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Nyheder2019januar01

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is an effective treatment for breast cancer, yet some patients develop metastasis in spite of it. Researchers at EPFL have discovered that chemotherapy-treated mammary tumors produce small vesicles that may help them spread to other organs. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology.

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Judith Rich Harris, Who Played Down the Role of Parents, Dies at 80

It’s not that parents don’t matter in how their child turns out, she said, but genes and their peer groups play a greater role.

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Leafcutter ants have their own landfill sites that emit greenhouse gas

Ants that grow fungi inside their nests also make their own landfills – and these release significant amounts of nitrous oxide

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Intel’s quest to build the world’s first true quantum computer

James Clarke, of Intel’s quantum computing research team, tells New Scientist about his ambitions to make the first device with a million qubits

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NASA spacecraft opens new year 4 billion miles from EarthNASA New Horizons UT

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has survived the most distant exploration of another world, a tiny, icy object 4 billion miles away that looks to be shaped like a peanut or bowling pin.

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New Horizons successfully explores Ultima ThuleNASA New Horizons UT

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past Ultima Thule in the early hours of New Year's Day, ushering in the era of exploration from the enigmatic Kuiper Belt, a region of primordial objects that holds keys to understanding the origins of the solar system.

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'We have a healthy spacecraft': NASA succeeds in historic flyby of faraway worldNASA New Horizons UT

NASA rang in the New Year on Tuesday with a historic flyby of the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever explored by humankind—a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule—in the hopes of learning more about how planets took shape.

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Take Your Pills When Your Genes Are Most Active

Drugs could be more effective if taken when the genetic proteins they target are most active — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It's official: NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has made historyNASA New Horizons UT

Space Visiting the most distant object ever. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, which visited Pluto back in 2015, has successfully completed a flyby of 2014 MU69.

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NASA Hits Its New Year’s Target at the Edge of the Solar System

After Pluto was discovered, in 1930, astronomers wondered whether the solar system stopped there. For decades, they peered through their best telescopes, searching for hints of more objects in the darkness. In the early 1990s, when telescope technology became powerful enough, they found one . The object was thousands of times fainter than Pluto, but it was there. A few months later, they found an

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New Horizons: Nasa probe survives flyby of Ultima Thule

The New Horizons spacecraft confirms its "healthy" status after a historic encounter with an icy world.

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Biggest archaeological dig in Europe will uncover UK’s buried history

The construction of a high-speed train line, HS2, is allowing archaeologists to search for Romans, plague victims and even mammoths

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Books are good for your brain. These techniques will help you read more.

DIY Turn yourself into a bookworm. Want to kick off the New Year with a new habit? Reading is a great way to relax, strengthen your brain, and improve your health. Here’s how to fit more books into your…

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NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation

One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. This research suggests for the first time that Actin is critical in regulating the genome during 'neurogenesis' — which involves the formation of 'neurons' or nerve cells. The methodology employed in this study will enable researchers to model

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Thriving on teamwork: new research shows how brain cells filter information in groups

For decades, scientists studying the visual system thought that individual brain cells, called neurons, operate as filters. Some neurons would prefer coarse details of the visual scene and ignore fine details, while others would do the opposite. Every neuron was thought to do its own filtering. A new study led by Salk Institute researchers reveals that the same neurons that prefer coarse details c

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Researchers discover a metamaterial with inherently robust sound transport

Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and at the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a metamaterial that can transport sound in unusually robust ways along its edges and localize it at its corners.

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Community-based HIV testing effective in reaching undiagnosed populations, new study finds

Results from a PATH-led evaluation study in Vietnam demonstrate that HIV testing by lay providers is an effective approach to reach people at risk of HIV who have never been tested or test infrequently. Key at-risk populations include people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, female sex workers, and first-time HIV testers.

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A new 'atlas' of genetic influences on osteoporosis

A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density (BMD), one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis. The paper, published in Nature Genetics, identifies 518 genome-wide loci, of which 301 are newly di

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Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits

Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, quantum coherence of a graphene-based superconducting qubit, meaning how long it stays in superposition to compute with two logical states simultaneously. The work is a key step forward for practical quantum computing.

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Early protostar already has a warped disk

Using observations from the ALMA radio observatory in Chile, researchers have observed, for the first time, a warped disk around an infant protostar that formed just several tens of thousands of years ago. This implies that the misalignment of planetary orbits in many planetary systems — including our own — may be caused by distortions in the planet-forming disk early in their existence.

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Wireless 'pacemaker for the brain' could offer new treatment for neurological disorders

A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's.

