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nyheder2019februar23

After a reset, Сuriosity is operating normally

NASA's Curiosity rover is busy making new discoveries on Mars. The rover has been climbing Mount Sharp since 2014 and recently reached a clay region that may offer new clues about the ancient Martian environment's potential to support life.

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Scientists Have Witnessed a Single-Celled Algae Evolve Into a Multicellular Organism

This footage is evolution in action, and it's absolutely breathtaking.

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Nyt dansk filter renser røgen fra brændeovne

PLUS. En tidligere chef for store, industrielle forbrændingsanlæg har udviklet en røggasrenser til almindelige brændeovne og pillefyr.

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Immunotherapy for egg allergy may allow patients to eat egg safely long after treatment

After completing up to four years of egg oral immunotherapy (eOIT) treatment, certain participants were able to safely incorporate egg into their diet for five years. This new research was presented by the study's first author, Edwin Kim, MD, at the annual American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) conference in San Francisco.

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Get a lifetime of language learning with Mondly for $69.99

Choose from 33 different mother tongues. Choose from 33 different mother tongues and get a lifetime of language learning with Mondly for $69.99.

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The trivial solution for designing Sustainable Energy Generation Systems with non-intermittent sources.

The purpose of this post is to share a solution for designing SEGS that is, in my opinion, the easiest to understand. A Sustainable Energy Generation System (SEGS) is an electric power system supported by 100% renewable energy. The root challenge of designing SEGSs is figuring out how much renewable energy and how much storage is required for sustainability. A SEGS is sustainable if it can meet t

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Exclusive breastfeeding lowers odds of some schoolchildren having eczema

Children exclusively breastfed for the first three months of life had significantly lower odds of having eczema at age 6 compared with peers who were not breastfed or were breastfed for less time, according to preliminary research presented during the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2019 Annual Meeting.

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Iceland to keep hunting up to 2,130 whales over 5 years

Iceland's whaling industry will be allowed to keep hunting whales for at least another five years, killing up to 2,130 baleen whales under a new quota issued by the government.

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Iceland to keep hunting up to 2,130 whales over 5 years

Iceland's whaling industry will be allowed to keep hunting whales for at least another five years, killing up to 2,130 baleen whales under a new quota issued by the government.

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China’s CRISPR twins might have had their brains inadvertently enhanced

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Strange Ways Animals Adapt to the Human-Built Environment

(Inside Science) — In 2012 and 2013, Bill Bateman, a zoologist based in Perth, Australia, began to notice something interesting about how animals were navigating the bush: When mining companies created small paths through the previously tangled environment to install seismic lines, animals started preferentially using those trails to move from one place to another. And animal ingenuity wasn’t con

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Revolt against the Rich

Nobel laureates, a new congresswoman and others urge raising taxes on the ultrawealthy to counter surging inequality. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Future of Earth defines future of humanity‽

Humans are going to extinct soon if the things continues! We have destroyed our planet literally and no one is taking a "crucial" step (the steps that are being taken simply aren't enough). It seriously hurts me when I see this :-\ I have decided to take the first step. I am creating a "SOCIETY" aimed at " "protection of this planet" and ultimately spreading human race into this vast universe;

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Jeff Bezos: New Shepard Will Launch First People Into Space “This Year”

Race to Space Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wants to send its first passengers to space as soon as this year. Bezos spoke during a private event at the Yale Club in New York City, Business Insider reports . “This year. This is the first time I’ve ever been saying, “this year.” For a few years, I’ve been saying, “next year,” Bezos told Jeff Foust, senior staff writer at Space News , during the event. The

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Employees Demand Microsoft Cancel U.S. Army HoloLens Contract

Augmented Warfare More than fifty employees at Microsoft signed a letter this week calling for the company to cancel a military contract that would supply U.S. Army soldiers with HoloLens augmented reality headsets. The letter titled “HoloLens for Good, Not War” states that the headset “will be deployed on the battlefield, and works by turning warfare into a simulated ‘video game,’ further distan

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Likelihood of tick bite to cause red meat allergy could be higher than previously thought

The original hypothesis was that humans developed the red meat allergy after being exposed to the alpha-gal protein through a tick that had fed previously on a small mammal. But new data suggests ticks can induce this immune response without requiring the mammal blood meal, which likely means the risk of each bite potentially leading to the allergy is higher than doctors had anticipated.

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Were dinosaurs killed off by asteroid or volcanoes? It's complicated

Every school child knows the dinosaurs were killed off by an asteroid smashing into the Earth some 66 million years ago.

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Nuclear goes retro — with a much greener outlook

submitted by /u/CrustySteak [link] [comments]

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NASA Clears SpaceX Crew Dragon’s First Test Flight

Demonstration Mission 1 All systems are go. SpaceX’s Crew Dragon passenger spacecraft is launching atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral in Florida on March 2 — but with only a spacesuit-wearing dummy on board. It will then attempt to autonomously dock with the International Space Station after reaching orbit early Sunday morning. NASA and SpaceX officially decided to proceed with pla

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Goodnight, Opportunity: So Long, and Thanks for All the Geology!

RIP Oppy (January 25, 2004–June 10, 2018) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Microphones That May Be Hidden in Your Home

Google apologized Wednesday to customers who purchased its Nest Secure home-security system. The device is equipped with a microphone that has gone unmentioned since it went up for sale in 2017. Earlier in February, Google announced on Twitter an upcoming software update that activated the microphone, making the Nest Guard responsive to voice commands and Google Assistant technology. The tweet st

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New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain

submitted by /u/passintimendgas [link] [comments]

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Apple closes two Dallas stores in apparent bid to ward off patent litigation

Apple is fleeing the patent-friendly courts of the Eastern District of Texas.

