southern Baptist Convention by the Houston Chronicle and San Antonio Express-News reported more than 700 cases of sexual abuse perpetrated by nearly 400 church leaders going back to 1998. After being accused, many perpetrators found new congregations where they could repeat their offenses against ne

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How health care quietly powers the U.S. economy

There is enormous job growth happening in the health care sector. It added 346,000 new jobs in 2018, outpacing every other sector. Hospitals economically sustain large communities not only through medical care but through ancillary industries such as construction, laundry, maintenance and food service jobs. Hospitals are a silent but mighty economic engine. Closing down hospitals rather than revi

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Journal retracts more than 400 papers at once

Ladies and gentlemen, we appear to have a new record. The Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences (JFAS) recently retracted 434 articles from three issues of their journal. Yes, 434, giving it more retractions than any other journal ever, according to our records. All of the articles, on topics ranging from “Effect of olive leaf … Continue reading Journal retracts more than 400 papers at once

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Nordic Medicare overtager klinik i Midtjylland

Nordic Medicare er blevet valgt til at overtage driften af Lægehuset i Bøvlingbjerg fra 1. maj og i mindst tre år frem.

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Orthobunyavirus spike architecture and recognition by neutralizing antibodies

Orthobunyavirus spike architecture and recognition by neutralizing antibodies Orthobunyavirus spike architecture and recognition by neutralizing antibodies, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08832-8 Orthobunyaviruses (OBVs) cause severe disease in humans and farm animals, but the molecular basis for infection is not fully understood. Here, the authors present crystal stru

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Targeting MC1R depalmitoylation to prevent melanomagenesis in redheads

Targeting MC1R depalmitoylation to prevent melanomagenesis in redheads Targeting MC1R depalmitoylation to prevent melanomagenesis in redheads, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08691-3 Melanocortin-1 receptor is a palmitoylated protein and variants of the receptor are associated with red hair colour and susceptibility to melanoma. Here, the authors describe a method to en

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Low temperature self-densification of high strength bulk hexagonal boron nitride

Low temperature self-densification of high strength bulk hexagonal boron nitride Low temperature self-densification of high strength bulk hexagonal boron nitride, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08580-9 Sintering hexagonal boron nitride until it is more than 96% dense remains a challenge. Here, the authors mix cubic boron nitride particles into hexagonal boron nitride f

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Integrated systems approach defines the antiviral pathways conferring protection by the RV144 HIV vaccine

Integrated systems approach defines the antiviral pathways conferring protection by the RV144 HIV vaccine Integrated systems approach defines the antiviral pathways conferring protection by the RV144 HIV vaccine, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08854-2 The RV144 vaccine trial showed reduced risk of HIV-1 acquisition, but mechanisms underlying protection are poorly under

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Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination

Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3 Immune activation induces long-term alterations of setpoints, impacting responses to subsequent unrelated stimuli. Here the authors show that volunteers vaccinated with BCG respond to controlle

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Additively manufacturable micro-mechanical logic gates

Additively manufacturable micro-mechanical logic gates Additively manufacturable micro-mechanical logic gates, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08678-0 Mechanical computing based on the logic devices that utilize mechanical energy can be an alternative to conventional electronic computing. Here, Song et al. show a micromechanical logic gate, fabricated using multi-stable

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Making silver a stronger n-dopant than cesium via in situ coordination reaction for organic electronics

Making silver a stronger n-dopant than cesium via in situ coordination reaction for organic electronics Making silver a stronger n-dopant than cesium via in situ coordination reaction for organic electronics, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08821-x Controlled doping of organic semiconductors is required to enhance charge injection in organic electronics, but the lack of

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Fundamental aspects to localize self-catalyzed III-V nanowires on silicon

Fundamental aspects to localize self-catalyzed III-V nanowires on silicon Fundamental aspects to localize self-catalyzed III-V nanowires on silicon, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08807-9 The ability to place perfectly aligned vertical nanowires at chosen positions on a silicon substrate is an important challenge in device fabrication. Here, the authors propose a mecha

11h

Goodnight, Opportunity: So Long, and Thanks for All the Geology!

