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nyheder2019februar22

Touchdown: Japan probe Hayabusa2 lands on distant asteroid

A Japanese probe sent to collect samples from an asteroid 300 million kilometres away for clues about the origin of life and the solar system landed successfully on Friday, scientists said.

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Trods forskeres advarsler: Sojabønner i biobrændsler går fri af nye EU-regler

Når biodiesel laves på sojabønner, bliver der ryddet jordområder med et højt kulstoflager, og det fører til markante CO2-udslip. Alligevel stempler en ny EU-akt biodiesel fra sojabønner som et bæredygtigt biobrændsel.

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Your dog’s personality can change over time

Like humans, dogs’ personalities likely change over time, according to new research. When dog owners spend extra time scratching their dogs’ bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs’ naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their pets’ personalities. Dogs, like people, have moods and personality traits th

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Alzheimer's: 'Holy herb' extract shows promise as future treatment

A laboratory screen found that a compound in the Yerba santa medicinal plant protects against several age-related triggers of death in mouse nerve cells.

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Pharmaceutical residues in fresh water pose a growing environmental risk

Over the past 20 years, concentrations of pharmaceuticals have increased in freshwater sources all over the world, as research by environmental experts has revealed. Levels of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have reached the point of potentially causing damaging ecological effects.

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Apps send intimate user data to Facebook: report

A news report Friday said many smartphone apps were sending highly personal information such as menstrual cycles and body weight to Facebook, without notifying users.

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A Stunning 'Firefall' Flared to Life in Yosemite This Week

The firefall has returned to Yosemite. All hail the firefall.

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A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Researchers probed a special kind of magnet containing atoms arranged in a pattern called a kagome lattice, which takes its name from a Japanese basket. They found that electrons in this material exhibit exotic behaviors that could be exploited for futuristic applications — and that under a high magnetic field some electrons in this material act like an upside-down magnet.

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Judging The Value of Forensic Evidence

Judging The Value of Forensic Evidence A New York district judge weighs in on using forensic science evidence in the courtroom. Judging The Value of Forensic Evidence Video of Judging The Value of Forensic Evidence Culture Friday, February 22, 2019 – 13:00 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — According to Senior U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff, at the Southern District of New York, "Forensic s

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Free Brain Awareness Week Handouts and Resources

Now in its 24 th year, Brain Awareness Week (March 11-17) is rapidly approaching, and this is the time for partners (and everyone) to take advantage of the free downloadable materials we have available on dana.org . Our printable fact sheets and puzzles make great handouts during this week-long celebration of the brain, as well for other neuroscience outreach events throughout the year. Our lesso

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A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Researchers probed a special kind of magnet containing atoms arranged in a pattern called a kagome lattice, which takes its name from a Japanese basket. They found that electrons in this material exhibit exotic behaviors that could be exploited for futuristic applications — and that under a high magnetic field some electrons in this material act like an upside-down magnet.

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Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study shows. Overall, 40 percent of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20 percent were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose role in the disease remains unknown.

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Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

The development of a simply made and easy-to-use planting device could make growing important herbs and beneficial insect-attracting plants significantly more efficient and effective. The low-cost tool, known as the Slide Hammer Seeder (a jab-style seeder), gives farmers and gardeners specific control in sowing plants with very small seeds.

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What tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common

Researchers are parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp.

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Virgin Galactic Sends a Rocket Plane Into Space for a Second TimeVirgin Galactic Space

After sending pilots to the edge of space in December, the company moved another step closer to commercial space travel with another safe flight on Friday.

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Celebrex may increase risk of heart valve disease

Scientists have discovered a link between a common arthritis drug and heart valve disease. The findings run counter to a well-known four-year study that found Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs, commonly called NSAIDs. W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University, and PhD student Megan Bowler started out testing celecoxib, the active compo

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United States extends fetal tissue contract and revives one experiment

Department mum on status of review of controversial research

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Virgin Galactic’s Space Plane Soars to New Heights

New Heights Virgin Galactic’s supersonic space plane, the VSS Unity, took off on its fifth test flight today. Mothership WhiteKnightTwo released the suborbital space plane at around 44,000 feet — and VSS Unity reached a new maximum altitude of 55.85 miles (89.9km.) The second generation SpaceShipTwo, dubbed VSS Unity, reached an altitude of 51.4 miles (82.7 km) during its fourth test flight in De

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Surgery for adult scoliosis? Depends on your life

New research clarifies the debate over how to treat scoliosis in adults. Spinal curvature often results in more back pain, leg pain, and other symptoms for adults than teens because adults also can have degeneration in the discs between vertebrae, and spinal stenosis—a narrowing of the opening for the spinal nerves. There hasn’t been good evidence regarding whether it’s better for adults with sco

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Four New DNA Letters Double Life's Alphabet

Synthetic DNA seems to behave like the natural variety, suggesting that a broader swathe of chemicals could support life than the four that evolved on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Finns

One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Overall, 40 percent of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20 percent were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose role in the disease remains unknown.

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From academia to industry: seven tips for scientists making the leap

From academia to industry: seven tips for scientists making the leap From academia to industry: seven tips for scientists making the leap, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00692-y Crystal Romeo Upperman shares her advice after moving out of the lab and into the private sector.

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Biblical Archaeology: The Study of Biblical Sites & Artifacts

Biblical archaeologists work to uncover the truths and inaccuracies of ancient biblical texts.

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AI: Life in the age of intelligent machines

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Taking their name from an intricate Japanese basket pattern, kagome magnets are thought to have electronic properties that could be valuable for future quantum devices and applications. Theories predict that some electrons in these materials have exotic, so-called topological behaviors and others behave somewhat like graphene, another material prized for its potential for new types of electronics.

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Learning Upgrade named co-winner of literacy XPrize

For more than two decades, San Diego's Learning Upgrade has developed "handcrafted" video games that use music to teach reading and math.

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BMW, Daimler to invest 1 bn euros in joint carsharing scheme

German auto giants BMW and Daimler said Friday they would invest one billion euros ($1.1 billion) in combining and extending their carsharing schemes DriveNow and Car2Go, in future offering …

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The Books Briefing: Escaping the Confines of Adult Supervision

When we asked you last week about the childhood books that you still think about, we had an outpouring of responses, both from readers of this newsletter and from Atlantic readers on Facebook . Many people described how the stories they grew up on shaped their understanding of the world: The Phantom Tollbooth and Harold and the Purple Crayon taught you new ways to use your imagination, The Boxcar

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Qualcomm's latest 5G chips to deliver 7 gigabits per second speeds to mobile devices

Qualcomm is introducing a 5G cellular modem chip that the company says is capable of delivering peak wireless download speeds of 7 gigabits per second to mobile devices.

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CRISPR-edited babies born in China may have enhanced brain functions

In November, Chinese scientist He Jiankui reported that he'd used the CRISPR tool to edit the embryos of two girls. He deleted a gene called CCR5, which allows humans to contract HIV, the virus which causes AIDS. In addition to blocking AIDS, deleting this gene might also have positive effects on memory and cognition. Still, virtually all scientists say we're not ready to use gene-editing technol

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A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Researchers probed a special kind of magnet containing atoms arranged in a pattern called a kagome lattice, which takes its name from a Japanese basket. They found that electrons in this material exhibit exotic behaviors that could be exploited for futuristic applications — and that under a high magnetic field some electrons in this material act like an upside-down magnet.

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Four New DNA Letters Double Life's Alphabet

Synthetic DNA seems to behave like the natural variety, suggesting that a broader swathe of chemicals could support life than the four that evolved on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Spotify gets into podcasts, industry readies for a new era

Some are calling it the second golden age of audio.

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Virgin Galactic: Rocket reaches space again in test flight

Virgin Galactic says its rocket plane has reached space for a second time in a test flight over California.

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Why Facebook Search Suggests ‘Photos of Female Friends in Bikinis’

The social network has been criticized for directing users to search for photos only of female friends, not male ones. But it's not all Facebook's fault.

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EU pledges more than $1 trillion to fight climate change

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Elon Musk self-driving car promises "almost unethical": AutoNation

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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“Zombie” Deer Disease Could Spread to Humans, Experts Warn

Deadly Deer “Zombie deer disease” is spreading across the globe. Known more formally as chronic wasting disease (CWD), the infection eats away at the brains of deer, elk, and moose. It causes the animals to show signs of dementia, manifesting as difficulty walking and eating, before they ultimately die — and experts are now warning that the disease could make the jump from animals to humans. Glob

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Are the French lousy at languages? Not if there's noise!

It is often said that the French have poor English skills. But according to a study conducted by a CNRS researcher and her colleagues in the Netherlands, Finland and the UK, when it comes to process English spoken in a noisy environment like a café or a restaurant, the French have nothing to be ashamed of!

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23 percent off a smart scale and other good deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Why We Think Cats Are Psychopaths

When Becky Evans started studying cat-human relationships, she kept hearing, over and over again, about how cats are psychopaths. On one hand, anyone who has looked into the curiously blank face of a catloaf knows exactly what that means. But also, exactly what does it mean to apply a human mental diagnosis to felines? We let these clawed creatures into our homes and our beds, but we still have t

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Great Barrier Reef: One million tonnes of sludge to be dumped

Australia agrees to discard of one million tonnes of waste in world's largest coral reef.

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Mark Zuckerberg talks privacy, accidentally disses Facebook Portal

Talking about the future of technology, which is Mark Zuckerberg's personal challenge this year, can be hard, as the Facebook CEO has found out over the years—whether it's before Congress or on television.

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Four stars full of burnt nuclear ash are speeding through the galaxy

When a star goes supernova it is usually destroyed in a powerful explosion, but four stars have survived to tell the tale and are running away fast

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Senators Opposing Green New Deal Are Drowning in Fossil Fuel Cash

Follow the Money The senators and representatives who support or have co-sponsored the Green New Deal , the ambitious package of proposals to combat global climate change, have received far less money from the fossil fuel industry than their opponents, according to HuffPost . The clear divide between legislators who’ve received large donations from oil, gas, and coal companies and those who haven

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Scientists Discovered a Star That Explodes Every Year

Explosive Strength Scientists have discovered a star in the Andromeda Galaxy that explodes every year — the first of its kind in the known universe. “When we first discovered that M31N 2008-12a erupted every year, we were very surprised,” San Diego State University astrophysicist Allen Shafter said in a press release . Blowing Up Shafter and colleagues describe the peculiar star in a new paper pu

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Boy, 12, said to have created nuclear reaction in playroom lab

Hobbyists say Jackson Oswalt of Tennessee is youngest person to achieve fusion An American 14-year-old has reportedly become the youngest known person in the world to create a successful nuclear reaction. The Open Source Fusor Research Consortium, a hobbyist group, has recognised the achievement by Jackson Oswalt, from Memphis, Tennessee, when he was aged 12 in January 2018. Continue reading…

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4 ways new strategy aims to prevent snakebite deaths

A new strategy from the World Health Organization (WHO) aims to halve the impact of snakebites around the world. Snakebites affect 5.4 million people globally each year, killing up to 138,000 and leaving 400,000 with permanent physical and psychological disabilities. David Williams, a snakebite expert at the University of Melbourne who heads the Australian Venom Research Unit, has played a key ro

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For Tesla, effects of Elon Musk's take-private tweet continue

Tesla and CEO Elon Musk settled with the SEC last year over Musk's tweets about taking the company private, but the fallout isn't over.

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Medicaid expansion led to increase in screening for colorectal cancer patients in Kentucky

The number of low-income patients screened for colorectal cancer more than tripled after Medicaid expansion in 2014, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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The Lesson of the Jussie Smollett Case

In 1880, Johnson Chesnut Whittaker, one of the earliest black cadets at West Point, was found bound, gagged, and unconscious in his room. He had been slashed with a knife; pages of his Bible were found torn and strewn around the room. Whittaker had been ostracized by white students, who now insisted that he had made the whole thing up. The school decided that a threatening letter Whittaker had re

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Why are TVs so cheap now? Well, your smart TV is watching you and making extra money, too

Your smart TV is watching you. And making money off you as well.

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One-third of all slavery is visible from space

Today, there are 40.3 million slaves on the planet, more than the number of people living in Canada. Slavery can be hard to find, but it commonly occurs in several key industries like fishing and mining. Using satellite data, researchers and activists are using crowdsourcing and artificial intelligence to identify sites where slavery is taking place. None If you turn on television news at any giv

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Daily briefing: The ten commandments for learning to code

Daily briefing: The ten commandments for learning to code Daily briefing: The ten commandments for learning to code, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00690-0 And some resources to get your started. Plus: four new DNA letters double life’s alphabet

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Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change

When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their dogs' personalities. Dogs, like people, have moods and personality traits that shape how they react in certain situations. New findings from Michigan State Unive

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Bedtime social media use may be harming UK teenagers, study says

Exclusive: a fifth of 13- to 15-year-olds ‘spend five hours or more a day on social media’ Teenagers in Britain may be putting their health and education at risk by spending too much time on social media at bedtime, according to a major study into adolescent sleep habits. More than a third of teenagers spent at least three hours a day on social media, with a fifth devoting at least five hours to

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Nike smart sneakers experience connection issues days after release, users report

Sometimes, seemingly promising futuristic products don't launch without a hitch. Customers who purchased Nike's brand-new Adapt BB smart sneakers have reported experiencing this firsthand.

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NASA-NOAA satellite provides wide view of Tropical Cyclone Oma

When you look at a Tropical Cyclone Oma from space, you'll get a sense of its massive size. While orbiting the Earth, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the large tropical storm in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes Typhoon Wutip

Typhoon Wutip was impacting the Federated States of Micronesia in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and analyzed the storm in infrared light.

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Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change

When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their dogs' personalities. Dogs, like people, have moods and personality traits that shape how they react in certain situations. New findings from Michigan State Unive

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Study finds high IQs won't be enough to prevent ecological disasters

High IQs aren't going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. It's going to take social intelligence, too.

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Quantum experiment suggests there really are ‘alternative facts’

A complex probe of the foundations of quantum mechanics suggests that the nature of reality depends on who is looking – there are no objective facts we can agree on

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NASA-NOAA satellite provides wide view of Tropical Cyclone Oma

When you look at a Tropical Cyclone Oma from space, you'll get a sense of its massive size. While orbiting the Earth, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the large tropical storm in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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New research identifies causes for defects in 3D printing and paves way for better results

New research, led by teams from Carnegie Mellon University and the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, has identified how and when tiny gas pockets in manufactured products, which lead to cracks and other failures, form. The team has also developed a methodology to predict their formation — information that could dramatically improve the 3D printing process.

