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nyheder2019februar26

Meet the neuroscientist shattering the myth of the gendered brain

Why asking whether your brain is male or female is the wrong question You receive an invitation, emblazoned with a question: “A bouncing little ‘he’ or a pretty little ‘she’?” The question is your teaser for the “gender reveal party” to which you are being invited by an expectant mother who, at more than 20 weeks into her pregnancy, knows what you don’t: the sex of her child. After you arrive, ex

1h

Mindre madspild: Nu bliver det nemmere at forstå datomærkninger

Flere madvarer med mærket ’bedst før’ får snart tilføjelsen ’ofte god efter’. Det skal få danskere til at smide mindre mad ud.

9h

Ny kommission skal endevende bil-afgifter og lade-infrastruktur – og skaffe 50 mia. kroner

Med Anders Eldrup i spidsen skal regeringens nyudnævnte kommission for grøn omstilling af personbiler pege på vejen frem mod 1 mio. elbiler i 2030.

5h

Millioner af passwords gemt som tekst hos amerikanske forsyningsselskaber

Passwords for omkring 15 millioner brugere ligger som plaintekst i databaserne hos en række forsyningsselskaber, som bruger it-virksomheden SEDC.

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Is a gene-edited animal a drug?

We eat mutations every day. All the vegetables, grains, fruits and meat humans consume as part of their diet is jam-packed with DNA speckled with mutations and beneficial variations.

4min

Is a gene-edited animal a drug?

We eat mutations every day. All the vegetables, grains, fruits and meat humans consume as part of their diet is jam-packed with DNA speckled with mutations and beneficial variations.

4min

I build mathematical programs that could discover the drugs of the future

Discovering and designing a new drug is one of the most challenging tasks in the biological sciences. It takes over 10 years and about US$2.6 billion to bring an average drug to market.

4min

A world without clouds? Hardly clear, climate scientists say

Newly flagged tipping point faces scrutiny from cloud scientists

4min

Maybe Dying Stars Fart So Much Because They're in a Relationship

These stars aren't really that gassy, they just look like they are.

5min

Stem cells provide greater insight into rotator cuff disease

New research explores stem cells in the rotator cuff in hopes of understanding why fatty accumulation happens at the tear site, instead of proper muscle healing.

7min

Improved outlook for people of African descent with treatment-resistant schizophrenia

A study led by researchers at Cardiff University means that more people of African descent who have treatment-resistant schizophrenia could be safely given the drug best proven to manage their symptoms.

7min

Cancer survivors see mostly positives in how they have changed

Two years after diagnosis, breast cancer survivors have four times more positive than negative thoughts about changes they experienced because of their illness, a new study found.

7min

Scientists provide new insight on how the nose adapts to smells

Our noses may be able to adapt themselves to tell the brain, as efficiently as possible, about the most typical smells in our environment, suggests new research published in eLife.

7min

Cancer genes' age and function strongly influence their mutational status

Researchers have provided new insight on why some genes that formed during the evolution of the earliest animals on earth are particularly impaired (or dysregulated) by specific mechanisms during cancer development.

7min

Student-led rheumatology interest group increases interest in field

A group of student and faculty researchers from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences published outcome of establishing Rheumatology Interest Group in the International Journal of Rheumatology.

7min

'Ibiza is different', genetically

'Ibiza is different.' That is what the hundreds of standard-bearers of the 'hippie' movement who visited the Pitiusan Island during the 60s thought, fascinated by its climate and its unexplored nature. What they did not imagine was that the utmost unique feature of the island was in its inhabitants.

7min

Tobacco plants transformed into 'green bioreactors' to benefit human health

Researchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute are using tobacco plants as 'green bioreactors' to produce large quantities of a human protein called Interleukin 37, or IL-37. The protein is naturally produced in the human kidney in very small quantities and has powerful anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressing properties, providing potential for treating a number of inflamm

7min

Växterna påverkas av sin historia

Det var ekologer vid Umeå universitet som år 2000 startade ett experiment där de grävde ut och flyttade på 96 stora vegetationstorvor mellan olika nivåer på en älvstrand nära Strycksele vid Vindelälven i norra Sverige. Varje torva var nästan en kvadratmeter stor och vägde mer än hundra kilo. Torvor från strandens övre nivåer flyttades till strandens mellersta och nedre delar för att simulera ökad

11min

Smarter Parts Make Collective Systems Too Stubborn

The poet John Donne immortalized the idea that “no man is an island,” but neither, it turns out, are most other species. Many natural and artificial systems are characterized by the collective, from neurons firing in sync and immune cells banding together, to schools of fish and flocks of birds moving in harmony, to new business models and robot designs operating in the absence of a single leader

12min

Robocalls are unstoppable – 3 questions answered about why your phone won't quit ringing

When your phone rings, there's about a 50 percent chance it's a spam robocall. That's not probability – it's what the U.S. government agency regulating telecommunications says. U.S. mobile phone users received 48 billion robocalls in 2018 alone – more than 100 calls per line.

16min

Experts move one step closer to demystifying the quantum world

The quantum world is notoriously complex, its multiple layers and miniscule components eluding standard analytical approaches.

16min

NASA selects mission to study space weather from space station

NASA has selected a new mission that will help scientists understand and, ultimately, forecast the vast space weather system around our planet. Space weather is important because it can have profound impacts – affecting technology and astronauts in space, disrupting radio communications and, at its most severe, overwhelming power grids.

16min

Migrants face a trade-off between status and fertility

Researchers from the Universities of Helsinki, Turku and Missouri as well as the Family Federation of Finland present the first results of a new, extraordinarily comprehensive population-wide dataset that details the lives of over 160,000 World War II evacuees in terms of integration. The results demonstrate that migrants' integration into a host community involves a trade-off between gaining incr

16min

SEC Threatens Elon Musk With Legal Action Over New Tweet

In Contempt According to documents filed yesterday in the Southern District of New York, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is asking a federal judge to hold Tesla CEO Elon Musk in contempt for a recent tweet, The Verge reports . The tweet in question: Last week, Musk said that Tesla was going to produce half a million cars in 2019. In a follow up posted roughly four and half hours late

22min

Framtiden för cannabisolja avgörs i Högsta domstolen

Högsta domstolen ska pröva om så kallad CBD-olja, som innehåller substansen THC, ska klassas som narkotika eller inte. Detta sedan en tilltalad i både tingsrätt och hovrätt friats från ringa narkotikabrott efter att ha innehaft fem flaskor med olja som innehöll THC – den rusgivande substansen i cannabis.

24min

AMD Radeon Adrenalin 2019 Drivers Finally Add Radeon Vega Support For Ryzen APUs

The driver situation for Ryzen APUs with Radeon Vega Graphics hasn't exactly been optimal (to say the least) since the chips initially launched back in 2017. Whereas the company's mainline …

26min

Apple Watch may finally gain sleep-tracking abilities in 2020

And that may mean big gains in battery life to support the feature.

26min

Scientists Finally Solve Mystery of Tiny, Ancient Worm’s ‘Mismatched’ Head and Body

A type of ancient, microscopic worm hid its jaws from scientists for more than 100 years.

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Study sheds more light on genes' 'on/off' switches

Regulation of genes by noncoding DNA might help explain the complex interplay between our environment and genetic expression.

28min

Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases risk of ADHD among offspring up to 3-fold

The higher the cotinine levels were in the mother's blood during pregnancy, the greater was the child's risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later in life, showed an epidemiological study conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku, Finland. Globally, it is the first study in which the connection between fetal nicotine exposure and

28min

Neuroscientists at TU Dresden discover neural mechanisms of developmental dyslexia

Neuroscientist Professor Katharina von Kriegstein from TU Dresden and an international team of experts show in a recently published study that people with dyslexia have a weakly developed structure that is not located in the cerebral cortex, but at a subcortical processing stage; namely the white matter connectivity between the left auditory motion-sensitive planum temporale (mPT) and the left aud

28min

New clue for cancer treatment could be hiding in microscopic molecular machine

Researchers have discovered a critical missing step in the production of proteasomes — tiny structures in a cell that dispose of protein waste — and found that carefully targeted manipulation of this step could prove an effective recourse for the treatment of cancer.

28min

Recovering forests important to conservation, study finds

Tropical forests recovering from disturbance could be much more important to the conservation of forest bird species than first thought, according to a new study.

28min

Koalas can learn to live the city life if we give them the trees and safe spaces they need

Australia is one of the world's most highly urbanised nations – 90% of Australians live in cities and towns, with development concentrated along the coast. This poses a major threat to native wildlife such as the koala, which can easily fall victim to urban development as our cities grow. Huge infrastructure projects are planned for Australian cities in the coming few years.

28min

Koalas can learn to live the city life if we give them the trees and safe spaces they need

Australia is one of the world's most highly urbanised nations – 90% of Australians live in cities and towns, with development concentrated along the coast. This poses a major threat to native wildlife such as the koala, which can easily fall victim to urban development as our cities grow. Huge infrastructure projects are planned for Australian cities in the coming few years.

28min

Copernicus Sentinel-1 reveals shared plumbing led to Agung awakening

When Mount Agung in Indonesia erupted in 2017, the search was on to find out why it had stirred. Thanks to information on ground deformation from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, scientists now have more insight into the volcano's hidden secrets that caused it to reawaken.

28min

New material holds promise for more secure computing

As computers advance, encryption methods currently used to keep everything from financial transactions to military secrets secure might soon be useless, technology experts warn. Reporting today in the journal Nature, a team of physicists and engineers led by University of Texas at Austin physics professor Xiaoqin Elaine Li report they have created a material with light-emitting properties that mig

28min

Alarmklokkerne ringer: Udbredt antibiotika-resistens i Europa

Ny rapport fra det EU´s fødevaremyndighed Efsa viser, at antibiotika bliver stadig mere ubrugelig overfor bakterier i fødevarer – især i sydeuropæiske lande med fjerkræ.

30min

What Does It Mean to Support ‘Free College’?

Every day now, it seems, another Democratic candidate announces his or her 2020 presidential run. Among the most popular ideas these hopefuls campaign for is a tuition-free secondary education. “A free-college proposal has practically become an entrance fee,” says writer Adam Harris. In a new Atlantic Argument , Harris explains that while this is an intriguing idea, it is also a vague and sweepin

33min

The College Affordability Crisis Is Uniting the 2020 Democratic Candidates

Bernie Sanders has called for tuition-free college. Julián Castro has signaled support for it as well. Elizabeth Warren has pushed, for years, for “debt-free” college. Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Kirsten Gillibrand have signed on to legislation that could make college debt-free. Even Amy Klobuchar, who notably shirked “free college for all” during a CNN town hall in February, signed on to a m

33min

Bill de Blasio Can’t Resist Meddling in Iowa

DES MOINES—Bill de Blasio’s friends, allies and top aides think his flirtation with running for president is ridiculous. None of them came with him here for the weekend. The why-not-me stage of the Democratic presidential primaries keeps getting extended every time yet another politician asks the question and buys a plane ticket here, and the mayor of New York City wants in. So talking to 40 peop

33min

Mobile tech is going to the dogs… literally

Is your dog getting enough exercise? Who will change your cat's litter box while you are away on holiday?

35min

Carbon emissions: Our research shows a decade of steady decline across Europe and the US

A sliver of hope against a backdrop of gloom: 18 countries showed a sustained decline in their carbon emissions from fossil fuel use over the past decade. This trend, averaging 2.2 percent a year over the period 2005-2015, is evident in less than 10 percent of the world's countries, mostly in the EU, but accounts for 28 percent of global emissions.

35min

Scientists simulate forest and fire dynamics to understand area burn of future wildfires

Climate change and wildfire – It's a combustible mix with costly devastation and deadly consequences. With a goal of understanding the link between the two variables, researchers over the years have studied the effects of climate and wildfire interactions in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. That research has evolved into learning about the distribution of trees, the extent of forest cover and car

35min

Tesla Owner Takes Delivery, Heads for Autobahn Experience

So excited about his new European delivery Model 3, Dan take the Tesla straight to the unlimited-speed Autobahn. Even though "I'm not used to driving on the Autobahn." The post Tesla Owner Takes Delivery, Heads for Autobahn Experience appeared first on ExtremeTech .

37min

Recovering forests important to conservation, study finds

Tropical forests recovering from disturbance could be much more important to the conservation of forest bird species than first thought, according to a new study.

40min

Calculate How Fast Quicksilver Is Moving in *X-Men Apocalypse*

To save two dozen people from an exploding building, Quicksilver must have moved at roughly 280 km/s—if you believe speed is in fact his superpower.

40min

Humor is both a hurdle and a gauge to improve AI, human interaction

Ask any smart virtual assistant to tell you a joke and the response is, well, lackluster. A flat, robotic voice drones out some simplistic humor. No laughter, no tone and no concern if you are even listening.

41min

Studying an emerging sign language won't kill it – so what are linguists scared of?

Connie de Vos was sitting on her hands. It was 2006, her first stay in the Balinese village of Bengkala, and visitors had come every night to her house, sitting on the floor of the front patio, eating fruit- or durian-flavoured candies and drinking tea. About eight to ten people were there now, hands flitting in the shadows, chatting away in Kata Kolok, the local sign language: Where is the next c

41min

Benefits, adverse effects and risks of Arctic mining should be evaluated more comprehensively

A joint study by the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), University of Lapland and Geological Survey of Finland called GovAda, which gathers scientific, peer-reviewed publications on the metallic, coal and industrial minerals and precious stones of the Arctic region, sheds light on the subject.

41min

Recovering forests important to conservation, study finds

Tropical forests recovering from disturbance could be much more important to the conservation of forest bird species than first thought, according to a new study.

41min

Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. And for mitochondria, much like for double-header engines stacked together in a steam train, working in multiples has its benefits.

41min

Right- or left-handed? Gene expression tells the story of snail evolution

Snails, like humans, can be right-handed or left-handed and the swirl etched into the shell of a snail can reveal a lot about them, down to their genetic makeup. Researchers from Shinshu University and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan have found that the gene influencing the direction of the shell coil may also offer insight into the evolution of snails

43min

New consolidated bio-saccharification technique for lignocellulose conversion developed

A research group from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has developed a novel strategy for cost-efficient lignocellulose conversion. Known as consolidated bio-saccharification, it combines cellulase production and hydrolysis, while separating fermentation from the integrated process by taking fermentable sugar as the target product to couple

43min

First common risk genes discovered for autism

A study headed by researchers from the Danish project iPSYCH and the Broad Institute, USA, has found the first common genetic risk variants for autism and uncovered genetic differences in clinical subgroups of autism. The discovery means that we will in future be able to determine the genes which separate the diagnostic groups, make more precise diagnoses, and provide better counselling for the in

43min

THC found more important for therapeutic effects in cannabis than originally thought

Researchers at the University of New Mexico recently solved a major gap in scientific literature by using mobile software technology to measure the real-time effects of actual cannabis-based products used by millions of people every day.

43min

Sea Creatures Still Arriving in the U.S. on Plastic Debris From the Japanese Tsunami Eight Years Ago

Marine biologists don't know how long different species can survive adrift in the open ocean, and some may become invasive when they reach new shores

43min

Quantum Computing, Now and In the (Not Too Distant) Future

Fifty years ago, smartphones would have been the ultimate computing wizardry. Just as classical computers were almost unimaginable to previous generations, we’re now facing the birth of an entirely new type of computation, something so mystical it may as well be magic: quantum computing. If the word “quantum” makes your head spin, you’re not alone. The world of the very small, very cold, very sen

46min

Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. And for mitochondria, much like for double-header engines stacked together in a steam train, working in multiples has its benefits.