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Don't go breaking my heart

For the first time, engineers have demonstrated an electronic device to closely monitor beating heart cells without affecting their behavior. A collaboration between the University of Tokyo, Tokyo Women’s Medical University and RIKEN in Japan produced a functional sample of heart cells with a soft nanomesh sensor in direct contact with the tissue. This device could aid study of other cells, organs

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Smelling in tiny houses: how ciliary electric currents keep olfaction reliable

Scientists have used a combination of mathematical modeling, electrophysiology, and computer simulations to explain how cells communicate effectively in highly constricted spaces such as the olfactory cilia, where odor detection takes place. The findings will inform future studies of cellular signaling and communication in the olfactory system and also in other confined spaces of the nervous syste

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Canagliflozin not associated with increased risk for fracture

Compared with a glucagon-line peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, canagliflozin was not associated with an increased risk for fracture in patients with type 2 diabetes at relatively low risk for fracture. Findings from a multidatabase cohort study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Horizons spacecraft homing in on Kuiper Belt targetNASA New Horizons UT

Only hours from completing a historic flyby of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69, nicknamed Ultima Thule, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is on course and ready to gather scientific data on the small object's geology, composition, atmosphere and more. Closest approach takes place in the early morning hours of New Year's Day — 12:33 a.m. EST — marking the event as the most distant exploration of worlds

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The Best Comics of 2018: 'Sabrina', 'Crowded', and More

They're not all books about superheroes, by the way.

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4 Dark Matter Searches to Watch in 2019

As 2019 nears, physicists are hard at work on the next generation of dark matter detectors, and on parsing confusing data from detectors that already exist.

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Archaeology Discoveries to Watch for in 2019

We may find what’s hiding inside the Great Pyramid. And also tablets from a lost city in Iraq, and lost Faberge eggs from the Russian royal family. Stay tuned.

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Everything you've ever wanted to know about muscles

Health Building them, tearing them, repairing them, eating them. Welcome to PopSci’s Muscle Month! We’re kicking off the season with an FAQ on all things muscle-related.

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Editorial: A proposal to correct minority underrepresentation in clinical trials

In an editorial in CNS Spectrums, a neurologists takes the research community to task for its lack of minority representation in Phase III clinical trials for drugs to treat Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and proposes changes to the system.

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Children Are Using Emoji for Digital-Age Language Learning

When preliterate kids type strings of emoji, it may seem like a random act. But when exposed to the rhythm of texts, kids discover how to communicate.

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It’s very bad news that common viruses are affected by climate change

No one knew climate change would affect viruses that spread from person to person, but it does. For the eighth of our 12 Days of Culture we look at how disease may change

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‘Genesis 2.0’ Review: How to Clone a Mammoth

Is it possible to bring back the mammoth? The documentary “Genesis 2.0” investigates.

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Tor Is Easier Than Ever. Time to Give It a Try

Been curious about Tor but worried it's too complicated to use? Good news: The anonymity service is more accessible than ever.

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NASA rings in New Year with historic flyby of faraway worldNASA New Horizons UT

NASA rang in the New Year on Tuesday with a historic flyby of the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever explored by humankind—a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule—in the hopes of learning more about how planets took shape.

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Ondt i håret? Det sker der i din krop, når du har tømmermænd

Dit hoved, din lever og din mavesæk er på overarbejde, når du har tømmermænd.

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Study suggests that 'actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation

A new NYU Abu Dhabi study suggests for the first time that actin, which is a cytoskeleton protein found in the cell, is critical to regulating the genome—the genetic material of an organism—during the formation of "neurons" or nerve cells. The study was published today in PLOS Genetics.

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Scientists: 'Time is ripe' to use big data for planet-sized plant questions

A group of Florida Museum of Natural History scientists has issued a "call to action" to use big data to tackle longstanding questions about plant diversity and evolution and forecast how plant life will fare on an increasingly human-dominated planet.

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Unmuting large silent genes lets bacteria produce new molecules, potential drug candidates

By enticing away the repressors dampening unexpressed, silent genes in Streptomyces bacteria, researchers at the University of Illinois have unlocked several large gene clusters for new natural products, according to a study published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.

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America, Meet Your (Acting) Secretary of Defense

It hasn’t received much attention, what with Donald Trump suddenly declaring victory against ISIS , ordering U.S. troops out of Syria, and provoking James Mattis to resign in protest. But the man who is now the president’s principal adviser on the nation’s defense, tasked with leading the largest employer in the world and managing the fallout from Trump’s military retrenchment, has less experienc

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How Trump Can Challenge China

President Donald Trump has good reason to denounce China’s tolerance of intellectual-property theft and various other trade abuses, as even his harshest critics will acknowledge. And there are tentative signs that U.S. negotiators are securing concessions from Beijing on market access for U.S. firms and the protection of their intellectual property. But a face-saving deal along these lines won’t

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What the Believers Are Denying

