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nyheder2019februar27

Climate rewind: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into coal

Scientists have harnessed liquid metals to turn carbon dioxide back into solid coal, in research that offers an alternative pathway for safely and permanently removing the greenhouse gas from our atmosphere. The new technique can convert carbon dioxide back into carbon at room temperature, a process that's efficient and scalable. A side benefit is that the carbon can hold electrical charge, becomi

23h

Dopamine modulates the reward experiences elicited by music [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Understanding how the brain translates a structured sequence of sounds, such as music, into a pleasant and rewarding experience is a fascinating question which may be crucial to better understand the processing of abstract rewards in humans. Previous neuroimaging findings point to a challenging role of the dopaminergic system in…

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Skadelige partikler rammer byboere og naboer til krydstogtskibe lige hårdt

Om man bor midt i byen eller er nabo til et krydstogtskib gør ingen forskel, når det kommer til luftforurening, viser nye målinger fra Force Technology.

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LATEST

A Moral Indictment of Trump

“A Racist … A Con Man … A Cheat.” Those were the words etched in chyron as Michael Cohen testified. Yet that litany somehow fails to do justice to Cohen’s moral portrait of Donald Trump. At the beginning of this presidency, the great fear was “ normalization .” The shock of Donald Trump’s election, this theory held, would eventually dissipate. Once he sat behind the big desk, surrounded by oil pa

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Michael, Is It True?

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, February 27. “Every day, most of us knew we were going to come in and lie on something.” In a wild day on Capitol Hill, Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and self-described “fixer,” testified before the House Oversight Committee about his work for Trump. Reporters, Hill staffers, and members of the public—including a World Wa

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Micro-droplets in minuscule channels need no help to get ahead

Micro-droplets in minuscule channels need no help to get ahead Micro-droplets in minuscule channels need no help to get ahead, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00701-0 Channel design allows fluid droplets to self-propel in a controlled manner.

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Transcendental Meditation reduces compassion fatigue and improves resilience for nurses

Nurses can better cope with the burnout that's endemic to the profession by practicing the Transcendental Meditation® technique, according to a new study published today in the Journal for Nurses in Professional Development. After four months of practice, standardized assessments found that nurses in the study had reductions in 'compassion fatigue' and burnout, and increases in compassion satisfac

18min

Not all sleep is equal when it comes to cleaning the brain

New research shows how the depth of sleep can impact our brain's ability to efficiently wash away waste and toxic proteins. Because sleep often becomes increasingly lighter and more disrupted as we become older, the study reinforces and potentially explains the links between aging, sleep deprivation, and heightened risk for Alzheimer's disease.

20min

The trials of turfgrass breeders

In the United States, turfgrasses occupy 1.9 percent of the continental surface and cover an area three times larger than any irrigated crop. Turfgrasses provide functional benefits such as water quality protection, soil erosion control, and water microclimate moderation. To fulfill the needs of consumers and to contribute to environmental sustainability, turfgrass breeding programs evaluate, deve

20min

Yes, humans are causing climate change. And we've known for 40 years.

Environment The certainty is not new or surprising. A new report reminds us that scientists are about as certain as scientists can ever get that humans caused climate change—but that's not really the point.

30min

Momo 'challenge' appearing in Fortnite and Peppa Pig YouTube videos, parents warned

'As you can imagine, this is highly distressing for the children to view'

34min

First semi-identical twins identified in pregnancy

Boy and girl twins in Brisbane, Australia, have been identified as only the second set of semi-identical, or sesquizygotic, twins in the world — and the first to be identified by doctors during pregnancy.

35min

Safeguarding hardware from cyberattack

Researchers have developed an algorithm that safeguards hardware from attacks designed to steal data. In the attacks, hackers detect variations of power and electromagnetic radiation in an electronic device's hardware and use the variation to steal encrypted information.

35min

City of the Future

submitted by /u/dancevirtual [link] [comments]

36min

FTC Hits TikTok With Record $5.7 Million Fine Over Children’s Privacy

The social media app will pay $5.7 million to settle the allegations, and be required to delete videos uploaded by anyone under 13.

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Grass, shrubs and dryness: a year in the life of a giant sloth

A 27,000-year-old tooth reveals the secrets of a single animal. Dyani Lewis reports.

53min

How'd the Cohen Hearing Go? That Depends on Your Filter Bubble

On social media and on partisan sites, the talk of Michael Cohen's hearing in the House Oversight Committee split into like-minded echo chambers.

55min

6 creative ways that powerful people manage stress

Anne Hathaway has just revealed her unique approach for tackling stress and anxiety . "Set a timer on your phone, have a candle nearby, and write it all down…You spew it all out. You do not read it…The timer goes off, you tear it out of the book, and you light it on fire," she told Town & Country . She recommends pouring your stresses out onto the page for 12 minutes before putting down your pen.

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Improving ecosystems with aquatic plants

Wetland restoration is critical for improving ecosystem services, but many aquatic plant nurseries do not have facilities similar to those typically used for large-scale plant production. This study attempts to determine what methods would effectively benefit the large-scale production of aquatic plants as a possible resource of bolstering the improvement of the ecosystems.

1h

Newly identified drug targets could open door for esophageal cancer therapeutics

Blocking two molecular pathways that send signals inside cancer cells could stave off esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), the most common esophageal malignancy in the United States, according to new research.

1h

Spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices

The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation.

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Aiming for gold: Improving reproducibility in hydrology studies

Low levels of reproducibility are not uncommon in hydrology studies. Researchers have created an online survey tool that will help authors and journals achieve improved reproducibility levels in water resource studies. This practice would recognize authors for their reproducibility work and make it easier for readers to find top reproducibility practices.

1h

Facial recognition software to identify Civil War soldiers

Photo Sleuth may help uncover the mysteries of nearly 4 million photographs of Civil War-era images.

1h

Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias

Cutting quality has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation of poinsettias. This study identifies treatments that will best benefit these ornamentals during transit to improve point-of-sale presentation.

1h

New mothers reduce their alcohol intake, but this change is short-lived

Most women dramatically reduce their alcohol intake on learning they are pregnant, but by the time their child is five they are back to their pre-pregnancy drinking levels, a new international study has found. The research reported little change in the drinking patterns of men on becoming fathers.

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Uncontradicted

Michael Cohen’s testimony to the House Oversight Committee was uncontradicted. The former personal attorney of the president of the United States today accused him of a litany of crimes, improprieties, immoralities, and betrayals of national security. And not one Republican member of the committee breathed one word in defense of the leader of their party. Those Republicans have learned the hard w

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Grass, shrubs and dryness: a year in the life of a giant sloth

A 27,000-year-old tooth reveals the secrets of a single animal. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Heavy petting: technique upcycles single-use plastics

Mixing PET plastics with biomass produces stronger and more valuable recycled results. Nick Carne reports.

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Millions of Ugandans quit internet after introduction of social media tax

submitted by /u/Donateblood0001 [link] [comments]

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Second-ever pair of semi-identical twins identified in Australia

The twins developed from a single egg fertilised by two different sperm, meaning unusually they share 75 per cent of their DNA

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Don't panic: Lessons learned from Hawaii false alarm

People did not panic after receiving a false alarm text message about an impending ballistic missile. Instead they looked to others for what to do.

1h

Model to predict suicide risk in at-risk young adults

New research shows that fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms are much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults.

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Researchers safeguard hardware from cyberattack

Researchers at the University of Wyoming and the University of Cincinnati developed an algorithm that safeguards hardware from attacks designed to steal data. In the attacks, hackers detect variations of power and electromagnetic radiation in an electronic device's hardware and use the variation to steal encrypted information.

1h

First semi-identical twins identified in pregnancy

Boy and girl twins in Brisbane, Australia, have been identified as only the second set of semi-identical, or sesquizygotic, twins in the world — and the first to be identified by doctors during pregnancy.

1h

Missing Out On Deep Sleep Causes Alzheimer's Plaques to Build Up

Getting enough deep sleep might be the key to preventing dementia. In a series of recent experiments on mice, researchers discovered that deep sleep helps the brain clear out potentially toxic waste. The discovery reinforces how critical quality sleep is for brain health and suggests sleep therapies might curb the advance of memory-robbing ailments, like Alzheimer's disease. “Alzheimer’s disease i

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Scientists stunned by discovery of 'semi-identical' twins

Boy and girl, now four, are only the second case of ‘sesquizygotic’ twins recorded A pair of twins have stunned researchers after it emerged that they are neither identical nor fraternal – but something in between. The team say the boy and girl, now four years old, are the second case of semi-identical twins ever recorded, and the first to be spotted while the mother was pregnant. Continue readin

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Newly identified drug targets could open door for esophageal cancer therapeutics

Blocking two molecular pathways that send signals inside cancer cells could stave off esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), the most common esophageal malignancy in the United States, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

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Cool Explanation of Facial Recognition Technology

submitted by /u/PuzzleheadedSpinach [link] [comments]

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Natural History museum to mark 150th anniversary

The American Museum of Natural History announced big plans Wednesday for its big 150th anniversary, including exhibits, an anniversary website and a new space show in the planetarium.

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Tesla to retire $920M in notes with company cash

Tesla Inc. will retire $920 million worth of convertible notes in cash when they come due on Friday, using up about one quarter of the cash available for capital spending and future debt payments.

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The trials of turfgrass breeders

A study out of the University of Minnesota investigated the practices and challenges of turfgrass breeders and distributors. Chengyan Yue led a team of researchers that unveiled important insight regarding breeding and distribution practices and management in the turfgrass industry.

1h

Improving ecosystems with aquatic plants

Researchers Lyn Gettys and Kimberly Moore conducted a study and a series of experiments at the University of Florida to determine whether littoral aquatic plants could be grown effectively using a variety of substrates and irrigation methods similar to techniques used by traditional greenhouses for large-scale plant production.

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Don't panic: Lessons learned from Hawaii false alarm

When Hawaiian Island residents received a false alarm text message that said "Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill," in January 2018, the result was not panic, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

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Team discovers 'incredibly' diverse microbial community high in Yellowstone

More than 10 miles into the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park, on the edge of the caldera, lives a high-elevation community so diverse that Montana State University scientists call it "incredible, unique and truly weird."

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The trials of turfgrass breeders

A study out of the University of Minnesota investigated the practices and challenges of turfgrass breeders and distributors. Chengyan Yue led a team of researchers that unveiled important insight regarding breeding and distribution practices and management in the turfgrass industry.

1h

Improving ecosystems with aquatic plants

Researchers Lyn Gettys and Kimberly Moore conducted a study and a series of experiments at the University of Florida to determine whether littoral aquatic plants could be grown effectively using a variety of substrates and irrigation methods similar to techniques used by traditional greenhouses for large-scale plant production.

1h

Computer Reset Cancels Orbital Burn for Israeli Lunar Lander

The lunar lander Beresheet suffered a computer reset on Monday, preventing a planned burn. The post Computer Reset Cancels Orbital Burn for Israeli Lunar Lander appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias

Vegetatively propagated unrooted cuttings of annual ornamentals are typically grown in equatorial locations and shipped via airfreight to propagators located in temperate climates. Cutting quality, defined as the resistance to external forces—such as physical damage and pathogen infection—has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation.

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Aiming for gold—improving reproducibility in hydrology studies

In six well-regarded hydrology and water resources journals published in 2017, the estimated percentage of studies whose results could be fully reproduced was only between 0.06 and 6.8 percent. This low level of reproducibility is not uncommon in hydrology studies—a fact many scientists readily acknowledge. However, a team of researchers at Utah State University may have found a solution to make t

1h

Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias

Vegetatively propagated unrooted cuttings of annual ornamentals are typically grown in equatorial locations and shipped via airfreight to propagators located in temperate climates. Cutting quality, defined as the resistance to external forces—such as physical damage and pathogen infection—has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation.

1h

Federal same-sex marriage ruling improved life satisfaction for individuals, study shows

Until the U.S. Supreme Court's Obergefell v. Hodges decision in 2015 provided federal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States, individual state laws varied. Some states were clear on whether or not they would recognize the marriages of same-sex couples, and others were in an uncertain flux, in some instances legalizing, then backpedaling on the decision days later. Some married coupl

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Animate your words in minutes with CrazyTalk Animator 3 Pro

Get this award-winning animation app now for $79. Get this award-winning animation app—CrazyTalk Animator 3 Pro—now for $79 and animate your words in minutes.

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Jordan Peterson on the art of forgiveness

Jordan Peterson says that recognizing your mistakes is essential, but you shouldn't "beat yourself to death" because of them. Atoning and repenting for mistakes clear the path for personal growth. If you avoid the responsibility of your errors, however, you're likely to make them again and again. None Apologizing shouldn't be hard. Recognizing and then owning your mistakes leads to a healthy rela

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An Exploding Asteroid Blasted Across Mars' Surface in the Last 10 Years

Sometime in the last decade, something heavy slammed into the Martian atmosphere and blasted apart into a hard rain of superheated material.

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Improving ecosystems with aquatic plants

Wetland restoration is critical for improving ecosystem services, but many aquatic plant nurseries do not have facilities similar to those typically used for large-scale plant production. This study attempts to determine what methods would effectively benefit the large-scale production of aquatic plants as a possible resource of bolstering the improvement of the ecosystems.

1h

The trials of turfgrass breeders

In the United States, turfgrasses occupy 1.9 percent of the continental surface and cover an area three times larger than any irrigated crop. Turfgrasses provide functional benefits such as water quality protection, soil erosion control, and water microclimate moderation. To fulfill the needs of consumers and to contribute to environmental sustainability, turfgrass breeding programs evaluate, deve

1h

Liquid biopsy as effective as tissue biopsy for non-small cell lung cancer according to MD Anderson study

A multi-center study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed that a liquid biopsy test called Guardant360®, is comparable to standard tissue biopsies in detection of guideline recommended biomarkers in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has a faster turn-around time, and has the potential to support identification of more patients who can be treat

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Scientists can now turn CO2 in the air into solid coal

A team of scientists used liquid metal and a liquid electrolyte to convert gaseous CO2 into a solid, coal-like substance. Compared to current methods, the new approach could prove to be a more efficient and scalable way to remove carbon from the atmosphere and safely store it. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says the global community must remove 100 billion to 1 trill

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Rising High: GM Yeast Generates Known and Novel Marijuana Compounds

Engineered microorganisms churn out THC, CBD and rarer, less-understood cannabis cousins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Privacy is a human right, we need a GDPR for the world: Microsoft CEO

Against the backdrop of a "techlash", the CEO of Microsoft called for new global norms on privacy, data and Artificial Intelligence. Satya Nadella, who has been shifting Microsoft's focus to cloud computing, said he would welcome clearer regulations as every company and industry grappled with the data age. In a talk at Davos, he praised GDPR , the European regulation on data protection and privac

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Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime

New technology could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur.

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Rising High: GM Yeast Generates Known and Novel Marijuana Compounds

Engineered microorganisms churn out THC, CBD and rarer, less-understood cannabis cousins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Yeast Engineered to Make Cannabinoids

Genes inserted into the yeast genome produce the compounds CBD and THC in the microbes.

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Don't panic: Lessons learned from Hawaii false alarm

People did not panic after receiving a false alarm text message about an impending ballistic missile. Instead they looked to others for what to do.

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Do soccer players have an increased risk of ALS?

Playing professional soccer may be linked to an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019. The study also found that soccer players may develop the disease 21 years earlier than people in the general population

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Lowering blood pressure and cholesterol may not improve thinking and memory

While drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol have been shown to be beneficial for heart health, a new study has found that two such drugs may not provide a similar benefit to the brain. The study, published in the Feb. 27, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Light wakes up freshwater bacteria

Some of the bacteria that live in ponds grow faster during the day, even if they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, suggesting the existence of special genes that absorb light.

2h

'Incredibly' diverse microbial community high in Yellowstone

More than 10 miles into the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park, on the edge of the caldera, lives a high-elevation community so diverse that scientists call it "incredible, unique and truly weird."

2h

New breakthrough in understanding a severe child speech impediment

Scientists have made a breakthrough in identifying a potential cause of the most severe child speech impediment — apraxia. One in 1000 children has apraxia, but understating the origins of this debilitating speech disorder has until now remained elusive. Speech pathologists have identified anomalies in a key speech pathway of the brain connected to speech.

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What Are Radio Waves?

Radio waves help us communicate across close and far distances. They also help us identify otherwise invisible objects in space.

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Scientists Gene-Hacked Yeast to Make THC Instead of Booze

Yeast High A team of researchers at UC Berkeley figured out a way to manufacture tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) — both products derived from the cannabis plant — from specially bioengineered yeast, according to Wired . By injecting cannabis sativa plant genes into common brewer’s yeast, which is the stuff that turns sugars into alcohol during the beermaking process, the yeast st

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Tasty butterflies turn sour without toxic wingmen

New finding challenges conventional understanding of copycat species

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FedEx joins Amazon in delivery robot fray

FedEx is testing a new self-driving robotic vehicle that could one day compete with Amazon in delivering packages or pizzas to homes.

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The mystery behind Minoan bull-leaping

The Minoan civilization, which existed on the island of Crete nearly 5,000 years ago, produced a treasure trove of artwork showing a unique sport or ritual: men leaping over charging bulls Scholars have argued over whether the Minoans actually performed this dangerous activity, though the evidence seems to suggest that they did. If so, modern bull-leaping sports, such as those practiced in France

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Oldest Frog Relative from North America Could Fit on Your Pinky Finger

It's possible that during the Triassic period, the crocodile-like phytosaur snapped at a frog-like creature, but missed. It's a good thing it did, because 216 million years later, paleontologists have found the fossils of these tiny frogs.