46min

Tiny poplar roots extract more water than their larger counterparts after drought

Our knowledge of how plant roots respond to stress is based largely on indirect data. Scientists didn't have a good way to see through soil. A team overcame that problem. They used neutron imaging. They measured water moving through the soil and being taken up by individual poplar seedling roots after a drought. Smaller diameter roots took up more water (per unit surface area) than bigger roots. N

46min

Saving threatened orangutans with climate change-resilient trees

A study of the International Union for Conservation of Nature has identified tree species native to Indonesia's Kutai National Park that are resilient to climate change. The species support threatened East Bornean orangutan populations; therefore, the study recommends their use in reforestation efforts. Hortus botanicus Leiden prefect Paul Kessler and former Leiden Ph.D. candidate Arbainsyah contr

46min

Key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA silencing Argonaute enzyme unveiled

The Argonaute (Ago) enzyme complex plays a critical role in DNA and RNA target cleavage for a process known as RNA silencing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them a target for future gene-editing technology. The present study unravels key differences between prokaryotic Ago (pAgo) and eukaryotic Ago (eAgo) enzymes in the cleavage reaction and may provide important clues on their evoluti

46min

New shape memory polymer represents biomedical breakthrough

Researchers in the College of Engineering and Computer Science have developed a material—a new kind of shape memory polymer (SMP)—that could have major implications for health care.

47min

Tiny poplar roots extract more water than their larger counterparts after drought

Our knowledge of how plant roots respond to stress is based largely on indirect data. Scientists didn't have a good way to see through soil. A team overcame that problem. They used neutron imaging. They measured water moving through the soil and being taken up by individual poplar seedling roots after a drought. Smaller diameter roots took up more water (per unit surface area) than bigger roots. N

47min

Saving threatened orangutans with climate change-resilient trees

A study of the International Union for Conservation of Nature has identified tree species native to Indonesia's Kutai National Park that are resilient to climate change. The species support threatened East Bornean orangutan populations; therefore, the study recommends their use in reforestation efforts. Hortus botanicus Leiden prefect Paul Kessler and former Leiden Ph.D. candidate Arbainsyah contr

47min

Key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA silencing Argonaute enzyme unveiled

The Argonaute (Ago) enzyme complex plays a critical role in DNA and RNA target cleavage for a process known as RNA silencing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them a target for future gene-editing technology. The present study unravels key differences between prokaryotic Ago (pAgo) and eukaryotic Ago (eAgo) enzymes in the cleavage reaction and may provide important clues on their evoluti

47min

The Entertainer

In praise of Raymond Smullyan: logician, magician, mathematician, puzzlist and philosopher — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

49min

Newly designed smart bone plates can monitor fracture healing

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

55min

Singapore wants self-driving cars to help its aging society

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

55min

The best new smartphones and gadgets from Mobile World Congress 2019

Gadgets Couldn't keep up with all the new smartphone announcements from MWC? We got you. Catch up on the new gadgets showing up in Spain.

56min

Pandora's Stories makes playlists feels like podcasts – CNET

Pandora Stories lets artists create playlists interspersed with voice tracks, so you can hear your favorite artists explain the stories and inspirations behind the music.

56min

Researchers find pond bacteria grows faster during the day, suggest a genetic explanation

Some of the bacteria that live in ponds, lakes and other freshwater environments grow faster during the day, even though they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, according to researchers at the University of Delaware. Special genes that absorb light could possibly explain this increased activity, as the research team recently described in the Journal of Bacteriology.

58min

Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create their own living space on plant

A team of scientists at The University of Toledo reports new details about the intimate relationship between insects and plants, opening the door to new possibilities in protecting grape crops worldwide from a major agricultural pest.

58min

Researchers find pond bacteria grows faster during the day, suggest a genetic explanation

Some of the bacteria that live in ponds, lakes and other freshwater environments grow faster during the day, even though they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, according to researchers at the University of Delaware. Special genes that absorb light could possibly explain this increased activity, as the research team recently described in the Journal of Bacteriology.

58min

Firms obscure bad news in financial reports, study suggests

Firms that publish complex or ambiguous annual reports might be trying to mask poor performance and could be inadvertently signalling a crash in their stock price, according to new research from the University of Alberta.

58min

Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create their own living space on plant

A team of scientists at The University of Toledo reports new details about the intimate relationship between insects and plants, opening the door to new possibilities in protecting grape crops worldwide from a major agricultural pest.

58min

Best Adjustable Beds 2019

Your doorway into dreamland is your bed, and the same bed also has a great potential of being more than that. All thanks go to the best adjustable beds in 2019 that are available on the market. These types of beds can create a very good environment for watching your favorite Netflix movies; it can also serve as your cozy reading nook or become your favorite place in your house. In addition to tha

1h

Savers aren’t more patient, just focused

When facing a choice between a smaller dollar amount now or more money weeks later, “patient savers” focus immediately on the two dollar amounts, quickly screening out other factors as irrelevant, according to a new study. Then they make a rapid choice in favor of the higher amount. Saving takes patience. People must sacrifice instant financial rewards in favor of larger, delayed rewards. Yet sav

1h

Are hip fractures a flag for Alzheimer’s?

Most older people hospitalized for hip fracture surgery carried biomarkers of developing Alzheimer’s disease even though they had no clinical signs of dementia, according to a new study. The results add to evidence that brain alterations that lead to poor balance in older people may underpin both increased risk of hip-fracturing falls and Alzheimer’s, and that hip fracture itself may serve as a f

1h

Carbon-fixing enzyme 10 times more abundant than previously thought

This is how Manajit Hayer-Hartl from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany, sums up her thoughts on a new analysis that the global abundance of plants' carbon dioxide converting enzyme is an order of magnitude higher than thought: "Since I work on rubisco I'm always giving talks saying that it is the most abundant protein on Earth. Sometimes my audience will ask 'Are you really sure?'

1h

Who can sort the rain?

If you want to predict extreme rainstorms, it's vital you know how small processes, such as condensation, affect bigger systems. These small processes, however, are hard to study. To learn more about these microphysical processes, researchers performed statistical analysis on a global data set of rain drop size distributions. They revealed the rain drops fit into six groups. These groups are indep

1h

Mechanical rice production

Growing rice is an intensive business. But in China where it is the primary food crop, mechanisation has not reached maturity, although it is as high as 90 per cent in some provinces. Writing in the International Journal of Information Technology and Management, researchers have looked at the fuel consumption index and the working efficiency index as the main basis for a rice transfer machine.

1h

America can afford a Green New Deal – here's how

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey are calling for a "Green New Deal" that would involve massive government spending to shift the U.S. economy away from its reliance on carbon.

1h

Unlocking the mystery of catalysts

Catalysis is, like many sciences, situational.

1h

Starwatch: early risers rewarded by a string of bright planets

Venus and Jupiter dominate the south-eastern sky, but Saturn and the waning crescent moon augment the display It is definitely worth getting up early this week as an attractive string of bright planets sits in the south-eastern sky. The brightest will be Venus, appearing low and furthest to the east. Venus is the planet that comes closest to earth. It orbits closer to the sun than our planet, and

1h

“Game-Changing” Camera Could Prevent Satellite Collisions

Eye on the Sky A team from Western Sydney University has unveiled the Astrosite, a first-of-its-kind space imaging system inspired by the human eye — and they’re saying it could help prevent collisions between satellites sharing space in an increasingly crowded gravity well. “By using technology inspired by nature and biology, we have developed a dynamic imaging system that runs faster, computes

1h

Scientists simulate forest and fire dynamics to understand area burn of future wildfires

Scientists, including Matthew Hurteau in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico, are examining more data via simulations of wildfires in the Sierra Nevada to improve their understanding between prior and future wildfires. They hypothesized that prior wildfires and their influence on vegetation, coupled with a changing climate and its influence on vegetation recovery after a wild

1h

ALMA differentiates two birth cries from a single star

Astronomers have unveiled the enigmatic origins of two different gas streams from a baby star. Using ALMA, they found that the slow outflow and the high speed jet from a protostar have misaligned axes and that the former started to be ejected earlier than the latter. The origins of these two flows have been a mystery, but these observations provide telltale signs that these two streams were launch

1h

Indigenous knowledge, key to a successful ecosystem restoration

Ecological restoration projects actively involving indigenous peoples and local communities are more successful. This is the result of a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which places value on indigenous and local knowledge contribution in the restoring of degraded ecosystems, and highlights the need to e

1h

Duke-NUS researchers discover the secret to bats' immunity

Bats' ability to host deadly viruses without getting sick could help shed light on inflammation and aging in humans.

1h

Electrically-heated silicate glass appears to defy Joule's first law

A group of scientists from Lehigh University and Corning Incorporated have authored a paper published today in Nature Scientific Reports that details their discovery that electrically-heated common, homogeneous silicate glasses appear to defy Joule's first law.

1h

Carbon farming: How agriculture can both feed people and fight climate change

Imagine "carbon emissions", and what springs to mind? Most people tend to think of power stations belching out clouds of carbon dioxide or queues of vehicles burning up fossil fuels as they crawl, bumper-to-bumper, along congested urban roads. But in Britain and many other countries, carbon emissions have another source, one that is almost completely invisible. In the UK, these overlooked emission

1h

Carbon-fixing enzyme 10 times more abundant than previously thought

This is how Manajit Hayer-Hartl from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany, sums up her thoughts on a new analysis that the global abundance of plants' carbon dioxide converting enzyme is an order of magnitude higher than thought: "Since I work on rubisco I'm always giving talks saying that it is the most abundant protein on Earth. Sometimes my audience will ask 'Are you really sure?'

1h

Neutrinos seen in the clustering of galaxies

In early times, the universe was an energetic mix of strongly interacting particles. The first particles to break free from this dense soup were neutrinos, the lightest and most weakly interacting particles of the Standard Model of particle physics. These neutrinos are still around us today, but are very hard to detect directly because they are so weakly interacting. An international team of cosmo

1h

Kampen mot vinterkräksjukan

Vinterkräksjukan är den vanligaste orsaken till mag- och tarminfektioner i vår del av världen. Den drabbar ungefär en halv miljon svenskar varje år, och ger bland annat upphov till illamående, kräkningar och diarréer som varar i en till tre dagar hos normalt friska personer. För riskgrupper är det värre. En studie från Sahlgrenska akademin 2012 visade att var femte patient över 80 år avled en mån

1h

US Cities Have Nowhere to Send Recyclables, so They’re Burning Them

Import Denied The United States used to send about 40 percent of the recyclables it collected to China for processing. But in early 2018, China decided to stop importing much of this foreign garbage, and that decision has left U.S. cities struggling to process mountains of recyclables — so now, in a bleak twist, they’re sometimes just burning them . Penn and Newspaper The Guardian recently publis

1h

This Peer-to-Peer Investing Platform Is a Disruptive New Tool for Making Money in Real Estate

FinTech, which stands for “financial technology,” has been one of the biggest buzzwords in the world of finance over the last few years, and for good reason. Broadly speaking, FinTech is made up of new technologies that are applied to—or sometimes specifically designed for—the traditional financial services sector. And as of late, they are starting to disrupt the financial industry by bringing in

1h

Google and Apple Can Help Learn How Phones Affect Kids’ Brains

Rotting Brains No matter what your mother tells you about your smartphone frying your brain, there’s not a lot of solid scientific research on what smartphones do to the adolescent brain. Evidence that smartphone use, especially social media, is correlated with signs of depression often sounds reasonable — but lacks scientific rigor . That’s because many times, the studies are based on large surv

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Kombinationsbehandling med paracetamol og ibuprofen reducerer behovet for morfin

Dansk studie dokumenter, at hofteopererede patienters behov for smertelindring med morfin er markant lavere, når de behandles med en kombination af paracetamol og ibuprofen.

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12 intensive sengepladser til patienter med svær psykisk sygdom på vej i Syddanmark

De nye intensive sengepladser i psykiatrien i Region Syddanmark er primært tiltænkt psykotiske patienter.

1h

Inherited mutations may play a role in pancreatic cancer development

A small, retrospective study has found that, in patients with particular pancreatic duct lesions, the presence of an inherited mutation in a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene may increase the patients' risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

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Understanding the rich social lives of animals benefits international conservation efforts

An international group of researchers working on a wide range of species, from elephants and crows, to whales and chimpanzees, argues that animals' cultural knowledge needs to be taken into consideration when planning international conservation efforts.

1h

Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe

There has been a growing debate over whether uncomplicated appendicitis should be treated with antibiotics rather than surgery. UCLA research finds that more than 97 percent of the surgeries for appendicitis were laparoscopic, or minimally invasive, and most patients were discharged the same day or the next day. Only 3 percent of the procedures resulted in complications. This indicates that surger

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Face it — our faces don't always reveal our true emotions

When it comes to reading a person's state of mind, visual context — as in background and action — is just as important as facial expressions and body language, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Porsche plans to electrify its best-selling Macan SUV

Porsche has announced that it will electrify the next-generation Macan, which will become its first all-electric compact SUV. The EV version of the Macan, which is Porsche's best-selling …

1h

Tighten up Mexico’s regulations on human gene editing

Tighten up Mexico’s regulations on human gene editing Tighten up Mexico’s regulations on human gene editing, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00666-0 Tighten up Mexico’s regulations on human gene editing

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The CRISPR-baby scandal: what’s next for human gene-editing

The CRISPR-baby scandal: what’s next for human gene-editing The CRISPR-baby scandal: what’s next for human gene-editing, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00673-1 As concerns surge after a bombshell revelation, here are four questions about this fast-moving field.

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Why were scientists silent over gene-edited babies?

Why were scientists silent over gene-edited babies? Why were scientists silent over gene-edited babies?, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00662-4 To be successful as researchers, we must be able to think through the impacts of our work on society and speak up when necessary, says Natalie Kofler.

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Norsk bølgekraftværk kan give strøm til sensorer under vand

PLUS. Et norsk ingeniørfirma tester bølgekraft på Hawaii for den amerikanske flåde.

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Targeting microRNAs

Medicinal chemists spend the vast majority of their time targeting proteins. Enzyme active sites, receptors, allosteric sites, interfacial sites – it’s one protein after another, to the point that you can mentally assume that your compounds are going to be hitting the familiar landscape of backbone amide bonds, pi-interacting tryptophan side chains, hydrogen-bonding aspartates and the rest of the

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New chimpanzee culture discovered

Chimpanzees have a more elaborate and diversified material culture than any other nonhuman primate. Their behavior varies across tropical Africa in a way that does not always correspond to ecology. For instance, only West African chimpanzees use stone and wooden hammers to crack nuts in a number of populations, despite the wide availability of hammers and appropriate nuts across the species' range

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Study shows parrots can pass classic test of intelligence

Usually, calling someone a bird-brain is meant as an insult, but an African grey parrot named Griffin is rewriting the rules when it comes to avian intelligence.

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New chimpanzee culture discovered

Chimpanzees have a more elaborate and diversified material culture than any other nonhuman primate. Their behavior varies across tropical Africa in a way that does not always correspond to ecology. For instance, only West African chimpanzees use stone and wooden hammers to crack nuts in a number of populations, despite the wide availability of hammers and appropriate nuts across the species' range

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Study shows parrots can pass classic test of intelligence

Usually, calling someone a bird-brain is meant as an insult, but an African grey parrot named Griffin is rewriting the rules when it comes to avian intelligence.

1h

With its burning grip, shingles can do lasting damage

Varicella zoster virus, which causes chickenpox and shingles, may instigate several other problems.

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00680-2 How Nature reported preparations for the Moon landing in 1969, and a rare archaeological find in 1919.

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Aramco CEO says oil industry facing 'a crisis of perception'

submitted by /u/imaschizo_andsoami [link] [comments]

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Research uncovers potential sustainable refining method for lignin

Lignin, used as a renewable resource to produce high-value products, has presented both production and economical challenges for biorefinery operations.

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Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges

Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, according to a new study by an international team of wildlife researchers from the University of Zürich, Penn State, and the Wild Nature Institute. This suggests that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances—and expend more energy—to obtain critical resour

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Understanding the rich social lives of animals benefits international conservation efforts

An international group of researchers working on a wide range of species, from elephants and crows, to whales and chimpanzees, argues that animals' cultural knowledge needs to be taken into consideration when planning international conservation efforts.

