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nyheder2019februar28

7min

Now Amazon Is Nixing a Seattle Expansion, Too

The Seattle City Council last year repealed a per-employee tax after Amazon threatened not to occupy a new office tower. Now, Amazon won't occupy the tower anyway.

13min

Ant societies' arms race: Gene activity in defenders depends on invading slavemaking ants

Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. In a new study, biologists examined the special relationship between the parasites and their host and made an exciting discovery: The ability of the host ants to defend themselves depends crucially on whether the raiding slavemakers come from an area with a successful or less successful parasite population.

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LATEST

Blood test could give two month warning of kidney transplant rejection

New research from the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre has found a way to predict rejection of a kidney transplant before it happens, by monitoring the immune system of transplant patients.

15min

The Lancet: Conceiving within a year of stillbirth does not increase risks for next pregnancy

The results are from the first large-scale observational study to investigate the interval between stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy, including almost 14,500 births in women from Australia, Finland and Norway who had a stillbirth in their previous pregnancy. The findings are published in The Lancet.

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F.D.A. says Canadian Company, CanaRx, Sells Unsafe Medicines to U.S. Buyers

The agency accused the company, a major seller of drugs purported to be from Canada, of substituting unapproved or mislabeled drugs from elsewhere.

19min

SpaceX and NASA to Test Launch Crew Dragon, a New Ride to Orbit

No astronauts will be on board for the Saturday launch, but the capsule could carry crew to the space station later in the year.

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Electronic cigarettes linked to wheezing in adults, new study finds

People who vaped were nearly twice as likely to experience wheezing compared to people who didn't use tobacco products, according to a new study. The findings are consistent with past research that shows emissions from e-cig aerosols and flavorings damage lung cells by generating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue. Study authors say the take-home message is that electronic cigar

22min

Nicotine may harm human embryos at the single-cell level

Nicotine induces widespread adverse effects on human embryonic development at the level of individual cells, researchers report. Single-cell RNA sequencing of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived embryoid bodies revealed that three weeks of nicotine exposure disrupts cell-to-cell communication, decreases cell survival, and alters the expression of genes that regulate critical functions such as

22min

Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons

Researchers have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

22min

Economic burden of dengue fever

Dengue fever is a major public health concern in many parts of South-East Asia and South America and its prevalence in Africa is thought to be expanding. Researchers have now conducted an analysis of the economic burden of dengue fever in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Cambodia.

22min

February's Stellar Space Pictures

February's Stellar Space Pictures Space salt, Martian clay, and unexpected X-rays feature in this month's slideshow. 4_crop_PIA23047-16.jpg A picture taken by the Curiosity rover's Mastcam on February 10th, 2019, showing the clay terrain of "Glen Torridon" on Mars. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS Space Thursday, February 28, 2019 – 18:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) —

25min

Amazon won’t sell porn, but will sell anti-vaxxer books

Tech companies like Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube have all recently moved to ban, demonetize or otherwise moderate content related to anti-vaccination causes. Amazon, which currently sells documentaries, books and merchandise created by anti-vaxxers, has offered no plans to do the same. How much responsibility private companies should take when it comes to keeping potentially dangerous informat

26min

Review of Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy

Susanne Hecker, Muki Haklay, Anne Bowser, Zen Makuch, Johannes Vogel & Aletta Bonn. (2018). Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy. University College London Press. Scientific progress is intertwined with the triad of the state, the scientist, and the citizen, all of which are emphasized in the field of citizen science. Taking a largely European perspective, Citizen Scienc

35min

Dogs and Their Owners Share Similar Personality Traits

You may have heard that dogs and their owners really do look alike. Now, new research has shown that owners and their pups often share personality traits, too. A paper, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, says a dog's personality reflects the personality of its owner. It also explains that dogs experience personality changes similar to how humans do over the course of their lives.

36min

Zika: Silent long-term circulation in Thailand

In an attempt to shed light on Zika circulation, scientists decided to investigate the history of the Zika virus in Thailand. They discovered that it has been circulating in the country for at least 16 years and probably longer.

36min

Turning them on, turning them off — how to control stem cells

Scientists have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells.

36min

Living together: How legume roots accommodate two distinct microbial partners

Researchers have revealed a key piece in the complex genetic systems that control how legume roots form close associations (symbioses) with microbial partners that help supply nutrients to the plant. They discovered a gene in the model legume, Lotus japonicus, that is crucial for enabling both nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi to colonize the roots.

36min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: These Boots Were Made for Walking Away

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, February 28. The Senate confirmed Andrew Wheeler, a former coal lobbyist, to be the new administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Michael Cohen also returned to the Hill —this time testifying behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee. Throwing In the Towel: President Donald Trump’s talks with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, en

46min

Tesla to close many stores as $35,000 Model 3 goes on sale

Tesla Inc said on Thursday it would offer a $35,000 version of its Model 3 sedan with a delivery time of two to four weeks, while closing many of its retail stores worldwide.

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These Australian twins are the second 'semi-identical' pair ever reported

Health It all started with two sperm and one egg. A set of Australian twins, now four years old, are, indeed, not identical. But they’re not fraternal, either. They’re what the medical community calls semi-identical,…

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Department of Energy moves forward with controversial test reactor

Facility would enable U.S. engineers to perform tests without going overseas

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Huge US institution cancels subscription with Elsevier

Huge US institution cancels subscription with Elsevier Huge US institution cancels subscription with Elsevier , Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00758-x University of California and Dutch publisher fail to strike deal that would allow researchers to publish under open-access terms.

1h

Pan-filovirus T-cell vaccine protects mice from Ebola and Marburg

Vaccines that induce protective T-cell responses could protect against members across the filovirus family, according to a new study.

1h

How prostate cancer becomes treatment resistant

Scientists have identified how prostate cancer transforms into a deadly treatment-resistant prostate cancer subtype called neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) following treatment with anti-androgen therapy. Their findings — which include the metabolic rewiring and the epigenetic alteration that drives this switch — reveal that an FDA-approved drug holds potential as a NEPC treatment.

1h

Moving closer to practical photonic quantum computing

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a way to map and measure large-scale photonic quantum correlation with single-photon sensitivity. The ability to measure thousands of instances of quantum correlation is critical for making photon-based quantum computing practical.

1h

Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study.

1h

Amoebae diversified at least 750 million years ago, far earlier than expected

Reconstitution of Amoebozoa's evolution shows significant Precambrian species diversity. This study changes the view of how life evolved in the very remote past and deepens the understanding of current climate change.

1h

No wires, more cuddles: Sensors are first to monitor babies in the NICU without wires

An interdisciplinary team has developed a pair of soft, flexible wireless sensors that replace the tangle of wire-based sensors that currently monitor babies in hospitals' neonatal intensive care units and pose a barrier to parent-baby cuddling and physical bonding. After completing a series of human studies, the researchers concluded that the wireless sensors provided data as precise and accurate

1h

Tesla Finally Slashes Model 3 Price to $35,000

Rejoice After many delays, Tesla is officially reducing its popular Model 3 electric luxury sedan to a base price of $35,000 — a long-routed price point for CEO Elon Musk. Tesla made the announcement via an email sent out to its retail stores today, Electrek reports . Tesla launching $24,450* Model 3!!! https://t.co/11Tu9vhyi5 * You are still gonna have to pay $35,000 pic.twitter.com/Kk0hg27Wvx —

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ESA tipsheet for March 4,5, 2019

Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on March 4,5, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.Digging for ancient parasites in museum archives; Species origin is linked to extinction risk; Pollinator-friendly cities need to be human community-friendly, too; and Is North America's "old growth" forest concept less important t

1h

AU researchers develop genetic test to detect antimicrobial resistance

Researchers at American University have developed a new, highly sensitive rapid genetic test that can determine whether bacteria carries a gene that causes resistance to two common antibiotics used to treat strep throat and other respiratory illnesses.

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Health data tools to rapidly detect sepsis in newborns

Automated programs can identify which sick infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have sepsis hours before clinicians recognize the life-threatening condition. A research team of data scientists and physicians tested machine-learning models in a NICU population, drawing on routine collected electronic health information.

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Research identifies mechanism that helps plants fight bacterial infection

Scientists have identified a regulatory, genetic mechanism in plants that could help fight bacterial infection.

1h

Lipid-filled particle may work with immune system to keep fat healthy

Researchers have discovered a new particle in fat that works with the immune system to rejuvenate fat.

1h

Tracking food leads to losing pounds

Without following a particular diet, overweight people who tracked daily food consumption using a free smartphone app lost a significant amount of weight in a new study. The results were achieved using automated, free tools, rather than expensive in-person interventions, suggesting a possible low-cost route to effective weight loss.

1h

Brain processes concrete and abstract words differently

A new review explores the different areas of the brain that process the meaning of concrete and abstract concepts.

1h

Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a new study. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between different shapes.

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Asian elephants may lose up to 42 percent of suitable habitats in India and Nepal

Protecting and expanding suitable habitats for wildlife is key to the conservation of endangered species, but owing to climate and land use change the ideal habitats of today may not be fitting in 30 or 50 years. An international team of scientists therefore predicted range shifts of Asian elephants in India and Nepal using species distribution models based on distribution data for the elephants a

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Efficiency record for data transfer in ultra-fast transatlantic cable

If you are making an overseas phone call or using cloud computing, there is a 99 percent chance an undersea fiber optic cable is being utilized. Now, new work with lasers shows promise for squeezing more data through these cables, to help meet the growing demand for data flow between computers in North America and Europe.

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New findings shed light on origin of upright walking in human ancestors

The oldest distinguishing feature between humans and our ape cousins is our ability to walk on two legs – a trait known as bipedalism. Among mammals, only humans and our ancestors perform this atypical balancing act. New research provides evidence for greater reliance on terrestrial bipedalism by a human ancestor than previously suggested in the ancient fossil record.

1h

Population increases and climate change point to future US water shortages

Climate change plus population growth are setting the stage for water shortages in parts of the U.S. long before the end of the century, according to a new study.

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Biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards

A team of biologists has documented 15 rare and disturbing predator-prey interactions in the Amazon rainforest including images of a dinner plate-size tarantula dragging a young opossum across the forest floor.

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Hybrid material may outperform graphene in several applications

A structure comprising a molybdenum disulfide monolayer on an azobenzene substrate could be used to build a highly compactable and malleable quasi-two-dimensional transistor powered by light.

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Unveiling disease-causing genetic changes in chromosome 17

Extensive single Watson-Crick base pair mutations can occur in addition to duplication or deletion of an entire group of genes on chromosomal region 17p11.2.

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2018's biggest volcanic eruption of sulfur dioxide

The Manaro Voui volcano on the island of Ambae in the nation of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean made the 2018 record books. A NASA-NOAA satellite confirmed Manaro Voui had the largest eruption of sulfur dioxide that year.

1h

Ability to control stress reduces negative impact

In individuals, stress exposure in adolescence increases vulnerability and risk of developing psychopathologies in adulthood, such as drug addiction, mood, anxiety, addiction to gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, etc. Researchers observed in animal models that the ability to control the source of stress diminishes its effects and could reduce the risk of later developing mental di

1h

First sypersymmetric laser array

A team of researchers has overcome a long-standing problem in laser science, and the findings could have applications in surgery, drilling and 3D laser mapping.

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Early-term infants can succeed at breastfeeding

Researchers have determined that healthy premature babies can have as much success breastfeeding as full-term babies. The study involved 2,700 pairs of mothers and infants and included two different survey groups — one in 2006/07 and another in 2011/12. The mother-infant pairs were monitored from birth to 12 months or until breastfeeding ceased.

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New species of 'golden death' bacterium digests parasitic worms from the inside out

A new species of bacterium, Chryseobacterium nematophagum, has been found to digest its hosts — roundworm parasites — from the inside out. The findings suggest that the bacteria may potentially be used in future, to control roundworm infections in animals, plants, and, potentially, humans.

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Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a new study. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between different shapes.

1h

Different kinds of loneliness – Having poor quality relationships is associated with greater distress than having too few

Loneliness not only feels bad, experts have characterised it as a disease that increases the risk of a range of physical and psychological disorders. Some national prevalence estimates for loneliness are alarming. Although they can be as low as 4.4 per cent (in Azerbaijan), in other countries (such as Denmark) as many as 20 per cent of adults report being either moderately or severely lonely. How

1h

Using stardust grains, ASU scientists build new model for nova eruptions

ASU scientists make breakthrough in modeling how stars erupt thanks to studies of microscopic stardust grains.

1h

China Is Censoring “Genetically Edited Babies” on Social Media

Don’t Speak China isn’t content to merely distance itself from scientist He Jiankui. It also wants to build a digital wall between its citizens and the scientist’s controversial genetically edited babies experiment . According to researchers at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), He’s experiment was one of the most censored topics on Chinese social media in 2018 — a discovery that could have distu

1h

Conservationists release 155 giant tortoises on Galapagos island

Conservationists have released 155 giant tortoises on an island in the Galapagos to help replace a similar species that died out 150 years ago, officials aid Thursday.

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Facebook's 'Workplace' claims two million users

A version of Facebook tailored for businesses collaboration announced Thursday that it has more than two million paying subscribers

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Conservationists release 155 giant tortoises on Galapagos island

Conservationists have released 155 giant tortoises on an island in the Galapagos to help replace a similar species that died out 150 years ago, officials aid Thursday.

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Amazon steers further toward autos, hires GM executive

Amazon has hired a top General Motors executive, a source familiar with the move said Thursday, in a further sign of the technology giant's likely expansion into autonomous vehicles.

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These 500mg CBD gummies are 25 percent off right now

Save 25 percent on Just CBD Gummies. These 500mg Just CBD gummies are 25 percent off right now.

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The Masked Singer Lets You In on the Scam

This article contains spoilers throughout the first season of The Masked Singer. “Ladies and gentlemen, I think we have just witnessed greatness. From the monster .” It was episode 8 of The Masked Singer , the Fox competition’s semifinals round, and a mystery celebrity dressed in a monster costume—a Minion-meets-Gritty situation, conical in form, with a cyclopean eye, a duo of teeth, and three wi

2h

Vapers may be twice as likely to wheeze

New research links vaping and wheezing in adults. In a new study, people who vaped were nearly twice as likely to struggle with wheezing as people who didn’t regularly use tobacco. Wheezing, caused by narrowed or abnormal airways, often precedes other serious health conditions such as emphysema, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, heart failure, lung cancer, and sleep apnea. The findings are consis

2h

Butt Implants Linked to Rare Cancer in First Reported Case

A woman with buttock implants was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer that, until now, has largely been linked with breast implants.

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Could medical marijuana help grandma and grandpa with their ailments?

Medical marijuana may bring relief to older people who have symptoms like pain, sleep disorders or anxiety due to chronic conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, neuropathy, spinal cord damage and multiple sclerosis, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May

2h

Climate change is shifting productivity of fisheries worldwide

Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. But climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin this major source of food.

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Crater counts on Pluto, Charon show small Kuiper Belt objects surprisingly rare

Using New Horizons data from the Pluto-Charon flyby in 2015, scientists have indirectly discovered a distinct and surprising lack of very small objects in the Kuiper Belt. The evidence for the paucity of small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) comes from New Horizons imaging that revealed a dearth of small craters on Pluto's largest satellite, Charon, indicating that impactors from 300 feet to 1 mile (91

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Stora småkryp äter små ryggradsdjur

Det finns gott om ryggradsdjur som äter småkryp som spindlar och andra leddjur. Men i en ny studie publicerad i Amphibian and reptile conservation ger ett internationell forskarteam 15 exempel på det omvända förhållandet; spindlar och andra leddjur i som äter ryggradsdjur. Exemplen kommer från Amazonas. Fågelspindlar av släktet Pamphobeteus kan bli stora som tallrikar. Forskarna har sett en sådan

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Earth's fish are disappearing because of climate change, study says

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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FarFarOut Might Be the Most Distant Object in the Solar System

FarOut can move over, as FarFarOut is even farther away. The post FarFarOut Might Be the Most Distant Object in the Solar System appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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These mice sing their little hearts out—and that's good for neuroscience

Animals What singing rodents can teach us about human conversation. The words “singing mice” might conjure up memories of Cinderelly’s —er, Cinderella’s pals and a squeaky yet exquisitely harmonized Christmas song sung by another trio of…

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These Self-Driving Cars Won’t Let Drunk Drivers Take Control

Call a Cab Self-driving cars, all hype aside, are still a long way away . For the foreseeable future, most autonomous vehicles will still require some degree of help from a human behind the wheel. And as long as people have any control over their vehicles, sleepy or drunk drivers will still pose a threat, even when their cars are at least partially autonomous. That’s why European researchers want

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Huawei pleads not guilty to accusations it stole T-Mobile’s trade secrets

The pleas follow a U.S. campaign to discredit Huawei among European allies.