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Motorola Confirms a Foldable Phone Is Coming

Motorola VP of Global Product Dan Dery has confirmed that the company is indeed working on a folding phone, and it's probably going to be a modern take on the Razr. The post Motorola Confirms …

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Life near people keeps giraffes on the move

Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, according to a new study. The findings suggest that the giraffes need to travel longer distances—and expend more energy—to find critical resources, like food, shelter, and a mate. “Giraffes are huge browsing animals that live in African savanna ecosystems where they must find everyt

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Fast, flexible ionic transistors for bioelectronic devices

Researchers have developed the first biocompatible internal-ion-gated organic electrochemical transistor (IGT) that is fast enough to enable real-time signal sensing and stimulation of brain signals. The IGT provides a miniaturized, soft, conformable interface with human skin, using local amplification to record high quality neural signals, suitable for advanced data processing. This could lead to

2h

Jumping spider mimics two kinds of ants as it grows

Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex. How do they get the attention of potential mates without breaking character to birds that want to eat them?

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Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives

As gray wolves return to Washington state, a new study finds that one species of deer is changing its behavior to spend more time away from roads, at higher elevations and in rockier landscapes.

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Latest anti-retroviral drug regimens provide 'Lazarus Effect' for HIV patients

Frailty related to HIV infection 'is rapidly becoming a specter of the past' and today it 'is possible to control HIV infection in all patients,' according to a perspective article.

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What controls the tips of our chromosomes?

The tips of our chromosomes have structures called telomeres that prevent our genetic material from unfolding. When they do not work properly, it can lead to the total erosion of our genetic material and can trigger cancer and age-related diseases. Scientists have now discovered a key aspect of the regulation of telomeres.

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How nerve fibers enter spinal cord during early development

New research could lead to regenerative therapies for people with injuries to their brachial plexus, a group of nerves that starts at the spinal cord and goes into the arm.

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Cell mechanism delays and repairs DNA damage that can lead to cancer

Researchers have identified a specific mechanism that protects our cells from natural DNA errors — an 'enemy within' — which could permanently damage our genetic code and lead to diseases such as cancer.

2h

Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime

New technology could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur.

2h

Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias

Cutting quality has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation of poinsettias. This study identifies treatments that will best benefit these ornamentals during transit to improve point-of-sale presentation.

2h

Facial recognition software to identify Civil War soldiers

Photo Sleuth may help uncover the mysteries of nearly 4 million photographs of Civil War-era images.

2h

Aiming for gold: improving reproducibility in hydrology studies

Low levels of reproducibility are not uncommon in hydrology studies. Researchers at Utah State University created an online survey tool that will help authors and journals achieve improved reproducibility levels in water resource studies. This practice would recognize authors for their reproducibility work and make it easier for readers to find top reproducibility practices.

2h

Fast, flexible ionic transistors for bioelectronic devices

Researchers have developed the first biocompatible internal-ion-gated organic electrochemical transistor (IGT) that is fast enough to enable real-time signal sensing and stimulation of brain signals. The IGT provides a miniaturized, soft, conformable interface with human skin, using local amplification to record high quality neural signals, suitable for advanced data processing. This could lead to

2h

Your brain cleans itself best with the right kind of sleep

How deep we sleep can affect our brain’s ability to efficiently wash away waste and toxic proteins, new research suggests. Because sleep often becomes increasingly lighter and more disrupted as we get older, the study reinforces and potentially explains the links between aging, sleep deprivation, and heightened risk for Alzheimer’s disease. “Sleep is critical to the function of the brain’s waste

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AnimalBiome Selects Loop Genomics to Expand Microbiome Testing Capabilities to Support Clinically Actionable Decision-Making for Veterinarians

Loop Genomics deploys new long-read sequencing technology and protocols to provide unparalleled insight into the status of gut health for dogs and cats

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Risk remains low despite rise in global shark attacks

A new study shows that although the number of shark attacks has increased over time, the rate of attack is low and the risk of being attacked by a shark is highly variable across the globe.

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Mother's behavioral corrections tune infant's brain to angry tone

The same brain network that adults use when they hear angry vocalizations is at work in infants as young as six months old, an effect that is strongest in infants whose mothers spend the most time controlling their behavior, according to a new study.

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Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought — study

A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back at least 3,500 years — almost 2,000 years older than previously thought. These human-built beach terraces continue to create habitat for clams and other sea creatures to flourish in the area.

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Light wakes up freshwater bacteria

Some of the bacteria that live in ponds grow faster during the day, even if they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, suggesting the existence of special genes that absorb light.

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Montana State team discovers 'incredibly' diverse microbial community high in Yellowstone

Montana State University researchers Dan Colman and Eric Boyd published their findings from a Smoke Jumper Geyser Basin hot spring in the journal Nature Communications earlier this month.

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Sandia spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices

The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation.

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Sloppy calorie counting can still help you lose weight

Health This is true of any diet that works for you: the more you check in, the better you’ll do. Few people want to weigh every ounce of meat they consume, and for some, that’s not even a possibility. For those folks, this study has some good news.

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What Is an Atmospheric River?

The so-called Pineapple Express is dumping rain down all over California, for one thing. An explanation in the form of a song. (With apologies to Talking Heads.)

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Q&A: The Thrill of the Chase

Most dogs love to fetch. Some are obsessed with it.

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Critic’s Pick: ‘Apollo 11’ Review: The 1969 Moon Mission Still Has the Power to Thrill

A new documentary uses previously unseen archival footage to show how astronauts first walked on the moon. It’s awe-inspiring.

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Ep. 36: Fighting the Flu, Green Burials, and Teen Vaccinations

Join journalist and author Seth Mnookin as he chats with Undark's deputy editor Jane Roberts about teenagers pushing to get vaccinated against their parents' wishes. Also: the quest to develop a universal flu vaccine, and the environmental and cultural movement of green burials.

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This parasitic cuckoo bird shows cheaters don’t always get ahead

Birds called greater anis that can slip extra eggs into other nests create a natural test of the benefits of honest parenting.

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9 Striking Moments From Michael Cohen’s Testimony

Updated at 5:52 p.m. ET on February 27 In his long-awaited testimony before the House Oversight and Reform Committee, Michael Cohen summed up his former employer this way: “I know what Mr. Trump is: He is a racist, he is a con man, and he is a cheat.” The comment from President Donald Trump’s former lawyer and fixer was one of many striking moments in Wednesday’s hearing, Cohen’s first public app

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Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year

Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. It eventually found water in a deep sinkhole, but it was the creature's last drink. A new analysis of its tooth offers insight into the landscape it inhabited and what it ate its last year of life.

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A rare assemblage of sharks and rays from nearshore environments of Eocene Madagascar

Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a new study. This newly described fauna is the first report of sharks and rays of this age in Madagascar.

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Forskere fordobler biologiens alfabet: Liv kan se helt anderledes ud i rummet

Dit DNA består normalt af fire bogstaver. Men nu har forskere tilføjet fire nye, og det kan ændre definitionen af liv.

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Death from above: Boeing unveils autonomous fighter jet

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Horrifying “Black Snow” Blankets Russian Towns

Black Snow Several weeks ago, residents of Russia’s Kuzbass region began posting videos and images to social media of the snow falling over their towns. The reason? The snow was midnight black. After investigating the issue, local police opened a criminal case against a coal-processing plant in the area on Monday, which had allegedly been pumping so much unfiltered coal dust into the atmosphere t

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How to Be Happy When the World Makes You Depressed

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers 4 tips to be happy in a world that can feel like a “Mad Max” chase through the headlines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The U.S. government fined the app now known as TikTok $5.7 million for illegally collecting children’s data

Federal regulators fined social media app Musical.ly — now known as TikTok — $5.7 million for illegally collecting the names, email addresses, pictures and locations of kids under 13, a record …

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Federal same-sex marriage ruling improved life satisfaction for individuals, study shows

Human Development and Family Studies researchers at the University of Illinois intially wanted to understand how variation in state-level legislation and local community climate regarding same-sex marriage impacts the well-being and life satisfaction of same-sex couples across the US. When the US Supreme Court announced they would be ruling on same-sex marriage in 2015, the researchers expanded th

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Why do some galactic unions lead to doom?

Three images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show pairs of galaxies on the cusp of cosmic consolidations. Though the galaxies appear separate now, gravity is pulling them together, and soon they will combine to form new, merged galaxies. Some merged galaxies will experience billions of years of growth. For others, however, the merger will kick off processes that eventually halt star formation,

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Opioid use in the family may influence adolescents' opioid risk after surgery

Having a family member with persistent opioid use may be a risk factor for young adults continuing prescriptions long after their own surgeries, a new study suggests.

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Achieving Paris climate target could net additional billions in fisheries revenue

Achieving the Paris Agreement global warming target could protect millions of tons in annual worldwide fisheries catch, as well as billions of dollars of annual revenues for fishers, workers' income and household seafood expenditures, according to new research.

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3,500 years of shellfish farming by indigenous peoples on the Northwest coast

The indigenous peoples of British Columbia have been harvesting shellfish from specially-constructed clam gardens for at least 3,500 years, according to a new study. This research offers new methods for tracking the history and development of mariculture.

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New Study: 99.9999 Percent Chance Humans Are Causing Climate Change

A new study from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California says there can no longer be any doubt that humans are responsible for climate change. The post New Study: 99.9999 Percent Chance Humans Are Causing Climate Change appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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How to Be Happy When the World Makes You Depressed

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers 4 tips to be happy in a world that can feel like a “Mad Max” chase through the headlines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science helped me run my first marathon in 3 hours and 21 minutes

Science Running is in our DNA, but training for a marathon is a careful mix of muscle, mental, and technological strength. I set out to understand how evolution, technology, and know-how can come together to propel the human body across 26.2 miles.

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UN aviation agency concealed serious hack: media

The Montreal-based United Nations aviation agency concealed for months a hack of its computers and allowed malware to spread throughout the airline industry, Canada's public broadcaster reported Wednesday.

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Infant sleep duration associated with mother's level of education and prenatal depression

A new study analyzing data from Canadian parents has found that babies sleep less at three months of age if their mothers do not have a university degree, experienced depression during pregnancy or had an emergency cesarean-section delivery.

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Infectious diseases could be diagnosed with smartphones in sub-Saharan Africa

A new review has outlined how health workers could use existing phones to predict and curb the spread of infectious diseases.

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'Universal entangler' for new quantum tech

One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. Now researchers have developed a "universal entangler" that can link a variety of encoded particles on demand. The discovery represents a powerful new mechanism with potential uses in

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Predictors that determine toxic fats in the liver

Researchers have discovered biomarkers in the blood that can predict the accumulation of toxic fats in the liver, which are a sign of early fatty liver disease.

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Good news for future tech: Exotic 'topological' materials are surprisingly common

Once thought rare, strangely behaving substances called 'topological materials' are in fact quite common, a finding that bodes well for their potential use in future electronics. An international team of researchers has assembled an online catalog, based on the periodic table, to make it easy to design new versions of these unusual materials.

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Genes might explain why dogs can’t sniff out some people under stress

Genes and stress may change a person’s body odor, confusing police dogs.

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Physicists Solve a 35-Year-Old Mystery Hidden Inside Atomic Cores

New research reveals that pairs of protons and neutrons within atomic nuclei influence the speed of quarks passing through — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Teen video app Musical.ly agrees to FTC fine

The operator of a video-sharing app popular with teenagers agreed to pay $5.7 million to settle federal allegations it illegally collected personal information from children.

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Opioid use in the family may influence adolescents' opioid risk after surgery

Having a family member with persistent opioid use may be a risk factor for young adults continuing prescriptions long after their own surgeries, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

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Study reveals the structure of the 2nd human cannabinoid receptor

There are two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) in the human body that can be targeted to alleviate certain pathological conditions, including chronic pain. Researchers from managed to obtain the crystal structure of CB2. While the CB1 receptors are responsible for psychoactive effects, the CB2 receptors are predominantly present in the immune system. Studies indicate that CB2 is a promising tar

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Hackers Can Spy on and Hijack Amazon Doorbell’s Video Feed

Doorbell Hack Security researchers have found that data streams from Amazon-Owned Ring doorbell’s app can be easily compromised. In a blog post on hardware security company Dojo’s website, cybersecurity expert Or Cyngiser outlined the issue: using a specialized security assessment tool called VideoSnarf, he and a team of researchers were able to extract and inject video and audio information as i

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Michael Cohen's Record Is His Greatest Asset—and Biggest Liability

The only thing that Democrats, Republicans, and Michael Cohen seem to agree on in his appearance before the House Oversight Committee is that Cohen has lied repeatedly in the past. Cohen kicked off the hearing on Wednesday with an explosive series of claims and revelations in his prepared testimony. But in the hours since Cohen finished reading those remarks, the members of the committee have bar

4h

The Last Person Made Famous by a Painting

Over the course of more than 15 years, Andrew Wyeth created 250 secret paintings. He hid them from everyone—including his wife, who was also his business manager—in the loft of a millhouse near his home in rural Pennsylvania. When they were discovered, in 1986, they generated a media frenzy that extended well beyond the art world. The Helga paintings, as they came to be called, all depicted a sin

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The Nuclear Game Theory of the India-Pakistan Crisis

What was most revealing about the first day of President Donald Trump’s summit in Vietnam with Kim Jong Un wasn’t the president’s characterization of his private conversation with the North Korean dictator (“Boy, if you could have heard that dialogue, what you would pay for that dialogue”). It wasn’t his refusal to respond to shouted questions about the fact that, back in Washington, D.C., all ey

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Engineered yeast can brew up the active ingredients in cannabis plants

A yeast with added genes from the cannabis plant can brew up cannabinoids more cheaply and with less environmental damage than farming the plant, say its makers

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Photos of Colorful, Majestic Marine Creatures Are 'A Visual Feast'

Photographers from around the world competed to take home the top prizes in the 2019 Underwater Photographer of the Year contest.

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Drug compound stops hard-to-treat melanoma

Scientists have figured out a way to stop the progression of a particularly voracious type of melanoma, according to a new study. Damaging effects of ultraviolet light—from sources like sunlight and tanning beds—commonly cause melanoma on the DNA of skin cells. This UV damage can activate genes that encourage precancerous cells to further mutate into full-blown skin cancer. At the same time, UV d

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A year in the life of a giant ground sloth during the Last Glacial Maximum in Belize

Stable isotope analysis of the first fossilized Eremotherium laurillardi remains from Belize offers valuable insights into the conditions within which this individual lived and its ability to adapt to the increasing aridity of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy was used to identify chemical alteration of the tooth during fossilization. Results demonstrate that the

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Benefits of the Paris Agreement to ocean life, economies, and people

The Paris Agreement aims to mitigate the potential impacts of climate change on ecological and social systems. Using an ensemble of climate-marine ecosystem and economic models, we explore the effects of implementing the Agreement on fish, fishers, and seafood consumers worldwide. We find that implementing the Agreement could protect millions of metric tons in annual worldwide catch of top revenu

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Sodium rutin ameliorates Alzheimers disease-like pathology by enhancing microglial amyloid-{beta} clearance

The accumulation of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain is the first critical step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which also includes synaptic impairment, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, and eventual cognitive defects. Emerging evidence suggests that impairment of Aβ phagocytosis and clearance is a common phenotype in late-onset AD. Rutin (quercetin-3-rutinoside) has long b

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Nonspecific effects of oral vaccination with live-attenuated Salmonella Typhi strain Ty21a

Epidemiological and immunological evidence suggests that some vaccines can reduce all-cause mortality through nonspecific changes made to innate immune cells. Here, we present the first data to describe the nonspecific immunological impact of oral vaccination with live-attenuated Salmonella Typhi strain Ty21a. We vaccinated healthy adults with Ty21a and assessed aspects of innate and adaptive imm

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Internal ion-gated organic electrochemical transistor: A building block for integrated bioelectronics

Real-time processing and manipulation of biological signals require bioelectronic devices with integrated components capable of signal amplification, processing, and stimulation. Transistors form the backbone of such circuits, but numerous criteria must be met for efficient and safe operation in biological environments. Here, we introduce an internal ion-gated organic electrochemical transistor (

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Direct evidence of nonstationary collisionless shocks in space plasmas

Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the universe: around stars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, binary systems, comets, and planets. Key information is carried by electromagnetic emissions from particles accelerated by high Mach number collisionless shocks. These shocks are intrinsically nonstationary, and the characteristic physical scales responsible for particle accelera

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Home ground advantage: Local Atlantic salmon have higher reproductive fitness than dispersers in the wild

A long-held, but poorly tested, assumption in natural populations is that individuals that disperse into new areas for reproduction are at a disadvantage compared to individuals that reproduce in their natal habitat, underpinning the eco-evolutionary processes of local adaptation and ecological speciation. Here, we capitalize on fine-scale population structure and natural dispersal events to comp

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Maternal immunity and antibodies to dengue virus promote infection and Zika virus-induced microcephaly in fetuses

Zika virus (ZIKV), an emergent flaviviral pathogen, has been linked to microcephaly in neonates. Although the risk is greatest during the first trimester of pregnancy in humans, timing alone cannot explain why maternal ZIKV infection leads to severe microcephaly in some fetuses, but not others. The antigenic similarities between ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV), combined with high levels of DENV immu

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Lower-crustal rheology and thermal gradient in the Taiwan orogenic belt illuminated by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake

The strength of the lithosphere controls tectonic evolution and seismic cycles, but how rocks deform under stress in their natural settings is usually unclear. We constrain the rheological properties beneath the Taiwan orogenic belt using the stress perturbation following the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake and fourteen-year postseismic geodetic observations. The evolution of stress and strain rate in th

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Cryo-EM structure of phosphodiesterase 6 reveals insights into the allosteric regulation of type I phosphodiesterases

Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) work in conjunction with adenylate/guanylate cyclases to regulate the key second messengers of G protein–coupled receptor signaling. Previous attempts to determine the full-length structure of PDE family members at high-resolution have been hindered by structural flexibility, especially in their linker regions and N- and C-terminal ends. Therefore, most

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A neuronal molecular switch through cell-cell contact that regulates quiescent neural stem cells

The quiescence of radial neural stem cells (rNSCs) in adult brain is regulated by environmental stimuli. However, little is known about how the neurogenic niche couples the external signal to regulate activation and transition of quiescent rNSCs. Here, we reveal that long-term excitation of hippocampal dentate granule cells (GCs) upon voluntary running leads to activation of adult rNSCs in the su

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Increased glymphatic influx is correlated with high EEG delta power and low heart rate in mice under anesthesia

The glymphatic system is responsible for brain-wide delivery of nutrients and clearance of waste via influx of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alongside perivascular spaces and through the brain. Glymphatic system activity increases during sleep or ketamine/xylazine (K/X) anesthesia, yet the mechanism(s) facilitating CSF influx are poorly understood. Here, we correlated influx of a CSF tracer into the

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Spiders that pretend to be ants keep their spiderly proportions to attract mates

Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex.

