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nyheder2019februar21

Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age

In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes and dogs were domesticated, as their diet was similar to that of their owners.

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Forskere løser mysteriet om zebraens striber

Zebraens striber forvirrer fluerne. Det viser forsøg med udklædte heste og avanceret videoteknik.

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Why a Japanese spacecraft is firing a bullet into an asteroid

Space And that’s actually not the craziest thing in store for this mission. About 180 million miles from Earth lies a tiny asteroid called Ryugu, with a diameter of a little less than 1 kilometer, orbiting the sun about once every 16 months. If…

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China Unveils the World’s First Female AI News Anchor

A New Woman On Tuesday, China’s state-run news outlet Xinhua announced the latest addition to its news team: Xin Xiaomeng. But Xin never went to journalism school — or any school — because “she” is not a real person. Instead, she’s an artificial intelligence created by Xinhua and search engine Sogou — making her the world’s first female AI news anchor. Two Sessions, Three AIs Xin will make her pr

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All the news and trailers for Jordan Peele’s Twilight Zone reboot

Coming to CBS All Access Continue reading…

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Reggie Fils-Aime, Famous Black Nintendo of America President, Retires This April

The video game industry still has a lot of issues when it comes to making the public actually aware of who it is that makes the products we all enjoy. The visible faces […] The post Reggie …

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Studies promising for sensory feedback for hand prostheses

(HealthDay)—By triggering sensory stimulation, transradial amputees are able to regain proprioception; and a slippage simulation strategy can detect slipping in a patient with hand amputation, …

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Design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials

A new article outlines novel design guidance that could rapidly advance development of disease-sensing nanomaterials for use in new drug development.

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Phantom limb sensation explained

After a limb amputation, brain areas responsible for movement and sensation alter their functional communication. This is the conclusion of a new study. The findings may help to understand why some patients report phantom sensations and others do not.

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Smartphones help researcher better understand the nature of depression and anxiety

A psychologist's research using smartphones is providing valuable data in real time, information that could provide treatment benefits for patients struggling with anxiety and depression.

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In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders

Researchers have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time.

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Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form

How do fruit flies grow their wings? Scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. Even when scientists manipulate cells to change how they divide, the shape of a fruit fly's wing remains the same. The discovery changes the scientific understanding of how organs form.

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Sun Protection to patients with rare genetic disease

Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research.

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Scientists uncover how high-fat diet drives colorectal cancer growth

A new study suggests that high-fat diets fuel colorectal cancer growth by upsetting the balance of bile acids in the intestine and triggering a hormonal signal that lets potentially cancerous cells thrive. The findings could explain why colorectal cancer, which can take decades to develop, is being seen in younger people growing up at a time when higher-fat diets are common.

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Handwriting: The foodie font of love

For restaurants, conveying a sense of love could be as simple as picking a different menu font. A recent study found that when restaurant diners read healthy food options printed on the menu in a typeface that appears handwritten, they were more likely to believe that the menu options were better for their bodies, made of better ingredients, and prepared with more care than healthy menu items prin

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WVU researcher explores what tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common

West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp. His findings are published in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

The development of a simply made and easy-to-use planting device could make growing important herbs and beneficial insect-attracting plants significantly more efficient and effective. The low-cost tool, known as the Slide Hammer Seeder (a jab-style seeder), gives farmers and gardeners specific control in sowing plants with very small seeds.

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With nanopore sensing, VCU physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles

Researchers in Virginia Commonwealth University's Department of Physics have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters, or extremely small chunks of matter that are bigger than a molecule but smaller than a solid.

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Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment

Biology at the center of last year’s contentious gene-edited twins result may hold other benefits for brain injury — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mark Zuckerberg Insists That Facebook Promotes Privacy

Zuck Stop Mark Zuckerberg wants everyone to know that Facebook truly values privacy. So much so, he says, that it practically invented the whole concept! At least, that was Zuckerberg’s message during a conversation with Jonathan Zittrain, a law professor at Harvard, reports CNBC . So Close “Thinking about Facebook as an innovator in privacy is certainly not the mainstream view,” said Zuckerberg

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NASA Lander Now Provides Daily Martian Weather Reports

Weather Report The temperature at Mars’ Elysium Planitia has hovered around a bracing -80 degrees Fahrenheit (-17 degrees Celsius) for the past week, occasionally spiking to a high of 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-10 degrees Celsius). At least, that’s according to a new NASA website that beams data on Martian weather from the space agency’s InSight lander on the Red Planet straight to your web browser

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This is why microwaved grapes produce flashes of plasma

Two grape halves heated in a microwave produce light-emitting ionized gas, or plasma. The grapes collect and trap microwaves whose energy eventually bursts outward. The discovery could lead to passive microwave antennas. None One of the internet's favorite mysteries has been what happens to an everyday grape nearly split in halves and put in a microwave: After about five seconds the grape produce

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Decades ago, ecstasy — yes, MDMA — was used in marriage counseling

For the first decade after it was synthesized, MDMA was used in individual and couples therapy. Many therapists spoke against the criminalization of MDMA in 1985 due to the drug's therapeutic potential. A revival has occurred in recent years, with the government allowing clinical trials to move forward. None Before the second "M" was affixed to "MDA," researchers spent decades searching for a uti

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HTC Goes All-In on Easy-to-Use VR, But Not For Everyone

Ahead of Mobile World Congress, the company announces the Focus Plus—a new VR headset aimed squarely at the enterprise market.

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NASA’s New Deep-Sea Submarine Could Eventually Look for Aliens

The Hadal Zone Thousands of feet below the surface of Earth’s ocean lies a vast habitat of strange-looking fish, giant jellies, and microscopic animals. To this day, the “hadal zone” — 3.7-6.8 miles (6,000-11,000 meters) below the surface — remains largely unexplored. But thanks to NASA and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the world’s leading non-profit dedicated to exploring our

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Why is this horse dressed like a zebra?

Researchers from the University of Bristol have found a novel way of keeping flies away from horses.

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Scientists Have Created Synthetic DNA with 4 Extra Letters

Will scientists ever be able to create 'better' DNA in the lab than evolution did in nature?

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Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment

Biology at the center of last year’s contentious gene-edited twins result may hold other benefits for brain injury — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment

Biology at the center of last year’s contentious gene-edited twins result may hold other benefits for brain injury — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New in the Hastings Center Report, January-February 2019

Social media as a bioethics issue: several articles examine concerns raised by integrating social media platforms and artificial intelligence into medical practice, research, and public health.

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Radio Atlantic: State of Emergency

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Last week, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency to get funding for his wall. The act gave him the elevated power to move money around, but it was immediately met with lawsuits from 16 states . What exactly is a national emergency? Why is this one different? And just how far do a president’s emergency p

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Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment

Biology at the center of last year’s contentious gene-edited twins result may hold other benefits for brain injury — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How bird feather patterns form

According to a new study, the precise patterning of bird feathers relies on signaling through ectodysplasin (EDA) and its receptor EDAR — the same signaling pathway known to be crucial for the formation of hair follicles, teeth and scales in fish, lizards and mammals.

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Electric car batteries inspire safer, cheaper way to make compounds used in medicines

Inspired by the refined electrochemistry of electric car batteries, scientists have developed a battery-like system that allows them to make potential advancements for the manufacturing of medicines. Their new method avoids safety risks associated with a type of chemical reaction known as dissolving metal reduction. Their method would offer significant advantages over current methods of chemical m

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In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders

While the "wisdom of the crowd" shapes the behavior of large groups of people, less is known about small-group dynamics and how individuals interact to make decisions, particularly when it comes to the emergence of leaders, a key area of inquiry in organizational research. The phenomenon is critical to arriving at an understanding of social networks of all kinds.

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New paper provides design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials

Scientists have long sought to develop drug therapies that can more precisely diagnose, target and effectively treat life-threatening illness such as cancer, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases. One promising approach is the design of morphable nanomaterials that can circulate through the body and provide diagnostic information or release precisely targeted drugs in response to disease-marker e

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Matter: DNA Gets a New — and Bigger — Genetic Alphabet

DNA is spelled out with four letters, or bases. Researchers have now built a system with eight. It may hold clues to the potential for life elsewhere in the universe and could also expand our capacity to store digital data on Earth

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Robots Are Building a Robotics Museum

Builder Bots In 2022, the Robot Science Museum is expected to officially open in Seoul, South Korea. The museum’s first exhibit, however, will actually launch two years prior — when a team of robots begin constructing the facility. Turkish firm Melike Altinisik Architects (MAA) recently announced that it had won an international competition to design the Robot Science Museum, which will serve as

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China has unveiled its 'first female AI news anchor'

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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World's Largest Bee Is Spotted For First Time In Decades

The bee towers over its apian cousins. Females have been recorded as being at least an inch and a half long. Add to that a pair of gigantic mandibles, and it's a bee like no other. (Image credit: Clay Bolt/claybolt.com)

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Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?

Scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction. But if greenhouse gases emitted before the impact created a hothouse climate that set life up for a fall when the impact cooled the planet, those gases did not coincide with the largest lava

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Dinosaur extinction lines up closely with timing of volcanic eruptions

Many people assume an asteroid triggered the mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs, but geologists say massive volcanic eruptions occurred at the same time

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Giant tortoise thought extinct is found on Galapagos

Conservationists in the Galapagos Islands have found a giant tortoise from a species thought to have become extinct more than a century ago.

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Smartphones help UB researcher better understand the nature of depression and anxiety

A University at Buffalo psychologist's research using smartphones is providing valuable data in real time, information that could provide treatment benefits for patients struggling with anxiety and depression.

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Phantom limb sensation explained

After a limb amputation, brain areas responsible for movement and sensation alter their functional communication. This is the conclusion of a new study published today in Scientific Reports. According to the authors, from the D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the findings may help to understand why some patients report phantom sensati

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New paper provides design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials

A newly published paper from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College, outlines novel design guidance that could rapidly advance development of disease-sensing nanomaterials for use in new drug development.

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In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders

Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. The work is detailed in a study, 'Social information and Spontaneous Emergence of Leaders in Human Groups,' published in The Royal Society Interface. The team included Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of biomedical engineering

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Giant tortoise thought extinct is found on Galapagos

Conservationists in the Galapagos Islands have found a giant tortoise from a species thought to have become extinct more than a century ago.

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Who sniffs the sniffers? Electronic nose takes a whiff of dogs to spot deadly disease

Device finds leishmaniasis pathogen in canine hair samples

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Scientists thought they lost the world's largest bee, but it was hiding in plain sight

Animals This time, they GIFed it. The bee species Megachile pluto was first described by Alfred Russel Wallace in 1859, thought extinct for 120 years, rediscovered and now, finally, turned GIFed.

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Cool stars may point the way to Earth-like planets

A new astronomical spectrograph provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, researchers report. The spectrograph allows astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our solar system, according to a new paper in the journal Optica . The Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) allows precise me

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The world’s largest bee has been rediscovered after 38 years

Researchers rediscovered the world’s largest bee living in the forests of an island of Indonesia.

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The world’s largest bee vanished decades ago. Now, scientists have spotted it again

Thumb-size bee found in Indonesian forest for the first time since 1981

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Japan probe Hayabusa2 set for asteroid landing

A Japanese probe is expected to land on a distant asteroid Friday, aiming to blast a "bullet" into the surface to collect clues about the origins of Earth and the solar system.

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How to keep stink bugs out this winter

Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away.

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NASA infrared image shows powerful center of Typhoon Wutip

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Wutip as it threatens Chuuk and Yap States in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Wutip has strengthened into a typhoon.

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New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts; they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. A study describes a form of 'interspecies communication' in which bacteria secrete a specific molecule — nitric oxide — that allows them to communicate with and control their hosts' DNA, and suggests that the conversation between the two may broa

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Evidence-based recommendations aimed at reducing Illinois gun violence

Illinois could reduce the number of people killed each year by gun violence by implementing ten policies supported by available research, according to a new report.

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Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age

In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes and dogs were domesticated, as their diet was similar to that of their owners.

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Indoor exposure to air pollution studied

In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents' daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed.

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How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities

A new study uses environmental, socioeconomic and management data from 30 Caribbean islands to identify which communities may be most at risk from the social and ecological effects of coral bleaching, which occurs when warm water causes coral polyps to expel algae living in their tissue. The analysis shows that independent island nations, such as Cuba and Jamaica, may be less vulnerable to coral b

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Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa

Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird — the now extinct adzebill — showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.

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A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is

Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study are the culmination of ten years of robotics research.

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How to keep stink bugs out this winter

Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away.

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New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties

Researchers from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD.

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Researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

JILA researchers have made a long-lived, record-cold gas of molecules that follow the wave patterns of quantum mechanics instead of the strictly particle nature of ordinary classical physics. The creation of this gas boosts the odds for advances in fields such as designer chemistry and quantum computing.

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How to keep stink bugs out this winter

Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away.

1h

NASA infrared image shows powerful center of Typhoon Wutip

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Wutip as it threatens Chuuk and Yap States in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Wutip has strengthened into a typhoon.

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JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

JILA researchers have made a long-lived, record-cold gas of molecules that follow the wave patterns of quantum mechanics instead of the strictly particle nature of ordinary classical physics. The creation of this gas boosts the odds for advances in fields such as designer chemistry and quantum computing.

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Study links diabetes and back pain

People with diabetes have a 35 percent higher risk of experiencing low back pain and 24 percent higher risk of having neck pain than those without diabetes, a review by University of Sydney researchers has found.

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Quantum dots can spit out clone-like photons

MIT and ETH Zurich researchers have produced coherent single photon emitters, a key component for future quantum computers and communications systems.

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'Goldilocks' thinking to cut cost of fuel cells in electric vehicles

Electric vehicles running on fuel cells tout zero emissions and higher efficiency, but expensive platinum is holding them back from entering a larger market. A new method increases fuel cell electrode activity at least tenfold, using 90 percent less metal.

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Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do 'quantum dances' in unison

The Cambridge team found a way to exploit the interaction between the electron and the thousands of nuclei using lasers to 'cool' the nuclei to less than 1 milliKelvin. They then showed they can control and manipulate the thousands of nuclei as if they form a single body in unison, like a second qubit. This proves the nuclei in the quantum dot can exchange information with the electron qubit and c

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More flexible nanomaterials can make fuel cell cars cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.A report of the findings, to be published Feb. 22 in Science, offers promise towards faster, cheaper production of electrical power using fuel cells, but also of bulk chemicals and materials such as hydrogen.

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Addressing a lack of regulatory standards in clinical artificial intelligence

As the use of artificial intelligence and predictive analytics in medicine becomes more commonplace in hospitals worldwide, the regulations around these approaches must keep pace — to ensure that the technology will improve the quality and efficiency of patient care.

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Hachimoji — Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight

A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study.

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Binary neutron star merger produced a compact jet of material detectible From Earth

Using a global network of radio telescopes, researchers have found that the binary neutron star merger event GW170817 produced a jet of material expanding at close to the speed of light, a new study reports.

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Two studies explore timing, influence of deccan trap volcanism in dinosaurs' demise

In two separate studies, researchers using different methods of high-precision dating attempted to illuminate the series of events that led to the demise of vast swaths of life on Earth nearly 66 million years ago.