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NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes Typhoon Wutip

Typhoon Wutip was impacting the Federated States of Micronesia in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and analyzed the storm in infrared light.

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Foldable Smartphones Era

With the upcoming release of the Galaxy Fold and with recent speculation and leaks of a folding phone under development by Apple, it's looking like the 2020s are shaping up to be the era of Foldable Smartphones. Where do you see this technology going and what are possible implications for life in the 2020s decade? submitted by /u/kjwilliamskc [link] [comments]

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Virgin's Unity plane rockets skyward

Scottish pilot Dave Mackay pushes Virgin Galactic's rocket plane faster and higher than it's ever been.

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Navy files for patent on room-temperature superconductor

A scientist working for the U.S. Navy has filed for a patent on a room-temperature superconductor, representing a potential paradigm shift in energy transmission and computer systems.

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California Threatens to Sue over Car Emissions Standards

Negotiations with the Trump administration around fuel-efficiency requirements broke down this week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a "hit and run" approach.

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VW sees steady profits in 2018 results

German car giant Volkswagen on Friday reported steady operating profit and rising revenues in 2018, but said its "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal again inflicted one-off costs of 3.2 billion euros ($3.6 billion).

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Ford launches probe into actual emissions of its vehicles

Ford has launched an investigation into the actual emissions of its vehicles after employees reported errors in data given to authorities, the automaker said.

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Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a "hit and run" approach.

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Jordan Peterson on why you need to clean your room

Jordan Peterson believes that only by taking care of your immediate environment can you then move onto bigger challenges. The idea stems from millennials who want to change capitalist economic structures though can be applied broadly. In a distracted age, our inability to pay attention to our environment is leading to increased rates of anxiety and depression. None Recently, an Equinox member tri

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Colliding neutron stars shot a light-speed jet through space

A stream of particles created in a neutron star crash, detected in 2017 using gravitational waves, could explain certain mysterious flashes of light.

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Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo Will Fly to Space Again Today

On Friday, Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo will fly in space for the second time, taking off from Mojave, California after days of weather delay. Their launch time is set for 8 a.m. PST. Unlike most spaceflights that fire rockets from the ground, SpaceShipTwo is carried on the back of a plane named WhiteKnightTwo before being released to propel itself into the upper atmosphere. It’s a suborbital fl

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Journal Retracts Ethics Article by Doctor Who Gene Edited Babies

Take it Back He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who edited the genome of a human embryo that eventually developed into a pair of living twins, justified his work by publishing a set of ethical guidelines for how genetic researchers can move their field forward. Now those guidelines have been retracted by The CRISPR Journal — because He failed to disclose his many conflicts of interest on the matte

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America’s Dopamine-Fueled Shopping Addiction

Consumerism in the U.S. has reached an all-time high. In 2017, we spent $240 billion on goods such as jewelry, watches, luggage, books, and phones—twice as much as in 2002, even though our population grew by only 13 percent during that time. This is not to mention the 81 pounds of clothes and textiles that each American throws away annually, or the 26 million tons of plastics we collectively disp

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UN warns loss of biodiversity threatens food production

Serious outbreak of disease would place limited range of crops under heightened risk

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US patient advocacy groups received majority of pharma donations in multi-country study

A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that U.S.-based patient advocacy organizations received a disproportionate amount of contributions made by the world's 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in 2016.

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Inside Elizabeth Holmes’s Final Months at Theranos

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Low pay, exclusivity requirements and lack of support plague postdocs across Europe

Low pay, exclusivity requirements and lack of support plague postdocs across Europe Low pay, exclusivity requirements and lack of support plague postdocs across Europe, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00688-8 Survey uncovers annual salaries as low as €5,000 in some Eastern European nations.

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The Lorena Bobbitt Story and the Willful Blindness of Humor

Before Lorena Bobbitt’s story was treated as a great tragedy, it was treated as great comedy. Bobbitt was 24, a relatively recent immigrant to the U.S., when, in the summer of 1993—finally breaking, she would later say, after years’ worth of escalating physical and mental abuse from her husband, John Wayne Bobbitt—she took a large knife from their kitchen, approached her sleeping spouse, and seve

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Your 2019 Oscars Crash Course

The Oscars are usually rather predictable. The red carpet is replete with glamorous stars and cringeworthy sound bites; the ceremony starts off with a speech that’s either inspiring or dull, and it may or may not include an ill-advised musical number. Favorites get snubbed or rewarded for their cinematic accomplishments, and teary speeches drag on too long or get cut off too soon. This year, howe

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Nye grønlandske søkort er først færdige i 2026

Udflytningen af Geodatastyrelsen til Aalborg forsinker produktionen af 73 digitale søkort over grønlandske farvande med otte år, så ventetiden i alt kommer op på 19 år.

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Outfitting T cell receptors to combat a widespread and sometimes deadly virus

Researchers have engineered "antibody-like" T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid the development of CMV vaccines and might also be used to target brain tumors.

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Physician well-being improving, but burnout risk remains

The good news is that physician burnout appears to be improving, along with indicators for physician well-being. However, physicians remain at high risk for burnout, depression and depersonalization, compared to other professionals.

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Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change

When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their dogs' personalities.

2h

Outfitting T cell receptors to combat a widespread and sometimes deadly virus

Researchers have engineered 'antibody-like' T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid the development of CMV vaccines and might also be used to target brain tumors.

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Geographic distribution of opioid-related deaths

Identifying changes in the geographic distribution of opioid-related deaths is important, and this study analyzed data for more than 351,000 US residents who died of opioid-related causes from 1999 to 2016. Researchers report increased rates of opioid-related deaths in the eastern United States, especially from synthetic opioids. In 2016, there were 42,249 opioid-related deaths (28,498 men and 13,

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US opioid deaths jump fourfold in 20 years; epidemic shifts to Eastern states

Opioid-related deaths nationwide jumped fourfold in the last two decades, and the epidemic has made major inroads in the Eastern states, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Harvard University and the University of Toronto.

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Doctor-affiliated PACs fund political candidates who oppose firearm safety policies

Researchers found that physician-affiliated political action committees provided more financial support to candidates who opposed increased background checks, contrary to many societies' recommendations for evidence-based policies to reduce firearm injuries.

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Clinical trial: Prenatal DHA prevents blood-pressure increase from obesity during childhood

A clinical trial at the University of Kansas and KU Medical Center finds pregnant mothers who daily consumed 600 milligrams of DHA — an omega-3 fatty acid — protected their offspring from the blood pressure-elevating effects of excessive weight in early childhood.

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African hominid fossils show ancient steps toward a two-legged stride

New Ardipithecus ramidus fossils reveal how hominids were shifting toward humanlike walking more than 4 million years ago.

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Party-Drug-Turned-Antidepressant Approaches Approval

Johnson & Johnson has submitted its esketamine for regulatory approval, but researchers still don't understand how the fast-acting antidepressant lifts moods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Engineering HIV-resistant babies may have accidentally changed their brains

Health In genetics, one small tweak can have tons of unexpected results. In November 2018, a group of researchers in China divulged what scientists around the world feared: In what many researchers now call an ethically dubious clinical trial…

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World's biggest bee found

Lost to science for decades and thought perhaps extinct, Wallace's giant bee (Megachile pluto) has been rediscovered in an Indonesian rainforest.

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How diabetes causes muscle loss

Diabetes is associated with various health problems including decline in skeletal muscle mass. A research group revealed that elevation of blood sugar levels leads to muscle atrophy and that two proteins play key roles in this phenomenon.

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Diving into Earth's interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation

Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet's habitability.

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Freezing upon heating: Formation of dynamical glass

Scientists have modeled the energy behavior of chaotic networks of superconducting elements (grains), separated by non-superconducting junctions, and found out some unexpected statistical properties at long (but still finite) time-scales.

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Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

Deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV-LEDs) made from aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN) efficiently transfer electrical energy to optical energy due to the growth of one of its bottom layers in a step-like fashion. This finding can lead to the development of even more efficient LEDs.

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Halving the global impact of snakebite

New strategy aims to ensure safe, effective and affordable treatment for all; empower communities at all levels to take proactive action; strengthen health systems to deliver better outcomes; build a global coalition of partners to coordinate action and mobilise resources.

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Fungus from the intestinal mucosa can affect lung health

Researchers have described the mechanism of 'immune cross-reactivity'. The immune system's reaction to Candida albicans in the intestine seems to amplify pathogenic immune processes in the lungs. In consequence, immune-compromised individuals may be at higher risk of health deterioration.

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New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties

Researchers have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD.

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Japan Just Landed a Robot Spacecraft on an Asteroid

Touchdown Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa2 touched down on the surface of Ryugu Friday — a kilometer-wide asteroid with an orbit that periodically brings it close to Earth as it circles the Sun. And the probe has already completed the first big step of its primary mission: collect tiny rock samples to send home. Congratulations on your successful touchdown, @haya2_jaxa ! We're excitedly waiting for

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Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

On National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, Vanderbilt study disputes that Celebrex has no more impact on valves than older drugs in its class.

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HIV infections in US could be reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030, study finds

New HIV infections in the United States could be substantially reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030 if ambitious goals for HIV care and treatment are met and targeted prevention interventions for people at risk for HIV are rapidly scaled up, according to a study by Georgia State University and the University at Albany-SUNY.

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Older biologic age linked to elevated breast cancer risk

Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person's age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. Biologic age was determined by measuring DNA methylation, a chemical modification to DNA that is part of the normal aging process. For every five years a woman's biologic age was older than her chronologic or actual age, she had

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Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a 'hit and run' approach.

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UCF study finds high IQs won't be enough to prevent ecological disasters

High IQs aren't going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. It's going to take social intelligence, too. That's the conclusion of a new study co-authored by a University of Central Florida researcher and published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications.

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Virtual reality a promising tool for reducing fears and phobia in autism

In a new pilot study, autistic adults showed real-life, functional improvement after a combination treatment approach that included graded exposure to fear and anxiety-producing experiences in a virtual reality environment.

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Outfitting T cell receptors to combat a widespread and sometimes deadly virus

Researchers have engineered "antibody-like" T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid the development of CMV vaccines and might also be used to target brain tumors.

2h

Parker Discovers a Potential “Nugget Hole” | Gold Rush

After Brennan stripped all the pay from the cut, Parker discovers a dip in the bedrock that could be loaded with gold. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush

3h

Data from dirt improve monsoon predictions

New soil moisture and temperature data can help better predict the impact of severe monsoons, researchers report. Thunderstorms within Indian monsoon systems can deluge areas with dozens of inches of rain in little time, causing severe flooding and the loss of hundreds of lives each year. Better predictions of when, where, and how much rain will fall are key to saving property and lives. Research

3h

The Next Data-Driven Healthtech Revolution

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

3h

Why It'll Take Israel's Lunar Lander 8 Weeks to Get to the Moon

An Israeli moon lander just took to the skies, but we'll all have to wait nearly two months for its historic touchdown try.

3h

Simple change cuts unnecessary UTI tests

Encouraging doctors to first look for signs of a UTI before testing a patient’s urine—a change in protocol—could reduce unnecessary testing and overuse of antibiotics, say researchers. “Over-testing for UTIs drives up health care costs and leads to unnecessary antibiotic use which spreads antibiotic resistance,” says infectious diseases specialist David K. Warren, a professor of medicine at Washi

3h

Birch Reduction Without Tears. Or Ammonia. Or Metals.

The Birch reduction is pretty interesting to run, especially the first time you do it. Liquid ammonia is not a typical reaction solvent, and condensing it off a cold finger always looks a bit like a magic trick. You’ll be standing there with a beaker of sodium or lithium metal pieces (sitting under solvent!), which were likely carved off with a knife from a larger piece that lives its life in a j

3h

Extinct weasel relative with confounding skull likely ate meat with a side of veggies

The oddly shaped skull of Leptarctus primus, an extinct weasel relative that lived in North America and Asia about 20 million years ago, has long led to conflicting theories about its diet. But new biomechanical models show that Leptarctus was likely a carnivorous predator, with capability for omnivory and a broader diet when prey was scarce, and a skull that functioned similarly to that of the li

3h

UTSA researchers examine patterns of prescription opioid misuse and other substance use

Researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio have studied the opioid epidemic in a representative sample from the United States and found that the majority of people misusing prescription opioids are also using other licit and illicit substances.

3h

Aquatic microorganism could inspire soft robots able to move fast in narrow spaces

Euglena cells are unicellular organisms that spend most of their time on swimming by beating their flagellum. Sometimes, Euglena performs harmoniously coordinated cell body deformation, in a behavior known as metaboly. A team of researchers shows that metaboly allows Euglena to crawl remarkably fast in narrow spaces. This feature could inspire new applications in soft robotics.

3h

British investigators drop probes on Rolls-Royce, GSK

Britain's Serious Fraud Office on Friday dropped major investigations into engineering firm Rolls-Royce and pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline in a move condemned by anti-corruption watchdog Transparency International.

3h

How to overcome apathy and find your power | Dolores Huerta

"Sí, se puede!" — "Yes, we can!" It's the rallying cry Dolores Huerta came up with as a young activist in the 1970s, and she's lived by it in her tireless pursuit of civil rights ever since. With her signature wit and humor, Huerta reflects on her life's work, offering inspiration for anybody trying to overcome apathy, get involved and find their own power.

3h

A 'joint' problem: Investigating marijuana and tobacco co-use

A survey of marijuana and tobacco co-users investigators found that co-users with high degree of interrelatedness between their use of the two substances had greater tobacco dependence and smoked more cigarettes per day. However, the finding of a strong link between the two substances was not universal. These finding suggest that highly personalized treatments are needed for co-users who want to q

3h

Successful measurement of vitamin D in human hair

A new study has reported for the first time that vitamin D can be measured in human hair. This is a major step forward in assessing vitamin D status, potentially one of the major innovations in vitamin D measurement.

3h

Stopping inflammation from becoming chronic

An international research team has developed a highly sensitive cell model to study the complex effects — and side effects — of anti-inflammatory drugs, with the ultimate aim of preventing chronic inflammation.

3h

A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour

A 15-year study by entomologists found that, when living apart from the unsavory bug it mimics, the viceroy butterfly becomes yucky, making biologists rethink old theories about animal mimicry.