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Craters on Pluto and Charon Show Kuiper Belt Lacks Small Bodies

When New Horizons flew past Pluto and its moon Charon in 2015, it took a lot of pictures. From studying those images, scientists have recently realized that while both bodies are covered in craters, almost none of those craters are small, meaning there may not be many small bodies around to smash into them. This changes astronomers’ views of the Kuiper Belt, the region of small – but apparently no

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Simulation of what music sounds like through a cochlear implant

submitted by /u/smillsier [link] [comments]

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NIH Vows to Do Better in Countering Sexual Harassment

The agency gives an accounting of grantees and staffers penalized for their behavior last year.

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Study of singing mice suggests how mammalian brain achieves conversation

By studying the songs of mice from the cloud forests of Costa Rica, researchers have discovered a brain circuit that may enable the high-speed back and forth of conversation.

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EU: Facebook, Google, Twitter Failed to Fight Fake News

Coasting The European Union is displeased with tech giants Google, Facebook, and Twitter — because all three corporations have failed to prevent the spread of fake news, according to Reuters . In October, the three companies agreed to a voluntary pledge to fight the political misinformation that proliferated on their platforms, as an alternative to harsher legislation being enacted against them i

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Researchers Enable "Super Mice" to See Near-Infrared Light

Nanoscale devices convert near-infrared light into visible, green light. When injected into the eyes, they enabled mice to see in the infrared — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers Enable "Super Mice" to See Near-Infrared Light

Nanoscale devices convert near-infrared light into visible, green light. When injected into the eyes, they enabled mice to see in the infrared — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hybrid material may outperform graphene in several applications

A structure comprising a molybdenum disulfide monolayer on an azobenzene substrate could be used to build a highly compactable and malleable quasi-two-dimensional transistor powered by light.

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Noah and Rhain Alisha Welcome Baby Elijah | Alaskan Bush People

Billy and Ami Brown are finally grandparents! Noah and wife, Rhain Alisha, welcomed a healthy baby boy on February 26, 2019. Weighing in at 7 pounds, 5 ounces, and measuring 20 inches. Meet Elijah Connor Brown. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww

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Disney reportedly negotiating with AT&T to buy its Hulu shares

According to Variety, an anonymous insider has confirmed Disney is in talks with AT&T to pick up its interest in Hulu.

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YouTube to block comments on most videos showing minors

YouTube said Thursday it will disable user comments on a broad array of videos featuring children to thwart "predatory behavior" after revelations about a glitch exploited for sharing of child pornography.

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‘Life Is Very Interesting at 95’

Most people dread the inevitable declines associated with aging. But to hear the residents of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale tell it, senescence gets a bad rap. In Jenny Schweitzer Bell’s short documentary The Blessings of Aging , dozens of elderly people describe how their lives have improved in their twilight years. “The thing that bothers me is that my kids are 60 years old—I’m staying young, an

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Doctor Directs World’s First 5G-Powered Surgery

The Next G Attendees at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona witnessed a world’s first on Wednesday. While on stage during the annual showcase of mobile tech, doctor Antonio de Lacy remotely guided a surgical team at a hospital three miles away through an operation. Surgical telementoring is nothing new, but what was different about this operation was the fact that de Lacy sent his instru

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New York probing Facebook on data from apps: source

New York regulators are probing Facebook's gathering of intimate consumer data such as menstrual cycles and body weight through smartphone applications, a person familiar with the matter said Thursday.

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Huawei pleads not guilty to trade secrets charges in Seattle

The Chinese tech giant Huawei pleaded not guilty Thursday to U.S. trade-theft charges in a case that has heightened a trade dispute between the world's two largest economies.

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Brain processes concrete and abstract words differently

A new review explores the different areas of the brain that process the meaning of concrete and abstract concepts. The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP).

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Tracking food leads to losing pounds

Without following a particular diet, overweight people who tracked daily food consumption using a free smartphone app lost a significant amount of weight in a new Duke University study. The results were achieved using automated, free tools, rather than expensive in-person interventions, suggesting a possible low-cost route to effective weight loss.

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Byggeriet er en klimasviner: Nyudviklet dansk cement kan spare store mængder CO2

Men grøn cement er ikke en løsning i sig selv, siger professor, som revser politikere for manglende handling.

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How Close Are We to Building a Moon Base?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Trump Can’t Make a North Korea Deal on His Own

The Hanoi debacle shows that if you want to make progress with North Korea, you have to put in the work.

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Andrew Wheeler is officially the head of the EPA

Environment His time as acting administrator has been troubling. After several months of Acting Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, Andrew Wheeler is now confirmed by the Senate.

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Painted Wolves: The Colorful Carnivores of the African Wild

A pack of long-legged, big-eared mammals chirps its way to one of the highest known hunting success rates. Yet, the hunting strategy of the painted wolves brings them into areas that threaten their very existence.

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New study links electronic cigarettes and wheezing in adults

People who vaped were nearly twice as likely to experience wheezing compared to people who didn't use tobacco products, according to a study published in Tobacco Control. The findings are consistent with past research that shows emissions from e-cig aerosols and flavorings damage lung cells by generating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue. Study authors say the take-home message

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European Military Contractor Tests New Laser Weapon

All Batteries Fire! Rheinmetall Defense, a Europe-based military technology contractor, recently tested a fully-functional laser weapon system. The laser turret was able to target and eliminate nearby drones and mortar shells during a December test near Zürich, according to Army Recognition — a terrifying vision of the future of warfare. Teamwork The laser is expected to be customized and deploye

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NGC 3079: Galactic bubbles play cosmic pinball with energetic particles

We all know bubbles from soapy baths or sodas. These bubbles of everyday experience on Earth are up to a few inches across, and consist of a thin film of liquid enclosing a small volume of air or other gas. In space, however, there are very different bubbles—composed of a lighter gas inside a heavier one—and they can be huge.

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LG OLED TV Deal: LG's B8 Drops to the Lowest Price Ever

If you're looking for a killer TV deal, one of our favorite LG 4K televisions is $1,100 right now

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What the hell is a blockchain phone—and do I need one?

The first wave of crypto-focused smartphones from big players like Samsung is a small step toward a decentralized web.

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Lipid-filled particle may work with immune system to keep fat healthy

Researchers have discovered a new particle in fat that works with the immune system to rejuvenate fat.

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Researchers use health data tools to rapidly detect sepsis in newborns

Automated programs can identify which sick infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have sepsis hours before clinicians recognize the life-threatening condition. A research team of data scientists and physicians tested machine-learning models in a NICU population, drawing on routine collected electronic health information.

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More women are training to be plastic surgeons, but racial/ethnic representation still lags behind

While the proportion of women entering plastic surgery residency programs has increased in recent years, numbers of Black and Hispanic trainees are declining or unchanged, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Online reviews after 'tummy tuck' — Cosmetic results aren't the only factor affecting positive ratings

For patients undergoing 'tummy tuck' surgery (abdominoplasty), satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is the main factor affecting whether they write a positive or negative online review for their plastic surgeon, reports the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Warm seas scatter fish

Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. But climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin this major source of food.

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Wireless Skin Sensors for Newborns Will Let Parents Cuddle Fragile Babies

Freeing infants in the NICU from tangles of wires could have a host of medical benefits

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The World Is Losing Fish to Eat as Oceans Warm, Study Finds

Fish populations are declining as oceans warm, putting a key source of food and income at risk for millions of people, according to new research.

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Trilobites: How the Icefish Got Its Transparent Blood and See-Through Skull

Research shows how the Antarctic blackfin icefish differs from its close relatives on the genetic level.

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Matter: These Mice Sing to One Another — Politely

Alston’s singing mice “converse,” scientists report. The finding may shed light on human language.

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UC Berkeley study finds link between inequality and racism

A new study finds a relationship between income inequality and racist attitudes. The effect is small, and doesn't exist for every kind of racial bias. The data won't be the last word on the subject, but it could give insights into how to remedy long standing issues. The idea that income inequality and racism are related is a common one. Marxists claim racism is a tool used by capitalistic oppress

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The Masks We Wear

We wear masks for many reasons: for fun, for protection, or to make a statement. In turbulent public settings, obscuring one’s face can protect an individual from retaliation while evoking fear and uncertainty in others. Donning the masks of cultural, political, or religious figures can ridicule them, or lend them power and further their legacy. Those who wear masks to protect their face from env

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Gene Editing Is Trickier Than Expected—but Fixes Are in Sight

A popular gene editing technique may produce lots of unintended changes to DNA, but the good news is we now have a better way of finding such errors.

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Popular new construction material helps measure protein particles

Understanding how proteins clump together is essential in modern pharmaceuticals. When these tiny particles aggregate, they can alter the effectiveness of both vaccines and drugs, especially many of the new, popular formulations derived from monoclonal antibodies. Despite its importance, the industry has yet to find an effective, large-scale way to measure particle clumping accurately. A new refer

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Scientists Give Mice “Super Vision” With Eye Injections

Super-Mice It’s something straight out of a Marvel comic book: giving test subjects the ability to see infrared light, similarly to how night-vision goggles work — but without the awkward and bulky apparatus. Scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China injected tiny nanoparticles that bind to the retina into the eyeballs of test mice, granting them what the researchers called

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Sexual harassment rife in Australian science, suggests first workplace survey

Sexual harassment rife in Australian science, suggests first workplace survey Sexual harassment rife in Australian science, suggests first workplace survey , Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00736-3 One in two female respondents to a national poll has been sexually harassed at work.

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The NASA Decision Russia Didn’t Like

Up on the International Space Station, the United States controls one half, and Russia controls the other half. Like the U.S., Russia has one of its astronauts on board right now, and as a rule, 250 miles above Earth, collaboration is synonymous with consensus. But recently, as the U.S. prepared to launch a new and somewhat risky mission, Russia hesitated before deciding whether it would endorse

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The One Time Trump Didn’t Blink

No U.S. president has trained his audience to expect the unexpected as effectively as Donald Trump, so a strange conclusion to his summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un in Vietnam was always the most likely outcome. What was surprising was the type of outcome: Trump abruptly left the summit and canceled a signing ceremony on the premise that no deal was better than a bad deal. And he did so, as m

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What if ‘child marriage’ means older teens making choices?

New research in Tanzania adds nuance to the global movement to end “child marriage.” Two out of five girls in Sub-Saharan Africa marry before turning 18. Opponents often assume that their families coerce them into it at a cost to their schooling, mental health, and physical wellbeing. “That’s a dominant narrative within the international development sector, that ‘child marriage’ happens because d

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In singing mice, scientists find clue to our own rapid conversations

Studying the songs of mice from the cloud forests of Costa Rica, researchers have identified a brain circuit that might enable the high-speed back and forth of human conversation. This insight could help researchers better understand the causes of speech disorders and point the way to new treatments.

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SwRI-led New Horizons research indicates small Kuiper Belt objects are surprisingly rare

Using New Horizons data from the Pluto-Charon flyby in 2015, a Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists have indirectly discovered a distinct and surprising lack of very small objects in the Kuiper Belt. The evidence for the paucity of small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) comes from New Horizons imaging that revealed a dearth of small craters on Pluto's largest satellite, Charon, indicating

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Natural climate solutions are not enough

To stabilize the Earth's climate for people and ecosystems, it is imperative to ramp up natural climate solutions and, at the same time, accelerate mitigation efforts across the energy and industrial sectors, according to a new policy perspective published today in Science. Among their findings, the researchers warn that a ten-year delay in emissions reductions from energy and industry could this

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New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles

Northwestern University researchers have developed a blueprint for understanding and predicting the properties and behavior of complex nanoparticles and optimizing their use for a broad range of scientific applications. These include catalysis, optoelectronics, transistors, bio-imaging, and energy storage and conversion.

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Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers.

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Hall effect becomes viscous in graphene

The movement of electron fluid in graphene has, for the first time, been observed to exist with two separate viscosities showing that the Hall effect — a phenomenon well known for more than a century — is no longer as universal as it was thought to be.

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Researchers reveal unexpected genome-wide off-target mutations caused by cytosine base editing

A research team led by Professor GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences performed a comprehensive investigation of the off-target mutations of BE3, HF1-BE3 and ABE using whole genome sequencing (WGS) in rice, an important crop species.

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Pluto and Charon's ancient scars reveal a dearth of small Kuiper Belt objects

By mapping the scars of ancient impacts on the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, researchers have gained a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the Kuiper Belt, a vast halo of orbiting debris lying at the fringes of our solar system.

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The songs of singing mice suggest how human brain achieves conversation

By studying the rapid song-like responses of singing tropical mice, researchers have discovered a neural mechanism that may support the high-speed back and forth vocal exchanges that characterize human conversation.

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For the fisheries of the future, some species are in hot water

Some fisheries may falter while others could become more productive as the world's waters continue to warm, according to a new study, which looks to the productivity of fisheries in the past to help predict the impact of climate change on future fisheries.

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New wireless system 'cuts the cord' from newborn patient monitoring approaches

A new, less invasive system for monitoring the vital signs of some of the world's most fragile patients — infants born pre-term or with debilitating disease — would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with these children when they otherwise couldn't have it.

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No wires, more cuddles: Sensors are first to monitor babies in the NICU without wires

An interdisciplinary Northwestern University team has developed a pair of soft, flexible wireless sensors that replace the tangle of wire-based sensors that currently monitor babies in hospitals' neonatal intensive care units and pose a barrier to parent-baby cuddling and physical bonding. After completing a series of human studies, the researchers concluded that the wireless sensors provided data

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Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, Rutgers-led study finds

Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today.

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Study of singing mice suggests how mammalian brain achieves conversation

By studying the songs of mice from the cloud forests of Costa Rica, researchers have discovered a brain circuit that may enable the high-speed back and forth of conversation.

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Study shows economic burden of dengue fever

Dengue fever is a major public health concern in many parts of South-East Asia and South America and its prevalence in Africa is thought to be expanding. Researchers have now conducted an analysis of the economic burden of dengue fever in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Cambodia. Their results appear this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

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Pan-filovirus T-cell vaccine protects mice from Ebola and Marburg

Vaccines that induce protective T-cell responses could protect against members across the filovirus family, according to a study published Feb. 28 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by TomᚠHanke of the University of Oxford, Bette Korber of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and colleagues

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Mobile bedside bioprinter can heal wounds

Scientists have created such a mobile skin bioprinting system — the first of its kind — that allows bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound.

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Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts

New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years.

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New method of synthesizing nanographene on metal oxide surfaces

Nanostructures based on carbon are promising materials for nanoelectronics. However, to be suitable, they would often need to be formed on non-metallic surfaces, which has been a challenge — up to now. Researchers have found a method of forming nanographenes on metal oxide surfaces.

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Does extra sleep on the weekends repay your sleep debt? No, researchers say

Insufficient sleep and untreated sleep disorders put people at increased risk for metabolic problems, including obesity and diabetes. But is extra sleep on the weekends enough to reduce those risks? The short answer, according to new findings is 'no.'

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Exiled planet linked to stellar flyby 3 million years ago

Paul Kalas of UC Berkeley was puzzled by the tilted but stable orbit of a planet around a binary star — an orbit like that of our solar system's proposed Planet Nine. He calculated backwards in time to see if any of the 461 nearby stars ever came close enough to perturb the system. One star fit the bill. The stellar flyby 2-3 million years ago likely stabilized the planet's orbit, keeping it from

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Terrifying Netflix Trailer Skewers The Horror of Algorithmic Love

Osmosis Finding your soulmate is a difficult task. But what if technology progresses to the point where an artificial intelligence, paired with an app, can take care of it for you? That’s the future Netflix’s dystopian new show “Osmosis” is imagining in a trailer that dropped today. The French production was greenlit by Netflix back in 2017 , with showrunner Audrey Fouché from hit dystopian serie

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What is the 'Book of Changes'?

