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nyheder2019februar25

Københavner-letbane vil blive langsommere end bilen

En letbane har en større kapacitet end busruter, men er billigere end en metrolinje. Derfor satser København på en letbanelinje, men letbane-planerne får hug fra flere sider.

1h

46min

Kemicocktail i mors blod hæmmer fostrets vækst

For første gang har forskere påvist, at en cocktail af fluorstoffer i gravides blod betyder mindre fostre.

10h

33 percent off a food dehydrator and other sweet deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

7min

US Military Files Patent for Room-Temperature Superconductor

Holy Grail The U.S. military may be honing in on one of the most sought-after discoveries in physics. On Thursday, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office made public a Navy scientist’s patent application for a room-temperature superconductor — and if the device works as described, it could radically change everything from transportation to computing. Chilly Science Plenty of materials conduct elect

9min

CRISPR Babies Trial May Have Been Government Funded

Documents about the experiment challenge a Chinese government investigation's finding that He Jiankui mostly acted alone.

9min

New protein 'switch' could be key to controlling blood-poisoning and preventing death

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have discovered a new protein 'switch' that could stop the progression of blood-poisoning, or sepsis, and increase the chances of surviving the life-threatening disease.

18min

Belief in conspiracy theories makes people more likely to engage in low-level crime

People who believe in conspiracy theories — such as the theory that Princess Diana was murdered by the British establishment — are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity.

18min

Researchers discover 'chromosome scanner' that protects against cancer

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA.

18min

Laser drill leads to world record in plasma acceleration

Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US have set a new world record for plasma accelerators: In a plasma tube only 20 centimetres long, the team led by Wim Leemans, then head of the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center and now Accelerator Director at DESY, accelerated electrons to an energy of 7.8 billion electron volts (GeV). The team reports its achievement in

18min

Breakthrough shines light on disease-fighting protein

A combination of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy assisted in a collaborative effort to obtain the highest-resolution structure of the fungal protein Hsp104, which may serve to hinder the formation of certain degenerative diseases.

18min

Elevation matters when it comes to climate change, deforestation and species survival

A study examining the impact of deforestation on lizard communities in the Dominican Republic demonstrates differing outcomes at different elevations. In the lowlands, deforestation reduces the number of individuals, but not which species occur in an area. In the highlands, it's the opposite. When the forest is cut down at higher elevations, the newly created pastures become filled with species fo

18min

Faster method to read quantum memory

Scientists at Aalto University and VTT have developed a faster way to read information out of qubits, the basic building blocks of a quantum computer.

18min

Insomnia tied to depression, cardiovascular disease

Two large genome studies lay less blame on stress or bad sleep habits

23min

Google looks to leave passwords behind for a billion Android devices – CNET

Where Android’s going, you won’t need passwords.

23min

Branching out to other body parts, LG G8 comes with palm-reading “Hand ID”

LG's latest smartphone will authenticate you via the veins in your hand.

23min

25min

High rents create a new class of hidden homeless in Los Angeles

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

25min

25min

Split-Sex Animals Are Unusual, Yes, but Not as Rare as You’d Think

From butterflies to chickens to lobsters, mixed male-female bodies offer clues as to why certain diseases strike one gender more often than the other.

28min

Did you solve it? The world's strangest families

Answers to today’s kinship riddles Earlier today I set you the following five puzzles. 1) Anna’s father has four daughters. The names of the first three daughters are April, May and June. What’s the name of the fourth daughter? Continue reading…

34min

Failed 1970s Venus Probe Could Crash to Earth This Year

The Soviet Union launched the Cosmos 482 Venus probe on March 31, 1972. But the failed Venus craft is crashing back to Earth soon.

38min

Skeptics Are Being Recruited for "Adversarial" Review of Climate Science

A proposed presidential committee would scrutinize research showing climate change is a national security risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

39min

People with chronic pain are coping with the help of Pinterest, new study reveals

A new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University that analyzed 502 posts on Pinterest about chronic pain revealed that the social media platform is helping people with chronic pain cope by sharing self-care and pain-management tips, venting about their pain's severity, and supporting others who are similarly suffering.

40min

Uncovering the origins of cultivated strawberries

In a new study published in Nature Genetics, researchers now unveil how the strawberry became an octoploid, as well as the genetics that determine important fruit quality traits. What researchers uncovered is a complex evolutionary history that started long ago on opposite sides of the world.

40min

High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones

A team of engineers in the McKelvey School of Engineering has developed a high-powered fuel cell that operates at double the voltage of today's commercial fuel cells. It could power underwater vehicles, drones and eventually electric aircraft at a significantly lower cost.

40min

A faster method to read quantum memory

The potential computing revolution that quantum computers have long promised is based on their weird property called superposition. Namely, qubits can take both logical states 0 and 1 simultaneously, on top of any value in between. By mastering superpositions of the whole quantum memory, quantum computers can quickly solve problems that would require too much computing time from regular computers

40min

Better endings help us feel good about what’s next

We’re more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a “well-rounded ending,” one with a sense of closure, according to new research. “Starting a new life phase in a positive and constructive way is often challenging, so we examined methods that could help people find a good start to a new job, a new relationship, or a new home,” explains G

43min

Israeli Moon Lander Is Carrying a Vast Backup of Human Knowledge

Backup Plans Right now, a backup copy of humanity’s collective knowledge is on its way to the surface of the Moon. The lander was built by the Israeli startup SpaceIL. It’s carrying a high-tech disc containing 25,000 books, a full copy of Wikipedia, and information on understanding Earthly languages — the equivalent, all told, of a 30 million-page tome. Once it’s there, the archive — dubbed the L

45min

52min

Fewer hospital programs address opioid abuse, Ohio University study finds

The damage done to America's health by the opioid epidemic is well-recognized and enormous, with drug overdose death rates helping to drive down US life expectancy in recent years. Yet as the problem has worsened, American hospitals collectively have seen a loss of programs dealing with substance abuse.

54min

Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments

A 3D hydrogel created by researchers at U of T Engineering is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers.

54min

Report cards show continued sea-level rise on East & Gulf coasts

Interactive plots provide annual sea-level projections to 2050 for 32 localities along the US coastline from Maine to Alaska.

54min

Have Dark Forces Been Messing With the Cosmos?

Axions? Phantom energy? Astrophysicists scramble to patch a hole in the universe, rewriting cosmic history in the process.

58min

Defensive Spines on Tenrecs Could Come at a Cost to Brain Size

The little mammals of Madagascar appear to have undergone an evolutionary tradeoff between brain size and defensive armor

58min

Tastetryk identificerer dig: »Ekstremt svært at genskabe en anden persons tasterytme«

Hvordan du skriver på tastaturet, kan afsløre, hvem du er, og kan på den måde også bidrage til øget sikkerhed. Men er det noget, vi kan stole på?

58min

Non-native pest-controlling wasp identified in Canada prior to formal approval

Thought to be Canada's most promising potential defense against the brown marmorated stink bug (a globally spreading pest of various fruits and vegetables), the samurai wasp has been considered for future release in the country in recent years. However, prior to any formal decision and approval, the parasitoid was found to be already present at a heavily infested site in Chilliwack, British Columb

1h

Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create own living space on plant

Grape phylloxera — the insect that nearly wiped out wine production at the end of the 19th century in France — hijacks a grape vine's reproductive programs to create a leaf gall, which it uses as a pseudo apartment for the parasite to siphon off the plant's nutrients.

1h

Partners in catalysis: An efficient route to unsaturated ketones

In organic chemistry, discovering new reactions is one thing, but to carry them off efficiently is quite another. Carbon-carbon bond-forming is at the heart of organic synthesis, allowing us to stitch together diverse functional groups into an endless array of useful compounds. Now researchers have neatly streamlined one of the most important of those reactions.

1h

GM seed use has exploded in India: Socially motivated decisions

After the Indian government liberalized its economy, shops stocking a previously controlled market of public agricultural goods were suddenly flooded with new private brands. Rather than relying on data for seed yields, many farmers make socially motivated purchasing decisions.

1h

This Beast-Mode Electric Skateboard Goes a Ridiculous 45 MPH

Bajaboard Pantera Australian electric skateboard manufacturer Bajaboard has come up with an outrageous new product: the Pantera , an off-road electric skateboard with more than 10 horsepower it uses to scream along at a staggering 45 mph (72 km/h). To put that in perspective: popular paved road electric longboard brand Boosted’s most powerful skateboard tops out at 24 mph (38 km/h) using a 2,100

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Urban parks could make you happier

UAB researchers found spending 20 minutes in an urban park will make someone happier — whether they are engaging in exercise or not during the visit.

1h

New skeletal disease found and explained

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new and rare skeletal disease. In a study published in the journal Nature Medicine they describe the molecular mechanism of the disease, in which small RNA molecules play a role that has never before been observed in a congenital human disease. The results are important for affected patients but can also help scientists to understand

1h

Over half of home health care clinicians say they lack adequate information from hospitals

A survey of Colorado home health care clinicians (HHCs) revealed that 60 percent said they had not received enough information to guide patient treatment while 52 percent said patients often had unrealistic expectations of the kind of care they would receive.

1h

Researchers identify possible role of Foxp1 protein in control of autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Higher School of Economics, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IBCh RAS), and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center created a genetic model that helps to understand how the body restrains autoimmune and oncological diseases. The researchers published their results in Nature Immunology.https://www.nature.com/articles/s41590-018-0291-z

1h

Mini tumors could help identify personalized treatments for people with rare cancers

UCLA scientists have developed a new method to quickly screen hundreds of drugs in order to identify treatments that can target specific tumors.

1h

Key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA silencing Argonaute enzyme unveiled

The Argonaute (Ago) enzyme complex plays a critical role in DNA and RNA target cleavage for a process known as RNA silencing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them a target for future gene-editing technology. The present study unravels key differences between prokaryotic Ago (pAgo) and eukaryotic Ago (eAgo) enzymes in the cleavage reaction and may provide important clues on their evoluti

1h

Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests

The federal government considers many factors when spending money to prevent structure fires. The key driver, however, is economic losses — the greater the cost of fire within a state, the more aid that state is likely to receive. A new model emphasizes an additional factor: losses associated with human fatalities and injuries. That tweak throws the current system off-track, suggesting that some

1h

Old stars live longer than we thought

The type of stars we refer to, which cannot be seen by the naked eye, officially up to now the objects which have suffered the greatest loss of mass. But the spiral structures detected by an international team, including a member who researches at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and at the University of La Laguna (ULL) show that this is not the case. The results of this work are pub

1h

Study outlines targeted treatment option for aggressive breast cancer

New findings outline a targeted therapeutic strategy to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) — a potential first for the particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. As demonstrated in the group's paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the proposed strategy centers on nanotechnology-based precision-targeting of a gene known as POLR2A.

1h

A very human machine

Researchers have designed a neural probe that looks, acts, and feels so much like a real neuron that the brain cannot identify the imposters.

1h

Amazon forest can be trained by higher rainfall variability

The Amazon rainforest has evolved over millions of years and even through ice ages. Yet today, human influences and global climate change put this huge ecosystem at risk of large-scale dieback — with major consequences for its capability as a global CO2 sink. New research published in Nature Geoscience now reveals a key player in shaping the resilience of the Amazon, and finds that regions with g

1h

New clues about why non-smokers, as well as smokers, develop chronic lung disease revealed

A group of researchers led by the universities of Leicester and Nottingham has discovered genetic differences that put some people at higher risk than others of developing chronic lung disease.

1h

Cool adaptations to the cold

Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them. Scientists have now investigated how they still manage to exist there and what evolutionary adaptations they have had to undergo in order to do so.

1h

A new spin in nano-electronics

In recent years, electronic data processing has been evolving in one direction only: the industry has downsized its components to the nanometer range. But this process is now reaching its physical limits. Researchers at HZDR are therefore exploring spin waves — a promising alternative for transporting information in more compact microchips. Cooperating with international partners, they have succe

1h

Laser 'drill' sets a new world record in laser-driven electron acceleration

Combining a first laser pulse to heat up and 'drill' through a plasma, and another to accelerate electrons to incredibly high energies in just tens of centimeters, scientists have nearly doubled the previous record for laser-driven particle acceleration at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center.

1h

Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history

A research team led by scientists at Arizona State University has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized

1h

Discovery improves understanding of Lou Gehrig's disease

Researchers uncovered a novel player in the development of ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease: mutated ubiquilin proteins that cause ALS fail to regulate the function of lysosomes, a key 'waste disposal and recycling center' of the cells.

1h

Oregon research team helps complete genome of Antarctic blackfin icefish

An international team has unveiled the genome of the Antarctic blackfin icefish, opening a genetic window on fish that evolved over the last 77 million years to survive in temperatures below the freezing point of freshwater. The icefishes, says University of Oregon biologist John Postlethwait, are examples of what Charles Darwin called the 'wrecks of ancient life.'