3h

Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently

Under conditions of insufficient sleep, effects on cognitive performance and morning glucose levels vary depending on how sleep is distributed.

3h

Aquatic microorganism could inspire soft robots able to move fast in narrow spaces

Euglena cells are unicellular organisms that spend most of their time on swimming by beating their flagellum. Sometimes, Euglena performs harmoniously coordinated cell body deformation, in a behavior known as metaboly. A team of researchers shows that metaboly allows Euglena to crawl remarkably fast in narrow spaces. This feature could inspire new applications in soft robotics.

3h

Extinct weasel relative with confounding skull likely ate meat with a side of veggies

New research on an extinct weasel relative reveals what it might have eaten when it lived in North America and Asia about 20 million years ago. The oddly shaped skull of Leptarctus primus has long led to conflicting theories about its diet. But the new work, based on biomechanical modeling and published this week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, shows that Leptarctus was likely a carnivo

3h

Magnetization reversal achieved at room temperature using only an electric field

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have achieved magnetization reversal in cobalt-substituted bismuth ferrite by applying an electric field. Researchers have sought such a technique for over a decade in order to make new types of low-power-consumption magnetic memory devices.

3h

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

Deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV-LEDs) made from aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN) efficiently transfer electrical energy to optical energy due to the growth of one of its bottom layers in a step-like fashion. This finding, published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, can lead to the development of even more efficient LEDs.

3h

Scientists reveal impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen discharge on nitrogen transport in global rivers

Excess nutrients from fertilizer application, pollution discharge, and water regulations outflow through rivers from lands to oceans, seriously impacting coastal water quality and ecosystems. Understanding the effects of human activities on riverine nitrogen movement is important for water environmental management and nitrogen cycle research.

3h

Research highlights the impact of the recession on stress within families

Growing Up in Ireland publishes a new report on the lives of children who were 3 years old in the middle of the Great Recession. The report seeks to understand how the economic recession affected experiences of economic strain and stress within families and how this, in turn, was associated with parenting and the socio-emotional and behavioural adjustment of 3-year-olds. The report was authored by

3h

The Dawn of the Age of Plastics

During World War II, as America's dependence on foreign cork supplies for a wide range of manufacturing came under pressure from Nazi blockades, the government turned to the nascent synthetic industry to fill gaps in its defense pipelines. It was the beginning of the nation's chemical revolution.

3h

When it Comes to Young Blood, Buyer Beware

In response to reports of companies providing infusions of plasma from young donors to older patients in an effort to combat a variety of aging-related conditions, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning Tuesday stating that such procedures have “no proven clinical benefit.”

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Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected, study finds

The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents — but in Europe. An international team of researchers has examined how effectively Natura 2000 protects listed habitat types in Germany. The result: although the existing network includes sites of special interest, not all habitat types are repres

3h

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill people by inducing cardiac arrest yet save others that are in cardiac arrest. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers of the University of Bern and the EPFL that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.

3h

A 'joint' problem: Investigating marijuana and tobacco co-use

A survey of marijuana and tobacco co-users by Medical University of South Carolina investigators found that co-users with high degree of interrelatedness between their use of the two substances had greater tobacco dependence and smoked more cigarettes per day. However, the finding of a strong link between the two substances was not universal. These findings, reported in Addictive Behaviors, sugges

3h

Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes

For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance. Biologists at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have now shed some new light on the benefits and disadvantages of the bee dance.

3h

Trinity and St. James's Hospital report successful measurement of vitamin D in human hair

A new study by researchers from Trinity College Dublin and St. James's Hospital has reported for the first time that vitamin D can be measured in human hair.The current study is the first in the world to report that it is possible to extract and measure vitamin D in human hair. This is a major step forward in assessing vitamin D status, potentially one of the major innovations in vitamin D measure

3h

Stopping inflammation from becoming chronic

An international research team led by Friedrich Schiller University in Jena has developed a highly sensitive cell model to study the complex effects — and side effects — of anti-inflammatory drugs, with the ultimate aim of preventing chronic inflammation.

3h

Surprise rheumatoid arthritis discovery points to new treatment

Researchers have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition.

3h

The ancient people in the high-latitude Arctic had well-developed trade

Russian scientists studied the Zhokhov site of ancient people, which is located in the high-latitude Arctic, and described in detail the way of life of the ancient people had lived there. It turned out that, despite the sparsely populated area, the ancient people had communicated with representatives of other territories and had even exchanged various objects with them through some kind of the fai

3h

Study of human impact on food webs and ecosystems yields unexpected insights

When the Australian government relocated Martu hunter-gatherers from their Western Australia lands in the 1960s, no one could have predicted the massive impact their absence would have on the desert ecosystem. A new study led by Stefani Crabtree, a Santa Fe Institute Visiting Researcher (Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center), and co-authored by Rebecca Bli

3h

Study of human impact on food webs and ecosystems yields unexpected insights

When the Australian government relocated Martu hunter-gatherers from their Western Australia lands in the 1960s, no one could have predicted the massive impact their absence would have on the desert ecosystem. A new study led by Stefani Crabtree, a Santa Fe Institute Visiting Researcher (Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center), and co-authored by Rebecca Bli

3h

In hives, graduating to forager a requirement for social membership

It is a classic coming-of-age story, in many ways.

3h

Improvised dance embodies complexities of social decisions

A work of art evolves from a series of decisions, as an artist combines brushstrokes, dance steps or musical notes to convey a feeling or idea. When a group of interacting dancers improvises a performance from a repertoire of possible movements, the dynamics of the artistic decisions become even more complex.

3h

In hives, graduating to forager a requirement for social membership

It is a classic coming-of-age story, in many ways.

3h

Datorspelande leder sällan till spelmissbruk

Anders Håkansson är professor i beroendemedicin med särskild inriktning på spelberoende vid Lunds universitet och överläkare på beroendecentrum i Malmö, Psykiatri Skåne. Han är tydlig med att det är skillnad mellan datorspel och spel om pengar. – På svenska har vi samma ord, men på engelska blir skillnaden tydligare. Där skiljer man mellan ”gambling” och ”gaming” där det senare nu har blivit uppm

3h

HTC Goes All-In on Easy-to-Use VR, But Not For Everyone

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3h

We’re constantly generating ‘shadow’ medical records

We all have official medical records, locked away in the computers and file cabinets of our doctors’ offices and hospitals, protected by strict privacy laws. But we also have the informal “shadow” records we generate just by living our lives. In a new article in Science , a team of experts calls for attention to this shadow record. They describe it as the data generated by everyone who wears a fi

3h

Utilities are starting to invest in big batteries instead of building new power plants

Due to their decreasing costs, lithium-ion batteries now dominate a range of applications including electric vehicles, computers and consumer electronics.

3h

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists increasingly rely on remote devices such as camera traps. In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and

3h

Diving into Earth's interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation

Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet's habitability.

3h

Green New Deal's focus on renewable energy could fight global warming, create healthier communities, says expert

The Green New Deal, a proposal taken up by scores of members of Congress this month, aims to use "clean, renewable, and zero-emission energy sources" to provide 100 percent of the power used in the U.S.

3h

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists increasingly rely on remote devices such as camera traps. In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and

3h

Jussie Smollett’s Alleged Hoax Will Feed Bigger Hoaxes

Last week, the Alabama small-town newspaper editor Goodloe Sutton published an editorial calling for the Ku Klux Klan to “ride again” and string up nooses in Washington, D.C. Contained in the short, hateful missive was this claim: “Slaves, just freed after the civil war, were not stupid. At times, they borrowed their former masters’ robes and horses and rode through the night to frighten some evi

3h

The Fan-Fiction Friendship That Fueled a Romance-Novel Empire

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a pair of romance authors who write under the combined pen name Christina Lauren. They met through Twilight fan-fiction forums and began their collaboration with a story written in response to a

3h

The 3 Big Things That People Misunderstand About Climate Change

The year is 2100. The United States has been devastated by climate change. Super-powerful hurricanes regularly ravage coastal cities. Wildfires have overrun Los Angeles several times over. And it is dangerous to go outside on some summer days—children and the elderly risk being broiled alive. In such a world as that one, will we give up on the idea of historical progress? Should we even believe i

3h

The Next Data-Driven Healthtech Revolution

Increasing your healthspan (i.e. making 100 years old the new 60) will depend to a large degree on artificial intelligence. And, as we saw in last week’s blog , healthcare AI systems are extremely data-hungry . Fortunately, a slew of new sensors and data acquisition methods—including over 122 million wearables shipped in 2018—are bursting onto the scene to meet the massive demand for medical data

3h

Diving into Earth's interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation

Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet's habitability.

3h

Political corruption scars young voters forever, new research finds

New research by Bocconi University, Milan, finds that political corruption has a long-term scarring effect on trust in democratic institutions and on voters' behavior and that such an effect differs according to one's age cohort, with first-time voters at the time of corruption revelation still being affected 25 years later.

3h

Proximity to land determines how coral reef communities respond to climate change events

Severe weather and environmental disturbances, such as cyclones or thermal coral bleaching, affect specific areas of coral reefs differently, new research has shown.

3h

Why the carbon tax will cost some Maritimes families more than others

This year, Canadian households will be paying for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How much each household pays will depend not only on the amount of energy they consume, but also on where they live.

3h

Estimate the Friction Coefficient in That Massive Nascar Pile-Up

A crash knocked 21 cars out of the Daytona 500. But good news: Everyone walked away, and the video makes for a cool physics problem.

3h

How the zebra got its stripes: The problem with 'just-so' stories

The mystery of why zebras have stripes has puzzled biologists for decades, and while we are closing in on the answer, the question isn’t settled yet

4h

Protecting young athletes from abusive coaches – Let's get it right

The federal government has announced new initiatives aimed at keeping young athletes safe from abuse and harassment. The announcement by Minister of Sport Kirsty Duncan follows a CBC investigation that revealed more than 200 coaches have been convicted of sexual offences against 600 victims under the age of 18 in the past 20 years.

4h

Cambridge: AI Might Help Us Avoid “Environmental Catastrophe”

Data Collectors From images taken by satellites to measurements recorded by increasingly sensitive sensors, we now have more data about our environment than ever before. But we’re not yet at the point where we can effectively make use of all this information, according to Simon Redfern, Head of the University of Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences. “Such huge datasets pose their own challeng

4h

Designer Babies – The Problem With China's CRISPR Experiment

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4h

Triclosan in soap and toothpaste actually makes germs stronger

A chemical in hand soap and toothpaste meant to kill bacteria is actually making them stronger and more capable of surviving antibiotic treatment, according to a new study in mice. The study, which appears in Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy , suggests that triclosan exposure may inadvertently drive bacteria into a state in which they are able to tolerate normally lethal concentrations of anti

4h

Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles

Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Various theories circulate about the actual cause of these unusual spatial patterns, ranging from poisonous Euphorbia plants or rising gases, to ants, termites or plant competition for sparse water resources. Scien

4h

Being a dad is hard when you're a plainfin midshipman fish

Each spring, male plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) —a kind of toadfish —emerge from the depths of the Pacific Ocean to breed on the beach. They overwhelm the beach at low tide, wedge themselves beneath rocks and excavate a nest in the rocks and sand. When their work is completed, the bachelors settle down and hum to attract mates.

4h

Top German court backs VW owners in 'dieselgate' opinion

Germany top court on Friday backed Volkswagen owners' claims against the firm over cars rigged to cheat regulatory emissions tests, in an opinion that could guide lower courts' rulings.

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Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles

Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Various theories circulate about the actual cause of these unusual spatial patterns, ranging from poisonous Euphorbia plants or rising gases, to ants, termites or plant competition for sparse water resources. Scien

4h

Being a dad is hard when you're a plainfin midshipman fish

Each spring, male plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) —a kind of toadfish —emerge from the depths of the Pacific Ocean to breed on the beach. They overwhelm the beach at low tide, wedge themselves beneath rocks and excavate a nest in the rocks and sand. When their work is completed, the bachelors settle down and hum to attract mates.

4h

A mysterious source spews ozone-damaging compound

A mysterious source spews ozone-damaging compound A mysterious source spews ozone-damaging compound, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00654-4 Known emitters of chloromethane do not produce enough of it to account for its atmospheric abundance.

4h

How to avoid tax season stress

DIY Tips for filing without feeling overwhelmed. If you haven’t filed taxes yet, now is probably the best time. Here’s why.

4h

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany and University of California, Davis, USA, the scientists explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time. The study is published in the international journal Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conse

4h

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

Deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV-LEDs) made from aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN) efficiently transfer electrical energy to optical energy due to the growth of one of its bottom layers in a step-like fashion. This finding, published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, can lead to the development of even more efficient LEDs.

4h

Fungus from the intestinal mucosa can affect lung health

Writing in the journal Cell, a research team from Cologne and Kiel describes the mechanism of 'immune cross-reactivity'. The immune system's reaction to Candida albicans in the intestine seems to amplify pathogenic immune processes in the lungs. In consequence, immune-compromised individuals may be at higher risk of health deterioration.

4h

Scientists reveal impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen discharge on nitrogen transport in global rivers

Scientists found that riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen in the USA has increased primarily due to the use of nitrogen fertilizers. In contrast, European rivers were affected mainly by point source pollution. However, both aspects are equally important for aquatic environments in China.

4h

Scientists find routine allomaternal nursing in an Old World monkey

A team of scientists led by Professor Li Ming at the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found widespread allomaternal nursing behavior in an Old World monkey, the golden snub-nosed monkey. Based on more than eight years of field observation of infants and their mothers at Shennongjia National Park, Central China, as well as analysis of the monkeys' reproductive histories, the

4h

New World Health Organization strategy aims to halve the global impact of snakebite

New strategy aims to ensure safe, effective and affordable treatment for all; empower communities at all levels to take proactive action; strengthen health systems to deliver better outcomes; build a global coalition of partners to coordinate action and mobilise resources.

4h

Laser-driven particle accelerator that can generate pairs of electron beams with different energies

Researchers at LMU have built the first-ever laser-driven particle accelerator that can generate pairs of electron beams with different energies.

4h

Virkeligheden kalder Blixt og Trane Nørby

Filmen knækker for Liselott Blixt, der reagerer på ny underskriftsindssamling ved at kalder læger for pivede – og for Ellen Trane Nørby, som tror at indsamlingen er en støtte til regeringens sundhedsreform.