1h

Why 4-Panel Comics Now Dominate Our Screens

Blame the death of Google Reader. Or Twitter. Or phones! But more than anything, webcomics have exploded because we're used to looking at squares.

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Amazon forest can be trained by higher rainfall variability

The Amazon rainforest has evolved over millions of years and even through ice ages. Yet today, human influences and global climate change put this huge ecosystem at risk of large-scale dieback—with major consequences for its capability as a global CO2 sink. New research published in Nature Geoscience now reveals a key player in shaping the resilience of the Amazon, and finds that regions with gene

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Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges

Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, according to a new study by an international team of wildlife researchers from the University of Zürich, Penn State, and the Wild Nature Institute. This suggests that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances—and expend more energy—to obtain critical resour

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Understanding the rich social lives of animals benefits international conservation efforts

An international group of researchers working on a wide range of species, from elephants and crows, to whales and chimpanzees, argues that animals' cultural knowledge needs to be taken into consideration when planning international conservation efforts.

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Christian Boel bliver ny regionsdirektør i Nordjylland

Christian Boel går fra at være koncerndirektør i Midtjylland til at blive øverste direktør i Nordjylland

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Target takes exclusive approach for new online marketplace – CNET

Target+ is apparently bringing in sellers on an invitation-only basis.

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Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have …

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Research uncovers potential sustainable refining method for lignin

Lignin, used as a renewable resource to produce high-value products, has presented both production and economical challenges for biorefinery operations.

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Research to help mobile phones act smarter and last longer

Melbourne researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict when users will reach for their mobile phone, helping people to maximise phone battery life.

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Could Tassie devils help control feral cats on the mainland? Fossils say yes

The Tasmanian devil – despite its name – once roamed the mainland of Australia. Returning the devil to the mainland may not only help its threatened status but could help control invasive predators such as feral cats and foxes.

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Could Tassie devils help control feral cats on the mainland? Fossils say yes

The Tasmanian devil – despite its name – once roamed the mainland of Australia. Returning the devil to the mainland may not only help its threatened status but could help control invasive predators such as feral cats and foxes.

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Troubling Trends Towards Artificial Intelligence Governance

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Hayabusa 2 Photographs Dark Spot at Asteroid Landing Site

A new image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows a mysterious dark blotch (next to the probe's shadow) where Hayabusa 2 touched down. The post Hayabusa 2 Photographs Dark Spot at Asteroid Landing Site appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans, thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France.

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Giant animals lived in Amazonian mega-wetland

A land of giants: This is the best definition for Lake Pebas, a mega-wetland that existed in western Amazonia during the Miocene Epoch, which lasted from 23 million to 5.3 million years ago.

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From the Archives: A Debate on Religion and the Brain

In 2009, Cerebrum’s editors invited three scientists to debate: Does evolution explain why the human brain supports religious belief? Each side wrote a position paper, which they exchanged, and then each wrote a response to the other’s statement. Dimitrios Kapogiannis and Jordan Grafman, scientists at the National Institutes of Health, followed up on their then-recent research by stating that bra

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All Brexit Scenarios Will Be Damaging to UK Health Service: Report

Public health care will take a hit however Britain leaves the European Union, but a no-deal exit will cause the most harm, a new analysis shows.

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Scientists decode dynamics of the largest protein-degrading machine in atomic detail

Protein nanomachines made of multiple protein molecules are highly dynamic during their actions on their functional targets, sometime called substrates. Dynamics of these large protein nanomachines of more than megadalton molecular weight are refractory to structural analysis by existing technology like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cryo-electron microscopy (cr

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Structure of fat-processing enzyme determined

After decades of work with no success, researchers have determined the high-resolution, three-dimensional structure for lipoprotein lipase, the enzyme that processes fats, or triglycerides, in the bloodstream and releases nutrients for vital tissues such as skeletal muscle and the heart. Triglycerides are the main source of fuel for most cells in the body.

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Species evolve ways to back up life's machinery

Scientists have learned a lot about evolution by studying fossils, by observing nature and, more recently, by unraveling the genetic code stored in DNA.

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Scientists decode dynamics of the largest protein-degrading machine in atomic detail

Protein nanomachines made of multiple protein molecules are highly dynamic during their actions on their functional targets, sometime called substrates. Dynamics of these large protein nanomachines of more than megadalton molecular weight are refractory to structural analysis by existing technology like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cryo-electron microscopy (cr

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The internal brakes on violent escalation—a descriptive typology

A CREST report by Joel Busher, Donald Holbrook and Graham Macklin examines why there are often thresholds of violence that members of extremist groups rarely cross.

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Structure of fat-processing enzyme determined

After decades of work with no success, researchers have determined the high-resolution, three-dimensional structure for lipoprotein lipase, the enzyme that processes fats, or triglycerides, in the bloodstream and releases nutrients for vital tissues such as skeletal muscle and the heart. Triglycerides are the main source of fuel for most cells in the body.

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Researchers discover 'chromosome scanner' that protects against cancer

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA. A 'scanner' inside the cells decides whether or not so-called flawless DNA repair, which protects against cancer, is launched.

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Species evolve ways to back up life's machinery

Scientists have learned a lot about evolution by studying fossils, by observing nature and, more recently, by unraveling the genetic code stored in DNA.

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Researchers discover 'chromosome scanner' that protects against cancer

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA. A 'scanner' inside the cells decides whether or not so-called flawless DNA repair, which protects against cancer, is launched.

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HeLa Cells from Different Labs Vary in Genetics, Phenotype

This could account for some reproducibility problems in cell line research, according to the authors of a comprehensive analysis of HeLa variants.

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A new sequencing method to detect DNA modifications of relevance to cancer

Ludwig Cancer Research scientists report in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology a new and improved method to detect chemical modifications to DNA. These modifications—or "epigenetic" marks—help control gene expression and their aberrant distribution across the genome.

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Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger

Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to 'sound the alarm' among its neighbouring cells so they can react with a quick response.

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Topological defects could be key to future nano-electronics

The reason that a magnet sticks to the fridge is that electronic spins or magnetic moments in the magnetic material spontaneously align or order in one direction, which enables it to exert an attractive force to the steel door. Magnets are one type of material with such built-in order. A topological defect in such a material occurs as a discontinuity in this order, i.e., a boundary region where th

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A new sequencing method to detect DNA modifications of relevance to cancer

Ludwig Cancer Research scientists report in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology a new and improved method to detect chemical modifications to DNA. These modifications—or "epigenetic" marks—help control gene expression and their aberrant distribution across the genome.

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Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger

Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to 'sound the alarm' among its neighbouring cells so they can react with a quick response.

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Brain response to mom's voice differs in kids with autism, Stanford study finds

For most children, the sound of their mother's voice triggers brain activity patterns distinct from those triggered by an unfamiliar voice. But the unique brain response to mom's voice is greatly diminished in children with autism, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Reformforhandlinger fortsætter

Forhandlingerne om sundhedsreformen kører på højtryk i overraskende konstellation.

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LHCb catches fast-spinning charmonium particle

The LHCb collaboration has spotted a new particle. Its mass and other properties place it squarely in the charmonium family that includes the better-known J/ψ particle, which was the first particle containing a "charm quark" to be discovered and won its discoverers a Nobel prize in physics. Future studies of the properties of this new charmonium state and its relatives will help physicists better

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Automation 'threat to 60,000 NI jobs'

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Trouble With Elizabeth Warren’s Child-Care Plan

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s call for a new federal child-care program is nothing if not shrewd. The dream of a comprehensive federal program that would liberate working parents from having to scrap for a seat in a safe, clean child-care facility that will provide for their little ones for a full day, and all for a price so low as to be negligible, has obvious appeal across the Democratic Party’s c

2h

The Mystery of Antarctica’s Missing Meteorites

For about a month, Katherine Joy spent hours snaking up and down the Antarctic ice on a snowmobile, trying to spot gatherings of meteorites. The bottom of the Earth is a jarringly alien realm—an “expansive place where the sky and ice seem to go on forever,” says Joy , a Royal Society University Research Fellow and meteorite hunter at the University of Manchester. And in some stretches of ice, “ev

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Distorted, stretched DNA may increase risk of off-target changes with CRISPR-Cas9

Distortions to DNA, which occur routinely during gene expression and other cellular processes, could lead to off-target changes to the genome when using CRISPR-Cas9, a new study suggests. The Medical Research Council scientists behind the research say that their findings may help to pave the way to improve on the accuracy of gene editing for clinical applications.

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Do copy cats really exist? New study shows that cats may reflect their owner's personality

Cat owners' personalities may be influencing the behaviour of their pets, new research suggests.

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Distorted, stretched DNA may increase risk of off-target changes with CRISPR-Cas9

Distortions to DNA, which occur routinely during gene expression and other cellular processes, could lead to off-target changes to the genome when using CRISPR-Cas9, a new study suggests. The Medical Research Council scientists behind the research say that their findings may help to pave the way to improve on the accuracy of gene editing for clinical applications.

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Right-wing extremism in Norway—changes and challenges

As a researcher, I have followed various extreme right groups and movements in Norway and Scandinavia during the last 30 years. There have been some significant changes during this time – changes that have an impact on how our society should relate to such milieus, and what kinds of preventive measures might be relevant and effective.

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Do copy cats really exist? New study shows that cats may reflect their owner's personality

Cat owners' personalities may be influencing the behaviour of their pets, new research suggests.

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How our tissues manage mechanical stress

When running, breathing and moving, the body is continuously deforming. How do the tissues in the body deal with all these mechanical stresses? Publishing today in Nature Physics, researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and AMOLF institute show how the two principal components of soft tissues, collagen and hyaluronic acid, work together for finely tuning the mechanical response of

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Partners in catalysis: An efficient route to unsaturated ketones

In organic chemistry, discovering new reactions is one thing, but to carry them off efficiently is quite another. Carbon-carbon bond-forming is at the heart of organic synthesis, allowing us to stitch together diverse functional groups into an endless array of useful compounds. Now, Kanazawa University researchers have neatly streamlined one of the most important of those reactions.

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Physicists investigate new class of resonators

The physicists from ITMO University, Ioffe Institute and the Australian National University examined a new mechanism of realization of high-quality optical resonators. It is based on the mutual destructive interference of two low-quality optical states in one resonator allowing for secure "trapping" of light in various materials even at small scales. The theoretical results of the work were confir

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A crack in an icy world

An Antarctic ice shelf gets set to split.

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Green and privileged childhoods signal better adult mental health

Two studies link parks and poshness to lower depression and cognitive decline, for reasons still unclear. Paul Biegler reports.

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Laser test finds no evidence of alien megastructure around weird star

New research dampens hopes that light fluctuations from Boyajian's Star were caused by extraterrestrial engineering. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Self-Monitoring for Weight Loss

Hands of woman reading smoothie recipe on website The most effective method for weight loss! Lose weight in less than 15 minutes per day. These sound like typical weight-loss overhyped sales pitches, but they are reasonably supported by evidence. There is now good (but not great) evidence that frequent and consistent self-monitoring predict successful long-term weight management. In fact, a new s

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Love the taste of whiskey? Thank an oak tree

Environment Excerpt: The Flavor of Wood Woodland ecologist Artur Cisar-Erlach's latest book, "The Flavor of Wood: In Search of the Wild Taste of Trees, from Smoke and Sap to Root and Bark" debuts February…

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Image of the Day: In the Eye of a Fly

A missing microRNA leads to degenerating neurons and blindness in a fruit fly.

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This Viral Therapy Could Help Us Survive the Superbug Era

When one man fell into a coma, his wife sought out a Soviet-era medical technique called phage therapy that ended up saving his life.

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What Ryan Murphy's Netflix Show Should Say About Hollywood

The showrunner's upcoming series is about the Golden Age of Tinseltown—it could be about a lot more.

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Pioneering naturalists: the woman who linked caterpillars to butterflies

Unjustly forgotten, Maria Sibylla Merian was one of the most important entomologists in history. Tanya Latty reports.

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Mount Vesuvius Didn't Kill Everyone in Pompeii. Where Did the Survivors Go?

Where did the refugees from Pompeii go after Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79?

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At-Home Test for Colorectal Cancer Could Simplify Screening

An at-home screening test for colorectal cancer may be as good an option as a colonoscopy, a new review study finds.

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Barren Desert 'Fairy Circles' Caused By … Rain?

Odd patterns of bare patches called "fairy circles" found in only two places on Earth may be the result of heavy rain and hot weather.

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The Dangerous Spread of Extremist Manifestos

N early eight years ago, the Norwegian extremist Anders Behring Breivik set the bar for what an individual terrorist could accomplish—detonating a truck bomb in Oslo that killed eight, then murdering 69 more , mostly teenagers, with semiautomatic weapons in another nearby location. All this was done in the name of a twisted ideology he had compiled largely from the internet, cobbled together into

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The world’s largest bee has been rediscovered after 38 years

Researchers rediscovered the world’s largest bee living in the forests of an island of Indonesia.

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Är diabetes och högt blodtryck riskfaktorer för att utveckla demens?

Idag lider 50 miljoner människor i världen av demens. Det är en folksjukdom som stadigt ökar och som vi i dagsläget inte kan bota. Det vi däremot vet är att diabetes och högt blodtryck, som går att behandla, ökar risken att utveckla demens. Kan vi förhindra insjuknandet i demens genom att behandla dessa riskfaktorer?

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Meta-Post: Horgan Posts on Poverty and Other Social Problems

Cross-Check columns on poverty, inequality, racism, sexism and violence. Plus progress and Noam Chomsky. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The First Time I Saw the Grand Canyon

On the National Park's 100th anniversary, a South African-born geologist recalls his first encounter with a spectacular natural wonder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI's Big Challenge

To make it truly intelligent, researchers need to rethink the way they approach the technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Letbane i Odense forsinket otte måneder

Det er endnu uvist, hvad forsinkelsen vil koste projektet i kroner og ører.

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Neuralt netværk kan hjælpe læger med at placere donorhjerter

Testene er lovende, men der mangler mere data fra Skandinavien, siger forsker.

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A Poor Childhood Could Hurt Your Memory in Old Age

In 2004, a study titled “The Long Arm of Childhood” found that whether children were rich or poor could influence their health in adulthood. Now a new paper out in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ) suggests that childhood has an even longer arm, reaching well into old age. Someone’s economic status as a child, this study suggests, could influence his or her memory and b

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The First Time I Saw the Grand Canyon

On the National Park's 100th anniversary, a South African-born geologist recalls his first encounter with a spectacular natural wonder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How artificially brightened clouds could stop climate change

submitted by /u/Norcan987 [link] [comments]

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Daily briefing: From safety goggles to stab vests, the dangers for women of a world built on male data

Daily briefing: From safety goggles to stab vests, the dangers for women of a world built on male data Daily briefing: From safety goggles to stab vests, the dangers for women of a world built on male data, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00698-6 The deadly side effects of research based on the average male body, seven tips for scientists making the leap from academia t

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AI's Big Challenge

To make it truly intelligent, researchers need to rethink the way they approach the technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To Effectively Talk About HIV, We Need to Listen to Black Women

I have been working on collecting oral histories from many older HIV-positive women in the Washington D.C. area, where I live and research. It is my hope that by focusing on the voices of African-American women themselves, we as a country are able to better understand the profound impact that HIV has had on black life.

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No, Data Is Not the New Oil

Proposals to "pay" users for the value of their data don't reflect how internet giants like Facebook and Google really operate.

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Polio Is Nearly Wiped Out—Unless Some Lab Tech Screws Up

The world is close to declaring the total containment of polio, but several labs could still, accidentally, be storing samples of the deadly virus.