1h

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds

Computer modeling shows that marine stratus clouds could disappear if atmospheric CO2 levels climb high enough, raising global temperatures.

1h

Google translates doctor's orders into Spanish and Chinese with few significant errors

In multicultural areas like San Francisco, doctors are increasingly looking to Google Translate to provide written instructions their patients can take home, so they stand a better chance of following medical advice. But is Translate trustworthy? Researchers at UC San Francisco say the answer is yes — with some caveats.

1h

Money-savers focus attention — and eyes — on the prize

Why can some people patiently save for the future, while others opt for fewer dollars now? A new Duke University study reaches some surprising conclusions. Saving takes patience — forgoing instant rewards for larger, delayed rewards. Yet 'patient savers' don't slowly weigh options and aren't necessarily better at resisting temptation. Instead, choosing between less money now or more later, savers

1h

Memories of movement are replayed randomly during sleep

After a rat has repeatedly moved from one spot to another, the same neurons that fired while the rat moved 'replay' this firing while the rat is asleep. Previously, it was thought that replay patterns only correspond to trips rats had made repeatedly while awake. Writing in Neuron today, scientists at IST Austria show that also when rats roam around freely, the hippocampus replays during sleep, bu

1h

CO2 emissions in developed economies fall due to decreasing fossil fuel and energy use

Efforts to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and tackle climate change are beginning to pay off according to research led by the Tyndall Centre at the University of East Anglia.The study suggests that policies supporting renewable energy and energy efficiency are helping to reduce emissions in 18 developed economies. The group of countries represents 28 percent of global emissions, and includes the

1h

Graphite offers up new quantum surprise

Researchers at The University of Manchester in the UK, led by Dr. Artem Mishchenko, Professor Volodya Fal'ko and Professor Andre Geim, have discovered the quantum Hall effect in bulk graphite — a layered crystal consisting of stacked graphene layers.

1h

Unprecedented biological changes in the global ocean

Current monitoring of marine biological systems only covers a tiny fraction of the ocean, which limits our ability to confidently predict the expected effects of climate disturbances on marine biodiversity. Using a new computer model, an international team led by the CNRS and involving, in France, researchers from Sorbonne University has demonstrated that biological changes are accelerating, which

1h

Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do

EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes.

1h

Brain cells involved in insomnia identified

An international team of researchers has identified, for the first time, the cell types, areas and biological processes in the brain that mediate the genetic risk of insomnia. This was made possible by assessing DNA and sleep features in no less than 1.3 million people. The findings are a major step towards getting grip on the biological mechanisms that cause insomnia. Today, Nature Genetics publi

1h

With nanotubes, genetic engineering in plants is easy-peasy

Genetically modifying plants requires gene guns or bacteria to carry DNA into the cell, but the success rate is low. UC Berkeley researchers developed a quick, efficient way to deliver genes into plants: loaded onto carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes easily diffuse through the cell wall and the DNA is expressed in the nucleus and chloroplast. The gene does not insert into the genome, so outside the E

1h

Boost for Australian grain industry

New findings from research by La Trobe University and CSIRO made possible with GRDC investment could lead to a significant increase in the Australian wheat crop yield — adding potentially around $1.8 billion to the national economy and improving global food security.

1h

Researchers invent a needle that knows where to go

In preclinical testing, resistance-sensing injector allows researchers to more safely and effectively deliver drugs to the body

1h

Breakthrough 'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster, cheaper and less invasively

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.

1h

What was effect of offering breakfast in the classroom on obesity?

Offering breakfast in the classroom at some Philadelphia public schools did not affect the proportion of students developing overweight and obesity, when examined as a combined measure, after 2.5 years. However, offering breakfast in the classroom did increase the proportion of students with obesity, although precise reasons for the increase are unknown. This study reports on a randomized clinical

1h

An easier way to engineer plants

MIT researchers have developed a genetic tool that could make it easier to engineer plants that can survive drought or resist fungal infections. Their technique, which uses nanoparticles to deliver genes into the chloroplasts of plant cells, works with many different plant species.

1h

A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery predicts outcomes in melanoma patients

A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery for melanoma can put patients in remission.

1h

The secret behind witchweed's devastating ability to steal nutrients from crops

Commonly known as 'witchweed,' the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica devastates crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have discovered a unique protein in Striga that helps sustain its high transpiration. Striga uses transpiration to effectively steal water and nutrients from its hosts, so this protein could provide a new target for controlling Striga. The findings were published on Feb. 25 in N

1h

Scientists lay foundation for single-cell level understanding of DNA replication

A research team established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. This method allowed them to obtain a detailed genome-wide view of replicated and unreplicated sequence distribution in each cell. They also succeeded in discriminating paternally and maternally derived homologous chromosomes in each cell by utilizing single-nucleotide variations between parents, making it

1h

It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles

In a paper published Feb. 25 in the journal Nature, a University of Washington-led team of physicists report that they have developed a new system to trap individual excitons — bound pairs of electrons and their associated positive charges. Their system could form the basis of a novel experimental platform for monitoring excitons with precision and potentially developing new quantum technologies.

1h

Stellar wind of old stars reveals existence of a partner

Red giants are old stars that eject gaseous material and solid particles through a stellar wind. Some red giants appear to lose an exceptionally large amount of mass this way, but a new international study led by Belgian university KU Leuven sheds new light on the matter.

1h

Insomnia-associated gene regions suggest underlying mechanisms, treatment targets

An international research team led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 57 gene regions associated with symptoms of insomnia. Their report also indicates a causal link between insomnia and coronary artery disease.

1h

Stolen Mummy Feet, Arms and More Found Stashed in Speakers at Cairo Airport

Egyptian officials at the airport discovered smuggled mummy parts.

1h

Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain

When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm. The cause is a complex interplay of various factors. Scientists have now discovered the important role of one of the participants. It is a puzzle piece that plays a decisive role in the development of epilepsies and is a possible starting point for therapies.

1h

Secret to making immune cells better cancer killers

Scientists have discovered a defect in immune cells known as 'killer T cells' that explains their inability to destroy cancer tumors. The researchers believe that repairing this defect could make the cells much better cancer killers.

1h

Skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile reconstructed

Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.

1h

Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending

We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a 'well-rounded ending' — or one marked by a sense of closure — finds a team of psychology researchers.

1h

Be yourself at work — It's healthier and more productive

At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study.

1h

Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change. The average migratory bird has advanced its spring migration by approximately one week in five decades, and the duration of the migration season has increased.

1h

Live long and prosper: Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of 'silver spoon effect'

The benefits of the 'silver spoon effect' in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.

1h

An educational program designed to lessen the risk of falls in children

The programme Safe Fall- Safe Schools© establishes a methodology that is suitable for different ages of students, centred on progression by levels and types of fall (backwards, sideways and forwards), in which the child, goes from being a passive to an active participant. The program is designed to be implemented in PE classes, with between five and ten minutes in each PE class being given over to

1h

Evidence for moiré excitons in van der Waals heterostructures

Evidence for moiré excitons in van der Waals heterostructures Evidence for moiré excitons in van der Waals heterostructures, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0975-z Multiple interlayer exciton resonances in a MoSe2/WSe2 heterobilayer with a small twist angle are attributed to excitonic ground and excited states confined within the moiré potential.

1h

Signatures of moiré-trapped valley excitons in MoSe2/WSe2 heterobilayers

Signatures of moiré-trapped valley excitons in MoSe 2 /WSe 2 heterobilayers Signatures of moiré-trapped valley excitons in MoSe 2 /WSe 2 heterobilayers, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0957-1 The trapping of interlayer valley excitons in a moiré potential formed by a molybdenum diselenide/tungsten diselenide heterobilayer with twist angle control is reported.

1h

Observation of moiré excitons in WSe2/WS2 heterostructure superlattices

Observation of moiré excitons in WSe 2 /WS 2 heterostructure superlattices Observation of moiré excitons in WSe 2 /WS 2 heterostructure superlattices, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0976-y Moiré superlattice exciton states are observed in WSe2/WS2 heterostructures with closely aligned layers.

1h

Earth could warm by 14°C as growing emissions destroy crucial clouds

If greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, a cloud feedback effect could lead to more than 14°C warming above the pre-industrial level

1h

An architect's subversive reimagining of the US-Mexico border wall | Ronald Rael

What is a border? It's a line on a map, a place where cultures mix and merge in beautiful, sometimes violent and occasionally ridiculous ways. And a border wall? An overly simplistic response to that complexity, says architect Ronald Rael. In a moving, visual talk, Rael reimagines the physical barrier that divides the United States and Mexico — sharing satirical, serious works of art inspired by

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1h

A World Without Clouds

On a 1987 voyage to the Antarctic, the paleoceanographer James Kennett and his crew dropped anchor in the Weddell Sea, drilled into the seabed, and extracted a vertical cylinder of sediment. In an inch-thick layer of plankton fossils and other detritus buried more than 500 feet deep, they found a disturbing clue about the planet’s past that could spell disaster for the future. Lower in the sedime

1h

You probably don't have a penicillin allergy

Two McMaster University physicians have five facts about penicillin allergy published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ). Derek Chu is a fellow in clinical immunology and allergy and David McCullagh is a fellow in infectious disease in the Department of Medicine.

1h

Super Typhoon Wutip's 25 mile-wide eye seen by NASA-NOAA satellite

Tropical Cyclone Wutip has strengthened into a powerful super typhoon and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snapped a visible image of the storm that revealed a clear eye.

1h

Fetal growth inhibited by cocktail of chemicals in the mother

For the first time, researchers have shown that a combination of perfluorinated substances in the mother significantly inhibits child growth. These are the substances which Denmark's minister for environment and food is currently working to ban.

1h

An educational program designed to lessen the risk of falls in children

The programme Safe Fall- Safe Schools© establishes a methodology that is suitable for different ages of students, centred on progression by levels and types of fall (backwards, sideways and forwards), in which the child, goes from being a passive to an active participant. The programme is thought out to be implemented in PE classes, with between five and ten minutes in each PE class being given ov

1h

India's integrated child development program increases educational attainment

In a new study funded by Grand Challenges Canada through the Saving Brains project, researchers at CDDEP and the University of Pennsylvania evaluated the long-term impact of ICDS on schooling attainment of adolescents and adults in India.

1h

Machines whisper our secrets

Scientists showed they could reconstruct what a researcher was doing by recording the sounds of the lab instrument used. The method accurately detects what type of DNA a DNA synthesizer is making. That means academic, industrial, and government labs are potentially wide open to espionage that could destabilize research, jeopardize product development, and even put national security at risk.

1h

Machines whisper our secrets

Scientists showed they could reconstruct what a researcher was doing by recording the sounds of the lab instrument used. The method accurately detects what type of DNA a DNA synthesizer is making. That means academic, industrial, and government labs are potentially wide open to espionage that could destabilize research, jeopardize product development, and even put national security at risk.

1h

New chimpanzee culture discovered

Different cultures, different habits and different behavioral patterns — this applies not only to humans but also to chimpanzees, one of our two closest living relatives. A team of researchers now describes a new 'behavioral realm' of the Eastern chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Bili-Uéré region in Northern DR Congo, based on the results of a 12-year study.

1h

Ashwin Answers Mystic Questions

@KrzysztofKruk asks: I wonder, what are those seemingly empty quasi-spherical structures, which we can see in some of the synapses. In some cells there are barely any of those and in others almost every synapse has one. For example, this one: Ashwin : My guess is that those structures are in fact mitochondria that for some reason were not well stained. It fit in line with the fact that typically

1h

Astronomers found a stream of thousands of stars hiding in the Milky Way

Space But where is this stellar river heading? Discovering a new star is always a delight in astronomy. So you can probably imagine the excitement over discovering a giant stream of stars winding through the Milky…

1h

The secret behind witchweed's devastating ability to steal nutrients from crops

Commonly known as "witchweed," the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica devastates crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have discovered a unique protein in Striga that helps sustain its high transpiration. Striga uses transpiration to effectively steal water and nutrients from its hosts, so this protein could provide a new target for controlling Striga. The findings were published on February 25

1h

Researchers complete genome of Antarctic blackfin icefish

An international team has unveiled the genome of the Antarctic blackfin icefish, opening a genetic window on fish that evolved over the last 77 million years to survive in temperatures below the freezing point of freshwater.