RIP Oppy (January 25, 2004–June 10, 2018) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Svensk datalæk: 2,7 mio. lydfiler fra patientopkald til sundhedstelefon har ligget frit tilgængeligt

170.000 timers optagelser med patientsamtaler har ligget på en ubeskyttet server.

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SWITL picks up sauce without changing its shape

submitted by /u/Firegoat3000 [link] [comments]

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Smart and fluffy storytelling robot to be trialled in US classrooms

Tega is a cute, fluffy robot that appears to boost language skills in young children. Soon it will be trialled in a dozen classrooms in the US

11h

Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth

A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary,' has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the University of Nottingham.

12h

Researchers peer inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form

Study lays the ground for uncovering the molecular basis of memory blocking that has baffled scientists for decades.

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Combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure in older overweight/obese adults, especially in women

Treadmill walking for 30 minutes in the morning lowered average blood pressure over an eight-hour day among older, overweight or obese men and women.Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day.

12h

Want to learn about dinosaurs? Pick up some Louisiana roadkill

Fossil-hunting can be grueling, but it's usually not gross. Paleontologists typically work with things that have been dead for millions of years, mineralized into rock and no longer smelly. At the end of a day in the field, the researchers just have to dust themselves off and wash muddy boots and sweaty clothes. But for a new study delving into the ecosystems that dinosaurs lived in, a team of pal

12h

A variety of hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures catalyse cathodic reactions

A variety of hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures catalyse cathodic reactions A variety of hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures catalyse cathodic reactions, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38006-3 A variety of hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures catalyse cathodic reactions

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A critical evaluation of TRPA1-mediated locomotor behavior in zebrafish as a screening tool for novel anti-nociceptive drug discovery

A critical evaluation of TRPA1-mediated locomotor behavior in zebrafish as a screening tool for novel anti-nociceptive drug discovery A critical evaluation of TRPA1-mediated locomotor behavior in zebrafish as a screening tool for novel anti-nociceptive drug discovery, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38852-9 A critical evaluation of TRPA1-mediated locomotor behavior in z

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Hydrophilic Quantum Dots Functionalized with Gd(III)-DO3A Monoamide Chelates as Bright and Effective T1-weighted Bimodal Nanoprobes

Hydrophilic Quantum Dots Functionalized with Gd(III)-DO3A Monoamide Chelates as Bright and Effective T 1 -weighted Bimodal Nanoprobes Hydrophilic Quantum Dots Functionalized with Gd(III)-DO3A Monoamide Chelates as Bright and Effective T 1 -weighted Bimodal Nanoprobes, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38772-8 Hydrophilic Quantum Dots Functionalized with Gd(III)-DO3A Monoa

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A novel benzamine lead compound of histone deacetylase inhibitor ZINC24469384 can suppresses HepG2 cells proliferation by upregulating NR1H4

A novel benzamine lead compound of histone deacetylase inhibitor ZINC24469384 can suppresses HepG2 cells proliferation by upregulating NR1H4 A novel benzamine lead compound of histone deacetylase inhibitor ZINC24469384 can suppresses HepG2 cells proliferation by upregulating NR1H4, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39487-6 A novel benzamine lead compound of histone deacet

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Strategic Eye Movements are Used to Support Object Authentication

Strategic Eye Movements are Used to Support Object Authentication Strategic Eye Movements are Used to Support Object Authentication, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38824-z Strategic Eye Movements are Used to Support Object Authentication

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A PKA/cdc42 Signaling Axis Restricts Angiogenic Sprouting by Regulating Podosome Rosette Biogenesis and Matrix Remodeling

A PKA/cdc42 Signaling Axis Restricts Angiogenic Sprouting by Regulating Podosome Rosette Biogenesis and Matrix Remodeling A PKA/cdc42 Signaling Axis Restricts Angiogenic Sprouting by Regulating Podosome Rosette Biogenesis and Matrix Remodeling, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37805-y A PKA/cdc42 Signaling Axis Restricts Angiogenic Sprouting by Regulating Podosome Rosett

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Automated behavioural analysis reveals the basic behavioural repertoire of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis

Automated behavioural analysis reveals the basic behavioural repertoire of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis Automated behavioural analysis reveals the basic behavioural repertoire of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis , Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38791-5 Automated behavioural analysis reveals the basic behavioural repertoire of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis

12h

LiFi nærmer sig: Snart kan mobiltelefonen sende data med lys

Engelske PureLifi er klar med et mobilt modem, der kan sende data med en hastighed på en gigabit i sekundet ved hjælp af lys.