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YouTube Starts Pulling Ads on Anti-Vaccination Videos

Anti-Vax Ads YouTube pulled programmatic ad placements on a number of anti-vaccination or “anti-vax” related channels, BuzzFeed News reports . “We have strict policies that govern what videos we allow ads to appear on, and videos that promote anti-vaccination content are a violation of those policies,” a YouTube spokesperson told BuzzFeed News . “We enforce these policies vigorously, and if we fi

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The Spotlight Effect: This Church Scandal Was Revealed by Outsiders

VATICAN CITY—Church officials reacted badly when investigative journalists at The Boston Globe in 2002 uncovered a pattern of sexual abuse of minors by clerics and a widespread culture of cover-up. One cardinal blamed the crisis on the “Jewish media ” and decried a smear campaign against Boston’s Cardinal Bernard Law who, after leaving Boston in disgrace for his role protecting predator priests,

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Oppo phone with 10x zoom camera will launch this spring

Following the teaser from mid-January, today Oppo held an event just ahead of MWC to talk more about its upcoming 10x "lossless" camera zoom technology. This will still be …

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Fabiola Gianotti: ‘There is nothing more rewarding than discovering a new particle’

The director general of Cern talks about discovering the Higgs boson, women in science and the next generation of colliders An Italian particle physicist, Fabiola Gianotti, 58, has been the director general of Cern since January 2016. Previously she led a collaboration of around 3,000 physicists from 38 countries which co-discovered the Higgs boson in 2012. Last month Cern published plans for a €

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Sen Feinstein proposes climate change resolution

submitted by /u/sinistimus [link] [comments]

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #8

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Feb 17 through Sat, Feb 23, 2019 Editor's Pick The 3 Big Things That People Misunderstand About Climate Change David Wallace-Wells, author of the new book The Uninhabitable Earth , describes why climate change might alter our sense of time. A child sleeps on a couch in a flooded

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Meet AIVA, the world’s first AI music composer [Jan, 2018]

submitted by /u/witan- [link] [comments]

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New refillable batteries could fuel an electric car revolution

submitted by /u/roku44 [link] [comments]

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Europe is NOT pledging 1 trillion for climate change, the article is vastly exaggerated

Hello, myself i'm very concerned with climate change and there are some victories, but the one being massively hailed by this sub is far from being as big as it is claimed. So to begin with, this article : https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/02/21/kicking-ass-her-generation-applause-16-year-old-greta-thunberg-eu-chief-pledges-1 Is based upon that Reuters report : https://www.reuters.com/articl

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Why Grow Industrial Hemp?

submitted by /u/shamshaday [link] [comments]

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NASA Renames Facility After Katherine Johnson of ‘Hidden Figures’ Fame

It is yet another honor for Ms. Johnson, one of the trailblazing African-American mathematicians who inspired the 2016 book and movie.

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The calming effects of sewing can help people express and heal themselves

How absorbing your concentration in needlework relieves inner turmoil I grew up in post-war Britain when, saved from German invasion – men returned from war, children from evacuation, families were reunited – the comfort of the home became paramount. Its importance was marked out in sewn domestic niceties: embroidered tray cloths, cheval sets and tea cosies. My home had a sewing machine in the co

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Countries with more butter have happier citizens

Haiti and other countries with low butter supply report low life satisfaction. The reverse is true for countries like Germany, which score high in both categories. As the graph below shows, a curious pattern emerges across the globe. But is it causation or correlation? "Give me a good sharp knife and a good sharp cheese, and I'm a happy man". Perhaps not a quote you'd expect from the creative min

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Fossil Bones Reveal New Baby Dinosaur

The partial skull and additional bones represent a dinosaur species never found before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through February 23)

GENETICS Doubling Our DNA Building Blocks Could Lead to New Life Forms Megan Molteni | Wired “[The research] could have immediate impacts on the nascent DNA data storage industry and NASA’s search for life elsewhere in the solar system. It also represents a big step toward the far-off vision of creating alternative life forms—organisms that use a genetic language unlike the one used by every othe

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Tony Beets Begins Winterizing Dredge #1 | Gold Rush

In order to focus his team’s efforts on his second dredge, Tony begins preparations to winterize dredge number one. To start, he must drain all the water surrounding it. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery

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Weekend reads: Retractions at Nature and NEJM; editor resigns after paper with “racist characterizations;” CRISPR babies ethics paper retracted

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a new record for most retractions by a journal; the … Continue reading Weekend reads: Retractions at Nature and NEJM; editor

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How to make the most of your credit card points

DIY Tips for choosing the right card, understanding the benefits, and getting the most money out of your rewards. Are you really making the most of your credit card points, or are you leaving money on the table? Here’s how to ensure you get as much of that free stuff as possible.

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Scientists Warn Self-Driving Cars Could Worsen Inequality

Share the Road Advocates of self-driving cars argue that by taking error-prone humans off the streets, there’ll be fewer accidents and less traffic. But a new study shows that that may not actually be the case, as roads full of autonomous vehicles could worsen road congestion and increase inequality in large cities. Swarm Robotics The research, conducted by a nonprofit organization called the Uni

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Lille dinosaur røber, hvornår T. rex blev en kæmpe

En nyopdaget tyrannosaurus på størrelse med en ged fylder et hul i historien om den berygtede T. rex.

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Game Design Is Not for the Faint of Heart

Videogame creator Lori Ann Cole says stress was an everyday occurrence when she was working on 'Hero U'.

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A Hidden Nest Secure Mic, Facebook's Dead VPN, and More Security News This Week

The 2020 disinformation campaigns have started, DrainerBot is coming for your smartphone's battery, and more security news this week.

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NASA Chief: Space Agency “Well on Our Way” to Discovering Aliens

Life on Mars The sad report that the Opportunity Mars rover had died was accompanied by a bit of exciting news last week: NASA thinks it’s close to discovering alien life. During a ceremony announcing Opportunity’s death, NASA chief Jim Bridenstine shared an update on the agency’s Mars 2020 mission, which will hunt for signs of alien life on the Red Planet. “We’re going to be able to look at samp

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Neanderthals Were Inbreeding. Did it Help Cause Their Extinction?

Scientists keep prying into the sex lives of Neanderthals. In the past decade, they’ve revealed that Neanderthals got busy with both Homo sapiens and Denisovans, another lineage of now-extinct humans. But there’s more: Mounting evidence suggests Neanderthals also had a habit of inbreeding, or conceiving with close relatives. Several studies have now reported this based on genetic patterns and bone

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Space Photos of the Week: Building Blocks of Water Everywhere

Turns out the moon has what we need to make water—and fuel rockets.

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Ajit Pai Claims His FCC Improved Broadband Access

But progress was actually similar to what it was during the Obama era.

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Why Does Earth Have an Atmosphere?

Earth's atmosphere is enormous, so far reaching that it even affects the International Space Station's route. But how did this giant gaseous envelope form?

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An Iceberg Twice the Size of NYC Could Soon Break Off Antarctica

Lengthening cracks in the Brunt Ice Shelf spell trouble for the shelf's future.

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Is a More Generous Society Possible?

Generosity helps communities cope with risks and disasters; new research untangles the factors involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Will Hunt (explorer) – into the Earth: the mysteries and meanings of underground spaces

"The surface of the earth is where we're rational . . . Part of us dreads the chaos, and part of us is always attracted to it." "There were these things hanging from the ceiling…long strands of bacteria called "snotsicles"… But at our feet was a natural stream that had been running through Brooklyn forever." "It's…about death. Undergoing a death. We're going into the other world and then retreati

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending February 23, 2019)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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Modification of DEC2 Gene Thoughts

What does everyone think the viability of the modification of the DEC2 gene will be in the future? Seeing the recent development of CRISPR technology got me thinking of these rare gene mutants who run on low sleep, imagine the possibilities! Not just with DEC2 but with other optimization areas! submitted by /u/erdnhead129 [link] [comments]

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Android "Statue" of Kannon at a Kyoto Buddhist Temple

submitted by /u/Tivra [link] [comments]

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Is a More Generous Society Possible?