The I Ching is the basis for polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz's binary code and subsequently basis of our digital technology. Psychologist Carl Jung used the Book of Changes to explore notions of synchronicity or "meaningful coincidence." Alan Watts considered the I Ching to be a model that mapped the thinking processes of the human mind. The I Ching or, as many Western audiences know it, the B

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SpaceX debuts new crew capsule in crucial test flight

SpaceX closes in on human spaceflight with this weekend's debut of a new capsule designed for astronauts.

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World's largest offshore wind farm went into operation.

submitted by /u/epSos-DE [link] [comments]

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New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection

Every bit of information about a person's health—their exposure to chemicals, their inherited risks, their current illnesses—lies within their molecules. That's a diverse array of substances that amounts to a number so long, it doesn't have a name: 1 with 50 zeros after it.

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Research identifies mechanism that helps plants fight bacterial infection

A team led by a plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a regulatory, genetic mechanism in plants that could help fight bacterial infection.

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Research identifies mechanism that helps plants fight bacterial infection

A team led by a plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a regulatory, genetic mechanism in plants that could help fight bacterial infection.

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Wutip now a depression, spotted on NASA-NOAA satellite imagery

Once a super typhoon, Tropical Cyclone Wutip weakened to a depression on February 28. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image the wispy looking-storm being battered by vertical wind shear.

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Team publishes paper on 'food inequality, injustice and rights'

As the world population swells, the inequitable distribution of food around the globe is prompting profound moral questions. Is the unequal distribution of food in rich and poor countries, for instance, merely a consequence of geography, with rich countries having more fertile lands? Or are food shortages in some countries a function of socio-economics and inequalities in international food trade?

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2015-2016 El Nino triggered disease outbreaks across globe

The 2015-2016 El Niño event brought weather conditions that triggered regional disease outbreaks throughout the world, according to a new NASA study that is the first to comprehensively assess the public health impacts of the major climate event on a global scale.

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Teaching baby B cells

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Sensitive sensing

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Binodal, wireless epidermal electronic systems with in-sensor analytics for neonatal intensive care

Existing vital sign monitoring systems in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) require multiple wires connected to rigid sensors with strongly adherent interfaces to the skin. We introduce a pair of ultrathin, soft, skin-like electronic devices whose coordinated, wireless operation reproduces the functionality of these traditional technologies but bypasses their intrinsic limitations. The enab

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Refining shape memory

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Unblocking the brain

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Glutamate signaling at cytoneme synapses

We investigated the roles of components of neuronal synapses for development of the Drosophila air sac primordium (ASP). The ASP, an epithelial tube, extends specialized signaling filopodia called cytonemes that take up signals such as Dpp (Decapentaplegic, a homolog of the vertebrate bone morphogenetic protein) from the wing imaginal disc. Dpp signaling in the ASP was compromised if disc cells l

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Impact craters on Pluto and Charon indicate a deficit of small Kuiper belt objects

The flyby of Pluto and Charon by the New Horizons spacecraft provided high-resolution images of cratered surfaces embedded in the Kuiper belt, an extensive region of bodies orbiting beyond Neptune. Impact craters on Pluto and Charon were formed by collisions with other Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) with diameters from ~40 kilometers to ~300 meters, smaller than most KBOs observed directly by telesco

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Interface and heterostructure design in polyelemental nanoparticles

Nanomaterials that form as heterostructures have applications in catalysis, plasmonics, and electronics. Multielement nanoparticles can now be synthesized through a variety of routes, but how thermodynamic phases form in such structures and how specific interfaces between them can be designed and synthesized are still poorly understood. We explored how palladium-tin alloys form mixed-composition

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Vernier spectrometer using counterpropagating soliton microcombs

Determination of laser frequency with high resolution under continuous and abrupt tuning conditions is important for sensing, spectroscopy, and communications. We show that a single microresonator provides rapid and broadband measurement of optical frequencies with a relative frequency precision comparable to that of conventional dual-frequency comb systems. Dual-locked counterpropagating soliton

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Compact radio emission indicates a structured jet was produced by a binary neutron star merger

The binary neutron star merger event GW170817 was detected through both electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves. Its afterglow emission may have been produced by either a narrow relativistic jet or an isotropic outflow. High-spatial-resolution measurements of the source size and displacement can discriminate between these scenarios. We present very-long-baseline interferometry observati

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Precipitation strengthening of aluminum alloys by room-temperature cyclic plasticity

High-strength aluminum alloys are important for lightweighting vehicles and are extensively used in aircraft and, increasingly, in automobiles. The highest-strength aluminum alloys require a series of high-temperature "bakes" (120° to 200°C) to form a high number density of nanoparticles by solid-state precipitation. We found that a controlled, room-temperature cyclic deformation is sufficient to

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Coupled ripple oscillations between the medial temporal lobe and neocortex retrieve human memory

Episodic memory retrieval relies on the recovery of neural representations of waking experience. This process is thought to involve a communication dynamic between the medial temporal lobe memory system and the neocortex. How this occurs is largely unknown, however, especially as it pertains to awake human memory retrieval. Using intracranial electroencephalographic recordings, we found that ripp

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Impacts of historical warming on marine fisheries production

Climate change is altering habitats for marine fishes and invertebrates, but the net effect of these changes on potential food production is unknown. We used temperature-dependent population models to measure the influence of warming on the productivity of 235 populations of 124 species in 38 ecoregions. Some populations responded significantly positively ( n = 9 populations) and others responded

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Motor cortical control of vocal interaction in neotropical singing mice

Like many adaptive behaviors, acoustic communication often requires rapid modification of motor output in response to sensory cues. However, little is known about the sensorimotor transformations that underlie such complex natural behaviors. In this study, we examine vocal exchanges in Alston’s singing mouse ( Scotinomys teguina ). We find that males modify singing behavior during social interact

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A lipase-independent pathway of lipid release and immune modulation by adipocytes

To meet systemic metabolic needs, adipocytes release fatty acids and glycerol through the action of neutral lipases. Here, we describe a secondary pathway of lipid release from adipocytes that is independent of canonical lipolysis. We found that adipocytes release exosome-sized, lipid-filled vesicles (AdExos) that become a source of lipid for local macrophages. Adipose tissue from lean mice relea

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Epithelial endoplasmic reticulum stress orchestrates a protective IgA response

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the major secretory immunoglobulin isotype found at mucosal surfaces, where it regulates microbial commensalism and excludes luminal factors from contacting intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IgA is induced by both T cell–dependent and –independent (TI) pathways. However, little is known about TI regulation. We report that IEC endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces a

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New Products

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Revised paleoaltimetry data show low Tibetan Plateau elevation during the Eocene

Paleotopographic reconstructions of the Tibetan Plateau based on stable isotope paleoaltimetry methods conclude that most of the Plateau’s current elevation was already reached by the Eocene, ~40 million years ago. However, changes in atmospheric and hydrological dynamics affect oxygen stable isotopes in precipitation and may thus bias such reconstructions. We used an isotope-equipped general cir

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Pantropical climate interactions

The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which originates in the Pacific, is the strongest and most well-known mode of tropical climate variability. Its reach is global, and it can force climate variations of the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans by perturbing the global atmospheric circulation. Less appreciated is how the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans affect the Pacific. Especially notew

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Structural basis of cooling agent and lipid sensing by the cold-activated TRPM8 channel

Transient receptor potential melastatin member 8 (TRPM8) is a calcium ion (Ca 2+ )–permeable cation channel that serves as the primary cold and menthol sensor in humans. Activation of TRPM8 by cooling compounds relies on allosteric actions of agonist and membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ), but lack of structural information has thus far precluded a mechanistic understan

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Mobilize for peace

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News at a glance

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Teaching baby B cells

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Wireless patches can comfortably monitor sick babies’ health

New skin sensors that wirelessly transmit health data could offer a less invasive way to keep tabs on newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit.

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Oceans that are warming due to climate change yield fewer fish

Warming water due to climate change is diminishing sustainable fishery yields in the world’s oceans.

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How singing mice belt out duets

A precise timing system in the brain helps musical rodents from the cloud forests of Costa Rica sing to one another.

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All that glitters not gold? Criticisms of Finland’s education system.

Finland scored high on the original PISA education assessment, but its scores have slipped in recent years. Critics argue that Finland's success came from earlier education models, not from headline-making features like late start times, lack of homework, and absence of test assessment. Asia's rigorous education system is now eclipsing Finland's PISA scores. Which approach is the right one? Which

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500-million-year old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada

Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago — evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research shows.

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Bungee jumping for science

Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outside a laboratory and under extreme conditio

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Warming oceans are hurting seafood supply—and things are getting worse

Fisheries’ productivity has plummeted by as much as 35% in some places

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This singing mouse’s brain could reveal keys to snappy conversation

Rodent vocal exchanges could help researchers understand disorders of communication

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A prescription for Madagascar’s broken health system: data and a focus on details

An eclectic group of scientists sets out to bring health care to one of the world’s poorest countries

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CRISPR offshoot still makes mistakes editing DNA, raising concerns about its medical use

A “base editor” that has great promise needs an upgrade

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Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, study finds

Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today.

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Researchers reveal unexpected genome-wide off-target mutations caused by cytosine base editing

Chinese scientists have found that cytosine base editors (BE3 and HF1-BE3) induce genome wide off-target mutations.

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Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, study finds

Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today.

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New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles

Northwestern University researchers have developed a blueprint for understanding and predicting the properties and behavior of complex nanoparticles and optimizing their use for a broad range of scientific applications. These include catalysis, optoelectronics, transistors, bio-imaging, and energy storage and conversion.

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Researchers reveal unexpected genome-wide off-target mutations caused by cytosine base editing

Chinese scientists have found that cytosine base editors (BE3 and HF1-BE3) induce genome wide off-target mutations.

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Forests, carbon sinks, cannot make up for delays in decarbonizing the economy: study

To stabilize the Earth's climate for people and ecosystems, it is imperative to ramp up natural climate solutions and, at the same time, accelerate mitigation efforts across the energy and industrial sectors, according to a new policy perspective published today in Science. Among their findings, the researchers warn that a ten-year delay in emissions reductions from energy and industry could this

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New Horizons research indicates small Kuiper Belt objects are surprisingly rare

Using New Horizons data from the Pluto-Charon flyby in 2015, a Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists have indirectly discovered a distinct and surprising lack of very small objects in the Kuiper Belt. The evidence for the paucity of small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) comes from New Horizons imaging that revealed a dearth of small craters on Pluto's largest satellite, Charon, indicating

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Hall effect becomes viscous in graphene

Researchers at The University of Manchester in the UK have discovered that the Hall effect—a phenomenon well known for more than a century—is no longer as universal as it was thought to be.

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New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection

Every bit of information about a person's health—their exposure to chemicals, their inherited risks, their current illnesses—lies within their molecules. That's a diverse array of substances that amounts to a number so long, it doesn't have a name: 1 with 50 zeros after it.

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NASA finds a hint of an eye in Tropical Cyclone Pola

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the hint of an eye developing in the center of Tropical Cyclone Pola. Warnings in the Southern Pacific Ocean have been posted for Tonga.

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In the Kuiper Belt, a baffling lack of small craters

Pictures from Pluto and its moon raise questions about the ring of rocks and planetisimals ringing the solar system. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Winners and losers: warming oceans already affecting fish stocks

Modelling finds some fish populations are benefitting, but more are under threat. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Why Are So Few Male Students Studying Abroad?

Even as new enrollments of international students at colleges in the United States have declined over the past two years , the number of American students studying abroad continues to grow. Some 332,700 students studied overseas in the 2016-17 academic year, up 17 percent from five years ago and 27 percent from a decade ago. But there is one group of students underrepresented in the surge of unde

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Stick-on sensors will let premature babies get the skin contact they need

Babies born too soon have to be closely monitored, but all that equipment stops parents from getting close. A new wireless sensor could help.

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Publisher Correction: Damage-tolerant architected materials inspired by crystal microstructure

Publisher Correction: Damage-tolerant architected materials inspired by crystal microstructure Publisher Correction: Damage-tolerant architected materials inspired by crystal microstructure, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0968-y Publisher Correction: Damage-tolerant architected materials inspired by crystal microstructure

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Weekend lie-ins don’t compensate for week-long exhaustion

Weekend lie-ins don’t compensate for week-long exhaustion Weekend lie-ins don’t compensate for week-long exhaustion, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00723-8 Catching up on sleep over the weekend doesn’t undo the negative metabolic effects of sleep deprivation.

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Research identifies mechanism that helps plants fight bacterial infection

A team led by a plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a regulatory, genetic mechanism in plants that could help fight bacterial infection.

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11% of U.S. adult energy intake is fast food

Research finds that fast food meals have gotten bigger—and packed on more calories and salt over the years. The paper, which appears in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics , reports that fast food now makes up 11 percent of adult energy intake in the United States. Researchers looked at menu items from 10 different fast food restaurants, including crowd favorites like McDonald’s

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Life is a Highway (of Flying Space Rocks)

It has been a great week for humans banging on things around the solar system. Japan's Hayabusa2 probe touched down and grabbed a sample of asteroid Ryugu; NASA's InSight is hammering into the surface of Mars; and a private Israeli spacecraft named Beresheet is heading toward an April landing on the Moon. But we are just beginners at the game. Nature has been banging and moving things around in th

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The Guardian view on opioids in the the UK: poverty and pain | Editorial

These painkillers don’t work against chronic pain. The UK must find alternatives to help sufferers in deprived areas People in Blackpool are twice as likely as the inhabitants of Wokingham to die before they are 70. A recent paper which measured the distribution of opioids not by the number of prescriptions, but in equivalent units of morphine, found that NHS prescriptions of opioid painkillers ha

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NASA finds a hint of an eye in Tropical Cyclone Pola

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the hint of an eye developing in the center of Tropical Cyclone Pola. Warnings in the Southern Pacific Ocean have been posted for Tonga.

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Wutip now a depression, spotted on NASA-NOAA satellite imagery

Once a super typhoon, Tropical Cyclone Wutip weakened to a depression on February 28. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image the wispy looking-storm being battered by vertical wind shear.

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Left turns are hard for self-driving cars and people alike

Technology How Waymo autonomous cars train for the challenge of unprotected left turns. One of the hardest maneuvers for any driver is called an “unprotected left.”…

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Andrew Wheeler, Who Continued Environmental Rollbacks, Is Confirmed to Lead E.P.A.

Senators formally handed oversight of the nation’s air and water to a former coal lobbyist with the same enthusiasm for deregulation as his predecessor, Scott Pruitt.

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SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

For years, NASA has had to rely on Russian vehicles to get astronauts to the International Space Station. That could soon change if the flight test of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule succeeds. (Image credit: SpaceX/NASA)

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Bill Gates: Custom Cancer Vaccines Will Revolutionize Medicine

Ciao, Cancer Every year since 2001 , MIT Technology Review has published a list of 10 “breakthrough technologies” it believes will profoundly affect our lives in the future. This year, the publication turned over the reins on its annual list to Bill Gates, and one of the technologies that made his cut could eviscerate the second-leading cause of death globally. “Scientists are on the cusp of comm

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To treat breast cancer fatigue, soybean oil beats fish oil

Soybean oil may be better than fish oil for reducing cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors, according to a new study. The study results—along with other findings—raise new questions about the value of fish oil and also the consumption of soy by women with breast cancer, which is controversial. “Our study confirms that the benefits of fish oil have been overstated,” says Luke Peppone,

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New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection

A team of Vanderbilt University chemists started decoding the total human molecular picture by examining 456 variations of one class of molecule, lipids, bellwethers of disease.

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2015-2016 El Niño triggered disease outbreaks across globe

The 2015-2016 El Niño event brought weather conditions that triggered regional disease outbreaks throughout the world, according to a new NASA study.

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New study uses big data to analyze the international food trade

A new study, "Food Inequality, Injustice, and Rights," looks at international food trade and whether it enhances or erodes equitable access to food across the planet. The researchers analyzed annual United Nations data on international food trade from 1986 to 2010 in nearly 180 countries, and focused on 266 commodities such as rice, wheat, maize, and soybeans as well as animal products.

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Junk food purchases increase after recreational marijuana legalization

New research by a UConn economist found a link between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods.

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PE, PP and PS: The most abundant type of microplastics in Mediterranean coastal waters

Polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene are the most abundant microplastics in the Mediterranean coastal waters, according to a new study published by the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin -by the experts Miquel Canals, William P. de Haan, and Anna Sànchez-Vidal, from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the University of Barcelona.