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Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives

As gray wolves continue to make a strong comeback in Washington state, their presence can't help but impact other animals—particularly the ones these large carnivores target as prey.

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Spiders that pretend to be ants keep their spiderly proportions to attract mates

Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex.

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Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives

As gray wolves continue to make a strong comeback in Washington state, their presence can't help but impact other animals—particularly the ones these large carnivores target as prey.

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NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Pola near Fiji

Tropical Cyclone Pola was passing near the Southern Pacific country of Fiji when NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and found it strengthening.

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Heated blankets, ski goggles, and other cold-weather items on sale today

Gadgets Our commerce editor helps you get the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives

As gray wolves return to Washington state, a new study finds that one species of deer is changing its behavior to spend more time away from roads, at higher elevations and in rockier landscapes.

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NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Pola near Fiji

Tropical Cyclone Pola was passing near the Southern Pacific country of Fiji when NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and found it strengthening.

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Jumping spider mimics two kinds of ants as it grows

Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex. How do they get the attention of potential mates without breaking character to birds that want to eat them?

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Iridescent color from clear droplets

Under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes.

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Achieving Paris climate target could net additional billions in fisheries revenue

Achieving the Paris Agreement global warming target could protect millions of tonnes in annual worldwide fisheries catch, as well as billions of dollars of annual revenues for fishers, workers' income and household seafood expenditures, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

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The tooth of the first fossilized giant ground sloth from Belize exposes its world

By analyzing a tooth from the first remains of an extinct giant ground sloth found in Belize, researchers have uncovered insights into the animal's dietary adaptations, as informed by local climate. In fossilized animals like it lacking tooth enamel, the authors discovered, tooth layers are affected differently by long sedimentary processes; thus, they say, if isotopic analyses

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Not all sleep is equal when it comes to cleaning the brain

New research shows how the depth of sleep can impact our brain's ability to efficiently wash away waste and toxic proteins. Because sleep often becomes increasingly lighter and more disrupted as we become older, the study reinforces and potentially explains the links between aging, sleep deprivation, and heightened risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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Typhoid vaccine may protect against other infections

New research by the University of Liverpool and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine shows that vaccination with weakened strains of Salmonella may also protect against other infections.

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Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year

Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. It eventually found water in a deep sinkhole, but it was the creature's last drink. A new analysis of its tooth offers insight into the landscape it inhabited and what it ate its last year of life.

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Environmental variables may influence B cell development and allergies in children

An analysis of a birth cohort containing 51 newborns followed from infancy through the first three years of life has linked mutations in antibodies to a heightened risk of allergic diseases such as eczema.

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Fast, flexible ionic transistors for bioelectronic devices

Columbia researchers have developed the first biocompatible internal-ion-gated organic electrochemical transistor (IGT) that is fast enough to enable real-time signal sensing and stimulation of brain signals. The IGT provides a miniaturized, soft, conformable interface with human skin, using local amplification to record high quality neural signals, suitable for advanced data processing. This coul

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In the game of love, local salmon have a home-ground advantage

Genetic analysis of thousands of salmon shows that in salmon mating, home-ground advantage applies. Salmon spawning in their home river produce vastly more offspring than salmon trying their luck on unfamiliar spawning grounds.

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3,500 years of shellfish farming by indigenous peoples on the Northwest coast

The indigenous peoples of British Columbia have been harvesting shellfish from specially-constructed clam gardens for at least 3,500 years, according to a study released Feb. 27, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicole Smith of the Hakai Institute, Dana Lepofsky of Simon Fraser University, and colleagues. This research offers new methods for tracking the history and development of mari

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A rare assemblage of sharks and rays from nearshore environments of Eocene Madagascar

Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a study released Feb. 27, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University and colleagues. This newly described fauna is the first report of sharks and rays of this age in Madagascar.

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Mother's behavioral corrections tune infant's brain to angry tone

The same brain network that adults use when they hear angry vocalizations is at work in infants as young as six months old, an effect that is strongest in infants whose mothers spend the most time controlling their behavior, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chen Zhao of the University of Manchester, UK, and colleagues.

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Risk remains low despite rise in global shark attacks

A new study led by Department of Oceanography & Coastal Sciences Assistant Professor Stephen Midway at Louisiana State University shows that although the number of shark attacks has increased over time, the rate of attack is low and the risk of being attacked by a shark is highly variable across the globe.

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ALS: New technique prevents toxic protein deposits in cells

Clumps of faulty TDP-43 protein inside nerve cells are common in ALS and other neurological diseases. Could this new technique offer a way to prevent them?

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Smoking and alcohol: Double trouble for the brain?

Along with many other harmful health consequences, smoking tobacco causes chemical changes, oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. Excessive alcohol use can have similar effects. Surprisingly, however, very few studies have examined the combined impact of smoking and alcohol on the brain. Now, researchers have shown that in rats, the joint use of tobacco and alcohol could increase neural

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Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment

During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. A new article documents the environmental legacy of Agent Orange in Vietnam, including hotspots where dioxin continues to enter the food supply.

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A new method for precision drug delivery: Painting

Researchers are one step closer to delivering precise amounts of medication to exact location, repurposing an existing imaging "painting" method.

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Thirty years of fast food: Greater variety, but more salt, larger portions, and added calories

Despite the addition of some healthful menu items, fast food is even more unhealthy for you than it was 30 years ago. An analysis of the offerings at 10 of the most popular US fast-food restaurants in 1986, 1991, and 2016, demonstrates that fast-food entrees, sides, and desserts increased significantly in calories and sodium and entrees and desserts in portion size over time.

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Yeast produce low-cost, high-quality cannabinoids

Synthetic biologists have created an enzymatic network in yeast that turns sugar into cannabinoids, including tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, but also novel cannabinoids not found in the marijuana plant itself. The yeast factories would be more environmentally friendly and less energy intensive than growing the plant and separating out the psychoactive and non-psychoactive ingredients. They

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Medicating mosquitoes to fight malaria

Mosquitoes that landed on surfaces coated with the anti-malarial compound atovaquone were completely blocked from developing Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, according to new research.

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USDA Cited 60 Percent Fewer Animal Welfare Violations in 2018

The drop may be due to fewer inspections, but critics say the USDA also appears to be avoiding documenting the violations.

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Facebook says 'clear history' feature ready this year

Facebook's feature allowing users to erase all their data is set to be released this year, many months after it was announced by the leading social network.

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Broadcasters aren't succumbing to Netflix era

If there is a high point to Netflix's status as the "cool kids" taking over television, it may be remembered as an emotional Chuck Lorre accepting a best comedy Golden Globe last month for "The Kominsky Method," his show on the streaming service.

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A new method for precision drug delivery: painting

If traditional drug delivery were a type of painting, it might be akin to paintball. With good aim, a majority of the paint ends on the bullseye, but it also drips and splashes, carrying streams of paint across the target.

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Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment, study says

During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. Agent Orange defoliated the thick jungle vegetation concealing Viet Cong fighters and destroyed a portion of the country's food crops, but it was primarily the dioxin contaminant that harmed so many Vi

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Complex medication regimens create challenges for home health care

Medically high-risk patients and communication breakdowns between providers contribute to the difficulty of medication management for older adults receiving home health care, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

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Infant sleep duration associated with mother's level of education and prenatal depression

A new study analyzing data from Canadian parents has found that babies sleep less at three months of age if their mothers do not have a university degree, experienced depression during pregnancy or had an emergency cesarean-section delivery.

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Thirty years of fast food: Greater variety, but more salt, larger portions, and added calories

Despite the addition of some healthful menu items, fast food is even more unhealthy for you than it was 30 years ago. An analysis of the offerings at 10 of the most popular US fast-food restaurants in 1986, 1991, and 2016, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, demonstrates that fast-food entrees, sides, and desserts increased significantly in calories and sodium and e

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A new method for precision drug delivery: Painting

Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are one step closer to delivering precise amounts of medication to exact location, repurposing an existing imaging "painting" method.

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Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment, study says

During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. A new article from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University documents the environmental legacy of Agent Orange in Vietnam, including hotspots where dioxin continues to enter the food supply

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Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

A species of Central American cuckoo, the greater ani, forms groups of two or three females that nest communally to protect their eggs from predators, but sometimes a female will go outside the communal group and lay an egg in an outsider's nest. A team of researchers found that the birds know best when to place all their eggs in one basket and when to spread them around.

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Engineers make clear droplets produce iridescent colors

Engineers have found that under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes.

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Scientists devise strategies to counteract T cell exhaustion in CAR T cancer therapies

CAR T-cell therapies have saved lives in patients with blood cancers, but there has been a downside: T cells that enter solid tumors can stop working due to a phenomenon called T cell exhaustion. Now scientists have found a way of counteracting T cell exhaustion and making CAR T cell therapies more effective.

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New mechanism of bone growth discovered

Researchers report that bone growth in mice takes place in accordance with the same principles as when new cells are constantly produced in blood, skin and other tissue. This contradicts the previous understanding that bone growth depends on a finite number of gradually consumed progenitor cells. If the findings apply to humans, they could make an important contribution to the treatment of childre

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How fungi influence global plant colonization

The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts like a filter.

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Why environmental cues make drug addiction extra hard to beat

Besides triggering the brain's emotional and stimulus-response systems, environmental cues activate areas where memories are processed, according to this study. Prompting these memory processing systems makes it extra difficult to counter addiction because the classic stimulus-response mechanisms are reinforced by the memory effects of environmental drug cues. While this double effect makes it har

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China county suspends fracking after earthquakes kill 2

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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In the game of love, local salmon have a home-ground advantage

Salmon spawning in their home rivers have the edge in mating over those born in other streams. This was the discovery of a new study examining the sex lives of Atlantic salmon in northern Finland. The results show that the local salmon produce vastly more offspring than salmon trying their luck on unfamiliar spawning grounds.

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A rare assemblage of sharks and rays from nearshore environments of Eocene Madagascar

Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a study released February 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University and colleagues. This newly-described fauna is the first report of sharks and rays of this age in Madagascar.

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Risk remains low despite rise in global shark attacks

Sharks have always struck at the heart of people's most primal fears of the ocean. Cue: JAWS theme song. However, a new study led by LSU Department of Oceanography & Coastal Sciences Assistant Professor Stephen Midway shows that although the number of shark attacks has increased over time, the rate of attack is low and the risk of being attacked by a shark is highly variable across the globe. Midw

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Capturing carbon from the air

Climate scientists predict disastrous consequences if greenhouse gases continue to accumulate at ever-increasing rates. Experts agree that any solution will require drastic reductions in emissions from sources such as automobiles and coal-fueled power plants. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, negative-emissi

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In the game of love, local salmon have a home-ground advantage

Salmon spawning in their home rivers have the edge in mating over those born in other streams. This was the discovery of a new study examining the sex lives of Atlantic salmon in northern Finland. The results show that the local salmon produce vastly more offspring than salmon trying their luck on unfamiliar spawning grounds.

4h

A rare assemblage of sharks and rays from nearshore environments of Eocene Madagascar

Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a study released February 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University and colleagues. This newly-described fauna is the first report of sharks and rays of this age in Madagascar.

4h

3,500 years of shellfish farming by indigenous peoples on the Northwest coast

The Indigenous Peoples of British Columbia have been harvesting shellfish from specially-constructed clam gardens for at least 3500 years, according to a study released February 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicole Smith of the Hakai Institute, Dana Lepofsky of Simon Fraser University, and colleagues. This research offers new methods for tracking the history and development of ma

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Achieving Paris climate target could net additional billions in fisheries revenue

Achieving the Paris Agreement global warming target could protect millions of tonnes in annual worldwide fisheries catch, as well as billions of dollars of annual revenues for fishers, workers' income and household seafood expenditures, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

4h

Risk remains low despite rise in global shark attacks

Sharks have always struck at the heart of people's most primal fears of the ocean. Cue: JAWS theme song. However, a new study led by LSU Department of Oceanography & Coastal Sciences Assistant Professor Stephen Midway shows that although the number of shark attacks has increased over time, the rate of attack is low and the risk of being attacked by a shark is highly variable across the globe. Midw

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Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year

Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. The region was arid, not like today's steamy jungle. The Last Glacial Maximum had locked up much of Earth's moisture in polar ice caps and glaciers. Water tables in the area were low.

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Grass, shrubs and dryness: a year in the life of a giant sloth

A 27,000-year-old tooth reveals the secrets of a single animal. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Immunizing quantum computers against errors

Researchers have used trapped calcium ions to demonstrate a new method for making quantum computers immune to errors. To do so, they created a periodic oscillatory state of an ion that circumvents the usual limits to measurement accuracy.

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Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges

Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, suggesting that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances — and expend more energy — to obtain critical resources.

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Steam-powered spacecraft could jump-start asteroid exploration

A centuries-old propulsion technology is making a comeback—in space

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Capturing carbon from the air

Climate scientists predict disastrous consequences if greenhouse gases continue to accumulate at ever-increasing rates. Experts agree that any solution will require drastic reductions in emissions from sources such as automobiles and coal-fueled power plants. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, negative-emissi

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What Is Infrared?

Infrared radiation plays a big role in our lives. It's what makes up half of the total energy released by the sun and it's what your TV remote shoots at the receiver when you're changing the channel.

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For the First Time, FTC Fines Company for Fake Amazon Reviews

Fake Reviews For the first time, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), a federal agency tasked with protecting American consumers, has charged a company with fraud for buying fake Amazon reviews — a move that could radically improve the experience of online shopping. “People rely on reviews when they’re shopping online,” Andrew Smith, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, said in an

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In Addition to Testosterone, Another Hormone Is Vital for Early Male Development

A hormone called androsterone, produced in the placenta and other organs, plays a role in fetal development in the womb

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Made From Microalgae, These Mardi Gras Beads Are Biodegradable

Louisiana State University molecular biologist Naohiro Kato is confronting plastic pollution one necklace and doubloon at a time

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What are the origins of the word ‘Latinx’?

Where did the term “Latinx” come from and is it here to stay? “So what we’re seeing is that ‘Latinx’ is providing another way for defining and representing the diversity of what is in fact a very complex community,” says Arlene Davila, professor of anthropology and American studies at New York University and founding director of the Latinx Project. “A label that includes more of us will always be

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Treating mosquitoes may be a new way to fight malaria

A lab test suggests it may be possible to treat mosquitoes infected with the malaria parasite to stop disease transmission.

5h

NASA tracks a weaker Typhoon Wutip through northwestern Pacific

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed that Typhoon Wutip has become more elongated as a result of wind shear.

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Is your building safe after an earthquake? These cheap sensors could tell you

Technology borrowed from cellphones can monitor buildings and check for damage

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Malaria drugs for mosquitoes could help prevent the disease in humans

Lacing mosquito nets with antimalarial drugs could help prevent the spread of malaria in humans, as mosquitoes become resistant to insecticides

5h

Engineered yeast can brew up the active ingredients in cannabis plants

A yeast with added genes from the cannabis plant can brew up cannabinoids more cheaply and with less environmental damage than farming the plant, say its makers

5h

Your genetic data can be exploited without you ever knowing about it

Your genome literally identifies you, but researchers and genetic firms keep saying that DNA data is anonymous. It's a privacy scandal waiting to happen

5h

How Plate Tectonics Could Make Rocky Planets Hospitable to Life

How Plate Tectonics Could Make Rocky Planets Hospitable to Life Planets closely orbiting red dwarf stars may have dynamic tectonic plates, making them more life-friendly than previously thought. RedDwarfandPlanet.jpg Illustration of a planet orbiting a red dwarf star Image credits: vchal/ Shutterstock Space Wednesday, February 27, 2019 – 13:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Shiftin

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Scientists Are 99.9999 Percent Sure Humans Caused Climate Change

submitted by /u/idarknight [link] [comments]

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New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates

In the face of declining numbers of insects across the globe, scientists continue to expand our knowledge about invertebrate organisms and their biodiversity across the globe. Insects are the most abundant animals on planet Earth—they outweigh all humanity by a factor of 17. Their abundance, variety, and ubiquity mean insects play a foundational role in food webs and ecosystems, from the bees that

5h

Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions

The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study.

5h

New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates

In the face of declining numbers of insects across the globe, scientists continue to expand our knowledge about invertebrate organisms and their biodiversity across the globe. Insects are the most abundant animals on planet Earth—they outweigh all humanity by a factor of 17. Their abundance, variety, and ubiquity mean insects play a foundational role in food webs and ecosystems, from the bees that

5h

Data sharing will be a major thrust of Trump’s $500 million childhood cancer plan

Plan draws mixed response from cancer research community, who also worry about impact on the National Cancer Institute budget

5h

Smoking and alcohol: Double trouble for the brain?

Along with many other harmful health consequences, smoking tobacco causes chemical changes, oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. Excessive alcohol use can have similar effects. Surprisingly, however, very few studies have examined the combined impact of smoking and alcohol on the brain. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have shown that in rats, the joint use of tob

5h

Immunizing quantum computers against errors

Researchers at ETH Zurich have used trapped calcium ions to demonstrate a new method for making quantum computers immune to errors. To do so, they created a periodic oscillatory state of an ion that circumvents the usual limits to measurement accuracy.