12h

Measles Outbreak: Your Questions Answered

The disease was declared eliminated in 2000. So far this year, there have been more than 100 cases.

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Classify viruses — the gain is worth the pain

Classify viruses — the gain is worth the pain Classify viruses — the gain is worth the pain, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00599-8 Viruses hold solutions to a lot of problems, so let’s fund and reward cataloguing, urge Jens H. Kuhn and colleagues.

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Researchers peer inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form

Try as you might, some events cannot be remembered. Known in psychology as memory blocking, the phenomenon has remained elusive since first described more than half a century ago. Now Donnelly Centre researchers have found that blocking is not due to problems with forming memories, as previously thought, but with memory recall—in worms at least.

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Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

The insects were created, using CRISPR, to carry a powerful "gene drive." The mosquitoes could provide a potent weapon against malaria, but they raise fears about unpredictable environmental effects. (Image credit: Pierre Kattar for NPR)

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Researchers peer inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form

Try as you might, some events cannot be remembered. Known in psychology as memory blocking, the phenomenon has remained elusive since first described more than half a century ago. Now Donnelly Centre researchers have found that blocking is not due to problems with forming memories, as previously thought, but with memory recall—in worms at least.

12h

Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth

A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilised while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the University of Nottingham.

12h

Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth

A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilised while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the University of Nottingham.

12h

Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete

A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tyres has been successfully tested by researchers at the University of Sheffield.

12h

Nyt våben mod kopivarer: Tjek med mobilen om din vare er falsk

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har opfundet et kemisk fingeraftryk, der med en app på…

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Frozen arias for the Anthropocene epoch

Frozen arias for the Anthropocene epoch Frozen arias for the Anthropocene epoch, Published online: 20 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00640-w A new opera grapples with the impacts of climate change. Patrick Goymer reviews it.

12h

coma is a state of the unconscious of a brain.

submitted by /u/RIANCOPPER5599 [link] [comments]

12h

Bästa träningen är den som blir av

Nytt år och nya löften. Januari är den månad då flest gymkort säljs och många önskar sig en nystart och ett mer aktivt liv. För att löftet ska hålla i sig är det inte bara beach 2019 som gäller, utan det är viktigt att hitta en träningsform som är rolig och som man vill fortsätta med. Men vilken träning är bäst? Och kan man bromsa åldrandet genom att träna?

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'Brexit gap' over wildlife protection is looming

Eighty per cent of Wales' environmental laws are tied to the EU and must be replaced, charities warn.

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Succesfuldt samarbejde styrker rekrutteringen af læger til Region Sjælland

De medicinstuderende på Københavns Universitet har taget godt imod det nye spor på…

13h

Siemens og Grundfos deler algoritmer og digital platform

PLUS. Hvis man skal have fuldt udbytte af nye digitale teknologier, er maskinbyggere og leverandører nødt til at dele data og algoritmer åbent, lyder det fra to leverandører, der arbejder sammen i nyt slagteriprojekt.

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Fouled waters reveal lasting legacy of US mining industry

Every day many millions of gallons of water loaded with arsenic, lead and other toxic metals flow from some of the most contaminated mining sites in the U.S. and into surrounding lakes and streams without being treated, The Associated Press has found.

13h

Samsung bends over backwards to rev smartphone desire

Samsung on Wednesday is expected to unveil new flagship smartphones including one with a screen that can fold closed like a book as it seeks to boost the moribund market.

13h

App-based delivery men highlight India's growing gig economy

Suraj Nachre works long hours and regularly misses meals but he treasures his job as a driver for a food delivery startup—working in a booming industry that highlights India's expanding apps-based gig-economy.