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Danmarks næste havmøllepark på mindst 800 MW skal ligge i Nordsøen

Forligskredsen bag Energiaftalen besluttede i dag, at Danmarks største havmøllepark skal ligge 20 kilometer fra kysten ud for Nissum Fjord og være i drift mellem 2024 og 2027.

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Maskiner har mental blokering

PLUS. At forstå, hvad andre tænker, er svært, især for maskiner – men nu har Google­firmaet DeepMind kastet sig over et nyt spil, der kræver netop dette.

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UK's Halley Antarctic base in third winter shutdown

Staff are pulled out once again amid ongoing uncertainty surrounding the stability of nearby ice.

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Facebook, Twitter doing too little against disinformation: EU

Facebook and Twitter are doing too little to scrutinise advertising placements on their sites in the runup to European Union elections in May, despite their pledges to fight disinformation, …

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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Signals Sea Change in U.S. Spaceflight

An uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station will be a crucial milestone for the company’s grand vision of private spaceflight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Spanish science reforms aim to make life easier for parents

Spanish science reforms aim to make life easier for parents Spanish science reforms aim to make life easier for parents, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00649-1 Researchers welcome changes that should also make it easier to hire researchers and buy equipment.

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‘Scanner’ directs DNA repairs to protect against cancer

For serious DNA damage, our cells have two basic repair systems, but only one of them is flawless, researchers report. Damage to human DNA can cause unstable genetic material and play a role in the development of cancer, so researchers are looking to the cells’ own protection against DNA mutations. Among other things, cells protect against these mutations by quickly and correctly repairing DNA da

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Mobile bedside bioprinter can heal wounds

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have created such a mobile skin bioprinting system — the first of its kind — that allows bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound.

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UMMS scientists develop technology to give night vision to mammals

A new study in the journal Cell describes how UMass Medical School biochemist Gang Han, PhD, and colleagues developed technology to give night vision to mammals with a simple injection that contains nanoantennae, allowing the animals to see light beyond the visible spectrum, into the range of infrared light.

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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Signals Sea Change in U.S. Spaceflight

An uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station will be a crucial milestone for the company’s grand vision of private spaceflight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Despite export bans global seahorse trade continues

Many countries are engaged in a vast illegal and unrecorded international trade in seahorses, one that circumvents global regulations, according to new UBC study that has implications for many other animal species.

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Despite export bans global seahorse trade continues

Many countries are engaged in a vast illegal and unrecorded international trade in seahorses, one that circumvents global regulations, according to new UBC study that has implications for many other animal species.

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Researchers explore the potential underwater movement of unexploded ordnance

The legacy of two world wars, live fire training exercises and the purposeful disposal of munitions in coastal waters by militaries in the United States and nations across the globe has caused concern when some of those areas are used for recreational and commercial activities, such as offshore energy initiatives.

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Population increases and climate change point to future US water shortages

Climate change plus population growth are setting the stage for water shortages in parts of the U.S. long before the end of the century, according to a new study in the AGU journal Earth's Future.

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New findings shed light on origin of upright walking in human ancestors

The oldest distinguishing feature between humans and our ape cousins is our ability to walk on two legs—a trait known as bipedalism. Among mammals, only humans and our ancestors perform this atypical balancing act. New research led by a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine professor of anatomy provides evidence for greater reliance on terrestrial bipedalism by a human ancestor than p

6h

2018's biggest volcanic eruption of sulfur dioxide

The Manaro Voui volcano on the island of Ambae in the nation of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean made the 2018 record books. A NASA-NOAA satellite confirmed Manaro Voui had the largest eruption of sulfur dioxide that year.

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Researchers break efficiency record for data transfer in ultra-fast transatlantic cable

If you are making an overseas phone call or using cloud computing, there is a 99 percent chance an undersea fiber optic cable is being utilized. Now, new work with lasers shows promise for squeezing more data through these cables, to help meet the growing demand for data flow between computers in North America and Europe. The method could increase network capacity without requiring new cables, whi

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Despite export bans global seahorse trade continues

Many countries are engaged in a vast illegal and unrecorded international trade in seahorses, one that circumvents global regulations, according to new UBC study that has implications for many other animal species.

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Exchanging information securely using quantum communication in future fiber-optic networks

Searching for better security during data transmission, governments and other organizations around the world have been investing in and developing technologies related to quantum communication and related encryption methods. Researchers are looking at how these new systems—which, in theory, would provide unhackable communication channels—can be integrated into existing and future fiber-optic netwo

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Integrated silicon photonic switch has lowest signal loss in high-speed data transmission

Experimental photonic switches tested by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A., show promise toward the goal of fully optical, high-capacity switching for future high-speed data transmission networks. The switch developed and tested for this research demonstrated capabilities not seen before in photonic switches.

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Researchers develop first sypersymmetric laser array

A team of University of Central Florida researchers has overcome a long-standing problem in laser science, and the findings could have applications in surgery, drilling and 3-D laser mapping.

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Democrats’ Two Roads to Beating Trump

Two distinct paths are emerging for Democrats to beat Donald Trump in 2020, each presenting different challenges—and perhaps demanding a different kind of nominee. The paths are through the Rust Belt and Sun Belt battlegrounds, which both parties consider most likely to decide the next presidential contest. New state-level polling from Gallup signals that Democrats face very different equations i

6h

Doctors Report World's Second Case of Semi-Identical Twins

The extremely rare event, thought to be caused by two sperm cells fertilizing the same egg simultaneously, was last reported in 2007.

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ExxonMobil finds largest Cyprus gas reserve yet

US energy giant ExxonMobil has discovered a huge natural gas reserve off the coast of Cyprus, Cypriot authorities said Thursday, a find that could raise tensions with nearby Turkey.

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The World's Smallest Baby Boy Is Even More Remarkable Than You Think

In August 2018, a baby boy was born in Tokyo weighing only 9.45 ounces (268 grams) — about the weight of a bag of potato chips.

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Prehistoric humans loved their dogs to death

Neolithic communities clustered near present-day Barcelona some 6,000 years ago were really keen on dogs, in this life and the next.

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Canada 'going to the Moon': Trudeau

Canada will join NASA's space mission to put an orbiter around the Moon in a few years, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Thursday.

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Nike continues esports push with league partnership in China

Nike has made another push into the esports market, partnering with China's premier "League of Legends" circuit to become its official provider of apparel and footwear.

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Boss Acting Nicer Recently? You May Have VR to Thank

New advances in virtual humans are making corporate training incredibly lifelike, a little bit awkward—and hopefully a lot more human.

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National Institutes of Health apologizes for lack of action on sexual harassers

Lengthy statement expresses sympathy with victims and vows new steps

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Cardiac arrest kills most victims outside the hospital. Could an artificial heart-lung machine help?

Randomized trials are comparing the life support machinery to CPR

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Leave No House Behind in Flood Buyout Programs, Group Says

Buyouts in flood-prone areas should be more proactive and target homes near environmental assets like streams — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Keeping up with climate change: the latest news in one place

Environment 13 things we learned about climate change this month. The climate is changing fast. Here's everything you need to keep up with environmental science.

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Intel Announces First Quantum Computing Testing Tool

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Parkinson’s drug pumped directly into brain fails to pass key tests

Delivering a nerve cell growth factor directly into the brain has long been touted as a possible treatment for Parkinson’s

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Hiding black hole found

Astronomers have detected a stealthy black hole from its effects on an interstellar gas cloud. This intermediate mass black hole is one of over 100 million quiet black holes expected to be lurking in our Galaxy. These results provide a new method to search for other hidden black holes and help us understand the growth and evolution of black holes.

6h

Pesticide exposure contributes to faster ALS progression

A new study helps determine the role of pesticides and pollutants during the course of the progressive neurodegenerative disease that has no cure.

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THC vs. CBD: Which Marijuana Compound Is More Beneficial?

A new study suggests that marijuana’s main active ingredient, THC may be more important for therapeutic effects.

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NIH revoked funding from 14 scientists over sexual harassment last year

NIH revoked funding from 14 scientists over sexual harassment last year NIH revoked funding from 14 scientists over sexual harassment last year, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00753-2 The agency has faced sharp criticism over its handling of harassment allegations.

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Daily briefing: The Denisova Cave rewrote human history — where to next?

Daily briefing: The Denisova Cave rewrote human history — where to next? Daily briefing: The Denisova Cave rewrote human history — where to next?, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00755-0 Going beyond the cave that changed everything, brewing cannabinoids from yeast and the most-censored science topics in China.

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Anti-Vaxxers Are Here to Stay

So what can officials do to protect the public’s health? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiny Fossils Reveal Early Days of Frogs

Bones uncovered in Arizona help fill a gap in the great amphibian backstory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards

Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution.

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Tropical Spiders Cause 'Surprising Amount of Death,' Hunting Opossums, Frogs and More

In the Amazon lowlands, spiders as big as dinner plates dine on opossums.

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Anti-Vaxxers Are Here to Stay

So what can officials do to protect the public’s health? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Walter Munk (1917-2019)

Walter Munk (1917-2019) Walter Munk (1917-2019), Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00750-5 A founder of modern oceanography.

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RNA snippets snare protein linked to degeneration of neurons

RNA snippets snare protein linked to degeneration of neurons RNA snippets snare protein linked to degeneration of neurons, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00700-1 Technique ties up an innocuous protein before it gathers into dangerous clumps.

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'Dark Phoenix' Trailer Here to Remind You X-Men Still a Thing

Move over, Captain Marvel—'Dark Phoenix' has a female superhero and supervillain, played by Sophie Turner and Jessica Chastain.

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The Problem With AOC’s Green New Deal: It Ignores Fusion Power

Green Glow Earlier this month, U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Ed Markey published a proposal for the Green New Deal, a plan to mobilize the American economy to stop climate change. It calls for America to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, mostly by expanding the nation’s infrastructure for renewable energy sources like solar and wind energy. But there’s so

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Y Combinator CEO: AI Will Replace Jobs, But Life Will be Awesome

The Human Touch What will artificial intelligence mean for the job market? That’s a question that’s been met with a lot of pessimism — from predictions of a collapse of the global economy to soaring mass unemployment . But Silicon Valley start-up incubator Y Combinator CEO Sam Altman has a far more positive take on the issue. AI might well replace most jobs as we know them today, he said during t

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China tightens its regulation of some human gene editing, labeling it ‘high-risk’

Response to babies created used genome editor CRISPR is “reasonable,” some scientists say, though concerns remain

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Nanoparticles give mice night vision

Injected into the retina, particles allow rodents to see infrared light

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Is the age of IC engine really coming to an end? Is there any application where electric engines cannot replace them?

I personally feel that the IC are only going to be relished by car/machine enthusiasts. submitted by /u/MechSand [link] [comments]

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Elon Musk Developing Technology To Connect The Human Brain To Computers

submitted by /u/LongjumpingCat2 [link] [comments]

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500-million-year old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada

Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago–evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Large-scale initiative linked to reductions in maternal and newborn deaths in Indonesia

A U.S.-funded initiative to improve quality of care and referrals during pregnancy and childbirth in Indonesia resulted in significant reductions in maternal and newborn mortality at participating hospitals, according to a new study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Will Cohen’s Remarks on Trump’s Racism Change Anything?

During Wednesday’s House Oversight Committee hearing, Michael Cohen lobbed several bombshells in his opening statements, including allegations that Trump had direct knowledge of campaign interactions with Russian actors and WikiLeaks, and paid hush money while in office. But as far as revelations about anything tied to Special Counselor Robert Mueller’s probe, that was pretty much it . The remain

7h

Ending the India-Pakistan Crisis Requires a Courageous Narendra Modi

The standoff between India and Pakistan would be hard enough to resolve if the two countries did not have nuclear weapons. That’s before you factor in a jingoistic media scene, the rapid spread of rumors and disinformation on messaging and social-media apps, and the fact that India’s nationalist prime minister is heading into parliamentary elections. The result: the worst military crisis between

7h

Amazon Prime members can now set a weekly delivery day

Instead of having another package arrive at your doorstep every single day, Amazon wants to cut down on cardboard and delivery trips by giving Prime members the ability to schedule …

7h

Att sova ikapp på helgerna räcker inte

De som sover för lite på vardagarna och försöker ta igen sömnen på helgerna kan få ökad risk att drabbas av diabetes och hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar. Kroppen behöver fler nätter för att återhämta sig.

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Ökad psykisk ohälsa bland förskollärare

– Problemen och lösningarna ligger alltså i professionen, arbetsmiljön, personalsituationen och organisationen. Ett av de verkliga problemen är att förskollärarna blir allt färre och inga prognoser pekar på att de blir fler, säger Sven Persson, professor i pedagogik vid Malmö universitet, och en av forskarna bakom studien. – Politiker och beslutsfattare måste börja diskutera förskollärarnas framt

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Weekend lie-ins not enough to recover from sleep loss, study finds

Research suggests link between disrupted sleep cycles and unbalanced metabolism Having a good lie-in at the weekend might not make up for sleep loss during the working week, research suggests. Scientists have previously found that a lack of sleep increases the risk of obesity and diabetes. However, it was not clear whether sleeping more on the weekend could balance the books and prevent such an u

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Mice given ‘night vision’ by injecting nanoparticles into their eyes

Thanks to nanotechnology mice can now see in infrared light – and they can read and respond to infrared cues in their environment

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Weekend lie-in can't undo the health damage caused by lack of sleep

A lack of sleep is a risk factor for diabetes and obesity – and if you think you can compensate with a weekend lie-in, you are out of luck

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No, You Probably Can't Make up for Lost Sleep on the Weekends

There are only so many hours in the day, and when work or school sucks up eight of them, it can be hard to squeeze in time for family, friends, exercise or binging Netflix. As a result, we often don’t get those eight hours of precious sleep during the week. But catching some extra z’s on the weekend can make up for it, right? Wrong, say researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. In a recen

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Scientists Injected Nanoparticles Into Mice's Eyes to Give Them Infrared Vision

It's easy to forget it, but much of the world is invisible to us. I don't mean that in the sense of things being really tiny, or in any metaphorical way. No, most of the world is literally invisible. That's because what we call visible light is actually a tiny sliver of the much greater electromagnetic spectrum. The rainbow we see sits in the middle of a vast continuum of wavelengths, including ev

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A Femur's Journey Into Putty: The Hidden World of Bone Transplants

A 17th-century Russian nobleman named Butterlijn had a bone to pick with his surgeon. Butterlijn, the story goes, had been struck in the head with a sword, and his surgeon repaired the injury by transplanting a piece of dog bone into Butterlijn’s skull. He survived, only to be excommunicated by his church because he was deemed no longer fully human. Butterlijn demanded that the surgeon take the do

7h

UCF researchers develop first sypersymmetric laser array

A team of University of Central Florida researchers has overcome a long-standing problem in laser science, and the findings could have applications in surgery, drilling and 3D laser mapping.

7h

Integrated silicon photonic switch has lowest signal loss in high-speed data transmission

Experimental photonic switches tested by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, US, show promise toward the goal of fully optical, high-capacity switching for future high-speed data transmission networks.

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New research suggests earlier emergence of malaria in Africa

After carrying out extensive research into the βS mutation by performing full sequencing of the HBB gene together with a large-scale genomic study on 479 individuals from 13 populations from Sub-Saharan Africa, scientists were able to reveal that malaria emerged in Africa at least 20,000 years ago – and not at the same time as the adoption of agriculture 4,000 to 5,000 years ago.

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Protein content as a marker for response to therapy in brain cancer

Brain tumors vary widely in how they respond to treatment. However, early assessment of therapy response is essential in order to choose the best possible treatment for the patient. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now been able to show in a study using non-invasive high-resolution 7-Tesla MRI scans that the protein content of tumors correlates with response to treatme

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Sleeping in on the weekend won't repay your sleep debt

Attempting to get extra sleep on the weekend to make up for lost sleep during the week has no lasting metabolic health benefits and can actually make our ability to regulate blood sugar worse, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research.

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Amoebae diversified at least 750 million years ago, far earlier than expected

Reconstitution of Amoebozoa's evolution shows significant Precambrian species diversity. This study changes the view of how life evolved in the very remote past and deepens the understanding of current climate change.

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An atlas of an aggressive leukemia

A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed 'atlas of cell states' for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could help improve treatment of the aggressive cancer.