5h

Scientists discover predictors that determine toxic fats in the liver

In a study published in the prestigious scientific journal, Nature, a team of researchers from the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, University of California, and University of Sydney, have discovered biomarkers in the blood that can predict the accumulation of toxic fats in the liver, which are a sign of early fatty liver disease.

5h

New mechanism of bone growth discovered

In a paper published in Nature, researchers at Karolinska Institutet report that bone growth in mice takes place in accordance with the same principles as when new cells are constantly produced in blood, skin and other tissue. This contradicts the previous understanding that bone growth depends on a finite number of gradually consumed progenitor cells. If the findings apply to humans, they could m

5h

Yale researchers create a 'universal entangler' for new quantum tech

One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. Now Yale researchers have developed a "universal entangler" that can link a variety of encoded particles on demand. The discovery represents a powerful new mechanism with potential uses

5h

Infectious diseases could be diagnosed with smartphones in sub-Saharan Africa

A new Imperial-led review has outlined how health workers could use existing phones to predict and curb the spread of infectious diseases.

5h

Good news for future tech: Exotic 'topological' materials are surprisingly common

Once thought rare, strangely behaving substances called 'topological materials' are in fact quite common, a finding that bodes well for their potential use in future electronics. An international team of researchers has assembled an online catalog, based on the periodic table, to make it easy to design new versions of these unusual materials.

5h

Scientists devise strategies to counteract T cell exhaustion in CAR T cancer therapies

CAR T-cell therapies have saved lives in patients with blood cancers, but there has been a downside: T cells that enter solid tumors can stop working due to a phenomenon called T cell exhaustion.Now scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology (LJI) have found a way of counteracting T cell exhaustion and making CAR T cell therapies more effective.

5h

Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

A species of Central American cuckoo, the greater ani, forms groups of two or three females that nest communally to protect their eggs from predators, but sometimes a female will go outside the communal group and lay an egg in an outsider's nest. A team of researchers at Princeton found that the birds know best when to place all their eggs in one basket and when to spread them around.

5h

Engineers make clear droplets produce iridescent colors

Engineers at MIT and Penn State University have found that under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes.

5h

Yeast produce low-cost, high-quality cannabinoids

UC Berkeley synthetic biologists have created an enzymatic network in yeast that turns sugar into cannabinoids, including tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, but also novel cannabinoids not found in the marijuana plant itself. The yeast factories would be more environmentally friendly and less energy intensive than growing the plant and separating out the psychoactive and non-psychoactive ingred

5h

Medicating mosquitoes to fight malaria

Mosquitoes that landed on surfaces coated with the anti-malarial compound atovaquone were completely blocked from developing Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

5h

A Cannabis High, No Plant Required

Fermentation-powered brewing has been getting people drunk for thousands of years. Soon, it could be getting them high, too. In research announced on Wednesday by the University of California at Berkeley, a team of synthetic biologists has modified brewer’s yeast to produce a range of cannabinoids, which are compounds in cannabis that affect the brain and body. The technique opens the possibility

5h

Comparing antioxidants levels in tomatoes of different color

Greater levels of specific antioxidants were associated with particular colorations of tomato fruit. These genotypes could be used either directly as food or in breeding programs to recover greater levels of functional compounds such as carotenoids, tocopherols, anthocyanins, and vitamin C.

5h

New arguments in favor of a ninth planet in our solar system

Researchers are offering new details about the suspected nature and location of a ninth planet in the solar system.

5h

Researchers 'bait' pathological proteins underlying many neurodegenerative disorders

The vast majority of patients with neurodegenerative disorders do not have specific gene mutations, but a single misbehaving protein — called TDP-43 — seems to be at the heart of these diseases. Researchers have found a way to recreate and rescue TDP-43 pathology in a dish.

5h

New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates

Researchers on the remote forested island of Hauturu, New Zealand have compiled a staggering inventory of invertebrate biodiversity using DNA sequencing, adding a significant number of invertebrates to GenBank – an open access database of all publicly available DNA sequences.

5h

Oldest frog relative found in North America

Paleontologists have identified fossil fragments of what are thought to be the oldest known frogs in North America.

5h

Comparing antioxidants levels in tomatoes of different color

Naturally occurring antioxidants have been of great interest in recent years due to their recognizable health benefits. A study out of Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico has clarified differing antioxidant levels by focusing on eight tomato genotypes with different-color fruit.

5h

Comparing antioxidants levels in tomatoes of different color

Naturally occurring antioxidants have been of great interest in recent years due to their recognizable health benefits. A study out of Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico has clarified differing antioxidant levels by focusing on eight tomato genotypes with different-color fruit.

5h

More support for Planet Nine

Corresponding with the three-year anniversary of their announcement hypothesizing the existence of a ninth planet in the solar system, Caltech's Mike Brown and Konstantin Batygin are publishing a pair of papers analyzing the evidence for Planet Nine's existence.

5h

Sugar high: the yeast that can be used to brew cannabis, not beer

Scientists develop GM strain that can produce cannabinoid compounds with addition of sugar Scientists in California have developed a strain of yeast that can be used to brew cannabis extract rather than beer. With just the addition of sugar, the genetically modified yeast fermented to produce pure cannabinoid compounds including mind-altering THC and the non-psychoactive CBD, which is used medica

5h

What leads children to commit ‘evil’ acts? | Letter

Scientists have studied the active brains of adolescents with psychopathic traits, and have consistently found particular structural abnormalities, writes Sally Llewellyn Vincent Lambe says he wants his film Detainment to open a conversation ( ‘I was told James Bulger’s killers were evil’ , G2, 22 February). He also refers to “trauma and troubled childhoods” leading to children committing horrendo

5h

Social parasitism as an alternative reproductive tactic in a cooperatively breeding cuckoo

Social parasitism as an alternative reproductive tactic in a cooperatively breeding cuckoo Social parasitism as an alternative reproductive tactic in a cooperatively breeding cuckoo, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0981-1 Mixed-effects logistic regression modelling of a dataset of individual reproductive behaviours shows fitness pay-offs of cooperative versus mixed coop

5h

Proteomics identifies new therapeutic targets of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma

Proteomics identifies new therapeutic targets of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma Proteomics identifies new therapeutic targets of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0987-8 A subtype of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by disrupted cholesterol homeostasis and associated with a poor prognosis responds to treatment

5h

Colouration by total internal reflection and interference at microscale concave interfaces

Colouration by total internal reflection and interference at microscale concave interfaces Colouration by total internal reflection and interference at microscale concave interfaces, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0946-4 A mechanism for creating patterns of iridescent structural colour by total internal reflection of light beams along a concave optical interface leadin

5h

Promising ways to encode and manipulate quantum information

Promising ways to encode and manipulate quantum information Promising ways to encode and manipulate quantum information, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00647-3 Quantum computers require controlled encoding to protect computations from environmental noise. Two experiments have achieved such encoding using what are known as infinite-dimensional quantum systems.

5h

Complete biosynthesis of cannabinoids and their unnatural analogues in yeast

Complete biosynthesis of cannabinoids and their unnatural analogues in yeast Complete biosynthesis of cannabinoids and their unnatural analogues in yeast, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0978-9 Genetic engineering of yeast enables the production of cannabinoids and cannabinoid analogues from the simple sugar galactose, without the need to cultivate Cannabis.

5h

Breast cancer cells rely on environmental pyruvate to shape the metastatic niche

Breast cancer cells rely on environmental pyruvate to shape the metastatic niche Breast cancer cells rely on environmental pyruvate to shape the metastatic niche, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0977-x Exogenous pyruvate is needed for breast cancer cells to form metastases, and the inhibition of pyruvate metabolism impairs collagen hydroxylation and the growth of lung m

5h

Encoding a qubit in a trapped-ion mechanical oscillator

Encoding a qubit in a trapped-ion mechanical oscillator Encoding a qubit in a trapped-ion mechanical oscillator, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0960-6 A single logical qubit is encoded, manipulated and read out using a superposition of displaced squeezed states of the harmonic motion of a trapped calcium ion.

5h

A newly discovered stem cell that keeps bones growing

A newly discovered stem cell that keeps bones growing A newly discovered stem cell that keeps bones growing, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00527-w Bone elongation requires the maintenance of a growth plate of cartilage. Two studies have now identified stem cells specific to this structure that give rise to both cartilage cells and bone-marrow stem cells.

5h

Comprehensive search for topological materials using symmetry indicators

Comprehensive search for topological materials using symmetry indicators Comprehensive search for topological materials using symmetry indicators, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0937-5 An algorithm based on symmetry indicators is used to search a crystallographic database and finds thousands of candidate topological materials, which could be exploited in next-generatio

5h

Taking connected mobile-health diagnostics of infectious diseases to the field

Taking connected mobile-health diagnostics of infectious diseases to the field Taking connected mobile-health diagnostics of infectious diseases to the field, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0956-2 Combining mobile phone technologies with infectious disease diagnostics can increase patients’ access to testing and treatment and provide public health authorities with new

5h

An integrative systems genetic analysis of mammalian lipid metabolism

An integrative systems genetic analysis of mammalian lipid metabolism An integrative systems genetic analysis of mammalian lipid metabolism, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0984-y The integration of liver and plasma quantitative lipidomic and proteomic data from 107 distinct mouse strains provides important insights into regulators of mammalian lipid metabolism.

5h

Author Correction: Mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes carrying pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations

Author Correction: Mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes carrying pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations Author Correction: Mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes carrying pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0876-1 Author Correction: Mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes carrying pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations

5h

Colour from colourless droplets

Colour from colourless droplets Colour from colourless droplets, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00638-4 Iridescent colours have been observed to be reflected from specially designed droplets of colourless liquids, with the reflected colour depending on the viewing angle. The finding reveals a curious mechanism for creating coloration.

5h

Catalogue of topological electronic materials

Catalogue of topological electronic materials Catalogue of topological electronic materials, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0944-6 Topological materials are thought to be scarce, but an algorithm that diagnoses nontrivial topology in nonmagnetic materials finds the opposite: more than 30 per cent of the 26,688 materials studied are topological.

5h

Structure of the IFNγ receptor complex guides design of biased agonists

Structure of the IFNγ receptor complex guides design of biased agonists Structure of the IFNγ receptor complex guides design of biased agonists, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0988-7 The X-ray structure of the hexameric complex of interferon-γ bound to its receptors is solved at 3.25 Å resolution, providing a basis for engineering variants of interferon-γ that enable d

5h

Entanglement of bosonic modes through an engineered exchange interaction

Entanglement of bosonic modes through an engineered exchange interaction Entanglement of bosonic modes through an engineered exchange interaction, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0970-4 Two superconducting cavity modes are entangled using an exponential-SWAP logic gate.

5h

Battling disease by giving mosquitoes an antimalarial drug

Battling disease by giving mosquitoes an antimalarial drug Battling disease by giving mosquitoes an antimalarial drug, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00648-2 Insecticides that kill mosquitoes have helped to fight malaria, but insecticide resistance is rising. Treating mosquitoes with drugs that target the disease-causing parasite offers another way of tackling malaria.

5h

Beware of plausible predictions of fantasy materials

Beware of plausible predictions of fantasy materials Beware of plausible predictions of fantasy materials, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00676-y Real materials rarely behave like their digital counterparts. Stability of the compounds must be part of the burden of proof for predicting the complex properties of matter, urges Alex Zunger.

5h

A complete catalogue of high-quality topological materials

A complete catalogue of high-quality topological materials A complete catalogue of high-quality topological materials, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0954-4 Topological quantum chemistry and newly developed codes are used to analyse and compute the topological properties of materials in a large crystal database and to identify new topological phases, finding that more

5h

Exposing Anopheles mosquitoes to antimalarials blocks Plasmodium parasite transmission

Exposing Anopheles mosquitoes to antimalarials blocks Plasmodium parasite transmission Exposing Anopheles mosquitoes to antimalarials blocks Plasmodium parasite transmission, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0973-1 Treatment of female Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes with atovaquone causes arrest of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite in the midgut, and this holds promise for

5h

Genome-wide analysis identifies NR4A1 as a key mediator of T cell dysfunction

Genome-wide analysis identifies NR4A1 as a key mediator of T cell dysfunction Genome-wide analysis identifies NR4A1 as a key mediator of T cell dysfunction, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0979-8 Tolerant T cells display characteristic patterns of gene expression and epigenetics that are distinct from other types of T cells and are orchestrated by the transcription fact

5h

When cooperators cheat

When cooperators cheat When cooperators cheat, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00643-7 A study of a cuckoo species that usually shows cooperative nesting behaviour, but sometimes cheats at parenthood by laying eggs in others’ nests, reveals the benefits that have shaped the evolution of this parasitic tactic.

5h

NR4A transcription factors limit CAR T cell function in solid tumours

NR4A transcription factors limit CAR T cell function in solid tumours NR4A transcription factors limit CAR T cell function in solid tumours, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0985-x Transfer of NR4A-deficient T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors is shown to reduce tumour burden and increase survival by shifting T cell transcriptional programs away from exhaustion

5h

Podcast: tropical cuckoo parasitism, topological materials, and cannabinoids in yeast

Podcast: tropical cuckoo parasitism, topological materials, and cannabinoids in yeast Podcast: tropical cuckoo parasitism, topological materials, and cannabinoids in yeast, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00730-9 Listen to the latest from the world of science, with Shamini Bundell and Benjamin Thompson.

5h

Colonic epithelial cell diversity in health and inflammatory bowel disease

Colonic epithelial cell diversity in health and inflammatory bowel disease Colonic epithelial cell diversity in health and inflammatory bowel disease, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0992-y Profiling of single epithelial cells in healthy and inflamed colons identifies specialized cellular subpopulations, including a type of goblet cell that secretes the antibacterial pr

5h

A radical switch in clonality reveals a stem cell niche in the epiphyseal growth plate

A radical switch in clonality reveals a stem cell niche in the epiphyseal growth plate A radical switch in clonality reveals a stem cell niche in the epiphyseal growth plate, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0989-6 Clonal genetic tracing is used to demonstrate that, in mice, longitudinal bone growth during fetal and neonatal periods relies on the gradual consumption of c

5h

Scientists brew cannabis using hacked beer yeast

Scientists brew cannabis using hacked beer yeast Scientists brew cannabis using hacked beer yeast, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00714-9 Researchers modify microbe to manufacture cannabis compounds including the psychoactive chemical THC.

5h

Structural basis for KCTD-mediated rapid desensitization of GABAB signalling

Structural basis for KCTD-mediated rapid desensitization of GABA B signalling Structural basis for KCTD-mediated rapid desensitization of GABA B signalling, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0990-0 X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and functional experiments reveal the details of how KCTD proteins interact with GABAB receptors and desensitize G-protein-coupled in

5h

Data mining uncovers a treasure trove of topological materials

Data mining uncovers a treasure trove of topological materials Data mining uncovers a treasure trove of topological materials, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00660-6 Sharing experimental data enhances materials discovery and engineering.

5h

Jäst tillverkar cannabinoider

I tusentals år har människor odlat hampaväxten Cannabis sativa som läkemedel eller för att berusa sig. Växten tillverkar cannabinoider, en grupp invecklade organiska molekyler varav flera ingår i försök att utveckla nya mediciner.

5h

Jäst tillverkar cannabinoider

I tusentals år har människor odlat hampaväxten Cannabis sativa som läkemedel eller för att berusa sig. Växten tillverkar cannabinoider, en grupp invecklade organiska molekyler varav flera ingår i försök att utveckla nya mediciner.

5h

Scientists luck upon a new way to make a rainbow

Chance observation reveals a new mechanism to produce rainbowlike iridescence

5h

Detecting cyanide exposure

Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke—or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise and

5h

Forget Growing Weed—Make Yeast Spit Out CBD and THC Instead

Yeast gives us beer and bread. Now researchers have engineered it to do something more improbable: manufacturing the cannabis compounds CBD and THC.

5h

Flipping the view: New microscope offers options for drug discovery, safety

A new type of microscope may give doctors a better idea of how safely and effectively a medication will perform in the body.

5h

Now you see heat, now you don't

Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors.

5h

Yeast produce low-cost, high-quality cannabinoids

University of California, Berkeley, synthetic biologists have engineered brewer's yeast to produce marijuana's main ingredients—mind-altering THC and non-psychoactive CBD—as well as novel cannabinoids not found in the plant itself.

5h

Engineers make clear droplets produce iridescent colors

Engineers at MIT and Penn State University have found that under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes.

5h

Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

In the tropical jungle of Central America where predators abound, a species of cuckoo has found safety in numbers by building communal nests guarded by two or three breeding pairs.

5h

Researchers create a 'universal entangler' for new quantum tech

One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. Now Yale researchers have developed a "universal entangler" that can link a variety of encoded particles on demand.

5h

Good news for future tech: Exotic 'topological' materials are surprisingly common

In a major step forward for an area of research that earned the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, an international team has found that substances with exotic electronic behaviors called topological materials are in fact quite common, and include everyday elements such as arsenic and gold. The team created an online catalog to make it easy to design new topological materials using elements from the peri

5h

Yeast produce low-cost, high-quality cannabinoids

University of California, Berkeley, synthetic biologists have engineered brewer's yeast to produce marijuana's main ingredients—mind-altering THC and non-psychoactive CBD—as well as novel cannabinoids not found in the plant itself.

5h

Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

In the tropical jungle of Central America where predators abound, a species of cuckoo has found safety in numbers by building communal nests guarded by two or three breeding pairs.

5h

Scientists find way to produce brilliant colours

US researchers discover optical effect that could lead to new display technologies

5h

Author Correction: Systems of mechanized and reactive droplets powered by multi-responsive surfactants

Author Correction: Systems of mechanized and reactive droplets powered by multi-responsive surfactants Author Correction: Systems of mechanized and reactive droplets powered by multi-responsive surfactants, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0930-z Author Correction: Systems of mechanized and reactive droplets powered by multi-responsive surfactants

5h

More support for Planet Nine

Mike Brown and Konstantin Batygin offer further clues about Planet Nine.