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Cracking feather formation could lead to cooler birds

Scientists have revealed how bird feathers form in a wave-like motion, creating a regular pattern in the skin. The team led by the University of Edinburgh has identified chemical signals that are switched on and off in the birds' skin as feathers are arranged sequentially.

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New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties

Researchers from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD.

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Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?

UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction. But if greenhouse gases emitted before the impact created a hothouse climate that set life up for a fall when the impact cooled the planet, those gases did not coincide with the

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Dueling dates for a huge eruption reignite the debate over dinosaurs’ death

New dating techniques for the Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions disagree on whether they were the main culprit in the dinosaurs’ demise.

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The disappearing-reappearing act of the world’s largest bee

Thumb-size bee found in Indonesian forest for the first time since 1981

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Four new DNA letters double life’s alphabet

Four new DNA letters double life’s alphabet Four new DNA letters double life’s alphabet , Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00650-8 Synthetic DNA seems to behave like the natural variety, suggesting that a broader swathe of chemicals could support life than the four that evolved on Earth.

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Mighty T. Rex Began As Cute, Deer-Size Dino

Apex predator T. rex had very humble beginnings.

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NASA takes an infrared analysis of Tropical Cyclone Oma

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within the Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Oma.

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Did volcanic eruptions help kill off the dinosaurs?

Twin studies find massive lava flows occurred around the time of a cataclysmic asteroid impact

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7 of the most popular science books of all time

Chaos theory, evolution and the cosmos make for an eye-opening read. Carl Sagan paints a sagacious picture of humanity's place in the universe. Great scientists give us a glimpse into their minds and their theories. Scientists have been sleuthing through the mysteries and secrets of the universe since humankind first started asking questions. Just what is going on in this grand amphitheater of re

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New Research: Bone Marrow Transplants Might Prevent Aging

Out With The Old There’s new evidence to suggest that transfusions of young tissue can stave off health problems for the elderly. After a transplantation of a healthy young mouse’s bone marrow, older mice’s brain cells were better preserved and the mice had better memories and cognitive abilities than their elderly peers, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Communications Bio

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News at a glance

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Digging skin deep

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Tumorigenic trio

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Scalable and safe synthetic organic electroreduction inspired by Li-ion battery chemistry

Reductive electrosynthesis has faced long-standing challenges in applications to complex organic substrates at scale. Here, we show how decades of research in lithium-ion battery materials, electrolytes, and additives can serve as an inspiration for achieving practically scalable reductive electrosynthetic conditions for the Birch reduction. Specifically, we demonstrate that using a sacrificial a

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A Josephson relation for fractionally charged anyons

Anyons occur in two-dimensional electron systems as excitations with fractional charge in the topologically ordered states of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). Their dynamics are of utmost importance for topological quantum phases and possible decoherence-free quantum information approaches, but observing these dynamics experimentally is challenging. Here, we report on a dynamical proper

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Keyhole threshold and morphology in laser melting revealed by ultrahigh-speed x-ray imaging

We used ultrahigh-speed synchrotron x-ray imaging to quantify the phenomenon of vapor depressions (also known as keyholes) during laser melting of metals as practiced in additive manufacturing. Although expected from welding and inferred from postmortem cross sections of fusion zones, the direct visualization of the keyhole morphology and dynamics with high-energy x-rays shows that (i) keyholes a

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A degenerate Fermi gas of polar molecules

Experimental realization of a quantum degenerate gas of molecules would provide access to a wide range of phenomena in molecular and quantum sciences. However, the very complexity that makes ultracold molecules so enticing has made reaching degeneracy an outstanding experimental challenge over the past decade. We now report the production of a degenerate Fermi gas of ultracold polar molecules of

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Catalytic reductive [4 + 1]-cycloadditions of vinylidenes and dienes

Cycloaddition reactions provide direct and convergent routes to cycloalkanes, making them valuable targets for the development of synthetic methods. Whereas six-membered rings are readily accessible from Diels-Alder reactions, cycloadditions that generate five-membered rings are comparatively limited in scope. Here, we report that dinickel complexes catalyze [4 + 1]-cycloaddition reactions of 1,3

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U-Pb constraints on pulsed eruption of the Deccan Traps across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

Temporal correlation between some continental flood basalt eruptions and mass extinctions has been proposed to indicate causality, with eruptive volatile release driving environmental degradation and extinction. We tested this model for the Deccan Traps flood basalt province, which, along with the Chicxulub bolide impact, is implicated in the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction approximately 6

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The eruptive tempo of Deccan volcanism in relation to the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

Late Cretaceous records of environmental change suggest that Deccan Traps (DT) volcanism contributed to the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB) ecosystem crisis. However, testing this hypothesis requires identification of the KPB in the DT. We constrain the location of the KPB with high-precision argon-40/argon-39 data to be coincident with changes in the magmatic plumbing system. We also found t

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Tunable intrinsic strain in two-dimensional transition metal electrocatalysts

Tuning surface strain is a powerful strategy for tailoring the reactivity of metal catalysts. Traditionally, surface strain is imposed by external stress from a heterogeneous substrate, but the effect is often obscured by interfacial reconstructions and nanocatalyst geometries. Here, we report on a strategy to resolve these problems by exploiting intrinsic surface stresses in two-dimensional tran

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A pharmacological master key mechanism that unlocks the selectivity filter gate in K+ channels

Potassium (K + ) channels have been evolutionarily tuned for activation by diverse biological stimuli, and pharmacological activation is thought to target these specific gating mechanisms. Here we report a class of negatively charged activators (NCAs) that bypass the specific mechanisms but act as master keys to open K + channels gated at their selectivity filter (SF), including many two-pore dom

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The sleep-wake cycle regulates brain interstitial fluid tau in mice and CSF tau in humans

The sleep-wake cycle regulates interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) that accumulates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Furthermore, chronic sleep deprivation (SD) increases Aβ plaques. However, tau, not Aβ, accumulation appears to drive AD neurodegeneration. We tested whether ISF/CSF tau and tau seeding and spreading were influenced by the sleep-wake cycle an

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Hachimoji DNA and RNA: A genetic system with eight building blocks

We report DNA- and RNA-like systems built from eight nucleotide "letters" (hence the name "hachimoji") that form four orthogonal pairs. These synthetic systems meet the structural requirements needed to support Darwinian evolution, including a polyelectrolyte backbone, predictable thermodynamic stability, and stereoregular building blocks that fit a Schrödinger aperiodic crystal. Measured thermo

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New Products

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The courage to leave

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Choreographed entanglement dances: Topological states of quantum matter

It has long been thought that all different phases of matter arise from symmetry breaking. Without symmetry breaking, there would be no pattern, and matter would be featureless. However, it is now clear that for quantum matter at zero temperature, even symmetric disordered liquids can have features, giving rise to topological phases of quantum matter. Some of the topological phases are highly ent

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Ubiquitin-dependent chloroplast-associated protein degradation in plants

Chloroplasts contain thousands of nucleus-encoded proteins that are imported from the cytosol by translocases in the chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteolytic regulation of the translocases is critically important, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We applied forward genetics and proteomics in Arabidopsis to identify factors required for chloroplast outer envelope membrane (O

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Structures and operating principles of the replisome

Visualization in atomic detail of the replisome that performs concerted leading– and lagging–DNA strand synthesis at a replication fork has not been reported. Using bacteriophage T7 as a model system, we determined cryo–electron microscopy structures up to 3.2-angstroms resolution of helicase translocating along DNA and of helicase-polymerase-primase complexes engaging in synthesis of both DNA st

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Latrophilin GPCRs direct synapse specificity by coincident binding of FLRTs and teneurins

Bidirectional signaling by cell adhesion molecules is thought to mediate synapse formation, but the mechanisms involved remain elusive. We found that the adhesion G protein–coupled receptors latrophilin-2 and latrophilin-3 selectively direct formation of perforant-path and Schaffer-collateral synapses, respectively, to hippocampal CA1-region neurons. Latrophilin-3 binds to two transcellular ligan

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The Real Dino Killer: A One–Two Punch

An asteroid impact and volcanoes acting together could have done in the beasts, new rock dates indicate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner

Mechanical engineers are working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner.

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A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is

Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study are the culmination of ten years of robotics research.

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Digging skin deep

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Tumorigenic trio

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DNA's Coding Power Doubled

All life on earth uses a genetic code based on four nucleotides. Now, scientists have created one with eight.

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Doubling Our DNA Building Blocks Could Lead to New Life Forms

But first, chemists hope to improve DNA data storage and churn out new medical compounds.

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Så gick apokalypsen till

Efter att dinosaurierna dog ut för 66 miljoner år sedan drabbades jorden av svåra vulkanutbrott. Det avslöjar två nya studier som gjort dateringar av stelnad lava i Indien.

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Tesla Model 3 Loses Coveted Consumer Reports Recommendation

Cracking Glass Tesla’s blockbuster of an electric car, the Model 3, has received some glowing reviews . But now the cracks are starting to show. The nonprofit Consumer Reports decided to pull its “recommended” rating today, citing new “reliability data” collected from a 2018 survey. It’s not the first time the Model 3 lost the “recommended” label. In 2018, Consumer Reports first removed the “reco

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The Orville is an adventure space holiday in 2084 and the crew is on UBI plus, no careers or jobs needed.

We know star trek isn't anything like the future 🙂 No-one at all is needed to man those workstations that from time to time blow up with enough force to throw you over the other side of the room 🙂 Whenever I see the Orville I imagine the crew are all on adventure holiday in the solar system with some AR and VR help. They all get Andrew Wangs Freedom dividend and the immersive group adventures

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More flexible nanomaterials can make fuel cell cars cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

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Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?

UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction. But if greenhouse gases emitted before the impact created a hothouse climate that set life up for a fall when the impact cooled the planet, those gases did not coincide with the

1h

Electric car batteries inspire safer, cheaper way to make compounds used in medicines

Recent advances in battery technology, from the engineering of their cases to the electrochemistry that takes place inside them, has enabled the rapid rise of Teslas, Leafs, Volts and other electric cars.

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How bird feather patterns form

Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird's skin, but it has been unclear how this happens. According to a new study published February 21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Dr. William Ho and Denis Headon of the University of Edinburgh, and collaborative colleagues, the patterning of bird feat

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Quantum dots can spit out clone-like photons

In the global quest to develop practical computing and communications devices based on the principles of quantum physics, one potentially useful component has proved elusive: a source of individual particles of light with perfectly constant, predictable, and steady characteristics. Now, researchers at MIT and in Switzerland say they have made major steps toward such a single photon source.

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Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do 'quantum dances' in unison

A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can operate as a quantum memory device.

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New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties

Researchers from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD.

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The Real Dino Killer: A One–Two Punch

An asteroid impact and volcanoes acting together could have done in the beasts, new rock dates indicate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Team calculates volume of 215,000 glaciers

Previous calculations overestimated the volume of the glaciers in High Mountain Asia, report researchers. The team of glaciologists used a combination of numerical models to calculate the ice thickness distribution and the ice volume of some 215,000 glaciers around the world. They excluded sea ice and glaciers that are connected to the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets from their calculations. C

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How bird feather patterns form

Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird's skin, but it has been unclear how this happens. According to a new study published February 21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Dr. William Ho and Denis Headon of the University of Edinburgh, and collaborative colleagues, the patterning of bird feat

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Expanding the use of silicon in batteries, by preventing electrodes from expanding

Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology. Silicon's ability to absorb more charge translates to longer battery life and smaller batteries, if researchers can check the physical expansion of the silicon that comes with charging. Research suggests that adding MXene ink to the silicon electrode-making process would do just that.

1h

Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures

Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But new research indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures.

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Women with more social support are less likely to die prematurely

In the largest study to explore the impact of perceived social support on cardiovascular disease and mortality, researchers found postmenopausal women aged 50-79 with higher perceived social support were modestly less likely to die during the course of the study; no significant link found between increased social support and CVD.

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Tornado fatalities continue to fall, despite population growth in Tornado Alley

The rate of tornado-related fatalities increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century. Around 1916, that trend started to reverse.

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Norman Orentreich, 96, Force Behind Hair Transplants, Dies

In the 1950s, Dr. Orentreich took hair from the back of the head and planted it in the scalp, and lo, it grew. He also helped establish the Clinique skin-care line.

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In Search of George Washington Carver’s True Legacy

The famed agriculturalist deserves to be known for much more than peanuts

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Women's Contributions to Early Genetics Studies Were Relegated to the Footnotes

While women scientists were frequently "acknowledged programmers" in population genetics research, few of them received full authorship

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Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner

Mechanical engineers are working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner.

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New weapon to combat counterfeit goods: use your smartphone to check for fake merchandise

Researchers have invented a chemical fingerprint that, when used with a phone app, reveals whether a product is genuine or a fake; the fingerprints have been tested and earned a 100 percent success rate.

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Huntington’s Disease on the Mind

“ On the Mind ” is a series that aims to demystify biological disorders and give a platform to patients; at last week’s event at New York’s Caveat, the focus was on Huntington’s disease (HD), a slowly progressive, hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that causes cognitive, psychiatric, and motor problems. The evening’s program had three parts: the scientific story of HD, dance performances inspi

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Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada

How wildlife respond to climate change is likely to be complex. To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, new research published today from Point Blue Conservation Science examines the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016). The drought resulted in the widespread death of pine trees due to attacks by bark beetles, pote

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Scientist Who Gene-Hacked Babies “Likely” Boosted Their Brainpower

Galaxy Brain When infamous Chinese scientists He Jiankui edited the genes of human twin babies last year, he was reportedly trying to make them immune to HIV. But researchers familiar with the genetic changes he made are now saying that the specific manipulation he performed may have broader consequences. The CCR5 gene is linked to HIV susceptibility, but research published Thursday in the journa

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How to find your own truth: According to Joseph Campbell & Alan Watts

Joseph Campbell's monomyth as a guide to finding one's self. Alan Watts explores the notion of symbolically returning to the forest. How to set ones own meaning in a world of confusion and chaos. Joseph Campbell's life work covered a wide range of the communal human experience. Campbell explored the various mythologies of our planet and managed to elucidate on the common threads between them all.

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Too hot for comfort: the physiological dangers of extreme heat

A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. The review is published in the journal Physiology.

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Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada

How wildlife respond to climate change is likely to be complex. To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, new research published today from Point Blue Conservation Science examines the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016). The drought resulted in the widespread death of pine trees due to attacks by bark beetles, pote

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Ryanair, Wizzair fined in Italy over cabin bag policy

Italy's antitrust authority on Thursday slapped fines on low cost airlines Ryanair and Wizzair over their cabin baggage policy.

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Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures

Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures.