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Data sharing uncovers five new risk genes for Alzheimer's disease

Analysis of genetic data revealed five new and confirmed 20 known risk genes for Alzheimer's disease. Research also shows that mutations in genes specific to tau, a hallmark protein of Alzheimer's, may play an earlier role in the disease. These new findings support developing evidence that groups of genes associated with processes, such as cell trafficking, lipid transport, inflammation and immune

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Inflammation signals induce dormancy in aging brain stem cells

In old age, the amount of stem cells in the brains of mice decreases drastically. The remaining ones protect themselves from completely vanishing by entering a state of dormancy, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now reported in Cell. The old stem cells are hard to awaken, but once reactivated, they are just as potent as young ones.

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How Capsella followed its lonely heart

The Brassicaceae plant family boasts a stunning diversity of fruit shapes. But even in this cosmopolitan company the heart-shaped seed pods of the Capsella genus stand out.

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How common are mental health disorders after diagnosis of head and neck cancer?

Treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC) might cure the disease but it also can result in adverse effects such as disfigurement and speech difficulties, which can affect quality of life for patients. Using information from a large insurance claims database, this study examined how common mental health disorders were in patients with HNC and how they were associated with diagnosis and treatment.

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Unveiling disease-causing genetic changes in chromosome 17

Extensive single Watson-Crick base pair mutations can occur in addition to duplication or deletion of an entire group of genes on chromosomal region 17p11.2.

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Digital breast tomosynthesis vs digital mammography screening outcomes

This study compared data on 180,340 breast cancer screenings for about 96,000 women ages 40 to 74 who underwent screening with 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2D digital mammography to see if the outcomes varied by patient age and breast density. The findings suggest DBT was associated with a better ability to correctly identify women without breast cancer and better detection of breast

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Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons

Researchers at the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at University of California San Diego have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

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Atlas of acute myeloid leukemia cell types may lead to improved, targeted therapies

A research team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has assembled a detailed atlas of bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia, an aggressive blood cancer that usually leads to death within five years of diagnosis.

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By blocking protein, researchers keep brain tumors from repairing themselves

Researchers at the San Diego Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at UC San Diego report inhibiting activity of a specific protein in glioblastomas boosts their sensitivity to radiation, improving treatment prospects for one of the most common and aggressive forms of brain cancer.

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Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a study published Feb. 28 in the journal Cell. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between different

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Does extra sleep on the weekends repay your sleep debt? No, researchers say

Insufficient sleep and untreated sleep disorders put people at increased risk for metabolic problems, including obesity and diabetes. But is extra sleep on the weekends enough to reduce those risks? The short answer, according to new findings reported in Current Biology on Feb. 28, is 'no.'

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Nicotine may harm human embryos at the single-cell level

Nicotine induces widespread adverse effects on human embryonic development at the level of individual cells, researchers report Feb. 28 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. Single-cell RNA sequencing of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived embryoid bodies revealed that three weeks of nicotine exposure disrupts cell-to-cell communication, decreases cell survival, and alters the expression of genes

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How prostate cancer becomes treatment resistant

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified how prostate cancer transforms into a deadly treatment-resistant prostate cancer subtype called neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) following treatment with anti-androgen therapy. Their findings — which include the metabolic rewiring and the epigenetic alteration that drives this switch — reveal that an FD

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The Real Significance of Michael Cohen’s Testimony

It helps to put it in plain terms: Donald Trump’s longtime fixer Michael Cohen offered crucial evidence on Wednesday that the president was kept in the loop on conversations with WikiLeaks about releasing emails related to Hillary Clinton. He also told lawmakers that, as president, Trump reimbursed him for hush-money payments made to the adult-film star Stormy Daniels, producing a copy of a check

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An Ingenious Injection Can Create Infrared Vision

The list of animals that can see infrared light, which lies just beyond the red part of the rainbow, is very small. It includes vipers and pythons, whose faces have infrared-detecting pits wired to the visual centers in their brain. It includes a few freshwater fish such as carp and tilapia . It includes salmon, but only when they swim back into rivers from the sea, and only after dramatically re

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FTC Slams TikTok With Record Fine For Spying on Pre-Teens

Hit Or Miss TikTok, the video-sharing social media app that works like a cursed reincarnation of Vine , just got slapped with a $5.7 million fine for collecting personal information about its pre-teen users. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced on Wednesday that TikTok agreed to the settlement after allegations that the app knowingly and illegally stored the names, email addresses, a

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Lack of discoveries is damaging prospects for next big particle collider

Physicists brace for decision on Japan’s International Linear Collider

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The Biggest Tech Trend Of 2019 Isn't AI Or Big Data, It's Trust.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Hydrogen From Seawater: Canadian Utility to Test New Tech

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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What does a national emergency mean for presidential power?

When an American president declares a national emergency, what new executive powers emerge? That question is on the minds of many in the wake of President Donald Trump’s February 15 declaration in order to move forward with securing funds to construct a wall or barrier along the US-Mexico border—an action he took after his administration failed to obtain its requested budget for the wall from Con

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High-tide floods are becoming more common, and it's costing businesses

Nexus Media News Stores can't operate with inches of water inside them, but climate change is making these sunny day floods far more frequent. Regular coastal flooding has become a persistent and costly problem across the United States, and is expected to worsen as sea levels rise. Annapolis, Maryland is a case…

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Google's Latest Chrome Caching Feature Turbocharges Your Browsing Experience

Chrome is on its way towards becoming a much faster browser than it already is, though there is a caveat—the upcoming speed boost applies to previously visited webpages, as Google's developers …

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Senate to Google: How Did You ‘Forget’ About Nest Secure Microphone?

Congress is demanding answers from Google about an invasive piece of hardware hidden in its Nest Secure hub. The search giant last week apologized, saying a built-in microphone was supposed …

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Researchers discover oldest tattoo tool in western North America

Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America.

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What spiders eating weird stuff tell us about complex Amazon food webs

By documenting rare events of invertebrates eating small vertebrates, scientists are shedding new light on the Amazon rainforest’s intricate ecosystem.

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With a Second Repeating Radio Burst, Astronomers Close In on an Explanation

Between this past Christmas and New Year’s Day, Brian Metzger realized he had his home to himself — no emails coming in, no classes to teach — and maybe, just maybe, the glimmer of an answer to one of astronomy’s most stubborn mysteries. He chased hard after the lead, worried a little error could unravel everything or that someone else would put together the same pieces first. “You’re racing a li

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Night-vision ‘super-mice’ created using light-converting nanoparticles

Night-vision ‘super-mice’ created using light-converting nanoparticles Night-vision ‘super-mice’ created using light-converting nanoparticles, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00735-4 The particles bind to photoreceptors in the eyes and convert infrared wavelengths to visible light.

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Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells

A research team has improved the efficiency of a new type of solar cell with a double layer consisting of pure anatase and brookite, two different mineral forms of titanium oxide. Using water-solute brookite nanoparticles, a brookite layer was fabricated on top of anatase, increasing solar cell efficiency by up to 16.82 percent.

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Interactive surfaces enter a whole new dimension of flexibility

Researchers propose a novel flexible tube display that is able to take various surface shapes. Information is expressed by streaming colored fluids through the tube and controlling the positions and lengths of the droplets. The tube's flexibility makes it possible to wrap the tube around the surface of an object and present information on its surface that is difficult to express on a standard two-

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How Capsella followed its lonely heart

The Brassicaceae plant family boasts a stunning diversity of fruit shapes. But even in this cosmopolitan company the heart-shaped seed pods of the Capsella genus stand out.

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Amoebae diversified at least 750 million years ago, far earlier than expected

Brazilian researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of amoebae and demonstrated that at the end of the Precambrian period, at least 750 million years ago, life on Earth was much more diverse than suggested by classic theory.

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Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a study published February 28 in the journal Cell. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between differ

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Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons

Researchers at the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at University of California San Diego have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

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First Evidence of “Planet-Wide Groundwater System” on Mars Found

Going Under Mars may look like a dry, dusty planet today. But scientific models indicate that it was likely once home to massive amounts of water, both above and below its surface — and now, researchers have evidence to back those models up. “Early Mars was a watery world, but as the planet’s climate changed this water retreated below the surface to form pools and ‘groundwater’,” European Space A

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How Capsella followed its lonely heart

The Brassicaceae plant family boasts a stunning diversity of fruit shapes. But even in this cosmopolitan company the heart-shaped seed pods of the Capsella genus stand out.

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Amoebae diversified at least 750 million years ago, far earlier than expected

Brazilian researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of amoebae and demonstrated that at the end of the Precambrian period, at least 750 million years ago, life on Earth was much more diverse than suggested by classic theory.

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Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons

Researchers at the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at University of California San Diego have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

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Nanoparticles Let Mice See Near Infrared Light

Researchers injected the retinas of mice with nanoparticles that bound to photoreceptors and converted near-infrared light to green light that the animals could see.

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Mysterious 'Planet Nine' Is Probably 5 to 10 Times the Size of Earth

There could be a planet hiding out on the distant frontiers of our solar system. Astronomers have published new details about what it probably looks like.

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Open-source software tracks neural activity in real time

A software tool called CaImAn automates the arduous process of tracking the location and activity of neurons. It accomplishes this task using a combination of standard computational methods and machine-learning techniques. In a new paper, the software's creators demonstrate that CaImAn achieves near-human accuracy in detecting the locations of active neurons based on calcium imaging data.

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2018's biggest volcanic eruption of sulfur dioxide

The Manaro Voui volcano on the island of Ambae in the nation of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean made the 2018 record books. A NASA-NOAA satellite confirmed Manaro Voui had the largest eruption of sulfur dioxide that year.

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New findings shed light on origin of upright walking in human ancestors

The oldest distinguishing feature between humans and our ape cousins is our ability to walk on two legs – a trait known as bipedalism. Among mammals, only humans and our ancestors perform this atypical balancing act. New research led by a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine professor of anatomy provides evidence for greater reliance on terrestrial bipedalism by a human ancestor than

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Population increases and climate change point to future US water shortages

Climate change plus population growth are setting the stage for water shortages in parts of the U.S. long before the end of the century, according to a new study in the AGU journal Earth's Future.

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Ability to control stress reduces negative impact

In individuals, stress exposure in adolescence increases vulnerability and risk of developing psychopathologies in adulthood, such as drug addiction, mood, anxiety, addiction to gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, etc. Researchers at the UAB observed in animal models that the ability to control the source of stress diminishes its effects and could reduce the risk of later developin

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Researchers break efficiency record for data transfer in ultra-fast transatlantic cable

If you are making an overseas phone call or using cloud computing, there is a 99 percent chance an undersea fiber optic cable is being utilized. Now, new work with lasers shows promise for squeezing more data through these cables, to help meet the growing demand for data flow between computers in North America and Europe.

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When our devices can read our emotions: Affectiva’s Gabi Zijderveld

Emotion-tracking AI is starting to help machines recognize our moods. Are we ready?

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AI is real now: A conversation with Sophie Vandebroek

Why there will never be another “AI winter,” and what IBM and MIT are doing together to ensure that.

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Is your country at risk of becoming a dictatorship? Here's how to know | Farida Nabourema

Farida Nabourema has dedicated her life to fighting the military regime in Togo, Africa's oldest autocracy. She's learned two truths along the way: no country is destined to be oppressed — and no country is immune to dictatorship. But how can you tell if you're at risk before it happens? In a stirring talk, Nabourema shares the four key signs of a dictatorship, along with the secret to defiance f

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Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells

A research team has improved the efficiency of a new type of solar cell with a double layer consisting of pure anatase and brookite, two different mineral forms of titanium oxide. Using water-solute brookite nanoparticles, a brookite layer was fabricated on top of anatase, increasing solar cell efficiency by up to 16.82 percent.

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Interactive surfaces enter a whole new dimension of flexibility

Researchers propose a novel flexible tube display that is able to take various surface shapes. Information is expressed by streaming colored fluids through the tube and controlling the positions and lengths of the droplets. The tube's flexibility makes it possible to wrap the tube around the surface of an object and present information on its surface that is difficult to express on a standard two-

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The periodic table is 150 years old this week

Its creation is a perfect illustration of how science progresses

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SpaceX to launch test for resumption of manned US flights

SpaceX will try to send a dummy to the International Space Station this weekend in a key test for resuming manned US space flights, perhaps this year if all goes well.

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Thai lawmakers approve controversial cybersecurity act

Thailand's legislature passed a cybersecurity bill on Thursday that would allow authorities access to people's personal information without a court order.

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New machine learning approach could give a big boost to the efficiency of optical networks

New work leveraging machine learning could increase the efficiency of optical telecommunications networks. As our world becomes increasingly interconnected, fiber optic cables offer the ability to transmit more data over longer distances compared to traditional copper wires.

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Exchanging information securely using quantum communication in future fiber-optic networks

Searching for better security during data transmission, governments and other organizations around the world have been investing in and developing technologies related to quantum communication and related encryption methods. Researchers are looking at how these new systems — which, in theory, would provide unhackable communication channels — can be integrated into existing and future fiber-optic

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Gonorrhoea: Drug resistance compromises recommended treatment in Europe

Gonorrhoea is the second most commonly notified sexually transmitted infection across the EU/EEA countries with almost 500 000 reported cases between 2007 and 2016. The infection is treatable but Neisseria gonorrhoeae keep showing high levels of azithromycin resistance according to latest results of the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme. This antibiotic agent is part of the

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Business this week

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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DI med nyt infrastruktur-udspil: Vil lappe togfonden og bygge Kattegatbroen

Politiske slåskampe har sløvet udviklingen af dansk infrastruktur. Derfor er der brug for en samlet plan, mener Dansk Industri.

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Bydende nødvendigt at forandre tilbud om lindring

Der er ikke brug for en progressiv fornyelse, tværtimod. Vi skal tilbage til mere af det, vi gjorde før i tiden, hvor den lindrende behandling blev varetaget af egen læge og hjemmeplejen i en skøn forening.

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How water droplets can make wild colors without dye

Under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors without any inks or dyes. In a paper in Nature , a team of researchers describes how a surface covered in a fine mist of transparent droplets and lit with a single white light lamp can produce bright, iridescent colors if each tiny droplet is precisely the same size. This form of struct

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Home insurance buyers lack access to public flood data

Canadian homeowners do not have the information they need to know if they should buy flood insurance leaving them exposed to significant financial risk.

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'Mutation hotspot' allows common fungus to adapt to different host environments

The fungus Candida albicans is found in the gastrointestinal tract of about half of healthy adults with little if any effect, yet it also causes an oft-fatal blood infection among patients with compromised immune systems, including those with HIV/AIDS. New research from Brown University helps show how this fungus gets the flexibility to live in these vastly different environments.

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'Mutation hotspot' allows common fungus to adapt to different host environments

The fungus Candida albicans is found in the gastrointestinal tract of about half of healthy adults with little if any effect, yet it also causes an oft-fatal blood infection among patients with compromised immune systems, including those with HIV/AIDS. New research from Brown University helps show how this fungus gets the flexibility to live in these vastly different environments.

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Human-driven climate change meets "gold standard" of scientific certainty

While it's difficult to find people who deny climate change is happening, some still argue that humans are not climate change's primary cause. By applying peer-reviewed statistical methods to 40 years' worth of satellite data, researchers have determined that the evidence of human-driven climate change has passed the gold standard of scientific certainty: the five-sigma level. This threshold is u

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'Extraordinarily Rare' Semi-Identical Twins Were Born in Australia

Twins can be fraternal, identical — and in extremely rare cases — semi-identical.

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Code used to reduce quantum error in logic gates for first time

Scientists have for the first time demonstrated improvement in quantum computers by using codes designed to detect and discard errors in the logic gates of such machines. The codes were applied to IBM's quantum computer via IBM Q.

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Could a blood test measure pain?

Researchers have created a prototype for a blood test that could measure pain. They tracked hundreds of participants to identify biomarkers in the blood that can help objectively determine how severe a patient’s pain is. The blood test, the first of its kind, would allow physicians far more accuracy in treating pain—as well as a better long-term look at the patient’s medical future. It could also

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Watching lots of TV may worsen memory in older people

The more hours of TV people watch the worse their memory is six years later – but the explanation for the link is unclear

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'Amazing snapshots' plumb volcanic depths

Research shedding light on the internal "plumbing" of volcanoes may help scientists better understand volcanic eruptions and unrest.

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Turning them on, turning them off—how to control stem cells

Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells.