5h

NASA tracks a weaker Typhoon Wutip through northwestern Pacific

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed that Typhoon Wutip has become more elongated as a result of wind shear.

5h

Researchers determine how nerve fibers enter spinal cord during early development

New research from Notre Dame could lead to regenerative therapies for people with injuries to their brachial plexus, a group of nerves that starts at the spinal cord and goes into the arm.

5h

The Supersonic Physics Behind Screechy Peeling Tape

(Inside Science) — Most of us are familiar with the screeching noise packing tape makes when it's peeled off a box, as well as the frustration of failing to cleanly remove a label from a new purchase. It turns out that the jerky stop-and-go motion we experience when peeling tape occurs at a microscopic level as well. Scientists exploring the physics of peeling tape have observed that tape detache

5h

The Military Wants to Build Deadly AI-Controlled Tanks

BattleTanx The U.S. Army just called on experts in the field to help it develop technology that would allow a ground combat vehicle like a tank to automatically detect, target, and engage enemy combatants. The Advanced Targeting and Lethality Automated System (ATLAS) would theoretically give a tank the ability to do everything necessary to take down a target except pull the trigger — a human oper

6h

Email Scammers Ditch Wire Transfers for iTunes Gift Cards

Business email compromise attacks are increasingly targeting nonprofits, and bilking them for iTunes gift cards.

6h

Comparing antioxidants levels in tomatoes of different color

Greater levels of specific antioxidants were associated with particular colorations of tomato fruit. These genotypes could be used either directly as food or in breeding programs to recover greater levels of functional compounds such as carotenoids, tocopherols, anthocyanins, and vitamin C.

6h

What controls the tips of our chromosomes?

The tips of our chromosomes have structures called telomeres that prevent our genetic material from unfolding. When they do not work properly, it can lead to the total erosion of our genetic material and can trigger cancer and age-related diseases. In a study now published in EMBO Journal, a research team from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC; Portugal), led by Jose Escandell and Miguel Godinh

6h

Daily briefing: Low pay and long hours plague postdocs across Europe

Daily briefing: Low pay and long hours plague postdocs across Europe Daily briefing: Low pay and long hours plague postdocs across Europe, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00734-5 Postdoc salaries as low as €5,000 in Eastern Europe, four questions lingering from the CRISPR-baby scandal and how Super-Kamiokande is setting the trap for neutrinos.

6h

Better Things Finds Magic in Change

Better Things has always been a television show that’s interested in the varying indignities and heartbreaks and wounds of being a woman, from the physical (sex, blood, depilation) to the abstract (identity, career, memory). Sam Fox (Pamela Adlon) is a single mother and an actor in Los Angeles, and between those two roles she’s constantly being asked to do the same thing over and over. Say lines.

6h

Netflix’s The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind Is a Winner

The title of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind , an inspirational true-story film based on a memoir by the Malawian engineer William Kamkwamba, is a bit of a spoiler. This isn’t exactly a complaint, but it’s useful to know going in. As a teenager, Kamkwamba built a wind turbine for his famine-stricken town in Malawi, helping to power small appliances and eventually irrigate crops. But though the fil

6h

How Chris Evans Became Twitter's Avatar of Male Decency

The actor helped Regina King up some stairs at the Oscars. Why is the internet praising him for doing the bare minimum?

6h

Crop residue burning is a major contributor to air pollution in South Asia

Urban emissions of black carbon from fossil fuel combustion are not always the main contributor to severe air pollution in south Asian megacities like New Delhi, shows a new study.

6h

Anemic galaxy reveals deficiencies in ultra-diffuse galaxy formation theory

A team of astronomers have discovered a bizarre, solitary ultra-diffuse galaxy (UDG). This transparent, ghost-like galaxy, named DGSAT I, contradicts the current theory on the formation of UDGs. All previously studied UDGs have been in galaxy clusters.

6h

A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other

Chemists have developed a new iron-nickel oxide catalyst for water splitting, the reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. The patent-pending catalyst shows significantly higher activity in the oxygen-evolution part of reaction than conventional nickel iron oxide catalysts.

6h

Right- or left-handed? Gene expression tells the story of snail evolution

Snails, like humans, can be right-handed or left-handed and the swirl etched into the shell of a snail can reveal a lot about them, down to their genetic makeup. Researchers have found that the gene influencing the direction of the shell coil may also offer insight into the evolution of snails overall.

6h

Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules — a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market — could lead to unintended consequences.

6h

Dark matter may be hitting the right note in small galaxies

Dark matter may scatter against each other only when they hit the right energy, says international team of researchers in new study.

6h

Eagle Eye Networks Expands Cloud Video API Developer Program

submitted by /u/kjnbv [link] [comments]

6h

This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it?

European collectors took two specimens from forests in Malaysia but didn’t have permits

6h

Electric Car Startup Faraday Future Is Circling the Drain

Faraday Past Electric car startup Faraday Future has been in financial free fall for months now. The company placed hundreds of employees on unpaid leave or furlough in October — and hundreds more followed two months later . And things are not looking up. An internal email obtained by The Verge paints a gloomy picture: the company is still desperately looking for funding, and extending the furlou

6h

How fungi influence global plant colonization

The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts like a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

6h

Latest anti-retroviral drug regimens provide 'Lazarus Effect' for HIV patients

Frailty related to HIV infection 'is rapidly becoming a specter of the past' and today it 'is possible to control HIV infection in all patients,' according to a perspective article authored by a clinical team at the University of Arizona College of Medicine — Tucson.

6h

Directed evolution builds nanoparticles

Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. Scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose.

6h

Detecting cyanide exposure

Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke — or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure.

6h

Now you see heat, now you don't

Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors.

6h

Using histones as bait: How do cells decide how to repair their DNA?

When DNA in the cell nucleus gets damaged, our cells can resort to a variety of repair mechanisms. A recent study elucidates the molecular basis by which a cell makes the choice between these repair mechanisms. The trick the scientists used: they developed a molecular bait to literally fish out the relevant proteins from the cell nucleus.

6h

Muscle gene mutations implicated in human nasal/sinus cancer

By sequencing the entire genomes of tumor cells from six people with a rare cancer of the nose and sinus cavity, researchers report they unexpectedly found the same genetic change — one in a gene involved in muscle formation — in five of the tumors.

6h

Flipping the view: New microscope offers options for drug discovery, safety

A new microscope could be used for drug testing and biological imaging. Researchers created a new type of microscope by adding just two small optics to the base design of a conventional microscope.

6h

Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions

The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study.

6h

Directed evolution builds nanoparticles

Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. Scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose.

6h

Detecting cyanide exposure

Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke — or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure.

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Clouds May Hold the Key to Future Warming

New findings that certain clouds could disintegrate under extreme warming come with key caveats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To find food, hungry worms get their wiggle on

Perpetually hungry, microscopic worms will spend up to 20 minutes seeking out snacks in their immediate surroundings before looking elsewhere. Now, scientists know what’s going on in their brains that drive the behavior. In a study, which appears in Neuron , researchers describe neural mechanisms responsible for the local search, showing that either smell- or touch-related cues trigger the behavi

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Twitter shows how quickly we adjust to wild weather

People have short memories when it comes to what they consider “normal” weather, according to new research. On average, people base their idea of normal weather on what has happened in just the past two to eight years, researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . This disconnect with the historical climate record may obscure the public’s perception of climat

6h

'Upcycling' plastic bottles could give them a more useful second life

Scientists have developed a recycling process that transforms single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and carpet made from the common polyester material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into more valuable products with a longer lifespan. Their research could help protect oceans from plastic waste by jumpstarting the recycled plastics market.

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Resistance training even as little as once per week benefits older individuals

Resistance training improves the health of over 65-year-olds, and the benefits occur even when some people train as little as once per week.

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A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain

Serious diseases are directly linked to the subcortical areas of the brain. Existing treatments for regulating and measuring the activity of the subcortical areas are highly invasive. Researchers have decided to see whether a noninvasive method — electroencephalography — could be employed in tandem with mathematical algorithms to measure this brain activity externally. They proved for the first

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Reprogramming the wonder drug rapamycin allows creation of new small-molecule drugs

In the new study, the authors aimed to reprogram rapamycin by keeping the parts of rapamycin and tacrolimus that bind FKBP12 and changing the remaining half of the molecule in order to target completely new disease-associated proteins beyond mTOR and calcineurin.

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This AI is so good at writing that its creators won't let you use it

submitted by /u/Pelotiqueiro [link] [comments]

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D-Wave announces its next-gen quantum computing platform

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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University of Guelph researchers uncover why environmental cues make drug addiction extra hard to beat

Besides triggering the brain's emotional and stimulus-response systems, environmental cues activate areas where memories are processed, according to this University of Guelph study. Prompting these memory processing systems makes it extra difficult to counter addiction because the classic stimulus-response mechanisms are reinforced by the memory effects of environmental drug cues. While this doubl

7h

Death From Above: Boeing Unveils Autonomous Fighter Jet

Bot Gun Military contractor Boeing announced Wednesday that it is developing an autonomous fighter jet plane that it plans to sell to customers around the world. The company plans to fly the pilot-free plane, dubbed the Boeing Airpower Teaming System, sometime in 2020. While the company says it can design the plane according to a given customers needs, the autonomous jet may be particularly well-

7h

The History of the Lab Rat Is Full of Scientific Triumphs and Ethical Quandaries

Lab rodents have been used in animal testing for more than 150 years, and the number of rodent-based studies continues to grow

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In advance of Brexit, U.K. scientists are stockpiling supplies

Crashing out of European Union could also limit access to research staff and funding

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Samsung's fastest phone memory ever goes into production at 512GB – CNET

And that capacity coincides with the storage that is slated to be in the Galaxy Fold.

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NASA’s InSight Mars Lander Tries to Start Digging, But Hits Snag

Hammer Time NASA’s Insight Mars lander came prepared with a number of instruments to explore the interior of the Red Planet. One of them is a heat flow probe built by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) to burrow itself into the surface of Mars in a mole-like fashion to take Mars’ temperature. The data it gathers could give us new clues about how Earth’s neighbor was formed. But InSight has hit a s

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3 explanations for ‘Oumuamua that aren’t alien spaceships

Astronomers are coming up with some creative ideas to explain the weird behavior of the first known interstellar object.

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Researchers develop model to predict suicide risk in at-risk young adults

New research from Pitt's School of Medicine shows that fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms are much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults.

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Is prenatal vitamin use by moms associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder recurrence in young siblings?

This study examined whether prenatal vitamin use by mothers was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) recurrence in high-risk families. The study included 241 children who were selected because a sibling was diagnosed with ASD. Mothers reported their use of prenatal vitamins during pregnancy. While most mothers reported taking prenatal vitamins while pregnant, only 87 (36 percent) mothers

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Family opioid use and risk of opioid use among teens, young adults following surgical, dental procedures

This study looked at whether long-term opioid use by one or more family members was associated with long-term opioid use by adolescents and young adults prescribed opioids for the first time after common surgical or dental procedures. This observational study used data from a commercial insurance database for about 346,000 patients (ages 13 to 21) who underwent procedures including tooth extractio

7h

'Upcycling' plastic bottles could give them a more useful second life

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have developed a recycling process that transforms single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and carpet made from the common polyester material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into more valuable products with a longer lifespan. Their research, published Feb. 27 in the journal Joule, could help protect oceans from plasti

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Researchers 'bait' pathological proteins underlying many neurodegenerative disorders

The vast majority of patients with neurodegenerative disorders do not have specific gene mutations, but a single misbehaving protein — called TDP-43 — seems to be at the heart of these diseases. Pitt researchers have found a way to recreate and rescue TDP-43 pathology in a dish.

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This AI lets you deepfake your voice to speak like Barack Obama

Advances in machine learning will soon make it possible to sound like yourself with a different age or gender—or impersonate someone else.

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Michael Cohen's House Testimony: 5 Key Takeaways from the Prepared Statement

Michael Cohen's testimony before the House Oversight committee tells a new story about Trump and Russia.

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Amazing Video: Nimble Humanoid Robot Threads Needle, Pours Drink

Bot Be Nimble This week, many of the world leaders in technology are gathered at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, Spain. Also in attendance is XR-1, a remarkably nimble humanoid created by INNFOS — a Chinese company that believes its bot could foreshadow the future of human-robot interactions. Actuators, Mount Up In an impressive video released on Sunday, INNFOS’ “intelligent service

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24M Ships First High Energy-Density Semi-Solid State Batteries

submitted by /u/RA2lover [link] [comments]

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MWC Barcelona 2019: 5G Is Putting Robots’ Heads in the Cloud

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Author Correction: Structural insights into the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors

Author Correction: Structural insights into the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors Author Correction: Structural insights into the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0983-z Author Correction: Structural insights into the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors

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Start-ups presser på for at sætte el til Tysklands biler

Hvis et universitet kan bygge en billig elbil, kan de store bilgiganter ikke sige, at det er svært, mener en universitetsprofessor bag flere prototyper af prisvenlige elbiler.

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Health insurance is not assurance of healthcare

Because of high out-of-pocket expenses, Ohioans who purchase subsidized health-exchange insurance often can't afford the care they need when they need it. That is a central finding of a new study from researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

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A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other

EPFL chemists have developed a new iron-nickel oxide catalyst for water splitting, the reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. The patent-pending catalyst shows significantly higher activity in the oxygen-evolution part of reaction than conventional nickel iron oxide catalysts. The work is now published in ACS Central Science.

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Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges

Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, suggesting that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances — and expend more energy — to obtain critical resources.

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Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions

The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study.

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Plant-based meals improve insulin and incretin secretion in those with type 2 diabetes

A plant-based diet improves the secretion of insulin and incretin hormones in those with type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in Nutrients.

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The Green New Deal is more feasible than you think

Environment Though that may depend on how we define "clean" and "renewable." It’s an ambitious target that some have called politically or economically infeasible, but the idea is not new. In fact, scientists have been exploring roadmaps for a…

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Volvo's Polestar unveils electric car touted as Tesla rival

Volvo's electric performance brand Polestar is unveiling a battery-powered compact car touted as a rival to Tesla's Model 3.

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California's Hidden Threat: High-Risk Volcanoes That Might Erupt in the Next Decade

California has several volcanoes that are at "high risk" or "very high risk" of erupting.

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Heavy petting: technique upcycles single-use plastics

Mixing PET plastics with biomass produces stronger and more valuable recycled results. Nick Carne reports.

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'Upcycling' plastic bottles could give them a more useful second life

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a recycling process that transforms single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and carpet made from the common polyester material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into more valuable products with a longer lifespan. Their research, published February 27 in the journal Joule, could help protect ocean

7h

Psychology and the Allure of Conspiracy Theories

Research has suggested that people who believe in conspiracy theories are more likely to perceive patterns in random stimuli, such as a series of coin tosses. Other studies have found that people who believe conspiracy theories are more likely to infer a relationship between unrelated events.

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US Hackers' Strike on Russian Trolls Sends a Message—but What Kind?

US Cyber Command's takedown of the Internet Research Agency's network may be more about signaling than immediate effects.

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The Problem With a Fight Against Toxic Masculinity

Over the past several years, toxic masculinity has become a catchall explanation for male violence and sexism. The appeal of the term, which distinguishes “toxic” traits such aggression and self-entitlement from “healthy” masculinity, has grown to the point where Gillette invoked it last month in a viral advertisement against bullying and sexual harassment. Around the same time, the American Psyc

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Doudna’s Confidence in CRISPR’s Research Potential Burns Bright

No one needs to remind Jennifer Doudna about the power of CRISPR, the precision genome-editing technology she codeveloped. CRISPR “gives us a way to ultimately control the evolution of any organism — including ourselves. It is a profound thing. Human beings have now learned enough about our own genetic code that we can change it at will,” she said. “It’s kind of crazy to think about.” That’s why

7h

How can you keep your microbiome healthy?

The human microbiome—that invisible world of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in and on our bodies—has been relatively unstudied even though scientists have known about it for centuries. But the world of science and medicine is starting to pay closer attention. “There is an ecological problem—a climate change—now happening inside of us,” says Martin Blaser, a pioneer in the field and the new director

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Flipping the view: New microscope offers options for drug discovery, safety

A microscope developed at Purdue University could be used for drug testing and biological imaging. Researchers created a new type of microscope by adding just two small optics to the base design of a conventional microscope.

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New research gives insight into warding off insect pests by way of nematode odors

A recent study revealed insect-killing nematodes also produce distinctive chemical cues that enhance plant defenses and deter Colorado potato beetles.Entomologists from Texas A&M University, including Dr. Anjel Helms, who led the study, and Penn State University took a look at whether Colorado potato beetles and potato plants responded to the presence of entomopathogenic nematodes, EPNs, or insect

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New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates

Researchers on the remote forested island of Hauturu, New Zealand have compiled a staggering inventory of invertebrate biodiversity using DNA sequencing, adding a significant number of invertebrates to GenBank – an open access database of all publicly available DNA sequences. The results are published this week in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications.

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Research suggests that medications for kidney transplants increase risk of skin cancer

A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analysed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications.

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Kaiser Permanente improves emergency care for patients with chest pain

Emergency physicians at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Southern California reduced hospital admissions and cardiac stress testing by using new criteria to assess the level of risk patients with chest pain have for subsequent cardiac events.

7h

Self-sterilising microneedles being developed in Australia for safer vaccinations

Researchers at the University of South Australia have developed a microneedle patch with antibacterial properties to make vaccinations much safer than traditional needles or other microneedles.

8h

Opt-out organ donation law: Your questions answered

Organ donation in England will take place on an opt-out basis from next year, now that a new law has been passed by MPs. But its effects on donation rates may be being overstated, finds Clare Wilson

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Twenty minutes into the future with OpenAI’s Deep Fake Text AI

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The World's Most Valuable AI Companies, and What They're Working On

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The self-assembling computer chips of the future | Karl Skjonnemand

The transistors that power the phone in your pocket are unimaginably small: you can fit more than 3,000 of them across the width of a human hair. But to keep up with innovations in fields like facial recognition and augmented reality, we need to pack even more computing power into our computer chips — and we're running out of space. In this forward-thinking talk, technology developer Karl Skjonne

8h

Bayer faces new marathon after mammoth Monsanto merger

German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer reported plunging profits for 2018 after taking over US agrichemical firm Monsanto, with years of hard work ahead of the group to fight off legal risks related to the merger and to keep profits flowing in its medicines division.