4h

New instrument unravels landscape longevity

How many years can a mountain exist? Bob Dylan's rhetorical question has just received yet another scientifically based answer. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and Denmark's Technical University (DTU) have developed a new method that can measure the exposure duration of rocks and sediments, leading to new insights in landscape evolution. In Scientific Reports, they reveal t

4h

An exoplanet with an 11-hour orbit

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) was launched on April 18 of last year with the primary objective of discovering transiting planets smaller than Neptune around stars bright enough for spectroscopic investigations of their masses and atmospheres. Before TESS there were roughly 385 exoplanets known with masses smaller than Neptune, with orbital periods ranging from less than half-a-d

4h

A new framework to predict spatiotemporal signal propagation in complex networks

Past studies have found that a variety of complex networks, from biological systems to social media networks, can exhibit universal topological characteristics. These universal characteristics, however, do not always translate into similar system dynamics. The dynamic behavior of a system cannot be predicted from topology alone, but rather depends on the interaction of a network's topology with th

4h

Basic income: World's first national experiment in Finland shows modest benefits

The preliminary findings from Finland's basic income experiment are out and they show mixed results. Both advocates and critics of the idea of a universal basic income will find cause for consternation and celebration. Though widely anticipated by basic income enthusiasts, the Finnish experiment will only fuel further debate on whether or not the idea works.

4h

Engineering wave reflections with power flow-conformal metamirrors

Metasurfaces are two-dimensional (2-D) metamaterials that can control scattering waves of a light beam. Their applications include thin-sheet polarizers, beam splitters, beam steerers and lenses. These structures can control and transform impinging waves based on the generalized reflection and refraction law (GSL; generalized Snell's law and generalized reflection law), which states that small pha

4h

Liberals who want a Green New Deal must include nuclear power

The congresswoman who sponsored the US Green New Deal suggested the plan won’t include any new money for nuclear power – that’s a mistake, says David Titley

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Low-cost drones fly to the rescue of the world's forests

Almost 1.6 billion people – more than a quarter of the global population – rely on forests for their livelihood. Of this number, it's said that around 60 million indigenous people are almost entirely dependent on forests to survive. Forests not only help these people to subsist, they also provide a number of essential services. They protect the soil, regulate water and support biodiversity. Equall

4h

Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do 'quantum dances' in unison

Scientists found a way to exploit the interaction between the electron and the thousands of nuclei using lasers to 'cool' the nuclei to less than 1 milliKelvin. They then showed they can control and manipulate the thousands of nuclei as if they form a single body in unison, like a second qubit. This proves the nuclei in the quantum dot can exchange information with the electron qubit and can be us

4h

Quantum dots can spit out clone-like photons

Researchers have produced coherent single photon emitters, a key component for future quantum computers and communications systems.

4h

Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently

Under conditions of insufficient sleep, effects on cognitive performance and morning glucose levels vary depending on how sleep is distributed, says study's principal investigator Professor Michael Chee.

4h

Magnetization reversal achieved at room temperature using only an electric field

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology achieved magnetization reversal in cobalt-substituted bismuth ferrite by applying only an electric field. Such an effect had been sought after for over a decade in order to make new types of low-power-consumption magnetic memory devices.

4h

How diabetes causes muscle loss

Diabetes is associated with various health problems including decline in skeletal muscle mass. A Japanese research group revealed that elevation of blood sugar levels leads to muscle atrophy and that two proteins play key roles in this phenomenon. These findings were published on Feb. 21 in the online edition of JCI Insight.

4h

A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour

A 15-year study led by University of Arizona entomologist Katy Prudic found that, when living apart from the unsavory bug it mimics, the viceroy butterfly becomes yucky, making biologists rethink old theories about animal mimicry.

4h

Potential of strategic partnerships to form a Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA)

Recognizing the persistence of health inequities in the Americas, an emerging Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA) describes its approach to promoting health equity through intersectoral partnerships in a newly released issue of Ethnicity & Disease.

4h

More water resources over the Sahel region of Africa in the 21st century under global warming

Scientists from Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the projection uncertainty of Sahel summer precipitation among the climate models is closely related to the historical precipitation simulation in South Asia and the western North Pacific. They use the specified historical simulation biases to calibrate future projections and found that more water resources ar

4h

Finding keyholes in metals 3D printing

New research published today in Science, led by researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and Argonne National Laboratory, has identified how and when these gas pockets form, as well as a methodology to predict their formation — a pivotal discovery that could dramatically improve the 3D printing process.

4h

Proximity to land determines how coral reef communities respond to climate change events

Severe weather and environmental disturbances, such as cyclones or thermal coral bleaching, affect specific areas of coral reefs differently, new research has shown.

4h

Freezing upon heating: Formation of dynamical glass

IBS scientists have modeled the energy behavior of chaotic networks of superconducting elements (grains), separated by non-superconducting junctions, and found out some unexpected statistical properties at long (but still finite) time-scales. Their findings are published in Physical Review Letters.

4h

A way to use a two-nickel catalyst to synthesize cyclopentenes

A pair of researchers at Purdue University has found a way to use a diatomic Ni-Ni catalyst to synthesize cyclopentenes. In their paper published in the journal Science, You-Yun Zhou and Christopher Uyeda describe their method and outline why they believe cyclopentene products would be useful. Keywan Johnson and Daniel Weix with the University of Wisconsin have published a Perspective piece in the

4h

How to break down work into tasks that can be automated

Virtually every organization is wrestling and experimenting with automation. But most are missing the benefits that come from deep and systemic change. One of the largest failings, in our estimation, is that organizations aren't spending the time necessary to deeply understand the work they're considering automating. They aren't deconstructing jobs so the specific tasks that can be automated can b

4h

Quantum Mechanics: Coldest quantum gas of molecules

Researchers have made a long-lived, record-cold gas of molecules that follow the wave patterns of quantum mechanics instead of the strictly particle nature of ordinary classical physics. The creation of this gas boosts the odds for advances in fields such as designer chemistry and quantum computing.

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New drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clears phase 1 clinical trial testing in boys

Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have few treatment options. Medications currently available or in development either target only a subset of DMD patients with a particular genetic mutation or cause significant side effects.

4h

One Woman Pushes Hula-Hooping to Its Absurd, Glittery Limits

How many hoops can a person hula? Marawa Ibrahim holds the record at 200—but when she's twirling a modest 100, her skill makes your head spin.

4h

Hyundai Nexo Review: The Hydrogen Fuel Cell-Powered Electric SUV

Hyundai has made an excellent car, but that may not be enough to overcome the difficulties of driving on hydrogen.

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How to Watch the Oscars 2019

No host? That's a good thing. Here's how to tune in for the (fingers-crossed it's streamlined) ceremony.

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Two out of five jobs at high risk of automation

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Top 5 most controversial figures in American history

Many of the most polarizing Americans were Presidents. Being controversial created complicated legacies. Pop culture can also cause strong division. Controversy is not always bad for you. Case in point, most of the people on this list are well-known political figures who have made a strong imprint on the country's life. While President Trump is certainly a divisive figure to many, the full extent

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A peek at living room decor suggests how decorations vary around the world

People around the world paint their walls different colors, buy plants to spruce up their interiors and engage in a variety of other beautifying techniques to personalize their homes, which inspired a team of researchers to study about 50,000 living rooms across the globe.

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CEOs make money from negative information released prior to stock option grants

Stock options are often used to align the interests of stakeholders and CEOs, as both benefit when share price rises. New research shows, however, that companies release more negative news during the period immediately before stock options are granted to their CEOs, which financially benefits the CEOs. CEOs, who control the release and tenor of the information, see higher future gains when options

4h

World's biggest bee found

Lost to science for decades and thought perhaps extinct, Wallace's giant bee (Megachile pluto) has been rediscovered in an Indonesian rainforest.

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The Grim, Caustic Appeal of Flack

In the superb fifth episode of Flack , Pop TV’s new imported drama, Bradley Whitford plays Calvin Cooper, a charismatic, troublesome actor flying from New York to London. Sitting next to him in his business-class pod is Robyn (Anna Paquin), a publicist who’s trying to rein in Calvin’s destructive behavior. As the flight waits for takeoff, Calvin hits on other passengers, sets off the bathroom smo

4h

Kritik af OUH-forlig: »Det er arbejdsgivers våde drøm«

OUH er sluppet for billigt efter systematisk at have brudt overenskomstreglerne. Det mener fællestillidsrepræsentant fra Rigshopsitalet og tidligere overlæge på OUH, der frygter, at der vil komme flere overenskomstbrud i fremtiden. Yngre Lægers formand er uenig.

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Sundhedsminister vil opkvalificere behandling af dobbeltdiagnoser

Sundhedsministeren anerkender, at borgere med dobbeltdiagnoser ikke får den rette behandling. Næstformand i Lægeforeningen efterlyser en forpligtende løsning fra regeringen.

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#voresvirkelighedjeresansvar

Folketingets magtelite er genstridig og med overbevisning i stemmen forsøger de at overbevise andre – og nok mest af alt sig selv – om, at de yder et værdifuldt bidrag til patienternes ve og vel, skriver Thomas Emil Christensen.

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Sexual selection in action: Birds that attract multiple mates change their songs more quickly

How do individuals choose their mates? Why are some more successful at attracting mates than others?

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Are the French lousy at languages? Not if there's noise!

It is often said that the French have poor English skills. But according to a study conducted by a CNRS researcher (along with colleagues in the Netherlands, Finland and UK), when it comes to processing English spoken in a noisy environment like a café or a restaurant, the French have nothing to be ashamed of.

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Sexual selection in action: Birds that attract multiple mates change their songs more quickly

How do individuals choose their mates? Why are some more successful at attracting mates than others?

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Pharmaceutical residues in fresh water pose a growing environmental risk

Over the past 20 years, concentrations of pharmaceuticals have increased in freshwater sources all over the world, as research by environmental experts at Radboud University has revealed. Levels of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have reached the point of potentially causing damaging ecological effects. The research is the first to examine the risks of two particular medicines in global freshwater so

4h

North Carolina Had No Choice

The decision came after a dramatic day, during a dramatic hearing, in a dramatic race. North Carolina election officials on Thursday ordered a new election in the state’s fraud-tainted Ninth Congressional District, the only 2018 U.S. House race that still doesn’t have a winner. The contest between the Republican Mark Harris and the Democrat Dan McCready appeared to have been decided, albeit by a

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Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins

The human genome contains an estimated 20,000 genes coding for proteins. The proteins are the body's "workers," tasked with performing specific functions that are key to survival. Despite their importance, there is a type of very small protein of fewer than 100 amino acids that is essential to understanding how living things work, and about which researchers know very little, since merely identify

5h

Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins

The human genome contains an estimated 20,000 genes coding for proteins. The proteins are the body's "workers," tasked with performing specific functions that are key to survival. Despite their importance, there is a type of very small protein of fewer than 100 amino acids that is essential to understanding how living things work, and about which researchers know very little, since merely identify

5h

We can pay for pollution now or later—and the price is lower now

Every time we fill our gas tank, fire up the furnace, ride in an airplane, or use electricity generated by oil, coal, or natural gas, we are contributing to climate change worldwide.

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Physicists train the oscillatory neural network to recognize images

Physicists from Petrozavodsk State University have proposed a new method for oscillatory neural network to recognize simple images. Such networks with an adjustable synchronous state of individual neurons have, presumably, dynamics similar to neurons in the living brain.

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A nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz

Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology.

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China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise

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Prototype paves way for ‘computer-on-a-chip’

Researchers have created a prototype “computer-on-a-chip.” The prototype’s data processing and memory circuits use less than a tenth as much electricity as any comparable electronic device. And yet despite its size, researchers designed it to perform many advanced computing feats. Electronic computing was born in the form of massive machines in air-conditioned rooms, migrated to desktops and lapt

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How the dinosaurs went extinct: Asteroid collision triggered potentially deadly volcanic eruptions

It's almost 40 years since scientists discovered what wiped out the dinosaurs: an asteroid hitting Earth near modern-day Mexico. That was it, or so we thought.

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A decline in gene discoveries

The number of papers reporting new protein-function discoveries in 2017 declined by two-thirds compared with 2000 output, according to research led by A*STAR.

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A decline in gene discoveries

The number of papers reporting new protein-function discoveries in 2017 declined by two-thirds compared with 2000 output, according to research led by A*STAR.

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Freezing upon heating: Formation of dynamical glass

The discovery of superconductivity and its experimental realization are two of the most important advancements in physics and engineering of the past century. Nevertheless, their statistical and dynamical characteristics have yet to be fully understood. A team of researchers at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), has mod

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This affordable therapy works for inmates with depression

Of the four million prisoners released each year, 23 percent suffer from depression but don’t receive treatment while incarcerated, according to a new study. They often rejoin society in worse mental shape than before their incarceration, which the right care could have prevented. Now researchers have come up with an effective way to change things and improve mental health in prisons. Researchers

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Newly discovered enzyme uses an unusual mechanism to generate a molecule with an awful smell

Newly discovered enzyme uses an unusual mechanism to generate a molecule with an eye-wateringly awful smell

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Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins—a promising treatment target

Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. Activation of the stress response is at the epicentre of the molecular events generated by genetic mutations that cause a complex neurological syndrome.

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Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins—a promising treatment target

Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. Activation of the stress response is at the epicentre of the molecular events generated by genetic mutations that cause a complex neurological syndrome.

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Where are all the aliens? Struggling and hustling, just like us

Space Conventional wisdom has it that aliens should be either everywhere, or nowhere. A new model suggests they can be both. If aliens have never visited Earth, does that mean interstellar space travel is just too hard to be worth it? Not necessarily, according to a new model.

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A tip for future nanoscale sensing

Commercially-available diamond tips used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) could help make quantum nanoscale sensing cost-effective and practical, A*STAR researchers have found.

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New program picks out targets in a crowd quickly and efficiently

It can be harder for computers to find Waldo, an elusive character that hides within crowds in a popular children's book series, than it is for humans.

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Newly discovered enzyme uses an unusual mechanism to generate a molecule with an awful smell

Newly discovered enzyme uses an unusual mechanism to generate a molecule with an eye-wateringly awful smell

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Moldovan mathematician among academics running in general election

Moldovan mathematician among academics running in general election Moldovan mathematician among academics running in general election , Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00664-2 The candidates hope to improve research and education in Moldova, which suffers because of poverty, corruption and a lack of funding.