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10 percent of Chinese adults have high heart disease risk, aren't treated for it

Researchers at Yale and at the National Center for Cardiovascular Disease in China just quantified a significant opportunity to improve Chinese heart health: 1 in 10 middle-aged Chinese adults are at high risk for heart disease, yet only about 3 percent of those at-risk are taking either statins or aspirin, the recommended therapies for managing that risk. This study was published in the Annals of

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Height gap with parents, not genetics, determines onset of puberty — Ben-Gurion U. study

'A child who hits puberty earlier than his peers, but at a time consistent with a parental height gap model, should be considered 'healthy',' Dr. Limony says. 'We believe having the ability to determine normal ranges more accurately will reduce the need for unnecessary diagnostic procedures and help doctors better explain the emergence of early- or late-onset puberty to concerned parents.'

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Too hot for comfort: the physiological dangers of extreme heat

A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. The review is published in the journal Physiology.

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Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada

To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, researchers examined the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016). The drought resulted in the widespread death of pine trees due to attacks by bark beetles, potentially impacting wildlife habitat. While the results were varied, researchers found that many bird species responded

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Salk scientists uncover how high-fat diet drives colorectal cancer growth

A new study led by Salk Institute scientists suggests that high-fat diets fuel colorectal cancer growth by upsetting the balance of bile acids in the intestine and triggering a hormonal signal that lets potentially cancerous cells thrive. The findings, which appeared in Cell on Feb. 21, 2019, could explain why colorectal cancer, which can take decades to develop, is being seen in younger people gr

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NASA takes an infrared analysis of Tropical Cyclone Oma

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within the Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Oma.

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Price transparency helps Arizona health system achieve financial turnaround

Efforts to understand costs and openly share information on healthcare prices played a key role in a major Arizona health system's successful turnaround from a financial crisis, according to a feature article in the Spring issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). This journal is published in the Lippincott po

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Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions — it helps reduce crime

It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new study suggests they can also significantly reduce crime in the neighborhoods in which they are deployed.

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Development of nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz

Researchers have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology.

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Review of modern cases of leprosy

Leprosy has a history that has spanned centuries and societies across the globe. Yet, it continues to be a problem — even in the modern era. Sufferers from the chronic and infectious skin disease still face the social stigma and lack of medical care that people have endured since the origins of the disease itself. Although leprosy can be treated, the World Health Organization reported 216,108 cas

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American drug overdose death rates the highest among wealthy nations

A new study found that the United States has the highest drug overdose death rates among a set of high-income countries. The study found that drug overdose death rates in the United States are 3.5 times higher on average when compared to 17 other high-income counties. The study is the first to demonstrate that the drug overdose epidemic is contributing to the widening gap in life expectancy betwee

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New robotic sensor technology can diagnose reproductive health problems in real-time

Researchers have developed new robotic sensor technology that has the capability to diagnose women's reproductive health problems in real-time.

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New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do.

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Hvorfor har måner ikke måner?

PLUS. Månen kunne have sin egen undermåne, men har ingen. Og så har forskere undersøgt, hvorfor svovl og bly er en skidt kombination for gamle malerier.

2h

What Are Neutrinos?

Billions of them are passing through every centimeter of your body right this instant, but you can't feel them. What are these mysterious "little neutral ones?"

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A Woman Died After Reportedly Eating Prized Mushrooms at Fancy Restaurant in Spain

A woman has died and more than two dozen others are ill after eating at a Michelin-starred restaurant in Spain.

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Hawaii's False Missile Alert Shows Americans Have No Idea What to Do in Nuclear Attack

An erroneous alert about a nuclear attack was sent to Hawaii residents. The ensuing confusion and hysteria revealed that Americans are not prepared.

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New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do.

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New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold. CRISPR-chrom works by fusing a Cas9 to chromatin-modulating peptides (CMPs), as described in an article published in The CRISPR Journal.

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Philosopher: AI Can Never Create True Art

AI Art Robots with artificial intelligence have created paintings and sketches for years — one even sold for almost half a million dollars at Christie’s Auction House in December. But is it really art in the same way some of the greatest achievements of creativity in human history have been called “art”? That’s a clear no. Or at least that’s what Sean Dorrance Kelly, philosophy professor at Harva

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SNoOPI: A flying ace for soil moisture and snow measurements

Work has begun on a new CubeSat mission that will demonstrate for the first time a new, highly promising technique for measuring soil moisture from space—data important for early flood and drought warnings as well as crop-yield forecasts.

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New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold. CRISPR-chrom works by fusing a Cas9 to chromatin-modulating peptides (CMPs), as described in an article published in The CRISPR Journal.

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Indonesians clean up the beach one sandal at a time

Hundreds of people sifted through a vast wasteland of rubbish strewn across a beach in Indonesia on Thursday, underscoring the Southeast Asian archipelago's mammoth marine waste problem

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'Flying bulldog': world's largest bee refound

The world's largest bee—a giant insect roughly the size of a human thumb—has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said Thursday.

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Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures

Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures.

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Expanding the use of silicon in batteries, by preventing electrodes from expanding

Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology. Silicon's ability to absorb more charge translates to longer battery life and smaller batteries, if researchers can check the physical expansion of the silicon that comes with charging. Research from Drexel University and the Trinity College in Ireland, suggests that adding MXene ink to the silicon elect

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New drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clears phase 1 clinical trial testing in boys

Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have few treatment options. Medications currently available or in development either target only a subset of DMD patients with a particular genetic mutation or cause significant side effects.

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Report offers evidence-based recommendations aimed at reducing Illinois gun violence

Ilinois could reduce the number of people killed each year by gun violence by implementing ten policies supported by available research, according to a new report authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research. The center is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. A study published today in Cell describes a form of 'interspecies communication' in which bacteria secrete a specific molecule — nitric oxide — that allows them to communicate with and control their hosts' DNA, and suggests that the conversation

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Current tools have low accuracy for predicting delayed ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Both CT angiography and transcranial Doppler have limited accuracy in detecting cerebral vasospasm and predicting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured aneurysm, reports a study in the inaugural edition of Critical Care Explorations, the official open-access journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). The journal is published in

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Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves

UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease.

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Google makes it easier to find prescription drug disposal sites

In an effort to combat the opioid crisis, Google will begin labeling places where people can safely dispose of their prescription drugs. Now, users can find clearly labeled drug disposal sites …

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The Reason Conspiracy Videos Work So Well on YouTube

Cataloging the conspiracies on offer on YouTube is a fool’s errand, but let’s try: fake moon landing , flat Earth , 9/11 stuff , the Illuminati , anti-vaxxer propaganda , medical quackery , QAnon , Nikola Tesla and the pyramids , fiat currency , global cooling , lizard people , robot overlords , time travel , and many even odder things you’ve probably never heard of. Last month, YouTube said it w

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Israeli spacecraft aims to make history by landing on Moon

A rocket will take off from Cape Canaveral in Florida on Thursday night carrying Israel's Beresheet spacecraft, which aims to make history twice: as the first private-sector landing on the Moon, and the first from the Jewish state.

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'Flying bulldog': world's largest bee refound

The world's largest bee—a giant insect roughly the size of a human thumb—has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said Thursday.

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Study examines individuals' willingness to use artificial intelligence in career choices

Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the way we do business, and it can potentially allow firms to improve their decision making, given that individuals are willing to adopt algorithms in decision?making contexts. A new Managerial and Decision Economics study indicates that cognitive perceptions play an important role on such willingness.

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Study: Teacher retention bonuses lead to positive results

Offering teachers a retention bonus to stay at low-performing schools may increase test score gains among students in both reading and mathematics, according to a new study.

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Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), collected skin bacteria from more than 2,300 healthy frogs and salamanders from 12 countries to describe microbes on a wide range of host animals to improve knowledge of the distribution of fro

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Watch as SpaceX Launches the First Private Lunar Lander

Tonight an Israeli company will dispatch its spacecraft to the moon aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.

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Getting to the bottom of fairy circles

Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Scientists have got to the bottom of this with soil investigations and drones. The results suggest Australian fairy circles were caused by processes like the weathering of the soil by heavy rainfall, extreme heat a

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Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut

A new study in mice shows dietary fiber promotes the aggregation of gut particles.

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Innovative nanocoating technology harnesses sunlight to degrade microplastics

Low density polyethylene film (LDPE) microplastic fragments, successfully degraded in water using visible-light-excited heterogeneous ZnO photocatalysts.

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Mandarin Chinese could help us understand how infants learn English

Infants may be more sensitive to non-native speech sounds than previously thought, according to a new study. The findings shed light on the way babies begin to understand language.

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Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), collected skin bacteria from more than 2,300 healthy frogs and salamanders from 12 countries to describe microbes on a wide range of host animals to improve knowledge of the distribution of fro

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How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities

Climate change has fueled coral reef bleaching throughout the tropics, with negative consequences for reef ecosystems and the people who depend on them. A new study finds that in the Caribbean, independent island nations such as Cuba and Jamaica are less vulnerable to coral bleaching than island territories like Saint Barthélemy.

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Method assesses health and size of lizard populations

Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. As described in a new Ecology & Evolution study, researchers have now developed a way to provide accurate estimates of lizard populations.

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Method assesses health and size of lizard populations

Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. As described in a new Ecology & Evolution study, researchers have now developed a way to provide accurate estimates of lizard populations.

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Video: Can mixing household cleaners kill you?

When the bathroom starts looking grimy, and it's time to whip out yellow gloves, the only thing that matters is getting the job done quickly.

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When Algorithms Think You Want to Die

Opinion: Social media platforms not only host troubling images of suicide and self-harm, they end up recommending it to the people most vulnerable to it.

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Using AI to avert ‘environmental catastrophe’

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Rosalind, a New Mars Rover, Is in Rare Company

When you read through the list of missions humankind has launched into space over the past 60 years, a pattern emerges. There’s Hubble , the telescope that sighted countless glittering galaxies. Cassini and Galileo , which orbited Saturn and Jupiter, respectively, for years. Kepler , the discoverer of thousands of exoplanets; Herschel , the chronicler of the Milky Way’s star-forming regions; Huyg

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Tornado fatalities continue to fall, despite population growth in Tornado Alley

The rate of tornado-related fatalities increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century. Around 1916, that trend started to reverse.

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Researchers discover a genetic defect linked to pediatric liver disease

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, in collaboration with several other institutions, have discovered a genetic defect linked to biliary atresia (BA), the most common pediatric cause of end-stage liver disease, and the leading indication for liver transplantation in children.

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Signals on the scales

How are the images cast on the retina reassembled in the brain? Researchers in Munich and Tuebingen find that processing of visual stimuli occurs at the earliest waystation on the way to the visual cortex — but not all are treated equally.

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New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold.

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The Mirror Test Peers Into the Workings of Animal Minds

Nearly 50 years after its development, only a handful of creatures have passed the self-awareness exam. A new attempt with fish highlights a debate over the test's use and meaning.

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This is how much your vacation costs, in trees

Environment Real environmentalists take the bus. Depending on how you go, that road trip or jet plane could require a veritable forest of trees to offset. So we calculated just that.

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Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease

Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath.

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WinRAR Finally Patches 19 Year Old Bug That Put Millions At Risk

You would have used WinRAR at some point if you’ve ever used a Windows PC as a daily driver. The software has been around for almost two decades and it was a lightweight tool to …

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Weak El Niños Like This Year's May Become Rarer with Warming

The droughts and deluges spurred by the events could be worse even if the El Niño cycle does not change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease

Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath.

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Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable

In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones—with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s—and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.

3h

Is Solar Worth It in Your Area? This Simple Cost Benefit Estimator Has the Answer

No one enjoys paying a utility bill. The feeling can be even worse if you don’t feel good about where your energy is coming from. If you want to create a more robust, distributed energy grid to power our future, solar energy might be for you. But with so many variables at play (location, weather, local regulations, etc.), is solar worth it in your specific area, and for your specific home ? Why S

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Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable

In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones—with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s—and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.

3h

Zebra stripes muddle how flies fly

Zebra stripes keep flies away. When scientists dressed a horse up in black and white, they found out why: Stripes make lousy landing strips. For a new study, which appears in PLOS ONE , researchers conducted a series of experiments to better understand how stripes manipulate the behavior of biting flies as they attempt to come in to land on zebras. Besides the costume changes—scientists dressed u

3h

Huge Open Buckets of Uranium Ore Found at Grand Canyon? Totally Fine, Experts Say.

Pay no attention to those buckets of radioactive uranium in the Grand Canyon museum, they're probably nothing to worry about, experts say.

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The 'Laminar Express': Engineers dissect the two-seam fastball

The worlds of engineering and baseball have collided. Researchers at Utah State University are breaking down the physics of a new baseball pitch that's been getting a lot of attention.

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While Pedophiles Flock to YouTube, Advertisers Flee It

Pervert Platform On Sunday, YouTube personality Matt Watson posted a video to the site exposing what he called a “soft-core pedophilia ring.” Based on his research, pedophiles are congregating on suggestive videos of children — and, once connected, using the comments sections to share contact info and links to child pornography. Watson’s video quickly generated more than 2 million views, and majo

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Band-Aids Over Bullet Wounds

By almost any measure, Jamira Burley has suffered much misfortune in her young life. She was born into extreme poverty. During her childhood, both of her parents, and subsequently all of her brothers, were incarcerated for long stretches of time. Then her brother Andre was murdered unexpectedly in their family home. That was the final straw. After Andre’s death, Burley made a lifelong commitment

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PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy

In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which patients with one type of HER2-positive breast cancer might best benefit from standalone HER2-targeted agents, without the need for standard chemotherapy.

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Smoking cessation may reduce risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Studies demonstrates for first time that behavior change can delay or even prevent the most severe form of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Retired physicist leading new Trump effort to question climate threat to security

William Happer has long argued carbon dioxide emissions pose little risk

3h

How Israel’s Moon Lander Got to the Launchpad

With $100 million and a lot of volunteer labor, SpaceIL’s Beresheet spacecraft could be the first privately built vessel to reach the lunar surface.

3h

How leaders rise from small groups

New research indicates how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. While the “wisdom of the crowd” shapes the behavior of large groups of people, less is known about small-group dynamics and how individuals interact to make decisions, particularly when it comes to the emergence of leaders, a key area of inquiry in organizational research. The phenomenon is critical to arriving at an

3h

America’s Unusual—and Unseen—Water Treatment Facilities

You may not ever see this infrastructure, but you depend on it every day.

3h

Bernie Sanders Will Hit Huge Obstacles in 2020

Bernie Sanders’s entry into the 2020 race amounts to a big stone in a lake: It will generate ripples that touch every other candidate. But his own path to the nomination remains rocky unless he can attract a broader coalition than he did in 2016. Whether or not Sanders claims the nomination himself, his bid could have a big impact on which candidate eventually does. Sanders will hurt contenders w

3h

A Netflix Show That Captures the Surrealism of Modern Romance

Television has treated dating like a game since, well, The Dating Game . Each generation finds an era-appropriate kind of competitive romance. The game shows of 20th-century networks presented the hunt for love as communal, lighthearted, and blessedly straightforward. For the aughts, reality TV made sport of anxiety-producing cultural pressures—courtship is not only battling for the best mate, bu

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Women with more social support are less likely to die, new study finds

In the largest study to explore the impact of perceived social support on cardiovascular disease and mortality, George Mason University College of Health and Human Services finds postmenopausal women aged 50-79 with higher perceived social support were modestly less likely to die during the course of the study; no significant link found between increased social support and CVD.