1h

How bacteria mobility is like human locomotion

Do bacteria control their "walks" like we do? It might sound strange, but it's a fundamental question. Understanding bacteria motility would not only expand our understanding of their behavior, but would also contribute to the fight against certain aggressive pathogens. However, the question has gone unanswered because microbiologists have lacked the tools to visualize bacterial filaments directly

1h

Scientists lay foundation for single-cell level understanding of DNA replication

A research team has established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. This method allowed them to obtain a detailed genome-wide view of replicated and unreplicated sequence distribution in each cell. They also succeeded in discriminating paternally and maternally derived homologous chromosomes in each cell by utilizing single-nucleotide variations between parents, makin

1h

Harvard: Men who can do 40 pushups have a 'significantly' lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Men who can perform 40 pushups in one minute are 96 percent less likely to have cardiovascular disease than those who do less than 10. The Harvard study focused on over 1,100 firefighters with a median age of 39. The exact results might not be applicable to men of other age groups or to women, researchers warn. None Quantifying workouts feeds our love for both math and goal-setting. While elite p

1h

The secret behind witchweed's devastating ability to steal nutrients from crops

Commonly known as "witchweed," the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica devastates crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have discovered a unique protein in Striga that helps sustain its high transpiration. Striga uses transpiration to effectively steal water and nutrients from its hosts, so this protein could provide a new target for controlling Striga. The findings were published on February 25

1h

Team uses nanoparticles to deliver genes into plant chloroplasts

MIT researchers have developed a new genetic tool that could make it easier to engineer plants that can survive drought or resist fungal infections. Their technique, which uses nanoparticles to deliver genes into the chloroplasts of plant cells, works with many different plant species, including spinach and other vegetables.

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It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2-D materials at angles to trap particles

Future technologies based on the principles of quantum mechanics could revolutionize information technology. But to realize the devices of tomorrow, today's physicists must develop precise and reliable platforms to trap and manipulate quantum-mechanical particles.

1h

Laser 'drill' sets a new world record in laser-driven electron acceleration

Combining a first laser pulse to heat up and "drill" through a plasma, and another to accelerate electrons to incredibly high energies in just tens of centimeters, scientists have nearly doubled the previous record for laser-driven particle acceleration.

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Graphite offers up new quantum surprise

Researchers at The University of Manchester in the UK, led by Dr. Artem Mishchenko, Prof Volodya Fal'ko and Prof Andre Geim, have discovered the quantum Hall effect in bulk graphite—a layered crystal consisting of stacked graphene layers. This is an unexpected result because the quantum Hall effect is possible only in so-called two-dimensional (2-D) systems where electrons' motion is restricted to

1h

CO2 emissions in developed economies fall due to decreasing fossil fuel and energy use

Efforts to cut emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and tackle climate change in developed economies are beginning to pay off according to research led by the Tyndall Centre at the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Researchers complete genome of Antarctic blackfin icefish

An international team has unveiled the genome of the Antarctic blackfin icefish, opening a genetic window on fish that evolved over the last 77 million years to survive in temperatures below the freezing point of freshwater.

1h

Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history

Oxygen in the form of the oxygen molecule (O2), produced by plants and vital for animals, is thankfully abundant in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Researchers studying the history of O2 on Earth, however, know that it was relatively scarce for much of our planet's 4.6 billion-year existence.

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With nanotubes, genetic engineering in plants is easy-peasy

Inserting or tweaking genes in plants is more art than science, but a new technique developed by University of California, Berkeley, scientists could make genetically engineering any type of plant—in particular, gene editing with CRISPR-Cas9—simple and quick.

1h

How bacteria mobility is like human locomotion

Do bacteria control their "walks" like we do? It might sound strange, but it's a fundamental question. Understanding bacteria motility would not only expand our understanding of their behavior, but would also contribute to the fight against certain aggressive pathogens. However, the question has gone unanswered because microbiologists have lacked the tools to visualize bacterial filaments directly

1h

Early sowing systems can boost Australian grain industry

New findings from research by La Trobe University and CSIRO made possible with GRDC investment could lead to a significant increase in the Australian wheat crop yield—adding potentially around $1.8 billion to the national economy and improving global food security.

1h

Unprecedented biological changes in the global ocean

Current monitoring of marine biological systems only covers a tiny fraction of the ocean, which limits scientists' ability to confidently predict the expected effects of climate disturbances on marine biodiversity. Using a new computer model, an international team led by the CNRS and involving researchers from Sorbonne University has demonstrated that biological changes are accelerating, which has

1h

Stellar wind of old stars reveals existence of a partner

Red giants are old stars that eject gaseous material and solid particles through a stellar wind. Some red giants appeared to lose an exceptionally large amount of mass this way. However, new observations reveal that this is not quite the case. The stellar wind is not more intense than normal, but is affected by a partner that was overlooked until now—a second star that circles the red giant. These

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Scientists lay foundation for single-cell level understanding of DNA replication

A research team has established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. This method allowed them to obtain a detailed genome-wide view of replicated and unreplicated sequence distribution in each cell. They also succeeded in discriminating paternally and maternally derived homologous chromosomes in each cell by utilizing single-nucleotide variations between parents, makin

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High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds

At high enough atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, Earth could reach a tipping point where marine stratus clouds become unstable and disappear, triggering a spike in global warming, according to a new modeling study.

1h

How Zero Built the SR/F, Its All-New Electric Motorcycle

The streetfighter bike delivers 110 horsepower, 140 pound-feet of torque, a 120 mph top speed, and 161 miles of range.

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Platschefen avgörande för säkerheten på byggarbetsplatser

Det sker mer är 3500 allvarliga arbetsplatsolyckor inom bygg- och anläggningsindustrin i Europa varje år. I en studie baserad på intervjuer med 37 byggarbetsledare har forskare undersökt vilken betydelse ledarskapet har för säkerheten på byggarbetsplatser och vilka ledarskapsbeteenden som påverkar. – Syftet med studien var att hitta vilka ledarbeteende som främjar säkerheten för att i nästa steg

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On Eve Of 2nd Trump-Kim Summit, Is North Korean Reactor Producing Plutonium?

Days before President Trump and Kim Jong Un are to meet in Vietnam, satellite images show no river ice downstream from the key North Korean facility at Yongbyon — a sign the reactor may be running. (Image credit: Planet Labs Inc.)

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'Black Panther' Won Three Oscars—and Made History

Also: Netflix makes a new play for Best Picture and the Carrie Fisher dedication no one expected.

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Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of two species of ancient reptile

Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.

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White House recruits researchers for ‘adversarial’ climate science review

Emerging plan calls for ad hoc group to operate out of public view

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Documenting and decoding the dynamics between work and pain

Workers suffering from chronic pain takes an immense toll on both employees and employers. Whether the pain that individuals experience is physical or psychological, constant or intermittent, or caused by work conditions or brought to the job, its effect on their productivity and wellbeing is a huge problem. Not surprisingly, work and pain are the subjects of a growing body of research, as technol

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Health literacy can promote older people's health

A new study on older Finnish people's health literacy found that one third of 75-year-old Finns find it difficult to understand and use health-related information.

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Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile

Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.

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Be yourself at work — It's healthier and more productive

At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley.

1h

UVA discovers secret to making immune cells better cancer killers

Scientists have discovered a defect in immune cells known as 'killer T cells' that explains their inability to destroy cancer tumors. The researchers believe that repairing this defect could make the cells much better cancer killers.

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Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending, new study shows

We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a 'well-rounded ending' — or one marked by a sense of closure–finds a team of psychology researchers.

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Live long and prosper: Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of 'silver spoon effect'

The benefits of the 'silver spoon effect' in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.

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Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain

When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm. The cause is a complex interplay of various factors. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now discovered the important role of one of the participants: α2δ4 (alpha2delta4). It is a puzzle piece that plays a decisive role in the development of epilepsies and is a possible sta

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School-based health services and educational attainment

A new article from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation examines relationships between availability and use of school-based health centers among adolescents and educational attainment in adulthood.

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The Maker of AK-47 Rifles Just Unveiled a “Suicide Drone”

Suicide Drone Russian weapons manufacturer Kalashnikov, maker of the ubiquitous AK-47 assault rifle, has unveiled a tiny drone that’s meant to destroy remote ground targets from a distance of up to 40 miles (64 km) away — by blowing itself up like a suicide bomber. The “high-precision attack unmanned aerial system” dubbed KUB-UAV in a press release, was revealed earlier this month at the Internat

1h

What Do We Do About the Next Massive Natural Disaster?

Few things in life are as unpredictable as natural disasters. Many times, they strike with little-to-no warning and even if there is advanced knowledge of an impending disaster, people are rarely fully prepared to deal with the event or potential consequences. As population rises and metropolitan areas grow, the risk associated with a massive natural disaster rise with them and that's something th

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SNAPSHOT: A Non-Invasive Way To Monitor Disease Outbreaks

A red-tailed guenon in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest region of Uganda nibbles on a jam-covered rope. It’s sweet treat with purpose — the rope will later be collected, the saliva left behind analyzed. This clever, non-invasive sampling technique was developed a few years ago by researchers at the University of California, Davis. Data from these samples helps scientists track the emergence of zoono

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One-time, universal flu vaccine may be on horizon, Australian researchers say

Scientists have discovered immune cells that can fight all different kinds of the flu virus. Depending on a patient's immune system, one shot could cover someone for 10 years or potentially life. This breakthrough could save thousands worldwide. A new treatment shows promise in becoming a one-time flu vaccine. In a recent study conducted by Professor Katherine Kedzierska at the University of Melb

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Youtube plockar bort annonser från antivaccin-kanaler

Youtube-kanaler som främjar konspirationsteorier kring vaccin kommer inte längre att få annonsera och därmed inte längre kunna tjäna pengar på sitt innehåll.

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Doctors eradicate Hepatitis C in patients after heart transplants from infected donors

Nine patients have recently been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a new study. The results highlight the potential for expanding the use of HCV-infected organs, including hearts, to broaden the donor pool for the more than 100,000 Americans currently on a transplant waitlist.

2h

Ultrasound can assess bone health, increase early screening for osteoporosis

The findings could lead to lower costs and increased screening for populations at-risk for bone diseases, which study authors say extends well beyond postmenopausal women. Prior research has demonstrated strong correlations between education level and socioeconomic status and bone quality. Because of its low-cost, mobility and safety, ultrasound is a promising tool for assessing more people, acros

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Is the most effective weight-loss strategy really that hard?

Dietary self-monitoring is the best predictor of weight-loss success. But the practice is viewed as so unpleasant and time-consuming, many would-be weight-losers won't adopt it. New research shows for the first time how little time it actually takes: 14.6 minutes per day on average. The frequency of monitoring, not the time spent on the process, was the key factor for those in the study who succes

2h

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

Researchers have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins.

2h

Estrogen made by neurons important to making memories

Estrogen in the brain is important to keep neurons communicating and memories being made, scientists report.

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Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring

Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new study.

2h

Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day

Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research finds.

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Likelihood of tick bite to cause red meat allergy could be higher than previously thought

The original hypothesis was that humans developed the red meat allergy after being exposed to the alpha-gal protein through a tick that had fed previously on a small mammal. But new data suggests ticks can induce this immune response without requiring the mammal blood meal, which likely means the risk of each bite potentially leading to the allergy is higher than doctors had anticipated.

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Exclusive breastfeeding lowers odds of some schoolchildren having eczema

Children exclusively breastfed for the first three months of life had significantly lower odds of having eczema at age 6 compared with peers who were not breastfed or were breastfed for less time, according to preliminary research.

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Immunotherapy for egg allergy may allow patients to eat egg safely long after treatment

After completing up to four years of egg oral immunotherapy (eOIT) treatment, certain participants were able to safely incorporate egg into their diet for five years.

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The 8 Most Striking Moments From the 2019 Oscars

The controversies leading up to this year’s Oscar night were so many that they’re likely already blurred in viewers’ minds. And in spite of the Academy’s messy scramble to keep audiences engaged, Sunday night’s broadcast was for the most part lively and entertaining, with highlights that ranged from heartfelt gratitude to hilarity to pure joy. Here are eight of the most striking moments from the

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The Bright Side of Teens’ Worries About Mental Health

In the past decade, young people in the United States have borne the brunt of some of the most highly publicized sources of stress. Mental illness is an enormous public-health concern for Americans of any age, but things such as anxiety over school shootings and the fallout of cyberbullying can make being young in this country uniquely difficult, on top of looming concerns such as college debt an

2h

6 Possible Scientific Reasons for Ghosts

Many people believe in ghosts, but could there be scientific explanations for some of our paranormal experiences? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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6 Possible Scientific Reasons for Ghosts

Many people believe in ghosts, but could there be scientific explanations for some of our paranormal experiences? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How scientists are piecing together the history of the moon

In the solar system's early days, a first Earth is thought to have been pulverised by a planet that scientists call Theia. We don't know what it was made of or where it came from, only that it may have been the size of Mars. The powerful collision destroyed both planets so completely that scientists can only guess what they were like.