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Volvo's Polestar unveils electric car touted as Tesla rival

Volvo's electric performance brand Polestar is unveiling a battery-powered compact car touted as a rival to Tesla's Model 3.

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Big data at the atomic scale: New detector reaches new frontier in speed

Advances in electron microscopy – using electrons as imaging tools to see things well beyond the reach of conventional microscopes that use light – have opened up a new window into the nanoscale world and brought a wide range of samples into focus as never before.

8h

Proteasome Inhibitors, Refined

The proteasome is quite the structure. It is the shredding unit of the cell, where no-longer-needed proteins go to be ripped down to their components for recycling, and it’s become a more and more important part of drug discovery over the years. For one thing, all this fashionable targeted protein degradation work is about sending designated proteins off for destruction at will and before their t

8h

Crossbreeding puts endangered Milky Stork at risk

Crossbreeding with their more widespread cousin threatens Milky Storks, an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, researchers warn. “Apart from habitat loss and fragmentation, extinction through hybridization is one of the major threats to endangered species,” says research lead Frank Rheindt, an assistant professor in the biological sciences department at the National University of Sin

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Reprogramming the wonder drug rapamycin allows creation of new small-molecule drugs

In the new study, the authors aimed to reprogram rapamycin by keeping the parts of rapamycin and tacrolimus that bind FKBP12 and changing the remaining half of the molecule in order to target completely new disease-associated proteins beyond mTOR and calcineurin.

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CVIA special issue on women's heart health to coincide with 'The Heart Truth'

The first Friday of February is an annual celebration by millions of Americans who wear red to raise awareness about The Heart Truth, a national campaign sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Wearing red on this day or throughout February, is promoted to remind women that heart disease is the No. 1 threat to their health. The new edition of CVIA has nine expert articles dedica

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Directed evolution builds nanoparticles

Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose.

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Muscle gene mutations implicated in human nasal/sinus cancer

By sequencing the entire genomes of tumor cells from six people with a rare cancer of the nose and sinus cavity, Johns Hopkins researchers report they unexpectedly found the same genetic change — one in a gene involved in muscle formation — in five of the tumors.

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Using histones as bait: How do cells decide how to repair their DNA?

When DNA in the cell nucleus gets damaged, our cells can resort to a variety of repair mechanisms. A recent study published in 'Nature Cell Biology', to which scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München made major contributions, elucidates the molecular basis by which a cell makes the choice between these repair mechanisms. The trick the scientists used: they developed a molecular bait to literally

8h

Detecting cyanide exposure

Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke — or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise a

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Now you see heat, now you don't

Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors.

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Self-sterilising microneedles being developed in Australia for safer vaccinations

Researchers at the University of South Australia have developed a microneedle patch with antibacterial properties to make vaccinations much safer than traditional needles or other microneedles.

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Remembering the Bold Thinking of Hampshire College

It’s hard to believe that nearly a half century has passed since I stood on a hillside in South Amherst, Massachusetts, with Van Halsey, then Hampshire College’s director of admissions, gazing at the rolling green farmland that stretched out toward Hadley, Massachusetts. “That is where the college will be,” Halsey explained. I was 17 years old, entering my senior year of high school, and convince

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It Isn’t the Kids. It’s the Cost of Raising Them.

For several decades, the work of happiness researchers has consistently pointed to an unintuitive conclusion: Having children doesn’t tend to make people happier, and might even make them less happy. “That never made any sense [to me],” says David Blanchflower, an economist at Dartmouth College. If having kids makes people less happy, why do so many people do it? Why would people have more than o

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Smugglers arrested in Malaysia with over 3,000 rare turtles

Smugglers were arrested in Malaysia on Wednesday with some 3,300 endangered turtles aboard their boat, officials said, as the country battles to clamp down on the burgeoning illicit wildlife trade.

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Smugglers arrested in Malaysia with over 3,000 rare turtles

Smugglers were arrested in Malaysia on Wednesday with some 3,300 endangered turtles aboard their boat, officials said, as the country battles to clamp down on the burgeoning illicit wildlife trade.

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Gene-edited livestock could be a boon to farmers in developing countries

Science sits down with a researcher trying improve cow, chicken productivity in Africa

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Ash loggers race against time before beetles get them all

Loggers in snowy forests are cutting down ash like there's no tomorrow, seeking to stay one step ahead of a fast-spreading beetle killing the tree in dozens of states.

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High-tech laser scans uncover hidden military traverse at Alcatraz Island

High-tech radar and laser scans have uncovered a hidden military traverse underneath the infamous Alcatraz penitentiary, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Sprint's 5G network will go live this May in Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas and Kansas City

Sprint users hoping to take advantage of the company's forthcoming 5G network now have a month to look forward to: May.

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Pokemon: Nintendo announces two new games, Sword and Shield, for the Switch

This is the first 'real' Pokemon game to appear on consoles, following successful titles on handheld and mobile.

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Plato predicts fake wisdom powered by google

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Researchers use AI to identify giraffes by their unique markings

submitted by /u/Portis403 [link] [comments]

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Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime

New technology developed by a Washington State University scientist could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur.

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Fixing Regulatory Pitfalls Could Reduce Methane Emissions

Smarter regulations can bring to market high-tech products that better find oil and gas leaks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brittiska konsumenter förlorare vid brexit

– Storbritannien importerar i dagsläget stora delar av sin livsmedelskonsumtion från EU. Därför kommer utträdet att innebära högre priser för brittiska konsumenter och producenter, förklarar Torbjörn Jansson, en av forskarna bakom en ny rapport från AgriFood Economics Centre, ett samarbete mellan Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU) och Ekonomihögskolan vid Lunds universitet. I EU blir effekten is

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Fixing Regulatory Pitfalls Could Reduce Methane Emissions

Smarter regulations can bring to market high-tech products that better find oil and gas leaks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain

Serious diseases are directly linked to the subcortical areas of the brain. Existing treatments for regulating and measuring the activity of the subcortical areas are highly invasive. Researchers from UNIGE decided to see whether a noninvasive method — electroencephalography — could be employed in tandem with mathematical algorithms to measure this brain activity externally. They proved for the

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Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity in the cortex in OCD patients

Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity distributed throughout different regions of the cerebral cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder. This fact could explain the presence of intrusive thoughts in this patient population as a result of inefficient sensory filtering.

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Raindrop size distributions vary across seasons and rain types

Precipitation and raindrop size distribution (DSD) characteristics in East China vary across seasons and rain types. To better improve the microphysics parameterization in numerical weather precipitation models for more accurate quantitative precipitation forecasting, the physical or microphysical processes resulting in the differences of seasonal precipitation microphysics are worthy of further s

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Resistance training even as little as once per week benefits older individuals

Resistance training improves the health of over 65-year-olds, and the benefits occur even when some people train as little as once per week.

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A real turn on: Evolutionary rotation of fly genitalia tied to mating success

Osaka University researchers sought evidence that developmental genital rotation of flies in the order Diptera evolved in correlation with a shift to accommodate mating positions; i.e., 'evolutionary cooperation' of morphology and behavior. They found that male flies with properly rotating genitalia had the greatest degree of reproductive success. However, they found no solid correlation with cour

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The World’s Most Valuable AI Companies, and What They’re Working On

It recognizes our faces. It knows the videos we might like. And it can even, perhaps, recommend the best course of action to take to maximize our personal health. Artificial intelligence and its subset of disciplines—such as machine learning , natural language processing , and computer vision —are seemingly becoming integrated into our daily lives whether we like it or not. What was once sci-fi i

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Noisier waters linked to behaviour change, hearing loss in whales

Studies investigating whale-watching boats and the inner ears of marine mammals could soon provide new insight into the effects of noisier oceans on cetaceans – dolphins, whales and porpoises – who depend on their hearing for navigating, finding food and communicating underwater.

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Noisier waters linked to behaviour change, hearing loss in whales

Studies investigating whale-watching boats and the inner ears of marine mammals could soon provide new insight into the effects of noisier oceans on cetaceans – dolphins, whales and porpoises – who depend on their hearing for navigating, finding food and communicating underwater.

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It's time to tell your laptop to stop installing software you don't want

DIY Don't compromise the security of your system or the safety of your data. Don't compromise the security of your system or the safety of your data—here's how to keep unwanted programs off your computer.

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Here's how Britain's changing weather is affecting wildlife

The Beast from the East, a polar vortex which brought freezing conditions to the UK, arrived on February 26 2018. Two days later there was a minimum temperature of -11.7°C (10.9˚F) at South Farnborough in Hampshire, and a maximum of only -4.8°C (23.4˚F) at Spadeadam in Cumbria.

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Studying how time is perceived in space

Einstein predicted that time slows down the faster you travel and the time-dilation hypothesis has since been proven by flying atomic clocks on aircraft.

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Here's how Britain's changing weather is affecting wildlife

The Beast from the East, a polar vortex which brought freezing conditions to the UK, arrived on February 26 2018. Two days later there was a minimum temperature of -11.7°C (10.9˚F) at South Farnborough in Hampshire, and a maximum of only -4.8°C (23.4˚F) at Spadeadam in Cumbria.

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FTC zooms in on tech with new antitrust task force

Amid calls for breaking up tech giants, the Federal Trade Commission is launching a task force to focus on monitoring competition in the tech industry.

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Will terrorism continue to decline in 2019?

Lost in the headlines, rapidly accelerating news cycles and the pervasive fear generated by terrorist threats is the fact that terrorist attacks worldwide have actually been declining – in some areas substantially.

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Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules – a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market – could lead to unintended consequences, according to a new study from Oregon State University.

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New continuity of care tracking method for GPs

New research has outlined a simple way to measure continuity of care for GPs, to benefit patients.

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Lab study: Parkinson's researchers test a new approach against motor disorders

Scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) have been able to alleviate motor disorders in mice that resemble those seen in Parkinson's patients.

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Crop residue burning is a major contributor to air pollution in South Asia

Urban emissions of black carbon from fossil fuel combustion are not always the main contributor to severe air pollution in south Asian megacities like New Delhi, shows a new study by researchers from Stockholm University and the Indian Institute for Tropical Meteorology, published in the journal Nature Sustainability.

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Anemic galaxy reveals deficiencies in ultra-diffuse galaxy formation theory

A team of astronomers led by the University of California Observatories discovered a bizarre, solitary ultra-diffuse galaxy (UDG). This transparent, ghost-like galaxy, named DGSAT I, contradicts the current theory on the formation of UDGs. All previously studied UDGs have been in galaxy clusters.

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Super-enhancers: novel target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Among many pathways of cancer progression that PDAC relies on, anomalous activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway has shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate.

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Cultured meat seems gross? It's much better than animal agriculture

The world is in the grips of a food-tech revolution. One of the most compelling new developments is cultured meat, also known as clean, cell-based or slaughter-free meat. It's grown from stem cells taken from a live animal without the need for slaughter.

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Cultured meat seems gross? It's much better than animal agriculture

The world is in the grips of a food-tech revolution. One of the most compelling new developments is cultured meat, also known as clean, cell-based or slaughter-free meat. It's grown from stem cells taken from a live animal without the need for slaughter.

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Ripples in Space-Time Could Help Solve Cosmic Mystery of How Fast Universe Is Expanding

Analyzing ripples in the fabric of space and time created by pairs of dead stars may soon solve a cosmic mystery surrounding how quickly the universe is expanding — if scientists are lucky.

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Directed evolution builds nanoparticles

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to three scientists who developed the method that forever changed protein engineering: directed evolution. Mimicking natural evolution, directed evolution guides the synthesis of proteins with improved or new functions.

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Præhospitalet i Region Midtjylland får ny direktør

Henning Voss stopper som afdelingschef for Klinisk IT på Odense Universitetshospital for at blive direktør for Præhospitalet i Region Midtjylland.

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Gran på menuen: Kræfthæmmende bakterier kan leve af nåletræer

Forskere ved DTU Bioengineering har været med til at sandsynliggøre, at præbiotika med fibre fra nåletræer kan beskytte mod inflammation og tyktarmskræft.

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Sibling rivalries lead to friendly finches

A new study has revealed that growing up with lots of siblings – and fighting over food – makes zebra finches more sociable in later life. In contrast, finches with fewer siblings become pickier about who they hang out with, and are less outgoing.

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Sibling rivalries lead to friendly finches

A new study has revealed that growing up with lots of siblings – and fighting over food – makes zebra finches more sociable in later life. In contrast, finches with fewer siblings become pickier about who they hang out with, and are less outgoing.

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Crop residue burning is a major contributor to air pollution in South Asia

Urban emissions of black carbon from fossil fuel combustion are not always the main contributor to severe air pollution in south Asian megacities like New Delhi, shows a new study by researchers from Stockholm University and the Indian Institute for Tropical Meteorology, published in the journal Nature Sustainability.

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Millions of Australian homes struggling in record-breaking heat

Australians left with soaring energy bills in the wake of a scorching summer are about to face another harsh reality: the vast majority of the nation's houses do not meet the current minimum energy performance requirements.

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Spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices

Whetstone, a software tool that sharpens the output of artificial neurons, has enabled neural computer networks to process information up to a hundred times more efficiently than the current industry standard, say the Sandia National Laboratories researchers who developed it.

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Amerikanska ateist-aktivister pratar hellre på nätet

– Det amerikanska samhället har en väldigt stark offentlig religiositet. Det finns en förväntan på att landets president ska vara kristen och göra kristna uttalanden. ”Vilken församling hör du till” är en vanlig fråga. Det går att använda kristna argument i den offentliga politiska debatten, på ett sätt som inte skulle passera i Sverige eller Västeuropa. För kvinnliga ateister i USA kan då Youtub

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‘Periodic table’ of droplet motions could aid crime-solvers

Liquid droplets assume complex shapes and behave in different ways, each with a distinct resonance—like a drum head or a violin string—depending on the intricate interrelationship of the liquid, the solid it lands on, and the gas surrounding it. Droplet movements have implications for all kinds of things, including manufacturing silicon chips and measuring bodily fluids, but until now there was n

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Researchers discover cell mechanism that delays and repairs DNA damage that can lead to cancer

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified a specific mechanism that protects our cells from natural DNA errors — an 'enemy within' — which could permanently damage our genetic code and lead to diseases such as cancer. The study has just been published in one of the most influential scientific journals, Nature Cell Biology.

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Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime

New technology developed by a Washington State University scientist could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur.

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Dark matter may be hitting the right note in small galaxies

Dark matter may scatter against each other only when they hit the right energy, says international team of researchers in new study.

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High-tech laser scans uncover hidden military traverse at Alcatraz Island

High-tech radar and laser scans have uncovered a hidden military traverse underneath the infamous Alcatraz penitentiary, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules — a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market — could lead to unintended consequences.

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New breakthrough in understanding a severe child speech impediment

An international study led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute has made a breakthrough in identifying a potential cause of the most severe child speech impediment — apraxia. One in 1000 children has apraxia, but understating the origins of this debilitating speech disorder has until now remained elusive. A team of researchers, led by MCRI speech pathologist Prof Angela Morgan, has identi

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New mothers reduce their alcohol intake, but this change is short-lived

Most women dramatically reduce their alcohol intake on learning they are pregnant, but by the time their child is five they are back to their pre-pregnancy drinking levels, a new international study has found.The research, led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, reported little change in the drinking patterns of men on becoming fathers.

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Bats migrate at the most energy-efficient flying speed for maximum range

Aerial migration is the fastest, yet most energetically demanding way of seasonal movements between habitats. A new study led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii). Using a wind tunnel experiment to determine the exact energy demands of different

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Bats migrate at the most energy-efficient flying speed for maximum range

Aerial migration is the fastest, yet most energetically demanding way of seasonal movements between habitats. A new study led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii). Using a wind tunnel experiment to determine the exact energy demands of different

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Microsoft CEO: Selling HoloLens to Military Is a ‘Principled Decision’

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella dismissed accusations that the company is war profiteering by selling HoloLens to the US Army to increase troop lethality. It's not clear he's even considered the question. The post Microsoft CEO: Selling HoloLens to Military Is a ‘Principled Decision’ appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Michael Cohen’s Stunning Testimony About Trump

In written testimony ahead of a hearing conducted by the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday, President Donald Trump’s former fixer Michael Cohen will deliver a series of bombshells that could transform the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Cohen’s testimony , at less than 4,000 words, doesn’t change the fundamental picture so much as fill in essential gaps. Cohen w

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Letters: Is It Constitutional to Allow a Religious Symbol on Public Land?

Why Is This Cross-Shaped Memorial Constitutional? In the decades following World War I, a private group in Bladensburg, Maryland, raised money to erect a 40-foot-high cross in memory of 49 local soldiers who had died in the fighting. (After the group’s fundraising efforts stalled, the local American Legion post eventually completed the project in 1925.) In 1961, the state acquired the land on whi

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Fossil fuels are bad for your health and harmful in many ways besides climate change

Many Democratic lawmakers aim to pass a Green New Deal, a package of policies that would mobilize vast amounts of money to create new jobs and address inequality while fighting climate change.

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No Amount of Patches Could Make 'Anthem' Fun to Play

Despite coming from a great developer, the game is a big disappointment.

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Undersøgelse: Tørken svækkede de voksne træer og tog livet af de små

I sidste års tørke døde op mod 100 procent af de nyplantede træer i Danmarks…

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Alternativets regionsrådsmedlemmer vil ud af reformforhandlinger

Alternativets bagland advarer mod partiets deltagelse i de igangværende forhandlinger om regeringens sundhedsreform.