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Did Crawling Critters Leave These Cracks? The Answer Could Rewrite Evolutionary History

Researchers say they found evidence life began moving 2.1 billion years ago, but that contentious conclusion is far from certain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Our Universe Could Emerge as a Hologram – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog. Physicists have devised a holographic model of “de Sitter space,” the term for a universe like ours, that could give us new clues about the origin of space and time. Drawing by Xi Dong The fabric of space and time is widely believed by physicists to be emergent, stitched out of quantum threads according to an unknown pattern. And

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Lime scooter riders are being injured by ‘sudden excessive braking,' company admits

Lime, one of the world’s largest electric scooter companies, is urging riders to be extra cautious while operating their devices because of a technical “bug” that can cause “sudden excessive …

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New data: World population will level off, then fall forever

submitted by /u/tachyonburst [link] [comments]

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Dag for dag: Derfor har Helge Ingstad ligget i tre måneder på havets bund

Over tre måneder efter den kolliderede med et tankskib, er bjærgningen af den norske fregat endelig begyndt tirsdag. Her er baggrunden for, at fregatten har ligget på havbunden så længe.

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Did Crawling Critters Leave These Cracks? The Answer Could Rewrite Evolutionary History

Researchers say they found evidence life began moving 2.1 billion years ago, but that contentious conclusion is far from certain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tåligare grödor via kloroplasternas kontrollsystem

– Till exempel kan växtens förmåga att klara högre salthalter i marken förbättras. Det gör att områden där grödor idag inte kan odlas kommer kunna utnyttjas för livsmedelsproduktion i framtiden, säger Mats Töpel, forskare vid institutionen för marina vetenskaper, Göteborgs universitet. Fram till år 2050 måste dagens livsmedelsproduktion öka med minst 70 procent för att tillgodose en växande värld

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Exposing flaws in metrics for user login systems

How good is the research on the success or failure of the system that verifies your identity when you log into a computer, smartphone or other device? Chances are it's not good, and that's a major security and privacy issue that should be fixed, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study that proposes a novel solution.

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Happy Centennial, Grand Canyon!

Grand Canyon National Park turns 100 today. Find out more about this phenomenal geologic treasure through some excellent books and videos. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tidligere PET-Chefer: Udvist Huawei-ansat kan udgøre sikkerhedsrisiko

En nu udvist Huawei-ansat har deltaget i fortrolige møder med TDC om parternes fremtidige samarbejde. Man må formode, at der ikke er foretaget en sikkerhedsundersøgelse af vedkommende, lyder det fra tidligere PET-chefer.

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The ‘Hidden Mechanisms’ That Help Those Born Rich to Excel in Elite Jobs

Over the past five years, the sociologists Daniel Laurison and Sam Friedman have uncovered a striking, consistent pattern in data about England’s workforce: Not only are people born into working-class families far less likely than those born wealthy to get an elite job—but they also, on average, earn 16 percent less in the same fields of work. Laurison and Friedman dug further into the data, but

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Why Asia and America are trading places

Less Asians are traveling to America, and this is partly because many U.S.-based top-tier schools have extension campuses in the East. Asia is becoming a melting pot itself because countries such as China and Japan are attracting immigrants from across the region, not only to attend the notable universities, but also to find jobs in caring for aging people. The tenure of an expat who moves to Asi

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Researchers discover the secret to bats' immunity

An international research team led by Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, has identified molecular and genetic mechanisms that allow bats to stay healthy while hosting viruses that kill other animals, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

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Researchers discover the secret to bats' immunity

An international research team led by Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, has identified molecular and genetic mechanisms that allow bats to stay healthy while hosting viruses that kill other animals, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

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‘Mama’s Last Hug’ showcases the emotional lives of animals

In ‘Mama’s Last Hug,’ Frans de Waal argues that emotions occur throughout the animal world.

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Harpestbakterien går att spåra vid terror

– Bakteriens förmåga att bli farlig redan i små mängder gör den tyvärr idealisk som biologiskt vapen. Därför är det ett viktigt framsteg att vi har hittat ett sätt att spåra ursprunget på olika bakteriekulturer, säger Chinmay Dwibedi, doktorand vid Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi vid Umeå universitet och Försvarets forskningsinstitut, FOI. Harpest, eller tularemi som är sjukdomens medicins

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Earth’s atmosphere swallows the Moon

Earth’s atmosphere swallows the Moon Earth’s atmosphere swallows the Moon, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00691-z The planet’s distant hydrogen veil billows much further than scientists suspected.

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A new Italian manifesto against racism

A new Italian manifesto against racism A new Italian manifesto against racism, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00668-y A new Italian manifesto against racism

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Slash local emissions to protect Tibetan plateau

Slash local emissions to protect Tibetan plateau Slash local emissions to protect Tibetan plateau, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00670-4 Slash local emissions to protect Tibetan plateau

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Soil pollution — speed up global mapping

Soil pollution — speed up global mapping Soil pollution — speed up global mapping, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00669-x Soil pollution — speed up global mapping

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Matrix mimics shape cell studies

Matrix mimics shape cell studies Matrix mimics shape cell studies, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00681-1 The extracellular matrix governs a surprising number of cellular functions. New techniques are revealing how cells and matrix communicate — and why this cross-talk matters.

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A window that darkens on demand could shine at saving energy

A window that darkens on demand could shine at saving energy A window that darkens on demand could shine at saving energy, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00658-0 Glass that quickly becomes opaque could reduce the need for air conditioning in buildings and vehicles.

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Traditional Islamic approach can enrich CRISPR twins debate

Traditional Islamic approach can enrich CRISPR twins debate Traditional Islamic approach can enrich CRISPR twins debate, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00665-1 Traditional Islamic approach can enrich CRISPR twins debate

4h

Study claiming hate cuts 12 years off gay lives retracted

After years of back and forth, a highly cited paper that appeared to show that gay people who live in areas where people were highly prejudiced against them had a significantly shorter life expectancy has been retracted. The paper, “Structural stigma and all-cause mortality in sexual minority populations,” was published in 2014 by Mark Hatzenbuehler … Continue reading Study claiming hate cuts 12 y

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Millions of fish have been dying in Australia’s major rivers

Shocking scenes of dead fish lining the rivers in the Murray-Darling Basins, the food bowl of Australia, have been blamed on policy failures and mismanagement

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Ny skelettsjukdom hittad

Den nu identifierade skelettsjukdomen observerades först hos en förälder och ett barn i en svensk familj. – De kom till min mottagning. De hade fått en annan diagnos, men den stämde inte med vad vi såg på skelettröntgen. Jag blev övertygat om att det här var en ny diagnos som inte hade beskrivits tidigare, säger Giedre Grigelioniene, biträdande överläkare och docent vid institutionen för molekylä

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It looks like Apple Music is coming to Google Home

Over two months since Apple Music landed on Amazon Echo, it's now set for another smart speaker that isn't the HomePod. A listing for the music streaming service has been …

5h

Study traces the origins of Chikungunya in Brazil

New evidence suggests that Chikungunya virus arrived in Brazil at least one year earlier than it was detected by public health surveillance systems. Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and Fundação Oswaldo Cruz published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.

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UK prejudice against immigrants amongst lowest in Europe

A new study published in Frontiers in Sociology challenges prevailing attitudes on Brexit, the nature of prejudice, and the social impact of modernization.According to analysis of the largest public European and international surveys of human beliefs and values, prejudice against immigrants in the UK is rare and comparable with that in other wealthy EU and Anglophone nations.

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Structure-property relationship of Co2MnSi thin films in response to He+-irradiation

Structure-property relationship of Co 2 MnSi thin films in response to He + -irradiation Structure-property relationship of Co 2 MnSi thin films in response to He + -irradiation, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39435-4 Structure-property relationship of Co 2 MnSi thin films in response to He + -irradiation

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ZipN is an essential FtsZ membrane tether and contributes to the septal localization of SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena

ZipN is an essential FtsZ membrane tether and contributes to the septal localization of SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena ZipN is an essential FtsZ membrane tether and contributes to the septal localization of SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena , Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39336-6 ZipN is an essential FtsZ membrane tether and contributes

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Phylogeography of plastid DNA sequences suggests post-glacial southward demographic expansion and the existence of several glacial refugia for Araucaria angustifolia

Phylogeography of plastid DNA sequences suggests post-glacial southward demographic expansion and the existence of several glacial refugia for Araucaria angustifolia Phylogeography of plastid DNA sequences suggests post-glacial southward demographic expansion and the existence of several glacial refugia for Araucaria angustifolia , Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39308-

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Structural characterization of poly-Si Films crystallized by Ni Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization

Structural characterization of poly-Si Films crystallized by Ni Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization Structural characterization of poly-Si Films crystallized by Ni Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39503-9 Structural characterization of poly-Si Films crystallized by Ni Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization

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Early differentiation of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation using the characteristics of fibrillatory waves in surface ECG multi-leads

Early differentiation of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation using the characteristics of fibrillatory waves in surface ECG multi-leads Early differentiation of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation using the characteristics of fibrillatory waves in surface ECG multi-leads, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38928-6 Early differentiation of long-standing pe

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New risk prediction model of coronary heart disease in participants with and without diabetes: Assessments of the Framingham risk and Suita scores in 3-year longitudinal database in a Japanese population

New risk prediction model of coronary heart disease in participants with and without diabetes: Assessments of the Framingham risk and Suita scores in 3-year longitudinal database in a Japanese population New risk prediction model of coronary heart disease in participants with and without diabetes: Assessments of the Framingham risk and Suita scores in 3-year longitudinal database in a Japanese po

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Tlr2 Deficiency is Associated with Enhanced Elements of Neuronal Repair and Caspase 3 Activation Following Brain Ischemia

Tlr2 Deficiency is Associated with Enhanced Elements of Neuronal Repair and Caspase 3 Activation Following Brain Ischemia Tlr2 Deficiency is Associated with Enhanced Elements of Neuronal Repair and Caspase 3 Activation Following Brain Ischemia, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39541-3 Tlr2 Deficiency is Associated with Enhanced Elements of Neuronal Repair and Caspase 3 A

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Experimental crossbreeding reveals strain-specific variation in mortality, growth and personality in the brown trout (Salmo trutta)

Experimental crossbreeding reveals strain-specific variation in mortality, growth and personality in the brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) Experimental crossbreeding reveals strain-specific variation in mortality, growth and personality in the brown trout ( Salmo trutta ), Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-35794-6 Experimental crossbreeding reveals strain-specific variation in

5h

America Must Stand as a Bulwark Against Autocracy

This week, the House Intelligence Committee will hold its first open hearing under the new Democratic majority. When I took over as chairman of the committee in January, there was no shortage of topics that would be obvious candidates for the committee to focus on—China’s growing might, Russian interference in our election, Turkey’s drift, or countless other threats. Our first hearing will not be

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Chernobyl: data wars and disaster politics

Chernobyl: data wars and disaster politics Chernobyl: data wars and disaster politics, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00678-w Sonja Schmid extols two studies on the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe, from medical impacts to radioactive blueberries.

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Why AI is a threat to democracy—and what we can do to stop it

Futurist and NYU professor Amy Webb on an impending artificial intelligence catastrophe—and why there’s still hope it can be averted.

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Ti and its alloys as examples of cryogenic focused ion beam milling of environmentally-sensitive materials

Ti and its alloys as examples of cryogenic focused ion beam milling of environmentally-sensitive materials Ti and its alloys as examples of cryogenic focused ion beam milling of environmentally-sensitive materials, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08752-7 Hydrogen contamination in metals during sample preparation for high-resolution microscopy remains a challenge, especi

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A network-centric approach to drugging TNF-induced NF-κB signaling

A network-centric approach to drugging TNF-induced NF-κB signaling A network-centric approach to drugging TNF-induced NF-κB signaling, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08802-0 Chemical perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions is notoriously difficult, yet necessary when complete inhibition of a signalling pathway is detrimental to the cell. Here, the authors

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A snapshot of biodiversity protection in Antarctica

A snapshot of biodiversity protection in Antarctica A snapshot of biodiversity protection in Antarctica, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08915-6 Antarctic biodiversity is increasingly under threat. Here, Wauchope et al. provide a continent-wide assessment of its terrestrial biodiversity, and find biodiversity protection is regionally uneven and biased towards easily det

5h

Modified carbon nitride nanozyme as bifunctional glucose oxidase-peroxidase for metal-free bioinspired cascade photocatalysis

Modified carbon nitride nanozyme as bifunctional glucose oxidase-peroxidase for metal-free bioinspired cascade photocatalysis Modified carbon nitride nanozyme as bifunctional glucose oxidase-peroxidase for metal-free bioinspired cascade photocatalysis, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08731-y Glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are used as an enzymatic

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Contrast and luminance adaptation alter neuronal coding and perception of stimulus orientation

Contrast and luminance adaptation alter neuronal coding and perception of stimulus orientation Contrast and luminance adaptation alter neuronal coding and perception of stimulus orientation, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08894-8 Sensory systems produce stable stimulus representations despite constant changes across multiple stimulus dimensions. Here, the authors revea

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Impact of pre-existing dengue immunity on human antibody and memory B cell responses to Zika

Impact of pre-existing dengue immunity on human antibody and memory B cell responses to Zika Impact of pre-existing dengue immunity on human antibody and memory B cell responses to Zika, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08845-3 Here, Andrade et al. assess the memory B cell (MBC) and antibody response to Zika virus (ZIKV) in individuals with and without prior dengue virus

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Societal decisions about climate mitigation will have dramatic impacts on eutrophication in the 21st century

Societal decisions about climate mitigation will have dramatic impacts on eutrophication in the 21 st century Societal decisions about climate mitigation will have dramatic impacts on eutrophication in the 21 st century, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08884-w Impacts of future changes to land use and land management on eutrophication are not well understood. Here, the

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G-quadruplex DNA drives genomic instability and represents a targetable molecular abnormality in ATRX-deficient malignant glioma

G-quadruplex DNA drives genomic instability and represents a targetable molecular abnormality in ATRX-deficient malignant glioma G-quadruplex DNA drives genomic instability and represents a targetable molecular abnormality in ATRX-deficient malignant glioma, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08905-8 ATRX deficiency is linked to genomic stability in cancer cells. Here, the

5h

UK prejudice against immigrants amongst lowest in Europe

According to analysis of the largest public European and international surveys of human beliefs and values, prejudice against immigrants in the UK is rare and comparable with that in other wealthy EU and Anglophone nations. Published in Frontiers in Sociology, this new study challenges prevailing attitudes on Brexit, the nature of prejudice, and the social impact of modernization.

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Data kan være nøglen til energieffektivisering i små virksomheder

PLUS. Potentialet for elbesparelser i de små og mellemstore virksomheder er stort. Med data fra Datahubben udvikler et Elforsk-projekt et nyt værktøj.

6h

Scientists create DNA-like molecule to aid search for alien life

submitted by /u/dannylenwinn [link] [comments]

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NASA study reproduces origins of life on ocean floor

Scientists have reproduced in the lab how the ingredients for life could have formed deep in the ocean 4 billion years ago. The results of the new study offer clues to how life started on Earth and where else in the cosmos we might find it.

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When sand-slithering snakes behave like light waves

Desert snakes slithering across the sand at night can encounter obstacles such as plants or twigs that alter the direction of their travel. While studying that motion to learn how limbless animals control their bodies in such environments, researchers discovered that snakes colliding with these obstacles mimic aspects of light or subatomic particles when they encounter a diffraction grating.

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Qualcomm wants your phone to drive your next VR and AR headsets

submitted by /u/real_genesix [link] [comments]

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How do professional football players perform under immense pressure?

Professional football players need to keep a cool head during a match, but some are better at this than others. Cristiano Ronaldo seems to be immune to pressure, while Neymar's performance crumbles under it. It's one of the remarkable findings of a study conducted by Belgian university KU Leuven and data intelligence company SciSports. They're presenting their results at the MIT Sloan Sports Analy

7h

BASF annual profits tumble as car woes, trade wars bite

German chemicals giant BASF reported Tuesday its annual profits slumped in 2018, with knock-on effects from major customer sectors and geopolitical headwinds including trade conflicts taking the business off the boil.