2h

Doctoral student creating 'scrubber' textiles discovers neutron analysis techniques at ORNL

Yue Yuan, a second-year Ph.D. student at NC State University's Wilson College of Textiles, is working to create textiles that filter carbon dioxide (CO2) by using the latest scientific techniques in synthesis and imaging. Known as biocatalytic textiles, these materials could serve as sustainable scrubbers for CO2 capture by using enzymes trapped in bio-based polymers to catalyze the hydration of C

2h

Verdens første atlas over huden ser dagens lys

Forskere fra Købehavns Universitet har lavet det første atlas over menneskehudens proteinsammensætning….

2h

Migrants face a trade-off between status and fertility

Researchers from the universities of Helsinki, Turku and Missouri as well as the Family Federation of Finland present the first results from a new, extraordinarily comprehensive population-wide dataset that details the lives of over 160,000 World War II evacuees in terms of integration. The results demonstrate that migrants' integration into a host community involves a trade-off between gaining in

2h

Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change. The average migratory bird has advanced its spring migration by approximately one week in five decades, and the duration of the migration season has increased.

2h

New targets for ischemic drugs found

Russian scientists investigated the role of opioid receptors in protecting the heart from coronary disease: the lack of its blood supply. These receptors are mainly responsible for pain regulation. It turned out that they significantly affect the mechanism of cardioprotection. The results of the work can help to develop new drugs for ischemia. The study was published in Physiological Research.

2h

A gene involved in ADHD could be related to addictive substance use

Some variations in the gene LPHN3-associated with the attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids and adults — could favor likelihood to smoke, consume alcohol, cannabis and other addictive substances, according to an article published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, from the Nature Publishing Group.

2h

Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues

Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world.

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Physicists from ITMO University experimentally investigated new class of resonators

The physicists from ITMO University, Ioffe Institute and the Australian National University examined a new mechanism of realization of high-quality optical resonators. The theoretical results of the work were confirmed experimentally, laying the basis for new miniature devices: effective sensors, optical filters and nonlinear light sources. The research paper is published in SPIE Advanced Photonic

2h

Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain

Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.

2h

Study finds ultrasound can assess bone health, increase early screening for osteoporosis

The findings could lead to lower costs and increased screening for populations at-risk for bone diseases, which study authors say extends well beyond postmenopausal women. Prior research has demonstrated strong correlations between education level and socioeconomic status and bone quality. Because of its low-cost, mobility and safety, ultrasound is a promising tool for assessing more people, acros

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Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues

Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world.

2h

Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain

Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.

2h

Cause of rare pediatric brain disorder

Physician-scientists have identified the cause of a devastating pediatric brain disorder paving the way for the first step in developing potential therapies for this rare neurodegenerative condition.

2h

Prenatal omega-3 shields kids from high blood pressure

Pregnant women who take 600 milligrams of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)—an omega-3 fatty acid—protect their kids from the blood pressure-elevating effects of excessive weight in early childhood, according to a new study. Prenatal vitamins, fish-oil supplements, and fish meat all contain DHA. For the study, researchers enrolled women with low-risk pregnancies between March 2006 and September 2009. Re

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Machines whisper our secrets: Spies can learn what a machine is making from the sounds it makes

Lab instruments are important tools throughout research and health care. But what if those instruments are leaking valuable information?

2h

Nordiske lande går sammen i kampen mod »farlige læger«

Kritikken af EU’s alarmsystem for læger, der efter at have fået frataget deres autorisation i ét EU-land blot rejser videre til et andet og praktiserer, har fået de fem nordiske lande til at gå sammen om et nyt nordisk alarmsystem.

2h

Non-native pest-controlling wasp identified in Canada prior to formal approval

Thought to be Canada's most promising potential defense against the brown marmorated stink bug—a globally spreading agricultural pest native to Asia—the samurai wasp (another species from Asia and natural parasitoid of the former) has been considered for future release in the country in recent years.

2h

Scientists eavesdrop on DNA synthesizer to steal genetic blueprint

During the DNA synthesis process in a laboratory, recordings can be made of the subtle, telltale noises made by synthesis machines. And those captured sounds can be used to reverse-engineer valuable, custom-designed genetic materials used in pharmaceuticals, agriculture and other bioengineering fields.

2h

Non-native pest-controlling wasp identified in Canada prior to formal approval

Thought to be Canada's most promising potential defense against the brown marmorated stink bug—a globally spreading agricultural pest native to Asia—the samurai wasp (another species from Asia and natural parasitoid of the former) has been considered for future release in the country in recent years.

2h

Letters: ‘I’d Stop Hating Beets If They’d Stop Tasting Like Dirt’

How to Stop Hating Your Least Favorite Food “As far as I can remember,” Amanda Mull wrote last week , “I’ve never liked cucumbers, mostly because they taste bad.” After talking with a handful of experts in her quest to figure out why humans have aversions to certain foods in the first place, Mull learned that there’s no neat explanation; preferences can arise from genetic differences, exposure, e

2h

Scientists eavesdrop on DNA synthesizer to steal genetic blueprint

During the DNA synthesis process in a laboratory, recordings can be made of the subtle, telltale noises made by synthesis machines. And those captured sounds can be used to reverse-engineer valuable, custom-designed genetic materials used in pharmaceuticals, agriculture and other bioengineering fields.

2h

Wanted: climate leadership for the World Bank

Wanted: climate leadership for the World Bank Wanted: climate leadership for the World Bank, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00661-5 US President Donald Trump’s candidate to lead the global institution could undermine its efforts to get greener. Nations need the courage to challenge the nomination.

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IBM’s ‘Project Debater’ AI Lost to a Human—But Put Up Quite a Fight

How can you efficiently change someone’s mind? The art of debate has always seemed like black magic to me. You’re not necessarily arguing for something you believe in—rather, you’re carefully dissecting the logic of your opponent’s arguments, while appealing to their (or an audience’s) emotions and showing your own character. It’s a cognitive-emotive venture that seems uniquely human. Not anymore

2h

Origin of resistance to lung-cancer drug discovered

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications what causes some lung-cancer patients to have an intrinsic resistance to the drug osimertinib: AXL, a protein belonging to the class of receptor tyrosine kinases. The combined application of osimertinib and an AXL inhibitor is shown to limit intrinsic resistance to the drug.

2h

Penn team eradicates Hepatitis C in patients after heart transplants from infected donors

Nine patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. The results highlight the potential for expanding the use of HCV-infected organs, including hearts, to broaden the donor pool for the more than 100,000

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Elucidation of molecular-targeted drug resistance mechanism by lung cancer cells

We revealed that ALK-positive lung cancer cells, treated with crizonitib, a molecular target drug, acquired resistance to the drug not only by genetic mutation but also by concomitant epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Further, in animal experiments, mesenchymal cancer cells due to EMT were shown to revert to epithelial ones by quisinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor; they reg

2h

New chimpanzee culture discovered

Different cultures, different habits and different behavioral patterns — this applies not only to humans but also to chimpanzees, one of our two closest living relatives. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig, Germany, and the University of Warsaw in Poland now describes a new 'behavioral realm' of the Eastern chimpanzee (Pan troglo

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Partners in catalysis: An efficient route to unsaturated ketones

A Japanese research team at Kanazawa University synthesized diverse β,γ-unsaturated ketones through direct reaction of aldehydes and allylic alcohols. An N-heterocyclic carbene acted as an umpolung catalyst, turning the normally electrophilic carbonyl carbon into a nucleophile. Another catalyst, based on phosphine-bound palladium, activated the alcohol. The catalytic synergy enabled both substrate

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Artificial intelligence debate raises more questions than answers

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Why That Oscars Performance of ‘Shallow’ Was So Stunning

Maybe what made Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga’s performance of “Shallow” so stunning at the Oscars is also what spoiled A Star Is Born ’s Best Picture chances: It treated the dinged-up tropes of romance for romance’s sake as something that can still feel new, which is like treating the greeting-card aisle at CVS as the place for the next great American novel. Taking on a third remake of a story th

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Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain

Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.

2h

Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain

Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.

2h

Becoming Dad After Death

IVF enjoys wide support among the Israeli public, but some have raised concerns that posthumous reproduction violates the rights of the unborn child. Meanwhile, experts in other parts of the world worry about the lack of adequate government and medical regulation as the procedure gains traction globally.

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Seminar skal skaffe praktiserende læger til Sønderjylland

Yngre Læger, tre sønderjyske kommuner og Region Syddanmark indgår i et samarbejde for at forsøge at sikre lægedækningen i Sønderjylland.

2h

Non-native pest-controlling wasp identified in Canada prior to formal approval

Thought to be Canada's most promising potential defense against the brown marmorated stink bug (a globally spreading pest of various fruits and vegetables), the samurai wasp has been considered for future release in the country in recent years. However, prior to any formal decision and approval, the parasitoid was found to be already present at a heavily infested site in Chilliwack, British Columb

2h

A reward now or later? Exploring impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients

Promises of food, sums of money or entertaining pastimes: it does not matter what the temptation is, a new study shows that patients suffering from Parkinson's disease who are treated with DBS of the subthalamic nucleus are not more impulsive than others when making decisions about an appealing stimulus. To establish this, in the experiment the scientists placed the patients in front of a choice:

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International team of scientists detect cause of rare pediatric brain disorder

An international effort led by physician-scientists at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM), in collaboration with a team at the Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MCH-MUHC), has identified the cause of a devastating pediatric brain disorder paving the way for the first step in developing potential therapies for this rare neurodegenerative condit

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Scientists decode dynamics of the largest protein-degrading machine in atomic detail

Seven cryo-EM structures at atomic-level resolution revealed the inner working of human proteasome and its dynamic substrate-processing steps of ubiquitin recognition, deubiquitylation, translocation initiation and processive substrate degradation.

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Machines whisper our secrets

Scientists from UC Irvine and UC Riverside showed they could reconstruct what a researcher was doing by recording the sounds of the lab instrument used. The method accurately detects what type of DNA a DNA synthesizer is making. That means academic, industrial, and government labs are potentially wide open to espionage that could destabilize research, jeopardize product development, and even put n

2h

Near ground-state cooling of 2-D trapped ion crystals

Researchers have been trying to cool macroscopic mechanical oscillators down to their ground state for several decades. Nonetheless, past studies have merely attained the cooling of a few selected vibrational modes of such oscillators.

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Why toxic methylmercury production increased in a Great Lakes estuary

Forest fires, coal use, and other activities emit mercury. Wetland microbes turn it into a neurotoxin. In freshwater wetlands of the Great Lakes region, a team showed the influence of wetland vegetation in regulating mercury toxicity. They also showed that enhanced production of toxic mercury in certain vegetated areas is associated with three factors: (1) degradation of dissolved organic matter,

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Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of 'silver spoon effect'

The benefits of the 'silver spoon effect' in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.

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Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of 'silver spoon effect'

The benefits of the 'silver spoon effect' in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.

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Forsker: Derfor er potentialudligning vigtigt for jernbaner

PLUS. Banedanmark bliver kritiseret for at udskyde potentialudligning på Københavns Hovedbanegård. DTU-lektor forklarer den særlige form for sikring mod elektrisk stød.

2h

Virgin Galactic: Scots-born pilot rockets into space

Scotsman Dave Mackay piloted Virgin Galactic's rocket plane to 90km above California's Mojave Desert.

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The sky has a highway 100 miles wide

Aviation Gotta love that Gulf stream. Here's what it looks like when thousands of planes soar across the sky each night.

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New artificial DNA molecule may give clues to find aliens

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

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5G is coming: what can we expect?

This year the telecoms industry will begin the transition to new fifth-generation cellular networks—known as 5G—which is expected to one day help run everything from self-driving cars to robot surgeons.

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Smart home systems need to improve security

The security of smart domestic appliances that can be managed remotely must be improved to better protect users' privacy, research suggests.

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Sweet butterfly turns sour to avoid getting eaten

When they live apart from the unsavory bug they mimic, viceroy butterflies develop their own foul flavor, according to new research. The findings are making biologists rethink old theories about animal mimicry. The viceroy butterfly is a mimic that models its orange-and-black colors after the queen butterfly, a bug that tastes so disgusting predators have learned not to eat it or anything that lo

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Sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) significantly improves EUV patterning

his week, at the SPIE Advanced Lithography conference 2019, imec, a world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, demonstrates the positive impact of sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) on the EUVL (extreme ultra-violet lithography) patterning process. This post-lithography technique is shown to significantly reduce stochastic nano-failures and line rou

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How a Green New Deal could exploit developing countries

The Green New Deal has changed the conversation among progressive Democrats about how to deal with climate change, from simply managing a disaster to how to take advantage of an existential threat to build a more just society.

3h

Stop the BS – when you hear a negative statistic about black students, question it

Evidence suggests white teachers are more negative with – and have lower expectations for – black students.