For two years, they formed a community of experts, about 1,000 in all, including 300 leading climate scientists inside and outside 13 federal agencies. For two years, they volunteered their time and expertise to produce the Fourth National Climate Assessment. There is no parallel process to tackle the questions I study; there is no ongoing national racial assessment mandated by a law summarizing

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The Modern Dignity of an Uncontacted Tribe

By some estimates , there are more than 100 “uncontacted tribes” in Brazil, mostly in the western reaches of the Amazon rainforest. These are indigenous peoples who live beyond the direct control, and sometimes knowledge, of the Brazilian state. Their groups vary in size but are, in many cases, quite small. Researchers from FUNAI —the Brazilian government agency that upholds indigenous rights— re

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Genanvendt plast: 2019 kommer til at rykke på fødevareområdet

Materialeskift i fødevareemballage bliver vejen til cirkulær økonomi for plastindustrien, men samtidig skal markedet også støttes politisk, mener Færch Plast A/S og Plastindustrien.

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Jordan Peterson: The fatal flaw lurking in American leftist politics

What is political extremism? Professor of psychology Jordan Peterson points out that America knows what right-wing radicalism looks like: white nationalism. "What's interesting is that on the conservative side of the spectrum, we've figured out how to box-in the radicals and say, 'No, you're outside the domain of acceptable opinion,'" says Peterson. But where's that line for the Left? There is no

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Could Exercising In Frigid Temperatures Make Us Healthier?

As a freezing winter drives many of us indoors, some extreme athletes embrace the cold as a great way to burn calories and retrain the immune system while working out. Not so fast, physiologists say. (Image credit: NurPhoto/Getty Images)

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China's Lunar Lander To Explore Moon's Far Side

Early in 2019, China hopes to land a rover — the first soft landing on the moon's far side. The mission is exploratory, and will lay groundwork for a trip by Chinese astronauts to the lunar surface. (Image credit: NASA/Goddard)

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Den store tømmermændsguide: Sådan overlever du 1. januar

Ligger du på langs med ondt i hovedet? Så er der her gode råd til, hvordan du kan lindre de frygtelige tømmermænd.

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Vietnam's draconian cybersecurity bill comes into effect

A law requiring internet companies in Vietnam to remove content communist authorities deem to be against the state came into effect Tuesday, in a move critics called "a totalitarian model of information control".

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NASA spacecraft opens new year at tiny, icy world past PlutoNASA New Horizons UT

The NASA spacecraft that yielded the first close-up views of Pluto opened the new year at an even more distant world, a billion miles beyond.

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Smelling in tiny houses: How ciliary electric currents keep olfaction reliable

Imagine trying to figure out how something works when that something takes place in a space smaller than a femtoliter: one quadrillionith of a liter. Now, two scientists with a nose for solving mysteries have used a combination of mathematical modeling, electrophysiology, and computer simulations to explain how cells communicate effectively in highly constricted spaces such as the olfactory cilia,

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Spørg Fagfolket: Skøjter man langsommere tæt ved havoverfladen?

En læser undrer sig over en udtalelse ved et vinter-OL, hvor det blev konstateret, at hastighedsrekorder blev slået i bjergene. Er det sandt? Det svarer speedskater på.

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Rocket Launches, Trips to the Moon and More Space and Astronomy Events in 2019

A busy year in space just ended, and this one will be full of new highlights in orbit and beyond.

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James Watson Won’t Stop Talking About Race

The Nobel-winning biologist has drawn global criticism with unfounded pronouncements on genetics, race and intelligence. He still thinks he’s right, a new documentary finds.

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A Rising Threat to Wildlife: Electrocution

Power lines and electrified fences are killing birds, monkeys, pangolins and even elephants in surprising numbers.

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Autism Revisited

Is there an autism epidemic? Why was autism rare in the past? This book tries to answer those questions with a historical and sociological approach and suggests deinstitutionalization was a key factor.

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Paleoart

See an update from Chicago's Field Museum about the works of Charles R. Knight and other paleoartists who pioneered the depiction of ancient life.

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Paleoart

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The Search for a Hangover Cure

Meet the author of a new book that explores the past, present, and future of research into how to salve the alcohol-addled brain and body.

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Like a Sturgeon

Watch scenes from the Maumee River in Ohio, where researchers are stocking an ancient fish species that is struggling against extinction

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Like a Sturgeon

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Frogs Have a Bioelectric Mirror

Amputation of one limb triggers a rapid electric response that reflects the injury in the opposite one, researchers find.

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Competition and Cooperation of Cheese Rind Microbes Exposed

Transposon mutagenesis give scientists a rare look at the most important interactions within microbial communities.

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Mitochondria Play an Unexpected Role in Killing Bacteria

The energy-producing organelles also send out parcels with antimicrobial compounds to help destroy pathogen invaders in macrophages.

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Taming the Transposon Hordes

Researchers repurpose the CRISPR machinery to turn whole classes of transposable elements on or off.