Generosity helps communities cope with risks and disasters; new research untangles the factors involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Those Health Apps Send Your Biometric Data Straight to Facebook

Sharing is Caring When you use an app to monitor your heartrate, track your period, or store any other private medical data, Facebook may be listening in. That’s the result of a new Wall Street Journal investigation that revealed how Facebook collects data from 11 popular health data apps like Flo and Breethe — whether or not users signed into Facebook through the apps or even have a Facebook acc

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10 Best Android Phone Deals This Weekend (2019)

The Galaxy S10 isn't the only smartphone to consider. A lot of great devices are on sale this week.

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The Best Combs a Presidential Candidate Could Use to Eat a Salad

The road to 2020 has started off bumpy for Amy Klobuchar. After the Minnesota senator announced a run for president less than two weeks ago, multiple reports have emerged of her mistreating members of her staff over the years. The latest and largest account came on Friday from The New York Times , and among the numerous incidents it describes, one in particular has left people confused. Before a

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Fighting With My Family Is a Curious Biopic About Pro Wrestling

From her stunning portrayal of a tricky character in the macabre period drama Lady Macbeth two years ago, I could tell that Florence Pugh was well on her way to Hollywood stardom. What I couldn’t have predicted was that her studio breakout would come from playing a professional wrestler. Fighting With My Family is, in most respects, a standard sports biopic, following the real-life WWE icon Paige

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The Documentary Highlighting the Real Green Book

In 1936, a black postal worker named named Victor Hugo Green published the first edition of The Negro Motorist Green Book . At the time, the segregation-era guide was meant to direct black New York City residents to businesses they could frequent without facing the overt discrimination and threats of violence they encountered even up North. Demand soon grew for a more geographically expansive doc

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The Two Amy Klobuchars

Treating subordinates like dirt is a moral flaw, and I would be mortified to be accused of it. (I avoid these accusations by having no subordinates.) By now the evidence of Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar’s guilt in this respect is overwhelming. The New York Times has replicated the findings of BuzzFeed and The Huffington Post before it: Klobuchar, who is now seeking the Democratic presidential

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Americans Don’t Need the Mueller Report to Judge Trump

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report could come out as soon as next week, CNN reported on Thursday . Unless, of course, it doesn’t—after all, there have been various suggestions for months that the end was in sight, and the Justice Department said Friday there would be no report next week. And anyway, none of this matters if the newly installed Attorney General Bill Barr decides not to release

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What Does It Mean to Be a Canadian Citizen?

“Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” In the half century since John F. Kennedy said those famous words, the balance has definitely shifted toward asking what your country can do for you. In almost every democracy, citizenship today offers more rights and imposes fewer responsibilities than it did in 1961. How much should that balance shift? Canadians ha

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Why the school-college-job pathway is about to go extinct

The automation age will render the traditional concept of "jobs" obsolete. Human work is about to undergo an historic shift. Is the education system ready? Lumina Foundation is partnering with Big Think to unearth the next large-scale, rapid innovation in post-high school education. If you have an idea that could empower learning beyond high school, enter the Lumina Prize. You could win flights a

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Hjælp forskerne: Amatør opdager hvid dværgstjerne med usædvanlige ringe

Ved hjælp af 'borger-forskere' har Nasa fundet en særlig stjerne af den type, Solen en dag bliver til.

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Pinterest Restricts Vaccine Search Results to Curb Spread of Misinformation

The digital platform is grappling with the proliferation of anti-vaccination content online, a problem also faced by Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

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Meet AIVA, the world’s first AI composer

submitted by /u/witan- [link] [comments]

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New Horizons spacecraft returns its sharpest views of Ultima Thule

The mission team called it a "stretch goal" – just before closest approach, precisely point the cameras on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft to snap the sharpest possible pics of the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule, its New Year's flyby target and the farthest object ever explored.

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Københavns Frihavn udvides og moderniseres

Efter mange års udbygninger var Københavns Frihavn i 1955 den største havn i Norden. Civilingeniør og frihavnsdirektør Axel Bronø gav i Ingeniøren et overblik over de seneste moderniseringer.

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Microsoft workers protest use of HoloLens headsets for war

A group of Microsoft workers is demanding the company cancel a contract supplying the U.S. Army with HoloLens headsets that they say would turn real-world battlefields into a video game.

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Canada energy regulator gives nod to Pacific pipeline

Canada's energy regulator renewed its support on Friday for a controversial oil pipeline to the Pacific, saying the risks to endangered whales from increased tanker traffic were "justified."

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Marshall Islands consider radical measures to survive rising sea levels

The far-flung Marshall Islands needs to raise its islands if it is to avoid being drowned by rising sea levels, President Hilda Heine has warned.

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Warning issued over attacks on internet infrastructure

Key parts of the internet infrastructure face large-scale attacks that threaten the global system of web traffic, the internet's address keeper warned Friday.

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Twitter co-founder Evan Williams leaving board

Twitter co-founder and one-time chief executive Evan Williams is stepping down from the board, leaving the one-to-many messaging service to focus on "other projects."

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Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters

When NFL player Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice, the ensuing debate took traditional and social media by storm. University of Kansas researchers have found that tweets both in support of and opposed to the protests can influence how young people think about the issue and, like in many aspects of life, the messenger's race mat

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Wolves are spreading in Germany by moving into military land

Wolves have returned to Germany. The animals seems to be spreading by moving between military training grounds, preferring these to protected natural areas

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NASA greenlights SpaceX crew capsule test to ISS

NASA on Friday gave SpaceX the green light to test a new crew capsule by first sending an unmanned craft with a life-sized mannequin to the International Space Station.

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Report identifies challenges towards a plastics circular economy

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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YouTube prevents anti-vaccine channels from running ads

YouTube is killing anti-vaccine channels' ability to earn from advertisements following a BuzzFeed News report that put a spotlight on the spread of anti-vax videos on the platform. …

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Svært ved at styre din brandert? Forskere finder din indre bodega-dæmon

Signaler i hjernen styrer måske, hvor god du er til at stoppe drukturen, mens den stadig er god. Sådan er det i hvert fald hos mus.