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How electric cars could make America's crumbling roads even worse

U.S. roads and bridges are in abysmal shape – and that was before the recent winter storms made things even worse.

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Lack of diversity in cell lines prevents minorities from accessing 'precision medicine'

As the biomedical field races to develop therapies based on an individual's genetic makeup, a City of Hope scientist and his colleagues found that some commercial cell lines used for countless laboratory studies have mislabeled ancestry when it comes to minorities. So, it will take longer for underrepresented populations to reap the benefits of 'precision medicine,' an emerging approach to disease

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Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia

Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the medical journal Neurology. Mental activities included reading, playing instruments, singing in a choir, visiting concerts, gardening, doing needlework or attending religious services.

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Finnish researchers discover a new form of hereditary osteoporosis

Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital (HUS) and Folkhälsan have identified a new gene whose variants cause hereditary childhood-onset osteoporosis. The gene defect was first found in two Finnish families.

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Nanoparticle computing takes a giant step forward

Inspired by how cellular membranes process biological information, we developed a platform for constructing nanoparticle circuits on a supported lipid bilayer. In our 'lipid nanotablet' platform, a supported lipid bilayer is used as a chemical circuit board to carry out molecular computation with a network of nanoparticles. This nano-bio computing translates molecular information in solution (inpu

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UCI, UCR scientists eavesdrop on DNA synthesizer to steal genetic blueprint

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine and the University of California, Riverside have uncovered the possibility of an acoustic side-channel attack on the DNA synthesis process, a vulnerability that could present a serious risk to biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and academic research institutions.

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Topological defects could be key to future nano-electronics

An article published this week in the leading journal Nature Materials by FLEET/UNSW Prof Jan Seidel outlines emerging research into different types of 'defective' order, i.e. topological structures in materials, and their potential highly interesting applications in nanotechnology and nanoelectronics. Seidel was invited by the journal editor to review current and future research on domain walls a

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A study on Bonelli's eagles urges a reduction in human-wildlife conflict

A study carried out by the University of Alicante (UA) by Vertebrate Zoology Research Group and the University of Valencia (UV) Cavanilles Institute on Bonelli's eagles warns of the serious impact that recreational activities in natural parks have on this endangered species, and urges governments to take actions to reduce human pressure on wildlife. The study has been published in journal Biologic

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Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change. The average migratory bird has advanced its spring migration by approximately one week in five decades, and the duration of the migration season has increased.

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Cloudy waters

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite captured this true-colour image on 5 February 2019, just three days after heavy rainfall in Rome and the surrounding area of Lazio, Italy. It shows sediment gushing into the Tyrrhenian Sea, part of the Mediterranean Sea. The downpour on 2 February led to flooded streets, the closing of the banks of the Tiber River and several roads.

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BMW fined for diesel software error

Germany prosecutors have fined automaker BMW 8.5 million euros ($9.66 million) for lax oversight in installing defective engine software that led to excessive diesel emissions in 7,965 cars.

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A study on Bonelli's eagles urges a reduction in human-wildlife conflict

A study carried out by the University of Alicante (UA) by Vertebrate Zoology Research Group and the University of Valencia (UV) Cavanilles Institute on Bonelli's eagles warns of the serious impact that recreational activities in natural parks have on this endangered species, and urges governments to take actions to reduce human pressure on wildlife. The study has been published in journal Biologic

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Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change. The average migratory bird has advanced its spring migration by approximately one week in five decades, and the duration of the migration season has increased.

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Data as material for product design

Products and services increasingly get smarter and more interconnected, forming intelligent eco-systems that allow the generation and sharing of large amounts of data through the internet. These new data often find their way in the evaluation of new products, but only after the design process has been concluded. Janne van Kollenburg and Sander Bogers, designers at Philips Design, have developed a

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Repulsive photons

Light particles normally do not "feel" each other because there is no interaction acting between them. Researchers at ETH have now succeeded in manipulating photons inside a semiconductor material in such a way as to make them repel each other nevertheless.

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Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes

For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance, which is a unique pattern of behavior, which probably evolved more than 20 million years ago. A bee's waggle dance tells its sisters in the colony where to find a high-quality source of food. However, in recent years, people have b

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Scientists complete first UK-wide assessment of changes in plankton community

Scientists have completed the first ever assessment of how plankton communities are changing in coastal waters and shelf seas around the UK.

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UK Met Office measures warmest February day on record

Britain's meteorological agency says temperatures have reached 20.3 C (68.5 F) in the west of the country, marking a record high for February.

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Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes

For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance, which is a unique pattern of behavior, which probably evolved more than 20 million years ago. A bee's waggle dance tells its sisters in the colony where to find a high-quality source of food. However, in recent years, people have b

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Solid-state battery testing to be part of ispace HAKUTO-R program

Officials with ispace, a commercial enterprise with ambitions of creating a lunar exploration system, have announced that part of their initial program will include testing a solid-state battery on the surface of the moon. The current plan is to test the battery with a lunar rover as early as 2021.

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Scientists complete first UK-wide assessment of changes in plankton community

Scientists have completed the first ever assessment of how plankton communities are changing in coastal waters and shelf seas around the UK.

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AI Transforming The World

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High-resolution observations uncover detailed structure of blazar's jet

Using Russia's Spektr-R space telescope (also known as RadioAstron), astronomers have conducted high-resolution observations of the blazar S5 0716+71. The results of these observations, presented in a paper published February 12 on the arXiv pre-print server, provide insights into the structure of the blazar's jet.

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UAE says its first astronaut going into space in September

The first astronaut from the United Arab Emirates will blast off into space on Sept. 25 on a trip to the International Space Station, authorities announced Monday.

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GE selling BioPharma unit for $21.4 bn to reduce debt

General Electric announced Monday it will sell its Biopharma unit to Danaher for $21.4 billion in cash as it reduces debt amid an ongoing corporate turnaround effort.

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Teaching chatbots regular human language

Customer service chatbots are ready to help you night and day. But communication with a bot can be cumbersome sometimes. Christine Liebrecht, Associate Professor of Language, Business Communication, and Digital Media, thinks there is room for improvement. How? By teaching bots regular human language. This is how Tilburg University focuses on technology that works for people.

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Phone surveys track real-time emotions to treat depression

Tracking someone’s emotional changes in real time using a smartphone could improve treatment for depression, new research suggests. Decades of research into anxiety and depression have resulted in the development of models that help explain the causes and dimensions of the two disorders. For all of their well-established usefulness, however, the models measure differences between individuals and

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Mycket svåra livsförhållanden för papperslösa migranter

Studiens resultat visar att 68 procent av deltagarna led av ångest, 71 procent av depression och 58 procent av posttraumatiskt stressyndrom (PTSD). – Nästan hälften uppgav att de var oroliga över att inte få mat för dagen, säger Lena Andersson, docent i socialt arbete vid Göteborgs universitet. Tillsammans med forskarna Henry Ascher och Anders Hjern från Sahlgrenska akademin har hon genomfört den

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The skeleton articulated

The skeleton articulated The skeleton articulated, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00679-9 Jan Zalasiewicz enjoys Brian Switek’s exploration of how the human scaffold — and our ideas about it — evolved.

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This fast food drive-thru is now using AI to take orders

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Artificial Intelligence: The Future of Retail and Hospitality

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This New AI Draws Grotesquely Warped Cats And We Can't Stop Looking

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Ludwig Promises Easy Machine Learning from Uber

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GE to sell slice of life sciences unit in $21bn deal

US industrial conglomerate’s latest move signals a focus on reducing its debt burden

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To space and beyond!

Western Australia has a secret. We're quietly becoming a space powerhouse.

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Big data harvesting tool will deliver smart farming

Researchers from across Norwich Research Park have launched a new system for organising vast datasets on climate and crops.

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Sprint's 5G service launches in four cities this May

It's Sprint's turn to commit to a 5G network launch. The carrier has confirmed that full-fledged 5G service will debut in May in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and Kansas City. …

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Techathlon podcast: Folding phones, expensive gadgets, and wacky crytpocurrencies

Technology We're the tech podcast that lets you play along. Outsmart our hosts on an entertaining, informative podcast about technology.

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West Coast's biggest starfish vanishing amid disease, warming oceans, study finds

Once a common delight of every beachcomber, sunflower starfish—the large, multi-armed starfish sometimes seen underwater at the near shore—are imperiled by disease and ocean warming along the West Coast.

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West Coast's biggest starfish vanishing amid disease, warming oceans, study finds

Once a common delight of every beachcomber, sunflower starfish—the large, multi-armed starfish sometimes seen underwater at the near shore—are imperiled by disease and ocean warming along the West Coast.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor staller et fly?

Hvilke betingelser skal være opfyldt, før et fly havner i et stall? Det svarer flyingeniør Lars Illum Jørgensen på.

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‘FarFarOut’: Nasa astronomer finds potential furthest object in solar system

Mystery shrouds ‘very faint’ planetary body that appears to be 140 times further from the sun than Earth A new object has been discovered in the distant reaches of our solar system and given the name FarFarOut, according to a prominent astronomer. At 140 times further away from the sun than our own planet is, the newly identified body – if its discovery is confirmed – will become the furthest kno

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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week: Feb. 25-Mar. 3

Today marks the first day of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week , an observance created by the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) in order to spread awareness about eating disorders and support for those dealing with them. According to NEDA , approximately 20 million women and 10 million men will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lives. Different studies show v

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Robotic glider makes first turbulence measurements beneath an Antarctic ice shelf

A small group of scientists and doctoral students from the University of California, Davis, recently returned from Antarctica, where they became the first group to collect turbulence measurements from an underwater glider beneath an ice shelf.

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Researcher models the key transformations that emissions undergo in the atmosphere

Josh Moss is a Ph.D. student in the lab of Professor Jesse Kroll, where he studies atmospheric chemistry and examines the chemistry of gases and particles in the atmosphere that humans are releasing and their interactions with existing particles in the atmosphere. He focuses on organic chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere which contribute significantly to smog formation. In the laborato

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Microsoft Launches $3,500 HoloLens 2 Headset

Microsoft's new HoloLens 2 has debuted, and the company claims to have doubled the field of view without reducing image quality. The post Microsoft Launches $3,500 HoloLens 2 Headset appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Artificial Intelligence In Humanoid Robots

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Why Quantum Computing's Time Is Now

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Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create own living space on plant

Grape phylloxera — the insect that nearly wiped out wine production at the end of the 19th century in France — hijacks a grape vine's reproductive programs to create a leaf gall, which it uses as a pseudo apartment for the parasite to siphon off the plant's nutrients.

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How scientist's disputed views about pollution are shaping EPA

In early 2018, a deputy assistant administrator in the EPA, Clint Woods, reached out to a Massachusetts toxicologist best known for pushing a public health standard suggesting that low levels of toxic chemicals and radiation are good for people.

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Effektivare dialysbehandling

Tusentals svenskar med nedsatt njurfunktion får regelbunden dialysbehandling. Fyra av fem får bloddialys, vilken kräver sjukhusbesök flera dagar i veckan. Övriga patienter får påsdialys som de själva kan sköta i hemmet, antingen manuellt eller automatiskt med hjälp av maskiner. Nu arbetar forskare vid Lunds universitet och Skånes universitetssjukhus på att ta fram en effektivare behandling med mål

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SanDisk speeds up high capacity mobile storage with 1 TB microSD card

Smartphones are getting ever more capable, now coming with 4K screens and multiple cameras. Streaming high resolution movies can quickly eat up mobile data allowance, and even generous …

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Extreme eco tent tested in Antarctica

A tent made from experimental eco-materials has been taken to one of the harshest climates in the world to test its endurance.

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Political corruption scars young voters forever, new research finds

New research finds that political corruption has a long-term scarring effect on trust in democratic institutions and on voters' behavior and that such an effect differs according to one's age cohort, with first-time voters at the time of corruption revelation still being affected 25 years later.

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For some bees, the dancing may as well stop

Research finds the renowned ‘waggle dance’ is no longer relevant for urban hives. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Garlic, onion, linked to decreased bowel cancer risk

Chinese study adds to evidence that alliums deliver positive human health outcomes. Natalie Parletta reports.

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This butterfly is not what it seems, doubly so

A harmless mimic turns toxic.

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Image of the Day: Watch and Learn

Young zebra finches that receive feedback after they sing from a video of a fluffed-up female eventually develop more accurate tunes.

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Explaining the increase in coal consumption worldwide

Published in December 2018, the recent report of the International Energy Agency (IEA) indicates that global coal consumption is on the rise again (+1% compared to 2017).

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Earthquake early-warning system will mean false alarms but it's still worth it, researchers say

Earthquake early warnings can come as false alarms—but it's better to be safer than sorry, researchers concluded in a new study.