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Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors influence the makeup of their microbiomes and how might the makeup of their microbiomes be important to amphibian health and survival?

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Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner

LSU mechanical engineering graduate student Tatiana Mello of Piracicaba, Brazil, is currently working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner.

3h

Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected

The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents — but in Europe. As part of an international team, researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries have examined how effectively Natura 2000 protects listed habitat types in Germany. The result: although the exist

3h

How to treat depression in prison — and why it matters

Of the 4 million prisoners released each year, 23 percent have suffered from major depressive disorder. Due to resource shortages, many go without adequate treatment while in prison. Oftentimes they rejoin society in worse mental shape than before their incarceration – which could be prevented with the right care. A team led by Michigan State University has found a cost-effective way to improve me

3h

Can mixing household cleaners kill you? (video)

When the bathroom starts looking grimy, and it's time to whip out yellow gloves, the only thing that matters is getting the job done quickly. So you open the cabinet, see a bunch of bottles and think, 'Hey, why not mix all of the different cleaners together?' Think again! Your all-purpose cleaning cocktail could turn a bad day even worse. Can death by toilet-bowl cleaning really happen? Today on R

3h

Could saffron be as effective as stimulant medicines in treating ADHD?

A new short-term pilot study in children and teens 6-17 years old with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has shown saffron to be as effective at controlling symptoms as methylphenidate, the commonly prescribed drug Ritalin.

3h

Junk food is linked to both moderate and severe psychological distress

The study revealed that California adults who consumed more unhealthy food were also more likely to report symptoms of either moderate or severe psychological distress than their peers who consume a healthier diet.

3h

How plants learned to save water

Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team is investigating how plants control their water balance.

3h

How to freeze heat conduction

The thermoelectric effect can turn waste heat into electrical energy. To make use of it, special materials with unusual properties are required. A remarkable effect has now been demonstrated, which can explain the particularly low thermal conductivity of clathrates, making them perfectly suitable for thermoelectricity.

3h

AI may be better for detecting radar signals, facilitating spectrum sharing

Researchers demonstrate that deep learning algorithms — a form of artificial intelligence — are significantly better than a commonly used method for detecting when offshore radars are operating, which can potentially improve certain spectrum-sharing operations.

3h

Study examines individuals' willingness to use artificial intelligence in career choices

Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the way we do business, and it can potentially allow firms to improve their decision making, given that individuals are willing to adopt algorithms in decision-making contexts. A new Managerial and Decision Economics study indicates that cognitive perceptions play an important role on such willingness.

3h

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.

3h

New iridium catalyst enables efficient selective synthesis of valuable drug ingredients

The researchers found that transient formation of hydrogen bonding between a substrate and the catalyst induced such high segregation in the reaction. By using inexpensive and readily available feedstock hydrocarbons, the researchers produced a group of chiral lactams in different shapes. Their diverse structures allow lactams to correspond to different pharmaceutical drugs.

3h

New compound offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS

Previous studies have shown that estrogens and estrogen-like compounds reduce multiple sclerosis-like inflammation and disability in mice. At first glance these treatments appear promising, but they carry a host of negative side effects, from feminizing male mice to increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke. An interdisciplinary team of scientists have piggy-backed on this approach w

3h

Tiny Neptune moon spotted by Hubble may have broken from larger moon

After several years of analysis, a team of planetary scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has at last come up with an explanation for a mysterious moon around Neptune that they discovered with Hubble in 2013.

3h

Older Adults Are Especially Prone to Social Media Bubbles

Research suggests that fake news will become an even bigger problem as the population ages — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Older Adults Are Especially Prone to Social Media Bubbles

Research suggests that fake news will become an even bigger problem as the population ages — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Thor Is Going to Be Playing the Hulk

That's Hulk Hogan, not the incredible one. Also, Chinese sci-fi blockbuster *The Wandering Earth* is coming to Netflix.

3h

Trump Calls For “6G,” Which Doesn’t Exist

Drawing Board We’d like to put out an open call: if you have any idea what 6G technology is, please contact us and fill us in. We ask because U.S. President Donald Trump just tweeted that he wants “6G” cell service in the U.S. “as soon as possible” — even though we don’t even have 5G service yet and no one has started to meaningfully discuss 6G, according to The Verge . Quick Primer 5G service is

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Why Samsung’s folding smartphone might prove more than just a fadSamsung Galaxy Fold

With the Galaxy Fold, Samsung has become the first major manufacturer to launch a phone with a folding screen – it might just be useful enough to tempt consumers

3h

Daily briefing: Why are there so many laws of physics?

Daily briefing: Why are there so many laws of physics? Daily briefing: Why are there so many laws of physics?, Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00675-z The real theory of everything might be “the question to which the universe is the answer”. Plus: why some US researchers are taking their gene-edited livestock abroad.

3h

China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise

The Chinese authorities turned to a Massachusetts company and a prominent Yale researcher as they built an enormous system of surveillance and control.

3h

Trilobites: Tiny Tyrannosaur Hints at How T. Rex Became King

The deer-sized dinosaur preceded one of Earth’s most fearsome predators.

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Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles

Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Scientists from the University of Göttingen, Australia and Israel have got to the bottom of this with soil investigations and drones. The results suggest Australian fairy circles were caused by processes like the w

3h

Aquatic microorganism could inspire soft robots able to move fast in narrow spaces

Euglena cells are unicellular organisms that spend most of their time on swimming by beating their flagellum. Sometimes, Euglena performs harmoniously coordinated cell body deformation, in a behavior known as metaboly. A team of researchers from SISSA and OGS in Trieste, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Pisa, and UPC in Barcelona shows that metaboly allows Euglena to crawl remarkably fast in narrow s

3h

Evening exercise will not ruin sleep and might even reduce appetite

With growing time demands, many middle-aged adults are finding time to engage in exercise increasingly difficult. For many, even the thought of fitting exercise in after a busy day at work can be as tiring as it is unappetizing. The standing belief that high-intensity exercise should be avoided in the early evening due to its effect on sleep only serves to act as another barrier to exercise at thi

4h

Researchers unveil Internet of Things security feature

Integrated circuit designers have developed a new approach for creating secure keys and IDs on Internet of Things (IoT).

4h

A scientific method for perfect cheese fondue

Cheese fondue is an icon of Swiss cuisine and a dinner party staple. While it may seem like a simple dish, getting the texture right can be a challenge for optimal mouthfeel, dipping and flavor release. This requires the perfect balance of cheese, wine and starch. Now, researchers reveal how to use these key ingredients to produce deliciously melted fondue.

4h

Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists

An international team of scientists has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals.

4h

Our Atmosphere Is So Big It Tickles the Moon

The wispy outermost layer of Earth's atmosphere extend much deeper into space than scientists realized — deep enough that the moon orbits through it.

4h

How human food is changing wildlife

Wild animals are increasingly eating our food and scientists are discovering 'hidden effects'.

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New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells

The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) have discovered that the protein Akna plays a key role in this process. It controls, for example, the behavior of neural stem cells via a mechanism that may also be involved in the formation of metastases. The

4h

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

Various stress effects make an integral part of modern life, and their minimization is of particular relevance. Currently, much attention is being paid to the study of the structural-metabolic and functional status of erythrocytes, since they serve as a kind of 'cell dosimeter' to signal stress reactions and the action of facultative and obligatory exogenous and endogenous factors that cause vario

4h

Not enough evidence linking noncaloric sweeteners with adverse effects on gut microbiota

There is not enough evidence related to the effects of noncaloric sweeteners on appetite, short-term intake, and risk of suffering from cancer or diabetes, according to the conclusions of this review.

4h

New weapon to combat counterfeit goods: use your smartphone to check for fake merchandise

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have invented a chemical fingerprint that, when used with a phone app, reveals whether a product is genuine or a fake. The fingerprints have been tested and earned a 100 percent success rate.

4h

Hubble helps uncover origin of Neptune's smallest moon Hippocamp

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, along with older data from the Voyager 2 probe, have revealed more about the origin of Neptune's smallest moon. The moon, which was discovered in 2013 and has now received the official name Hippocamp, is believed to be a fragment of its larger neighbor Proteus.

4h

How to freeze heat conduction

The thermoelectric effect can turn waste heat into electrical energy. To make use of it, special materials with unusual properties are required. A remarkable effect has now been demonstrated, which can explain the particularly low thermal conductivity of clathrates, making them perfectly suitable for thermoelectricity.

4h

How plants learned to save water

Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team at the University of Würzburg is investigating how plants control their water balance.

4h

Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins — a promising treatment target

Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. Activation of the stress response is at the epicenter of the molecular events generated by genetic mutations that cause a complex neurological syndrome.

4h

Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease

Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath.

4h

Surprising findings on forest fires

Several years ago, an international team of scientists led by the University of Bonn raised sediments from the bottom of Lake Van in eastern Turkey reflecting the past 600,000 years. Soil scientists and paleobotanists have now evaluated the drill cores for residues of early fires — with surprising findings. The fires did not mainly occur during particularly dry periods as assumed, but in comparat

4h

A missing gene makes a big difference in patients' recovery from mild stroke

UCLA neuroscientists found that patients born without a gene called CCR5 recover better from mild stroke. The discovery could lead to the first pill to reverse the physical and mental aftermath of the disease.

4h

Cellular sickness linked to type 1 diabetes onset

A UC San Francisco study of human and mouse pancreatic tissue suggests a new origin story for type 1 (T1) diabetes. The findings flip current assumptions about the causes of the disease on their head and demonstrate a promising new preventative strategy that dramatically reduced disease risk in laboratory animals.

4h

Research shows for the first time how we use others' viewpoints to make decisions

Everyday life is full of situations that require us to take others' perspectives. Now new research by the University of Plymouth has provided the first direct evidence that we can do this because we spontaneously form mental images of how the world looks to the other person, so that we can virtually see through their eyes and make judgements as if it was what we were seeing.

4h

Comparing financial burdens of head and neck cancer with other cancers

Head and neck cancer is expensive to treat and the disease can create long-term health needs. Using national survey data over nearly two decades, this study assessed the financial burdens of head and neck cancers compared with other cancers among nearly 17,000 patients with cancer, of whom 489 reported head and neck cancer.

4h

Could whole grains, dietary fiber be associated with lower risk of liver cancer?

This study used data for participants followed-up for 24 years as part of two well-known study groups to examine the association between whole grain and dietary fiber intake with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, a predominant form of liver cancer.

4h

Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life

Paleobiologists from the University of Bristol have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.

4h

Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms

Laboratory model breaks laws of heredity, opening up new research possibilities in genetics and synthetic biology.

4h

Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form

How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. Even when scientists manipulate cells to change how they divide, the shape of a fruit fly's wing remains the same. The discovery changes the scientific understanding of how organs form, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study in Cur

4h

Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes

New research finds that some yeast picked up a whole suite of genes from bacteria that gave them the new ability to scavenge iron from their environment. It's one of the clearest examples yet of the transfer of genes from one branch on the tree of life to another.

4h

Climate Change Enters Its Blood-Sucking Phase

W e found the moose calf half an hour in. He lay atop thin snow on a gentle slope sheltered by the boughs of a big, black spruce, curled up as a dog would on a couch. He had turned his long, gaunt head to rest against his side and closed his eyes. He might have been sleeping. The day before, April 17, 2018, when the GPS tracker on the moose’s collar stopped moving for six hours, this stillness ha

4h

How Much Leisure Time Do the Happiest People Have?

Up and down the economic ladder, many Americans who work—and especially those raising kids—are pressed for time, wishing they had more of it to devote to leisure activities (or even just sleeping). At the same time, research has indicated that people who are busy tend to be happier than those who are idle, whether their busyness is purposeful or not . A research paper released late last year inve

4h

EEG helps scientists predict epileptic seizures minutes in advance

A new study shows that acetate, an acid found in some foods, may help doctors intervene when seizures are imminent. Scientists can monitor the brain activity of a specific cell type to predict epileptic seizures four minutes in advance in humans and mice.

4h

CASSINI Trial publishes data on preventing blood clots in cancer patients

Researchers have published the first clinical study investigating the use of the direct oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, to prevent blood clots in patients with cancer at high-risk. The study found no significant reduction in venous thromboembolism or death in the overall 180-day trial period; however, the researchers did observe a lower incidence of these events while patients were actively on th

4h

The new exercise trend that's made for everyone

Bringing the science of high intensity interval training (HIIT) into everyday life could be the key to helping unfit, overweight people get more of the exercise they need to improve their health, according to researchers.

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor ruller rulletrapperne omvendt på Nørreport Station?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor de gængse regler om at holde til højre ikke gælder på Nørreport Station. Metroselskabet forklarer, hvorfor det forholder sig omvendt lige præcis her.

4h

Verdens største bi fundet for første gang siden 1981

Forskere frygtede, at Wallace's kæmpebi var uddød. Men nu er den fundet af forskere for første gang i 38 år.

4h

The White House is infested with flies

Science This isn't the iconic building's first pest, or its last. There are multiple YouTube videos of Barack Obama swatting the large, persistent insects during interviews. Donald Trump has complained about the flies amidst tours…

4h

Why microwaving a grape sparks a fiery glow

Why microwaving a grape sparks a fiery glow Why microwaving a grape sparks a fiery glow, Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00633-9 Scientists debunk a popular explanation for a flashy party trick.

4h

The Russian Sleuth Who Outs Moscow's Elite Hackers and Assassins

Roman Dobrokhotov has been playing a dangerous game for a Russian reporter: identifying agents of the GRU military intelligence agency.

4h

HIV drug could improve recovery after stroke

A protein that may hinder the brain’s regrowth after damage points researchers to an unexpected treatment

4h

Software Bug Immediately Crashes Nike’s Self-Lacing Sneakers

Great Scott A great way to generate hype for your product is to name it after something from the “Back To The Future” franchise. That’s why auto-balancing skateboards are called “hoverboards” and Nike’s automatically-tightening shoe uses the phrase “self-lacing.” Unfortunately, a great way to generate ridicule for your futuristic tech product is to totally break it with a software update, which i

4h

A New AI Draws Cats, and They’re Utterly Grotesque

This Cat Does Not Exist Ceci n’est pas un chat. Last week, we reported on a mysterious new website , ThisPersonDoesNotExist.com , that shows you a new human face, generated by an AI, every time you hit the refresh button. It’s a growing trend: more copycat websites like ThisAirbnbDoesNotExist.com and ThisWaifuDoesNotExist.net have also cropped up in its wake. And now, ThisCatDoesNotExist.com take

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4h

What is AI-Art? And is it really Art?

AI-Art is Art that is generated by Artificial Intelligence technology. Precisely, it is the sort of technology which is able to produce an original image based on a bank of existing ones. I believe that everyone has the ability to contribute to discussions about art. Artificial Intelligence made art has drawn my attention because even the best artistic experts struggle to differentiate A.I. made

4h

Powerful Magnetic Energy Blows Up a Lab

submitted by /u/vernes1978 [link] [comments]

4h

‘Tags’ let your phone spot counterfeit stuff

Researchers have developed a 100 percent pirate-safe labeling system, where individual items receive a label, called a “tag,” that corresponds with a unique fingerprint. The buyer of a new designer bag, watch, or other merchandise might later suspect or discover that it was a fake. More ominously, people die from counterfeit drugs on a daily basis. Globally, consumer counterfeit imports are worth

4h

China’s CRISPR twins might have had their brains inadvertently enhanced

New research suggests that a controversial gene-editing experiment to make children resistant to HIV may also have enhanced their ability to learn and form memories.