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Infographic: How Cities Influence Evolution

Urban environments are driving genetic changes in resident species through multiple mechanisms, from establishing gene flow barriers to exerting novel selection pressures.

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Infographic: How Exposure to Cannabis in Utero Affects Development

Rodent and human studies have revealed a multitude of effects starting during gestation and lasting into adulthood.

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Jorge Henao-Mejia Explores the Immune System’s Controls

By tying together his understanding of the microbiome and nucleic acids, the UPenn immunologist is decoding the underlying causes of inflammation and disease.

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Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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January 2019 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

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Infographic: How Macrophage Mitochondria Help Destroy Pathogens

Researchers have uncovered a mechanism whereby macrophages employ their energy-generating organelles to aid in bacterial killing.

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T-cell Tracker: A Profile of Wendy Havran

By uncovering novel properties of a unique population of T cells, the Scripps Research Institute immunologist has helped to redefine the immune cells, uncovering their role in wound healing.

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Serotonin Neurons Implicated in SIDS

Inhibiting nerve cells that produce the neurotransmitter made it harder for baby mice to recover from bouts of slowed breathing.

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The "Science" of Hangovers

As advanced as humans are, we still don't have a handle on how to tame our response to a night of drinking.

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Painting Dinosaurs, early 20th century

Charles R. Knight's illustrations shaped the public's view of prehistoric life.

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Researchers Aim to Reestablish an Ancient Fish in an Ohio River

The sturgeon restoration study's outcome won't be known for decades.

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The Open Data Explosion

Scientists are working to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of sharing.

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Genome Editing on Board

2018 closed with hubbub surrounding the purported birth of babies whose genomes had been edited using CRISPR.

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Infographic: Controlling Transposons En Masse

Researchers repurpose the CRISPR machinery to turn whole classes of transposable elements on or off.

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Researchers Engineer Epigenome Editors to Study How Gene Expression Affects Disease

Using CRISPR and other tools, scientists are modifying DNA methylation, histone marks, and other modifiers of gene expression to understand how they affect health and disease.

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Researchers Track Sharks and Whales Using DNA in Seawater Samples

In addition to detecting unseen organisms in the ocean, studies of environmental DNA can shed light on the genetic structure of marine populations.

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Researchers Explore the Genetics of Eating Disorders

Large-scale genomic studies of anorexia and bulimia are turning up clues about the conditions’ development and persistence.

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Prenatal Exposure to Cannabis Affects the Developing Brain

Children born to moms who smoked or ingested marijuana during pregnancy suffer higher rates of depression, hyperactivity, and inattention.

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Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?

Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology.

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Science Happens: Pioneering DIY Discoveries

Where would we be without flow cytometry? With this poster, learn about some of the "aha!" moments that came about thanks to researchers having access to a flow cytometer at the right time!

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Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution

From changes in gene flow to adaptation, the effects of urbanization are shaping the evolutionary trajectories of plants and animals.

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The Mystery of Sleep

The reason we need sleep has long mystified scientists, but it’s crystal clear that we do need it. In fact, the more we learn about what happens while we snooze, the more we discover new… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space probe Osiris-Rex makes closest ever orbit of smallest ever object

Nasa sampling mission skims a mile above tiny asteroid Bennu where it will try to land and collect samples The Nasa spacecraft Osiris-Rex has gone into orbit around an ancient asteroid, setting a pair of records. Osiris-Rex spacecraft entered orbit on Monday around Bennu, 70m miles (110m kilometres) from Earth. It is the smallest celestial body ever to be orbited by a spacecraft, at just 500 metr

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NASA’s New Horizons Spacecraft Signals Successful Flyby of Ultima Thule, the Most Distant Object Ever VisitedNASA New Horizons UT

Now scientists await pictures and a bounty of new data about a small, mysterious icy body four billion miles from Earth.

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Watch live as NASA spends New Year's Eve exploring the mysterious outer regions of our solar systemNASA New Horizons UT

Space It's time to meet 2014 MU69. Tonight, scientists around the world are spending the holiday waiting to hear news of a historic space event.

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Recycling: Where is the plastic waste mountain?

A year ago China imposed a ban on waste imports, so what's happened to the UK's plastic?

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Science News from around the Planet

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Germany to Rwanda, including one on the discovery of the world's oldest known brewery, discovered in Israel. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Atlantic Daily: She’s Running

(Photo by David Goldman / AP) What We’re Following 10 new factors that will shape the Democratic primar y ( Edward-Isaac Dovere ) A pundit president, impeachment fever, grappling with the Obama legacy, and more. → Read on. Elizabeth Warren doesn’t want to be Hillary 2.0 ( Edward-Isaac Dovere ) “Operatives working for several other Democratic candidates about to make their own announcements have i

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In Screening for Suicide Risk, Facebook Takes On Tricky Public Health Role

Some doctors warn that Facebook is becoming an arbiter of users’ mental distress without proving that its efforts are accurate, effective or safe.