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Hermit crabs are drawn to the smell of their own dead

A new study finds that the smell of hermit crab flesh attracts other hermit crabs of the same species desperately looking for a larger shell.

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70 million years ago, several species shared a nest

Birds and reptiles co-habitated for mutual profit and protection. Nick Carne reports.

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Plant communities do not take the same route from A to B as from B to A

Ecologists at Umeå University in Sweden have discovered that plant communities follow different trajectories when they adapt to dryer conditions than when they adapt to more frequently flooded conditions. Further, in two side studies in the same experiment they found that flooding history of the vegetation alter the response of germinating seeds and of litter decomposition to the current condition

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The law is closing in on Facebook and the 'digital gangsters'

For social media and search engines, the law is back in town.

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Plant communities do not take the same route from A to B as from B to A

Ecologists at Umeå University in Sweden have discovered that plant communities follow different trajectories when they adapt to dryer conditions than when they adapt to more frequently flooded conditions. Further, in two side studies in the same experiment they found that flooding history of the vegetation alter the response of germinating seeds and of litter decomposition to the current condition

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Linguists need preservation of languages to study human language

In a recent article here at ScienceNordic & Forskerzonen, we argued that this year's U.N. initiative International Year of Indigenous Languages is urgently needed in light of the global decline of minority and indigenous languages.

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Study: ACA Medicaid expansion shows impact on colon cancer screenings, survival in Kentucky

A new University of Kentucky study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows a direct link between the adoption of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and the impact of colon cancer on Kentuckians.

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Simultaneous X-ray and infrared observations of the galactic center

The supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, Sagittarius A*, is by far the closest such object to us, only about 25 thousand light-years away. Although not nearly as active or luminous as other SMBHs, its relative proximity provides astronomers with a unique opportunity to probe what happens close to the "edge" of a black hole. Monitored in the radio since its discover

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All publicly funded Australian research could soon be free for you, the taxpayer, to read

What happens to research that is funded by taxpayers? A lot ends up in subscription-only journals, protected from the eyes of most by a paywall.

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X-rays might be a better way to communicate in space

In the coming years, thousands of satellites, several next-generation space telescopes and even a few space habitats are expected to be launched into orbit. Beyond Earth, multiple missions are planned to be sent to the lunar surface, to Mars, and beyond. As humanity's presence in space increases, the volume of data that is regularly being back sent to Earth is reaching the limits of what radio com

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The race for enzymatic DNA synthesis heats up

The race for enzymatic DNA synthesis heats up The race for enzymatic DNA synthesis heats up, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00682-0 An alternative to chemical oligonucleotide synthesis inches closer to reality.

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New machine learning approach could give a big boost to the efficiency of optical networks

New work leveraging machine learning could increase the efficiency of optical telecommunications networks. As our world becomes increasingly interconnected, fiber optic cables offer the ability to transmit more data over longer distances compared to traditional copper wires. Optical Transport Networks (OTNs) have emerged as a solution for packaging data in fiber optic cables, and improvements stan

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Hayabusa 2: Asteroid image shows touchdown marks

A new image from Japan's Hayabusa-2 spacecraft reveals a dark splodge where it touched down on the surface of an asteroid last week.

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New membrane water treatment system to reduce toxic waste and waste disposal cost by over 90 per cent

A new pilot plant to treat industrial wastewater is being built that could potentially reduce the amount of liquid waste by over 90 per cent.

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Quantum optical micro-combs

Compact quantum devices could be incorporated into laptops and mobile phones, thanks in part to small devices called quantum optical micro-combs.

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Ancient people in the high-latitude Arctic had well-developed trade

Russian scientists have studied the Zhokhov site of an ancient population, which is located in the high-latitude Arctic. They have described in detail the way of life of the ancient people who lived there. Despite the area's sparse population, the ancient people communicated with representatives of other territories and even exchanged goods with them through trade fairs.

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World's forests increasingly taking up more carbon

The world's forests are increasingly taking up more carbon, partially offsetting the carbon being released by the burning of fossil fuels and by deforestation in the tropics, according to a new study.

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Scientists Must Speak Up for the Green New Deal

The resolution’s focus on climate and social justice highlights the central challenges—and opportunities—of our time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New comparative study on DNA modifications across the fungal tree of life

DNA activity can change without changing the sequence of the DNA segment itself. Gene activation and inactivation can be the basis for how species produce unique individuals. Some processes that change gene activity are well understood in the context of model species. However, scientists are still grappling with how some processes, like DNA methylation, change gene activity in many diverse organis

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New comparative study on DNA modifications across the fungal tree of life

DNA activity can change without changing the sequence of the DNA segment itself. Gene activation and inactivation can be the basis for how species produce unique individuals. Some processes that change gene activity are well understood in the context of model species. However, scientists are still grappling with how some processes, like DNA methylation, change gene activity in many diverse organis

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Rethinking traffic congestion to make our cities more like the places we want them to be

Soon after becoming prime minister last year, Scott Morrison appointed a minister for "congestion busting", signalling the importance he attaches to this issue. The large number of Google search results on "traffic congestion in Australian cities 2019" (9.5 million) and "traffic congestion in Australian cities costing the economy 2019" (8.3 million) seems to support his opinion.

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Navy files for patent on room-temperature superconductor

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Facebook brings 5G wireless internet to California homes – CNET

At MWC 2019, the social network is demonstrating all the ways in which it's building out the underlying technology of the internet.

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Medicinsk udstyr stjålet fra regionshospital

35 skoper forsvandt lørdag eftermiddag fra samme rum på Regionshospitalet Herning. Politiet efterforsker sagen.

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Scientists Must Speak Up for the Green New Deal

The resolution’s focus on climate and social justice highlights the central challenges—and opportunities—of our time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Thinks He’s the Only One Who Can Fix North Korea

Heading into his second summit with Kim Jong Un this week, Donald Trump is making a striking argument: With his singular smarts, deal-making prowess, and sizzling personal chemistry with Kim, he is the only one capable of eliminating the North Korean nuclear threat. But Trump’s approach of “I alone can fix it” (which he initially espoused as a presidential candidate in reference to America’s brok

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Dear Therapist: Is It Wrong to Divorce My Sick Wife?

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Let me start by saying I'm not leaving my wife because of her illness. On the contrary, I've probably stayed way longer—we’ve been married nearly 14 years—than I should have because of it. We both could make a

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Doctors plan to test a gene therapy that could prevent Alzheimer’s disease

A novel dementia treatment will flood people’s brains with a low-risk version of a key gene.

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Physicists Just Solved a 35-Year-Old Mystery Hidden Inside Atomic Cores

The quarks inside atoms move slower than the quarks inside free-floating protons and neutrons. But why?

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21 Totally Sweet Spider Superlatives

What's the largest spider? The fastest? The weirdest? This list has all of your arachnid records covered.

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This Weight Loss Strategy Takes Just 15 Minutes a Day

A new study suggests that monitoring your diet may not be as much work as you think.

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Ming Dynasty Skeletons Reveal Secrets of Foot-Binding

Foot-binding was practiced for 1,000 years in China, but archaeologists are only starting to study this form of body modification.

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Chips may be inherently vulnerable to Spectre and Meltdown attacks

Most malware exploits coding errors and poor design. But Google security researchers say a fundamental flaw in the nature of computing could make some threats impossible to defeat.

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Eminem & Oculus Reveal Virtual Reality Short ‘Marshall From Detroit’

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The Ocean Is Running Out of Breath, Scientists Warn

Widespread and sometimes drastic marine oxygen declines are stressing sensitive species—a trend that will continue with climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New microSD Express Format Brings SSD-Level Removable Storage Performance To Smartphones

With smartphone these days including an increasing amount of onboard storage, it's easy to forget that microSD card storage is also expanding at a rapid clip. However, the biggest downside …

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The Ocean Is Running Out of Breath, Scientists Warn

Widespread and sometimes drastic marine oxygen declines are stressing sensitive species—a trend that will continue with climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Picture-editing AI lets you easily alter a celebrity’s face

AI can create convincing pictures of fake people, but now they are expert photo editors too

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Rare cancers: A growing focus of early-stage clinical trials

The proportion of early-stage drug trials tackling the biggest cancer killers has declined sharply since the early 1990s as less common tumour types receive increasing attention, according to new research to be presented during the International Congress on Targeted Anticancer Therapies (TAT) 2019, taking place Feb. 25-27 in Paris, France. The analysis highlights the changing treatment landscape,

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New study finds “important deficiencies” in university reports of misconduct

Retraction Watch readers may recall the name Yoshihiro Sato. The late researcher’s retraction total — now at 51 — gives him the number four spot on our leaderboard. He’s there because of the work of four researchers, Andrew Grey, Mark Bolland, and Greg Gamble, all of the University of Auckland, and Alison Avenell, of the … Continue reading New study finds “important deficiencies” in university rep

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The Cancer Personality Scandal (Part 1)

The Journal of Health Psychology has just published an extraordinary pair of papers that call for a new inquiry into a 30-year old case of probable scientific fraud. According to Anthony J. Pelosi, author of the main paper, the case was "one of the worst scientific scandals of all time" and yet has never been formally investigated. The journal's editor, David F. Marks, agrees and, in an editorial,

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The Oscars Thwarted Its Bid for Relevance by Crowning Green Book

Since the 91st Academy Awards aired without a host or any planned stunts, the show will be defined by its victors. One was a genuine shocker: Olivia Colman won Best Actress for The Favourite , triumphing over seven-time Oscar loser Glenn Close, who’d been expected to take home a lifetime-achievement award of sorts for The Wife . Spike Lee’s Best Adapted Screenplay win for BlacKkKlansman was a lon

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The Fears That Racial Hoaxes Illuminate

If the purported attack on the actor Jussie Smollett indeed turns out to be staged, it will be the latest in a long line of hoaxes grounded in racial stereotypes. By design, these hoaxes reinforce different groups’ worst suspicion of one another: Whites are racists. Blacks are criminals. Smollett, a cast member of HBO’s Empire , is African American and gay. After telling Chicago police last month

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Don't Strip ISIS Fighters of Citizenship

In October 1959, Lee Harvey Oswald presented himself to the U.S. consul in Moscow and attempted, without success, to rid himself of his U.S. citizenship. The Warren Commission Report describes his frustration: First he told the consul, Richard E. Snyder, that he wanted to give up his citizenship. The consul refused to accept his declaration, so Oswald picked up a pen and put it in writing. To rem

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Banedanmark om udskudt sikkerheds-forbedring: »Det er ikke lovpligtigt«

Banedanmark bliver kritiseret for at udskyde sikkerhedsarbejde på Københavns Hovedbanegård af økonomiske hensyn. Sikringen ville have været lovpligtig, hvis anlæggene havde været nye.

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AI-filosof: Der går nok lidt tid, før robotterne overtager verden

Sådan kan mennesker skabe robotter med bevidsthed ifølge filosof.

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Techtopia #93: Verdens hurtigste hyperloop

467 km/t er hastigheden på verdens hurtigste hyperloop, der bygges i München. Helt så hurtigt flyver Wing-dronerne ikke i Helsinki, men de kan levere en espresso på under to minutter uden at spilde.

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KMD solgt til japansk firma

Danske KMD er blevet godkendt til salg af de europæiske konkurrencemyndigheder. Japanske NEC køber det tidligere Kommunedata for omkring 8 milliarder.

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Android Is Helping Make Passwords Obsolete on a Billion Devices

By officially embracing the FIDO2 standard, Android will soon let you log into sites and services without having to remember a password.

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The FDA says don’t buy young plasma therapies. Here’s why

Infusions of plasma from young people may hold the secret of youth, but there’s not much evidence to support the idea yet.

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I Randers kan klimasikring være tapirsø, ‘skywalk’ og amfiscene

PLUS. Vandmasserne fra Guden­åen, fjorden og himlen skal i Randers holdes på afstand med metoder, der også gør byen mere attraktiv at bo i.

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Flera plus med tvåspråkig undervisning

Detta är den första studien som tar ett rejält grepp om engelskspråkig undervisning i Sverige. – Och det trots att den här typen av undervisning har förekommit i Sverige sedan sent 1970-tal och stundtals debatterats intensivt i media, säger professor Liss Kerstin Sylvén, som lett forskningsprojektet som ville ta reda på vilken roll undervisningsspråket spelar för utvecklingen av elevers skriftlig

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Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day

Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds.