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French carmaker PSA boosts outlook after 'historic year'

French auto giant PSA, which produces the Citroen and Peugeot brands, said Tuesday it had boosted its profit outlook after recording a "historic year" in 2018.

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Machine learning speeds up synthesis of porous materials

Machine learning speeds up synthesis of porous materials Machine learning speeds up synthesis of porous materials, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00639-3 Failed chemical reactions are often not reported, which means that vast amounts of potentially useful data are going to waste. Experiments show that machine learning can use such data to optimize the preparation of po

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HTC hopes Exodus 1 phone will cash in on cryptocurrency – CNET

Too bad for the Taiwanese company the digital currency excitement fizzled last year.

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HTC Exodus 1 Review: Blockchain Dreams

A smartphone that doubles as a crypto wallet, the Exodus makes for a solid device—as long as you level your expectations.

7h

Homeopath Quits Homeopathy but Thinks the Homeopathic Approach Has Value

A former homeopath shows that there's nothing scientific about homeopathy; in fact, it contradicts all known scientific principles. Nevertheless she finds value in the homeopathic approach to the patient and thinks all providers can learn from it.

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Robinson Crusoe island sets example for the world in conservation

For almost a century, the inhabitants of Robinson Crusoe—named for literature's most famous castaway—have known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them conserving its unique wildlife.

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Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock

Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows.

7h

Nematode odors offer possible advantage in the battle against insect pests

Gardeners commonly use nematodes to naturally get rid of harmful soil-dwelling insects. A new study published today in the journal Functional Ecology revealed that these insect-killing nematodes also produce distinctive chemical cues, which deter Colorado potato beetles and make potato leaves less palatable to them.

7h

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock

Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows.

7h

Nematode odors offer possible advantage in the battle against insect pests

Gardeners commonly use nematodes to naturally get rid of harmful soil-dwelling insects. A new study published today in the journal Functional Ecology revealed that these insect-killing nematodes also produce distinctive chemical cues, which deter Colorado potato beetles and make potato leaves less palatable to them.

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Forskere finder ’kromosom-scanner’ der beskytter mod kræft

I et nyt studie har forskere fra Københavns Universitet fundet en af de centrale mekanismer bag…

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Evidence for man-made global warming hits 'gold standard': scientists

submitted by /u/kPuTEr5S2Y [link] [comments]

8h

CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides

Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides.

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Publisher Correction: A biomimicry design for nanoscale radiative cooling applications inspired by Morpho didius butterfly

Publisher Correction: A biomimicry design for nanoscale radiative cooling applications inspired by Morpho didius butterfly Publisher Correction: A biomimicry design for nanoscale radiative cooling applications inspired by Morpho didius butterfly, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37080-x Publisher Correction: A biomimicry design for nanoscale radiative cooling application

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Publisher Correction: Model-Based Therapy Planning Allows Prediction of Haemodynamic Outcome after Aortic Valve Replacement

Publisher Correction: Model-Based Therapy Planning Allows Prediction of Haemodynamic Outcome after Aortic Valve Replacement Publisher Correction: Model-Based Therapy Planning Allows Prediction of Haemodynamic Outcome after Aortic Valve Replacement, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36022-x Publisher Correction: Model-Based Therapy Planning Allows Prediction of Haemodynami

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Publisher Correction: Interspecific formation of the antimicrobial volatile schleiferon

Publisher Correction: Interspecific formation of the antimicrobial volatile schleiferon Publisher Correction: Interspecific formation of the antimicrobial volatile schleiferon, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37081-w Publisher Correction: Interspecific formation of the antimicrobial volatile schleiferon

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Israel vs Silicon Valley in the race for lab grown meat

submitted by /u/futurefoodshow [link] [comments]

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France’s Double Standard for Populist Uprisings

PARIS —In 2005, the Paris banlieues , the suburbs that are to France what the inner cities are to the United States, erupted in three weeks of riots. Triggered by the deaths of two teenagers who were reportedly evading police, demonstrators burned thousands of cars and trashed businesses—an uprising of rage by a population that’s largely poor and composed of immigrants, one that had long felt ign

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Frederikssund Kommunes mailsystem angrebet: Døjer med phishing-problem

Siden januar er vellignende phishing-mails blevet sendt ud af kommunens systemer.

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'Silent-type' cells play greater role in brain behavior than previously thought

Brain cells recorded as among the least electrically active during a specific task may be the most important to doing it right.

10h

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock

Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows.

10h

Nematode odors offer possible advantage in the battle against insect pests

Gardeners commonly use nematodes to naturally get rid of harmful soil-dwelling insects. A new study published today in the journal Functional Ecology revealed that these insect-killing nematodes also produce distinctive chemical cues, which deter Colorado potato beetles and make potato leaves less palatable to them.

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Golfstrømmen er svækket, men går næppe helt i stå

PLUS. Målesystemer forankret på Atlanterhavets bund skal give viden om mekanismer, der styrer transporten af varme i havet, og om frem­tiden for Golfstrømmen under klimaforandringer.

11h

Artificial Intelligence Hype Is Real

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

11h

Elon Musk’s Latest Tweets Could Land Him in Contempt of Court

The SEC has asked a judge to hold the Tesla CEO in contempt of court, but even that didn't stop Musk's tweeting.

11h

Att skriva för att påverka – eller förändra sig själv

Varför ska man skriva skönlitterärt? Och hur ska en god skribent vara? I avhandlingen Skrivande och blivande undersöker litteraturvetaren Sofia Pulls vilka motiv som handböcker och läromedel i skrivande presenterar. Hon får syn på flera förändringar från slutet av 1970-talet fram till i dag: från att skrivandet i handböckerna beskrivs som ett sätt att påverka samhället, till ett sätt att uppnå pe

12h

Nät-KBT och vårdsamordnare ger bättre primärvård vid depression

– Att få tillgång till vård, och att få kontinuitet och samordning i vården är centralt för patienter med psykisk ohälsa, konstaterar Anna Holst, disputerad i allmänmedicin vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, samt specialistläkare och vårdcentralschef inom Närhälsan i Göteborg. I arbetet med sin avhandling har hon studerat kostnadseffektiviteten vid kognitiv beteendeterapi, KBT, via

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US climate and oceans agency hit by leadership shake-up

US climate and oceans agency hit by leadership shake-up US climate and oceans agency hit by leadership shake-up, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00702-z Former industry scientist Neil Jacobs takes over as acting chief of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a sudden switch.

13h

Apple opens in-app subscription discounts to existing users

In a ploy to keep people paying for apps, Apple will let developers offer discounted subscriptions to current and recent subscribers. Until now, developers could only offer freebies …

13h

Humans struggle to identify snail shell shades, but technology reveals true colors

They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.

13h

'Star Wars' characters' costumes reflect shift from power to romance

Changes in costume in the female leads — Padmé and Leia — in 'Star Wars' Episodes I through VI parallel shifts in the characters' positions of power, a new study suggests.

13h

New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse

Research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse.

13h

Humans struggle to identify snail shell shades, but technology reveals true colors

They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.

13h

Most laptops vulnerable to attack via peripheral devices

Many modern laptops and an increasing number of desktop computers are much more vulnerable to hacking through common plug-in devices than previously thought, according to new research.

13h

New parents face 6 years of disrupted sleep

The birth of a child has drastic short-term effects on new mothers' sleep, particularly during the first three months after birth. Researchers have also found sleep duration and satisfaction is decreased up to six years after giving birth for both parents.

13h

Manipulating gene expression in neurons with CRISPR

Neuroscientists have used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to regulate genes in the rat brain. This technique paves the way for researchers to probe genetic influences on brain health and disease in model organisms that more closely resemble human conditions.

13h

ADHD drug Ritalin has no effect on primate prefrontal cortex

In contrast to studies of mice and rats, new research investigating the effect of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on neuronal activity in monkeys has found no effect of the drug on the prefrontal cortex. The study leaves open the question of how and why Ritalin improves attention in humans.

13h

Chinese government was involved in designer babies

submitted by /u/Ghenlezo [link] [comments]

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Microsoft CEO Defends Army Contract for Augmented Reality

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella rebuffed a call from employees to terminate a contract making HoloLens augmented reality headsets for the US Army.

14h

Star Wars undermines female characters through costume choices

Strong women become sexualised and romanticised as the sci-fi saga progresses. Samantha Page reports.

14h

'Star Wars' characters' costumes reflect shift from power to romance

Changes in costume in the female leads—Padmé and Leia—in Star Wars Episodes I through VI parallel shifts in the characters' positions of power, a study published in the open access journal Fashion and Textiles suggests. These changes in costume and status seem to be linked to the progression of the characters' romantic relationships, and take focus away from their roles as political leaders, and t

14h

The Atlantic Daily: When an American ISIS Fighter Wants to Come Home

What We’re Following In 2014, an Alabama college student set off for Syria to join ISIS. Now, the woman, Hoda Muthana, says she wants to return to the U.S., but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has declared that Muthana never had U.S. citizenship to begin with, and has no legal basis to come back to the country with her 18-month-old son. Graeme Wood argues that that’s a shortsighted move, setting a

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A Judge Asks: Is Forensic Science Really Science?

(Inside Science) — According to Senior U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff, at the Southern District of New York, "Forensic science continues to be routinely admitted by the courts, both state and federal, even though considerable doubts have now been raised as to whether forensic science really is science at all, and whether it is reliable and valid.” As part of the National Commission on Forensic Sc

15h

The Daring Rescue Of A Rare, Elusive Bat

Hosts Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro tell the story of a rare bat found trapped in the Museum of English Rural Life, and its rehabilitation by a bat-loving museum volunteer.

15h

Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang's Case for UBI | Joe Rogan

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Pink or brown?

They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.

15h

Most laptops vulnerable to attack via peripheral devices, say researchers

Many modern laptops and an increasing number of desktop computers are much more vulnerable to hacking through common plug-in devices than previously thought, according to new research.

15h

New parents face 6 years of disrupted sleep

The birth of a child has drastic short-term effects on new mothers' sleep, particularly during the first three months after birth. Researchers at the University of Warwick have also found sleep duration and satisfaction is decreased up to six years after giving birth for both parents.

15h

For Tesla, effects of Elon Musk's take-private tweet continue

Tesla and CEO Elon Musk settled with the SEC last year over Musk's tweets about taking the company private, but the fallout isn't over.

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Humans struggle to identify snail shell shades, but technology reveals true colors

They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.

15h

Humans struggle to identify snail shell shades, but technology reveals true colors

They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.

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Working long hours linked to depression in women

Women who work more than 55 hours a week are at a higher risk of depression but this is not the case for men, according to a new UCL-led study with Queen Mary University of London.

16h

The Lancet: Brexit will cause significant harm to the NHS, but No-Deal Brexit presents by far the worst option

All forms of Brexit will negatively impact the UK National Health Service (NHS), but the prospect of a No-Deal Brexit presents by far the worst scenario, with negative effects on the health care workforce, NHS financing, availability of medicines and vaccines, sharing of information and medical research, according to a new Health Policy review published in The Lancet.

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Renewable hydrogen ‘already cost competitive’, say researchers

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Nuclear goes retro — with a much greener outlook

submitted by /u/Xaron [link] [comments]

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Surface chemical defence of the eelgrass Zostera marina against microbial foulers

Surface chemical defence of the eelgrass Zostera marina against microbial foulers Surface chemical defence of the eelgrass Zostera marina against microbial foulers, Published online: 26 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39212-3 Surface chemical defence of the eelgrass Zostera marina against microbial foulers

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Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise

Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to researchers.

16h

Annual noninvasive stool test effective for colon cancer screening

A new study provides the strongest evidence to date to support recommendations that average risk patients can safely opt for an annual, easy-to-use home stool test instead of a screening colonoscopy.

16h

Tweets tell scientists how quickly we normalize unusual weather

What kinds of weather do people find remarkable, when does that change, and what does that say about the public's perception of climate change? A study examined those questions through the lens of more than 2 billion US Twitter posts.

16h

When a superconductor truly becomes super

A research team has confirmed the existence of a phase transition in copper-oxide-based (or cuprate) superconductors. The team believes that it could be during this 'quantum critical point,' when superconductivity actually occurs.

16h

We need to police gene editing. The World Health Organization agrees.

Health The Committee plans to examine the scientific, ethical, social, and legal Who’s going to police CRISPR? That was the cry of many scientists after news broke at the end of last year that Chinese researchers had edited the genomes of embryos…

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Bill Jenkins, Who Tried to Halt Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Dies at 73

Black men were being used as guinea pigs, an alarmed Dr. Jenkins told his health agency supervisor, not knowing that the supervisor was involved.

16h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Another Accuser

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, February 25. It’s been 10 days since President Donald Trump announced that he was declaring a national emergency to access funds to build a border wall. More than 50 former national-security officials told the Trump administration in a letter on Monday that the president’s declaration is unjustified. In Congress, Democrats, led by Representative Joaquin Cas

16h

Entangling photons of different colors

Researchers have developed a novel way to entangle two photons — one with a wavelength suitable for quantum-computing devices and the other for fiber-optics transmissions.

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Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise

Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to researchers.

16h

For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments

One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5 percent said they or their family had filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of illness or treatment.

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Some personal beliefs and morals may stem from genetics

Researchers found that while parents can help encourage their children to develop into responsible, conscientious adults, there is an underlying genetic factor that influences these traits, as well.

16h

30-Million-Page Archive of Humanity is Headed to the Moon

submitted by /u/Biomexr [link] [comments]

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Zero’s new electric motorcycle justifies the comparisons to Tesla

California-based Zero Motorcycles pulled the cover off of its newest electric bike, the SR/F, at an event in midtown Manhattan on Monday. It’s the company’s most advanced bike in …

16h

Why This Man's Blood Turned 'Milky' Colored

The man's blood fat levels were off the charts.

17h

Infared Photos Reveal Dubai's Green Space

The city's plant life still has a ways to go.

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Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. Researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans — thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France.

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Self-organized dynamics and the transition to turbulence of confined active nematics [Applied Physical Sciences]

We study how confinement transforms the chaotic dynamics of bulk microtubule-based active nematics into regular spatiotemporal patterns. For weak confinements in disks, multiple continuously nucleating and annihilating topological defects self-organize into persistent circular flows of either handedness. Increasing confinement strength leads to the emergence of distinct dynamics, in which the…

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Recovery from tachyphylaxis of TRPV1 coincides with recycling to the surface membrane [Physiology]

The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channel is essential for sensation of thermal and chemical pain. TRPV1 activation is accompanied by Ca2+-dependent desensitization; acute desensitization reflects rapid reduction in channel activity during stimulation, whereas tachyphylaxis denotes the diminution in TRPV1 responses to repetitive stimulation. Acute desensitization has been at

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Complex modifier landscape underlying genetic background effects [Genetics]

The phenotypic consequence of a given mutation can be influenced by the genetic background. For example, conditional gene essentiality occurs when the loss of function of a gene causes lethality in one genetic background but not another. Between two individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, S288c and Σ1278b, ∼1% of yeast genes…

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Central role of G protein G{alpha}i2 and G{alpha}i2+ vomeronasal neurons in balancing territorial and infant-directed aggression of male mice [Neuroscience]

Aggression is controlled by the olfactory system in many animal species. In male mice, territorial and infant-directed aggression are tightly regulated by the vomeronasal organ (VNO), but how diverse subsets of sensory neurons convey pheromonal information to limbic centers is not yet known. Here, we employ genetic strategies to show…

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{alpha}-Difluoromethylornithine reduces gastric carcinogenesis by causing mutations in Helicobacter pylori cagY [Medical Sciences]

Infection by Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The most potent H. pylori virulence factor is cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is translocated by a type 4 secretion system (T4SS) into gastric epithelial cells and activates oncogenic signaling pathways. The gene cagY encodes for a key component…

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Direct observation of individual tubulin dimers binding to growing microtubules [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The biochemical basis of microtubule growth has remained elusive for over 30 years despite being fundamental for both cell division and associated chemotherapy strategies. Here, we combine interferometric scattering microscopy with recombinant tubulin to monitor individual tubulins binding to and dissociating from growing microtubule tips. We make direct, single-molecule measurements…

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Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates a high-fat diet-mediated renal injury by activating PAX2 and AMPK [Pharmacology]

A high-fat diet (HFD) causes obesity-associated morbidities involved in macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). AMPK, the mediator of macroautophage, has been reported to be inactivated in HFD-caused renal injury. However, PAX2, the mediator for CMA, has not been reported in HFD-caused renal injury. Here we report that HFD-caused renal injury…

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Correction for Copin et al., Sequential evolution of virulence and resistance during clonal spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [Corrections]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Sequential evolution of virulence and resistance during clonal spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,” by Richard Copin, William E. Sause, Yi Fulmer, Divya Balasubramanian, Sophie Dyzenhaus, Jamil M. Ahmed, Krishan Kumar, John Lees, Anna Stachel, Jason C. Fisher, Karl Drlica, Michael Phillips, Jeffrey N. Weiser, Paul J….