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Researchers watch molecules in a light-triggered catalyst ring 'like an ensemble of bells'

Photocatalysts – materials that trigger chemical reactions when hit by light – are important in a number of natural and industrial processes, from producing hydrogen for fuel to enabling photosynthesis.

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Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age

In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes and dogs were domesticated, as their diet was similar to that of their owners.

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The Latest Diet Trend Is Not Dieting

In 2016, Molly Bahr changed her whole life with a Google search. Bahr, a therapist, was at a professional training on eating disorders when a speaker mentioned in passing that participants might be interested in something called intuitive eating. Bahr looked up the term. “I went home that day and it was like a light switch,” she says. “I felt like I got hit by a truck.” Bahr decided that she want

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Disabled people more likely to be victims of crime

The Morrison government has finally agreed to a royal commission into the abuse of people living with disability – if the states get on board.

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In making banks less risky for consumers, the Dodd-Frank Act produced mixed results at best, study finds

The Dodd-Frank Act, enacted in 2010 to promote economic stability and protect consumers in response to the 2008 global financial crisis, is showing mixed results, according to a new study by Case Western Reserve University.

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Study: Banning criminal conviction questions on job applications increases hiring of ex-prisoners

Efforts to ban such questions show promise to ease re-entry into workforce for increasing number of Americans with criminal histories

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What we risk as humans if we allow gene-edited babies: a philosopher’s view

Concerns over edited humans extend well beyond health and medical grounds, writes Janna Thompson from Australia's La Trobe University.

6h

Image of the Day: Seeing is Bee-lieving

Four decades after it was thought to have disappeared in the wild, scientists have found a single female Wallace’s giant bee in Indonesia.

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New Info on The Cause of the Dinosaur Extinction

There is little doubt that an asteroid impact, the one that formed the Chicxulub crater in the Caribbean Sea, was the primary cause of the K-Pg extinction event, the one that saw the end of non-avian dinosaurs. But there is continued debate about the role of massive volcanic eruptions at about the same time in the Deccan Traps, in what is modern day India (on the almost exact opposite side of the

6h

Sunscreen 'Sea Change' May Be Coming with New FDA Rules

The FDA is proposing new sunscreen regulations aimed at improving the safety and effectiveness of these products.

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480-Million-Year-Old Mystery Creature Finally Identified from Its Preserved Guts

For the past 150 years, scientists have hotly debated a mysterious creature that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. And now, with the discovery of stunningly detailed fossils in Morocco, paleontologists have finally ID'd the bizarre life-forms.

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Photos: Cretaceous 'Night Mouse' Was a Wee Mammal

Paleontologists have unearthed a new 69 million-year-old mammal species in the North Slope of Alaska.

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Tiny Dino-Era 'Night Mouse' Found Above Arctic Circle

A tiny Cretaceous mammal lived among the northernmost dinosaurs on Earth.

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The AI Road to Serfdom? by Robert Skidelsky

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How AI and Genomics are used to treat Epilepsy

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Facebook finally pulls the plug on creepy Onavo 'research' app that paid teens for their data

The Onavo VPN app was downloaded by users, some of which were as young as 13 years old, who were paid to take part in Facebook's controversial research project.

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Smider du mad ud for tidligt? Mange har ikke styr på holdbarhedsdatoer

Forvirring omkring datomærker giver madspild, viser amerikansk undersøgelse. Vi oplever det også i Danmark, siger ekspert.

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Ingen plan B for bjærgningen af Helge Ingstad: »Plan A er nødt til at fungere«

Der er identificeret flade områder på havbunden, hvor fregatten skal sænkes og efterlades, hvis noget skulle gå galt.

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Less burnout seen among US physicians, Stanford researcher says

The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association.

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New theory could lead to better batteries, fuel cells

A new theory could enable researchers and industry to tune and improve the performance of a material called ionic ceramics in rechargeable batteries, fuel cells and other energy applications.

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Our language needs to evolve alongside AI. Here's how

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How to Break Down Work into Tasks That Can Be Automated

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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New soil moisture and temperature data helps predict life-threatening Indian monsoon rains

Thunderstorms embedded within Indian monsoon systems can deluge areas with dozens of inches of rain in little time, causing severe flooding and the loss of hundreds of lives each year. Better predictions of when, where and how much rain will fall is key to saving property and lives.

6h

Researchers develop sharp solution for waste glass

A new process turning waste glass into everyday products could save tens of millions of tonnes of glass from going to landfill every year.

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Climate change may affect ecological interactions among species

With herbivores, omnivores, carnivores, insectivores, frugivores, scavengers and decomposers, Earth's ecosystems function within a vast web of interactions among plants, animals, insects, fungi and microorganisms. A fundamental part of this web resides in the equilibrium of the food chain that links predators to herbivores and regulates plant production on our planet.

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Climate change could make Iowa temps feel like Oklahoma cities by 2080

A new study suggests what the climate in several major Iowa cities could feel like by 2080.

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Climate change may affect ecological interactions among species

With herbivores, omnivores, carnivores, insectivores, frugivores, scavengers and decomposers, Earth's ecosystems function within a vast web of interactions among plants, animals, insects, fungi and microorganisms. A fundamental part of this web resides in the equilibrium of the food chain that links predators to herbivores and regulates plant production on our planet.

6h

Could a Space Helicopter Find Life on Saturn's Moon Titan?

Hard to say, but it’s not as crazy as it might sound — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Thumbtack Tries Bridging the Benefits Gap for Gig Workers

As tech companies draw scrutiny over on-demand labor practices, one platform is piloting a program in which worker benefits are supported by customers.

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NASA’s Space Shuttle Rises From the Dead to Power New Vehicles

New documents show that Boeing wants to use Space Shuttle engines on a secret military project, the latest move to reuse parts of the famous vehicle.

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Solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars ever observed. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-mete

6h

Physicists calculate proton's pressure distribution for first time

Neutron stars are among the densest-known objects in the universe, withstanding pressures so great that one teaspoon of a star's material would equal about 15 times the weight of the moon. Yet as it turns out, protons—the fundamental particles that make up most of the visible matter in the universe—contain even higher pressures.

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Image: Restless star makes for stunning storm

Geomagnetic activity caused by our star recently created a stir in the skies over Iceland, resulting in the seeming electrification of the night, as captured here by photographer Ollie Taylor.

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Supernovas show the universe expands at the same rate in all directions

Analyzing supernovas indicates that expansion rates agree within 1 percent across large regions of sky.

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Could a Space Helicopter Find Life on Saturn's Moon Titan?

Hard to say, but it’s not as crazy as it might sound — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Another Australian Chiropractor is in Hot Water for Manipulating a Newborn

Yet another Australian chiropractor is under fire for treating young infants. Will anything be done about it?

6h

How AlphaZero has rewritten the rules of gameplay on its own

David Silver says the computer program that taught itself to be a chess grandmaster exhibits “the essence of creativity”.

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Efter angreb med falske mails: Socialdemokratiet er sikret med DMARC – som eneste parti

Ved at anvende teknologien DMARC kan svindelmails forhindres i at nå deres mål. Men mange bruger kun metoden halvhjertet.

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YouTube walks a tightrope with its video makers, advertisers

YouTube has plenty of problems to deal with, ranging from advertiser boycotts to a recommendation engine often blamed for encouraging conspiracies on the video-sharing network. But rarely does it score such a spectacular own goal as it did with its 2018 year-in-review video.

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Japan’s Hayabusa 2 bags its first sample from the asteroid Ryugu

A Japanese spacecraft has touched down on an asteroid and collected the first of three samples, raising hopes for the space mining industry

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In Search of Life's Origins, Japan's Hayabusa 2 Spacecraft Lands on an Asteroid

The mission to Asteroid Ryugu could return samples of the space rock to Earth in 2020 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Search of Life's Origins, Japan's Hayabusa 2 Spacecraft Lands on an Asteroid

The mission to Asteroid Ryugu could return samples of the space rock to Earth in 2020 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Botswana mulls lifting elephant hunting ban

A government report recommends lifting a four-year ban on hunting elephants.

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'A Britain which no longer exists'

A collection of images spanning 64 years has been described as the "historical Google Earth".

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Future technology smartwatch

Hi, I'm working with a product and what we're making is a new kind of smartwatch. No screen, instead it communicates with you through vibrations that after a while of use can be interpreted intuitively. In situations when your sight is occupied or if you want to use the screen less but still want to know when things happen. I thought people on this sub would find it interesting! xtactor.com sub

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Electric bikes could provide old people with brain boost

submitted by /u/lowlandslinda [link] [comments]

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DTU efter million-udgift: Hvorfor fortalte ingen, at vores store stalde var unødvendige?

PLUS. DTU er uenig i den en afgørende del af en beretning fra Rigsrevisionen. Universitet mener, at Fødevarestyrelsen skulle have sagt, at et staldbyggeri under projektering i Lyngby var komplet unødvendigt.

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Exploring the global landscape of quantum technology research

Leading quantum technology experts from around the world have explored their respective regional and national goals for the future of the field, in a new focus issue of Quantum Science and Technology.The first five articles in the collection, covering Australia, Japan, the United States, Canada and the European Union, are published today. They are written by the leading researchers involved in eac

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Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins

CRG investigators develop a technique to identify and classify proteins with less than 100 amino acids. These types of proteins account for only 16 percent of a bacterial genome's coding capacity. This technique may be applied to guide the search for new proteins with different functions, such as antimicrobials.

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Pharmaceutical residues in fresh water pose a growing environmental risk

Over the past 20 years, concentrations of pharmaceuticals have increased in freshwater sources all over the world, as research by environmental experts at Radboud University has revealed. Levels of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have reached the point of potentially causing damaging ecological effects. The research is the first to examine the risks of two particular medicines in global freshwater so

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Journal to retract article from 2000 that plagiarized one from 1984

When it comes to plagiarism, there is apparently no statute of limitations. That’s one lesson one might take from this tale of two papers, one published in 1984 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (AJOG), and the other published in 2000 in the Medical Journal of The Islamic Republic of Iran (MJIRI). Both … Continue reading Journal to retract article from 2000 that plagiarized one

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Arbetsplatsnedläggningar drabbar inte barnen

Rapportförfattarna studerar familjer där en förälder jobbade på en arbetsplats som blev nedlagd under 1995–2000. De finner att de föräldrar som blev friställda oftare var arbetslösa och hade lägre arbetsinkomster under en lång tid efteråt. Bland papporna ökade risken att dö i förtid och bland mammorna ökade risken att skilja sig, behöva vård för alkoholrelaterade sjukdomar samt psykisk sjukdom. B

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3 qualities of super resilient people

Shaka Senghor spent 19 years in prison, seven years of which he was in solitary confinement – a punishment designed to drive a person crazy after 90 days. In his most adverse moments, Senghor took inspiration from the memoirs of great minds, learning resiliency from their words and stories. Resilience boils down to 3 ingredients: Optimism – you have to acknowledge it's a dark period with light at

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This Week in Anti-Semitism

The week began with Alain Finkielkraut taking his mother-in-law to Sunday lunch in Paris. As he returned to his apartment on the Left Bank, he crossed through a crowd of “yellow vest” protesters. They recognized the well-televised philosopher. Despite the fact that he has professed sympathy for their grievances in his punditry, his presence enraged them. A viral video captured young men bedecked

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Blame Congress for the National Emergency

Who empowered President Donald Trump to declare that “a national emergency exists at the southern border of the United States”? Congress. Congress authorized such sweeping authority. Congress failed to impose meaningful constraints or define “national emergency.” Congress is failing to maintain accountability by abiding by its six-month mandatory reviews of such emergencies. And it is Congress th

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Progressives Risk Killing More Than the Amazon Deal

The failed attempt to bring Amazon’s second headquarters to New York was a debacle, exposing a rift among progressives so large that it occupied half of last Sunday’s Meet the Press broadcast. When a local economic-development deal garners that kind of national press attention—when the head of the Democratic National Committee is grilled about it by Chuck Todd—it is clear that this is about much

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A Great, Forgotten Black Radical

I wrote this comic about Timothy Thomas Fortune, a newspaper editor, orator, and leader who was born into slavery and spent most of his life advocating for the rights of black Americans. Although not as well known as some of his more famous counterparts, Fortune had a profound influence on the battle for civil rights. — Adam Serwer

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America Is Too Impeachment Obsessed

Calls to impeach President Donald Trump—and denunciations of those calls—have run rampant in American public discourse since Election Day 2016. Although support for ending Trump’s tenure has never exceeded 50 percent, it’s no exaggeration to say that talk of impeachment is now a defining feature of our politics. But major implications of that fact remain underappreciated. This essay was adapted f

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What Will Win at the 2019 Oscars?

However dramatic Sunday’s Academy Awards presentation might prove to be (safe prediction: not very), it will be all but impossible for the ceremony to match the turmoil of its run-up. Last summer, the Academy announced that it would add a new prize for “popular” film— a truly terrible idea —only to reverse itself within a month. In December, days after being announced as the host, Kevin Hart step

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Folketingets domæne er ikke sikret: Danske Bank har sikret 2600 domæner

Et forsøg på svindel satte gang i et større projekt med at implementere DMARC hos Danske Bank.

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First private mission to the moon is launched on SpaceX rocket

The moon has only ever been visited by government superpowers, but a small Israeli non-profit called SpaceIL is about to change that with its lunar lander

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BMW, Daimler to invest 1 bn euros in joint carsharing schemeBMW Daimler Invest

German auto giants BMW and Daimler said Friday they would invest one billion euros ($1.1 billion) in combining and extending their carsharing schemes DriveNow and Car2Go, in future offering a slew of "mobility services", including for electric cars.

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A dangerous duo of common fungi prompts immune woes

A dangerous duo of common fungi prompts immune woes A dangerous duo of common fungi prompts immune woes, Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00628-6 Gut fungus helps to trigger the proliferation of T cells that are prevalent in inflamed lung tissue.

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Open-access pioneer Randy Schekman on Plan S and disrupting scientific publishing

Open-access pioneer Randy Schekman on Plan S and disrupting scientific publishing Open-access pioneer Randy Schekman on Plan S and disrupting scientific publishing, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00595-y eLife’s departing editor talks about the seismic changes he sees coming — and why some journals will lose out.

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Hør ugens podcast: Folketinget beskytter ikke mod fup-mails og plan for 5G fremlagt

Folketinget og de fleste politiske partier beskytter ikke deres email-domæner mod hacker-misbrug, selvom det kan gøres helt gratis.