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Better options needed for children at higher risk of premature heart disease

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

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Isothermal Analysis of ThermoFluor Data can readily provide Quantitative Binding Affinities

Isothermal Analysis of ThermoFluor Data can readily provide Quantitative Binding Affinities Isothermal Analysis of ThermoFluor Data can readily provide Quantitative Binding Affinities, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37072-x Isothermal Analysis of ThermoFluor Data can readily provide Quantitative Binding Affinities

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Allele specific chromatin signals, 3D interactions, and motif predictions for immune and B cell related diseases

Allele specific chromatin signals, 3D interactions, and motif predictions for immune and B cell related diseases Allele specific chromatin signals, 3D interactions, and motif predictions for immune and B cell related diseases, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39633-0 Allele specific chromatin signals, 3D interactions, and motif predictions for immune and B cell related d

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Hypochlorous-Acid-Generating Electrochemical Scaffold for Treatment of Wound Biofilms

Hypochlorous-Acid-Generating Electrochemical Scaffold for Treatment of Wound Biofilms Hypochlorous-Acid-Generating Electrochemical Scaffold for Treatment of Wound Biofilms, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38968-y Hypochlorous-Acid-Generating Electrochemical Scaffold for Treatment of Wound Biofilms

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Effect of Lure Combination on Fruit Fly Surveillance Sensitivity

Effect of Lure Combination on Fruit Fly Surveillance Sensitivity Effect of Lure Combination on Fruit Fly Surveillance Sensitivity, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37487-6 Effect of Lure Combination on Fruit Fly Surveillance Sensitivity

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Dengue virus nonstructural 3 protein interacts directly with human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and reduces its glycolytic activity

Dengue virus nonstructural 3 protein interacts directly with human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and reduces its glycolytic activity Dengue virus nonstructural 3 protein interacts directly with human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and reduces its glycolytic activity, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39157-7 Dengue virus nonstructural

7h

Long-duration spaceflight adversely affects post-landing operator proficiency

Long-duration spaceflight adversely affects post-landing operator proficiency Long-duration spaceflight adversely affects post-landing operator proficiency, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39058-9 Long-duration spaceflight adversely affects post-landing operator proficiency

7h

In Vivo Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using Local Delivery of Novel Targeted Molecular Probes

In Vivo Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using Local Delivery of Novel Targeted Molecular Probes In Vivo Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using Local Delivery of Novel Targeted Molecular Probes, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38970-4 In Vivo Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using Local Delivery of Novel Tar

7h

The bacterial community of Quesnel Lake sediments impacted by a catastrophic mine tailings spill differ in composition from those at undisturbed locations – two years post-spill

The bacterial community of Quesnel Lake sediments impacted by a catastrophic mine tailings spill differ in composition from those at undisturbed locations – two years post-spill The bacterial community of Quesnel Lake sediments impacted by a catastrophic mine tailings spill differ in composition from those at undisturbed locations – two years post-spill, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10

7h

Life probably can’t exist on quite as many planets as we once thought

The habitable zone around other stars has been defined as the region where liquid water can exist on a planet’s surface, but it takes more than water to support complex life. A team of astronomers has calculated what that means for where we should go looking.

7h

Publisher Correction: A meiosis-specific BRCA2 binding protein recruits recombinases to DNA double-strand breaks to ensure homologous recombination

Publisher Correction: A meiosis-specific BRCA2 binding protein recruits recombinases to DNA double-strand breaks to ensure homologous recombination Publisher Correction: A meiosis-specific BRCA2 binding protein recruits recombinases to DNA double-strand breaks to ensure homologous recombination, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08995-4 Publisher Correction: A meiosis-spe

7h

Hybridization is a recurrent evolutionary stimulus in wild yeast speciation

Hybridization is a recurrent evolutionary stimulus in wild yeast speciation Hybridization is a recurrent evolutionary stimulus in wild yeast speciation, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08809-7 Hybridization can contribute to diversity from the genomic to the species level. Here, Eberlein, Hénault et al. investigate genomic, transcriptomic and phenotypic variation among

7h

Author Correction: Planar and van der Waals heterostructures for vertical tunnelling single electron transistors

Author Correction: Planar and van der Waals heterostructures for vertical tunnelling single electron transistors Author Correction: Planar and van der Waals heterostructures for vertical tunnelling single electron transistors, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08910-x Author Correction: Planar and van der Waals heterostructures for vertical tunnelling single electron tran

7h

A molecular mechanism for transthyretin amyloidogenesis

A molecular mechanism for transthyretin amyloidogenesis A molecular mechanism for transthyretin amyloidogenesis, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08609-z A number of disease-causing human transthyretin (TTR) mutations are known to lead to amyloid formation. Here the authors combine neutron crystallography, native mass spectrometry and modelling studies to characterize th

7h

Author Correction: Growth hormone regulates neuroendocrine responses to weight loss via AgRP neurons

Author Correction: Growth hormone regulates neuroendocrine responses to weight loss via AgRP neurons Author Correction: Growth hormone regulates neuroendocrine responses to weight loss via AgRP neurons, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09022-2 Author Correction: Growth hormone regulates neuroendocrine responses to weight loss via AgRP neurons

7h

Assembly and functionality of the ribosome with tethered subunits

Assembly and functionality of the ribosome with tethered subunits Assembly and functionality of the ribosome with tethered subunits, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08892-w The tethered ribosome system Ribo-T supports cell proliferation though at a reduced rate. Here the authors show this is due to slower ribosome assembly instead of reduced functionality.

7h

Peptide-oligourea hybrids analogue of GLP-1 with improved action in vivo

Peptide-oligourea hybrids analogue of GLP-1 with improved action in vivo Peptide-oligourea hybrids analogue of GLP-1 with improved action in vivo, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08793-y The peptide hormone GLP-1 has the potential to be a remedy for diabetes type II, yet is unstable. Here, the authors synthesized α-peptide-oligourea hybrid analogues of GLP-1 some of whi

7h

Dynamic network coding of working-memory domains and working-memory processes

Dynamic network coding of working-memory domains and working-memory processes Dynamic network coding of working-memory domains and working-memory processes, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08840-8 Early neuropsychological studies suggested that different aspects of working memory (WM) are exclusively associated with specific brain areas. Here, the authors show, using ma

7h

Oppo's prototype foldable phone looks a lot like the Huawei Mate X

Nope, we're not quite done with foldable phones from MWC just yet. Following its 10x camera zoom technology unveil over the weekend, today Oppo surprised us with its very own foldable …

7h

Viborg betalte millioner for ingenting: Nu sender Aalborg 100 MW geotermi i udbud

Der er yderst blandede erfaringer med geotermi landet over. Bestyrelsesformand i Aalborg Forsyning håber, at såkaldt turnkey-løsning minimerer den økonomiske risiko for selskabets kunder.

8h

You have doppelgängers. They’re quietly influencing your life.

One way companies recommend products to you is by referring the purchasing tendencies of individuals who have bought similar items in past. When these individuals have many similarities, they are referred to as doppelgangers. This can also work in medicine. When someone gets sick, professionals may refer to the patient's health doppelganger, who's had similar symptoms, and prescribe treatments th

8h

Qualcomm launches its first platform made for robots

Qualcomm's interest in robots is definitely more than a passing fancy. It just unveiled RB3, its first all-encompassing platform for robotics. The part is based on last year's …

8h

Your next 5G phone may plug right into an AR/VR headset – CNET

A new wave of USB-C headsets are ready to work with Snapdragon 855 phones. It could mean cheap smart glasses are on their way.

8h

This Telecom Upstart’s 5G Tech Gets a Boost From Facebook

Common Networks taps Facebook's Terragraph design and millimeter-wave technology to offer home broadband for $50 a month.

8h

Peter Gøtzsche and antivaxers: Should a science advocate ever speak at an antivaccine conference?

Last week, I wrote about how evidence-based medicine icon Peter Gøtzsche was slated to speak at an antivaccine conference. This week, I now know why he agreed to appear. In part, he thought he could change antivaxer minds. This leads me to ask: Is it ever a good idea for a science advocate to speak at a pseudoscience conference?

9h

Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth

submitted by /u/usuratica [link] [comments]

9h

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins.

9h

Is the most effective weight-loss strategy really that hard?

Dietary self-monitoring is the best predictor of weight-loss success. But the practice is viewed as so unpleasant and time-consuming, many would-be weight-losers won't adopt it. New research published in Obesity shows for the first time how little time it actually takes: 14.6 minutes per day on average. The frequency of monitoring, not the time spent on the process, was the key factor for those in

9h

HTC and Sprint's latest 5G product is a hub-tablet hybrid

HTC might not be making very many phones anymore, but that doesn't mean it can't trot out 5G mobile devices here at MWC 2019. Following up on its 5G hotspot from a continuing …

9h

KaiOS, now with 85M feature phones shipped, doubles down with Google, carrier deals and more

As the rate of smartphone sales continues to slow down and decline, a software startup called KaiOS — which launched in 2017 from the ashes of Mozilla’s failed Firefox OS mobile …

9h

Microbiome Research Will Accelerate The Blue Biotechnology Industry

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

9h

Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring

Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new University of Michigan study.

9h

Faced with choice overload, Indian farmers say, 'I'll have what he's having'

Suicide rates among Indian farmers remain high, accounting for more than 12,500 deaths in the country in 2015, according to a government report. While many have blamed climate change for farmers' distress, the issue is likely much more complex.

9h

Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring

Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new University of Michigan study.

9h

The 2019 Oscars in Photos

The 91st Academy Awards took place last night in Hollywood, and despite the lack of a host, it moved along at a good pace . Nominees and their supporters dressed to impress, the winners sparked celebration (and controversy), tears were shed, speeches were made, and parties were attended. You should definitely read Hannah Giorgis on Black Panther ’s technical wins , but I also invite you to view t

9h

Apollo 11 review – eye-opening documentary is a five-star triumph

An exceptional, vibrant restoration of never-before-seen footage results in one of the most astounding films about space ever made The documentary Apollo 11 starts, as the famous mission did, in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Trucks ferry massive rocket props, machinery grinds as it would in any construction zone, the sky is a crystal blue. The scene is, in a word, vibrant — so startlingly alive that f

9h

Faced with choice overload, Indian farmers say, 'I'll have what he's having'

Suicide rates among Indian farmers remain high, accounting for more than 12,500 deaths in the country in 2015, according to a government report. While many have blamed climate change for farmers' distress, the issue is likely much more complex.

9h

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins.

9h

Incentives to downsize would ease the housing crisis

Housing policy is too concentrated on first-time buyers and should be refocused towards 'last-time buyers' to encourage those aged 55+ to downsize, according to a new report for the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation (CSFI).

9h

Controversial Roundup weed killer on trial again in US

The controversial Roundup weed killer goes on trial again Monday in the United States, six months after a groundskeeper won the first-ever lawsuit accusing the chemical of causing cancer.

9h

Consumer goods companies preparing for climate change impact

Companies behind some of the best-known consumer products—from soaps to sodas—are beginning to factor climate change into their business equation, according to a report published Monday.

9h

Controversial Roundup weed killer on trial again in US

The controversial Roundup weed killer goes on trial again Monday in the United States, six months after a groundskeeper won the first-ever lawsuit accusing the chemical of causing cancer.

9h

Israeli startups join firms making lab-grown 'clean meat'

Several Israeli start-ups have joined a handful of companies around the globe trying to develop lab-grown meat, something they see as a solution to the needs of the world's ever-growing population and burgeoning demand for food.

9h

Poachers kill elephant in Cambodia wildlife sanctuary

An elephant has been found dead with its tusks and tail sliced off in a wildlife sanctuary in Cambodia, where wild elephant numbers have dwindled to just a few hundred due to poaching and deforestation.

9h

Poachers kill elephant in Cambodia wildlife sanctuary

An elephant has been found dead with its tusks and tail sliced off in a wildlife sanctuary in Cambodia, where wild elephant numbers have dwindled to just a few hundred due to poaching and deforestation.

9h

Can you solve it? The world's strangest families

Test your ken about kinship UPDATE: Read the solutions here Family relationships have provided material for many classic puzzles since at least medieval times. They make for fun problems because they require no technical knowledge and often present entertaining or curious set-ups. Here are a selection of five of my favourites of the genre. 1) Anna’s father has four daughters. The names of the fir

10h

Nokia 9 PureView packs five rear cameras for sharper shooting

The current trend for smartphones seems to be all about cramming more and more cameras in. At Mobile World Congress this week, the crown was stolen by the Nokia 9 PureView, which has …

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11h

Security flaws in 4G and 5G allow snooping on phone users

Security researchers are already poking holes in 5G mere months into its existence. They've discovered three flaws in 4G and 5G that could be used to intercept phone calls and …

11h

Germany Is Testing the Limits of Democracy

BERLIN—When Germany’s domestic-intelligence chief announced last month that his agency would begin keeping tabs on parts of the Alternative for Germany, the country’s biggest far-right party, and was considering putting the entire grouping under surveillance, he framed it as a matter of merely doing his democratic duty. Thomas Haldenwang’s announcement sparked cheers from many here who view the A

11h

11h

Bøf eller bønnesalat: Hvorfra får du det bedste protein?