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Known as the ‘mother of Hubble,’ astronomer Nancy Roman dies at 93

Astronomer Nancy Roman, the “mother of Hubble,” has died.

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2018 Was a Year to Forget. Really.

Our memory for the details of real-life events is poor, according to a recent study . Seven MIT students took a one hour walk through Cambridge, MA. A day later, they were presented with one second video clips they may or may not have seen during their walk (the “ foils ” were taken from another person's recording). Mean recognition accuracy was 55.7%, barely better than guessing. 1 Minimal recog

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I built a sniffing machine to protect dogs

Science Canines can detect poachers' contraband, but the job puts them in danger. To find illegal animal products, customs officials rely on trained dogs at ports. To keep the pooches out of harm's way, I built a smell-sucking machine so they can…

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Nonfiction: A Book That Will Make You Terrified of Your Own House

Rob Dunn’s “Never Home Alone” catalogs the world of microbial beings that share our living space and inhabit our showerheads and pillowcases.

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New Year’s Eve Photos: Welcoming 2019

Festive and colorful images from Australia, China, the United States, Spain, and many other countries around the world as people greet the new year with fireworks, polar-bear swims, traditional festivals, and solemn observations

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The Leaked Louis C.K. Set Is Tragedy Masked as Comedy

A little over a year ago, Louis C.K. published a statement in The New York Times , after several women had come forward to confirm the rumors that had, for years, been swirling around him . “These stories are true,” he wrote, expressing regret for several instances of sexual misconduct and suggesting that the acts being made public would be a turning point for him. His confession concluded with c

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Young people’s blood is being tested as a treatment for Parkinson’s

The Californian firm Alkahest has begun a trial to see if injections of an extract of younger adults’ blood can improve Parkinson’s symptoms in older people

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American Health Care Worker Monitored for Ebola Symptoms

The person, whose identity has not been revealed, may have been exposed to the virus in Democratic Republic of Congo and is now at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

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Elizabeth Warren Doesn’t Want to Be Hillary 2.0

An odd thing happened to the woman who came onto the scene as an anti-banking, anti-establishment, burn-down-the-castle revolutionary: Elizabeth Warren became the castle. In the past few years, she raised millions of dollars to build a political machine. She began talking up policy issues beyond the bread-and-butter economic proposals she became famous for. She bolstered her foreign-policy creden

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Happy new year! Count down to our #1 story of 2018

Happy new year and thanks for reading! To close out 2018, here are the 10 most popular stories we published in 2018. 10. TO BETTER ENJOY YOUR JOB, COMPLAIN MORE? The team that gripes together, sticks together . 9. 3-YEAR-OLD GIRL HAS ALL-NEW GENETIC SYNDROME “It’s likely that other cases will be discovered now .” 8. NEW A.I. APPLICATION CAN WRITE ITS OWN CODE “The days when a programmer could wri

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Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits

Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit—meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously. The demonstration, which used a new kind of graphene-based qubit, represents a critical step forward for practical quantum computing, the researchers say.

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Researchers discover a metamaterial with inherently robust sound transport

Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and at the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a metamaterial that can transport sound in unusually robust ways along its edges and localize it at its corners.

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Did you solve it? 2019 in numbers

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you the following puzzles about the number 2019 1) Date jam Continue reading…

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Remembering Riccardo Giacconi: A Titan of the Heroic Age of Astronomy

On the occasion of his passing, we honor a man for all seasons and an astronomer for all wavelengths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The immune system's fountain of youth

Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.

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Bats in Sierra Leone Carry Marburg Virus

It's the first time the deadly pathogen has been found in West Africa.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Season of Turmoil

One of the nation’s top cancer hospitals has grappled with how to bring breakthrough treatments to market while remaining true to its mission.

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When Doctors Serve on Company Boards

Some hospital executives and cancer researchers sit on the boards of publicly traded companies, raising questions about whether their dual roles create a conflict of interest.

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Patients now living a median 6.8 years after stage IV ALK+ lung cancer diagnosis

Stage IV ALK+ lung cancer patients treated at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital between 2009 and 2017 had median overall survival of 6.8 years.