4h

Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form

How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases.

4h

Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes

An insect's gut might seem an inhospitable place to settle in, but diverse microbes nonetheless make their home there. Yet in the gut, there's a struggle for the nutrients needed to survive among the resident bacteria and fungi—not to mention the insect.

4h

Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms

The idea that children inherit half of their DNA from each parent is a central tenet of modern genetics. But a team led by KAUST's Christian Frøkjær-Jensen has re-engineered this heredity pattern in roundworms, a commonly used model organism in biology, and created animals with an unusual pedigree that are beginning to help scientists better understand nongenetic modes of inheritance and molecular

4h

Trump calls for 6G cellular technology, because why the heck not

We’ve been covering the battle for 5G between the U.S. and China for some time. The White House has made 5G technology a national security priority, and industry leaders have followed up that …

4h

When Humanitarian Aid Is Used as a Weapon to Bring Down Regimes

CÚCUTA , Colombia—Here at the Venezuelan border, American officials have addressed the press several times in recent days, touting a project meant to challenge the rule of Venezuela’s leadership. But it is one that has aid workers and international organizations worried. First there was the United States’ ambassador to Colombia, Kevin Whitaker, who spoke near a barricaded border bridge close to w

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A Court Battle Over a Dallas Toddler Could Decide the Future of Native American Law

When Chad and Jennifer Brackeen realized that God was calling on them to help children in their area, they first tried to ignore it. They already had two young children of their own, and foster care isn’t exactly known for being easy. But then they did some research and learned of the great need for foster parents in Dallas. They signed up. The second foster child who was placed in their care was

4h

Righty or lefty, as you like

New iridium catalyst enables selective synthesis of valuable drug ingredients in a more efficient way. The researchers found that transient formation of hydrogen bonding between a substrate and the catalyst induced such high segregation in the reaction. By using inexpensive and readily available feedstock hydrocarbons, the researchers produced a group of chiral lactams in different shapes. Their d

4h

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.

4h

Study examines individuals' willingness to use artificial intelligence in career choices

Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the way we do business, and it can potentially allow firms to improve their decision making, given that individuals are willing to adopt algorithms in decision-making contexts. A new Managerial and Decision Economics study indicates that cognitive perceptions play an important role on such willingness.

4h

Method assesses health and size of lizard populations

Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. As described in a new Ecology & Evolution study, researchers have now developed a way to provide accurate estimates of lizard populations.

4h

Study links unhealthy diet to mental illness in California adults

The study, published Feb. 16, 2019 in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, revealed that California adults who consumed more unhealthy food were also more likely to report symptoms of either moderate or severe psychological distress than their peers who consume a healthier diet.

4h

Astronomers from UCI, other institutions use new technique to find extrasolar planets

Scientists from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have begun using the Habitable Planet Finder, a spectrograph coupled with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in Texas, to hunt for exoplanets at M-dwarf stars.

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Figuring out the fovea

Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can be disrupted by disease.

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Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life

Amiskwia was originally described by the famous palaeontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott (1850-1927) in 1911 who compared it to the modern arrow worms (chaetognaths) – a group of ocean-dwelling worms that are fierce predators, equipped with an array of spines on their head for grasping small prey.

4h

Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form

How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases.

4h

Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes

An insect's gut might seem an inhospitable place to settle in, but diverse microbes nonetheless make their home there. Yet in the gut, there's a struggle for the nutrients needed to survive among the resident bacteria and fungi—not to mention the insect.

4h

Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms

The idea that children inherit half of their DNA from each parent is a central tenet of modern genetics. But a team led by KAUST's Christian Frøkjær-Jensen has re-engineered this heredity pattern in roundworms, a commonly used model organism in biology, and created animals with an unusual pedigree that are beginning to help scientists better understand nongenetic modes of inheritance and molecular

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior

The most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon using radio-telemetry reveals new and surprising information about how they use their habitats, how they spend their time, and how they interact with their own species. Researchers conducted radio-tracking by boat, with assistance from a Cessna 172 aircraft, and visually located and followed nine dolphins se

4h

Coping with cancer: Partners can reframe challenging situations

Spouses can help breast cancer patients with coping by positively reframing the cancer experience and other negative experiences. In general, positive reframing — finding the silver lining — was associated with less stress. Researchers suggest the findings can be extended to a broader population.

4h

New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex

A newly discovered, diminutive — by T. rex standards — relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North American roost.

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New 'smart drug' shows promise for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

A clinical trial has found that patients responded to a new 'smart drug' for women with an aggressive form of breast cancer.

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Health-related Google searches doubled in week before ER visits

Patients are often willing to share their Google search histories with medical researchers, revealing that many people do searches on their condition well before deciding to go to the hospital.

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Complete world map of tree diversity

Researchers have succeeded in constructing, from scattered data, a world map of the diversity of tree species. Climate plays a central role for its global distribution; however, the number of species in a specific region also depends on the spatial scale of the observation, the researchers report. The new approach could help improve conservation.

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Antibody therapy training phagocytes to destroy tumors now tested on patients

An immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill cancer. The antibody therapy prevented the growth of tumours in several mouse models. The development of the therapy has now progressed to patient testing in a phase I/II clinical trial.

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Why eating ice cream is linked to shark attacks

Ice cream consumption is actually linked to shark attacks. But the relationship is correlative, not causal. It's pretty stunning how media outlets skip over this important detail. None Soda and ice cream are linked to violence. What the what? And people have concluded from data that smoking, chocolate, and curly fries are good for you. Why the when? I'll explain — but also go much further and sh

4h

The problems of flying to Mars

Astronauts will have to worry about space radiation—and also each other

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Rice, maize and sorghum may be able to fix nitrogen from the air

That would help agricultural productivity a lot

4h

A lot of the periodic table is a result of neutron stars colliding

Such collisions are the ultimate nuclear reactor

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A long-term natural experiment hints at how species disperse

The aftermath of a tsunami spreads species across an ocean

4h

Mt. Gox was riddled with price manipulation, data mining reveals

The collapse of the world’s largest bitcoin exchange in 2013 left many scratching their heads over what happened. A new analysis of a data leak from 2014 uncovers some deeply suspicious patterns.

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Non-polluting membrane for outerwear

As part of his master's project, the chemical engineer Mario Stucki developed a breathable, environmentally friendly membrane for rain jackets. With his colleague Anna Beltzung, he has since founded the spin-off Dimpora to market the membrane commercially.

4h

School struggles can make little kids less popular

Children who do well academically are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who struggle academically, according to a new study. The findings directly challenge the common stereotype that links academically gifted children with unpopularity—and also confirm the significant effect academic performance can have on a student’s mental and social well-being. “Plenty of research before t

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Synthesizing useful compounds without forming unwanted chiral partners

Did you know that more than half of the drugs currently in use are chiral, potentially resulting in two different responses in the body? Chiral compounds are pairs of molecules that are mirror images of each other, just like a person's right and left hand. Since the body interacts with each molecule differently, a chiral drug may produce the desired effects from one molecule, along with an unwante

4h

Study: Teacher retention bonuses lead to positive results

Offering teachers a retention bonus to stay at low-performing schools may increase test score gains among students in both reading and mathematics, according to a new study.

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MTHFD2 mitochondrial metabolic enzyme maintains cancer stem-like cells

Tumor tissues include cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) that are responsible for recurrence and drug resistance. The metabolic mechanisms in CSCs are largely unknown and currently there are no therapies targeting them. We show that methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 2 (MTHFD2)-mediated purine synthetic metabolism is essential for the maintenance of CSCs. Targeted therapy against MTHFD2 would be a

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Hesperos' multi-organ 'human-on-a-chip' found effective for long-term toxicology testing

Hesperos reports the successful testing of multi-organ 'human-on-a-chip' models to recapitulate the 28-day experiments typically used in animals to evaluate the systemic toxicity of drug and cosmetic compounds. The work is published in Advanced Functional Materials.

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Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa

Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird — the now extinct adzebill — showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.

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Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable

In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones — with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s — and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.

4h

How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities

A new study uses environmental, socioeconomic and management data from 30 Caribbean islands to identify which communities may be most at risk from the social and ecological effects of coral bleaching, which occurs when warm water causes coral polyps to expel algae living in their tissue. The analysis shows that independent island nations, such as Cuba and Jamaica, may be less vulnerable to coral b

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UBC researchers discover how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation

Researchers from the University of British Columbia have discovered how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation — a finding that could lead to the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis.

4h

New study: How to save a seabird

A new study outlines more than a decade of success in reducing seabird bycatch in Alaska's longline fisheries, and where there's still room for improvement.

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Student likeability might be link between academic success and risk of depression

A new study suggests that children doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically.

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People with osteoporosis should avoid spinal poses in yoga, study says

Yoga postures that flex the spine beyond its limits may raise the risk of compression fractures in people with thinning bones, according to new research from Mayo Clinic. The results appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings..

4h

Prenatal exposure to phthalates linked to motor skill deficiencies at age 11

Scientists report motor skills problems in children exposed during pregnancy to plasticizer chemicals known as phthalates that are widely used in personal care products like moisturizers and lipstick, as well as plastic containers and children's toys.

4h

Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk

Consumption of allium vegetables — which include garlic, leeks, and onions — was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China.

4h

Habitable Zone Planet Finder enables discovery of planets around cool stars

A new astronomical spectrograph provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, allowing astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our solar system.

4h

How education helped me rewrite my life | Ashweetha Shetty

There's no greater freedom than finding your purpose, says education advocate Ashweetha Shetty. Born to a poor family in rural India, Shetty didn't let the social norms of her community stifle her dreams and silence her voice. In this personal talk, she shares how she found self-worth through education — and how she's working to empower other rural youth to explore their potential. "All of us are

5h

Could Earth's Oceans Ever Boil Away?

When will the end come for the oceans?

5h

Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior

Using telemetry units in hospitals to monitor patient health is standard practice. Now, a similar approach is proving to be invaluable for dolphins, too. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute and collaborators have conducted the most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon (I

5h

Mark Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture chief after 'digital gangsters' report – CNET

The meeting at Facebook headquarters on Thursday follows the damning report from a UK committee.

5h

Google moves to fix YouTube glitch exploited for child porn

Google-owned YouTube said Thursday it was taking action to close a loophole that enabled users to share comments and links on child pornography over the video-sharing service.

5h

Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior

Using telemetry units in hospitals to monitor patient health is standard practice. Now, a similar approach is proving to be invaluable for dolphins, too. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute and collaborators have conducted the most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon (I

5h

Food industry waste becomes profitable biogas

Huge gains can be made by using waste from the food industry for biogas production, no matter whether the biogas is used in vehicles or to produce electricity and heat. This is the conclusion of researchers from the Biogas Research Center at Linköping University, in a recently published article.

5h

Researchers explore an often ignored source of greenhouse gas

In a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus, researchers have discovered a surprising new source of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions—bicarbonates hidden in the lake water used to irrigate local orchards.

5h

How news coverage of terrorism may shape support for anti-Muslim policies

Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries. A new Political Psychology study indicates that how the news media portray these attacks may influence emotional responses and support for anti-Muslim policies such as immigration bans.

5h

Bike Reveal: Paul Sr.'s WWII Themed Bike with Sidecar | American Chopper

Paul Sr. is in Chicago to reveal his bike designed for the Oscar Mike Foundation in support of veterans. Stream Full Episodes of American Chopper: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.in

5h

UBC researchers explore an often ignored source of greenhouse gas

In a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus, researchers have discovered a surprising new source of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions — bicarbonates hidden in the lake water used to irrigate local orchards.

5h

How news coverage of terrorism may shape support for anti-Muslim policies

Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries. A new Political Psychology study indicates that how the news media portray these attacks may influence emotional responses and support for anti-Muslim policies such as immigration bans.

5h

Social connectedness may help victims of cyberbullying

A new Psychology in the Schools study found that social connectedness may act as a protective buffer against the negative mental health effects of cyberbullying.

5h

Complex medication regimens are common & sometimes dangerous in patients with lung disease

Patients with interstitial lung disease — a group of disorders causing progressive scarring of lung tissue — are often prescribed various medications that specifically target their disease and others that treat their symptoms. A new Respirology study found that patients often experience significant burden associated with the treatment and management of their illness, and some are at risk of expe

5h

Is the drug overdose epidemic unique to the United States?

Is the current American drug overdose epidemic an isolated phenomenon? Have other high-income countries experienced similar increases in drug overdose mortality, or are they likely to going forward? A new study published in Population and Development Review addresses these questions.

5h

The dollar store diet: Study shows discount produce matches quality of traditional chains

When you hear about dollar-discount stores, the first thought that comes to mind likely isn't groceries for you and your family. But it might be time to consider dollar-discount stores as a stop for your grocery needs, says a new UNLV study, which found that the quality of fruits and vegetables at dollar stores is just as good as regular grocery store produce.

5h

How obesity affects vitamin D metabolism

A new Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study confirms that vitamin D supplementation is less effective in the presence of obesity, and it uncovers a biological mechanism to explain this observation.

5h

Certain factors linked with higher risk of infection after orthopaedic surgery

In an International Wound Journal study of 4,818 older patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgeries, five risk factors were linked with an increased risk of developing surgical site infections, including diabetes, morbid obesity, tobacco smoking, prolonged surgical duration, and lower serum albumin levels prior to surgery.

5h

Free patient case management tool accurately measures physicians' diagnostic abilities

Assessing the accuracy and value of an increasingly popular and free online patient management app, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and other institutions say that physicians with more training and experience perform better in selecting appropriate diagnoses for sample patient scenarios.

5h

Study examines indoor exposure to air pollution

In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents' daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed.

5h

Being overweight in adolescence may increase kidney cancer risk later in life

Being overweight has been linked with a higher risk of developing a form of kidney cancer called renal cell carcinoma (RCC) among adults, but it's unclear if this risk is present during adolescence. In an International Journal of Cancer study of adolescents who were followed for 37 years, researchers observed a trend for higher RCC risk with increasing body mass index during adolescence, where one

5h

Health burden of glaucoma has risen worldwide

The health burden of glaucoma has continuously increased around the globe in the past 25 years, according to an Acta Opthalmologica study.

5h

Unnecessary testing for UTIs cut by nearly half

Over-testing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, which spreads antibiotic resistance. Infectious disease specialists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis made changes to hospital procedures that cut urine tests by nearly half without compromising doctors' abilities to detect UTIs.

5h

ICHE Roundup: Unnecessary urine tests, surgical infections, nurses' role in stewardship

Brief summaries of embargoed studies that to publish in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, including preventing unnecessary urine tests and treatment, surgical site infections come from patients' microbiome, and nurses role in antibiotic stewardship.