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Mechanical diffraction reveals the role of passive dynamics in a slithering snake [Physiology]

Limbless animals like snakes inhabit most terrestrial environments, generating thrust to overcome drag on the elongate body via contacts with heterogeneities. The complex body postures of some snakes and the unknown physics of most terrestrial materials frustrates understanding of strategies for effective locomotion. As a result, little is known about…

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Advantaged socioeconomic conditions in childhood are associated with higher cognitive functioning but stronger cognitive decline in older age [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Cognitive aging is characterized by large heterogeneity, which may be due to variations in childhood socioeconomic conditions (CSC). Although there is substantial evidence for an effect of CSC on levels of cognitive functioning at older age, results on associations with cognitive decline are mixed. We examined by means of an…

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Vortex-induced dispersal of a plant pathogen by raindrop impact [Engineering]

Raindrop impact on infected plants can disperse micron-sized propagules of plant pathogens (e.g., spores of fungi). Little is known about the mechanism of how plant pathogens are liberated and transported due to raindrop impact. We used high-speed photography to observe thousands of dry-dispersed spores of the rust fungus Puccinia triticina…

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Aligning research with policy and practice for sustainable agricultural land systems in Europe [Sustainability Science]

Agriculture is widely recognized as critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), but researchers, policymakers, and practitioners have multiple, often conflicting yet poorly documented priorities on how agriculture could or should support achieving the SDGs. Here, we assess consensus and divergence in priorities for agricultural systems among research, policy,…

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Redox and pH gradients drive amino acid synthesis in iron oxyhydroxide mineral systems [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Iron oxyhydroxide minerals, known to be chemically reactive and significant for elemental cycling, are thought to have been abundant in early-Earth seawater, sediments, and hydrothermal systems. In the anoxic Fe2+-rich early oceans, these minerals would have been only partially oxidized and thus redox-active, perhaps able to promote prebiotic chemical reactions….

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Limits to the world’s green water resources for food, feed, fiber, timber, and bioenergy [Sustainability Science]

Green water––rainfall over land that eventually flows back to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration––is the main source of water to produce food, feed, fiber, timber, and bioenergy. To understand how freshwater scarcity constrains production of these goods, we need to consider limits to the green water footprint (WFg), the green water…

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Glial ensheathment of the somatodendritic compartment regulates sensory neuron structure and activity [Neuroscience]

Sensory neurons perceive environmental cues and are important of organismal survival. Peripheral sensory neurons interact intimately with glial cells. While the function of axonal ensheathment by glia is well studied, less is known about the functional significance of glial interaction with the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. Herein, we show that…

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Memory and resource tracking drive blue whale migrations [Ecology]

In terrestrial systems, the green wave hypothesis posits that migrating animals can enhance foraging opportunities by tracking phenological variation in high-quality forage across space (i.e., “resource waves”). To track resource waves, animals may rely on proximate cues and/or memory of long-term average phenologies. Although there is growing evidence of resource…

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SHARPIN at the nexus of integrin, immune, and inflammatory signaling in human platelets [Cell Biology]

Platelets mediate primary hemostasis, and recent work has emphasized platelet participation in immunity and inflammation. The function of the platelet-specific integrin αIIbβ3 as a fibrinogen receptor in hemostasis is well defined, but the roles of αIIbβ3 or integrin-associated proteins in nonhemostatic platelet functions are poorly understood. Here we show that…

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Extremely high-gain source-gated transistors [Engineering]

Despite being a fundamental electronic component for over 70 years, it is still possible to develop different transistor designs, including the addition of a diode-like Schottky source electrode to thin-film transistors. The discovery of a dependence of the source barrier height on the semiconductor thickness and derivation of an analytical…

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Fecal stanols show simultaneous flooding and seasonal precipitation change correlate with Cahokia’s population decline [Anthropology]

A number of competing hypotheses, including hydroclimatic variations, environmental degradation and disturbance, and sociopolitical disintegration, have emerged to explain the dissolution of Cahokia, the largest prehistoric population center in the United States. Because it is likely that Cahokia’s decline was precipitated by multiple factors, some environmental and some societal, a…

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Expert assessments of the cost and expected future performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for vehicles [Sustainability Science]

Despite decades of development, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) still lack wide market acceptance in vehicles. To understand the expected trajectories of PEMFC attributes that influence adoption, we conducted an expert elicitation assessment of the current and expected future cost and performance of automotive PEMFCs. We elicited 39 experts’…

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Correction for Rentoft et al., Heterozygous colon cancer-associated mutations of SAMHD1 have functional significance [Corrections]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “Heterozygous colon cancer-associated mutations of SAMHD1 have functional significance,” by Matilda Rentoft, Kristoffer Lindell, Phong Tran, Anna Lena Chabes, Robert J. Buckland, Danielle L. Watt, Lisette Marjavaara, Anna Karin Nilsson, Beatrice Melin, Johan Trygg, Erik Johansson, and Andrei Chabes, which was first published April 11, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1519128113…

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Correction for Giguere-Croteau et al., North America’s oldest boreal trees are more efficient water users due to increased [CO2], but do not grow faster [Corrections]

PLANT BIOLOGY, EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “North America’s oldest boreal trees are more efficient water users due to increased [CO2], but do not grow faster,” by Claudie Giguère-Croteau, Étienne Boucher, Yves Bergeron, Martin P. Girardin, Igor Drobyshev, Lucas C. R. Silva, Jean-François Hélie, and Michelle Garneau, which…

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Correction for Bloomfield et al., Triparental inheritance in Dictyostelium [Corrections]

GENETICS Correction for “Triparental inheritance in Dictyostelium,” by Gareth Bloomfield, Peggy Paschke, Marina Okamoto, Tim J. Stevens, and Hideko Urushihara, which was first published January 22, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1814425116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:2187–2192). The authors note that Fig. 4 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and its legend appear below….

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Rapidly declining remarkability of temperature anomalies may obscure public perception of climate change [Sustainability Science]

The changing global climate is producing increasingly unusual weather relative to preindustrial conditions. In an absolute sense, these changing conditions constitute direct evidence of anthropogenic climate change. However, human evaluation of weather as either normal or abnormal will also be influenced by a range of factors including expectations, memory limitations,…

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Evolution of chloroplast retrograde signaling facilitates green plant adaptation to land [Evolution]

Chloroplast retrograde signaling networks are vital for chloroplast biogenesis, operation, and signaling, including excess light and drought stress signaling. To date, retrograde signaling has been considered in the context of land plant adaptation, but not regarding the origin and evolution of signaling cascades linking chloroplast function to stomatal regulation. We…

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Nitrogen-fixing red alder trees tap rock-derived nutrients [Ecology]

Symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing trees supply significant N inputs to forest ecosystems, leading to increased soil fertility, forest growth, and carbon storage. Rapid growth and stoichiometric constraints of N fixers also create high demands for rock-derived nutrients such as phosphorus (P), while excess fixed N can generate acidity and accelerate leaching…

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Lead isotopes in silver reveal earliest Phoenician quest for metals in the west Mediterranean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

When and why did the Phoenicians initiate long-term connections between the Levant and western Europe? This is one of the most hotly debated questions in ancient Mediterranean history and cultural research. In this study, we use silver to answer this question, presenting the largest dataset of chemical and isotopic analyses…

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Migrating whales depend on memory to exploit reliable resources [Commentaries]

Animal migrations, which can span hundreds to thousands of kilometers and require journeys lasting weeks to months, are fascinating biological phenomena. Across systems and species, key questions focus on the behavioral mechanisms that facilitate successful migrations. Perception, information sharing among individuals, and various forms of memory separate migration from other…

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Widespread global peatland establishment and persistence over the last 130,000 y [Environmental Sciences]

Glacial−interglacial variations in CO2 and methane in polar ice cores have been attributed, in part, to changes in global wetland extent, but the wetland distribution before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ka to 18 ka) remains virtually unknown. We present a study of global peatland extent and carbon (C)…

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Geoarchaeological evidence from Angkor, Cambodia, reveals a gradual decline rather than a catastrophic 15th-century collapse [Environmental Sciences]

Alternative models exist for the movement of large urban populations following the 15th-century CE abandonment of Angkor, Cambodia. One model emphasizes an urban diaspora following the implosion of state control in the capital related, in part, to hydroclimatic variability. An alternative model suggests a more complex picture and a gradual…

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Activation of GCN2 by the ribosomal P-stalk [Biochemistry]

Cells dynamically adjust their protein translation profile to maintain homeostasis in changing environments. During nutrient stress, the kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α, initiating the integrated stress response (ISR). To examine the mechanism of GCN2 activation, we have reconstituted this process in vitro, using purified…

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Morphology, pathology, and the vertebral posture of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal [Anthropology]

Although the early postural reconstructions of the Neandertals as incompletely erect were rejected half a century ago, recent studies of Neandertal vertebral remains have inferred a hypolordotic, flat lower back and spinal imbalance for them, including the La Chapelle-aux-Saints 1 skeleton. These studies form part of a persistent trend to…

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Residential green space in childhood is associated with lower risk of psychiatric disorders from adolescence into adulthood [Environmental Sciences]

Urban residence is associated with a higher risk of some psychiatric disorders, but the underlying drivers remain unknown. There is increasing evidence that the level of exposure to natural environments impacts mental health, but few large-scale epidemiological studies have assessed the general existence and importance of such associations. Here, we…

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Thank a cloud today

Environment Five reasons you shouldn't take cloud cover for granted. Cloudy days aren’t popular, but alarming new research suggests we’ve been taking our fluffy friends for granted.

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Master the Internet of Things with this Raspberry Pi hacker bundle

Pick up four courses for only $19. Pick up four courses for only $19 and master the Internet of Things with this Raspberry Pi hacker bundle.

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Report: In Fatal Crash, Door Handles Fail on Burning Tesla

Fatal Collision A man died after crashing a 2016 Tesla Model S into a tree in Miami, Florida yesterday afternoon, according to local news . The car reportedly swerved through multiple lanes of traffic before hitting a median and some trees and bursting into flames — and the death may have been related to the electric carmaker’s iconic pop-out door handles malfunctioning after the wreck. “Efforts

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A faster method to read quantum memory

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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New study shows use of medication abortion rebounded in Texas after FDA label change

Proportion of medication abortion plummeted after House Bill 2, bounced back after FDA label change on abortion medication mifepristone.

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How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species

Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease.

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How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species

Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease.

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Pinterest, YouTube say acting against anti-vaccine messages

Several social networks including Pinterest and YouTube have detailed measures they are taking in response to pressure to combat disinformation on vaccines, which they have been accused of enabling.

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Facebook plays defense over concerns about content moderators' mental health – CNET

The social network stands by its hiring of contractors to review content, though says there's room for improvement.

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Humpback Whale Washes Ashore in Amazon River, Baffling Scientists in Brazil

The young humpback was found on an island near the mouth of the river, about 4,000 miles from Antarctica, where they usually feed this time of the year.

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What was socialism like during the Seattle General Strike?

In 1919, the city of Seattle was shut down by a strike. Most business that took place was union approved. The story shows how a city can be run by workers even in the United States. It also shows that big ideas can benefit from well thought out plans. The world was pretty unstable one hundred years ago. The Spanish flu was decimating global populations already ravaged by the first world war, revo

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2019 Nissan Leaf EV Review: The Long Ranger Rides, Finally

Leaf Plus EV joins the high 200-mile club: 226 miles rated, 235-240 likely. It's a solid contender, especially when it undercuts the Tesla Model 3. ProPilot Assist is a big plus. The post 2019 Nissan Leaf EV Review: The Long Ranger Rides, Finally appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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AI extracts speech bubbles from comic strips

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Crispr Infuses First Human in Landmark Gene-Editing Study

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Climate Change Is Eliminating Clouds. Without Them, Earth Burns

Clear Skies In addition to trapping heat, new research suggests that greenhouse gases are eliminating the sky’s clouds — which could drastically speed up the pace of global warming over the coming century. As carbon accumulates in the atmosphere, it breaks up the low-hanging stratocumulus clouds that help cool the planet. With those clouds out of the way, the planet could experience a rapid, glob

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Magic Leap Wants to Build AR “Layers” Over The Entire Earth

Magicverse Chorus Augmented reality startup Magic Leap wants to merge the digital and the physical worlds. In October, CEO Rony Abovitz first shared the idea of the “Magicverse,” a series of digital layers that would exist in AR over the physical world. On Saturday, the company elaborated on the concept with a blog post and new interview — and its vision of the future is one in which the line bet

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How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species

Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease.

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Device spots cancer in a single blood drop

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device that could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, report researchers. The device could lead to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients. The “lab-on-a-chip” for liquid biopsy analysis detects exosomes—tiny parcels of biological information tumor cells produce to stimulate tumor growth or metastasize. “Histori

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Tariffs, BAT, and Social Credit: A US-China Debate

Intelligence Squared U.S. gathers five foreign policy experts to debate and discuss China's tech ascension.

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The Boring Company’s Chicago Tunnel Project Might Soon be Dead

Digging Tunnels Elon Musk’s Boring Company is hitting a lot of roadblocks in its quest to connect downtown Chicago with O’Hare International Airport, The Verge reports . The tunnel-digging venture’s plans to dig a pair of 18 mile (29 km) tunnels for just $1 billion is on shaky ground. The concept has been met with ridicule and a ton of red tape — and it even got sucked in to corruption scandals .

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Entangling photons of different colors

Some of the most advanced communication systems now under development rely on the properties of quantum science to store and transport information. However, researchers designing quantum communication systems that rely on light, rather than electric current, to transmit information face a quandary: The optical components that store and process quantum information typically require visible-light ph

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Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia

A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St. Louis. And it involves ancient human poop.

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Entangling photons of different colors

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a novel way to entangle two photons–one with a wavelength suitable for quantum-computing devices and the other for fiber-optics transmissions.

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How your genes could affect the quality of your marriage

How important is it to consider a romantic partner's genetic profile before getting married? It is logical to think that genetic factors may underlie many traits already used by matching sites – like personality and empathy – which many assume could promote initial chemistry and long-term potential in specific couples. So it is perhaps not surprising that there are now websites that combine genet

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Plants' drought alert system has unlikely evolutionary origin: underwater algae

Plants' water-to-land leap marks one of the most important milestones in the evolution of life on Earth. But how plants managed this transition when faced with unfamiliar challenges such as drought and bright light has been unclear.

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New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse

New University of Sydney research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse.

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Plants' drought alert system has unlikely evolutionary origin: underwater algae

Plants' water-to-land leap marks one of the most important milestones in the evolution of life on Earth. But how plants managed this transition when faced with unfamiliar challenges such as drought and bright light has been unclear.