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Unmuting large silent genes lets bacteria produce new molecules, potential drug candidates

By enticing away the repressors dampening unexpressed, silent genes in Streptomyces bacteria, researchers at the University of Illinois have unlocked several large gene clusters for new natural products. Since many antibiotics, anti-cancer agents and other drugs have been derived from genes readily expressed in Streptomyces, the researchers hope that unsilencing genes that have not previously been

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7 exercises to master in 2019

Diversity in exercise is an essential component of a good fitness diet. Constantly pushing your physical boundaries provides equally valuable neurological benefits. These seven exercises and tools are worth integrating into your regimen in 2019. None There are two responses when seeing a new exercise: "No" and "I'll give it a shot." I've watched both play out often. Sometimes the "no" is justifie

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10 Buddhist koans, and why understanding them is pointless

Koans are one of the most meaningful practices in Zen Buddhism. Usually translated as "nonsensical," the sentences have much greater purpose. Breaking beyond concepts in meditation is a driving factor of the koan. None Humans like to know what a sentence means. Sometimes we'll go to great lengths to derive meaning from a group of words. More often than not, however, we'll take the easiest possibl

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Scientists: 'Time is ripe' to use big data for planet-sized plant questions

A group of Florida Museum of Natural History scientists has issued a 'call to action' to use big data to tackle longstanding questions about plant diversity and evolution and forecast how plant life will fare on an increasingly human-dominated planet.

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Macaques take turns while chattering

Japanese monkeys take turns while communicating. Adjusting response times while chattering, macaques intentionally pause like humans do when chatting.

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A Year of Miseducation

T hat word, miseducation , has been in the air. All year long, essayists, musicians, podcasters, and others have been revisiting Lauryn Hill ’s masterpiece, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill , on the occasion of its 20th anniversary. A sudden burst of cinema about conversion therapy began in early August with the premiere of Desiree Akhavan’s film, The Miseducation of Cameron Post . ProPublica publ

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You can do it! 4 tips to keep your resolutions

In order to keep your resolutions in 2019, consider these tips from Tim Bono, author of When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness (Grand Central Life & Style, 2018) and lecturer in psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. Find your motivation: Identify an important reason why you are resolving to change something in your life (e.g., “I’m doing it for my kids” o

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Ultracold atoms can make strange and beautiful quantum fireworks

Feed enough energy into a gas of ultracold atoms and it will create waves that produce a burst of quantum fireworks

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Don’t Go Out on New Year’s Eve

If you have ever turned on your television on New Year’s Eve and felt even a little bit jealous of the partyers gathered in Times Square to watch the ball drop, I want you to remember one thing: A lot of those people are wearing diapers . It has been widely reported that there is nowhere for New Year’s Eve revelers to use the bathroom in Times Square— no porta-potties , and don’t even think about

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Why the sight of blood knocks us out

Head Trip Do you pass out when you get your blood drawn? You're not the only one. Why some folks faint at the sight of blood and others don’t isn’t entirely clear, but prior fear of blood and needles often increases the chances of passing out.

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Does curiosity make kids better at math and reading?

Characteristics related to openness, such as intellectual curiosity and confidence, may make children more adept at math and reading than characteristics that describe conscientiousness, such as diligence and perseverance, a new study shows. “Our findings provide additional knowledge on the complex set of skills that interact and give rise to differences in academic achievement between children,

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T cell photos make data encryption truly random

A new encryption method uses T cells to protect data from hackers and malware. The biological encryption key approach is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler, researchers say. “Currently, encryption is done with mathematical algorithms that are called one-way functions,” says Saptarshi Das, assistant professor of engineering s

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Video: Rørposten lever!

Ingeniøren har besøgt en mindre dansk produktionsvirksomhed i Herlev, hvor et godt, gammeldags rørpostsystem stadig er i daglig brug. Systemet er pålideligt og sparer de ansatte for mange gåture mellem etagerne i virksomheden. Se systemet demonstreret her.

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The immune system's fountain of youth

Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.

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US winter storms kill seven: media

Parts of the United States were digging out Saturday from winter storms that media reports said led to at least seven deaths, while warmer regions braced for potential flooding during the New Year's travel period.

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Volunteers strive to stave off shutdown chaos at US parks

Sabra Purdy is just back from Joshua Tree National Park in southern California, which was crammed with tourists. It is high season, and to prevent chaos from the partial shutdown of the US federal government, she put on her gloves, cleaned toilets and picked up trash.

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10 New Factors That Will Shape the 2020 Democratic Primary

The economy can only go down from here. The number of revelations from Robert Mueller can only go up. But that doesn’t mean a Democratic candidate is a shoo-in for 2020—everyone thought Donald Trump faced too many hurdles to win in the first place, too. The Democrats who are about to launch presidential campaigns can tell themselves Trump looks weak now, but this could be just the midpoint in his

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NASA spaceship zooms toward farthest world ever photographedNASA New Horizons UT

A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.

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The Top WIRED Photo Stories of 2018

Want to give your eyes a break from the news cycle? Start here.

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The 2018 Internet Moments That Made Being Online Worth It

'A Star Is Born' birthed great memes and Zendaya was Meechee.