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Exiled planet linked to stellar flyby three million years ago

Some of the peculiar aspects of our solar system—an enveloping cloud of comets, dwarf planets in weird orbits and, if it truly exists, a possible Planet Nine far from the sun—have been linked to the close approach of another star in our system's infancy flung things helter-skelter.

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U.S. companies put record number of robots to work in 2018

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Chicken nuggets, beef burgers and other meats could soon be cloned

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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AI is finally learning from children, the best intelligent machines

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Prickly Pear Cactus Needles Are Oldest Tattoo Tool in Western North America

A 2,000-year-old spiky object recently rediscovered in museum storage is the oldest known tattoo-making tool from western North America, a new study finds.

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Turning them on, turning them off—how to control stem cells

Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells.

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Students go to ends of the Earth to dig up climate history

Between 256 million and 335 million years ago, the landmasses of the Southern Hemisphere were squished together in a super continent called Gondwana. Gripped in the cold throes of an ice age, glaciers moved slowly across the landscape, churning up ground and leaving a trail of sediment in their wake. They retreated as the Earth warmed, transitioning from an icehouse to a greenhouse climate at the

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Building digitally, living digitally

DFAB HOUSE has officially opened today on the NEST building of Empa and Eawag in Dübendorf. It is the world's first inhabited "house" that was not only digitally planned, but also – with the help of robots and 3-D printers – built largely digitally. The construction technologies were developed by ETH Zurich researchers in collaboration with industrial partners.

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The ‘Golden Death’ Bacterium Found in a Rotten Apple

For several years in the fall, Marie-Anne Félix would walk through an apple orchard near Paris in search of rotten fruit. Félix, an evolutionary biologist at École normale supérieure, studies tiny, translucent worms called nematodes. These worms feed on bacteria, so they tend to congregate, as their prey do, on the flesh of decaying fruit. In 2009, Félix picked up one such apple rich in nematodes

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Vietnam Won the Trump-Kim Summit

HANOI —Vietnam was celebrating its Lunar New Year holiday when President Donald Trump said his second summit with Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader, would take place here. That announcement was barely three weeks ago. At the time, much of this country was shut down, as is customary during the holiday, Tet. Officials were home visiting family, most restaurants and shops were closed, and city st

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Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease in women

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease in WomenIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Special Issue on Women's Cardiovascular Health, Volume 3, Number 4, 2019, Guest Editor Gladys P. Velarde) pp. 421-434(14); DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0064, Nimeh Najjar, MD, Peter Staiano, MD and Mariam Louis, MD from the University of Florida, Department of M

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Psychosocial stress, the unpredictability schema, and cardiovascular disease in women

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Special Issue on Women's Cardiovascular Health, Volume 3, Number 4, 2019, Guest Editor Gladys P. Velarde) pp. 391-401(11); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0065 Tomás Cabeza de Baca, PhD and Michelle A. Albert, MD, MPH from the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA consider psychosocial s

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Recent advances in spina bifida care extend life and improve quality of life

Spina bifida (myelomeningocele) is the most common, permanently disabling birth defect compatible with life. In a collection of articles, published in the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, experts describe important advances made in the care of spina bifida patients that extend life and improve quality of life.

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Home insurance buyers lack access to public flood data

Canadian homeowners do not have the information they need to know if they should buy flood insurance leaving them exposed to significant financial risk. A recent study from the University of Waterloo found flood mapping information in Canada was inadequate, incomplete, hard to locate and varied widely from province-to-province.

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Heart disease in pregnancy: A special look at peripartum cardiomyopathy

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Special Issue on Women's Cardiovascular Health, Volume 3, Number 4, 2019, Guest Editor Gladys P. Velarde) pp. 403-408(6); DOI: ttps://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0066 Dmitry Yaranov, MD and Jeffrey D. Alexis, MD from the College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL, USA and the University of Rochester, Rochester, N

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Scientists at FAU are researching a new method for developing artificial ovaries

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg led by Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini from the Chair of Materials Science (biomaterials) and Professor Dr. Ralf Dittrich from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer.

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Challenges in cardiovascular risk prediction and stratification in women

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Special Issue on Women's Cardiovascular Health, Volume 3, Number 4, 2019, Guest Editor Gladys P. Velarde) pp. 329-348(20); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0068 Sonia Henry, Rachel Bond, Stacey Rosen, Cindy Grines & Jennifer Mieres, from Hofstra School of Medicine, Manhasset, NY, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY and The K

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Thermodynamic properties of hevein investigated by Lobachevsky University scientists

Hevein is a small protein consisting of forty-three amino acid residues. It is the main component of the bottom fraction of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) latex that has a pronounced antimicrobial activity, thus attracting researchers' attention.Antimicrobial peptides have a wide spectrum of action, they are capable of killing target cells quickly; moreover, there is no resistance to this group

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'Mutation hotspot' allows common fungus to adapt to different host environments

A new study finds that samples of Candida albicans from patients frequently lack one copy of a vital master regulator, which gives them flexibility to lose the other copy and adapt to different environments.

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Zips on the nanoscale

Nanostructures based on carbon are promising materials for nanoelectronics. However, to be suitable, they would often need to be formed on non-metallic surfaces, which has been a challenge — up to now. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have found a method of forming nanographenes on metal oxide surfaces. Their research, conducted within the framework of collaborativ

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Shedding light — literally — on resistance to radiation therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they'll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

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Researchers move closer to practical photonic quantum computing

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a way to map and measure large-scale photonic quantum correlation with single-photon sensitivity. The ability to measure thousands of instances of quantum correlation is critical for making photon-based quantum computing practical.

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Reduced salinity of seawater wreaks havoc on coral chemistry

New research confirms that drastic changes in ocean salinity from, for example, severe freshwater flooding, as recently experienced off the coast of north-east Queensland from abnormal monsoonal conditions, provoke a similar stress response in corals as extreme heating, resulting in 'freshwater bleaching' and if unabated, coral death.

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Higher hospital readmission rates for cardiac patients in Northern vs. Southern Ontario: Importance

Patients hospitalized with heart attacks, heart failure, atrial fibrillation or stroke in Northern Ontario, Canada, were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital and repeatedly hospitalized after discharge than those living in Southern Ontario. Yet, no geographical differences were found in 30-day survival. A new study recommends providing access to timely transitional care by clinicians who h

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Oldest tattoo tool in western North America

Archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. The tool was made around 2,000 years ago by the Ancestral Pueblo people of the Basketmaker II period in what is now southeastern Utah.

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Code used to reduce quantum error in logic gates for first time

Scientists have for the first time demonstrated improvement in quantum computers by using codes designed to detect and discard errors in the logic gates of such machines. The codes were applied to IBM's quantum computer via IBM Q.

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The coming revolution in LED lighting

A revolution in energy-efficient, environmentally-sound, and powerfully-flexible lighting is coming to businesses and homes, according to a paper in latest special energy issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal.

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Norge har ikke svaret på danske problemer

Chefpsykolog Birgitte Bechgaard argumenterer for ‘Den norske model’ ud fra fortællinger fra en studietur til Norge afholdt af psykologernes fagforening. Men den norske model kan ikke umiddelbart adopteres her.

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Chemists Grew A “Synthetic Brain” That Stores Memories in Silver

Natural Growth In the ongoing quest to build an artificial human brain, scientists from UCLA may have just taken a big step forward. While a real synthetic brain is still far away , a team of chemical engineers found out how to grow self-assembling circuitry that resembles the structure and electrical activity of parts of a brain, according to ZDNet . The research is the pet project of UCLA chemi

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Amazon taking action to help brands fight against fake goods

Amazon is providing a tool that will allow brands to remove listings from its site that they consider to be for counterfeit goods.

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What's in the Green New Deal? Four key issues to understand

In the few weeks since it was introduced as a non-binding resolution before the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, the Green New Deal (GND) Resolution has generated more discussion and coverage of climate change – positive and negative – among, by, and aimed at policymakers than we’ve seen in more than a decade. The nonbinding initiative introduced by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) a

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Prices are not Enough

This is a re-post from TripleCrisis by Frank Ackerman. Fourth in a series on climate policy; find Part 1 here , Part 2 here , and Part 3 here . We need a price on carbon emissions. This opinion, virtually unanimous among economists, is also shared by a growing number of advocates and policymakers. But unanimity disappears in the debate over how to price carbon: there is continuing controversy abo

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Researchers move closer to practical photonic quantum computing

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a way to map and measure large-scale photonic quantum correlation with single-photon sensitivity. The ability to measure thousands of instances of quantum correlation is critical for making photon-based quantum computing practical.

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A new species of huntsman spider described

Senckenberg scientist Dr. Peter Jäger has described four new species in the huntsman spider family. One of the newly discovered animals reveals a surprising specialization: It makes its home inside of bamboo. To enter the plants, the palm-sized, eight-legged creature relies on the help of other animals. This is only the second species of spider known to science whose ecology is closely tied to bam

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Biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards

Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution.

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How Many Times Do You Have to Slap a Chicken to Cook It?

While you could technically cook a chicken by slapping it, as proposed by a recent meme, you might also cook your hand. We crunch the numbers.

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The Siberian City Where the Winter High Is –40°F

Think the Midwest is cold? Welcome to Yakutsk, Russia, a town of 200,000 built on permafrost.

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Mindfulness could promote positive body image

Making people more aware of their own internal body signals, such as heartbeat or breathing rate, could promote positive body image, according to new research.

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Systems biology: Cell atlas of the aging lung

Aging promotes lung function decline and increases susceptibility to diseases of the respiratory tract. In order to understand these effects in detail, researchers analyzed the aging process in the lung at single-cell level using AI approaches.

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'Amazing snapshots' plumb volcanic depths

Research shedding light on the internal 'plumbing' of volcanoes may help scientists better understand volcanic eruptions and unrest. The study analyzed crystals in Italy's famous Mount Etna to reveal how quickly magma moves to the surface.

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Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors play a role in developing steroid diabetes

Researchers focused on glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), the receptors for the body's endogenous steroids, are clarifying part of the mechanism behind metabolic disturbances caused by steroids.

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Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children

On Tuesday afternoon, a Twitter user going by the name of Wanda Maximoff whipped out her iPhone and posted a terrifying message to parents. “Warning! Please read, this is real,” she tweeted . “There is a thing called ‘Momo’ that’s instructing kids to kill themselves,” the attached screenshot of a Facebook post reads. “INFORM EVERYONE YOU CAN.” Maximoff’s plea has been retweeted more than 22,000 t

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Honor and Dishonor

The full spectrum of Republican behavior has been on display this week. Michael Cohen (no relation, save in the most distant possible sense) ratted out his former boss Donald Trump in a spectacularly revealing piece of congressional testimony. Representative Matt Gaetz, the self-described “outspoken conservative firebrand” from Florida, threatened Cohen (by tweet, of course) with revelations of m

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Where Is Amazon Headed With Its Self-Driving Car Initiatives?

The list of companies pursuing self-driving vehicles keeps on growing . On it, you find many companies that might initially come as a surprise—including Amazon. Amazon’s statement about its recent investment in self-driving vehicle startup Aurora tells you something about the company’s thoughts on the future of the technology. “Autonomous technology has the potential to help make the jobs of our

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A new species of huntsman spider described

Senckenberg scientist Dr. Peter Jäger has described four new species in the huntsman spider family. One of the newly discovered animals reveals a surprising specialization: It makes its home inside of bamboo. To enter the plants, the palm-sized, eight-legged creature relies on the help of other animals. This is only the second species of spider known to science whose ecology is closely tied to bam

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Biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards

Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution.

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Asian elephants may lose up to 42 percent of suitable habitats in India and Nepal

Protecting and expanding suitable habitats for wildlife is key to the conservation of endangered species, but owing to climate and land use change the ideal habitats of today may not be fitting in 30 or 50 years. An international team of scientists therefore predicted range shifts of Asian elephants in India and Nepal using species distribution models based on distribution data for the elephants a

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Bungee jumping for science

Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outsi

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A trap for positrons

For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) have succeeded in losslessly guiding positrons, the antiparticles of electrons, into a magnetic field trap. This is an important step towards creating a matter-antimatter plasma of electrons and positrons, like the plasmas believed to occur near neutron stars and black

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In-depth insights into glass corrosion

Silicate glass has many applications, including the use as a nuclear waste form to immobilize radioactive elements from spent fuel. However, it has one disadvantage — it corrodes when it comes into contact with aqueous solutions. Scientists at the University of Bonn were able to observe in detail which processes take place. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Materials.

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Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts

New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years.

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Reduced salinity of seawater wreaks havoc on coral chemistry

New research confirms that drastic changes in ocean salinity from, for example, severe freshwater flooding, as recently experienced off the coast of north-east Queensland from abnormal monsoonal conditions, provoke a similar stress response in corals as extreme heating, resulting in "freshwater bleaching" and if unabated, coral death.

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Image: ISS transits the sun

Humankind's most distant outpost was recently captured crossing the face of our enormous and gleaming sun. The fleeting transit of the International Space Station was over in the blink of an eye, but Ian Griffin, Director at the Otago Museum of New Zealand, made sure he was in the right place to capture it.

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Physicists use code to reduce quantum error in logic gates

Scientists at the University of Sydney have for the first time demonstrated improvement in quantum computers by using codes designed to detect and discard errors in the logic gates of such machines.

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Small tweaks to vastly improve gaming on your phone

DIY Ready, player one? Whether you're an Android or iPhone user, part-time or dedicated gamer, you should find some useful ideas here for boosting gameplay on your mobile.

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Study: THC Has More Therapeutic Benefits Than We Thought

CBDenied Thanks to loosening legal constraints , cannabis products have flooded the health and wellness market in recent years. But research on the most effective compounds, doses, and delivery methods for various ailments hasn’t kept up with that surge in products. In an attempt to fill that knowledge gap, a team of researchers tracked nearly 20,000 cannabis sessions by more than 3,000 patients

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Paul Nurse on Brexit: ‘UK is sleepwalking into a disaster’

Paul Nurse on Brexit: ‘UK is sleepwalking into a disaster’ Paul Nurse on Brexit: ‘UK is sleepwalking into a disaster’, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00694-w As departure day approaches, chief of top UK lab says he fears science will drop off the government’s agenda.

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Excellence is overrated. Let’s embrace being good enough instead | André Spicer

Schools, bodies, relationships – this quest to be outstanding can be damaging, even to people who really are outstanding We live in a society obsessed with being exceptional. Whether it is as workers, parents, students, lovers or cooks, we are expected to be outstanding. We must strive to be the best employee, craft an outstanding body, have an amazing relationship, all while being exceptionally h

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Underdog phone makers try to escape shadow of giants at top fair

Vestel, Noa, Lesia… you have probably never heard of these smartphone brands but they are all taking part in the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the mobile industry's biggest annual global event.

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Boeing lands huge British Airways order, after Airbus ends A380

British Airways announced a multi-billion dollar order for up to 42 Boeing 777 fuel-efficient passenger jets on Thursday, just two weeks after Airbus said it would no longer make its A380 superjumbo.

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Zika: Silent long-term circulation in Thailand

In an attempt to shed light on Zika circulation, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with US teams and the Thai National Institute of Health, decided to investigate the history of the Zika virus in Thailand. They discovered that it has been circulating in the country for at least 16 years and probably longer. Their findings were published in The Lancet Infectious Di

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Turning them on, turning them off — how to control stem cells

Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells.

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New sanitation system halves healthcare associated infections and cuts costs by 75 percent

The spread of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals can be limited by sanitation methods that remodulate the hospital microbiota, leading to lower antimicrobial consumption and costs, according to a paper in Infection and Drug Resistance co-authored by two Bocconi University scholars. In particular, an experiment conducted in five Italian hospitals led to a 52 percent decrease in healthcare associ

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Ant societies' arms race: Gene activity in defenders depends on invading slavemaking ants

Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. In a new study, biologists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) examined the special relationship between the parasites and their host and made an exciting discovery: The ability of the host ants to defend themselves depends crucially on whether the raiding slavemakers come from an area with a successful or less s

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Mindfulness could promote positive body image

Making people more aware of their own internal body signals, such as heartbeat or breathing rate, could promote positive body image, according to new research published in the journal Body Image.