5h

Media alert: New articles in the CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its February 2019 issue. The Journal is dedicated to validating and publishing outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing, including CRISPR biology, technology and genome editing, and commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory, and ethical issues affecting the field.

5h

Firearm homicide rate higher in US counties with greater income inequality

Counties in the United States with greater gaps between rich and poor have a higher rate of homicide deaths involving firearms, according to a national study by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health. These same counties experienced higher levels of crime and poverty, and lower levels of community social networks.

5h

Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation

Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in the ocean's coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide uptake, a new Duke-led study shows. The findings — based on thousands of samples collected in the western North Atlantic — upend prevailing theories about where and when nitrogen fixation occurs, and underscore the need for scientists to revisit the global distribution

5h

Genetic study seeks to prevent foodborne infection caused by Salmonella

Project presented at FAPESP Week London identifies genes that allow bacteria to survive in the digestive tract of poultry and thus infect humans.

5h

Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner

Who knew a potentially deadly bacteria could be used for good?

5h

Biodegradable Mardi Gras beads update

LSU Department of Biological Sciences Professor Naohiro Kato is refining the process to make biodegradable Mardi Gras beads. He has patent applications pending on various formulations and methods of making the biodegradable beads that could help prevent tens of thousands of pounds of plastic Mardi Gras beads from entering the environment every year.

5h

Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner

Who knew a potentially deadly bacteria could be used for good?

5h

Breakthroughs, Sort of

We’re all familiar with the FDA’s “breakthrough” designation for drugs (and drug indications) in the clinical trial/approval process. Opinions vary on the whole idea – useful way to prioritize regulatory attention, PR device for all involved because they’re handing ’em out like Halloween candy these days, or some of each. But if you want to know what the public (or at least one segment of the pub

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5h

Joe Crowley Just Played Into Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Hands

It shouldn’t really come as a surprise to anyone that former Representative Joe Crowley, the New York Democrat who was famously dethroned last summer by the progressive political rookie Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is taking on a new role as a government lobbyist. It’s a pretty standard career move in Washington, D.C., with many retiring lawmakers from both parties getting hired to stick around Capi

5h

Biodegradable Mardi Gras beads update

LSU Department of Biological Sciences Professor Naohiro Kato is refining the process to make biodegradable Mardi Gras beads. He has patent applications pending on various formulations and methods of making the biodegradable beads that could help prevent tens of thousands of pounds of plastic Mardi Gras beads from entering the environment every year.

5h

Earthworm research spurs farmers to act

A study of England's farmland has found key earthworm types are rare or absent in two out of five fields and has led to the majority of farmers affected vowing to change the way they farm.

5h

Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected

The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents – but in Europe. Twenty per cent of the EU's landmass and large parts of the surrounding seas have been designated nature protection sites under Natura 2000 over the last 17 years. As part of an international team, researchers from the Leibniz-Inst

5h

Astronauts optimistic for ISS launch after botched flight

Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin and US astronaut Nick Hague said Thursday they were ready to head into space again next month after their last launch ended in failure.

5h

Drone sighting halts flights at Ireland's Dublin Airport

Flights to and from Dublin Airport in Ireland were briefly halted Thursday after a drone was spotted over the airfield.

5h

Study examines indoor exposure to air pollution

In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents' daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed.

5h

The dollar store diet: Study shows discount produce matches quality of traditional chains

When you hear about dollar discount stores, the first thought that comes to mind likely isn't groceries for you and your family.

5h

Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows

More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in "asset" poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on in the event of a financial shock such as a job loss, a medical crisis or the recent federal government shutdown, new research from Oregon State University indicates.

5h

How Our Universe Could Emerge as a Hologram

The fabric of space and time is widely believed by physicists to be emergent, stitched out of quantum threads according to an unknown pattern. And for 22 years, they’ve had a toy model of how emergent space-time can work: a theoretical “universe in a bottle,” as its discoverer, Juan Maldacena , has described it. The space-time filling the region inside the bottle — a continuum that bends and undu

5h

What alchemy and astrology can teach artificial intelligence researchers

Artificial intelligence researchers and engineers have spent a lot of effort trying to build machines that look like humans and operate largely independently. Those tempting dreams have distracted many of them from where the real progress is already happening: in systems that enhance – rather than replace – human capabilities. To accelerate the shift to new ways of thinking, AI designers and devel

5h

Do alpha particle condensates exist in oxygen nuclei?

Nuclei in their lowest energy states (ground state) are composed of neutrons and protons. Two protons and two neutrons in a nucleus can cluster together to form alpha particles. When the nucleus gets nearly enough energy to disintegrate into alpha particles, the alpha particles can arrange themselves in the lowest possible quantum energy level, forming a Bose-Einstein condensate. Examples are the

5h

Audi Traffic Light Info Helps You Catch Multiple Green Lights

First TLI, now GLOSA. For Audi, V2I is a BFD: accurate information on how long until the light turns green, and how fast or slow you should drive to hit multiple green lights. The post Audi Traffic Light Info Helps You Catch Multiple Green Lights appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions—it helps reduce crime

It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new University of British Columbia study suggests they can also significantly reduce crime in the neighbourhoods in which they are deployed.

5h

Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows

More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in 'asset' poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on in the event of a financial shock such as a job loss, a medical crisis or the recent federal government shutdown.

5h

A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is

Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study, which have been published in Science Robotics, are the culmination of ten years of robotics research.

5h

Tools to help seriously ill patients near death make decisions about their care aren't commonly used in routine practice

Many seriously ill people in the United States — and around the world — are not dying as they would like. Yet, a new study led by Dartmouth Institute Ph.D. student Catherine Saunders found that although there are dozens of tools available to help people make difficult decisions near the end of their lives, they are of varying quality and very few are actually available for patients and families

5h

Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world

A comprehensive and multinational review of peppers/chilis (Capsicum species) with academic and scientific input from points across the globe, such as Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, Italy, Hungary, Austria, and the United States sets out to explore various aspects of interest concerning this horticulturally important crop.

5h

Cell division in plants: How cell walls are assembled

Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how pivotal processes are coordinated in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. In The EMBO Journal, they describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these bui

5h

HTC revamps standalone VR headset to keep pace with Oculus while it looks to big business

HTC has had a little bit of a rough ride these past few years. After betting the farm on VR, the company has had to make some substantial business strategy shifts to keep the division kicking …

5h

5h

Det lönar sig att göra biogas av livsmedelsavfall

Livsmedelsindustrin är Sveriges näst största industrigren när det kommer till omsättning och fjärde största sett till antal anställda. Produktionen är resurseffektiv, sett både till energianvändning och utnyttjandet av de primära råvarorna, men ingen forskning har tidigare gjorts på hur avfallet i form av organiska biprodukter kan användas på bästa sätt. – Mycket av avfallet går till djurfoder me

5h

Purposeful Evolution: Creating an Ethical, Prosperous Future

More often than not, we fall into the trap of trying to predict and anticipate the future, forgetting that the future is up to us to envision and create. In the words of Buckminster Fuller, “We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims.” But how, exactly, do we create a “good” future? What does such a future look like to begin with? In Future Consciousness: The Path to Purposeful

5h

Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world

A comprehensive and multinational review of peppers/chilis (Capsicum species) with academic and scientific input from points across the globe, such as Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, Italy, Hungary, Austria, and the United States sets out to explore various aspects of interest concerning this horticulturally important crop.

5h

Language has become a tool for social exclusion

Within a week of the Salzburg Global Seminar's Statement for a Multilingual World launching in February 2018, the document – which calls for policies and practices that support multilingualism – had received 1.5m social media impressions.

5h

Cell division in plants: How cell walls are assembled

Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how pivotal processes are coordinated in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. In The EMBO Journal, they describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these bui

5h

Signs of ancient flowing water on Mars

These images from ESA's Mars Express satellite show a branching, desiccated system of trenches and valleys, signs of ancient water flow that hint at a warmer, wetter past for the Red Planet.

5h

700,000 submunitions demilitarized by Sandia-designed robotics system

More than 700,000 Multiple Launch Rocket System submunitions have been demilitarized since the Army started using an automated nine-robot system conceptualized, built and programmed by Sandia National Laboratories engineers.

5h

»Jeg mangler nogen gange nogle læger, der tager et ansvar i stedet for at sætte sig tilbage og pive«

Sundhedspolitikerne i Folketinget tager vidt forskelligt imod underskriftindsamling fra læger, der advarer om, at sundhedsvæsenet er på vej mod et kollaps.

5h

Kardiolog modtager Hagedorn pris for stor indsats i hjerteforskning

Professor og overlæge Hans Erik Bøtker hædres for at have sat stort aftryk på dansk og international hjerteforskning og for et stort engagement som vejleder.

5h

Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut

Food, microbes, and medicine all clump together as they move through our gut. Sticky molecules secreted into our intestines bind the gut particles in the same way that flour holds a ball of dough together. Now a new mice-based study from Caltech is showing that dietary fiber also plays a role in clumping. This is the first time that researchers have shown that fiber—stringy molecules found in food

5h

Single mothers spend more on children's health in hard times

When money is tight, single mothers spend more of their health care dollars on their children than themselves, while two-parent families are less likely to make changes, according to a Rutgers study.

5h

Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut

Food, microbes, and medicine all clump together as they move through our gut. Sticky molecules secreted into our intestines bind the gut particles in the same way that flour holds a ball of dough together. Now a new mice-based study from Caltech is showing that dietary fiber also plays a role in clumping. This is the first time that researchers have shown that fiber—stringy molecules found in food

5h

Meet Hippocamp, “The Moon That Shouldn’t Be There”

Moon Boon In 2013, scientists discovered a tiny moon orbiting Neptune. They gave it the forgettable name S/2004 N 1, but it soon earned the nickname of “ the moon that shouldn’t be there ,” because its size and placement didn’t make sense to astronomers. Now, a team of planetary scientists has not only given Neptune’s 14th moon a more memorable moniker — Hippocamp — but also unraveled some of the

5h

Skybrudsvand ender i haven i stedet for i kælderen

PLUS. I stedet for at løse skybrudsproblemer med større rør og bassiner, skal vi have flere vandpytter, siger Cathrine Leth fra Call Copenhagen, der promoverer LAP: Lokal Afledning af Peaks.

5h

Building GPUs Out of Entire Wafers Could Turbocharge Performance, Efficiency

An old approach to manufacturing could yield tremendous dividends if applied to modern processors. The post Building GPUs Out of Entire Wafers Could Turbocharge Performance, Efficiency appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Nine Key Questions About the Green New Deal

If you’ve heard a lot recently about the Green New Deal but still aren’t quite sure what it is, we’re here to help.

5h

Trilobites: The World’s Largest Bee Is Not Extinct

An expedition of conservationists found a living Wallace’s Giant Bee on remote islands in Indonesia. It hadn’t been seen since 1981.

5h

Decrease anxiety about learning English with mobile gaming

It's normal to experience some anxiety when speaking a second language. When paired with large class sizes and limited opportunities for practice during class time, however, this anxiety can limit a person's ability to perform in the language classroom.

5h

Applying computational chemistry to simulate realistic chemical processes

The waters of science are muddy these days—especially at the University of California San Diego where all that separates a chemist from a physicist in some cases is office drywall. Chemists ask the questions in their experiments, and physicists supply the answers with the tools needed to do the job. Sometimes that job needs to be quicker and easier, so a computational expert is called in. Add a bi

5h

Surprising findings on forest fires

Lake Van in eastern Turkey is considered a unique climate archive. Several years ago, an international team of scientists led by the University of Bonn raised sediments from the bottom of the lake reflecting the past 600,000 years. An interdisciplinary group of soil scientists and paleobotanists from the University of Bonn has now evaluated the drill cores for residues of early fires—with surprisi

5h

A “Tiltrotor” Helicopter May Replace the Army’s Black Hawk

Time to Upgrade The U.S. Army is currently developing replacements for its famous Black Hawk helicopter, which has been a mainstay of the military since it was developed in the 1970s. Decades later, the Black Hawk is too slow and has too short a range to be practical. One of the frontrunners to replace it borrows the best from planes and helicopters — with two rotating wings, each of which houses

5h

How plants learned to save water

Tiny pores on the leaves of plants, called stomata, have a huge influence on the state of our planet. Through the stomata, plants absorb carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into carbohydrates, and release oxygen. But they also lose water through open pores, which can be life-threatening for plants in dry conditions.

5h

Popularity contest: Student likeability might be link between academic success and risk of depression

A new study suggests that children doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically.

5h

Five insights that could move tourism closer towards sustainability

Tourism is New Zealand's biggest export earner, contributing 21% of foreign exchange earnings. The latest data show tourists added NZ$39.1 billion to the economy and the industry has seen a 44% increase over the past five years.

5h

A qualitative model to describe microscopic 'jumps' by adhesive tape unwinding from a roll

A team of researchers from Universite de Lyon and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique has developed a qualitative model to describe microscopic "jumps" that happen when adhesive tape is unwound from a roll. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of the process using high-speed cameras and what they found.

5h

Prenatal exposure to plastics linked to motor skill deficiencies at age 11

Scientists with the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report motor skills problems in children exposed during pregnancy to plasticizer chemicals known as phthalates that are widely used in personal care products like moisturizers and lipstick, as well as plastic containers and children's toys.

5h

Tiny Neptune moon spotted by Hubble may have broken from larger moon

After several years of analysis, a team of planetary scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has at last come up with an explanation for a mysterious moon around Neptune that they discovered with Hubble in 2013.

5h

Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions — it helps reduce crime

It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new University of British Columbia study suggests they can also significantly reduce crime in the neighborhoods in which they are deployed.

5h

Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk

Consumption of allium vegetables — which include garlic, leeks, and onions — was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China.

5h

Student likeability might be link between academic success and risk of depression

A new study suggests that children doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically.

5h

People with osteoporosis should avoid spinal poses in yoga, Mayo Clinic study says

Yoga postures that flex the spine beyond its limits may raise the risk of compression fractures in people with thinning bones, according to research from Mayo Clinic. The results appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Silver linings come from partner support, research says

Spouses can help breast cancer patients with coping by positively reframing the cancer experience and other negative experiences. In general, positive reframing — finding the silver lining — was associated with less stress. Researchers suggest the findings can be extended to a broader population.

5h

Development of nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz

Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology.

5h

Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world

Capsicum is a major vegetable and spice crop worldwide. Global production of both fresh and dried fruit continues to increase steadily in terms of area harvested and total yield. This review informs the reader and also inspires increased interest and collaboration among scientists to address the many questions regarding the botany, physiology, genetics, genomics, etc., of this important crop plant

5h

Artificial intelligence can identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol

A first-of-its kind study has demonstrated that an artificial intelligence technique can be used to identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol. Researchers used the technique, natural language processing, to identify alcohol misusers from clinician notes in electronic health records. In 78 percent of cases, the technique was able to differentiate between patients who misused alcohol and those who

5h

World’s biggest bee rediscovered after decades on ‘most wanted’ list

The giant black bee is the size of a human thumb, with a wingspan of 6 centimetres and fierce-looking mandibles

5h

The Catholic Church’s Battle Between Rhetoric and Reality

ROME—Pope Francis opened a highly anticipated meeting about the sexual-abuse crisis in the Catholic Church with remarks that were strong, brief, and to the point. “The holy people of God looks to us, and expects from us not simple and predictable condemnations, but concrete and effective measures to be undertaken. We need to be concrete,” he said. But how to be concrete? In this seemingly never-e

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Could an artificial nervous and endocrine system make robots feel everything humans or animals feel, including temperature, pain, emotions, feelings, and sexual pleasure and sexual desire?