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A skin test after a traumatic event may identify those at risk of PTSD

A simple skin test appears to predict those most at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder – a finding that may help them get the support they need

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Some tensions are good for life

In a recent study, Joseph Jose Thottacherry, along with his collaborators from other Indian and Spanish institutes, has tried to understand how cells maintain their shapes in spite of expelling material from their membrane. The study found that the answer to what makes the cell stay stable lies in a force called membrane tension.

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Study points to increased risk of harm from cannabis across Europe

A significant new study shows that cannabis potency has doubled across Europe in the past 11 years.

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Scientists produce 'designer triacylglycerols' in industrial microalgae

A research team led by Prof. XU Jian from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has discovered two novel diacylglyceryl transferases (DGAT2s) that preferentially attach LA and EPA, respectively, to the glycerol backbone to form TAGs.

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Lion kills worker at US wildlife park

A lion attacked and killed a young American woman who had just started working at the facility where it was kept, the center said Sunday.

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Ghosn's detention extended to Jan 11

Former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn will be spending the beginning of 2019 behind bars after a Tokyo court on Monday extended his detention through to January 11.

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Climate change takes toll on French oyster farmers

Gulping down oysters has long been a favourite New Year's Eve ritual for the French, but as winters get warmer and summers get drier many growers worry there will soon be fewer of the prized mollusks to go around.

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Was that a bed bug on my couch? This app has the answer

Just the thought of a bed bug infestation is enough to make you start scratching and tossing out furniture.

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Meteor Showers That Will Light Up Night Skies in 2019

All year long, Earth passes through streams of cosmic debris. Here’s our list of major meteor showers and how to spot one.

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2018's Weirdest Google Earth Apparitions

Live Science has gathered all the weird Google Earth sightings of the year, mixing the false alarms with authentic surprises. Can you guess which is which?

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Woman Develops Donor's Peanut Allergy After Lung Transplant

Sometimes, you just really want a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. And, as long as you're not allergic to the ingredients, that's totally fine. At least, that's what one woman thought.

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NASA undersøger nu det fjerneste hjørne af vores solsystem

Mennesket har aldrig før undersøgt et objekt så langt væk fra Jorden.

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Vaguer goals may help you stick to your new exercise routine

If you’re thinking of taking up a new pursuit, vague, open goals may be better to help you do it than setting hard targets, we find on the seventh of our 12 Days of Culture

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The Year in Science—and What Americans Thought about It

Pew polls reveal a public divided on climate, supportive of NASA and wary of AI and genetic engineering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The mummified penguins that hold the secrets of Antarctica’s past

Antarctica’s Adélie penguins nest on the well-preserved remains of their ancestors. All it takes is a trowel and a strong stomach to dig into their climate history

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Dear Therapist: My Mother-In-Law Didn’t Mean to Ruin My Wedding, but I’m Still Angry With Her

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I recently got married, and have not been able to move past feelings of anger and resentment toward my mother-in-law that surfaced during the wedding weekend. Before the wedding, she and I had a close and very

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The Blunt-Force Power of Widows, in One Scene

The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series delves into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Today: Steve McQueen’s Widows . This will be the year’s final installment of the “And, Scene” series, which can be found in its entirety here . There are heists happening at every layer of Widows . The central story follows Veronica Rawlings

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Big Tech Is Here to Help You Fight Excessive Phone Use—Kinda

How Google, Apple, and Facebook turned "digital wellness" into a Goopified trend that gives them a new way to market themselves.

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How to Follow New Horizons' Historic Flyby of Ultima ThuleNew Horizons Ultima Thule

On New Year's Eve, NASA's probe will reach Ultima Thule, an icy body at the edge of our solar system. Here's its timeline.

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The Worst Hacks of 2018: Marriott, Atlanta, Quora, and More

From the Marriott and Facebook meltdowns to state-sponsored assaults, 2018 was an eventful year for cybercrime.

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Seven New Year’s resolutions for Big Tech in 2019

2018 was a no good, very bad year for Silicon Valley. Here’s some of the things tech giants should commit to do next year to avoid a repeat performance.

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Pete Tong NYE 'balloon drop' cancelled after protests

Organisers had planned to release 130,000 balloons at a Manila nightclub to ring in the new year.

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How ancient DNA may rewrite prehistory in India

Aryans are not the earliest or only source of Indian civilisation, suggests new research on genetic ancestry.

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Snifferteknologi fra Danmark skal hjælpe i international kamp mod skibsforurening

Langdistancedroner skal snuse til røg fra skibe i europæisk farvand. 'Næserne' leveres af dansk virksomhed.