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Nytt teleskop har upptäckt hundratusentals nya galaxer

Europas största radioteleskop, Lofar, har upptäckt hundratusentals nya galaxer. Uppdraget är att kartlägga hela norra himlen och se det som förut varit osynligt för oss.

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Bronsålderskrigare var de första vikingarna

Redan på bronsåldern for svenskar ut i världen. Deras snabba båtar kunde förflytta sig tio mil om dagen. Ute i Europa bytte de slavar mot metaller och ylletyg. Ny forskning visar att det här är början till vad som skulle ske i Norden flera tusen år senare.

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People In Sweden Get A Chip In Their Hands

submitted by /u/global_tech [link] [comments]

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The doctor who prescribed the meaning of life to his patients

Not having a meaningful life can be dreadful, and one psychologist thought it was the root cause of many neuroses. His ideas became Logotherapy, which focuses on the need for a meaningful life and has shown success in many areas. Many studies agree that leading a meaningful life has tangible benefits and lacking meaning can lead to problems. Many people struggle with the question of what the mean

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Antidepressant-relevant concentrations of the ketamine metabolite (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine do not block NMDA receptor function [Pharmacology]

Preclinical studies indicate that (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is a putative fast-acting antidepressant candidate. Although inhibition of NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) is one mechanism proposed to underlie ketamine’s antidepressant and adverse effects, the potency of (2R,6R)-HNK to inhibit NMDARs has not been established. We used a multidisciplinary approach to determine the effects..

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Major histocompatibility complex class I diversity limits the repertoire of T cell receptors [Evolution]

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that initiate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells. The high polymorphism found at these genes, thought to be promoted and maintained by pathogen-mediated selection, contrasts with the limited number of MHC loci found in most vertebrates. Although…

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Calpain drives pyroptotic vimentin cleavage, intermediate filament loss, and cell rupture that mediates immunostimulation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Pyroptosis is an inflammatory form of programmed cell death following cellular damage or infection. It is a lytic process driven by gasdermin D-mediated cellular permeabilization and presumed osmotic forces thought to induce swelling and rupture. We found that pyroptotic cells do not spontaneously rupture in culture but lose mechanical resilience….

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Elementary response triggered by transducin in retinal rods [Neuroscience]

G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling is crucial for many physiological processes. A signature of such pathways is high amplification, a concept originating from retinal rod phototransduction, whereby one photoactivated rhodopsin molecule (Rho*) was long reported to activate several hundred transducins (GT*s), each then activating a cGMP-phosphodiesterase catalytic subunit (GT*·PDE*). This..

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Phosphate graphene as an intrinsically osteoinductive scaffold for stem cell-driven bone regeneration [Engineering]

Synthetic, resorbable scaffolds for bone regeneration have potential to transform the clinical standard of care. Here, we demonstrate that functional graphenic materials (FGMs) could serve as an osteoinductive scaffold: recruiting native cells to the site of injury and promoting differentiation into bone cells. By invoking a Lewis acid-catalyzed Arbuzov reaction,…

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Photoexcitation-controlled self-recoverable molecular aggregation for flicker phosphorescence [Chemistry]

Chemical systems with external control capability and self-recoverability are promising since they can avoid additional chemical or energy imposition during the working process. However, it remains challenging to employ such a nonequilibrium method for the engineering of optoelectronic function and for visualization. Here, we report a functional molecule that can…

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Targeting CXCR4-induced desmoplasia to improve checkpoint inhibition in breast cancer [Commentaries]

T lymphocyte checkpoint inhibition-based therapy represents the great therapeutic advance for cancer in the current decade. Beginning in 2012 with the initial presentation of a phase 3 trial in metastatic melanoma demonstrating the value of CTLA-4–directed therapy, every year has seen the expansion of this therapeutic modality in terms of…

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Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI as a noninvasive proxy measure of dopamine function in the human brain [Neuroscience]

Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI (NM-MRI) purports to detect the content of neuromelanin (NM), a product of dopamine metabolism that accumulates with age in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN). Interindividual variability in dopamine function may result in varying levels of NM accumulation in the SN; however, the ability of NM-MRI to…

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LINC00116 codes for a mitochondrial peptide linking respiration and lipid metabolism [Biochemistry]

Genes coding for small peptides have been frequently misannotated as long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes. Here we have demonstrated that one such transcript is translated into a 56-amino-acid-long peptide conserved in chordates, corroborating the work published while this manuscript was under review. The Mtln peptide could be detected in mitochondria…

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Inner workings of gene folding [Commentaries]

The eukaryotic genome is far more than a simple DNA polymer that encodes the sequences of proteins. The genome, or the ensemble of DNA together with all its associated proteins, is an information-processing machine that helps regulate the transcription of the very genes encoded within the DNA. Chromosomes fold in…

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Suppression of GABAergic neurons through D2-like receptor secures efficient conditioning in Drosophila aversive olfactory learning [Neuroscience]

The GABAergic system serves as a vital negative modulator in cognitive functions, such as learning and memory, while the mechanisms governing this inhibitory system remain to be elucidated. In Drosophila, the GABAergic anterior paired lateral (APL) neurons mediate a negative feedback essential for odor discrimination; however, their activity is suppressed…

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China Develops Non-Lethal Microwave Radar Weapon: Global Times

submitted by /u/TheFerretman [link] [comments]

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Sunscreen Regulations Haven’t Aged Well

So now, the FDA has announced proposals to update the process for regulating sun protection products.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Samsung’s Foldable Phone Future

Samsung revealed not one, not two, but five new smartphones this week – including a folding phone. Axios’s Ina Fried joins on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast.

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The Atlantic Daily: The Last Undecided 2018 U.S. House Race Will Be Re-Run

What We’re Following A North Carolina House election tainted by allegations of fraud is getting a do-over. The Republican Mark Harris barely eked out a victory against his Democratic opponent in November, but the win was marred by evidence of suspicious absentee ballots. A hearing on the allegations turned disastrous for Harris, as his son testified that he had warned his dad about hiring the nef

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Food allergies: A research update

Families impacted by food allergies will need psychosocial support as they try promising new therapies that enable them to ingest a food allergen daily or wear a patch that administers a controlled dose of that food allergen.