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Cell atlas of the aging lung

Aging promotes lung function decline and increases susceptibility to diseases of the respiratory tract. In order to understand these effects in detail, researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research, analyzed the aging process in the lung at single-cell level using AI approaches. They have now presented this atlas of the aging lung in Nature Communicatio

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'Amazing snapshots' plumb volcanic depths

Research shedding light on the internal 'plumbing' of volcanoes may help scientists better understand volcanic eruptions and unrest.The University of Queensland-led study analyzed crystals in Italy's famous Mount Etna to reveal how quickly magma moves to the surface.

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Exiled planet linked to stellar flyby 3 million years ago

Paul Kalas of UC Berkeley was puzzled by the tilted but stable orbit of a planet around a binary star — an orbit like that of our solar system's proposed Planet Nine. He calculated backwards in time to see if any of the 461 nearby stars ever came close enough to perturb the system. One star fit the bill. The stellar flyby 2-3 million years ago likely stabilized the planet's orbit, keeping it from

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Study: Growing up Around Green Space Halves Mental Health Risk

Growing Up Green We already knew that a city’s green space — its parks, sports fields, and other “green” areas — played an important role in the physical and mental health of its citizens. Now, researchers from Denmark’s Aarhus University have found that the amount of green space surrounding a person while they’re growing up might impact their mental health as an adult — an important revelation i

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Kampagne skal få læger til at råbe op

Region Sjælland vil udbrede kendskab til retningslinjer, der forklarer, hvordan medarbejdere skal råbe op ved fejl. Men regionen ved ikke, hvor bredt retningslinjerne er nået ud, siger lægefaglig chef.

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Gig economy platforms causing 'unpaid labour' among workers in developing world

Researchers at the University of Oxford have found that the practice of hiring workers through freelancer platforms like Freelancer.com and Amazon Mechanical Turk is creating unstable working conditions for millions of people in the developing world.

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Facebook, Twitter doing too little against disinformation: EU

Facebook and Twitter are doing too little to scrutinise advertising placements on their sites in the runup to European Union elections in May, despite their pledges to fight disinformation, EU officials said Thursday.

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Cooperativity and entanglement pave way for ground-state cooling using nitrogen vacancy centers

Center for Nanoscale Materials researchers present a quantum model for achieving ground-state cooling in low frequency mechanical resonators and show how cooperativity and entanglement are key factors to enhance the cooling figure of merit.

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Purple or brown? This 3D-printed cup changes colour in different light

A 3D-printed goblet made with gold nanoparticles can look either purple or brown depending on the light, and its colour will never fade

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Self-charging socks could track your exercise and power wearable tech

Socks that charge themselves as you walk using static electricity can count your steps and may also be able to power wearable devices

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Watching lots of TV worsens memory in older people

The more hours of TV people watch the worse their memory is six years later – but the explanation for the link is unclear

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NY startup aims to take on Tesla's Powerwall

Italian entrepreneurs who migrated to Stony Brook University's energy incubator to form an innovative-battery startup are planning to take on the Powerwall of Elon Musk's Tesla Inc.

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How global climate influences sediment input and basin water conditions in a young rift

New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. Young rift basins, such as the Gulf of Corinth, are known to be sensitive rec

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New software application uses artificial intelligence to calculate images of reality based on incomplete data

Advances in the field of metrology have resulted in totally novel instruments the raw data of which needs to be presented in images comprehensible to human beings, which is why Torsten Enßlin's group at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching has been researching information field theory for the past decade. Building upon this theory, the team develops imaging software known as NIFTy

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Huawei racks up 5G deals at top mobile fair despite US pressure

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei racked up a slew of deals to sell 5G equipment at the world's top mobile fair in Spain despite Washington's campaign to convince its allies to bar the firm from their next-generation wireless networks.

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Crocodiles and birds were 'prehistoric bedfellows'

Crocodiles and birds may not seem the most obvious bedfellows, but scientists now say a prehistoric fossil find in Romania suggests that at one time the two species may have shared nests.

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The way teens feel pain can be key to self-harm

Teenagers and young adults who intentionally hurt themselves engage in such behavior based, in part, on how they experience pain and their emotional distress, according to a new study. Non-suicidal self-injury is relatively common in adolescents, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with more than 10 percent of teen boys and about 25 percent of teen girls doing so each yea

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Living together: How legume roots accommodate two distinct microbial partners

University of Tsukuba researchers, collaborating with two other Japanese universities, have revealed a key piece in the complex genetic systems that control how legume roots form close associations (symbioses) with microbial partners that help supply nutrients to the plant. They discovered a gene in the model legume, Lotus japonicus, that is crucial for enabling both nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacte

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Interactive surfaces enter a whole new dimension of flexibility

Researchers at Osaka University propose a novel flexible tube display that is able to take various surface shapes. Information is expressed by streaming colored fluids through the tube and controlling the positions and lengths of the droplets. The tube's flexibility makes it possible to wrap the tube around the surface of an object and present information on its surface that is difficult to expres

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Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University improved the efficiency of a new type of solar cell with a double layer consisting of pure anatase and brookite, two different mineral forms of titanium oxide. Using water-solute brookite nanoparticles, a brookite layer was fabricated on top of anatase, increasing solar cell efficiency by up to 16.82 percent.

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U-M biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards

Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution.

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Researchers identify how metabolites target brain-homing immune cells to treat MS

A newly published paper featured on the March cover of the journal Brain details how metabolites can be used to inhibit epigenetic mechanisms and effectively treat multiple sclerosis and a range of other diseases.

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Reduced salinity of seawater wreaks havoc on coral chemistry

New research confirms that drastic changes in ocean salinity from, for example, severe freshwater flooding, as recently experienced off the coast of north-east Queensland from abnormal monsoonal conditions, provoke a similar stress response in corals as extreme heating, resulting in 'freshwater bleaching' and if unabated, coral death.

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Study: Pesticide exposure contributes to faster ALS progression

A new study helps determine the role of pesticides and pollutants during the course of theprogressive neurodegenerative disease that has no cure.

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New study indicates early-term infants can succeed at breastfeeding

Researchers have determined that healthy premature babies can have as much success breastfeeding as full-term babies.The study, conducted by researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Nursing and the University of Hong Kong, involved 2,700 pairs of mothers and infants and included two different survey groups — one in 2006/07 and another in 2011/12. The mother-infant pairs were monitored from birth t

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Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors play a role in developing steroid diabetes

Researchers at Osaka University focused on glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), the receptors for the body's endogenous steroids, clarifying part of the mechanism behind metabolic disturbances caused by steroids.

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Code used to reduce quantum error in logic gates for first time

Scientists at the University of Sydney have for the first time demonstrated improvement in quantum computers by using codes designed to detect and discard errors in the logic gates of such machines. The codes were applied to IBM's quantum computer via IBM Q.

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It looks like a video game, but it's not. it's a 3-D map of the buildings, roads and land in 1815 baltimore, created by

In the early 1800s, you could walk the city of Baltimore in an evening. Thanks to researchers from UMBC, who have created a 3-D digital model of Baltimore circa 1815, you can see an approximation of what that walk would have looked like—building-by-building, block-by-block.

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How being beautiful influences your attitudes toward sex

People tend to feel strongly about matters of sexual morality, such as premarital sex or gay marriage.

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The Green New Deal is already changing the terms of the climate action debate

What a splendid irony it would be if the enduring legacy of Donald Trump's presidency was the Green New Deal – a radical, government-directed plan to transition the US to a socially just society with a zero-carbon economy.

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For the Elderly, Too Much TV Could Hurt Their Memory

Everything old is new again in TV-land, as it so often is. Last week we learned that kids still watch more television than anything else, and this week a new study comes out confirming what many of us have long suspected: too much TV can rot your mind — if you're over 50. It’s like the 80s never left! Now, to be fair, it’s all couched in the careful language of science, so technically it’s a decli

9h

Popular Porsche SUV to go electric

The next generation of Porsche's popular SUV, the Macan, will be completely electric, company officials announced recently.

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Banedanmark: Risikoen for elektrisk stød på København H er minimal

Banedanmark udskyder sikkerhedsarbejde på Københavns Hovedbanegård på ubestemt tid. Det medfører en »teoretisk risiko« for elektrisk stød, oplyser styrelsen.

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Reformforhandlinger: Radikale sat uden for døren

Efter et bilateralt møde mellem regeringen og Radikale Venstre, er forhandlingerne mellem de to lagt på is. I stedet taler regeringen nu videre med Alternativet og Dansk Folkeparti.

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Researchers observe the reaction of silicate glass with aqueous solutions in real time

Silicate glass has many applications, including use as a nuclear waste form to immobilize radioactive elements from spent fuel. However, it has one disadvantage—it corrodes when it comes into contact with aqueous solutions. Scientists at the University of Bonn were able to observe in detail which processes take place. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Materials.

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Sequencing the white shark genome is cool, but for bigger insights we need libraries of genetic data

The headlines are eye-catching: Scientists have sequenced the genome of white sharks. Or the bamboo lemur, or the golden eagle. But why spend so much time and money figuring out the DNA makeup of different species?

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Unexpected complexity: A 3-D look into plant root relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria

By taking nitrogen out of the air and turning it into plant nutrients, some bacteria help plants like beans, peas, and clovers thrive. How? A study shows that the traditional view of this symbiotic relationship doesn't capture the entire picture. Scientists resolved a 3-D map of the metabolic products of bacteria found in plant root nodules. This spatial perspective could help unravel the overall

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Sequencing the white shark genome is cool, but for bigger insights we need libraries of genetic data

The headlines are eye-catching: Scientists have sequenced the genome of white sharks. Or the bamboo lemur, or the golden eagle. But why spend so much time and money figuring out the DNA makeup of different species?

9h

Unexpected complexity: A 3-D look into plant root relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria

By taking nitrogen out of the air and turning it into plant nutrients, some bacteria help plants like beans, peas, and clovers thrive. How? A study shows that the traditional view of this symbiotic relationship doesn't capture the entire picture. Scientists resolved a 3-D map of the metabolic products of bacteria found in plant root nodules. This spatial perspective could help unravel the overall

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Managing nitrogen to restore water quality in China

Managing nitrogen to restore water quality in China Managing nitrogen to restore water quality in China, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1001-1 Managing nitrogen to restore water quality in China

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'Devotion' Is a Brilliant Videogame—Too Bad You Can't Play It

Following a controversy involving Winnie the Pooh memes, the game is no longer on Steam.

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The Perfect Pair of Pants Is Just a 3D Body Scan Away

A new startup can generate a piece of custom clothing using smartphone photos you snap of your body. And that's just the beginning of the bespoke clothing future.

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Too much television leaves older folk lost for words

UK research indicates staring at the box every night impacts verbal memory. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Watching hours of TV is tied to verbal memory decline in older people

The more television people age 50 and up watched, the worse they recalled a list of words in tests years later, a study finds.

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Hiding black hole found

Astronomers have detected a stealthy black hole from its effects on an interstellar gas cloud. This intermediate mass black hole is one of over 100 million quiet black holes expected to be lurking in our Galaxy. These results provide a new method to search for other hidden black holes and help us understand the growth and evolution of black holes.

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Asian elephants may lose up to 42 percent of suitable habitats in India and Nepal by 2070

Protecting and expanding suitable habitats for wildlife is key to the conservation of endangered species, but owing to climate and land use change the ideal habitats of today may not be fitting in 30 or 50 years. An international team of scientists therefore predicted range shifts of Asian elephants in India and Nepal using species distribution models based on distribution data for the elephants a

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Congenital heart defects vastly increase risk of heart problems later in life

An infant born with a relatively simple heart defect is far more likely to develop heart problems as an adult, researchers have discovered.

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Too-tight membrane keeps cells from splitting

Scientists uncover how one protein keeps conditions 'just right' so that cells can easily divide into two identical daughter cells.

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Many antibiotic courses for common infections not in line with guidelines

Many antibiotic courses prescribed for common infections treated in English primary care (general practices and community services) exceed the recommended guidelines.

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Early use of antibiotics in elderly patients with UTIs associated with reduced risk of sepsis

Prescribing antibiotics immediately for elderly patients with urinary tract infections is linked with a reduced risk of sepsis and death, compared with patients who receive antibiotics in the days following diagnosis, or none at all.

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Asian elephants may lose up to 42 percent of suitable habitats in India and Nepal by 2070

Protecting and expanding suitable habitats for wildlife is key to the conservation of endangered species, but owing to climate and land use change the ideal habitats of today may not be fitting in 30 or 50 years. An international team of scientists therefore predicted range shifts of Asian elephants in India and Nepal using species distribution models based on distribution data for the elephants a

10h

Samsung Electronics doubling current smartphone storage speed

Samsung Electronics today announced that it has begun mass producing the industry's first 512-gigabyte (GB) embedded Universal Flash Storage (eUFS) 3.0 for next-generation mobile devices. In line with the latest eUFS 3.0 specification, the new Samsung memory delivers twice the speed of the previous eUFS storage (eUFS 2.1), allowing mobile memory to support seamless user experiences in future smart

10h

Celgene Complications

Is Bristol-Myers Squibb going to buy Celgene or not? Most such deals go through, but the exceptions are big ones (such as Pfizer’s bid for AstraZeneca). The uncertainty has come in because of yesterday’s announcement from Wellington management, the largest institutional holder of BMY (8% of common shares) that they oppose the deal. You can tell that the markets took this seriously – Celgene’s sto

10h

Intervention with at-risk infants increases children's compliance at age 3

Children who are maltreated often develop problems complying with directions and expectations of parents and other authority figures. Lack of compliance can lead to other problems, including difficulty regulating anger and academic troubles. A new study tested a home-visiting intervention for parents of children referred to Child Protective Services (CPS). The study found that children whose paren

10h

Is alcohol consumption more helpful than harmful? It depends on your age

Studies of health effects of alcohol consumption may underestimate the risks of imbibing, particularly for younger people, according to a new study.

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Over 40 percent of GPs intend to quit within five years: New survey

A new survey of GPs has revealed that over 40 percent intend to leave general practice within the next five years, an increase of nearly a third since 2014.

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Family businesses should prepare for the unexpected if next generation to succeed

Family businesses looking to the next generation to take over need to prepare themselves for unexpected events — such as Brexit — according to researchers. Rather than trying to protect firms from the outside world and excluding non-family members from taking up senior roles, modern family businesses should open themselves up to collaboration and external expertise, experts urge.

10h

Podcast Recap (February 2019): The Alter Ego Effect and the Flexibility of Human Sexuality

The Psychology Podcast recap for February 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Visualizing interconnections among climate risks

Socio-economic activities in the present world have become increasingly interdependent because of rapid technological progress, urbanization, and globalization. Because of these interdependencies between human society and natural ecosystems, climate impacts on one sector may influence other sectors, including seemingly remote ones, which we call "interconnections of climate risks". While a substan

10h

Branding in the age of social media

Brands have to vie with each other to grab our increasingly diminishing attention spans across a much wider range of media, from traditional print and broadcast to the rapidly changing social media that are so readily scrollable. Writing in the International Journal of the Business Environment, one research team explains how it has looked at the impact of social media on brand commitment and teste

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Turning off HSF5 gene leads to less and poorer quality sperm

In research on zebrafish, Örebro researchers have identified a gene that is essential for producing sperm. Results show that fewer and poorer quality sperm are produced when the gene was turned off with the Crispr/Cas9 technique. The next step is to test whether the same is true in humans.

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The car that judges your fitness to drive

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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China is overtaking the U.S. as the leader in artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Turning off HSF5 gene leads to less and poorer quality sperm

In research on zebrafish, Örebro researchers have identified a gene that is essential for producing sperm. Results show that fewer and poorer quality sperm are produced when the gene was turned off with the Crispr/Cas9 technique. The next step is to test whether the same is true in humans.

10h

WSU researcher discovers oldest tattoo tool in western North America

Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. The tool was made around 2,000 years ago by the Ancestral Pueblo people of the Basketmaker II period in what is now southeastern Utah.

10h

How fungi influence global plant colonisation

The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts like a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

10h

Too-tight membrane keeps cells from splitting

Cells divide to grow new tissues or patch up damaged ones, but when cell division goes wrong, it can cause more harm than good. To avoid dire consequences, namely disease and unwanted cell death, cells employ a suite of failsafes to ensure they split evenly, every time. Now, scientists have identified a previously unknown mechanism by which cells accomplish this impressive feat.