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Mini-tornadoes of spores illuminated during raindrop impact

Plant diseases are a significant threat to our food security. Rain provides fresh water to our crops, but splashing drops may also contribute to the spread of plant disease. Raindrop impact is known to be a mechanism for dispersing microscopic spores of pathogens, which infect staple crops and devastate crop yields.

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It takes very little to successfully disguise yourself

We're not as good at facial recognition as you might think. Who needs Mission Impossible latex masks? You can change your hair or make up and pass for someone else. None Maybe Lois Lane wasn't so stupid after all. A brilliant reporter, yes, but of all the implausibilities of the Superman story, her inability to tell that Clark Kent and Superman were the same person thanks to a pair of glasses str

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Do industries that kill more people than they employ have a right to exist?

A study developed a formula to identify industries that do more bad than good. The U.S. coal and tobacco qualify as having a net negative value to society. Should we tolerate any industry that makes a profit? None Joshua Pearce of Michigan Technological University has raised an interesting question: If "The unwritten rule with industry is you get to make money if you're a benefit to society," wha

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Migrating blue whales rely on memory more than environmental cues to find prey

Blue whales reach their massive size by relying on their exceptional memories to find historically productive feeding sites rather than responding in real time to emerging prey patches, a new study concludes.

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Breakthrough shines light on disease-fighting protein

X-ray and electron microscopy techniques help unfold the story of protein chaperones.

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Migrating blue whales rely on memory more than environmental cues to find prey

Blue whales reach their massive size by relying on their exceptional memories to find historically productive feeding sites rather than responding in real time to emerging prey patches, a new study concludes.

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Nitrogen-fixing trees 'eat' rocks, play pivotal role in forest health

By tapping nutrients from bedrock, red alder trees play a key role in healthy forest ecosystems, according to a new study.

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Tweets tell scientists how quickly we normalize unusual weather

What kinds of weather do people find remarkable, when does that change, and what does that say about the public's perception of climate change? A study led by the University of California, Davis, examined those questions through the lens of more than 2 billion U.S. Twitter posts.

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A.I. saves phone battery for when you need it

Artificial intelligence can predict when you’ll reach for your phone to make the most of your battery life, according to new research. Chu Luo, Jorge Goncalves, Eduardo Velloso, and Vassilis Kostakos, all of the University of Melbourne, explain their research here. How many times have you lost your competitive edge because your smartphone starts downloading large email files while you’re playing

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How a Modern Exorcist Fights Evil

In the rolling Tuscan hills of Italy, the Vatican’s most prominent exorcist fights the true essence of evil. Father Raffaele Talmelli is engaged in an age-old tradition, but he takes a decidedly unorthodox approach to battling demons. Ivan Olita’s short documentary Contra Dæmones offers an inside look at the modern exorcist’s practice. “People have totally misleading ideas about both evil and dem

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For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments

One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5 percent said they or their family had filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of illness or treatment.

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A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health

While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. In a small study in Columbus, researchers found that many migrants celebrated living in Columbus. However, they also experienced discrimination and exhibited physical signs of stress, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar and obesity.

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Belief in conspiracy theories makes people more likely to engage in low-level crime

People who believe in conspiracy theories—such as the theory that Princess Diana was murdered by the British establishment—are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity.

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New periodic table of droplets could help solve crimes

Liquid droplets assume complex shapes and behave in different ways, each with a distinct resonance—like a drum head or a violin string—depending on the intricate interrelationship of the liquid, the solid it lands on and the gas surrounding it.

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Google's rumored Pixel 3 Lite devices reportedly leak in FCC listings

It's no secret that smartphones are getting more expensive every year. The $1,000 iPhone X debacle is one indicator of this trend, but Samsung's $2,000 Galaxy Fold is arguably a much more egregious …

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Most Americans don’t realize what companies can predict from their data

Sixty-seven percent of smartphone users rely on Google Maps to help them get to where they are going quickly and efficiently. A major of feature of Google Maps is its ability to predict how long different navigation routes will take. That's possible because the mobile phone of each person using Google Maps sends data about its location and speed back to Google's servers, where it is analyzed to g

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The endangered species list is full of ghosts

Animals Like dozens of others, the Scioto madtom has probably been extinct for years even though it's still listed as "endangered." The International Union for Conservation of Nature, which organizes the international species lists, declared the Scioto madtom extinct in 2013. It had last been seen…

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Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise

Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to Penn State researchers.

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New study reveals when a superconductor truly becomes super

Unraveling the mystery of superconductivity at high temperatures, specifically in copper oxide materials, remains one of the most puzzling challenges in modern solid-state physics. But an international research team of engineers and scientists may have taken one step closer to understanding.

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Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise

Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to Penn State researchers.

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Study: Political parties sideline minority voters, leave other orgs to pick up the slack

A vote is a vote is a vote, supposedly, with each citizen in our democracy having an equal say. Yet a San Francisco State University study finds that America's political parties act as though some votes are more important than others, with white voters being contacted more frequently than their counterparts in other groups.

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Younger Americans much more likely to be arrested than previous generations

Americans under the age of 26 are much more likely to be arrested than Americans born in previous decades, with the increase in arrest rates occurring most rapidly among white Americans and women, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

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Report cards show continued sea-level rise on East & Gulf coasts

Researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science have issued the first annual update of their sea level "report cards," marking 50 years of water-level observations from 1969 through 2018.

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Breakthrough shines light on disease-fighting protein

X-ray and electron microscopy techniques help unfold the story of protein chaperones.

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Elevation matters when it comes to climate change, deforestation and species survival

University of Toronto student George Sandler was shocked to see the rainforest floor suddenly come to life around him, as if in a scene from an Indiana Jones movie.

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Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate

On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work from Carnegie's Leander Anderegg and University of Washington's Janneke Hille Ris Lambers.

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India's integrated child development program increases educational attainment

India is home to an estimated 114 million children under the age of five years—the largest population of this age group in the world. Undernutrition is common; thirty percent of all children and 45 percent of adolescent girls are underweight and 39 percent are stunted. Numerous studies have demonstrated that undernutrition during the first two to three years of life has short-term adverse conseque

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Scientists uncover genetic roadmap of cultivated strawberry

Consumers want strawberries to be red, sweet, ripe and juicy, like those fresh picked from a garden. Suppliers want them to be easy to handle and ship, without getting squished. Commercial strawberry growers need their crops to be high-yielding and disease-resistant.

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New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples. The microfluidic device works by separating the various cell types found in blood by their size. The device may one day enable rapid, cheap liquid biopsies to help detect cancer and develop targeted t

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Super Typhoon Wutip's 25 mile-wide eye seen by NASA-NOAA satellite

Tropical Cyclone Wutip has strengthened into a powerful super typhoon and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snapped a visible image of the storm that revealed a clear eye.

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Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments

A 3-D hydrogel created by researchers in U of T Engineering Professor Molly Shoichet's lab is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers.

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Scientists uncover genetic roadmap of cultivated strawberry

Consumers want strawberries to be red, sweet, ripe and juicy, like those fresh picked from a garden. Suppliers want them to be easy to handle and ship, without getting squished. Commercial strawberry growers need their crops to be high-yielding and disease-resistant.

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Climate Change Could Make These Super-Common Clouds Extinct, Which Would Scorch the Planet

Carbon dioxide emissions could wipe out one of Earth's most common types of clouds. That's bad news.

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Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise

Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to Penn State researchers.

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130,000 years of data show peatlands store carbon long-term

An international team of scientists has become the first to conduct a study of global peatland extent and carbon stocks through the last interglacial-glacial cycle 130,000 years ago to the present. The team discovered that northern peatland expanded across high latitudes during warm periods and were buried during periods of cooling, or glacial advance.

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New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse

New University of Sydney research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse.

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Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans — thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France.

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Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia

A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St. Louis. And it involves ancient human poop.

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Common virus is 'less prone to mutation' giving hope for vaccine development

One of the commonest causes of congenital disability, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is less prone to mutation than previously thought, a finding which could help develop a successful vaccine, UCL researchers have found.

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Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible

Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis, a technique that could become fundamental to medical research. The new procedure makes in vitro protein synthesis more widely accessible for research and educational use.

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New periodic table of droplets could help solve crimes

Scientists have created a periodic table of droplet motions, inspired in part by parallels between the symmetries of atomic orbitals, which determine elements' positions on the classic periodic table, and the energies that determine droplet shapes.

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Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia

Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a new study. Mental activities included reading, playing instruments, singing in a choir, visiting concerts, gardening, doing needlework or attending religious services.

19h

New form of hereditary osteoporosis

Researchers have identified a new gene whose variants cause hereditary childhood-onset osteoporosis. The gene defect was first found in two Finnish families.

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Avoiding the crack of doom

The deformations and fractures that cause catastrophic failure in materials begin with a few molecules torn out of place, a process of urgent interest to researchers. Now scientists have devised a way to observe the effects of strain at the single-molecule level.

19h

New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood

Researchers have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples.

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Giant animals lived in Amazonian mega-wetland

Lake systems existing in regions over 10 million years ago survived the Amazon River reversal due to Andean uplift.

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Clouds’ cooling effect could vanish in a warmer world

Clouds’ cooling effect could vanish in a warmer world Clouds’ cooling effect could vanish in a warmer world, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00685-x High concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide can result in the dispersal of cloud banks that reflect about 30% of Earth’s sunlight.

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A quest for silver sparked epic voyages by an ancient people

A quest for silver sparked epic voyages by an ancient people A quest for silver sparked epic voyages by an ancient people , Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00686-w Chemical evidence suggests that the Phoenicians had spread to the Iberian Peninsula by the ninth century bc.

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Greener Childhood Associated With Happier Adulthood

Research suggests the more of your childhood that is spent surrounded by green spaces, the lower your risk of developing mental illness in adulthood, whether in the city or the country. (Image credit: Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images)

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Nu kan smartphones foldes: Ekspert tvivler på opbakning fra kunderne

Den seneste uge har både Samsung og Huawei præsenteret en foldbar smartphone.

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Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests

The federal government considers many factors when dividing money nationwide to prevent structure fires. The key driver, however, is economic losses—for example, the greater the cost of fire within a state, the more aid that state is likely to receive.

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New imaging technique reveals how mechanical damage begins at the molecular scale

Just as a journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step, the deformations and fractures that cause catastrophic failure in materials begin with a few molecules torn out of place. This in turn leads to a cascade of damage at increasingly larger scales, culminating in total mechanical breakdown. That process is of urgent interest to researchers studying how to build high-strength composite materi

19h

New NASA mission could find more than 1,000 planets

A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth's solar system, new research suggests.

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Is the World’s Largest Animal Too Reliant on the Past?

Imagine trying to test the memory of the blue whale—the biggest animal that exists or has ever existed, a 190-ton behemoth that dwarfs even the largest dinosaur, a leviathan that is rarely seen except when it comes up for air and a minute part of its 110-foot-long body breaks the surface and slowly crests for what seems like an eternity. How would you subject such a creature to a psychological te

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GMO people and animals

submitted by /u/pinky2906 [link] [comments]

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Your Weather Tweets Are Showing Your Climate Amnesia

A database of 2 billion tweets shows people get so used to weather extremes they might stop noticing them. That's bad for action on climate change.

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Robust and specific gene regulation tool developed for primary brain neurons

A powerful neuroscience tool is available to investigate brain development, mechanisms of memory and learning, and brain dysregulation in neuropsychiatric diseases like addiction, depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. This molecular biology tool can selectively and robustly turn on genes in vitro and in brain neurons of living adult rats. It can turn on a single gene or multiple genes

19h

New NASA mission could find more than 1,000 planets

A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth's solar system, new research suggests.

19h

A new sequencing method to detect DNA modifications of relevance to cancer

Scientists report a new and improved method to detect chemical modifications to DNA. These modifications — or 'epigenetic' marks — help control gene expression and their aberrant distribution across the genome contributes to cancer progression and resistance to therapy.

19h

Immune system's unknown messenger

A previously unknown messenger which alarms nearby cells when the immune system recognizes a bacterial or viral infection has been uncovered.

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Researchers discover 'chromosome scanner' that protects against cancer

Researchers have identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA.

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Ape-like or human? Disagreement erupts over Neanderthal posture

Recent studies are attempts to render Neanderthals 'less human', researchers say. Dyani Lewis reports.

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The humble wild plant that made the strawberry succulent

The humble wild plant that made the strawberry succulent The humble wild plant that made the strawberry succulent, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00657-1 Beloved fruit has a tangled family tree — but owes much of its fragrance and sweetness to just one ancestor.

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High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones

Engineers have developed a high-powered fuel cell that operates at double the voltage of today's commercial fuel cells. It could power underwater vehicles, drones and eventually electric aircraft at a significantly lower cost.

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To feel happier at work, share ‘the real you’

At work, it’s healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study. The study examines 65 studies focusing on what happens after people in a workplace disclose a stigmatized identity, such as sexual orientation, mental illness, physical disability, or pregnancy. Eden King, a coauthor of the study and an associate professor of psychology at Rice University, calls the decisio

19h

Light-driven signaling of bacteria may provide clues to defeat dangerous infections

From the complex to the simple, all life forms have mechanisms for translating environmental cues into cellular behavior that helps them survive. This universal activity may hold the key to understanding how common bacteria transform into virulent, deadly infections in humans, but the multifaceted protein sensing and signaling processes that allow lifeforms to adapt are poorly understood in even t

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Identifying common ground for sustainable agriculture in Europe

Agriculture is critical to achieving many Sustainable Development Goals. New research from Lund University shows that researchers, policymakers, and farmers in Europe currently have different, often conflicting, priorities for sustainable agriculture. The researchers propose a way forward built on shared priorities.

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Light-driven signaling of bacteria may provide clues to defeat dangerous infections

From the complex to the simple, all life forms have mechanisms for translating environmental cues into cellular behavior that helps them survive. This universal activity may hold the key to understanding how common bacteria transform into virulent, deadly infections in humans, but the multifaceted protein sensing and signaling processes that allow lifeforms to adapt are poorly understood in even t

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Ancient wetlands provide new insight into global carbon cycle

Scientists have unearthed and pieced together evidence on more than 1,000 ancient wetland sites from across the globe that are presently covered by fields, forests and lakes. Although vanished from the Earth's surface, these buried sites could explain some of the differences between global carbon cycle models and real-life observations.

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Facebook Mods Are so Traumatized They’re Getting High at Work

Making Sausage The people who moderate Facebook spend their days reading and watching conspiracy theories, violent murders, and hate speech, often hundreds of times per day. Many of them — who actually work for a professional services company called Cognizant — don’t make it a full year of consuming the absolute worst of the internet before quitting, The Verge ‘s Casey Newton found in a chilling

19h

Elon Musk: Mars Base Will Have “Outdoorsy, Fun Atmosphere”

Fun Atmosphere In an interview newly published by Popular Mechanics , SpaceX CEO Elon Musk shared his thoughts on colonizing Mars — from how the first settlers will grow food to the friendly vibe he envisions at the first base on the Red Planet. “For having an outdoorsy, fun atmosphere, you’d probably want to have some faceted glass dome, with a park, so you can walk around without a suit,” Musk

19h

New study reveals when a superconductor truly becomes super

A research team including Jianshi Zhou from UT Austin has confirmed the existence of a phase transition in copper-oxide-based (or cuprate) superconductors. The team believes that it could be during this 'quantum critical point,' when superconductivity actually occurs.

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Identifying barriers to care for women with endometriosis

An expert review by a Society for Women's Health Research working group identifies areas of need in endometriosis to improve a woman's diagnosis, treatment, and access to quality care. Barriers to care include societal normalization of women's pain, stigma around menstrual issues, lack of knowledge and awareness about endometriosis, limitations of current diagnostic and treatment options, and diff

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Ancient Angkor’s mysterious decline may have been slow, not sudden

Analyzing sediment from the massive city’s moat challenges the idea that the last capital of the Khmer Empire collapsed suddenly.