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Could blockchain ensure integrity of clinical trial data?

UC San Francisco researchers have created a proof-of-concept method for ensuring the integrity of clinical trials data with blockchain. The system creates an immutable audit trail that makes it easy to spot any tampering with results — such as making the treatment look more effective or diminishing side effects. The research will be published Feb. 22 in Nature Communications.

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New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain

MIT researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain. Using this technique, they can track electrical activity inside the neurons of living animals, enabling them to link neural activity with specific behaviors.

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Correct antibiotic dosing could preserve lung microbial diversity in cystic fibrosis

Children and young adults with cystic fibrosis whose lung infections were treated with suboptimal doses of antibiotics had fewer changes in lung microbial diversity during the IV treatment, and their microbial diversity levels were higher 30 days later, a multi-institutional study that includes Children's researchers shows.

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Treatment to a T? Taking a 'BiTE' out of lung cancer

An Osaka University-led research team assayed T cell cytotoxicity in tumor tissue in lung cancer, along with normal lung tissue and peripheral blood. They found associations of tumor T-cell cytotoxicity with smoking and cytokine levels. They also revealed that T-cell cytotoxicity in peripheral blood correlated with that in tumors, and also with the effectiveness of nivolumab in cancer immunotherap

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Copper-catalyzed oxidative benzylic C-H cyclization via iminyl radical from intermolecular anion-radical redox relay

Copper-catalyzed oxidative benzylic C-H cyclization via iminyl radical from intermolecular anion-radical redox relay Copper-catalyzed oxidative benzylic C-H cyclization via iminyl radical from intermolecular anion-radical redox relay, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08849-z The synthesis of high value heterocycles from cheap starting materials remains challenging. Here,

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On the predictability of infectious disease outbreaks

On the predictability of infectious disease outbreaks On the predictability of infectious disease outbreaks, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08616-0 Forecasting of infectious disease outbreaks can inform appropriate intervention measures, but whether fundamental limits to accurate prediction exist is unclear. Here, the authors use permutation entropy as a model independ

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Lithium anode stable in air for low-cost fabrication of a dendrite-free lithium battery

Lithium anode stable in air for low-cost fabrication of a dendrite-free lithium battery Lithium anode stable in air for low-cost fabrication of a dendrite-free lithium battery, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08767-0 The lithium metal is a promising anode material for batteries; however, the growth of dendrite and its instability against moisture are two technical chall

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Characterized cis-FeV(O)(OH) intermediate mimics enzymatic oxidations in the gas phase

Characterized cis -Fe V (O)(OH) intermediate mimics enzymatic oxidations in the gas phase Characterized cis -Fe V (O)(OH) intermediate mimics enzymatic oxidations in the gas phase, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08668-2 FeV(O)(OH) species have long been thought to play a role in a range of enzymatic oxidations, but their characterization has remained elusive. Here, usi

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Ocean precursors to the extreme Atlantic 2017 hurricane season

Ocean precursors to the extreme Atlantic 2017 hurricane season Ocean precursors to the extreme Atlantic 2017 hurricane season, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08496-4 Active Atlantic hurricane seasons are favoured by positive sea surface temperature anomalies. Here the authors identify a new air-sea heat flux driver for these anomalies in the severe 2017 season, while t

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STAT1 signaling shields T cells from NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity

STAT1 signaling shields T cells from NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity STAT1 signaling shields T cells from NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08743-8 The JAK-STAT signaling pathway is important for cytokine responses and CD4 T-cell differentiation. Here the authors show that Stat1 also serves to protect CD4 T cells from natural killer cell-media

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Halogen bonding as a supramolecular dynamics catalyst

Halogen bonding as a supramolecular dynamics catalyst Halogen bonding as a supramolecular dynamics catalyst, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08878-8 The halogen bond is well known for its ability to assemble supramolecules. Here, using NMR experiments, the authors reveal the role of these bonds in dynamic processes, finding that the halogen bond directly catalyzes dynam

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Author Correction: Solution-processed perovskite light emitting diodes with efficiency exceeding 15% through additive-controlled nanostructure tailoring

Author Correction: Solution-processed perovskite light emitting diodes with efficiency exceeding 15% through additive-controlled nanostructure tailoring Author Correction: Solution-processed perovskite light emitting diodes with efficiency exceeding 15% through additive-controlled nanostructure tailoring, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09013-3 Author Correction: Soluti

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The role of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 expression in radiocontrast-induced nephropathy

The role of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 expression in radiocontrast-induced nephropathy The role of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 expression in radiocontrast-induced nephropathy, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39534-2 The role of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 expression in radiocontrast-induced nephropathy

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Evolutionary dynamics of the chromatophore genome in three photosynthetic Paulinella species

Evolutionary dynamics of the chromatophore genome in three photosynthetic Paulinella species Evolutionary dynamics of the chromatophore genome in three photosynthetic Paulinella species, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38621-8 Evolutionary dynamics of the chromatophore genome in three photosynthetic Paulinella species

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Electrically Reconfigurable Micromirror Array for Direct Spatial Light Modulation of Terahertz Waves over a Bandwidth Wider Than 1 THz

Electrically Reconfigurable Micromirror Array for Direct Spatial Light Modulation of Terahertz Waves over a Bandwidth Wider Than 1 THz Electrically Reconfigurable Micromirror Array for Direct Spatial Light Modulation of Terahertz Waves over a Bandwidth Wider Than 1 THz, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39152-y Electrically Reconfigurable Micromirror Array for Direct Spat

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Effects of ultraviolet treatment and alendronate immersion on osteoblast-like cells and human gingival fibroblasts cultured on titanium surfaces

Effects of ultraviolet treatment and alendronate immersion on osteoblast-like cells and human gingival fibroblasts cultured on titanium surfaces Effects of ultraviolet treatment and alendronate immersion on osteoblast-like cells and human gingival fibroblasts cultured on titanium surfaces, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39355-3 Effects of ultraviolet treatment and alen

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A quasi-reagentless point-of-care test for nitrite and unaffected by oxygen and cyanide

A quasi-reagentless point-of-care test for nitrite and unaffected by oxygen and cyanide A quasi-reagentless point-of-care test for nitrite and unaffected by oxygen and cyanide, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39209-y A quasi-reagentless point-of-care test for nitrite and unaffected by oxygen and cyanide

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Moraxella catarrhalis NucM is an entry nuclease involved in extracellular DNA and RNA degradation, cell competence and biofilm scaffolding

Moraxella catarrhalis NucM is an entry nuclease involved in extracellular DNA and RNA degradation, cell competence and biofilm scaffolding Moraxella catarrhalis NucM is an entry nuclease involved in extracellular DNA and RNA degradation, cell competence and biofilm scaffolding, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39374-0 Moraxella catarrhalis NucM is an entry nuclease invol

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Optical bleaching front in bedrock revealed by spatially-resolved infrared photoluminescence

Optical bleaching front in bedrock revealed by spatially-resolved infrared photoluminescence Optical bleaching front in bedrock revealed by spatially-resolved infrared photoluminescence, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38815-0 Optical bleaching front in bedrock revealed by spatially-resolved infrared photoluminescence

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The circulating form of neprilysin is not a general biomarker for overall survival in treatment-naïve cancer patients

The circulating form of neprilysin is not a general biomarker for overall survival in treatment-naïve cancer patients The circulating form of neprilysin is not a general biomarker for overall survival in treatment-naïve cancer patients, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38867-2 The circulating form of neprilysin is not a general biomarker for overall survival in treatment

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Naming and Shaming the Pro-Trump Elite

C harlie Sykes is sitting behind a desk in a sparse, disheveled office—blank walls lined with empty filing cabinets, windows covered with crooked blinds—as he tries to conjure the perfect metaphor for The Bulwark , the anti–Donald Trump conservative news site he recently helped start. “We are the ultimate wilderness!” he declares to me. But that doesn’t sound quite lonely enough for the political

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Ørsted-satellitten fylder 20 år: Nu skal den på arbejde igen

PLUS. Efter fire år uden kontakt vil DTU Space igen forsøge at hente data ned fra den aldrende satellit. Nogle instrumenter burde stadig virke.

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The mummy of all Tutankhamun shows will land in London

Saatchi Gallery to host exhibition of 150 artefacts before their permanent return to Egypt The largest number of King Tutankhamun treasures ever to leave Egypt are heading to London for an exhibition which organisers say will never happen again. It was announced on Thursday that the Saatchi Gallery in London will be the only UK venue for a world tour of 150 original artefacts from Tutankhamun’s t

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Operera inte äggstockarna i onödan

Forskare har följt närmare 2 000 kvinnor för att se hur godartade förändringar i äggstockarna utvecklas om de inte behandlas. Resultaten visar att uppföljning med ultraljud i stället för operation inte leder till ökade risker för följdsjukdomar. Forskarna bakom studien menar att resultaten ger anledning att se över hur man behandlar äggstocksförändringar.

9h

Liselott Blixt løber fra sit ansvar

Det er ærlig talt forstemmende at læse interview med formanden for Folketingets sundhedsudvalg, som nedgør en hel faggruppe på en respektløs unuanceret måde uden kendskab til lægernes daglige arbejde.

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Presset region satser på hjælp fra privathospitalerne

Kapacitetsproblemer inden for en lang række lægefaglige specialeområder tvinger Region Sjælland til at sende udredning og behandling af større patientgrupper i udbud. Regningen skal i sidste ende betales af de afdelinger, der har været nødt til at sende patienter videre til det private. Det kan føre til nye besparelser, og dermed yderligere kapacitetsproblemer på afdelingerne

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Nyt studie skal afgøre, om samtlige danske gravide skal screenes for diabetes

Nyt studie skal undersøge, om WHO’s retningslinjer for screening af graviditetsrelateret diabetes blandt gravide skal indføres i Danmark. Indføres retningslinjerne, kan samtlige gravide fremadrettet screenes for diabetes.

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Opdelt diabetesbehandling giver tryghed og bedre behandling for patienten

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen opdeler som det eneste sted i landet diabetesbehandling efter type 1 og type 2. Det giver bedre behandlingsforløb og større patientsikkerhed, mener overlæge.

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Siemens to Supply Motors for Eviation’s All-Electric Airplanes

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

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Cost benefits to boost mines' adoption of renewable hybrids

submitted by /u/energynew [link] [comments]

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‘Reprogrammed’ stem cells to treat spinal-cord injuries for the first time

‘Reprogrammed’ stem cells to treat spinal-cord injuries for the first time ‘Reprogrammed’ stem cells to treat spinal-cord injuries for the first time, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00656-2 Approval from Japanese regulators means that trials of induced pluripotent stem cells can begin later this year.

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The lessons infantile adults can learn from children go far beyond climate change | Richard Russell

As a teacher, how do I show my pupils the right values when they see so little of it from their adult ‘role models’? The children’s climate strike has become another lightning rod in the never-ending culture war. Those on the left applauded them for their brave moral stand. Jonathan Freedland – not without basis – pointed to the strike as evidence that children were acting more like adults than t

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AIs could debate whether a smart assistant should snitch on you

If a smart home spots cannabis in a teenager’s bedroom, should it tell their parents? Or even the police? One proposal is to let debating AIs decide

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Baidu profit falls but revenue beats expectations

Leading Chinese internet search provider Baidu has announced a 50 percent plunge in net profit for the fourth quarter but revenue beat expectations on growth in its core search business and …

11h

Triclosan added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment

Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However, new research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that a chemical that is supposed to kill bacteria is actually making them stronger and more capable of surviving antibiotic treatment.

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Triclosan added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment

Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However, new research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that a chemical that is supposed to kill bacteria is actually making them stronger and more capable of surviving antibiotic treatment.

11h

Pinterest files confidentially for stock listing: report

Pinterest, the online "visual discovery" service which claims some 250 million users, has filed confidentially for a stock market listing, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

11h

Going greener: Finland's new gas-fuelled icebreaker

The steel behemoth pushes ahead, crunching the ice as it navigates the northernmost tip of the Baltic, considered one of the most polluted seas in the world. But unlike other icebreakers spewing diesel, this state-of-the-art ship boasts cleaner fuel.

11h

Baidu profit falls but revenue beats expectations

Leading Chinese internet search provider Baidu has announced a 50 percent plunge in net profit for the fourth quarter but revenue beat expectations on growth in its core search business and a push into artificial intelligence (AI).

11h

Under fire Huawei and foldable screens in focus at top mobile fair

Phone makers will focus on foldable screens and the introduction of blazing fast 5G wireless networks at the world's biggest mobile fair starting Monday in Spain as they try to reverse a decline in sales of smartphones.

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Israel flying to moon after SpaceX launch

An Israeli spacecraft rocketed toward the moon for the country's first attempted lunar landing, following a launch Thursday night by SpaceX.

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Cellphone internet access bringing changes fast to Cuba

After a tornado slammed Havana in late January, Mijail Ramirez complained on Twitter that authorities were threatening to evict him from his damaged home. A week later he said the government had changed its mind and would help him rebuild the house.

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New research, February 11-17, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. Temperature, precipitation, wind Change Point Analysis of Global Temperature Records Improved decadal prediction of Northern-Hemisphere summer land temperature Impact of Atmospheric Heat and Moisture Transport on the Arctic Warming Atmospheric circulation modulates the spatial variability of temperature in the Atlantic‐Arctic re

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Børns første leveår er centrale i forebyggelsen af fedme

Der skal sættes ind så tidligt som muligt for at forebygge overvægt blandt børn. Det mener to professorer, der peger på, at sundhedsplejersker skal have flere redskaber til at løfte opgaven.

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Do we need another massive particle collider? Science Weekly podcast

With the Large Hadron Collider reaching its upper limits, scientists around the world are drawing up plans for a new generation of super colliders. Ian Sample weighs up whether or not the potential new discoveries a collider may make will justify the cost of building them. Cern recently announced a proposal to build a machine that would dwarf the Large Hadron Collider . It could cost around $12bn

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Do we need another massive particle collider? Science Weekly podcast

With the Large Hadron Collider reaching its upper limits, scientists around the world are drawing up plans for a new generation of super colliders. Ian Sample weighs up whether or not the potential new discoveries a collider may make will justify the cost of building them.. Help support our independent journalism at gu.com/sciencepod

12h

A Global Geopolitical Crisis Comes to Moldova

CHISINAU—Change comes slowly here in the Moldovan capital. Beyond the neon signs for fast-food restaurants such as McDonald’s or cellphone providers such as Orange, the drab, gray streets could easily form the backdrop of a gritty Cold War spy movie. This former Soviet republic is within Europe’s eastern borderlands, where the competition to set the country’s future path, much like in neighboring

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Grøn bølge: 4 teknologier gør din næste bil så meget federe

De er ikke helt selvkørende endnu, men nye biler kan rigtig meget.