13h

Så såg Stockholm ut för 11 000 år sedan

Kaknästornet på Gärdet är 155 meter högt och Stockholm högsta byggnad. Men för 11 000 år sedan hade marken runt omkring varit sjöbotten – och vattenytan hade gått vid restaurangen i tornets topp. Spela klippet ovan för att se hur Stockholm såg ut för 11 000 år sedan då inlandsisen täckte stora delar av Sverige.

13h

Air France-KLM more than doubles profits in 2018 despite strikes

Air France-KLM, which was badly hit last year by strikes and management upheaval, reported on Wednesday that its annual net profits rose by 150 percent to 409 million euros ($463 million).

13h

Trump signs 'Space Force' directive

President Donald Trump signed an order Tuesday outlining his vision for a new "Space Force" that could one day become a separate military branch on an equal footing to the Army and Navy.

13h

Northern Red Sea coral reefs may survive a hot, grim future

As the outlook for coral reefs across a warming planet grows grimmer, scientists in Israel have discovered a rare glimmer of hope: The corals of the northern Red Sea may survive, and even thrive, into the next century.

13h

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

14h

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene

A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene. The research is published February 19th in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Mic

14h

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene

A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene. The research is published February 19th in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Mic

14h

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

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Citroen builds boxy EV concept for the cities of the future

Much is unknown about how our cities will look in the future, but current indication is that they'll likely be a lot more crowded than they are now, which calls for some creative ideas …

15h

Space Force will be a Marines-like branch under Air Force authority

submitted by /u/sidcool1234 [link] [comments]

15h

Kovending: Fujitsu kan alligevel løse »uoverkommelige« udfordringer med EFI-afløser

Et økonomisystem fra Fujitsu, der bruges i flere af landets kommuner, kunne i 2017 ikke leve op til de datakrav, som følger med regeringens nye it-system til at kradse gæld ind. Fujitsu har tidligere meddelt, at det ikke kan lade sig gøre at ændre systemet, men nu er situationen en anden.

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How close are we to speech models that are virtually indifferentiable from human voice?

Amazon Polly is decent, but nowhere near natural human voice and Google Cloud has their speech model which is marginally better, but still quite a ways away from being indifferentiable. Are there other projects or APIs in the works that are significant improvements on Polly and Google's? submitted by /u/actualsnek [link] [comments]

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Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care

Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients.

16h

MIT Scientists Are Making Flexible Superhero Body Armor Inspired By… Lobsters

It's worked for the crustaceans for more than 100 million years.

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Samsung unveils robotic arm that will assist in cooking in the kitchen | ZDNet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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What Robots Mean for the Future of American Manufacturing

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Cervical cancer could be eliminated in most countries by 2100 – research

Millions of cases could be prevented with high HPV vaccine and screening coverage Cervical cancer could be effectively eliminated in most countries around the world by the end of the 21st century, according to research. The HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccine, which protects against the virus that causes most cases, has dramatically reduced incidences of cervical cancer wherever uptake has been h

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Storstilet klimaløsning: Forsker vil plante 1.200 milliarder CO2-sugende træer

Både en schweizisk forsker og Australiens premierminister har netop fremlagt ideer om at plante massevis af træer for at suge CO2 ud af atmosfæren.

16h

New method identifies which asthma patients respond to systemic corticosteroids

Physicians will be able to predict which of their patients with severe asthma are likely to benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids — and which might only suffer their side effects — with help from a dozen clinical variables researchers have identified using machine learning techniques, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

17h

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

17h

Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being.

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Can free-cash handouts help society? | The Economist

submitted by /u/imcoolifyourcool [link] [comments]

17h

Down on the farm — with robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Curious Kids: are robots smarter than humans?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Damp skal drive små sonder frem i rummet

PLUS. Amerikansk forsker og virksomhed har udviklet og testet en prototype på et rumfartøj, som suger vand fra kilder i universet og bruger det til fremdrift.

17h

”Vit dvärg” med mystiska ringar hittad

En medborgarforskare i Tyskland har hittat den kallaste och äldsta vita dvärgstjärna som människan hittills skådat, rapporterar Nasa. Konstigt nog är den omgiven av ringar.

17h

Space travel edges closer at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum

It is still the final frontier, but space travel has come a little closer to the public at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum.

18h

Out of the Way, Human! Delivery Robots Want a Share of Your Sidewalk

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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