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Tuberculosis Treatment Kills Bacteria with Their Own Suicide Toxin

submitted by /u/StcStasi [link] [comments]

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In a New Experiment, Scientists Used Jolts of Electricity to Spark Actual Joy

People all around the world (or at least where Netflix is available) have been exhausting themselves of late trying to "spark joy" in their lives. The urge comes from cleaning guru Marie Kondo, whose philosophy rests on the principle that we should rid our homes and minds of things that don't inspire bursts of pleasure. The message resonates, in part, because it ties positivity to the world of mat

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The Case for Being Skeptical of Moral Outrage – Facts So Romantic

If, as the research shows, our moral outrage is highly sensitive to actions but not consequences, we might want to treat feelings of moral outrage—whether others’ or our own—skeptically. Photograph by Vjacheslav_Kozyrev / Flickr The episode last month at the Lincoln Memorial, involving the boys from Covington Catholic High School, and a Native American man, was like so many Internet-born controve

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Finding the Right Balance: AMPA Receptor Palmitoylation Regulates Network Excitability

Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases, affects approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population and is characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures (Stafstrom and Carmant, 2015). During seizures, neurons synchronize in one region of the brain and the aberrant neural activity can spread to other regions (Staley, 2015). Thus, epilepsy can arise when the balance between neural exci

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Twitter co-founder Evan Williams leaving board

Twitter co-founder and one-time chief executive Evan Williams is stepping down from the board, leaving the one-to-many messaging service to focus on "other projects."

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Schrödinger’s Mueller Report

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, February 22. The past few weeks have offered a roller-coaster ride of news reports teasing the Russia investigation’s end date: A Department of Justice official is now saying that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report will not be delivered this week or next. Here’s what else we’re following: No Other Option: North Carolina state officials on Thursday orde

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New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain

Researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain. Using this technique, they can track electrical activity inside the neurons of living animals, enabling them to link neural activity with specific behaviors.

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What is the Belt and Road initiative? | CNBC Explains

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Huawei 'Mate X' foldable phone appears to be a thing at MWC 2019 – CNET

An image leaked online purports to show a billboard for the foldable being installed at Mobile World Congress.

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Microsoft workers protest use of HoloLens headsets for war

A group of Microsoft workers is demanding the company cancel a contract supplying the U.S. Army with HoloLens headsets that they say would turn real-world battlefields into a video game.

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Undersea Odyssey: Awards

We’re so glad you could join us for this celebration of all things aquatic and oceantastic! Thank you, Eyewirers, and congrats as well on your achievements. Here is the summary of competition awards, but you can also view the full results (including @susi swag details) here . As always… for science! Accuracy Happy Hours Coral Reef Hunt Games Maker Badge These players prepared the Hunt cell! Trivi

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New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain

Researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain. Using this technique, they can track electrical activity inside the neurons of living animals, enabling them to link neural activity with specific behaviors.

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Could blockchain ensure integrity of clinical trial data?

Researchers have created a proof-of-concept method for ensuring the integrity of clinical trials data with blockchain. The system creates an immutable audit trail that makes it easy to spot any tampering with results — such as making the treatment look more effective or diminishing side effects.

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Undersea Odyssey Closing Ceremony Chat Transcript

ICYMI, here’s the full transcript from the closing ceremony of Eyewire’s Undersea Odyssey . Check your notifications feed for bonus information. Thanks for swimming along. For science! devonjones | 5 minutes left in HH! devonjones | lots of people around right now, awesome amy | for science! nkem_test | ZA ZNANOST! kinryuu | for science! nkem_test | PARA A CIÊNCIA! dragonturtle | FOR SCIENCE! ga

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This Fast Food Drive-Thru Is Now Using AI to Take Orders

Fries With That We already had a robot that could make fast food burgers . And now we have an artificial intelligence that can take your order for one . Earlier this month, Colorado-based startup Valyant AI announced the launch of a voice-based AI customer service platform, which is now taking customer orders at the drive-thru at Denver’s Good Times Burgers and Frozen Custard. “We’re excited to d

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The FDA is questioning the safety of 14 common sunscreen ingredients

Health The proposed regulations could change what ingredients can go into the UV protecting products. This week the FDA proposed guidelines and regulatory regulations to better reflect what we know about sunscreen ingredients, how they work, and how they affect our…

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MindFi helps you practice mindfulness in 10 minutes each day

You can get lifetime access now for $39. You can get lifetime access now for $39 to MindFi, which helps you practice mindfulness in 10 minutes each day.

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Virgin Galactic Reaches New Record Altitude in Latest Test Flight

The company just completed yet another test flight of its rocket-powered spaceplane, reaching the highest altitude yet of 55.87 miles (89.8 kilometers). The post Virgin Galactic Reaches New Record Altitude in Latest Test Flight appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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UnitedHealth Loses Case to the Health Venture Begun by Amazon, Berkshire-Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase

A court battle over trade secrets highlighted how the Big Three corporations’ new unit is unnerving major insurers in the field.

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New Ultima Thule Photos Were Made in a Flash

The images were recorded while the New Horizons spacecraft was moving at more than 32,000 miles per hour.

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Virgin Galactic Rocket Plane Reaches Edge of Space

This was Virgin Galactic’s fifth supersonic-powered test flight. The venture marked another step forward in a new kind of space race.

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'Desus & Mero' Is the Future of Late-Night TV

The duo's new Showtime program is like watching the best of Twitter in real time.

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NASA Picks Science Experiments to Send to the Moon This Year

Following on the heels of its announcement to return to the moon this year, NASA announced Thursday the first batch of science projects and technology demonstrations they want to send skyward in 2019, assuming their commercial partners can launch on time. The selections highlight the science questions NASA wants answered as it ramps up robotic missions to the moon and shoots for placing humans bac

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US cities burn recyclables after China bans imports

submitted by /u/advocatus2018diaboli [link] [comments]

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Breaking New Ground in Liquid Biopsy

submitted by /u/rourou48 [link] [comments]

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Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters

University of Kansas journalism researchers showed real tweets about the NFL anthem protests to a group of millennials. Eye tracking software found they viewed tweets from white males the longest, but self-reported data showed they gave the most credibility to African-American males.

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Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to 'maybe.'

Princeton geoscientists Blair Schoene and Gerta Keller led an international team of researchers who have assembled the first high-resolution timeline for the massive eruptions in India's Deccan Traps, determining that the largest eruption pulse occurred less than 100,000 years before the mass extinction that killed the (non-avian) dinosaurs.

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Disability progression in multiple sclerosis linked to income, education

Neighborhood income and education level is associated with risk of disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

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Illinois researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells

Whether healthy or diseased, human cells exhibit behaviors and processes that are largely dictated by growth factor molecules, which bind to receptors on the cells. For example, growth factors tell the cells to divide, move, and when to die—a process known as apoptosis.

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New dynamic dependency framework may lead to better neural social and tech systems models

Many real-world complex systems include macroscopic subsystems which influence one another. This arises, for example, in competing or mutually reinforcing neural populations in the brain, spreading dynamics of viruses, and elsewhere. It is therefore important to understand how different types of inter-system interactions can influence overall collective behaviors.