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Israeli company sends world's first privately funded mission to moon

The unmanned robotic capsule, called Beresheet, will land on the moon in mid-April An Israeli spacecraft aboard a SpaceX rocket has launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida, beginning a two-month journey to land on the Moon. If successful, Israel, a state with fewer than 9 million citizens, will join Russia, the US and China as the only countries to have made a controlled landing on the surface of

13h

Japanese Hayabusa 2 space probe lands on asteroid

Research could provide insights into origins of planets and evolution of life on Earth

14h

PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy

In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which patients with one type of HER2-positive breast cancer might best benefit from standalone HER2-targeted agents, without the need for standard chemotherapy.

14h

Partier og Folketinget står åbne for hackeres fup-mails

Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste anbefaler en åben og gratis standard til beskyttelse mod angreb via mail, men hverken Folketinget eller en stribe politiske partier anvender den. Sløjt, siger bidragyder til anbefalingen.

14h

Signals on the scales: How the brain processes images

How are the images cast on the retina reassembled in the brain? Researchers have found that processing of visual stimuli occurs at the earliest waystation on the way to the visual cortex — but not all are treated equally.

14h

Equilibrium: When does one of the central ideas in economics work?

Many situations in economics are complicated and competitive. New research raises the question of whether many theories in economics may suffer from the very fundamental problem that the key behavioral assumption of equilibrium is wrong.

14h

New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells

The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists have discovered that the protein Akna plays a key role in this process. It controls, for example, the behavior of neural stem cells via a mechanism that may also be involved in the formation of metastases.

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How to treat depression in prison — and why it matters

The first randomized study of its kind reveals effective treatment for prisoners suffering from mental illness.

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Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life

Paleobiologists have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.

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Surprising findings on forest fires

Several years ago, an international team of scientists raised sediments from the bottom of Lake Van in eastern Turkey reflecting the past 600,000 years. Soil scientists and paleobotanists have now evaluated the drill cores for residues of early fires — with surprising findings. The fires did not mainly occur during particularly dry periods as assumed, but in comparatively humid and warm periods.

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SpaceX Just Launched the First Commercial Lunar Lander, Ever

Making History It’s official: Israeli space company SpaceIL’s lunar lander Beresheet just launched into space aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket this evening, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. SpaceX confirmed the successful deployment just after 9:30pm EST. If all goes well, the dishwasher-sized spacecraft will be the first private spacecraft to ever reach the lunar surface. A Long

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Improving integration in societal consequences to climate change [Letters (Online Only)]

Recreating fine-resolution dating of an increase of dust and stable isotopes captured in two stalagmites in northern Iran, Carolin et al. (1) in PNAS argue for close coincidence and a causal link with the decline of the Akkadian Empire at ∼4.2 ka. The integration of high-resolution climate datasets with historical…

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Reply to Jaffe et al.: Paleoscience precision in an archeological or historical context [Letters (Online Only)]

Jaffe et al. (1) present some of the many challenges faced in attempting to integrate climate science and archeological records. We accept that these challenges exist, and thank the authors for their comments. Our response to the four points made by Jaffe et al. (1) follows:i)Our study (2) provides evidence…

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Unleashing floret fertility in wheat through the mutation of a homeobox gene [Plant Biology]

Floret fertility is a key determinant of the number of grains per inflorescence in cereals. During the evolution of wheat (Triticum sp.), floret fertility has increased, such that current bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars set three to five grains per spikelet. However, little is known regarding the genetic basis of…

16h

Droplet motions fill a periodic table [Engineering]

Drawing parallels to the symmetry breaking of atomic orbitals used to explain the periodic table of chemical elements; here we introduce a periodic table of droplet motions, also based on symmetry breaking but guided by a recent droplet spectral theory. By this theory, higher droplet mode shapes are discovered and…

16h

Unnatural verticilide enantiomer inhibits type 2 ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium leak and is antiarrhythmic [Physiology]

Ca2+ leak via ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) can cause potentially fatal arrhythmias in a variety of heart diseases and has also been implicated in neurodegenerative and seizure disorders, making RyR2 an attractive therapeutic target for drug development. Here we synthesized and investigated the fungal natural product and known insect…

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Role for nuclear interleukin-37 in the suppression of innate immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

The IL-1 family member IL-37 broadly suppresses innate inflammation and acquired immunity. Similar to IL-1α and IL-33, IL-37 is a dual-function cytokine in that IL-37 translocates to the nucleus but also transmits a signal via surface membrane receptors. The role of nuclear IL-37 remains unknown on the ability of this…

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Circadian clock protein Rev-erb{alpha} regulates neuroinflammation [Neuroscience]

Circadian dysfunction is a common attribute of many neurodegenerative diseases, most of which are associated with neuroinflammation. Circadian rhythm dysfunction has been associated with inflammation in the periphery, but the role of the core clock in neuroinflammation remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Rev-erbα, a nuclear receptor and circadian…

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The nature of recollection across months and years and after medial temporal lobe damage [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We studied the narrative recollections of memory-impaired patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage who took a 25-min guided walk during which 11 planned events occurred. The recollections of the patients, recorded directly after the walk, were compared with the recollections of controls tested directly after the walk (C1), after…

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Arg302 governs the pKa of Glu325 in LacY [Biochemistry]

Lactose permease is a paradigm for the major facilitator superfamily, the largest family of ion-coupled membrane transport proteins known at present. LacY carries out the coupled stoichiometric symport of a galactoside with an H+, using the free energy released from downhill translocation of H+ to drive accumulation of galactosides against…

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Down-regulation of FZD3 receptor suppresses growth and metastasis of human melanoma independently of canonical WNT signaling [Medical Sciences]

Frizzled 3 receptor (FZD3) plays an important role in the homeostasis of the neural crest and its derivatives, which give rise to pigment-synthesizing cells, melanocytes. While the role for FZD3 in specification of the melanocytic lineage from neural crest is well established, its significance in the formation of melanoma, its…

16h

Smoking cessation may reduce risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Studies demonstrates for first time that behavior change can delay or even prevent the most severe form of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors influence the makeup of their microbiomes and how might the makeup of their microbiomes be important to amphibian health and survival?

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Seeing through another's eyes

New research provides direct evidence that we can take others' perspectives because we spontaneously form mental images of how the world looks to the other person, so that we can virtually see through their eyes and make judgements as if it was what we were seeing.

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Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world

Capsicum is a major vegetable and spice crop worldwide. Global production of both fresh and dried fruit continues to increase steadily in terms of area harvested and total yield. A comprehensive review explores various aspects of interest concerning this horticulturally important crop.

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How does the eye talk to the brain?

Two eyes are better than one! Our brains integrate two slightly different images coming from our two eyes to give us depth perception. How does this happen? To answer this, we will look at where the neural pathways from the two eyes converge. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are neurons in the eye that send visual information to the brain. RGCs are divided into many subtypes based on the shapes of t

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Old becomes new

Two students take up the challenge of repairing, reusing and recycling clothes for London Fashion Week.

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How do Stem Cells Actually Work? | Earth Lab

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation

Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in the ocean's coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide uptake, a new study shows. The findings — based on thousands of samples collected in the western North Atlantic — upend prevailing theories about where and when nitrogen fixation occurs, and underscore the need for scientists to revisit the global distribution of marine

17h

Firearm homicide rate higher in US counties with greater income inequality

Counties in the United States with greater gaps between rich and poor have a higher rate of homicide deaths involving firearms, according to a new study. These same counties experienced higher levels of crime and poverty, and lower levels of community social networks.

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Focusing on the fovea

Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can be disrupted by disease.

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Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable

In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones — with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s — and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.

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Researchers explore an often ignored source of greenhouse gas

Researchers have discovered a surprising new source of carbon dioxide emissions — bicarbonates hidden in the lake water used to irrigate local orchards.

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Japan’s Hayabusa 2 successfully touches down on Ryugu asteroid

The probe was due to fire a pellet into the surface of the asteroid to try to capture dust A Japanese spacecraft has successfully touched down on a speeding asteroid 300 million kilometres from the Earth as it attempts an audacious manoeuvre to collect samples and bring them back for scientists to study. The Hayabusa 2 probe touched down on the asteroid Ryugu at around 11:30pm GMT on Thursday. Da

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Bagsiden: ‘Mirakelapparatet’ Cera Heater

Hold hele huset varmt med kun 350 W!

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The Scientific Adventures of Ben Barres Part I: Dishing out Discoveries

Dr. Ben Barres is a hero to those of us here at NeuWriteSD. Ben was a pioneering scientist and a devoted mentor, as well as a relentless crusader for greater inclusivity in science. While we’ve highlighted his advocacy work and published a memorial post after his death, we haven’t paid nearly enough tribute to his […]

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How blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation

Researchers have discovered how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation — a finding that could lead to the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis.

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How to save a seabird

A new study outlines more than a decade of success in reducing seabird bycatch in Alaska's longline fisheries, and where there's still room for improvement.

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Sackler Testimony Appears to Conflict With Federal Investigation

Publication of a sealed deposition by Richard Sackler of Purdue Pharma shows inconsistencies between his statements about OxyContin and evidence presented in a Justice Department report.

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Trump Shouldn't Plan to Tweet From a 6G Phone Anytime Soon

As wireless carriers begin to introduce 5G technology, Trump says he wants 6G. Researchers are working on it, but say any such standard is a decade away, or more.

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The Atlantic Daily: Americans Who've Met No One of Another Race or Religion

What We’re Following For some, the bubble is real. In the American mythos, the United States is a hodgepodge of groups that blend together in a swirl of harmonious pluralism. Yet a new study conducted by The Atlantic and the Public Religion Research Institute pokes holes in that self-image. Democrats and Republicans, for example, have wildly different views on the values of multiculturalism and r

18h

Insects decline: What do insects actually do?

Reports show many insect populations are declining. How will that affect us?

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Japan’s Hayabusa2 craft touches down on asteroid Ryugu

Japan’s Hayabusa2 craft touches down on asteroid Ryugu Japan’s Hayabusa2 craft touches down on asteroid Ryugu, Published online: 22 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00671-3 The mission team is now waiting to learn whether the probe collected a sample from the space rock.

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How to Preorder the Galaxy S10 (and the Best Deals So Far)

So you want a Galaxy S10, eh? Do you know which one, and where the best deals are? It's OK, we've got you covered.

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'Historical Google Earth' project captures a changing Britain

Cambridge University launches free digital archive of aerial photos going back to 1945 A “historical Google Earth” featuring aerial photographs of Britain going back to 1945 has been made freely available by Cambridge University. The vast archive captures 70 years of change across urban and rural landscapes, from the bomb-scarred postwar period to the emergence of motorways and skyscrapers. Conti

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UN: Growing threat to food from decline in biodiversity

A UN report says the plants and animals crucial to human food systems are in global decline.

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Google Ends Forced Arbitration After Employee Protest

Google will no longer bar employees from suing the company for discrimination or wrongful termination, or from joining together in class-action suits.

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Will currency as a whole ever be useless?

Do you believe currency as a whole will ever be obsolete? Since we have finite amount of resources, could currency ever be abolished/made obsolete? submitted by /u/DayTrader1122 [link] [comments]

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SNAPSHOT: A New Way to Track Biodiversity

A team of scientists at the University of Alberta used an image spectrometer — essentially a specialized camera that captures light waves invisible to the naked eye — to create this technicolor shot of plants in the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in Minnesota. The different colors show differences in plants’ functions, which, the team suggests in a paper published last year in Nature Ecolog

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Why Flu Vaccines Don’t Work as Well in the Elderly

The adage that “the older you are, the wiser you get” doesn’t always apply to our immune systems. Despite being exposed to a lifetime’s worth of illnesses, immune systems in the elderly are worse at fighting stealthy, shape-shifting viruses like the flu. Why aging decreases our immune system’s abilities has been a mystery to researchers. But a new study published in Cell Host & Microbe finds that

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A New Species of Tiny Tyrannosaur Helps Explain the Rise of T. rex

Scientists have discovered a new species of tiny tyrannosaur that lived some 95 million years ago in what’s now Utah. The find helps fill a frustrating gap in the fossil record at a critical time when tyrannosaurs were evolving from small, speedy hunters, into the bone-crushing apex predators we know so well. The new dinosaur has been dubbed Moros intrepidus, and its name means “harbinger of doom.

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Did Huge Volcanic Eruptions Help Kill Off The Dinosaurs?

Nearly 66 million years ago, most living things on Earth died. Most researchers agree that the prime culprit was an asteroid that struck Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, leading to the mass extinction that took out most of the dinosaurs. But in a new research published Thursday, two independent research groups are making the case that enormous volcanic eruptions in India likely contributed to the demis

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Japan's Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Shot an Asteroid Tonight

Far from Earth, a tiny spacecraft punched an asteroid tonight. Hayabusa2 swooped close to Ryugu today to collect asteroid dust. The JAXA spacecraft has spent the last day leaving its usual orbit around the asteroid to zoom in close. Tonight, it flew in close enough to touch Ryugu and hopefully steal some space dust before darting away again. It didn't stay long. The touchdown was more of a quick t

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Three years into soda tax, sugary drink consumption down more than 50 percent in Berkeley

Consumption of sugary drinks dropped 52 percent among Berkeley's low-income residents in the three years after the city enacted a penny-per-ounce excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in early 2015, a new study shows. The study, which is the first to document the long-term impacts of a soda tax in the United States, suggests that taxation may be an effective tool in the fight against diabetes, h

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Climate change may affect ecological interactions among species

Predator-prey equilibria are being disrupted by climate change, according to a new study.