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A Shutdown Reveals the Transformation of the GOP

Republicans used to shut down the government in the name of fiscal restraint. Now they’re digging in for the sake of a boondoggle. This Trump-era shutdown could well become the longest ever, eclipsing the Clinton-era 26-day standoff over Medicare spending, and the Obama-era 16-day standoff over Obamacare. GOP tactics in the past may have been misguided, but at least the party was in theory fighti

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Teddy Roosevelt’s Critique of Ostrich Science

Between breaking news developments, 2018 has marked out a number of momentous anniversaries. Fifty years since the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy. One hundred years since the end of the fighting in World War I. One hundred and fifty years since Andrew Johnson’s impeachment. Looking backward from this moment of uncertainty and upheaval often means finding others, some o

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The Media’s Post-Advertising Future Is Also Its Past

I t’s my holiday tradition to bring tidings of discomfort and sorrow to my colleagues in the news business. One year ago, I described the media apocalypse coming for both digital upstarts and legacy brands. Vice and BuzzFeed had slashed their revenue projections by hundreds of millions of dollars, while The New York Times had announced a steep decline in advertising . Twelve months later, it’s en

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Follow NASA’s New Horizons Mission as It Heads for New Year’s Flyby With Ultima ThuleNASA New Horizons UT

The probe that visited Pluto will study a mysterious icy world just after midnight. Ultima Thule will be the most distant object ever visited by a spacecraft.

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The New Health Care: Congratulations on the Promotion. But Did Science Get a Demotion?

The incentives of grant funding and career advancement, even the potential for fame, can influence researchers.

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Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators

People who have meditated for thousands of hours exhibit a remarkable difference in their gamma brainwaves. "All of us get gamma for a very short period when we solve a problem we've been grappling with, even if it's something that's vexed us for months. We get about half second of gamma; it's the strongest wave in the EEG spectrum," explains Goleman. In high-level mediators, gamma is a lasting s

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Techtopia #85: Fiskenet genanvendes til 3D print

Mød to af de danske virksomheder, der deltager i FNs SDG Accelerator. Det kommer til at handle om genbrug af fiskenet til 3D print og om effektiv logistik, når byggematerialer skal genanvendes.

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Mother of the Hubble: Tributes paid to Nasa scientist

Dr Nancy Grace Roman, the first woman to hold a senior leadership position at Nasa, has died at 93.

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From a molecule of natural origin new therapeutic opportunities against hypertension

Spirulina is celebrated as a 'superfood' because of its possible beneficial properties, albeit its mechanism of action is still subjected to investigation. Sometimes classified as a 'blue algae,' it was supposedly used as a food by the Aztecs. Now a research from I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, in Italy, shows that one of its extracts may counteract arterial hypertension by dilating blood vessels.

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How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

Republican Orrin Hatch is leaving the Senate after 42 years. He led bipartisan efforts to get health care for more kids and AIDS patients. He also thrived on donations from the drug industry. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Getty Images)

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When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts. (Image credit: Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images)

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Skyen ligger på en dansk mark – og den æder strøm

PLUS. Vores glæde ved at glo på kattevideoer og ­alskens anden underholdning giver de i forvejen store datacentre vokseværk. Og udbygningen af kapaciteten vil kun accelerere i takt med den ventede eksplosion i IoT-tjenester, strea­ming, VR, AI og selvkørende biler. Men hvordan kommer datacentrene til a…

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Podcast-special: Videoforbrug giver boom i strømslugende datacentre

Vi streamer og downloader som aldrig før, og den globale it-trafik spås at blive tredoblet frem mod 2021. De store datamængder lagres blandt andet i de enorme og energislugende datacentre, der skyder op rundt omkring i Danmark.

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Måneformørkelse, Merkur-tur og stjerneskud på himlen i 2019

Se stjerneskud og total måneformørkelse i januar. Og i november er planeten Merkur på vandring over solskiven.

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Science-Based Medicine in the New Year

As 2018 ends, the managing editor of Science-Based Medicine comments on the future of SBM.

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Nasa probe believed to have performed most distant space flyby

New Horizons expected to have encountered Ultima Thule space rock on edge of solar system A Nasa probe is believed to have performed the most distant flyby in history in the early hours of New Year’s Day, barrelling past a space rock called Ultima Thule on the outer edge of the solar system. Unless gremlins intervene, the New Horizons spacecraft will have zoomed by the cosmic body at 5.33am GMT a

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Can you solve it? 2019 in numbers

Calculations to kick-start the new year UPDATE: To read the solutions click here. To welcome the New Year, we’re going to celebrate the number 2019. Here’s one numerical factoid readers may find charming: 2019 is the smallest number that can be written in 6 ways as the sum of the squares of 3 primes: 7² + 11² + 43² = 2019 7² + 17² + 41² = 2019 13² + 13² + 41² = 2019 11² + 23² + 37² = 2019 17² + 1

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Guide: Sådan hjælper du din hund nytårsaften

Hunde kan opleve frygt og angst, når der skydes fyrværkeri af. Men der er heldigvis flere ting du kan gøre for at hjælpe din hund.

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