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Illinois researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells

Whether healthy or diseased, human cells exhibit behaviors and processes that are largely dictated by growth factor molecules, which bind to receptors on the cells. For example, growth factors tell the cells to divide, move, and when to die—a process known as apoptosis.

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Inca Ritual Baths Fed by Waterfall Reveals More of Its Secrets

Cutting-edge radar and laser scans and on-the-ground excavations are revealing just how the Inca built and used a ceremonial complex more than 500 years ago.

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Cahokia: North America's massive, ancient city

Near modern-day St. Louis, Missouri, you can find towering mounds of earth that were once the product of a vast North American culture. Cahokia was the largest city built by this Native American civilization. Because the ancient people who built Cahokia didn't have a writing system, little is known of their culture. Archaeological evidence, however, hints at a fascinating society. None Update Sat

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Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'

The good thing about the short Antarctic summer is it's a lot like a Midwest winter.

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Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'

The good thing about the short Antarctic summer is it's a lot like a Midwest winter.

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'Roma’ Should Win Best Picture at the Oscars—for Itself, Not Netflix

Plus: WIRED's other pie-in-the-sky Oscar wishes.

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The Family Weekly: The Consequential Legal Battle Over One Dallas Family’s Adoption

This Week in Family When the Brackeens, a married couple in Dallas, agreed to foster a nine-month-old baby, they had no idea that a year later they would run afoul of a 1978 law called the Indian Child Welfare Act. The law was passed as a retroactive measure after centuries of forcibly removing Native American children from their families and sending them to boarding schools or to live with white

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Eyewire Release Report 2/22/2019

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. There used to be a lot of false-alarm 404 errors in browser consoles for Eyewire; we have gotten rid of them so that when you check your console for error messages it’s much more obvious what might be wrong. We have added a “Request Sponsorship” link to the h

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Researchers engineer a tougher fiber

Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.

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Illinois researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, University of Illinois professor Andrew Smith reported the invention of a new technology platform that digitally counts, for the first time ever, the amount of growth factor entering an individual cell. Prior to this, researchers inferred growth factor binding based on how the receiving cells responded when the growth factor molecules were intr

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Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'

A molecular analysis by the University of Cincinnati found that wingless flies protected their eggs with a temperature-resistant gel to help them withstand freezing and thawing in Antarctica.

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New dynamic dependency framework may lead to better neural social and tech systems models

In a paper published recently in Nature Physics, researchers present a dynamic dependency framework that can capture interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems which are used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interacting layers. "This dynamic dependency framework provides a powerful tool to better understand many of the interactin

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How fear of regret barricades us into unhealthy jobs and relationships

Science Behind the psychology and biology of regret. How many times have you thought about starting a company, taking a year out to write that novel or leaving a loveless relationship but ended up doing nothing about it?

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Hey, You Looking at Me?

How to trick audiences into thinking you’re staring them in the eye — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers engineer a tougher fiber

Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.

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Predicting the monsoon a year ahead

With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. Until now.

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Correct antibiotic dosing could preserve lung microbial diversity in cystic fibrosis

Children and young adults with cystic fibrosis whose lung infections were treated with suboptimal doses of antibiotics had fewer changes in lung microbial diversity during the IV treatment, and their microbial diversity levels were higher 30 days later, a multi-institutional study.

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Diabetes linked to back pain

People with diabetes have a 35 percent higher risk of experiencing low back pain and 24 percent higher risk of having neck pain than those without diabetes, researchers have found.

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Microwaved Grapes Spit Plasma, and Scientists Finally Know Why

Why do grapes ignite when you microwave them? At long last, science has an answer.

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Trump Administration Blocks Funds for Planned Parenthood and Others Over Abortion Referrals

The new rule would steer federal family planning funds under Title X to anti-abortion and faith based groups.

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The (Non-Trump) Surprise Inside Andrew McCabe's Memoir

In *The Threat*, the former FBI deputy director paints a familiar portrait of Trump, but deepens our understanding of a dark time for agency.

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The contentious history of the Anarchist Cookbook

The Anarchist Cookbook provides instructions for making bombs, drugs, and operating firearms; naturally, this makes it rather controversial. Concerned citizens, anarchists themselves, and many others have called for the ban of the book, but most liberal democracies have refused to do so. Whether you think dangerous literature should be banned or whether banning books is an inherently anti-democra

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Liquid has structure, which may be key to understanding metallic glass

Researchers have found that liquid has structure in certain circumstances, and that this structure significantly influences the mysterious and complex formation of metallic glasses.

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Q&A: Ron Vale, new chief of Janelia Research Campus, on why 15 years is a good research time frame

Cell biologist takes helm of Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s research center early next year

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Magnetization reversal achieved at room temperature using only an electric field

Scientists have achieved magnetization reversal in cobalt-substituted bismuth ferrite by applying only an electric field. Such an effect had been sought after for over a decade in order to make new types of low-power-consumption magnetic memory devices.

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Surprise rheumatoid arthritis discovery points to new treatment

Researchers have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition.

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Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes

For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance. Biologists have now shed some new light on the benefits and disadvantages of the bee dance.

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Legal Marijuana Could Threaten the Alcohol Industry, Says Report

Risky Business Marijuana is becoming more accepted — and that could be a problem for the alcohol industry, according to new research. “Though not yet mainstream, cannabis adoption is certainly growing in states where it’s legal and does pose a risk to the beverage alcohol industry in the future,” Brandy Rand, U.S. president of the International Wine and Spirits Research (IWSR), a company that col

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Hospital Goes Out of Business, Pulls Medical Records Offline

Medical Records When two hospitals in Arizona went bankrupt in June, all of their medical records went into storage — meaning that patients can’t access them. The Florence Hospital at Anthem and Gilbert Hospital took on various investors that are currently fighting over who’s to blame for the hospitals’ bankruptcy. Meanwhile, patients and their doctors are left waiting with no ability to pull the

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Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is a good idea to start with — and it may have an extra economic benefit. Engineers are presenting results on turning carbon dioxide into oxalic acid, which is used to process rare earth elements for electronic devices.

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Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox

Scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a 'hit and run' approach.

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Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

Scientists have explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time.

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Why Are Georgia O’Keeffe’s Paintings Breaking Out in Pimples?

A new handheld tool lets scientists diagnose the chemical reaction behind “art acne”—and learn how it can be prevented

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Trump Administration Blocks Funds for Planned Parenthood and Others Over Abortion Referrals

The new rule would steer federal family planning funds under Title X to anti-abortion and faith based groups.

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Hayabusa2 just tried to collect asteroid dust for the first time

The Japanese Hayabusa2 spacecraft touched down on asteroid Ryugu and attempted to gather a sample of its rock to bring back to Earth.