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Breast cancer study confirms importance of multigenerational family data to assess risk

Researchers evaluated four commonly used breast cancer prediction models and found that family-history-based models perform better than non-family-history based models, even for women at average or below-average risk of breast cancer. The study is the largest independent analysis to validate four widely used models of breast cancer risk and has the longest prospective follow-up data available to d

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The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Experts warn of a surge in vector-borne diseases as humanitarian crisis in Venezuela worsens

The ongoing humanitarian crisis in Venezuela is accelerating the re-emergence of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease, dengue, and Zika virus, and threatens to jeopardize public health gains in the country over the past two decades, warn leading public health experts. The conclusion comes from a Review paper that provides the most comprehensive assessment of the impact of the cris

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Troubling extent of trauma and PTSD in British young people revealed

New research from King's College London suggests one in 13 young people in the UK have had post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) before reaching age 18. The first UK-based study of its kind, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, found 31% of young people had a traumatic experience during childhood, and those who were exposed to trauma were twice as likely as their peers to have a range of mental hea

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Pinterest files confidentially for stock listing: report

Pinterest, the online "visual discovery" service which claims some 250 million users, has filed confidentially for a stock market listing, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

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Chemical added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment

Triclosan exposure may inadvertently drive bacteria into a state in which they are able to tolerate normally lethal concentrations of antibiotics — including those antibiotics that are commonly used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs).

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Achieving greater efficiency for fast data center operations

Algorithm and software system Shenango improves data center efficiency for microsecond-speed operations by better allocating data processing across CPU cores to reduce tail latency and ensure hardware runs productively.

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After SpaceX Launch, Israeli Spacecraft Begins Journey to the Moon

The privately built spacecraft will take a long trip to the moon, landing on its surface in April.

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Oral yeast infection medications may be risky during pregnancy

Health And other treatments might be just as effective. Women who took the anti-fungal medication during the first trimester of pregnancy, at both low and high doses, were more likely to have a pregnancy loss, found a study…

19h

Europe’s New Rules Aim to Make Online Marketplaces More Fair

New rules seek a level playing field between online platforms and companies that sell or market through them. Critics say the rules won't work.

19h

Rymdsond har landat på asteroid – väntas återvända om två år

Den japanska rymdsonden Hayabusa2 har landat på asteroiden Ryugu, omkring 28 miljoner mil från jorden. Sonden ska samla material från asteroiden som sedan ska skickas tillbaka till jorden. Forskare hoppas att prover från Ryugus ska kunna ge svar på frågor om liv och universum.

20h

Långt kvar till gruvdrift i rymden

Om den japanska rymdsonden lyckas få med sig material tillbaka till jorden handlar det bara om små mängder: Allra högst 30 gram. Men det vore mycket mer än det första japanska försöket att få hem material från en asteroid. 2010 fick den första Hayabusa-sonden med sig långt under ett gram. Men leveransen tillbaka till jorden lyckades.

20h

Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aimé Is Retiring

Also, the Day One patch for 'Anthem' dropped early and Steam stopped selling movies. (Yes, Steam sold movies.)

20h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cleanup in District 9

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, February 21. North Carolina’s Board of Elections unanimously voted to redo the election in the state’s Ninth Congressional District. The Republican Mark Harris, whose campaign was accused of election fraud, defeated the Democrat Dan McCready by 905 votes in November, but the state board has twice declined to certify a winner. Life in a Bubble: Upwards of

20h

The Atlantic Hires Andrew Ferguson as Staff Writer, Joining Ideas Section

Andrew Ferguson will join The Atlantic ’s Ideas section as a staff writer, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. His essays, reporting, and reviews will appear at TheAtlantic.com and in the print magazine. Ferguson, who was most recently a national correspondent at The Weekly Standard , will begin with The Atlantic in April. This week, The Atlantic also welcomed Dante Ramos as a senio

20h

'Goldilocks' thinking to cut cost of fuel cells in electric vehicles

Electric vehicles running on fuel cells tout zero emissions and higher efficiency, but expensive platinum is holding them back from entering a larger market. A new method increases fuel cell electrode activity at least tenfold, using 90 percent less metal.

20h

Deal reveals what scientists in Germany are paying for open access

Details of landmark contract with Wiley become public

20h

20h

Japan’s Hayabusa 2 Probe Is About to Shoot an Asteroid

In a few hours, Hayabusa 2 will launch a small projectile at Ryugu to dislodge material from the surface, which it will then attempt to scoop up. The post Japan’s Hayabusa 2 Probe Is About to Shoot an Asteroid appeared first on ExtremeTech .

20h

Consumer Reports No Longer Recommends Tesla Model 3, Cites Reliability

Consumer Reports has dropped its recommendation of the Model 3, citing significant reliability issues reported by owners in an addendum to its consumer vehicle reliability survey. The post Consumer Reports No Longer Recommends Tesla Model 3, Cites Reliability appeared first on ExtremeTech .

20h

InSight Beams Back Daily Weather Reports From Mars

In the most recent update, it was a balmy 2 degrees Fahrenheit (-17 degrees Celsius) at Elysium Planitia. The post InSight Beams Back Daily Weather Reports From Mars appeared first on ExtremeTech .

20h

11 household items you can use to take better photos

DIY Pricey accessories are great, but sometimes the tool you need is only a junk drawer away. You may not be able to find a way to blast your way out of a collapsed tunnel with a salt shaker, a stick of gum and a handful of pushpins, but you’d be surprised the…

20h

Watch a Self-Driving Car Obey Police Hand Signals

Palm Reading For autonomous vehicles that rely on smooth roads and clear signals, a broken traffic light could conceivably pose a major problem. To get around the problem of a missing green light, self-driving car company Waymo trained its vehicles’ artificial intelligence to detect and respond to the arm movements of a traffic cop as they wave traffic through an intersection, according to CNET —

20h

20h

China’s Ambitious Plan to Build the World’s Biggest Supergrid

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

20h

Of note.

submitted by /u/dreadprtroberts [link] [comments]

21h

“Holy Herb” Shows Promise as Alzheimer’s Treatment

Old Medicine The name native California tribes gave to the plant Eriodictyon californicum — “Yerba santa” — translates to “holy herb” in English, and the moniker is a testament to the tribes’ respect for the plant, which they used to treat everything from headaches to sore muscles. Now, in a heartening old-meets-new finding, scientists think they may have discovered yet another ailment Yerba sant

21h

Achieving greater efficiency for fast data center operations

Algorithm and software system Shenango improves data center efficiency for microsecond-speed operations by better allocating data processing across CPU cores to reduce tail latency and ensure hardware runs productively. The research comes from the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).

21h

Chemical added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment

Triclosan exposure may inadvertently drive bacteria into a state in which they are able to tolerate normally lethal concentrations of antibiotics — including those antibiotics that are commonly used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs).

21h

Research creates DNA-like molecule to aid search for alien life

In a research breakthrough funded by NASA, scientists have synthesized a molecular system that, like DNA, can store and transmit information. This unprecedented feat suggests there could be an alternative to DNA-based life, as we know it on Earth – a genetic system for life that may be possible on other worlds.

21h

The United States Is Still Trying to Sell North Korea on Denuclearization

It was a remarkable statement: “I don’t know if North Korea has made the choice yet to denuclearize,” a senior Trump administration official noted on Thursday, just days before Donald Trump is due to meet Kim Jong Un for a second summit that the president has touted as evidence of his success in ending the North Korean nuclear threat. Eight months after the U.S. and North Korean leaders first met

21h

Dive into DevOps with 75 hours of certification training for $69

Save hundreds on this comprehensive education. Save hundreds on this comprehensive education and dive into DevOps with 75 hours of certification training for $69.

21h

This Bird's Body Is Half Male, Half Female. So Is Its Brain.

Male cardinals are red. Females are tan. This one is both at the same time.

21h

Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

21h

Spacewatch: Nasa to produce new survey of the universe

Comprehensive mission known as SPHEREx will collect data on more than 300m galaxies Nasa has approved a new sky survey mission that will explore the origins of the universe and its galaxies and of water in planetary systems. This comprehensive mission is known as SPHEREx (the spectro-photometer for the history of the universe, epoch of reionization and ices explorer). It will survey the sky in 96

21h

Did hidden volcanoes heat up the ice cap on Mars?

A magma chamber must have formed under the surface of Mars in the past few hundred thousand years in order for there to be enough heat to produce liquid water underneath its thick ice cap, new research suggests. A study from last year suggested liquid water is present beneath the south polar ice cap of Mars. The new research doesn’t take sides as to whether the liquid water exists. Instead, the a

21h

Healthy menu options in handwritten typeface prompt positive response

Food can conjure up all kinds of warm and fuzzy feelings—childhood nostalgia, memories of road trips, or just the simple comfort of a nourishing cup of soup.

21h

Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder

21h

Scientists Have Created Four New Letters of Artificial DNA

Researchers have synthesized new ingredients for the blueprint of life. Steven Benner, a pioneer in the field of synthetic biology, and his team created four new DNA letters, according a study out today in the journal Science. The new eight-letter genetic system, dubbed “hachimoji” (hachi meaning eight in Japanese and moji meaning letter), doubles the number of building blocks for life. “A lot of

21h

SpaceX Just Launched Israel's Lunar Lander off to the Moon

The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet launched this evening on a trip to the moon, where it hopes to touch down in two months. This will be the first attempt at a lunar landing by a private company, and it's also the first launch by an Israeli spacecraft. Beresheet took off from from Cape Canaveral on one of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rockets at 8:45 Eastern time tonight. An hour after launch, Beresheet's engin

21h

With nanopore sensing, physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles

Researchers in Virginia Commonwealth University's Department of Physics have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters, or extremely small chunks of matter that are bigger than a molecule but smaller than a solid.

21h

Russian rocket launches Egyptian telecom satellite

Russia successfully launched an Egyptian telecommunications satellite on Thursday, the Russian space agency Roskosmos announced.

21h

Too hot for comfort: The physiological dangers of extreme heat

A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans.

21h

Climate change may affect ecological interactions among species

Predator-prey equilibria are being disrupted by climate change, according to a study led by Brazilian researchers and published in Nature Climate Change.

21h

Russia to China: Together we can rule the world

submitted by /u/rieslingatkos [link] [comments]

21h

The Galaxy Fold – Launched by Samsung

submitted by /u/MainBuilder [link] [comments]

21h

NASA Warns SpaceX and Boeing About Safety Flaws in Spacecraft

Back to the Basics Both Boeing and SpaceX are working to develop tools for NASA to use in upcoming crewed missions from the International Space Station. While NASA planned on launching test flights over the next few months, the whole program may be delayed as the government agency has found over 30 technical flaws or safety hazards for each company’s system, according to Reuters — a startling reb

21h

Sustainable, solar-driven chemical manufacturing

A team of researchers is working to upend energy-intensive, fossil fuel-dependent chemical manufacturing processes and replace them with sustainable, solar-driven reactions that rely on renewable feedstocks. The team recently designed a novel reactor that uses solar energy and plant waste to sustainably produce adiponitrile, an precursor material used in Nylon production.

21h

A ban on artificial trans fats in NYC restaurants appears to be working

New Yorkers’ levels of artificial trans fats dropped, especially in people who ate out the most, after a citywide ban on the fats in restaurant foods.

21h

Japan’s Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Lands on Ryugu Asteroid

The probe ascended from the space rock after firing a bullet to help with the gathering of samples that will eventually be returned to Earth.

21h

Wait —: Wait — What Is a Hole?

A journey down the rabbit hole of “holes.”

21h

Tesla’s Model 3 loses coveted Consumer Reports recommendation

Owner survey finds issues with paint and trim, cracked windows, and touchscreen.

21h

Sleep Deprivation Hardly Harms Fruit Flies

Some individuals sleep just minutes a day. And keeping flies awake does not have untoward effects on longevity.

21h

DeNovix: CellDrop Slide-Free Cell Counter

Experience the difference of counting cells without a slide

21h

22h

Kick-Starting Space Manufacturing – Karda2 – Medium

submitted by /u/FirasHermez [link] [comments]

22h

Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada

To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, researchers examined the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016). The drought resulted in the widespread death of pine trees due to attacks by bark beetles, potentially impacting wildlife habitat. While the results were varied, researchers found that many bird species responded

22h

Photos: Closing In on the Last ISIS Stronghold

In recent months, a U.S.-backed coalition of Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) has been attacking and closing in on the last remaining ISIS holdout, in eastern Syria. What remains of the so-called caliphate that once controlled more than 30,000 square miles in Syria and Iraq can now fit into less than half of one square mile in a small village called Baghouz. Weeks of air strikes and bom

22h

Letters: ‘Colin Kaepernick Did Not “Win”’

Kaepernick Won. The NFL Lost. Last week, Colin Kaepernick reached a settlement with the NFL, the details of which remain undisclosed. “Technically, the NFL did not admit that it conspired to blackball Kaepernick from the league after he began taking a knee during the national anthem to protest racial injustice,” Jemele Hill wrote . “But nontechnically speaking, the NFL lost. Massively.” Kaepernic

22h

With nanopore sensing, physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles

Researchers have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters, or extremely small chunks of matter that are bigger than a molecule but smaller than a solid.

22h

Sustainable, solar-driven chemical manufacturing

A team of researchers is working to upend energy-intensive, fossil fuel-dependent chemical manufacturing processes and replace them with sustainable, solar-driven reactions that rely on renewable feedstocks. The team recently designed a novel reactor that uses solar energy and plant waste to sustainably produce adiponitrile, an precursor material used in Nylon production.

22h

GI neuroimmune disruption contributes to Gulf War Illness

Many Persian Gulf War veterans experience Gulf War Illness (GWI), a chronic condition with symptoms ranging from gastrointestinal to neurological. While exposure to the anti-nerve gas pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is linked to the development of GWI, the exact cause and mechanisms of the illness remain unclear. Recently, an animal study tested the hypothesis that exposure to PB contributes to the de

22h

Seasonal and geographic trends in syphilis

Much of the public health impact of syphilis revolves around its impact on fetuses and neonates through the mother-to-child transmission of the disease. Researchers reporting have now analyzed temporal and demographic patterns in gestational syphilis (GS) and mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of syphilis.

22h

Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes

New research finds that some yeast picked up a whole suite of genes from bacteria that gave them the new ability to scavenge iron from their environment. It's one of the clearest examples yet of the transfer of genes from one branch on the tree of life to another.

22h

Electric car batteries inspire safer, cheaper way to make compounds used in medicines

Inspired by the refined electrochemistry of electric car batteries, scientists have developed a battery-like system that allows them to make potential advancements for the manufacturing of medicines. Their new method avoids safety risks associated with a type of chemical reaction known as dissolving metal reduction. Their method would offer significant advantages over current methods of chemical m

22h

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