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Biologists find the long and short of it when it comes to chromosomes

A team of biologists has uncovered a mechanism that determines faithful inheritance of short chromosomes during the reproductive process. The discovery elucidates a key aspect of inheritance — deviation from which can lead to infertility, miscarriages, or birth defects such as Down syndrome.

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Stopwatch set for milestone marathon in 2032

The elusive sub-two hour marathon running mark will likely be first shattered by a male athlete in May 2032, according to a ground-breaking statistical study.

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Brennan Beats Rick's Total From Last Year | Gold Rush

Brennan's Big Red season total eclipses Rick's season from last year by 19 ounces. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're

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Crowd-sourced computer network delves into protein structure, seeks new disease therapies

When Greg Bowman presents a slideshow about the proteins he studies, their 3-D shapes and folding patterns play out as animations on a big screen. As he describes these molecules, it might be easy to miss the fact that he can't really see his own presentation, at least not the way the audience does.

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Crowd-sourced computer network delves into protein structure, seeks new disease therapies

When Greg Bowman presents a slideshow about the proteins he studies, their 3-D shapes and folding patterns play out as animations on a big screen. As he describes these molecules, it might be easy to miss the fact that he can't really see his own presentation, at least not the way the audience does.

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The Tory plan for no-deal medical shortages is staggeringly negligent | Jolyon Maugham

The government’s ‘serious shortage protocols’ are a real danger to the British public’s health – and may be illegal • Jolyon Maugham QC is a director of the Good Law Project “A no-deal Brexit … is expected to have an immediate and drastic effect on supply chains” for medicines. From the pen of an op-ed writer, such language might seem alarmist. But this comes from a report published this week in t

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Any free port in a storm: New analysis predicts limited impact of free zones for post-Brexit Britain

Proposals to relax customs rules and duties in specially-designated areas, known as free ports or more generally free zones, would make little impact on rebuilding the UK economy after Brexit, new analysis by the UK Trade Policy Observatory (UKTPO) at the University of Sussex has detailed.

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Study finds majority of public is unfamiliar with ballot measures

Political science researchers used a new approach to gauge the public's knowledge of ballot measures and found that overall, fewer people have general knowledge of ballot measures than previously thought.

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How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity

The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect. Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music 'significantly impaired' people's ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity —

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Getting to the core of underwater soil

Soils all over the Earth's surface are rigorously tested and managed. But what about soils that are down in the murky depths? Some scientists are working to get them the recognition and research they deserve.

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How young adults experience pain affects self-injury

Teen-agers and young adults who intentionally hurt themselves engage in such behavior based, in part, on how they experience pain and their emotional distress, according to a new study.

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New treatment offers potentially promising results for the possibility of slowing, stopping, or even reversing Parkinson's disease

A pioneering clinical trials program that delivered an experimental treatment directly to the brain offers hope that it may be possible to restore the cells damaged in Parkinson's disease. The study investigated whether boosting the levels of a naturally-occurring growth factor, Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), can regenerate dying dopamine brain cells in patients with Parkinson

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Bat-mobile with cruise control

A new study investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii).

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Custom-made proteins may help create antibodies to fight HIV

Using computational modeling, a team of researchers has designed and created proteins that mimicked different surface features of HIV. After being immunized with the proteins, rabbits developed antibodies that were able to bind with the virus.

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Study suggests humans are now producing more chemical waste than can be tested

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. has found evidence that suggests humans are dumping more chemical waste into the environment than can be tested for its impact. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their review of recent research surrounding the amounts and types of chemicals being dumped into ecosyst

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Turning stem cells into bone with nanoclay-reinforced hydrogel

Assistant Professor Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz and colleagues have developed a hydrogel that combines synthetic materials with living cells, and can turn stem cells into bone without adding external growth or differentiation factors.

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Study finds green certification improves public opinion of oil and gas development

Researchers at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs found that public opinion of oil and gas development could be improved if firms were "green certified," meaning that they pledged to adhere to stricter environmental standards than required.

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Regulating Facebook could hinder small businesses with overseas customers

Digital platforms provide a host of challenges for governments. Questions about how to best protect privacy, democracy, and speech online become more pressing every year.

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New map reveals geology and history of Pluto's moon Charon

What a difference a planetary flyby makes. Pluto's moon Charon—once no more than a fuzzy blob of pixels beside a larger blob—now has its first geological map, published in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

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Monitoring the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall in real time

A significant breakthrough has just been made in the world of biochemistry: a team of international researchers has developed a revolutionary method to monitor in real time an essential element of bacterial growth.

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New consolidated bio-saccharification technique for lignocellulose conversion developed

A research group from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, has developed a novel strategy for cost-efficient lignocellulose conversion. Known as consolidated bio-saccharification (CBS), it combines cellulase production and hydrolysis, while separating fermentation from the integrated process by taking fermentable sugar as the target pr

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Right- or left-handed? Gene expression tells the story of snail evolution

Snails, like humans, can be right-handed or left-handed, and the swirl etched into the shell of a snail can reveal a lot about them, down to their genetic makeup.

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Better planning would help residents warm up to winter cities, researcher finds

Planning, design and governance of a city play at least as important a role as attitudes in helping convince residents to embrace long, cold winters, says a University of Alberta researcher.

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Right- or left-handed? Gene expression tells the story of snail evolution

Snails, like humans, can be right-handed or left-handed, and the swirl etched into the shell of a snail can reveal a lot about them, down to their genetic makeup.

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Overlæges ord skabte høj bølgegang under høring om behandling af lavt stofskifte

Overlæge Birte Nygaards bekymringer angående behandling med Thyroid var upopulære, da hun deltog i en høring om Thyroid til behandling af stofskiftesygdomme.

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Paleontologists identify small fossils as that of oldest frog relative found in North America

A team of paleontologists led by Virginia Tech's Michelle Stocker and Sterling Nesbitt of the Department of Geosciences have identified fossil fragments of what are thought to be the oldest …

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Monitoring the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall in real time

A significant breakthrough has just been made in the world of biochemistry: a team of international researchers has developed a revolutionary method to monitor in real time an essential element of bacterial growth.

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Australia can 'rewild' swathes of territory by focusing on what makes it unique

Since colonisation, a dizzying array of Australia's native species and ecosystems have been altered or removed altogether. It therefore seems natural to consider the idea of restoring what's been lost – a process termed "rewilding."

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New consolidated bio-saccharification technique for lignocellulose conversion developed

A research group from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, has developed a novel strategy for cost-efficient lignocellulose conversion. Known as consolidated bio-saccharification (CBS), it combines cellulase production and hydrolysis, while separating fermentation from the integrated process by taking fermentable sugar as the target pr

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Volcanoes, archaeology and the secrets of Roman concrete

High above Italy's Tyrrhenian Sea, off the north coast of Sicily, 13 students sit atop Stromboli Volcano as it erupts. Ash falls on their shoulders and ping-ping-pings their helmets. The ground beneath their feet trembles.

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A way to get a liquid to move through a channel without a driving force

A team at the University of Oxford has found a technique to move liquid through a small channel without using a driving force. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their technique and how it works.

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Anemic galaxy reveals deficiencies in ultra-diffuse galaxy formation theory

A team of astronomers led by the University of California Observatories (UCO) have studied in great detail a galaxy so faint and in such pristine condition it has acted as a time capsule, sealed shortly after the dawn of our universe only to be opened by the newest technology at W. M. Keck Observatory.

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Australia can 'rewild' swathes of territory by focusing on what makes it unique

Since colonisation, a dizzying array of Australia's native species and ecosystems have been altered or removed altogether. It therefore seems natural to consider the idea of restoring what's been lost – a process termed "rewilding."

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Are Smart Meters a Health Risk?

Don't worry. There is no plausible health risk from the miniscule EMF from smart meters.

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Stress and habitat linked to koala recovery

New research led by Western Sydney University Stress Lab's Dr. Edward Narayan, has found the psychological state of wild koalas and the location they are rescued from, can have significant impacts on their chances of recovery and rehabilitation.

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Blinking ground lights developed to ensure pedestrian traffic safety

The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT, President Seung Heon Han) has announced the development of its "next-generation pedestrian traffic accident prevention system." The system induces motor vehicles approaching crosswalks to reduce their speed, thereby reducing pedestrians' traffic accidents.

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Stress and habitat linked to koala recovery

New research led by Western Sydney University Stress Lab's Dr. Edward Narayan, has found the psychological state of wild koalas and the location they are rescued from, can have significant impacts on their chances of recovery and rehabilitation.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: counting vampires and nudist founding fathers

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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The Small, Small World of Facebook’s Anti-vaxxers

Look up “vaccinations” on Facebook, as Representative Adam Schiff did last week , and the results will show a rich supply of anti-vaccination posts, pages, and groups. Such propaganda appears to be flourishing online, drawing the uninitiated into a tangled web of sources through algorithmic recommendations and human shares. Facebook, for its part, laments the reach of such “health-related misinfo

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The Invisibility of Older Women

In Alfred Hitchcock’s 1938 film, The Lady Vanishes , a young woman on a train becomes disturbed by the sudden disappearance of a kindly older woman, a governess and music teacher. The latter, a spinster, is introduced to the viewer when she writes the letters of her name in the condensation on one of the train’s glass windowpanes, only to have them evaporate almost instantly. Within minutes, she

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Shark researcher names new species of deep-sea shark after daughter

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee is best known for his studies of mako sharks, the fastest swimming sharks in the world. But when it came to identifying and describing a new species of shark, the process was anything but fast.

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Shark researcher names new species of deep-sea shark after daughter

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee is best known for his studies of mako sharks, the fastest swimming sharks in the world. But when it came to identifying and describing a new species of shark, the process was anything but fast.

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Why we see hope for the future of science journalism

Eat blueberries for the antioxidants. Exercise daily at a moderate intensity for optimal heart health. Get the vaccine to prevent the disease.

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The tentacle and you

The tentacle and you The tentacle and you, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00684-y It’s a whole new start!

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Asteroid touchdown, Spain’s reforms and an ‘extinct’ tortoise returns

Asteroid touchdown, Spain’s reforms and an ‘extinct’ tortoise returns Asteroid touchdown, Spain’s reforms and an ‘extinct’ tortoise returns, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00663-3 The week in science: 22–28 February 2019.

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Identification of genes responsible for sour taste in citrus fruit may enable the creation of new, sweeter varieties

A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. Published Tuesday, Feb. 25 in Nature Communications, the research could help plant breeders develop new, sweeter varieties.

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Revealed: the physics of sticky tape

It’s used everywhere from kindergartens to factories, but it turns out to be hellishly complicated stuff. Phil Dooley reports.

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A protein chaperone

Microscopy helps reveal a potential therapeutic for serious illnesses.

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Your voice assistant isn’t working for you even if it feels like it is

Humanity must adjust before machines fully take over our lives on behalf of tech companies, write Nathalie Collins and Jeff Volkheimer.

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Dark matter detection may involve a pinch of salt

Physicists suggest a radically different approach to confirming the most elusive substance in the universe. Alan Duffy reports.

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Chile petroglyphs point to 1700-year-old star-gazing site

The astronomers at the European Southern Observatory might not have been the first to stand on the spot and look upwards. Gabriella Bernardi reports.

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FedEx joins Amazon in delivery robot fray

FedEx is testing a new self-driving robotic vehicle that could one day compete with Amazon in delivering packages or pizzas to homes.

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Semi-flexible model-based analysis of cell adhesion to hydrogels

Hydrogels are commonly used as biomaterials for applications in biomedicine due to their biocompatibility. However, the relationship between biological cells and the hydrogel surface is still unclear and the existing parameters to explain the interactions are not sophisticated enough. In a recent study, Jooyoung Lee, Boa Song and co-workers at the Center for Biomaterials and the Department of Poly

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Identification of genes responsible for sour taste in citrus fruit may enable the creation of new, sweeter varieties

A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. Published Tuesday, Feb. 25 in Nature Communications, the research could help plant breeders develop new, sweeter varieties.

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'Ibiza is different', genetically

"Ibiza is different." That is what the hundreds of standard-bearers of the "hippie" movement who visited the Pitiusan Island during the 60s thought, fascinated by its climate and its unexplored nature. What they did not imagine was that the most unique feature of the island was in its inhabitants. Now a study led by Francesc Calafell, principal investigator of the Institute of Evolutionary Biology

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Image of the Day: Metastatic Moment

A human breast cancer cell divides as it moves through surrounding blood vessel cells in vitro.

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'Ibiza is different', genetically

"Ibiza is different." That is what the hundreds of standard-bearers of the "hippie" movement who visited the Pitiusan Island during the 60s thought, fascinated by its climate and its unexplored nature. What they did not imagine was that the most unique feature of the island was in its inhabitants. Now a study led by Francesc Calafell, principal investigator of the Institute of Evolutionary Biology

10h

Researchers uncover mechanism behind DNA damage control

DNA damage is occurring in our cells all the time due to external agents, such as exposure to sun, or internal agents, like reactive oxygen species. To detect and repair DNA lesions, cells have evolved DNA damage response. Activation of this response underpins genome integrity, which is crucial for preventing the onset of many human pathologies, including hematological disorders, neurodegenerative

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Why are there UK wildfires in February?

What is causing the multiple February wildfires and is this the new normal?

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Review: Jiobit's Location Monitor Tracks Your Kids and Pets

This simple and attractive GPS-enabled tracker is the best way to keep tabs on your pets and kids.

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Since China’s Ban, Recycling in the US Has Gone Up in Flames

All that neatly sorted plastic, paper, and glass used to go to China. Now a lot of it is just getting burned instead.

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New book first to link theory, practice for future social workers

Social workers apply a diverse range of theories that examine social, cultural, political, ecological and psychological aspects of human behavior to their everyday work in helping people. Yet, when receiving their professional education, there are virtually no classes or books that bring the two together. University of Kansas social welfare professors have authored "Human Behavior Theory for Socia

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Researchers uncover mechanism behind DNA damage control

DNA damage is occurring in our cells all the time due to external agents, such as exposure to sun, or internal agents, like reactive oxygen species. To detect and repair DNA lesions, cells have evolved DNA damage response. Activation of this response underpins genome integrity, which is crucial for preventing the onset of many human pathologies, including hematological disorders, neurodegenerative

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Snapshot technique helps scientists 'hear' the quantum world

When scientists examine very small and swift objects they see the laws of physics working wildly differently than in the everyday "normal-sized" world.

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Indigenous knowledge key to a successful ecosystem restoration

Ecological restoration projects actively involving indigenous peoples and local communities are more successful. This is the result of a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which places value on indigenous and local knowledge contributions in the restoring degraded ecosystems, and highlights the need to eng

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Telecommuting positively impacts job performance, study finds

Telecommuting contributes to improved job performance for employees in complex jobs, allowing them to benefit from fewer interruptions common in an office setting, research from FIU Business finds.

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Evolutionary rotation of fly genitalia tied to mating success

In the order Diptera, more-primitive species such as mosquitos generally do their deed in the end-to-end position. Higher (more evolved) species such as flies tend toward the male mounting the female from behind (male-above position).

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Opinion | A.I. Still Needs H.I. (Human Intelligence), for Now

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5 things to know about artificial intelligence

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Evolutionary rotation of fly genitalia tied to mating success

In the order Diptera, more-primitive species such as mosquitos generally do their deed in the end-to-end position. Higher (more evolved) species such as flies tend toward the male mounting the female from behind (male-above position).

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High-resolution data products help illuminate urbanization's reach

Two data products and a mapping tool recently released through the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center operated by CIESIN, provide data on man-made impervious surfaces and urban extents throughout the world, in greater detail than has been previously available. The Human Built-up and Settlement Extent (HBASE) and Global Man-made Impervious Surface (GMIS) data sets can shed new light on

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New survey raises concerns about elephant poaching in Botswana

Botswana has an elephant poaching problem. The numbers far exceed previous years according to a new survey. The survey was conducted between July and October 2018 by conservation group Elephants without Borders, in collaboration with Botswana's Department of Wildlife and National Parks.

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Solving the 'population problem' through policy

Australia has a problem with population. It's a problem with the potential to result in enormous chaos, risking the nation's economic well-being. And this problem is moving like an overcrowded Sydney train, careering out of control towards inevitable carnage.

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New survey raises concerns about elephant poaching in Botswana

Botswana has an elephant poaching problem. The numbers far exceed previous years according to a new survey. The survey was conducted between July and October 2018 by conservation group Elephants without Borders, in collaboration with Botswana's Department of Wildlife and National Parks.

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Here’s How Horticulturalists Made the Michelle Obama Orchid

This year’s orchid show takes over the cavernous naturally-lit Kogod Courtyard with thousands on view

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Daddy Day Care Underwater

Searching for mouthbrooding fish is like an aquatic treasure hunt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Humpback Whale That Washed Ashore in Amazon Jungle Was Likely Sick

How did a humpback whale get stranded in the Amazon?

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Oldest frog relative found in North America

A team of paleontologists led by Virginia Tech's Michelle Stocker and Sterling Nesbitt of the Department of Geosciences have identified fossil fragments of what are thought to be the oldest known frogs in North America.

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FedEx’s new autonomous delivery bot has iBot wheelchair DNA

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Meet the FedEx SameDay Bot

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How some men are challenging gender inequity in the lab

How some men are challenging gender inequity in the lab How some men are challenging gender inequity in the lab, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00683-z Offering support to female colleagues can trigger a culture change that makes science and engineering more equitable for all.

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What the Media Won’t Tell You About ISIS

Here’s a prediction: When or if the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is killed, if he isn’t dead already, foreign-policy pundits will argue that his bloody demise is ultimately a hollow victory for the Western-backed anti-ISIS coalition, and that ISIS, as an idea and an organization, will long outlive the death of its “caliph.” Some will even argue that his killing is in fact a boon to t

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A Troubling Discovery in the Deepest Ocean Trenches

Alan Jamieson remembers seeing it for the first time: a small, black fiber floating in a tube of liquid. It resembled a hair, but when Jamieson examined it under a microscope, he realized that the fiber was clearly synthetic—a piece of plastic. And worryingly, his student Lauren Brooks had pulled it from the gut of a small crustacean living in one of the deepest parts of the ocean. For the past d

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A Man's Trouble Smelling Was Caused By a Tooth Growing in His Nose

A man got a completely unexpected diagnosis after he told his doctors that for the past two years, his left nostril had been stuffy, drippy and losing its ability to smell.