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The doctor who prescribed the meaning of life to his patients

Not having a meaningful life can be dreadful, and one psychologist thought it was the root cause of many neuroses. His ideas became Logotherapy, which focuses on the need for a meaningful life and has shown success in many areas. Many studies agree that leading a meaningful life has tangible benefits and lacking meaning can lead to problems. Many people struggle with the question of what the mean

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World’s largest bee, thought to be extinct, found in Indonesia

The giant bee was first discovered in 1859, but since has only officially sighted once. An international team of researchers set out to rediscover the bee in January. Determining exactly when a species is extinct is difficult, especially for small animals like insects. None In 1859, while exploring the remote island of Bacan in the North Moluccas, Indonesia, the renowned naturalist Alfred Russel

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The Hottest Cars From BMW Test Fest

The latest and sportiest from BMW, Mini, and even Rolls-Royce. We ride and drive in the new BMW X7 super-SUV, and also the BMW X3 Competition — think of an M-car on even more steroids. The post The Hottest Cars From BMW Test Fest appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Hayabusa 2 Successfully Collects Sample From Asteroid Ryugu

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sent a long-awaited command, and the probe landed on the surface of the asteroid Ryugu, shot it with a bullet, and floated back upward. The post Hayabusa 2 Successfully Collects Sample From Asteroid Ryugu appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is a good idea to start with — and it may have an extra economic benefit. Engineers are presenting results on turning carbon dioxide into oxalic acid, which is used to process rare earth elements for electronic devices.

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Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

Scientists have explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time.

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New 2019 guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation

Lin Yee Chen, MD, MS, Associate Professor with Tenure, Cardiovascular Division, in the Department of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School was part of a Writing Committee tasked with updating the 2014 guidelines for patients with AFib. The 2019 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fib

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Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is a good idea to start with — and it may have an extra economic benefit. A Michigan Tech engineering is presenting their results this week on turning carbon dioxide into oxalic acid, which is used to process rare earth elements for electronic devices.

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What Washington can learn from past measles outbreaks

Health Minnesota's prior experiences may inform how Washington should handle their current problem. Anti-vax groups have, for decades, used debunked research to stoke parents’ fears of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) inoculation, fueling an uptick in unvaccinated…

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Map of Mangrove Height Reveals Carbon-rich Coastal Forests

Map of Mangrove Height Reveals Carbon-rich Coastal Forests Critical ecosystem’s first global height measurement could aid climate change fight. Mangrove_topNteaser.jpg Scientist Laura Duncanson (University of Maryland/NASA GSFC) looking towards the top of a large mangrove tree to measure its height. Image credits: NASA Earth Friday, February 22, 2019 – 14:00 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Sc

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Older biologic age linked to elevated breast cancer risk

Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person's age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists. Biologic age was determined by measuring DNA methylation, a chemical modification to DNA that is part of the normal aging process. For every five years a woman's biologic age was older than her chronologic or actual age, she had a 15 percent increased risk of devel

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Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change

When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their dogs' personalities.

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Extinct weasel relative with confounding skull likely ate meat with a side of veggies

The oddly shaped skull of Leptarctus primus, an extinct weasel relative that lived in North America and Asia about 20 million years ago, has long led to conflicting theories about its diet. But new biomechanical models show that Leptarctus was likely a carnivorous predator, with capability for omnivory and a broader diet when prey was scarce, and a skull that functioned similarly to that of the li

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Proximity to land determines how coral reef communities respond to climate change events

Severe weather and environmental disturbances, such as cyclones or thermal coral bleaching, affect specific areas of coral reefs differently, new research has shown.

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A peek at living room decor suggests how decorations vary around the world

People around the world paint their walls different colors, buy plants to spruce up their interiors and engage in a variety of other beautifying techniques to personalize their homes, which inspired a team of researchers to study about 50,000 living rooms across the globe.

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Finding keyholes in metals 3D printing

New research has identified how and when gas pockets form, as well as a methodology to predict their formation — a pivotal discovery that could dramatically improve the 3D printing process.

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Apps send intimate user data to Facebook: report

A news report Friday said many smartphone apps were sending highly personal information such as menstrual cycles and body weight to Facebook, without notifying users.

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Police: Uber Data Helped Prove Jussie Smollett Faked Hate Crime

Actor Arrested Data from Uber helped land actor Jussie Smollett in jail. On Wednesday, Chicago police officially charged Smollett , an actor with a role on the hit Fox series “Empire ,” with filing a false police report, a felony crime. The next day, Smollett turned himself in to authorities, and they shared details on how they built their case — and it turns out that Uber data played a significa

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High IQs won't be enough to prevent ecological disasters

High IQs aren't going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. It's going to take social intelligence, too. That's the conclusion of a new study.

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Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox

Scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a 'hit and run' approach.

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Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins

Investigators develop a technique to identify and classify proteins with less than 100 amino acids. These types of proteins account for only 16 percent of a bacterial genome's coding capacity. This technique may be applied to guide the search for new proteins with different functions, such as antimicrobials.

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Why a Japanese WWII soldier refused to surrender for 29 years

Japan may have surrendered to the Allies on August 15, 1945, but many Japanese soldiers did not get word until much later. The culture of death before surrender that permeated the Japanese military caused many to continue to fight even after Japan's formal surrender. Hiroo Onada was one such holdout. He engaged in a guerrilla war in the jungles of the Philippines for nearly 30 years. None The idy

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China’s CRISPR twins: A time line of news

It’s been three months since news broke that twin girls had been genetically modified using CRISPR. There’s a lot to catch up on.

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Letters: ‘It Is Difficult to Accept That One of Our Own Would Betray Us’

What the Jussie Smollett Story Reveals On January 29, the Empire actor Jussie Smollett said that in the middle of the night in Chicago, he had been attacked by two men who shouted racial and homophobic slurs, covered him in a chemical substance, and tied a rope around his neck. This week, almost a month later, Chicago police charged Smollett with a felony for allegedly filing a false police repor

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Photos of the Week: Tank Slippers, Baby Sifaka, Molten Steel

A pangolin in South Africa, a slap shot in Florida, medieval warriors in Monaco, fashion week in London, heavy snow in Nebraska, canoe slalom in Australia, Carnival in France, a march for the environment in Brussels, Makha Bucha Day in Bangkok, and much more

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Team in monsoon research breakthrough

With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. Until now, according to findings by Nir Y. Krakauer, a City College of New York civil engineer.

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CCNY's Nir Krakauer in monsoon research breakthrough

With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. Until now, according to findings by Nir Y. Krakauer, a City College of New York civil engineer.