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How Parents of Child Influencers Package Their Kids’ Lives for Instagram

Something peculiar happened when Ryker Wixom Googled his name recently. Instead of finding unrelated links and the Facebook accounts of people with similar names, the 8-year-old was greeted with photos of himself as a toddler atop the first page of results. A little farther down was an entry for him on a website called FamousBirthdays.com. A little more scrolling revealed a Daily Mail video of a

10h

How fungi influence global plant colonisation

The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts like a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

10h

Too-tight membrane keeps cells from splitting

Cells divide to grow new tissues or patch up damaged ones, but when cell division goes wrong, it can cause more harm than good. To avoid dire consequences, namely disease and unwanted cell death, cells employ a suite of failsafes to ensure they split evenly, every time. Now, scientists have identified a previously unknown mechanism by which cells accomplish this impressive feat.

10h

Small and medium-sized towns are surprisingly innovative

Small and medium-sized towns are increasingly appearing on the radar of policy makers all over Europe. Findings from a project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation on the role and significance of these towns in Switzerland show that national policy and planning overlook their potential.

10h

Large Hadron Collider upgrade project leaps forward

The U.S. Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project is the Fermilab-led collaboration of U.S. laboratories that, in partnership with CERN and a dozen other countries, is working to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider. LHC AUP began just over two years ago and, on Feb. 11, it received key approvals, allowing the project to transition into its next steps.

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Biofunctionalized ceramics for cranial bone defect repair – in vivo study

Advances in materials science and production technology have enabled bone tissue engineering (BTE) strategies that generate complex scaffolds with controlled architecture for bone repair. The novel biomaterials can be further functionalized with bioactive molecules for biocompatibility by enhancing osteoinductivity (induce osteogenesis to initiate bone healing). In a recent study published in Mult

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Like a boiling frog, humans quickly normalize extreme temperatures

Environment Heat waves are still uncomfortable. But they stop feeling remarkable. We find such the temperature extremes caused by climate change unremarkable after just a few years of repeated events, according to a new study published Monday in…

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Why gene editing could 'make the rich richer and the poor poorer'

Science commentator Anjana Ahuja predicts a move to genetic enhancement

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Cluster reveals inner workings of earth's cosmic particle accelerator

Using unprecedented in-situ data from ESA's Cluster mission, scientists have shed light on the ever-changing nature of Earth's shield against cosmic radiation, its bow shock, revealing how this particle accelerator transfers and redistributes energy throughout space.

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Gene activity in defenders depends on invading slavemaking ants

Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. These tiny social insects neither rear their offspring nor search for food themselves. Instead, they raid nests of another ant species, Temnothorax longispinosus, kidnap their larvae and pupae to bring these back to their own nest. Once these have reached adulthood, the abducted ants must feed the brood of the slavemaking s

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Researchers study mechanical properties of mammoth ivory from the Siberian permafrost soils

For the first time, scientists from the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena and the Senckenberg Research Station for Quaternary Palaeontology Weimar conducted a detailed comparison of the mechanical properties of mammoth ivory from the Siberian permafrost soils and the ivory from modern African elephants. In their study, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, the team of scientists s

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Scientists measure exact edge between superconducting and magnetic states

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a method to accurately measure the "exact edge" or onset at which a magnetic field enters a superconducting material. The knowledge of this threshold— called the lower critical field— plays a crucial role in untangling the difficulties that have prevented the broader use of superconductivity in new technologies.

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Clues to possible Martian life found in Chilean desert

A robotic rover deployed in the most Mars-like environment on Earth, the Atacama Desert in Chile, has successfully recovered subsurface soil samples during a trial mission to find signs of life. The samples contained unusual and highly specialized microbes that were distributed in patches, which was linked to the scarce availability of water and nutrients. These findings will aid the search for ev

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Psychiatry: Case notes indicate impending seclusion

Using notes made by the attending healthcare professionals about psychiatric patients enables impending coercive measures to be predicted in advance — potentially even through automated text analysis.

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Gene activity in defenders depends on invading slavemaking ants

Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. These tiny social insects neither rear their offspring nor search for food themselves. Instead, they raid nests of another ant species, Temnothorax longispinosus, kidnap their larvae and pupae to bring these back to their own nest. Once these have reached adulthood, the abducted ants must feed the brood of the slavemaking s

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Untangling the Ties between Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Autism and OCD frequently accompany each other; scientists are studying both to understand how they differ — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pinning Down Uncertainty

Cynthia Flores describes how Heisenberg’s famous principle has shaped her mathematical career and worldview — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Your period tracking app could tell Facebook when you're pregnant. An 'algorithmic guardian' could stop it

Most of us know tech platforms such as Facebook and Google track, store and make money from our data. But there are constantly new revelations about just how much of our privacy has been chipped away.

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University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

Penn State search for extraterrestrial intelligence center could boost underfunded field

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Ny mekanism för bentillväxt upptäckt

Tillväxt hos barn är beroende av så kallade tillväxtplattor som ligger nära ändarna av alla långa ben i kroppen. Dessa tillväxtplattor består av broskceller (kondrocyter) som bildar en form av byggnadsställning som stödjer bildandet av ny benvävnad. Broskcellerna genereras från stamcellsliknande förfäderceller. För att långa ben ska kunna växa krävs att broskceller genereras konstant under hela t

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Coding drops quantum computing error rate by order of magnitude

Australian breakthrough brings workable quantum computers a big step closer. Alan Duffy reports.

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A bat, released

The flying mammals are incredibly fuel-efficient, researchers find.

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Study claiming prejudice leads to early death for gay people retracted

A coding error rendered findings null, and efforts to fix things have ended. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Is yeast a potential cannabinoid powerhouse?

Genetic modification leads to natural and synthetic compounds, without the need to grow a marijuana crop. Samantha Page reports.

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World's most heavily trafficked turtle plays vital role in Indonesia environment, economy

The Southeast Asian box turtle is the most heavily trafficked turtle in the world – captured and sold to China for food and medicine and for the pet trade in the United States, Japan and Europe. But little was known about its ecology until a University of Rhode Island herpetologist spent six months studying the animal's habits and habitat last year.

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Researchers discover oldest tattoo tool in western North America

Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America.

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A Second Life for the 'Do Not Track' Setting—With Teeth

In recent years, the setting has been criticized as being essentially meaningless. But it might have a crucial role to play in enforcing privacy regulations.

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Image of the Day: Shark Fitbits

To track the behavior of blacktip sharks, researchers are equipping them with radios and satellite sensors.

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Untangling the Ties between Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Autism and OCD frequently accompany each other; scientists are studying both to understand how they differ — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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World's most heavily trafficked turtle plays vital role in Indonesia environment, economy

The Southeast Asian box turtle is the most heavily trafficked turtle in the world – captured and sold to China for food and medicine and for the pet trade in the United States, Japan and Europe. But little was known about its ecology until a University of Rhode Island herpetologist spent six months studying the animal's habits and habitat last year.

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How to create your own AI lab?

If one were to get into the AI business, without any outside help or involvement from governments or companies or universities, how to do it? AI from your garage if you will. submitted by /u/sanem48 [link] [comments]

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Why storage and handling are to blame for Uganda's poor quality seed

The quality of purchased seeds, such as maize, groundnuts and others, is a major concern in Uganda.

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Bat flight model can inspire smarter, nimbler drones

Bats are among nature's best flyers—able to fly for long periods of time, maneouvre in mid-air with pinpoint precision and get into some very tight spaces. However, scientists have not fully understood exactly how bats manage to fly so well, until now.

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Raindrop size distributions vary across seasons and rain types

Precipitation and raindrop size distribution (DSD) characteristics in East China vary across seasons and rain types, according to Prof. Kun Zhao, Distinguished Scientist at the Key Laboratory of Mesoscale Severe Weather of the Ministry of Education and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, and one of the authors of a recently published study.

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Rolls-Royce pulls out of race to power future Boeing plane

Rolls-Royce no longer wishes to be a candidate to make the engine for a new midsize passenger jet proposed by US planemaker Boeing, the troubled British group said Thursday.

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Mayan Artifacts Used in Ritual Sacrifices Discovered at the Bottom of Sacred Lake

The sunken artifacts include ceremonial bowls and obsidian blades that may have been used in ancient animal sacrifices.

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Amazon taking action to help brands fight against fake goods

Amazon is providing a tool that will allow brands to remove listings from its site that they consider to be for counterfeit goods.

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Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night

Stay overnight on an Antarctic ice shelf, and you may feel the shaking from thousands of tiny quakes as the ice re-forms after melting during the day.

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Connecting food waste and sanitation services can help African farmers

African agriculture is fundamental to supporting rural livelihoods and bolstering economic growth, and can benefit from technology and advances in other development sectors. One solution to help Africa's agriculture can come from an unlikely sector: sanitation.

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After Raising the Stakes for North Korea Summit, Trump Walks Away

Updated at 4:05 p.m. ET on February 28, 2019. The expectations were enormous: Perhaps Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un would, at a summit in Vietnam, finally declare an end to the Korean War, establish liaison offices in each other’s capitals, and trade the destruction of North Korea’s main nuclear facility for the easing of some sanctions against Pyongyang. There was a palpable sense that history wa

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Diabetesprofessor modtager Eliteforsk-pris

Professor og overlæge Niels Jessen får Eliteforsk-pris for sin forskning inden for behandling af type 2-diabetes.

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Kvalitetsproblem bromsar hajpade nanomaterial

– Kolatomerna måste sitta helt perfekt i en välordnad kristallstruktur över stora avstånd, men det gör det inte i de kommersiellt tillgängliga materialen som finns på marknaden idag, säger Krister Svensson, docent i fysik vid Karlstads universitet. Kolbaserade nanomaterial som grafen och kolnanorör har länge spåtts en lysande framtid på grund av deras speciella egenskaper, såsom hög elektrisk och

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Only half of packaging waste is recycled – here's how to do better

Almost half of Australia's packaging waste is not being recovered for recycling, according to the first comprehensive study to track the fate of used packaging materials.

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500-million-year-old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada

Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago—evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Researchers find mechanism that regulates telomeres

The tips of chromosomes have structures called telomeres comparable to the plastic cover at the end of shoelaces. They work as a protective cap that prevents genetic material from unfolding and corroding. When telomeres do not work properly, the total erosion of genetic material can occur, triggering cancer and age-related diseases. In a study now published in the EMBO Journal, a research team fro

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Interactive surfaces enter a whole new dimension of flexibility

An "interactive surface" refers to an interface whose input and output share a common surface that can be manipulated intuitively with the fingers. However, ordinary multi-touch displays, e.g., liquid crystal displays (LCD), can only provide two-dimensional information, limiting expressions and interactions with such displays to the surface. Novel three-dimensional display systems have been propos

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New technique for precise estimates of trends in ozone and other atmospheric constituents

Ozone is an atmospheric constituent that affects not only human health but also vegetation, especially annual crops. Thus, ozone can impact land and water use. Detecting increases and declines in ozone and other constituents within a certain area or timeframe is hard. Why? The ozone signal is swamped by natural variations or cycles. Now, researchers developed a method to optimize the air quality s

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Big pharma is embracing open-access publishing like never before

Big pharma is embracing open-access publishing like never before Big pharma is embracing open-access publishing like never before, Published online: 28 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00610-2 Proportion of open-access publications with authors from the pharmaceutical industry doubled between 2009 and 2016.

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Researchers find mechanism that regulates telomeres

The tips of chromosomes have structures called telomeres comparable to the plastic cover at the end of shoelaces. They work as a protective cap that prevents genetic material from unfolding and corroding. When telomeres do not work properly, the total erosion of genetic material can occur, triggering cancer and age-related diseases. In a study now published in the EMBO Journal, a research team fro

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Universitetsalliance skal skabe europæiske uddannelser

Københavns Universitet bliver nu medlem af universitetsalliancen 4EU+, der skal uddanne europæere,…

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Innovationsfonden etablerer whistleblowerordning

En af Danmarks største bidragsydere til dansk forskning, Innovationsfonden, har oprettet en anonym whistleblowerordning, hvor modtagere af fondens midler kan tippe om mistanke om svindel, bestikkelse eller sexchikane

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Microsoft-ansatte nægter at udvikle HoloLens-briller til militær brug

Åbent brev til Microsofts ledelse kræver annullering af kontrakt med det amerikanske militær.

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Jeg er ikke ansat til at rydde op

Pernille Blach Hansens forgænger som regionsdirektør i Midtjylland blev tvunget af posten på grund af »udfordringer mellem ledelse og medarbejdere«. Den nye kvinde i front vil se fremad og »signalere noget ro«.

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Newfound 'FarFarOut' Is Most Distant Solar System Body Ever Seen

Astronomers just discovered an object, dubbed FarFarOut, that lies 140 astronomical units from the sun. That's 140 times the Earth-sun distance, which is about 93 million miles (150 million kilometers).

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Doctors Often Miss Colorectal Cancer in Younger Adults, New Study Suggests

In recent years, there's been an alarming rise in colorectal cancer cases among young adults

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50 years ago, people thought MSG caused ‘Chinese restaurant syndrome’

In the 1960s, people blamed monosodium glutamate in Chinese food for making them sick, but the claim hasn't stood up to time or science.

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Earthbound NASA Rover Uncovers Clues to Finding Life on Mars

A NASA rover deployed to Chile’s Atacama desert has discovered microbes in one of the most Mars-like environments on Earth. It could prove helpful in the search for life on Red Planet. The life that the rover found was adapted to extremely salty environments, much like those on Mars. Scientists also say the life was patchy, which they expected and called a basic rule of ecology. That's because nut

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Maze Therapeutics raises $191m in genetic modifiers push

Biotech start-up to use money to fund clinical trials in 3 disease areas

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How to Make YouTube Kids Safer for Your Kids

YouTube's filters won't catch every disturbing video, but it does offer settings to better control what kids watch online. Here’s how to use them.

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Post-Apocalyptic Insurers Try Out a New 'Make it Rain' Strategy

These disaster insurers don't want to hear your story. They just want to drop a flat cash payout, no matter how much—or little—you suffered.

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The secret to a new drug could be hiding in your genes

Companies are searching gene databases for people whose DNA says they should be very sick, but who aren’t.

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History’s Treatment of Black Inventors Has Evolved. But It’s Still Imperfect.

Our representations of black scientists and inventors have evolved over the past century to meet the pressing needs of an African American community fighting for racial equality and liberation. But we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that these inventors were more than the sum of their inventions.

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Don't You Dare Call It Meat

The M-word applied to plant-based substitutes is making people who produce the real thing very nervous — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the Universe Remembers Information – Issue 69: Patterns

It was one of the great missed connections of physics. In 1965 a particle theorist derived a formula for the collision of elementary particles. Twenty years later two gravitation theorists, using completely different techniques, derived a formula for the collision of stars or black holes. And they were the same formula. The only difference was that the first used “ p ” to denote momentum and the

12h

The Math That Takes Newton Into the Quantum World – Issue 69: Patterns

In my 50s, too old to become a real expert, I have finally fallen in love with algebraic geometry. As the name suggests, this is the study of geometry using algebra. Around 1637, René Descartes laid the groundwork for this subject by taking a plane, mentally drawing a grid on it, as we now do with graph paper, and calling the coordinates x and y . We can write down an equation like x2 + y2 = 1, a

12h

The Deadly Plant Sneeze – Issue 69: Patterns

A summer rain falling on a barley field is the very picture of vitality. The shower softens the dry ground; crops grow tall; grain fattens and is harvested to make bread, or beer, or feed for livestock. But zoom in close and you may witness a strikingly different scene: The same raindrops that bestow life can also spread disease and death. Just as the common cold can travel through a handshake or

12h

Image: Electron backscatter diffraction view of hybrid 3-D-printed metal part

A colourful microscopic view of a single piece of space-quality Inconel super alloy processed using two different 3-D printing techniques; this is a close-up of the boundary layer between them.

12h

Immunizing quantum computers against errors

Building a quantum computer requires reckoning with errors—in more than one sense. Quantum bits, or "qubits," which can take on the logical values zero and one simultaneously, and thus carry out calculations faster, are extremely susceptible to perturbations. A possible remedy for this is quantum error correction, which means that each qubit is represented redundantly in several copies, such that

12h

A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other

Electricity can be generated by renewable sources such as sunlight and wind, then used to split water, which makes hydrogen as a fuel for emerging energy devices such as fuel cells. Because hydrogen is a clean fuel, researchers are putting a lot of effort into developing water-splitting catalysts, which are essential for the reaction's energy efficiency.

12h