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In the Brazilian Amazon, Power Lines Compound the Environmental Destruction of Hydroelectric Dams

In the Brazilian Amazon, Power Lines Compound the Environmental Destruction of Hydroelectric Dams A new study highlights the magnitude of transmission lines' potential negative effects on the forest. BeloMonte_topNteaser.jpg Belo Monte dam under construction in northern Brazil. Image credits: Anfri via Pixabay . Earth Monday, February 25, 2019 – 13:30 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) —

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Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible

Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), a technique that could become fundamental to medical research.

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Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible

Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), a technique that could become fundamental to medical research.

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New periodic table of droplets could help solve crimes

A team led by Paul Steen, professor of engineering at Cornell University, has created a periodic table of droplet motions, inspired in part by parallels between the symmetries of atomic orbitals, which determine elements' positions on the classic periodic table, and the energies that determine droplet shapes.

20h

Giant animals lived in Amazonian mega-wetland

Lake systems existing in regions over 10 million years ago survived the Amazon River reversal due to Andean uplift.

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Roundup weed killer contributed to man's cancer, 1st US federal trial told

The controversial weed killer Roundup was a "substantial factor" in the cancer of a US man who woke up one day with a lump in his throat and was soon diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, his lawyer said Monday, opening the first US federal trial of its kind.

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Reddit to open Dublin office this year

Social media firm Reddit said on Monday it will open an office in Dublin later this year, part of international expansion plans after raising $300 million in new funding.

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Roundup weed killer contributed to man's cancer, 1st US federal trial told

The controversial weed killer Roundup was a "substantial factor" in the cancer of a US man who woke up one day with a lump in his throat and was soon diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, his lawyer said Monday, opening the first US federal trial of its kind.

20h

Palmer i Arktis: Vi er på vej til at slå oldgammel klimarekord

For 56 millioner år siden var kloden syv grader varmere end nu. Vi udleder nu ti gange så meget CO2, som naturlige omstændigheder gjorde dengang, siger forskere.

20h

Genetic roadmap of cultivated strawberry

Scientists have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits.

20h

Continued sea-level rise on East and Gulf coasts detailed

Interactive plots provide annual sea-level projections to 2050 for 32 localities along the US coastline from Maine to Alaska.

20h

Faster method to read quantum memory

Scientists have developed a faster way to read information out of qubits, the basic building blocks of a quantum computer.

20h

Laser drill leads to world record in plasma acceleration

Scientists have set a new world record for plasma accelerators: In a plasma tube only 20 centimeters long, the team has accelerated electrons to an energy of 7.8 billion electron volts (GeV).

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Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments

A 3D hydrogel is helping researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers.

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'Mermaid tears' are killing our oceans

Environment Also known as 'nurdles,' these tiny pellets are a major source of plastic pollution. Also known as “mermaid tears”, these small plastic pellets are a feedstock in the plastic industry. Instead of being converted into household items, many end up in the…

20h

Grandma's Influence is Good for Grandkids

Grandmothers can enhance the survival of grandchildren. That is, unless grandma’s too old or lives too far away. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible

Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis, a technique that could become fundamental to medical research. The new procedure makes in vitro protein synthesis more widely accessible for research and educational use.

20h

Some personal beliefs and morals may stem from genetics

Penn State researchers found that while parents can help encourage their children to develop into responsible, conscientious adults, there is an underlying genetic factor that influences these traits, as well.

20h

Avoiding the crack of doom

The deformations and fractures that cause catastrophic failure in materials begin with a few molecules torn out of place, a process of urgent interest to researchers. Now scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have devised a way to observe the effects of strain at the single-molecule level.

20h

The importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention, treatment of heart failure in women

There are many important differences between women and men with heart failure, highlighting the importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention and treatment, according to three papers publishing today in JACC: Heart Failure. This special focus issue will explore heart failure in women.

20h

High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones

Engineers have developed a high-powered fuel cell that operates at double the voltage of today's commercial fuel cells. It could power underwater vehicles, drones and eventually electric aircraft at a significantly lower cost.

20h

Grandma's Influence is Good for Grandkids

Grandmothers can enhance the survival of grandchildren. That is, unless grandma’s too old or lives too far away. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Daughters of stressed meerkat moms more likely to help out

When meerkat mothers feel stressed, it alters the growth and behavior of their daughters in a way that makes them more likely to help mom at their own expense, a new study shows. Daughters of stressed meerkat mothers—but not sons—grow more slowly early in life, which reduces their future chances of having babies of their own. Instead, daughters from stressed mothers redirect their energy to help

20h

Elevation matters when it comes to climate change, deforestation and species survival

A study examining the impact of deforestation on lizard communities in the Dominican Republic demonstrates differing outcomes at different elevations. In the lowlands, deforestation reduces the number of individuals, but not which species occur in an area. In the highlands, it's the opposite. When the forest is cut down at higher elevations, the newly created pastures become filled with species fo

20h

Breakthrough shines light on disease-fighting protein

A combination of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy assisted in a collaborative effort to obtain the highest-resolution structure of the fungal protein Hsp104, which may serve to hinder the formation of certain degenerative diseases.

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Grandma's Influence is Good for Grandkids

Grandmothers can enhance the survival of grandchildren. That is, unless grandma’s too old or lives too far away. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples.

20h

Study: Political parties sideline minority voters, leave other orgs to pick up the slack

Political parties sideline minority voters, and leave other organizations to pick up the slack. Outreach by nonpartisan institutions increases nonwhite voter participation.

20h

Discovery of colon cancer pathway could lead to new targeted treatments

University of Massachusetts Amherst food science researchers have pinpointed a set of enzymes involved in tumor growth that could be targeted to prevent or treat colon cancer.

20h

Regaining independence after hip fracture — age is the most important predictor

Most middle-aged and older adults recover their ability to live independently within a year after surgery for hip fracture, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

20h

Alzheimer’s Trial Will “Bathe” Patients’ Brains in Helpful Genes

Brain Bath Roughly 25 years ago, the hunt for a cause of Alzheimer’s disease led researchers to the gene APOE . This gene comes in three common variants, and the version a person has appears to increase or decrease their risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Soon, researchers will launch a clinical trial in which they’ll attempt to “ bathe ” the brains of people with the increased-risk version of the g

20h

Iowa Will Make or Break Both Amy Klobuchar and Kamala Harris

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa—Demographically and economically, Iowa isn’t actually that representative of the country as a whole. But even as the demographics and economics make it less like the rest of America, Iowa’s absurdly outsize role in picking the leader of the free world remains. Enter two candidates, in the space of 48 hours, who both see the state as crucial: two women, two senators, two form

20h

HTC Unveils 5G Wirless Hub At MWC 2019 Bringing 5G To Existing Devices

Odds are that most people have multiple devices that need internet connectivity on the go, be it a smartphone, tablet, or laptop. These gadgets represent a significant investment in money and …

21h

BMW drivers will be able to control their car just by LOOKING at the controls by 2021

Gaze recognition was unveiled at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona. It allows the car's internal controls to be operated by simply looking at them.

21h

Team uncovers strawberry’s odd evolutionary origins

Researchers have discovered that the cultivated garden strawberry’s complex evolutionary history started long ago on opposite sides of the world. Until now, researchers have known little about the evolutionary origins of the cultivated strawberry. While most species, including humans, are diploid with two copies of the genome—one copy from each parent—the strawberry is an octoploid, with eight co

21h

Could these brain changes explain phantom limb?

Changes in communication between sensory and motor areas of the brain after lower limb amputation could explain phantom sensation, even without pain.

21h

It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles

Physicists report that they have developed a new system to trap individual excitons — bound pairs of electrons and their associated positive charges. Their system could form the basis of a novel experimental platform for monitoring excitons with precision and potentially developing new quantum technologies.

21h

Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate

On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work. The findings are an important step in understanding how forest growth will respond to a climate altered by human activity.

21h

The secret behind witchweed's devastating ability to steal nutrients from crops

Commonly known as 'witchweed,' the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica devastates crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have discovered a unique protein in Striga that helps sustain its high transpiration. Striga uses transpiration to effectively steal water and nutrients from its hosts, so this protein could provide a new target for controlling Striga.

21h

Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do

Biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes.

21h

New membrane water treatment system to reduce toxic waste by over 90 percent

A new pilot plant to treat industrial wastewater is being built in Singapore, which could potentially reduce the amount of liquid waste by over 90 percent.

21h

Jeff Bezos: In the Future, We’ll Live In “Giant Space Colonies”

“Giant Space Colonies” Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos thinks that in the future humanity will live in “giant space colonies,” rather than settling on the surface of planets, according to an interview with Space News senior staff writer Jeff Foust last week. The concept is pretty simple, according to Bezos: travel to other planets requires a lot of fuel and energy. “The space colonies we’ll build will have

21h

Manipulating gene expression in neurons with CRISPR

Neuroscientists have used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to regulate genes in the rat brain. Described in eNeuro, this technique paves the way for researchers to probe genetic influences on brain health and disease in model organisms that more closely resemble human conditions.

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ADHD drug Ritalin has no effect on primate prefrontal cortex

In contrast to studies of mice and rats, new research published in eNeuro investigating the effect of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on neuronal activity in monkeys has found no effect of the drug on the prefrontal cortex. The study leaves open the question of how and why Ritalin improves attention in humans.

21h

Researchers invent a needle that knows where to go

Syringes and hollow needles have been used to deliver medication for more than a century. However, the precise implementation of these devices depends on the operator, and it can be difficult to deliver medication to delicate regions such as the suprachoroidal space at the back of the eye. Investigators have developed a highly sensitive intelligent-injector for tissue-targeting (i2T2) that detects

21h

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds

Computer modeling shows that marine stratus clouds could disappear if atmospheric CO2 levels climb high enough, raising global temperatures.

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Amazon forest: Areas with higher rainfall variability are more resilient to climate change

The Amazon rainforest has evolved over millions of years and even through ice ages. Yet today, human influences and global climate change put this huge ecosystem at risk of large-scale dieback — with major consequences for its capability as a global CO2 sink. New research now reveals a key player in shaping the resilience of the Amazon, and finds that regions with generally higher rainfall variab

21h

Boost for Australian grain industry

New findings could lead to a significant increase in the Australian wheat crop yield — adding potentially around $1.8 billion to the national economy and improving global food security.

21h

It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles

Physicists report that they have developed a new system to trap individual excitons — bound pairs of electrons and their associated positive charges. Their system could form the basis of a novel experimental platform for monitoring excitons with precision and potentially developing new quantum technologies.

21h

Money-savers focus attention — and eyes — on the prize

Why can some people patiently save for the future, while others opt for fewer dollars now? A new study reaches some surprising conclusions. Saving takes patience — forgoing instant rewards for larger, delayed rewards. Yet 'patient savers' don't slowly weigh options and aren't necessarily better at resisting temptation. Instead, choosing between less money now or more later, savers focus on the do

21h

Key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA silencing Argonaute enzyme unveiled

The Argonaute (Ago) enzyme complex plays a critical role in DNA and RNA target cleavage for a process known as RNA silencing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them a target for future gene-editing technology. The present study unravels key differences between prokaryotic Ago (pAgo) and eukaryotic Ago (eAgo) enzymes in the cleavage reaction and may provide important clues on their evoluti

21h

New skeletal disease found and explained

Researchers have discovered a new and rare skeletal disease. They describe the molecular mechanism of the disease, in which small RNA molecules play a role that has never before been observed in a congenital human disease. The results are important for affected patients but can also help scientists to understand other rare diagnoses.

21h

CO2 emissions in developed economies fall due to decreasing fossil fuel and energy use

Efforts to cut emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and tackle climate change in developed economies are beginning to pay off according to new research.

21h

Warren Buffett: “Electric Cars Are Very Much in America’s Future”

Crystal Ball American electric car manufacturers just got a powerful vote of confidence. With tax credits for buying an electric vehicle going away and some of America’s most powerful corporations working hand-in-hand with the fossil fuel industry, it may be hard to fathom electric cars ever overtaking their gas-guzzling counterparts. But in billionaire investor Warren Buffett’s opinion, a prolif

21h

New protein 'switch' could be key to controlling blood-poisoning and preventing death from sepsis

Scientists have discovered a new protein 'switch' that could stop the progression of blood-poisoning, or sepsis, and increase the chances of surviving the life-threatening disease.

21h

Urban parks could make you happier

Researchers found spending 20 minutes in an urban park will make someone happier — whether they are engaging in exercise or not during the visit.

21h

Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history

A research team has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized.

21h

Old stars live longer than we thought

The type of stars we refer to, which cannot be seen by the naked eye, officially up to now the objects which have suffered the greatest loss of mass. But the spiral structures detected by an international team show that this is not the case.

21h

A new spin in nano-electronics

In recent years, electronic data processing has been evolving in one direction only: the industry has downsized its components to the nanometer range. But this process is now reaching its physical limits. Researchers are therefore exploring spin waves — a promising alternative for transporting information in more compact microchips. Cooperating with international partners, they have successfully

21h

Tortoise Not Seen for 113 Years Found on Galapagos Island

Chelonoidis phantasticus, or the Fernandina giant tortoise, was feared extinct until an expedition found a lone female in a remote area on the island of Fernandina.

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New NASA mission could find more than 1,000 planets

A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth's solar system, new research suggests.

21h

Breeding a better strawberry

An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits.

21h

A new sequencing method to detect DNA modifications of relevance to cancer

Ludwig Cancer Research scientists report in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology a new and improved method to detect chemical modifications to DNA. These modifications — or 'epigenetic' marks — help control gene expression and their aberrant distribution across the genome contributes to cancer progression and resistance to therapy.

21h

Human Generosity Study Shows Altruistic Societies Better Survive Hard Times

In January 2016, Cathryn Townsend set out to live among “the loveless people.” So named by anthropologist Colin Turnbull, the Ik are a tribe of some 11,600 hunter-gatherers and subsistence farmers living in an arid and harsh mountainous region of Uganda. Turnbull studied the Ik in the 1960s and famously characterized them as “inhospitable and generally mean” in his book The Mountain People. He doc

21h

A map of Kim Jong-un’s slow train trip to Vietnam

Kim Jong-un is already traveling for his summit with Trump on Wednesday. Rather than flying, he's taking a 60-hour train trip through China. The trip is a closely guarded secret, but this map shows the most likely itinerary. None This Wednesday and Thursday, Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump will have their second summit, this time in Vietnam. But while the U.S. president is still in DC, North Korea's

21h

This Solution to Aging Oil Wells Could Help Combat Climate Change

Abandoned oil rigs pose a real threat to the environment and climate change. Can we find a way to eliminate the threat and also find a solution to the green energy crisis? The post This Solution to Aging Oil Wells Could Help Combat Climate Change appeared first on Futurism .

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New study shows red raspberries may help with glucose control in people with pre-diabetes

A study released today from the Illinois Institute of Technology shows the benefits of including red raspberries in the diet of individuals with pre-diabetes and insulin resistance.

22h

Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger

A previously unknown messenger which alarms nearby cells when the immune system recognises a bacterial or viral infection has been uncovered. Immunologists from Aarhus University, Denmark, are behind the discovery, which will help fighting infections and autoimmune diseases.

22h

Younger Americans much more likely to be arrested than previous generations

One possible byproduct of the of the nation's zero-tolerance criminal justice policies may be a trend that finds that Americans under the age of 26 are much more likely to be arrested than Americans born in previous decades. A new study finds the increase in arrests occurred most rapidly among white men and all women, and is linked to a lower likelihood of being married and lower income during adu

22h

Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate

On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work from Carnegie's Leander Anderegg and University of Washington's Janneke Hille Ris Lambers. Their findings are an important step in understanding how forest growth will respond to a climate altered by human activity.

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Researchers ID gene that may predict pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes

Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a gene called "UCP-1" that may predict the development of pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes. Their findings are published in Gastroenterology.

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