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Setting the stage for cassava disease monitoring: A baseline for Vietnam and Cambodia

Southeast Asia is the source of 95 percent of global cassava exports, and the detection in 2015 in Cambodia of Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus raised alarm. By 2016, the disease had spread, showing potential to become a major threat to millions of smallholders. The virus's spread over a single growing season was documented by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture. The study is the firs

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Researchers engineer a tougher fiber

Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.

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Take Pictures of Your (Six-Legged) Roommates for Science

Modern Americans spend nearly 90% of their lives indoors. Yet despite all that time inside, we know remarkably little about the life that shares our indoor spaces. This spring, a team at North Carolina State University hopes to change that by asking students to document the creatures they find in their dorms, homes, and apartments for a citizen science project called “Never Home Alone @ NCSU.” Eve

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Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo Just Made its Second Trip to Space

On Friday, Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo flew in space for the second time, taking off from Mojave, California after days of weather delay. SpaceShipTwo took off at 8:07 a.m. PST carrying two pilots, a crewmember, and a nearly full weight of science projects from NASA. Unlike most spaceflights that fire rockets from the ground, SpaceShipTwo is carried on the belly of a plane named WhiteKnightTwo

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Toughening stretchable fibers via serial fracturing of a metallic core

Tough, biological materials (e.g., collagen or titin) protect tissues from irreversible damage caused by external loads. Mimicking these protective properties is important in packaging and in emerging applications such as durable electronic skins and soft robotics. This paper reports the formation of tough, metamaterial-like core-shell fibers that maintain stress at the fracture strength of a met

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Observation of enhanced thermopower due to spin fluctuation in weak itinerant ferromagnet

Increasing demand for higher energy efficiency calls for waste heat recovery technology. Thus, facilitating practical thermoelectric generation systems is strongly desired. One option is enhancing the thermoelectric power factor, S 2 / r , where S is the Seebeck coefficient and r is the electrical resistivity, although it is still challenging because of the trade-off between S and r . We demonstr

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Telecom-band lasing in single InP/InAs heterostructure nanowires at room temperature

Telecom-band single nanowire lasers made by the bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid approach, which is technologically important in optical fiber communication systems, still remain challenging. Here, we report telecom-band single nanowire lasers operating at room temperature based on multi-quantum-disk InP/InAs heterostructure nanowires. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that highly uniform

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Nano-bio-computing lipid nanotablet

Using nanoparticles as substrates for computation enables algorithmic and autonomous controls of their unique and beneficial properties. However, scalable architecture for nanoparticle-based computing systems is lacking. Here, we report a platform for constructing nanoparticle logic gates and circuits at the single-particle level on a supported lipid bilayer. Our "lipid nanotablet" platform, insp

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A nanofluidic ion regulation membrane with aligned cellulose nanofibers

The advancement of nanofluidic applications will require the identification of materials with high-conductivity nanoscale channels that can be readily obtained at massive scale. Inspired by the transpiration in mesostructured trees, we report a nanofluidic membrane consisting of densely packed cellulose nanofibers directly derived from wood. Numerous nanochannels are produced among an expansive a

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Probing vacancy behavior across complex oxide heterointerfaces

Oxygen vacancies () play a critical role as defects in complex oxides in establishing functionality in systems including memristors, all-oxide electronics, and electrochemical cells that comprise metal-insulator-metal or complex oxide heterostructure configurations. Improving oxide-oxide interfaces necessitates a direct, spatial understanding of vacancy distributions that define electrochemically

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Supramolecular architectures of molecularly thin yet robust free-standing layers

Stable, single-nanometer thin, and free-standing two-dimensional layers with controlled molecular architectures are desired for several applications ranging from (opto-)electronic devices to nanoparticle and single-biomolecule characterization. It is, however, challenging to construct these stable single molecular layers via self-assembly, as the cohesion of those systems is ensured only by in-pl

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Ultrafast photoactivation of CboxhH bonds inside water-soluble nanocages

Light energy absorbed by molecules can be harnessed to activate chemical bonds with extraordinary speed. However, excitation energy redistribution within various molecular degrees of freedom prohibits bond-selective chemistry. Inspired by enzymes, we devised a new photocatalytic scheme that preorganizes and polarizes target chemical bonds inside water-soluble cationic nanocavities to engineer sel

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Do participation trophies hinder child development?

Coaches, parents, and pro athletes malign participation trophies for teaching children the wrong life lessons. Psychologists argue it is more beneficial to praise a child's efforts over their achievements. But proponents who use participation trophies as emotional Band-Aids will find they do their children no favors either. Controversial subjects brim with intense emotions. Abortion, the death pe

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Israel's Private Lunar Lander Blasts Off for the Moon

The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet will gradually raise its orbit to reach the moon, landing after about a month and a half of flight

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How BlacKkKlansman’s music uses the ‘evil triad’

When the pickup truck carrying Ku Klux Klansman Felix rolls onscreen in BlacKkKlansman , Oscar-nominated composer Terence Blanchard employs a harmonic device that has signified villainy since the days of Richard Wagner. Scott Murphy, a professor of music at the University of Kansas, says his ears pricked up when he heard “the evil triad,” as he calls it, while taking in BlacKkKlansman in the thea

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Virgin Galactic reaches space again – this time with a passenger

The first test passenger has gone to the edge of space aboard Virgin Galactic’s Unity space plane, a key milestone in the firm’s quest to send paying customers to space

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Facebook Reportedly Let Marketers Advertise to Nazis

Targeted Ads Facebook’s massive stash of user data allows advertisers to target their ideal customers with specially-crafted messages. However, several investigations have found that Facebook helps advertisers target specific unsavory demographics, including literal neo-Nazis, according to The Los Angeles Times . In a recent attempt to test Facebook’s advertising service, the LA Times found that

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The single best way to make your smartphone less stressful

Technology Silence the worst parts, enhance the best. The number one trick to reducing smartphone stress? Turn off badges. It's that easy.

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Setting the stage for cassava disease monitoring: A baseline for Vietnam and Cambodia

Southeast Asia is the source of 95 percent of global cassava exports, and the detection in 2015 in Cambodia of the potentially harvest-devastating Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) raised alarm. By 2016, the disease, which cannot always be detected visually, had spread, showing its potential to become a major threat to the livelihoods of millions of smallholder farming families.

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Researchers engineer a tougher fiber

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.

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Setting the stage for cassava disease monitoring: A baseline for Vietnam and Cambodia

Southeast Asia is the source of 95 percent of global cassava exports, and the detection in 2015 in Cambodia of the potentially harvest-devastating Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) raised alarm. By 2016, the disease, which cannot always be detected visually, had spread, showing its potential to become a major threat to the livelihoods of millions of smallholder farming families.

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