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Ram-Headed Sphinx Abandoned by King Tut's Grandfather Found in Egypt

A giant, unfinished ram-headed sphinx has been found in a quarry site near the Nile.

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Photos: The Ram-Headed Sphinx of Gebel el-Silsila

Archaeologists discovered a ram-headed sphinx dating back some 3,700 years at a famous site in Egypt.

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Ten recent low-tech inventions that have changed the world

Technologies don’t have to be cutting edge to make a profound difference in people’s lives.

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Ten big global challenges technology could solve

None is easy, but all are incredibly important.

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10 of Bill Gates’s favorite books about technology

And how they helped him choose this year’s list of 10 breakthrough technologies

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The new, safer nuclear reactors that might help stop climate change

From sodium-cooled fission to advanced fusion, a fresh generation of projects hopes to rekindle trust in nuclear energy.

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Former FCC Chair Tom Wheeler Says the Internet Needs Regulation

Big telecom networks and platforms such as Google and Facebook are centralizing the internet, former FCC Chair Tom Wheeler says.

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Etsy Crafts a Plan for Carbon-Neutral Online Shopping

Etsy is pledging to completely offset its shipping emissions, and its CEO says that the rest of the industry can afford to follow Etsy's lead.

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Chris Hadfield: Astronaut Life Is Much More Than a Spacewalk

The astronaut shares the moments that changed his life, from his boyhood adventures to the rattling spacewalk during which he found himself going blind.

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How Data Helps Deliver Your Dinner On Time—and Warm

Uber Eats, GrubHub, and DoorDash are battling to be the delivery service of choice for restaurant meals. Knowing the cooking time of pad thai could make the difference.

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Why drones often aren’t the solution to developing-world problems

A critical theorist tells us how studying drones lets her better understand how technology and society shape one another.

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Bill Gates: How we’ll invent the future

The thinking behind this year’s list of 10 Breakthrough Technologies began with the plow.

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A simple blood test to predict premature births could save babies’ lives

15 million babies are born prematurely every year.

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The 10 worst technologies of the 21st century

We all make mistakes sometimes.

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Wristwatch heart monitors might save your life—and change medicine, too

Making complex heart tests available at the push of a button has far-reaching consequences.

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One man’s two-decade quest to suck greenhouse gas out of the sky

Klaus Lackner’s once wacky idea increasingly looks like an essential part of solving climate change.

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The race to grow a more planet-friendly burger

Meat production spews tons of greenhouse gas and uses up too much land and water. Is there an alternative that won’t make us do without?

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Bill Gates explains why we should all be optimists

We sat down to talk about breakthrough technologies, China, and reasons to be cheerful with this issue’s guest editor.

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Editor’s Letter: How Bill Gates thinks about the future

Our first guest curator in 18 years has a singular view on where technology is heading.

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It-chef frygter landskab af isolerede sundheds-it systemer med valg af leverandør bag Sundhedsplatformen

Frygt for landskab af isolerede sundheds-it systemer i Norge med valget af leverandøren bag Sundhedsplatformen, Epic – og det står går stik modsat den norske ambition om en landsdækkende enhedsjournal på tværs af sygehuse og kommuner.

11h

Algoritme får San Francisco til at frafalde over 8.000 hashdomme

Det gør den californiske by til det første amt i USA, der automatiserer processen med at rydde op i gamle hashdomme, som efter legaliseringen af hash ikke længere er gyldige.

11h

Paleontologists identify small fossils as that of oldest frog relative found in North America

A team of paleontologists led by Virginia Tech's Michelle Stocker and Sterling Nesbitt of the Department of Geosciences have identified fossil fragments of what are thought to be the oldest known frogs in North America.

11h

Two Views of a Single Presidency

The people who serve in the Trump administration have never been reticent about telling their stories. They have, however, mostly declined to put their names to their tales. That preference for anonymity has begun to end. On the same day—January 29—Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey and Trump ally, released a memoir of his political career, Let Me Finish , and the former Trump comm

11h

Daddy Day Care Underwater

Searching for mouthbrooding fish is like an aquatic treasure hunt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Daddy Day Care Underwater

Searching for mouthbrooding fish is like an aquatic treasure hunt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Why Do We Crave Sweets When We're Stressed?

A brain researcher explains our desire for chocolate and other carbs during tough times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Light pollution has reached fragile habitats and may threaten wildlife

A dull orange skyglow as bright as the moon now smudges out the stars in over two-thirds of the world’s safe havens for biodiversity

11h

Why Do We Crave Sweets When We're Stressed?

A brain researcher explains our desire for chocolate and other carbs during tough times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Why Do We Crave Sweets When We're Stressed?

A brain researcher explains our desire for chocolate and other carbs during tough times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

My Newspaper Died 10 Years Ago. I’m Worried the Worst Is Yet to Come.

I feel like a ghost. I have one foot in a world that no longer exists. When my students look at me, they know not the world whence I come, and it disappeared only 10 years ago. I’m a survivor of the waning days of metro newspapers with knowledgeable beat reporters, journalists who spent years developing expertise in the courts, or local government, or schools. One of the perks of working in a new

12h

What the True Detective Finale Forgot

This post contains spoilers through all eight episodes of True Detective ’s third season. It’s always about the cops, not the case. Sunday’s finale of True Detective ’s third season has some fans sputtering after it offered a not-all-that-grandiose conclusion to the mystery that the detectives Wayne Hays (Mahershala Ali) and Roland West (Stephen Dorff) chased over 35 years. Rather than dwelling o

12h

Is Bernie Sanders a Leftist or a Moderate?

When The New York Times ’ popular podcast The Daily broadcast an episode about the field of Democratic presidential candidates, the political reporter Alex Burns described a “full spectrum” of contenders “running from sort of quasi-Marxist to avowedly moderate,” with Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont situated on its left flank. In his telling, the debate about whether Democrats need to move to th

12h

Neurosexism: the myth that men and women have different brains

Neurosexism: the myth that men and women have different brains Neurosexism: the myth that men and women have different brains, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00677-x The hunt for male and female distinctions inside the skull is a lesson in bad research practice, writes Lise Eliot.

12h

What if you were immune to chronic pain? Vaccines could make it happen.

Alzheimer's disease and unintentional deaths (like opioid overdoses and suicides) have been driving down U.S. longevity statistics for three consecutive years – a trend not seen since the Spanish flu pandemic. Our current approach to treating chronic pain is drug-based, but a vaccine-based approach can cut addiction out of the equation. You can vaccinate against pain! Scientists are developing va

12h

Will scientific error checkers become as ubiquitous as spell-checkers?

How common are calculation errors in the scientific literature? And can they be caught by an algorithm? James Heathers and Nick Brown came up with two methods — GRIM and SPRITE — to find such mistakes. And a 2017 study of which we just became aware offers another approach. Jonathan Wren and Constantin Georgescu of the … Continue reading Will scientific error checkers become as ubiquitous as spell-

12h

Hver anden PLO-klinik er nu en kompagniskabspraksis

For første gang nogensinde er solopraksis ikke længere den dominerende praksistype herhjemme. Antallet af kompagniskabspraksis befinder sig nu på samme niveau og rummer tre ud af fire praksislæger, viser den årlige opgørelse fra PLO.

12h

ITV, BBC to team up for 'BritBox' on-demand TV streaming service

British broadcaster ITV is teaming up with publicly funded rival the BBC to launch a new streaming service for UK viewers, a Netflix-style offering of British box-sets and original series. …

12h

Kina stod for 45 pct. af al ny vindkraft i 2018

For første gang er Kina nu også nummer ét i udbygning med vindkraft offshore, hvor UK ellers har siddet på topplaceringen. Det viser nye tal fra den globale brancheforening, GWEC.

12h

Extreme elements push the boundaries of the periodic table

The hunt for the next elements on the periodic table might turn up superheavy atoms that flaunt the rules of chemistry.

12h

Firefighters tackle moorland blazes fuelled by UK's warm weather

Moorland fires have broken out in West Yorkshire and Edinburgh, thanks in part to the unseasonably warm and dry conditions in the UK

12h

AI's Big Challenge

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12h

Nvidia's got a cunning plan to keep powering the AI revolution

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12h

The US Army wants to turn tanks into AI-powered killing machines

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12h

Forsker: Sundheds­reformen bør forebygge udbrændte læger

Hvis man ikke tænker den eksplosive stigning i antallet af udbrændte læger i almen praksis ind i en reform af primærsektoren, risikerer man med sine tiltag at forværre problemet, lyder det fra forsker Anette Fischer Pedersen.

13h

Begravda torvmarker – viktig pusselbit i globala kolcykelns historia

Sedan den senaste istidens början har många torvmarker, framför allt på nordliga breddgrader, täckts av sediment under kallare perioder. I studien som sammanfattar resultat från fler än 1060 begravda torvmarker runtom i världen, beskrivs torvmarkernas historik och en modell har använts för att beräkna hur deras kolförråd har förändrats över tid. Kartan visar var begravda torvmarker finns och när

13h

Så funkar ytor som inte gillar vatten

Vissa djur och växer i naturen har sedan urminnes tider varit experter på att förhålla sig till vätskor som vatten. Två exempel är lotusblommans självrengörande blad och hoppstjärtens skal som stöter bort vätskor med låg ytspänning för att inte smutsas ner i en skitig miljö. De här superhydrofoba ytor har forskarna känt till under en längre tid, och man har bland annat gjort studier på kontaktvin

13h

… Dreams about the Future | inVeritaSoft

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13h

Persistent DNA-break potential near telomeres increases initiation of meiotic recombination on short chromosomes

Persistent DNA-break potential near telomeres increases initiation of meiotic recombination on short chromosomes Persistent DNA-break potential near telomeres increases initiation of meiotic recombination on short chromosomes, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08875-x Meiotic recombination density is increased on shorter chromosomes. Here the authors show that recombinati

13h

Perivascular cell-specific knockout of the stem cell pluripotency gene Oct4 inhibits angiogenesis

Perivascular cell-specific knockout of the stem cell pluripotency gene Oct4 inhibits angiogenesis Perivascular cell-specific knockout of the stem cell pluripotency gene Oct4 inhibits angiogenesis, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08811-z Perivascular cells are essential to the formation and stabilization of new blood vessels during angiogenesis. Here, Hess and Kelly-Goss

13h

Thermal artefacts in two-photon solar cell experiments

Thermal artefacts in two-photon solar cell experiments Thermal artefacts in two-photon solar cell experiments, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-07166-1 Thermal artefacts in two-photon solar cell experiments

13h

Tightly-orchestrated rearrangements govern catalytic center assembly of the ribosome

Tightly-orchestrated rearrangements govern catalytic center assembly of the ribosome Tightly-orchestrated rearrangements govern catalytic center assembly of the ribosome, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08880-0 In eukaryotes, ribosome biogenesis culminates in the cytoplasm with the maturation of the peptidyl transfer center (PTC). Here the authors describe several struc

13h

Promiscuous enzymatic activity-aided multiple-pathway network design for metabolic flux rearrangement in hydroxytyrosol biosynthesis

Promiscuous enzymatic activity-aided multiple-pathway network design for metabolic flux rearrangement in hydroxytyrosol biosynthesis Promiscuous enzymatic activity-aided multiple-pathway network design for metabolic flux rearrangement in hydroxytyrosol biosynthesis, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08781-2 Metabolic engineering usually focuses on manipulating enzyme(s) w

13h

Prospects for low-toxicity lead-free perovskite solar cells

Prospects for low-toxicity lead-free perovskite solar cells Prospects for low-toxicity lead-free perovskite solar cells, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08918-3 Prospects for low-toxicity lead-free perovskite solar cells

13h

Subnanometer cobalt oxide clusters as selective low temperature oxidative dehydrogenation catalysts

Subnanometer cobalt oxide clusters as selective low temperature oxidative dehydrogenation catalysts Subnanometer cobalt oxide clusters as selective low temperature oxidative dehydrogenation catalysts, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08819-5 Current oxidative dehydrogenation processes are based on petroleum cracking that is indirect, environmentally unfriendly, and energ

13h

Bio-inspired nitric-oxide-driven nanomotor

Bio-inspired nitric-oxide-driven nanomotor Bio-inspired nitric-oxide-driven nanomotor, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08670-8 Depletion of propellant in chemical-fuel-driven nanomotors is a limiting factor in device design and application. Here, the authors create a nitric-oxide-generating nanoparticle and explore cellular uptake and application of the nanomotors in ni

13h

Custom-made proteins may help create antibodies to fight HIV

Using computational modeling, a team of researchers led by Penn State designed and created proteins that mimicked different surface features of HIV. After being immunized with the proteins, rabbits developed antibodies that were able to bind with the virus.

13h

Biologists find the long and short of it when it comes to chromosomes

A team of biologists has uncovered a mechanism that determines faithful inheritance of short chromosomes during the reproductive process. The discovery elucidates a key aspect of inheritance — deviation from which can lead to infertility, miscarriages, or birth defects such as Down syndrome.

13h

Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn’s Disease

Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn’s Disease Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn’s Disease, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39232-z Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn

13h

Repetitive sex change in the stony coral Herpolitha limax across a wide geographic range

Repetitive sex change in the stony coral Herpolitha limax across a wide geographic range Repetitive sex change in the stony coral Herpolitha limax across a wide geographic range, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37619-y Repetitive sex change in the stony coral Herpolitha limax across a wide geographic range

13h

On the emerging relationship between the stratospheric Quasi-Biennial oscillation and the Madden-Julian oscillation

On the emerging relationship between the stratospheric Quasi-Biennial oscillation and the Madden-Julian oscillation On the emerging relationship between the stratospheric Quasi-Biennial oscillation and the Madden-Julian oscillation, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40034-6 On the emerging relationship between the stratospheric Quasi-Biennial oscillation and the Madden-Ju

13h

Inactivation of Ppp1r15a minimises weight gain and insulin resistance during caloric excess in female mice

Inactivation of Ppp1r15a minimises weight gain and insulin resistance during caloric excess in female mice Inactivation of Ppp1r15a minimises weight gain and insulin resistance during caloric excess in female mice, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39562-y Inactivation of Ppp1r15a minimises weight gain and insulin resistance during caloric excess in female mice

13h

Personality-dependent breeding dispersal in rural but not urban burrowing owls

Personality-dependent breeding dispersal in rural but not urban burrowing owls Personality-dependent breeding dispersal in rural but not urban burrowing owls, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39251-w Personality-dependent breeding dispersal in rural but not urban burrowing owls

13h

Testing a Cognitive Control Model of Human Intelligence

Testing a Cognitive Control Model of Human Intelligence Testing a Cognitive Control Model of Human Intelligence, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39685-2 Testing a Cognitive Control Model of Human Intelligence

13h

Device Thrombogenicity Emulation: An In Silico Predictor of In Vitro and In Vivo Ventricular Assist Device Thrombogenicity

Device Thrombogenicity Emulation: An In Silico Predictor of In Vitro and In Vivo Ventricular Assist Device Thrombogenicity Device Thrombogenicity Emulation: An In Silico Predictor of In Vitro and In Vivo Ventricular Assist Device Thrombogenicity, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39897-6 Device Thrombogenicity Emulation: An In Silico Predictor of In Vitro and In Vivo Vent

13h

Attentional processes in typically developing children as revealed using brain event-related potentials and their source localization in Attention Network Test

Attentional processes in typically developing children as revealed using brain event-related potentials and their source localization in Attention Network Test Attentional processes in typically developing children as revealed using brain event-related potentials and their source localization in Attention Network Test, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36947-3 Attentional

13h

Siberia’s ancient ghost clan starts to surrender its secrets

Siberia’s ancient ghost clan starts to surrender its secrets Siberia’s ancient ghost clan starts to surrender its secrets, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00672-2 A mysterious group of extinct humans known as Denisovans is helping to rewrite our understanding of human evolution. Who were they?

13h

Biologists find the long and short of it when it comes to chromosomes

A team of biologists has uncovered a mechanism that determines faithful inheritance of short chromosomes during the reproductive process. The discovery, reported in the journal Nature Communications, elucidates a key aspect of inheritance—deviation from which can lead to infertility, miscarriages, or birth defects such as Down syndrome.

13h

Slow-tv for nørder: Følg hævningen af sunket fregat

Så er arbejdet i gang. Det går ikke hurtigt. Men det kræver præcision og roligt vejr.

13h

Biologists find the long and short of it when it comes to chromosomes

A team of biologists has uncovered a mechanism that determines faithful inheritance of short chromosomes during the reproductive process. The discovery, reported in the journal Nature Communications, elucidates a key aspect of inheritance—deviation from which can lead to infertility, miscarriages, or birth defects such as Down syndrome.

13h

14h

Gigantic Japanese detector prepares to catch neutrinos from supernovae

Gigantic Japanese detector prepares to catch neutrinos from supernovae Gigantic Japanese detector prepares to catch neutrinos from supernovae, Published online: 27 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00598-9 Recent upgrades to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino observatory will allow it to trace the history of exploding stars.

14h

Föreläsning om bröstcancer

Välkommen till en föreläsningskväll om bröstcancer. Tid: Onsdag den 6 mars 2019, kl 18.00 till ca 20.10, Plats: Jubileumsaulan, Jan Waldenströms gata 1, Skånes universitetssjukhus i Malmö.

14h

Kommuner: Lokal klimatilpasning er ikke nok

PLUS. Samarbejde om klimatilpasning skal gøre det lettere at dele viden og sikre løsninger, der kan mere end bare at bremse vandet.

14h