I believe a nervous system and endocryne system could make robots feel everything a human being can feel, even sex arousal and sexual desire. Even physiological sensations like temperature, pain, and hunger may be possible. However somehow robot bodies would have artifitial glands and nerve parts that would produce the artifitial hormones and neurotransmitters, along with the receptors. I think t

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Could UBI for basic needs and a gig economy for disposable income, be a lot more responsive to demand, and so more economically successful that what we have now?

I suppose it would be dependant on getting the UBI amount just right? Thoughts? submitted by /u/Jakeypoos [link] [comments]

5h

How plants learned to save water

Tiny pores on the leaves of plants, called stomata, have a huge influence on the state of our planet. Through the stomata, plants absorb carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into carbohydrates, and release oxygen. But they also lose water through open pores, which can be life-threatening for plants in dry conditions.

5h

The best rain gear for motorcycle riders

Technology Motorcyclist magazine's top selections to help you stay dry during rainy rides. We break down some of the riding gear we count on when riding in the wet.

6h

Worrying long-term stability of pesticides in honey

Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. This is a follow up to their study on the global contamination of honey by these pesticides published in the Journal Science in October 2017. The authors, which also include colleagues from the Botanical Garden of Neuchâte

6h

Bacteria can survive starvation in zombie mode

Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown, alternative survival strategy: a kind of zombie mode, in which the bacteria do not sleep, but slow down extremely. Their discovery has been published in the journal Nature Com

6h

A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover

A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history—the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows. At the time, it extended over three con

6h

Study finds increase in calls to US Poison Control Centers for kratom exposure

A new study found that there were more than 1,800 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to kratom from January 2011 through December 2017.

6h

Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics

The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic. Originating in the ringed teeth of a squid's predatory arms, this protein can be processed into fibers and films with applications ranging from health-monitoring 'smart' clothes to self-healing recyclable fabrics that reduce microplastic poll

6h

Bacteria can survive starvation in zombie mode

Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown, alternative survival strategy: a kind of zombie mode, in which the bacteria do not sleep, but slow down extremely. Their discovery has been published in the journal Nature Com

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New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells

The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) have discovered that the protein Akna plays a key role in this process. It controls, for example, the behavior of neural stem cells via a mechanism that may also be involved in the formation of metastases. The

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Tiny T-Rex ancestor was smaller than you

When you think of tyrannosaurs, the first thing that probably comes to mind is the terrifying, giant predator from the Jurassic Park movies – but even the biggest names have to start …

6h

Apple and Goldman Sachs plan to launch an iPhone-linked credit card this year

The card, which will be linked with Apple Wallet, will let users set spending goals, track rewards, and manage balances. It's expected to roll out among employees first, then more widely in …

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'Flying bulldog': world's largest bee refound

The world's largest bee—a giant insect roughly the size of a human thumb—has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said Thursday.

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Gold nano-stars for intracellular delivery

Researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a new method for star-shaped nanoparticles synthesis based on laser irradiation. A wide range of customizable conditions provides an opportunity to create a comfortable environment for various substances for delivery to different types of cells. The results are published in Journal of Biophotonics. The research was supported by the Russian

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New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells

The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) have discovered that the protein Akna plays a key role in this process. It controls, for example, the behavior of neural stem cells via a mechanism that may also be involved in the formation of metastases. The

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Sculpting stable structures in pure liquids

Oscillating flow and light pulses can be used to create reconfigurable architecture in liquid crystals. Materials scientists can carefully engineer concerted microfluidic flows and localized optothermal fields to achieve control on nucleation , growth and shape of such liquid domains. In comparison, pure liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium are structurally homogeneous. Experimental work based on

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Australia's been hacked – so will the data be weaponised to influence election 2019? Here's what to look for

Prime Minister Scott Morrison recently said both the Australian Parliament and its major political parties were hacked by a "sophisticated state actor."

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Climate change: Obsession with plastic pollution distracts attention from bigger environmental challenges

By now, most of us have heard that the use of plastics is a big issue for the environment. Partly fuelled by the success of the BBC's Blue Planet II series, people are more aware than ever before about the dangers to wildlife caused by plastic pollution – as well as the impact it can have on human health – with industries promising money to tackle the issue.

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This Massive, Nightmare Bee Was Once Thought Extinct. Not Anymore.

The world's biggest bee species has been feared extinct since it was last seen in 1981.

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Simulated ocean mesoscale structures induce air-sea interaction

The mesoscale activities (or mesoscale structures) in the ocean possess immense energy. Such structures (including oceanic fronts and eddies) can induce mesoscale air-sea interaction (MASI) and then greatly impact oceanic circulation. MASI is distinct from large-scale interaction mainly in terms of the atmospheric forcing, and it can be revealed by high-resolution observations and simulations.

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Supplying high-quality cancer-imaging isotopes

Zirconium-89 is a radionuclide that's just right for cancer tumor imaging. When the isotope is combined with a tumor-seeking molecule, it lasts long enough in the body to find the tumor and to be imaged. Researchers developed a less labor intensive and more efficient way to chemically process and purify the isotope. They use a low energy cyclotron, a simple target station, and an automated chemica

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Can smoking cessation reduce rheumatoid arthritis risk?

In an Arthritis Care & Research analysis of 230,732 women, those who quit smoking many years ago had a lower risk of a certain form of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with women who recently quit.

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How to keep the stink bugs out this winter

Two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away

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Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior

The most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon using radio-telemetry reveals new and surprising information about how they use their habitats, how they spend their time, and how they interact with their own species. Researchers conducted radio-tracking by boat, with assistance from a Cessna 172 aircraft, and visually located and followed nine dolphins se

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New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex

A newly discovered, diminutive — by T. rex standards — relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North American roost.

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Researchers develop new compound that offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS

Previous studies have shown that estrogens and estrogen-like compounds reduce multiple sclerosis-like inflammation and disability in mice. At first glance these treatments appear promising, but they carry a host of negative side effects, from feminizing male mice to increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke. An interdisciplinary team of scientists have piggy-backed on this approach w

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Penn State's Habitable Zone Planet Finder enables discovery of planets around cool stars

A new astronomical spectrograph provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, allowing astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our solar system.

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Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut

A new study in mice shows dietary fiber promotes the aggregation of gut particles.

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New blood test may map fetal genome for countless mutations

Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy.

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Russian physicists trained the oscillatory neural network to recognize images

Physicists from Petrozavodsk State University have proposed a new method for oscillatory neural network to recognize simple images. Such networks with an adjustable synchronous state of individual neurons have, presumably, a dynamics similar to neurons in the living brain.

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AI may be better for detecting radar signals, facilitating spectrum sharing

In a new paper, NIST researchers demonstrate that deep learning algorithms — a form of artificial intelligence — are significantly better than a commonly used method for detecting when offshore radars are operating, which can potentially improve certain spectrum-sharing operations.

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Water, soil analysis technology may help improve cleanup and monitoring at contaminated Superfund sites

At least 53 million Americans, including about 18 percent of the nation's children, live less than three miles from a Superfund site, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

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Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation

Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake in these waters, a new study led by Duke University scientists shows.

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Even coral reefs are affected by socio-economics

Marine biologists working to save the world's coral reefs say that they are increasingly being affected by human activities. As a result, the marine biologists now need to include an assessment of the effects of activities, perhaps in distant markets or cities, on the survival of coral reefs.

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Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa

Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird – the now extinct adzebill – showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.

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Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa

Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird – the now extinct adzebill – showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.

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Female presidents are held to higher standards than males

Kirsten Gillibrand, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar—the list of women who have thrown their hats into the ring for the 2020 U.S. presidential election continues to grow.

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How to freeze heat conduction

Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy.

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Innovative nanocoating technology harnesses sunlight to degrade microplastics

Low density polyethylene film (LDPE) microplastic fragments successfully degraded in water using visible-light-excited heterogeneous ZnO photocatalysts. The innovative nanocoating technology was developed by a research team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.

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Habitable zone planet finder enables discovery of planets around cool stars

A new astronomical spectrograph built by a Penn State-led team of scientists provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, allowing astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our solar system. The Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) allows precise measurement of a star's radial velocity, m

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World's biggest bee found alive

A giant bee, thought lost to science decades ago, has been re-discovered on an Indonesian island.

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The Triumphant Rediscovery of the Biggest Bee on Earth

Despite the astonishing size of Wallace's giant bee, the species was lost to science for 40 years. This is the story of its dramatic rediscovery.

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16 Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Stream Right Now—From 'Roma' to 'RBG'

Better hurry, the Academy Awards show is on Sunday.

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Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics

The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic. Originating in the ringed teeth of a squid's predatory arms, this protein can be processed into fibers and films with applications ranging from health-monitoring 'smart' clothes to self-healing recyclable fabrics that reduce microplastic poll

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Salt could be a key factor in allergic immune reactions

Researchers have demonstrated in cell cultures that salt leads to the formation of Th2 cells. These immune cells are active in allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis. The team also detected elevated salt concentrations in the skin of patients.

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Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy

Scientists have found that children with both atopic dermatitis and food allergy have structural and molecular differences in top layers of skin near the eczema lesions, whereas children with atopic dermatitis alone don't. Defining these differences may help identify children at risk for developing food allergies.

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A deer-sized T. rex ancestor shows how fast tyrannosaurs became giants

A newly found dinosaur called Moros intrepidus fills a hole in the evolutionary history of tyrannosaurs, helping narrow when the group sized up.

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Teeny T. rex relative discovered in US

A newly discovered relative of T. rex stood just a metre or more tall at the hip, a study suggests.

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World's largest bee, missing for 38 years, found in Indonesia

Biologists discover single female Wallace’s giant bee inside a termites’ nest in a tree As long as an adult thumb, with jaws like a stag beetle and four times larger than a honeybee, Wallace’s giant bee is not exactly inconspicuous. But after going missing, feared extinct, for 38 years, the world’s largest bee has been rediscovered on the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. Continue reading

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Apple and Samsung lose ground in smartphone market as Chinese rivals pile on pressure

Data from research firm Gartner showed that across the whole of 2018, Samsung’s market share fell from 20.9 percent to 19 percent, while Apple went from 14 percent to 13.4 percent. Gartner says …

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Microsoft HoloLens app is coming to Android phones – CNET

The company is increasing the reach of its mixed reality software, at least for businesses.

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Fler alkoholrelaterade skador bland äldre

Huvudorsaken till äldre personers ökade känslighet för alkoholens omedelbara och långsiktiga effekter beror dels på fysiologiska och kroppsliga förändringar, dels på medicinska faktorer. Ett exempel på hur känsligheten ökar med åren är att kroppsvikten ofta minskar när personer blir äldre, vilket innebär att alkoholhalten i blodet blir högre när de dricker samma mängd som tidigare. Dessutom kan f

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Tio skäl att bevara gräsmarkerna

– Vi tycker att gräsmarkerna borde få högre prioritet i planeringen av hur landskapet ska skötas i framtiden. De är en viktig del av jordbrukslandskapet som vi har nytta av på många sätt. De har till exempel betydelse för vattenhushållning, bete för djur, klimatet, biologisk mångfald och speglar även vår kulturhistoria. Tänk bara på den lövade midsommarstången i en hage, säger professor Jan Bengt

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Who’s the Cutest Little Tyrannosaur? Is It You?

In 2012, Lindsay Zanno was searching for dinosaur fossils in the hillsides of eastern Utah when she found a bone protruding from the hillside. Most of it was still wreathed in rock, but Zanno, who heads the paleontology division at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, could already tell that it was the limb of some two-legged meat eater. “That was a thrilling moment,” she says. It took

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LMC S154 is a symbiotic recurrent nova, study suggests

Astronomers have conducted observations of a symbiotic star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), known as LMC S154, which provide new insights about the nature of this object. Results of these observations, presented in a paper published February 7 on arXiv.org, suggest that LMC S154 is a symbiotic recurrent nova—the first such object identified in Magellanic Clouds.

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New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex

A newly discovered, diminutive—by T. rex standards—relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North American roost.

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Tiny T.rex ancestor throws light on predator evolution

US discovery adds important piece to evolutionary puzzle. Andrew Masterson reports.

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What are the real health effects of coal power?

China and the US are the two largest producers of coal power, but power plants in India take the highest toll in the world when it comes to health, according to new research. To estimate where in the world most urgently requires action to fight the health effects of coal power, Stefanie Hellweg’s research group from ETH Zurich’s Institute of Environmental Engineering modeled and calculated the un

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For adult scoliosis, surgery, other treatments are viable options

A study of adults with the spinal deformity known as lumbar scoliosis determined that the most important factor in determining whether to do surgery is the extent of a patient's disability, as well as how much that disability interferes with day-to-day life.

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Study of quark speeds finds a solution for a 35-year physics mystery

MIT physicists now have an answer to a question in nuclear physics that has puzzled scientists for three decades: Why do quarks move more slowly inside larger atoms?

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Sådan siger partierne ovenpå de første møder om sundhedsreformen

Dagens Medicin har mødt alle de partier, regeringen har inviteret til sættemøder om sundhedsreformen. Særligt ét parti er positivt indstillet, mens de øvrige varierer fra mellemfornøjede til stærkt pessimistiske.

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Greta Thunberg tells EU: your climate targets need doubling

Swede, 16, says EU cannot just ‘wait for us to grow up and become the ones in charge’ The EU should double its climate change reduction targets to do its fair share in keeping the planet below a dangerous level of global warming, the Swedish activist Greta Thunberg has told political and business leaders in Brussels. Flanked by students from the Belgian and German school strike movements, the Swe

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Indonesian fires robbed kids of height and future income

Forest fires in Indonesia stunted the growth of children who were exposed to smoke while in the womb, research finds. In 1997, which was an abnormally dry year, fires set to clear land primarily for oil palm plantations in Indonesia spread and burned out of control. Between August and October, when the fires were most intense, they engulfed 11 million hectares (27.2 million acres), causing massiv

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Google says it can't fix a security flaw affecting all computer chips

A critical security flaw called Spectre affecting nearly every computer is here to stay. According to Google there isn’t any software that can fix it

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Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce

Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a family studies researcher.

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Spinraza-konkurrent er mere skånsom for patienten

Spinraza-konkurrenten Zolgensma forventes at blive godkendt af EU til efteråret. Zolgensma er en mere skånsom behandling for patienten, men den er en kostelig affære, siger overlæge.