Proteiner fra et grønt måltid mætter ifølge en ny undersøgelse lige så godt som proteiner fra kød.

12h

Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring

Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new University of Michigan study.

12h

Estrogen made by neurons important to making memories

Estrogen in the brain is important to keep neurons communicating and memories being made, scientists report.

12h

Faced with choice overload, Indian farmers say, 'I'll have what he's having'

After the Indian government liberalized its economy, shops stocking a previously controlled market of public agricultural goods were suddenly flooded with new private brands. Rather than relying on data for seed yields, many farmers make socially motivated purchasing decisions.

12h

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins.

12h

Patients' HIV status should not impact their cancer care

New articles published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, note that there is no medical justification to deny optimal cancer therapy to individuals with HIV.

12h

Mothers with children taken into out-of-home care at risk of poor prenatal care in next pregnancies

Mothers whose first child was taken into care were found to have inadequate or no prenatal care during subsequent pregnancies, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).The study was conducted in the province of Manitoba, which has one of the highest rates of children in out-of-home care in developed countries. About 3 percent of children live in homes without p

12h

Gladsaxe taler ud om dataovervågning: Vi vil gerne lave en ‘black box’

Gladsaxe står parat ved havelågen, hvis en kommende bekendtgørelse skulle lovliggøre overvågnings-algoritme. Tænketank er bekymret for retssikkerhed og menneskerettigheder.

12h

Roma's Oscars may be Netflix's last step to conquering Hollywood – CNET

Top-category wins could mark Netflix entering Hollywood's most hallowed sanctum. That may mean more Romas (and possibly more Bird Boxes) for you to stream.

12h

How the Oscars Made Do Without a Host

The last time the Oscars didn’t have a host, the show didn’t exactly move briskly. The 61st Academy Awards, which aired in 1989, opted to go without an emcee and instead began with a baffling musical revue featuring Rob Lowe and a then-unknown actress playing Snow White . The ceremony was such a disaster that it took 30 years for the Academy to risk going hostless again. This time, it did so only

13h

Beskyttelse mod elektrisk stød på København H udskydes på ubestemt tid

Vandrende strøm er en reel risiko, kendt fra Gl. Lillebæltsbro sidste år. Alligevel udsættes det, fordi pengene skal bruges til at lukke et underskud i Ringsted.

13h

The Magnitude of Black Panther’s Technical-Oscar Wins

The 91st Academy Awards arrived this year on a swell of public distrust. The ceremony had been mired in an impressively wide array of controversies : There was the on-and-off hosting gig of the comedian Kevin Hart (which culminated in a hostless evening); and the creation, and subsequent indefinite delaying, of a Best Popular Film award , which some feared would be used to quell fan furor over pe

13h

U.S. Navy files for patent on room-temperature superconductor

submitted by /u/AdministrativePapaya [link] [comments]

13h

Best Oscars 2019 memes: Wayne's World reunion, Trump's hair, Aquaman's scrunchie – CNET

Also: Billy Porter rocks a tux-dress, Queen will rock you, rock you, and Chris Evans is always the captain.

14h

Elon Musk's OpenAI Terrifies its Creators

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

14h

We Just Got The Most Detailed Image of The Farthest Object Ever Explored by Humans

"The details we now see on Ultima Thule's surface are unlike any object ever explored before."

14h

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Privately funded Moon mission blasts off

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

16h

16h

Incentives to downsize would ease the housing crisis

Housing policy is too concentrated on first-time buyers and should be refocused towards 'last-time buyers' to encourage those aged 55+ to downsize, according to a new report for the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation (CSFI).

17h

Sperm quality unaffected by one course of chemotherapy for early testicular cancer

Men with early stage testicular cancer can safely receive one course of chemotherapy or radiotherapy after surgery without it having a long-term effect on their sperm count, according to a study published in Annals of Oncology. Until now, this has not been clear, although it is known already that several rounds of chemotherapy or high doses of radiotherapy given to men with more advanced testicula

17h

Physician PACs give more money to pro-gun candidates

Political action committees (PACs) affiliated with physician organizations provide more financial support to candidates who oppose policies to reduce firearm-related injuries, a new study shows. This pattern of giving is inconsistent with many individual physicians’ and organizations’ advocacy efforts that support gun restriction policies, researchers say. “Doctors can—and should—lead efforts to

17h

For bees, growing up and leaving home has a scent

Honey bees develop different scent profiles as they age, and the gatekeeper bees respond differently to returning foragers than they do when they encounter younger bees who have never ventured out, report researchers. A honey bee ( Apis mellifera ) hatches and grows up deep inside a hive. Surrounded by 40,000 of her closest relatives, this dark and constantly buzzing place is all that she knows.

17h

Lenovo Refreshes ThinkPad Laptop Family Including 13-inch ThinkPad X390 For MWC 2019

Lenovo is working some magic on its ThinkPad family of laptops at the Mobile World Congress, which means that we’re seeing the introduction of the ThinkPad X390, X390 Yoga, T490, T490s and …

17h

18h

Role of sea-ice initialization in climate predictability over the Weddell Sea

Role of sea-ice initialization in climate predictability over the Weddell Sea Role of sea-ice initialization in climate predictability over the Weddell Sea, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39421-w Role of sea-ice initialization in climate predictability over the Weddell Sea

18h

Hard particle force in a soft fracture

Hard particle force in a soft fracture Hard particle force in a soft fracture, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40179-4 Hard particle force in a soft fracture

18h

Dianne Feinstein Doesn’t Need a Do-Over

On Friday morning in San Francisco, the Sunrise Movement faced off against the Sunset Movement—and the Sunset Movement won. It won big. A group of jackbooted tots and aggrieved teenagers showed up at the local office of Dianne Feinstein—85 years old and holding—with the intention of teaching her about climate change and demanding that she vote for the Green New Deal. The resulting encounter was s

18h

Right-wingers find more meaning in life, say researchers

A team of psychologists looked at the link between right-wing attitudes and having meaning in life. They found that supporters of authoritarian ideologies felt their lives had more significance. Future studies are necessary to see if this holds true outside of the U.S. None Do right-wingers feel more significance in life? Such is the implication of a new study that found an existential connection

18h

Google Assistant is coming to Android Messages to infuse AI into your chats – CNET

Plus, the search giant’s digital helper software also unveils voice typing for feature phones in emerging markets.

18h

China's Huawei set to unveil 5G phone with folding screen

China's Huawei is set to take the wraps off a new folding-screen phone, joining the latest trend for bendable devices as it challenges the global smartphone market's dominant players, Apple …

18h

U.S. Army will leverage latest 3D printing technologies

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

18h

Advancing additive manufacturing by slashing support

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

18h

Microsoft reveals an A.I. camera for developers that costs $399

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

18h

Scientists use CRISPR to make stem cells invisible to immune system

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

19h

19h

A closer look at Microsoft’s new Kinect sensor

Microsoft resurrected Kinect yesterday during the company’s HoloLens 2 press event at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The software giant has shrunk Kinect into a $399 PC peripheral …

19h

Bold New Idea: Recharge Electric Cars by Filling Them at the Pump

Refillable Batteries Electric cars are great — until you run down the battery and have to stop and charge them for a few hours. That’s why, according to NBC News, certain electric vehicle advocates are extremely excited about so-called “refillable batteries” — lithium ion cells which, when the electrolyte that powers them gets depleted, can be refilled with freshly-charged liquid instead of getti

19h

20h

Huawei takes fight with US over spying fears to top mobile fair

Huawei unveiled a new foldable smartphone on Sunday on the eve of the world's top mobile fair in Barcelona and hit out against Washington's campaign to bar it from developing next-generation 5G wireless networks.

20h

Tech companies scope out Africa surveillance sector

At a security exhibition in Morocco tech companies pushed to convince African officials that their state-of-the-art surveillance tools are the key to stability and development.

20h

Scientists measure thickness of Kilauea lava flows in Hawaii

Scientists measuring the thickness of Kilauea volcano's newest lava flows have said molten rock added as much as 180 feet (55 meters) of lava to parts of the Big Island last year. New land created in the ocean reaches as high as 919 feet (280 meters.)

20h

20h

What 5 powerful people can teach us about success

Actress Mindy Kaling recently shared an epiphany she's had about success , telling Variety , "For many years, I thought that hard work was the only way you could succeed, but it's simply not true… Particularly if you're a woman of color, you need people to give you opportunities, because otherwise it won't happen. Talent is an important part of success, but you also need mentors to find promise i

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20h

Blood diamonds, stolen cars, sweatshops: Blockchain stops all that

Blockchain technology, as a digital ledger for economic transactions, is poised to "radically" impact companies across the board. It may help reinforce the trust in certain markets as sensors collect data throughout production. Blockchain might also create a marketplace for whistleblowing.

21h

His Dark Materials TV series: Teaser, release date, cast, plot and more – CNET

The new TV series will be coming to the BBC and HBO, and may satisfy your Game of Thrones void.

21h

NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover Recovers After Serious Glitch

Curiosity Killed NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover, which touched down in 2012, experienced a “hiccup” while booting up last week — but scientists on Earth have brought it back online and are working to reconstruct what went wrong. “We’re still not sure of its exact cause and are gathering the relevant data for analysis,” said Steven Lee, Curiosity’s deputy project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Labo

21h

Automated trucking technology leaders?

I've been reading Andrew Yang's "The War On Normal People" and am becoming increasingly convinced in that the rise in automation is going to lead to mass unemployment in coming years. One of the key technologies he discusses is automated trucking displacing upwards of 5 million drivers in the next 10-15 years. I know there are a few well known companies including Tesla and Google (Waymo), and Ube

21h

The Chapel at the Border

MISSION, TEXAS—About a hundred parishioners gathered for Mass at a white adobe chapel built beside the Rio Grande in 1899. Father Roy Snipes, the parish priest, tolled the rusty church bell by hand, signaling the start of a welcome-home service for migrant farmworkers and “Winter Texans”—retirees flocking back to the Rio Grande Valley for another season of warm November mornings like this. But ju

22h

Eating small amounts of peanut after immunotherapy may extend allergy treatment benefits

Regular dietary peanut consumption after completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) or sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for peanut allergy may provide continued protection against accidental exposures to the allergen, according to a new study led by Edwin Kim, MD, who presented the findings at the annual American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) conference in San Francisco.

22h

How I picture traffic lights becoming redundant in a world of self-driving cars, and how self-driving cars could vastly improve traffic flow.

Firstly, in my mind Traffic Lights exist to solve 2 major problems. vehicles crashing into each other. vehicles hitting people. Self driving cars could solve at least the first of these issues very well. There would be no need for traffic lights if vehicles knew where each other were, and each just adjusted speed to avoid hitting the intersection of their paths at the same time. Humans do this al

22h

What Is The Magicverse (And Why)? | Magic Leap

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

22h

Epic Games' Unreal Engine will support HoloLens

You can't call HoloLens 2 a gaming platform, but Microsoft is at least laying the groundwork. Epic Games has announced that it's adding HoloLens support to Unreal Engine …

22h

Life Lessons From Grandma: Eat Last, Ignore Naysayers, Stop Texting!

In our recent story on the evolutionary benefits of grandmothers, we asked our audience: How did you and your grandma help your family survive and thrive? Readers share their stories. (Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR)

22h

Introducing Microsoft HoloLens 2

submitted by /u/Chrome_Plated [link] [comments]

22h

Microsoft's HoloLens 2 feels like practical magic

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

22h

Huawei says Trump 'clear and correct' on 5G as trade deadline looms

China's Huawei welcomed comments from President Donald Trump about the future of U.S. mobile communications on Sunday and asserted its position as a world-leading smartphone producer as Washington …

23h

Warning issued over attacks on internet infrastructure

Key parts of the internet infrastructure face large-scale attacks that threaten the global system of web traffic, the internet's address keeper warned Friday.

23h

Heavenly key to the Stonehenge mystery | Letters

Maybe the ancients saw a parallel between the stars and planets and the bluestones, writes Neil Hornsby Prof Colin Richards fears that we may never know why the bluestones of Preseli warranted such reverence as to be transported from south-west Wales to Stonehenge ( Report , 20 February). In fact the answer may well be staring us in the face. Stonehenge itself was clearly intended to connect with

23h

Survivors of Church Abuse Want Zero Tolerance. The Pope Offers Context.

VATICAN CITY—At a Vatican conference on protecting minors in the Church, abuse survivors, including a woman who’d been raped repeatedly by a priest, told how their lives had been ruined—before Pope Francis and an audience of 190 prelates from around the world. A Nigerian nun took the Church to task for “mediocrity, hypocrisy, and complacency.” A cardinal acknowledged that some Church files on abu

23h

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