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Can we all move to Mars? Prof Martin Rees on space exploration – video

The first of a series of films called 'Five minute masterminds' starts with Prof Martin Rees, the astronomer royal. He asks how the future of space exploration will transform how we think of humanity and if we can rely on mass emigration to Mars to save us from the Earth's problems Continue reading…

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300 år sedan monarken i Sverige tappade makten

Carl XVI Gustaf har ingen formell makt alls. Just idag den 21 februari är det 300 år sedan makten togs ifrån monarken för första gången – när enväldet avskaffades.

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How a zebra's stripes put bloodthirsty flies into a tailspin

Animals This optical illusion serves a purpose. Why do zebras have stripes? Many have considered the classic quandary, Darwin included. Stripes could be camouflage, create herd-wide optical illusions to deter hungry…

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The need for minimum energy efficiency standards for rental properties

It's not news that rental homes are less energy efficient than other dwellings. Although energy efficiency pays dividends for an owner-occupier, landlords have little incentive to invest, as they would bear the cost without experiencing the benefits. Rental properties thus tend to be harder and costlier to heat and to cool.

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Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds, according to new research.

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The Fishy Mystery of Lake Malawi

In the second-largest lake in Africa, fish evolution is taking place at an explosive rate. Why? Scientists are diving into the question

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Galaxies, merging

Astronomers find a neutron star about to be crunched between two colliding star systems.

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Making Water on the Moon

If all goes well, the 2020s may be the decade that we return to the Moon. There is certainly renewed interest in the Moon, and we may, in fact, be entering a new space race with China. In December 2018 NASA announced their updated Gateway mission plans – they seek to put a platform in permanent orbit around the moon, and then use the platform to shuttle astronauts to and from the Moon’s surface.

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What’s all that other stuff in my medicine?

Are all those extra ingredients in your medicine or supplement, like fillers and coatings, something to be concerned about?

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I Stopped Using Exclamation Points and Lost All My Friends

At the same time, I found a better way to make a point.

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Instacart Delivers Groceries, but Detaches Us From Our Food

The less we touch our food, the further we get away from its significance.

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Revealed: the carrot of youth

A Japanese salad vegetable is a natural source of a compound with anti-ageing properties. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Rediscovered: the biggest bee in the world

Insect seen only twice in 170 years found in a termites’ nest. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Changing on the beach: introduced plant underwent rapid evolution

South African daisy transplanted to Australia looks very different after less than a century. Nick Carne reports.

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Cometh the medium, cometh the media star

Major analysis finds link between communications tech and the types of people who become famous. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Yeasts stole bacteria genes to survive in insect stomachs

Rare case of horizontal transfer between two life domains reported. Nick Carne reports.

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Image of the Day: Nuclei Hoarders

When lacking certain enzymes that help plants coordinate cell division, Arabidopsis thaliana cells grow and collect multiple nuclei.

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Smaller, safer, cheaper: One company aims to reinvent the nuclear reactor and save a warming planet

By shrinking its reactors, NuScale Power aims to compete with cheap natural gas

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One tiny step for a nematode, one big step toward sustainable agriculture in space

An exciting collaboration between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Pheronym (Alachua, FL), will send nematodes (small round worms) into space to the International Space Station (ISS). The mission represents a look into the future where food crops will be grown in space.

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One tiny step for a nematode, one big step toward sustainable agriculture in space

An exciting collaboration between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Pheronym (Alachua, FL), will send nematodes (small round worms) into space to the International Space Station (ISS). The mission represents a look into the future where food crops will be grown in space.

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New study—how to save a seabird

In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries. Marine fisheries scientist Ed Melvin, at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington, and research associate Kim Dietrich, an independent contractor, were at the forefront of a collaborative res

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CRISPR er nyt våben mod banan-død verden over

Flere forskerteams er på vej med virus- og svamperesistente bananer skabt med CRISPR i en tid, hvor banandyrkere lider massive tab.

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New study—how to save a seabird

In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries. Marine fisheries scientist Ed Melvin, at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington, and research associate Kim Dietrich, an independent contractor, were at the forefront of a collaborative res

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The potential of non-toxic materials to replace lead in perovskite solar cells

Developing efficient solar cells without lead as a major component remains a "formidable scientific challenge," according to a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

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Life-changing magic of tidying up—complex structural organization studied in slime mold

Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination.

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Life-changing magic of tidying up—complex structural organization studied in slime mold

Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination.

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Solar wind fills research sails at space weather center

Researchers at CU Boulder are starting work on a new collaborative grant from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that will improve solar wind modeling.

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Getting Lost Makes the Brain Go Haywire

On the evening of December 18, 2004, in the hamlet of Madiran, in southwestern France, a man named Jean-Luc Josuat-Vergès wandered into the tunnels of an abandoned mushroom farm and got lost. Josuat-Vergès, who was 48 and employed as a caretaker at a local health center, had been depressed. Leaving his wife and 14-year-old son at home, he’d driven up into the hills with a bottle of whiskey and a

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Serendipity reveals sex bias in embryo development

New published research from the College of Veterinary Medicine shows that heightened levels of genomic instability can prove fatal to female embryos in mice.

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Serendipity reveals sex bias in embryo development

New published research from the College of Veterinary Medicine shows that heightened levels of genomic instability can prove fatal to female embryos in mice.

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A Brilliant Daytime Meteor Exploded Over Cuba This Month. Here's Where It Came From

Astronomers just got the goods on the meteor that flared up over Cuba earlier this month.

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This Fish Just Gave Evolution the Finger and Got Pregnant

Mary's species of fish never evolved to have sex or incubate live young. She did it anyway.

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Kratom 'Poisonings' Have Increased 50-Fold in Recent Years

Calls to U.S. poison centers regarding the herbal supplement kratom have increased dramatically in recent years.

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Meet Hippocamp: Neptune's Smallest Moon Has a Name (and a Violent Past)

A faint and frigid little moon doesn't have to go by "Neptune XIV" anymore.

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De återskapar gammaldags murbruk för restaurering

För att anpassa murbruk till nya byggnadsmaterial och industriella metoder under 1900-talet förändrades innehållet i mur och putsbruk. Förändringen innebar att kunskap om historiska material och metoder för framställning av bruk gick förlorad. – Kunskapen är viktig att återta för att vårda och bevara kulturhistoriska byggnader som är byggda med andra material än vad som används i dag, säger Jonny

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Fat bats withstand the effects of white-nose syndrome, study finds

Although white-nose syndrome (WNS) has pushed some bat populations to extinction, researchers have found that higher fat stores are helping some little brown bats to survive this deadly disease. The study, led by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, was published February 19 in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

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Ocean acidification shown to have negative impact on fish skeletons

For more than a century, the world's oceans have been becoming steadily more acidic as they soak up ever-increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the impacts can be fatal for invertebrates such as shellfish, plankton, and corals that rely on dissolved minerals to build their shells and exoskeletons.

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First Private Moon Lander Heralds New Lunar Space Race

An Israeli firm is sending a privately built craft to the Moon—and leading a fresh era of exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fat bats withstand the effects of white-nose syndrome, study finds

Although white-nose syndrome (WNS) has pushed some bat populations to extinction, researchers have found that higher fat stores are helping some little brown bats to survive this deadly disease. The study, led by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, was published February 19 in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

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Ocean acidification shown to have negative impact on fish skeletons

For more than a century, the world's oceans have been becoming steadily more acidic as they soak up ever-increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the impacts can be fatal for invertebrates such as shellfish, plankton, and corals that rely on dissolved minerals to build their shells and exoskeletons.

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Scientists Need to Talk to the Public

And plenty of resources are available to help them learn how to do it well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Microsoft Wants Rules for Facial Recognition—Just Not These

Microsoft executives have urged lawmakers to set restrictions on the technology, but the company is opposing a Washington state bill that would do just that.

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A 'Smart Wall' Could Spark a New Kind of Border Crisis

A technological barrier might be preferable to a physical one, but it raises civil liberties concerns that are largely absent from the debate.

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The Problem With Trump’s Pledge to End HIV

According to a blueprint released by the Department of Health and Human Services, President Trump’s plan to end HIV will be focused on expanding efforts to diagnose, treat, and prevent cases of HIV/AIDS. But if we are to permanently defeat the epidemic, what we really need is a cure.

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A philosopher argues that an AI can’t be an artist

Creativity is, and always will be, a human endeavor.

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The Impossible Job of Speaking Truth to Trump

Dan Coats was nervous. Ahead of his very first threat briefing to Congress nearly two years ago, he was having trouble keeping straight what he could say in the unclassified part and what he had to save for the classified portion. He had retired from the Senate just months before—now he’d been thrust into an entirely different kind of job as the director of national intelligence. In the words of

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Scientists Need to Talk to the Public

And plenty of resources are available to help them learn how to do it well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent. "There is still a long way to go before we arrive at a pharmaceutical product," said Hell

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First private mission to the moon is about to launch on SpaceX rocket

The moon has only ever been visited by government superpowers, but a small Israeli non-profit called SpaceIL is about to change that with its lunar lander

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Why We Stink at Tackling Climate Change – Issue 69: Patterns

What’s wrong with us? Not us Democrats, Republicans, or Americans. Rather, what’s wrong with our species, Homo sapiens ? If human beings are as Hamlet suggested, “noble in reason, infinite in faculty,” then why are we facing so many problems? In many ways, people are better off than ever before: reduced infant mortality, longer lifespans, less poverty, fewer epidemic diseases, even fewer deaths p

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The Impossible Mathematics of the Real World – Issue 69: Patterns

Using stiff paper and transparent tape, Craig Kaplan assembles a beautiful roundish shape that looks like a Buckminster Fuller creation or a fancy new kind of soccer ball. It consists of four regular dodecagons (12-sided polygons with all angles and sides the same) and 12 decagons (10-sided), with 28 little gaps in the shape of equilateral triangles. There’s just one problem. This figure should b

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Watch and See: The Medium Really Is the Message – Issue 69: Patterns

Cesar Hidalgo, director of the Collective Learning group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, would like you to know that Marshall McLuhan was right. And he has the datasets to prove it. In a new paper, “ How the Medium Shapes the Message: Printing and the Rise of the Arts and Sciences ,” named after the media philosopher’s renowned phrase, “the medium is the message,” Hidalgo

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What Dark Matter Needs Are New Kinds of Experiments – Issue 69: Patterns

Three decades have passed since the first direct search for dark matter, a modest attempt at recycling the data from a particle detector originally built for another purpose. This work was a rapid response to a proposal by theoretical physicists Mark Goodman and Edward Witten, who called attention to the possibility of detecting dark matter via nuclear recoils. The experimental approach proposed

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Lasers control a mini-light show

Lasers control a mini-light show Lasers control a mini-light show, Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00624-w Device achieves resolution thousands of times higher than current display screens.

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Complete world map of tree diversity

Biodiversity is one of Earth's most precious resources. However, for most places in the world, scientists only have a tiny picture of what this diversity actually is. Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have now constructed from scattered data a world map of biodiversity showing numbers of tree species. W

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Google indrømmer fejl: Fortalte ingen om skjult mikrofon i produkt

I et alarmprodukt fra Googles Nest-serie har der været anbragt en mikrofon, selvom virksomheden ikke har oplyst omkring det i produktets specifikationer.

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Svenskere presser lidar-teknologi ned i mikrochip

Den dyre lidarteknologi krymper og nærmer sig en mikrochip til en lav pris og med lavt energiforbrug. Et hold svenske forskere viser en ny silicium-chip frem, som fungerer som lidar, der kan bruges til droner, robotter eller kikkertoperationer.

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Journals deny corrections to Chiara Francavilla

Manchester scientist Chiara Francavilla discovered duplicated images in her older papers and submitted correction requests to Molecular Cell and JCB, only to be ignored.

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New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent. "There is still a long way to go before we arrive at a pharmaceutical product," said Hell

8h

Complete world map of tree diversity

Biodiversity is one of Earth's most precious resources. However, for most places in the world, scientists only have a tiny picture of what this diversity actually is. Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have now constructed from scattered data a world map of biodiversity showing numbers of tree species. W

8h

Water is more homogeneous than expected

In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases, even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses at BESSY II, ESRF and Swiss Light Source show that this is not the case. At room temperature and normal pressure, the water molecules form a fluctuating network with an average of 1.74 ± 2.1 percent donor

8h

The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy

The smell of food induces a variety of physiological processes in our body. Thus, the production of saliva and digestive enzymes is stimulated before the actual food intake in order to prepare the gastrointestinal tract for the upcoming digestive process. In a healthy organism, this coordination depends on a dynamic balance between formation and degradation of proteins (proteostasis). This plays a

8h

'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D

Miniaturization is the watchword of progress. Nanoscience, studying structures on the scale of a few atoms, has been at the forefront of chemistry for some time now. Recently, researchers at the University of Tokyo developed the new strategy to construct sub-nanosized metal aggregates, building up small metal clusters into grander 3-D architectures. Their creations could have real industrial value

8h

The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy

The smell of food induces a variety of physiological processes in our body. Thus, the production of saliva and digestive enzymes is stimulated before the actual food intake in order to prepare the gastrointestinal tract for the upcoming digestive process. In a healthy organism, this coordination depends on a dynamic balance between formation and degradation of proteins (proteostasis). This plays a

8h

Zombie Stars Shine On after Mystery Detonations

A newly discovered class of odd stars appears to have persevered through supernova explosions—providing a rare glimpse into these astrophysical catastrophes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Zombie Stars Shine On after Mystery Detonations

A newly discovered class of odd stars appears to have persevered through supernova explosions—providing a rare glimpse into these astrophysical catastrophes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

'It eats everything'—the new breed of wildfire that's impossible to predict

We're fighting a different kind of wildfire whose behaviour experts are struggling to predict.

9h

Hoppkräftor utsöndrar dofter som påverkar hela havet

Ämnena som hoppkräftorna släpper ut som försvar i havsvattnet kallas copepodamider. När växtplankton i vattnet känner av copepodamiderna aktiverar de sina försvarsmekanismer för att undvika att bli uppätna. En del växtplankton producerar då ljus, mareld. Andra plankton använder sig av kemisk krigsföring och producerar gift eller krymper i storlek. – Eftersom växtplanktonen i havet är grunden för

9h

The consideration and care that ought to be taken considering the advent of Automation and UBI

People have a certain aversion to UBI because they believe it would make people not contribute to the workforce, which research suggests isn't the case in most studies. The deeper problem might lie with the fact that people see labor and work as something that gives their life meaning, when in reality, meaning is intrinsic to itself and can be derived through more "meaningful" work. Work that ena

9h

Smarte kontakter skulle spare strøm, men sluger selv energien

PLUS. Mellem 13,8 og 21 procent af elforbruget i to demonstrationsbyggerier stammede fra de smarte kontakter, der egentlig skulle hjælpe med at spare på strømmen.

9h

Kommuner: Vi har ikke brug for mere digital overvågning af borgerne

Ønsket fra kommunernes socialchefer om flere overvågningsmuligheder til bekæmpelse af socialt bedrageri støttes ikke af Kommunernes Landsforening.

9h

Ban gas boilers for new UK homes by 2025, says climate report

A report by the Committee on Climate Change, which advises the UK government, has said that the UK must tackle energy inefficient homes to meet climate targets

9h